Sunset in the Forest Concert Series ~ 2016

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Sunset in the Forest Concert Series ~ 2016
Sunset in the Forest Concert Series ~ 2016
2760 Roundtop Drive
Puu Ualakaa State Park
A BENEFIT FOR THE OUTDOOR CIRCLE
Hawaii’s oldest environmental organization, focused exclusively on the Hawaiian Islands
to protect our unique natural beauty for future generations to enjoy.
“Keeping Hawaii Clean, Green, and Beautiful for Over 100 Years”
A Canopy of Majestic Trees
Music by Beloved Island Artists
Historic Nutridge Estate on Tantalus Mountain
Intimate 250-seat Covered Theater in the Rainforest
Home of Hawaii’s Oldest Macadamia Nut Tree and Grove
Extraordinary View of Honolulu and the Coastline to the Horizon Beyond
s
Saturday, April 9, 2016
Maunalua • Sean Na‘auao
Saturday, May 7, 2016
HAPA • Waipuna
Saturday, June 18, 2016
Jeff Rasmussen & Robi Kahakalau • Nathan Aweau
s
7:30 PM Showtime for Main Attractions
Doors Open Pre-sunset
Keeping Hawaii Clean, Green and Beautiful for 104 Years
HIGHLIGHTS
• 1912 - The Outdoor Circle established
• 1918 - Founded the first plant nursery in
Waikiki (1918), gave to city in 1946, now
the C&C nursery in Kapiolani Park
• 1922 - Established the “Shade Tree
Commission” which became the Honolulu
City and County Department of Parks
and Recreation
• 1927 - Spearheaded the enactment of
Hawaii’s first billboard and signage laws
• 1955 - Started the first campaign to place
utility wiring underground
AND MORE
• 1957 - Spearheaded enactment of Hawaii
State Sign Ordinance banning billboard
advertising
• 1978 - Dedicated Diamond Head State
Monument, opening the crater to the public, and eliminating signs there
• 1981 - Founded the Hawaii Nature Center
in Makiki
• 1993 - Initiated legislation to underground
all utilities along federal aid highways
• 1997 - Established the “Green Hawai‘i
Coalition” to promote the planting and
better maintenance of trees
• 1960 - Provided 154-woman all volunteer
staff (363 days/year) at Foster Botanical Gar• 1912 - Planted mahogany and coconut trees
den
along Kalakaua
• 1960 - Spearheaded preservation of Kawainui
• 1912 - Planted scores of trees and
Marsh through the “Kawainui Heritage
flowering plants at A‘ala Park, Thomas
Foundation”
Square, Alapai Plaza
• 1970 - Successfully preserved Mount
• 1914 - Hired Honolulu’s first City tree trimOlomana, Kailua, from development
mer
• 1972 - Successfully helped create City and
• 1920 - Landscaped military bases for
County height limits for development in
camouflage
Kailua, Oahu
• 1920 - Planted Banyans at Ala Moana Beach • 1973 - Conceived the “Lei of Green”
Park
allowing shorelines to be primarily devoted
• 1920 - Planted 5000 street trees in Kaimuki
to parks and open space
• 1920 - Planted hundreds of street trees along • 1975 - Spearheaded the enactment of
Vineyard, Piikoi, Tantalus and Round Top
Hawaii’s Exceptional Tree Act, to protect
Drive
magnificent historical specimens for future
generations
• 1922 - Rehabilitated the grounds of Iolani
Palace
• 1976 - Opened Hawaii’s first recycling facility
on Sand Island
• 1920-30s - Planted hundreds of trees at Kamamalu Park, Kalihi Park, Pauoa Park, Queen
• 1981 - Planted 1800 hibiscus in the medial at
Emma Park
the entrance to Waikiki
• 1930 - Rehabilitated the grounds of
• 1980 - Spearheaded efforts to create the
Washington Place
tree-shaded park at Aikahi Park, Kailua
• 1932 - Donated the Thomas Square
• 1982 - Planted 200 hibiscus on the State
fountain in honor of TOC President
Capitol grounds (1982)
Beatrice Castle Newcomb
• 1984 - Began Kona’s Environmental
• 1937- Planted Banyans along the Ala Wai
Education Center
Canal
• 1991 - Established the Sadie Seymour Botan• 1930s-40s - Planted scores of trees at Fort
ical Garden in Kona
Kamehameha, Fort Armstrong, Fort Ruger,
• 1992 - Established the “Ho‘oma‘oma‘o
Fort DeRussy
Restoration Project” to replant hundreds
• 1939-45 - Planted thousands of trees at Schoof endemic species on Kauai, after
field Barracks
Hurricane Iniki
• 1947 - Landscaped and planted trees at over
• 1993 - Saved 600 trees on the Puna Coast
80 public schools on Oahu
• 1998 - Established the “Hawaii
• 1950 - Landscaped the entire Keahole Road
Environmental Coalition” for more
entrance to Kona Airport
effective legislative action
• 1950 - Planted scores of trees on
• 1999 - Established the Waimea Ulu La‘au
Ka‘ahumanu Highway, Maui
Tree Park in Waimea, Big Island
• 2004, 2006 - Spearheaded the enactment
of Hawaii’s laws banning vehicular and
aerial advertising
• 2013 - Established the “Exceptional Tree
Initiative” to preserve and replant our
exceptional trees
• 2014 - Successfully helped uphold
challenge to aerial advertising ban
• 2014 - Played a key role in establishment
of Hawaii’s Environmental Court, the
second in the nation
• 2015 - Recipient of prestigious Community Service Award from national “Keep
America Beautiful” organization
• 2000 - Spearheaded the planting of
hundreds of street trees in downtown Kailua,
Oahu
• 2000, 2001, 2004 - Planted over 160 trees at
Magic Island in Ala Moana Beach Park
• 2005 - Created the “Urban Reforestation
Master Plan” for City and County
• 2005 - Helped preserve Irwin Park from
development
• 2005 - Provided tree-pruning workshops
to the Depts. of Transportation and
Education
• 2006 - Preserved Waimea Valley, Oahu, as
historic and cultural site, in partnership with
Audubon Society and OHA
• 2008 - Protected 15-20 mature trees
threatened with removal for a music
festival on Magic Island
• 2008 - Protected one of the last remaining,
historic (15th century) coconut groves, Helumoa, in Waikiki
• 2009 - Partnered with State Forest
Stewardship Program to preserve
remaining Uhiuhi trees in Waikoloa, Hawaii
• 2010 - Joined the “Complete Streets
Initiative” to make our communities
more livable
• 2012 - Helped spawn the “Waikoloa Dry
Forest Initiative” which protects and
preserves endangered native trees
• 2013 - Helped preserve and protect the
Kanaha Wetlands from development
• 2014 - Gave away over 1000 plants and trees
in communities state-wide
• 2015 - Recognized by the Honolulu Mayor
Kirk Caldwell and the City and County for
crafting Bill 84 to update and expand Hawaii’s Exceptional Tree Program
• 2015 - Created a public access interactive
digital map of all Exceptional Trees and their
environmental benefits.
The Outdoor Circle • 1314 S. King Street #306 • Honolulu, HI 96814 • Phone: (808) 593-0300 • Email: [email protected] • www.outdoorcircle.org
Sunset in the Forest Concert Series
2760 Roundtop Drive
Puu Ualakaa State Park
SPONSORSHIP LEVELS
Exceptional Tree Title Season Sponsor ~ $30,000
One Title Season Sponsorship Available
For all three shows ~
• Access and use of historic Nutridge Estate private home and
lawn, including:
- Private party for 10 with dinner-style Chef Chai
appetizers and wine
- Private concert by acoustical soloist inside the
Nutridge Estate home
• Live pre-concert entertainment at the historic Tiki Bar stage
• No-host cocktails available
• 4:00 PM early entry time for strolling the Estate and
sunset viewing
• Reserved premier table concert viewing for 10
• Complimentary wine
• Private shuttle service for party of 10 from
Central Union Church
- Begin your relaxing evening by allowing us to transport
your party along curvy Tantalus Drive (recommended)
- Or complimentary reserved premier valet parking for early
exit (8 vehicles)
• Prominent Placement/Mention
- Radio and Television PSAs
- Press Materials
- Concert video loop
- Social media and website promotion
- Mention in TOC Annual Report
- Your company promotional items placed in
complimentary tote bags, deliver 750 items by 3/28/16
• Exclusive to title sponsor: company name and logo on
concert tee-shirt
• Exclusive to title sponsor: media interviews
• Exclusive to title sponsor: company name on ticket purchase
website and all event collateral
Lei of Green Concert Series Sponsorships ~ $15,000
For all three shows ~
• Pre-concert event party for 10 with Chef Chai appetizers
• Live pre-concert entertainment at the historic Tiki Bar stage
• No-host cocktails available
• 5:30 PM early entry time for sunset viewing
• Reserved priority table concert viewing for 10
- Tables reserved first-come, first-sold sponsor basis
• Shuttle service for party of 10 from Central Union Church
or complimentary reserved valet parking (4 vehicles)
• Complimentary wine
• Secondary Placement/Mention
- Press Materials
- Concert video loop
- Social media promotion
- TOC Annual Report mention
- Your company promotional items placed in
complimentary tote bags, deliver 750 items by 3/28/16
Clean, Green and Beautiful Concert Series
Sponsorships ~ $7,500
For all three shows ~
• Pre-concert event party for 10 with Chef Chai appetizers
• Live pre-concert entertainment at the historic Tiki Bar stage
• No-host cocktails available
• 6:00 PM early entry time for sunset viewing
• Reserved table for 10
- Table reserved first-come, first-sold sponsor basis
• Shuttle service for party of 10 from Central Union Church
or complimentary valet parking (2 vehicles)
• Name Mention
- Concert video loop
- Social media promotion
- TOC Annual Report mention
The Outdoor Circle • 1314 S. King Street #306 • Honolulu, HI 96814 • Phone: (808) 593-0300 • Email: [email protected] • www.outdoorcircle.org
Very Special Details About The Concert Series
TRANSPORTATION
DRESS ATTIRE
Begin enjoying the evening from the moment you
leave the car behind and relax on board our courtesy
shuttle.
The Nutridge Estate and Concert Hall is situated outdoors on a mountainside. Flat shoes and a light jacket would be wise attire. We hope all guests
will walk the grounds, especially to find a special place to enjoy sunset
before 7:30 PM show time.
The drive along Tantalus Mountain is one of Oahu’s
most scenic drives with numerous curves through the
forest. We highly encourage everyone to take advantage of the convenient, free shuttle service that will
run throughout the evening from Central Union
Church to the Nutridge Estate.
OUTSIDE ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND FOOD
Please note that this is state property and outside alcoholic beverages are
not allowed.
Multiple shuttles will run continuously until 10 PM.
TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION
We do understand that personal situations may
require some guests to drive their own vehicles,
therefore we are providing limited valet service at the
venue.
The Outdoor Circle is a 501c3 non-profit organization. Sponsors will receive a letter stating the portion of their sponsorship that is tax-deductible.
Each sponsor level includes a specific number of
vehicles that may be valeted. Any additional vehicles
will pay $25.00, cash only, for valet service at the
venue.
CONCERT SERIES QUESTIONS
Valet service closes at 9:50 PM.
Please be prepared for a potential line when retrieving your vehicle as there is only one road into the
concert venue.
Rain or shine series.
Please call or e-mail The Outdoor Circle offices
and the right person will contact you:
Telephone: 808-593-0300
Email: [email protected]
The Outdoor Circle • 1314 S. King Street #306 • Honolulu, HI 96814 • Phone: (808) 593-0300 • Email: [email protected] • www.outdoorcircle.org
Sunset in the Forest Concert Series ~ 2016
Sponsor Information
Company/Individual Name (how you would like it to appear in event materials):
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
Contact Name:_________________________________________________ Title:____________________________________
Phone:__________________________________ Email:_________________________________________________________
Mailing Address:_________________________________________________________________________________________
City:_____________________________________________ State:______________________ Zip:_______________________
SPONSOR LEVEL: n Exceptional Tree ($30,000) n Lei of Green ($15,000) n Clean, Green and Beautiful ($7,500)
CREDIT CARD:
Number:__________________________________ Card Type: n Visa n Mastercard n American Express n Discover
Expiration:______________ Security Code:_______________ Signature of Holder:____________________________________
Carholder address (only if different from above):________________________________________________________________
City:_____________________________________________ State:______________________ Zip:_______________________
CHECK: Please make checks payable to: The Outdoor Circle, 1314 S. King Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 96814
You will receive a letter stating the tax-deductible portion of your contribution. 501c3 tax I.D.: 99-0085044
For questions, please call (808) 593-0300
THE OUTDOOR CIRCLE CELEBRATES 100 YEARS BEAUTIFYING HONOLULU
Published by Honolulu Magazine, November 8, 2012
YAY TREES!
In 1909, Honolulu was dusty and
undeveloped. Cherilla Lowery
wanted to improve it. She and six
other women formed The Outdoor Circle in 1912 with the aim
of lining Honolulu’s streets with
shady trees and transforming its
parks.
These were no lunching ladies.
The women scattered kukui nuts
from horseback on Round Top
CHERILLA LOWERY
Drive and Tantalus, and watered
the bougainvillea in the area with
water barrels carried up the hill by horse and buggy.
Mahogany and coconut trees on Kalakaua Avenue. Banyan
trees at Ala Moana Beach Park. Golden shower trees down
Pensacola. You have the women of the Outdoor Circle to thank
today. “We are the go-to tree organization,” says Bob Loy, the
Circle’s director of environmental programs.
In 1975, the Circle was instrumental in getting the Exceptional
Tree Act passed, which protects old, rare, historical and
culturally significant trees. Areas include UH, Ala Moana
Beach Park, the Honolulu Zoo and more.
BOO TO BILLBOARDS
Trees are great, but they shouldn’t have to compete for space
with giant signs, thought the Circle founders. So they decided
to take on the corporations putting them up. “It was a 15-year
battle,” says Loy.
The women even had the help of Lorrin Thurston, owner/
publisher of the Pacific Commercial Advertiser. Thurston let
the Circle publish an anti-billboard edition in 1913.
In 1926, the Outdoor Circle purchased the Honolulu
Poster Service—the last local billboard company—for $4,000,
($52,000 in today’s dollars) and shuttered it. The following year,
a billboard ban was signed into law.
After lobbying by the Circle, the state created the Diamond
Head State Monument in 1978. Without that, says former
Outdoor Circle president Susan
Spangler, “it would have been built
up with all kinds of things.”
The Circle hates hotdogs. Well,
giant, hotdog-shaped vehicles.
The Oscar Mayer vehicle visited
Hawaii in 2009, much to the
chagrin of the Circle, which
considered it a violation of
the 2006 law against mobile
advertising. “The Wienermobile was a perfect example of a billboard truck,”
says Loy.
CURRENT MISSIONS
MR. MYNAH BIRD TEACHES KIDS NOT TO LITTER.
SUSAN SPANGLER, CIRCLE PRESIDENT FROM
1992 TO 1995 USED TO DON THE COSTUME,
EVEN DANCING WITH FORMER MAYOR EILEEN
ANDERSON IN IT DURING A PARADE.
The Circle’s members
continue to police local
advertising. This summer, First Hawaiian Bank put up a large sign along Kalaniana‘ole Highway. The Circle immediately got calls. “We asked
[the bank] if they’d do the right thing,” says Bob Loy, “They
took down the billboard that week.”
This January, The Outdoor Circle officially became a plaintiff
in a federal lawsuit to stop the rail project. Their objections are
simple: It’ll impact around 900 trees and ruin the view planes.
“It’ll be so ugly,” says Spangler.
IN 1927, A BILLBOARD BAN WAS SIGNED INTO LAW.
The Outdoor Circle • 1314 S. King Street #306 • Honolulu, HI 96814 • Phone: (808) 593-0300 • Email: [email protected] • www.outdoorcircle.org
THE GREEN WARRIORS
STORY BY SHANNON WIANECKI PHOTOS BY PF BENTLEY
REPRINTED COURTESY OF HANA HOU MAGAZINE, DECEMBER 2015
Th e G r e e n Warriors
B
ack in the days of horsedrawn buggies and silent
films, the streets of Honolulu
were a mess of exposed power lines, partially filled wetlands and giant billboards
hawking everything from politicians to
pickled vegetables. While the city’s powerbrokers focused on constructing one coral
brick building after the next, their wives
held a different, greener vision for the
Pacific metropolis. In January 1912 seven
women formed the Outdoor Circle. Their
aim? Beautifying their urban home. Straight
away they began planting trees and flowers
and protesting unsightly signage — the
most offensive of which blocked the view of
Diamond Head with a huge Heinz pickle.
“Women Open War on Billboards!” On
April 5, 1912, a small story in the Hawaiian
Gazette revealed that certain ladies had
been delivering notes to Honolulu businesses bearing a succinct message: “I will
not buy anything advertised on billboards
as long as I can find a substitute, or as a
last resort, go without.” Sign sellers were
incensed. One even threatened the boycotters with criminal charges — baseless yet
intimidating. But others publicly expressed
support: “Seven women won’t be able to do
much towards getting rid of the billboards,
but they are the drop before the shower
that comes before the downpour,” one mer-
its sign; other businesses weren’t so accommodating. Undeterred, the Circle bought
Hawai‘i’s last billboard company and
shuttered it in 1926. The following year the
Territorial Legislature banned billboards.
Over the ensuing century, the Circle
grew, and branches sprang up across the
Hawaiian Islands. Members planted hundreds of thousands of trees, established
parks, lobbied for underground wiring and
successfully contested development that
would have degraded scenic views or treasured landmarks. Because of their efforts,
hundred-year-old shade trees survive
throughout the Islands, and Hawai‘i’s signage laws remain some of the strongest in
the nation. Today, if you want to alter the
Island landscape in any noticeable way, you
had better clear it with the Circle first.
chant told the Gazette. “And seven hundred
women will clean this town of billboards.”
Prophetic words. By 1915 the Circle’s
ranks had swelled to four hundred women
— each dedicated to keeping Hawai‘i
“clean, green and beautiful.” Women didn’t
get the vote until five years later, but the
members of the Outdoor Circle were
already proving their political might. They
wrote letters, appealed to advertisers and
boycotted products. Heinz readily removed
Cherilla Lowrey, the Circle’s first
president, argued for comprehensive city
planning that emphasized natural beauty.
The wharves of New York and San Francisco were ugly and barren, she said, but
Honolulu could create a seafront as inviting
as those in Europe. Rather than wait for
someone else to make this happen, Lowrey
and her colleagues lined Kaläkaua Avenue
with coconut palms, distributed hibiscus
and plumeria cuttings and petitioned for
wider, paved sidewalks.
Hawai‘i is renowned for its glorious trees and vistas, and members of the Outdoor Circle have long championed the causes of both. Forty years ago the Circle
sponsored the Exceptional Tree Act to recognize important trees in the Islands; among them is the Hitachi monkeypod tree at Honolulu’s Moanalua Gardens,
seen on the opening spread and here. Above (left to right) Outdoor Circle members Kaui Lucas, Alexandra Avery and Myles Ritchie in front of a kapok tree.
134
The Outdoor Circle • 1314 S. King Street #306 • Honolulu, HI 96814 • Phone: (808) 593-0300 • Email: [email protected] • www.outdoorcircle.org
T h e Gr e e n War r i ors
Both photos: L. E. Edgeworth, Bishop Museum
Honolulu wasn’t always free of billboards—the signs above, posted in 1911, hawked events and
tobacco in the city; the billboards below pushed oats, footwear and scouring powder on Nu‘uanu Avenue
in 1912. But thanks to the early and tireless advocacy of the women of the Outdoor Circle, Honolulu
officially banned billboards in 1927. Still, the issue is far from over, say Circle members, who note that
every decade seems to see a new challenge to the law.
The ladies rode horseback to scatter
kukui nuts and wiliwili seeds along the
road leading up to Tantalus, the cinder cone
overlooking Honolulu. They installed a
fountain in Thomas Square (inspired by
a visit three members made to Versailles)
and planted two dozen monkeypod trees at
‘A‘ala Park, which wasn’t a park yet, just a
bleak, empty lot. The Circle employed the
city’s first tree trimmer and established a
nursery to provide thousands of trees and
plants to public parks, playgrounds, schools
and even military posts. During both world
wars the Circle helped camouflage bases
with landscaping. In 1946 the greenthumbed organization donated the nursery
to the county; it’s still in use.
When necessary, Circle members went
to court to fight on behalf of view planes
or notable trees. One battle concerned a
grove of ironwoods planted in 1890 by
Princess Ka‘iulani’s father, Archibald
Cleghorn. City engineers had slated the
mile-long stretch of trees along Kaläkaua
Avenue in Kapi‘olani Park for demolition;
they wanted to widen the road. The Circle
compelled them to build a new road parallel
to the old one, thereby saving the trees.
New inductees carry on the indomitable
legacy of their predecessors. Marti Townsend was fresh out of college when she
discovered the Outdoor Circle in 1999. She
saw Mary Steiner (the Circle’s executive
director for twenty years) on the local news
defending a historic tree. I want to do that,
Townsend said to herself. She volunteered
as an intern and worked closely with
Steiner. At the time, the Circle was engaged
in a campaign to stop the Hawaiian Electric
Company from erecting massive steel
poles and high-voltage lines on Wa‘ahila
ridge in Mänoa.
After a seven-year skirmish, the electric
company waved the white flag. The state
Board of Land and Natural Resources
scuttled the plan, conceding that the huge
towers would permanently damage the
area’s beauty and have a negative impact
on tens of thousands of residents and visitors. The case inspired Townsend to
pursue an environmental law degree. Later,
when Steiner retired, Townsend filled her
mentor’s position. Soon she was the one
on TV defending trees. “Trees are quite
controversial,” says Townsend. “Loved by
most of the community, hated by some.”
Really? Who hates trees? Townsend
offers a recent example: A man in O‘ahu’s
Wilhelmina Rise neighborhood resented
a large shower tree shading a bus stop near
his home; the leafy canopy blocked his
view. He complained. When the city
wouldn’t remove the tree, he drilled holes
into its trunk and poisoned it. Such sabotage has been going on since the start; in
1916 Lowrey offered a $100 reward for the
apprehension of whoever mutilated thirteen
royal poinciana trees on Wilder Avenue.
But while smug tree assassins may win
temporarily, even the most cunning foes
are no match for Hawai‘i’s champions of all
things green. To formally protect historic
and culturally significant trees, the Circle
sponsored Hawai‘i’s Exceptional Tree Act,
passed in 1975. To be granted exceptional
status, a tree must be historic, rare, endemic
to Hawai‘i or otherwise remarkable. Landowners who shelter exceptional trees receive tax benefits.
Trees, it turns out, are more than just
symbolic of a community’s health. Urban
trees in particular are credited with improving air quality, encouraging physical
activity, reducing energy use and even
decreasing crime. Surgery patients who can
see trees from their hospital beds reportedly
recover faster. At the Queen’s Medical
Center on Punchbowl Street, a giant African
baobab dangles a curtain of aerial roots
at the hospital’s entrance. White terns dart
beneath to roost on the elephantine limbs
of a nearby pink bombax. Both trees bear
small plaques declaring them “exceptional.”
But trees don’t live forever, no matter
what their protection. Many of Hawai‘i’s
most venerable specimens are now nearing
the end of their natural life spans. When
they die the Circle endeavors to replace
them. That’s a staggering task considering
The Outdoor Circle • 1314 S. King Street #306 • Honolulu, HI 96814 • Phone: (808) 593-0300 • Email: [email protected] • www.outdoorcircle.org
T h e Green Warriors
The kapok tree is famed for the
cottony fluff that comes from its
seed pods; this gargantuan kapok
in Honolulu stands seventy-five feet
tall and lives at the corner of King
and Ke‘eaumoku Streets; like
the Hitachi monkeypod, it is safeguarded under the auspices of
the Exceptional Tree Program.
the Exceptional Tree list numbers around
one thousand individuals and groves, on
public and private land. The majority are on
O‘ahu, but exceptional trees exist on every
island. Even a tiny islet off Moloka‘i is
represented with a forest of exceptional
native loulu palms. Myles Ritchie, another
Circle intern who stepped up to leadership,
is currently traveling island to island to
determine the health of old trees and review
new designees.
Once a year the board of directors hosts
a “Full Circle” meeting to plot the course
for the following year. The statewide
membership has diversified; it’s not just
wealthy society ladies anymore. Each
community-based branch has unique priorities. North Shore members, for instance,
worked to build a four-mile bike path near
Hale‘iwa. On Hawai‘i Island the Waikoloa
branch funded a 275-foot predator fence
to protect the last stand of native uhiuhi
trees. After Hurricane Iniki blasted Kaua‘i
in 1992, the local chapter helped restore
the island’s landscaping.
One of the Circle’s most innovative
projects sprouted up at the Women’s Community Correctional Center in Waimänalo.
Margaret Brezel, an eighty-something
canoe paddler, initiated a hydroponic
garden at the prison. Circle members now
visit twice a week, helping inmates produce
a thousand heads of lettuce per week, plus
a supply of breadfruit, taro and bananas
for their cafeteria. The “Learning to Grow”
program has been internationally recog-
nized for lowering recidivism. One past
inmate, now employed at Home Depot,
says she wouldn’t have made it out of prison
without the garden.
For all of these reasons and more, the
Honolulu Advertiser recognized the Outdoor Circle in a 2009 roundup of “50 Who
Steered the Course After Statehood.” With
all the hallmarks of a national agency—
a polished identity, century-old reputation
and political clout — the Circle casts a
bigger shadow than one would expect from
a homegrown, all-volunteer upstart.
“No environmental group has had such
a profound, positive impact on Hawai‘i as
the Outdoor Circle,” the late Honolulu
councilman Duke Bainum told the Los
Angeles Times in 2000. “When I and
millions of visitors look at the vista of
Diamond Head, it’s because of the efforts
of the Outdoor Circle that we look at a
pristine monument and not one built up
with condos and billboards.” (The Circle
pushed the state to create the Diamond
Head State Monument in 1978.)
Meanwhile, the signage laws still need
defending. Every so often a government
official wants to fund a project by selling
ads plastered to city buses, taxis or cruise
ships. Would-be advertisers search for
loopholes. Each time, Circle members step
in and say no. If it weren’t for their nearfanatic dedication to the cause, serene days
at the beach would be shattered by the
buzz of low-flying aircraft broadcasting
equally noisy messages. Case in point: On
The Outdoor Circle • 1314 S. King Street #306 • Honolulu, HI 96814 • Phone: (808) 593-0300 • Email: [email protected] • www.outdoorcircle.org
T h e G re e n Wa r r io r s
T h e G re e n Wa r r io r s
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Hawai‘i
is inon
Vermont
. This The
courtstate
has of
exclusive
with
rulesabove
against
signs.It He
knew he
Benyo, anlocal
advertising
mogul
Florida
established
Environmental
Court—
the
jurisdiction an
over
cases concerning
natural
violating
ordinances
butfrom
counted
on
second
its kind in thedrinking
nation (water,
the firstair
known
for flaunting
in areas
resourceofmanagement,
his exemption
from his
the business
Federal Aviation
). This
is
in Vermont
court
haswaste
exclusive
with
rules against
He knew
Administration
to signs.
supersede
them.he
Hewas
pollution,
litter
control,
solid
and
jurisdiction
natural
violating
local ordinances
but counted
hadn’t counted
on the Outdoor
Circle’s on
more. In theover
past cases
these concerning
fundamentally
resource
management,
water, air
his
exemption
volunteer
army.from the Federal Aviation
interrelated
cases coulddrinking
receive conflicting
Administration
to supersede
He
pollution,
litter control,
solid judge
waste heard
and
“We had to catch
Benyo’sthem.
pilot with
rulings, depending
on which
hadn’t
the Townsend.
Outdoor Circle’s
more.
In the past
thesethe
fundamentally
bannercounted
in hand,”onsays
“We had
the complaint.
Under
new system,
volunteer
army. all over with cameras
interrelated
cases could
receive
people stationed
the Hawai‘i Supreme
Court
chiefconflicting
justice
“Wephotos.”
had to catch
Benyo’s pilot
with
rulings,
depending
on which
judge heard
designates
certain judges
as experts
in
taking
They delivered
the evidence
banner
hand,”who
saysissued
Townsend.
“We
the
complaint. Under
environmental
law. the new system,
to
localin
police,
the pilot
a had
peopleWhen
stationed
all over
with again
cameras
the Already,
Hawai‘i Supreme
Courtjudges
chief justice
accomplished
are
ticket.
he tried
the stunt
a few
designates
judges as
experts says
in
taking photos.”
They
delivered
evidence
developingcertain
the necessary
expertise,
weeks
later, they
arrested
him. the
Soon
after,
environmental
to
local determined
police, whothat
issued
the pilot
a
David Forman,law.
director of the University
a judge
the FAA
exemption
Already, accomplished
are
ticket.
he tried
stunt
again
a few
of Hawai‘i’s
Environmentaljudges
Law Program.
did notWhen
override
localthe
laws.
“This
was
developing
the necessary
says
weeks
they arrested
him. Soon after,
“The establishment
of theexpertise,
Environmental
Marti atlater,
her finest,”
says Avery.
David
Forman,
director
of in
theour
University
a judge determined that the FAA exemption
Court is
a landmark
event
state
of
Hawai‘i’s
Environmental
Law
Program.
did
override local
laws. “This
was have
history,”
he says.
“It will have
a significant
ThenotCircle’s
founders
couldn’t
“The
of the Environmental
Marti
her finest,”
says Avery. crush of
impactestablishment
on the enforcement
of environmenknownatwhat
was coming—the
Court
is in
a landmark
tal laws
Hawai‘i.” event in our state
tourism spurred by jet travel, the waves of
history,”
he says.
“Itprovides
will haveconsistent,
a significant
The
Circle’s
founders
have
A judiciary
that
population
growth—but
still couldn’t
they strove
impact
onrulings
the enforcement
environmenknown
whatHawai‘i’s
was coming—the
crush offor
educated
on mattersofrelating
to
to preserve
natural treasures
tal
laws innatural
Hawai‘i.”
tourism
spurred by The
jet travel,
the waves of
Hawai‘i’s
resources is bound to
future generations.
organization’s
A judiciary
that
consistent,
population
growth—but
still
they
strove
benefit
all parties
—provides
particularly
those who
current leadership
takes the
long
view,
too.
educated
onThe
matters
relating
to
to
preserve
Hawai‘i’s
treasures
speak for rulings
the trees.
Outdoor
Circle
“The
billboard
ban is natural
what we’ve
been for
Hawai‘i’s
natural resources
is bound
to to
future
Theone
organization’s
will undoubtedly
put this new
leverage
knowngenerations.
for for the last
hundred years,”
benefit
all parties
— particularly
those who
current
leadership
takes
long view,
too.
use. “There
will always
be somebody
says Alexandra
Avery,
thethe
Circle’s
outgoing
speak
the trees.
Outdoor Circle
“The billboard
is what we’ve
beenis
comesfor
up with
someThe
cockamamie
idea to
president.
“Theban
Environmental
Court
will
undoubtedly
put this
known
for for
the last one hundred
years,”
use our
natural beauty
fornew
theirleverage
benefit,”to
what
we’ll
be remembered
for for the
next
use.
will“The
always
be somebody
who
says hundred
Alexandra
Avery, the Circle’s outgoing
one
years.”
says “There
Townsend.
legacy
of the Outdoor
comes is
uptowith
somevigilant.”
cockamamie
president.
Environmental
Court isup
For that“The
the Outdoor
Circle teamed
Circle
be ever
HH idea to
use our natural beauty for their benefit,”
what we’ll be remembered for for the next
one hundred years.”
says Townsend. “The legacy of the Outdoor
For
that
the
Outdoor
Circle
teamed
up
Circle
is to be ever vigilant.” HH
The Outdoor Circle • 1314 S. King Street #306 • Honolulu, HI 96814 • Phone: (808) 593-0300 • Email: [email protected] • www.outdoorcircle.org