REPORT June 19-21, 2013 St. Vincent and the Grenadines

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REPORT June 19-21, 2013 St. Vincent and the Grenadines
“Building Effective Youth Partnerships to create, influence,
and implement national and regional Policies”
REPORT
“REGIONAL WORKSHOP ON POLICIES FOR
IMPROVED BUSINESS EFFICIENCY IN
AGRICULTURE FOR THE YOUTH”
June 19-21, 2013
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
ABBREVIATIONS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY …………………………………………………………………………………………………
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INTRODUCTION …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
OPENING SESSION ………………………………………………………………………………………………………
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DAY 1: WEDNESDAY 19TH JUNE, 2013
Session 1: How to Reduce Costs and Maximize Business Profitability ……………………………..
Session 2: Developing entrepreneurial skills for engaging in agri-business……………………..
Session 3: Group Work and Presentation …………………………………………………………………….
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DAY 2 – THURSDAY 20TH JUNE, 2013
Session 1: Best Practices with Young People Initiatives …………………………………………………..
Session 2: How to set- up and develop an agri-business enterprise…………………………………..
Session 3: Financing youth in agri-business ……………………………………………………………………
Session 4: Information and requirements for improved business efficiency …………………….
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DAY 3: FRIDAY 21ST JUNE, 2013
Session 1: Improving the Regulatory Framework for Doing Business along
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Agricultural Value Chains - An Insider Perspective …………………………………………. 18
Group Work/ Final Session ……………………………………………………………………………………………
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CONCLUSION ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
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RECOMMENDATIONS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………
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AGENDA ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
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LIST OF PARTICIPANTS …………………………………………………………………………………………………
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ABBREVIATIONS
ABS
Agri-business Society
ACP
African, Caribbean Pacific
CaFAN
Caribbean Farmers Network
CAFY
Caribbean Agricultural Forum for Youths
CaRAPN
Caribbean Regional Agricultural Policy Network
CARDI
Caribbean Agriculture Research and Development Institute
CARICOM
Caribbean Community
CED
Centre for Enterprise Development
CGYBY
Caribbean Group of Youth Business Trusts
COTED
Council for Trade and Economic Development
CTA
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
CWA
Caribbean Week of Agriculture
ECTAD
Eastern Caribbean Trading Agriculture and Development Organisation
EU
European Union
FAO
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
IICA
Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture
NEFO
North East Farmers Organization
NGO
Non-Governmental Organizations
UWI
University of the West Indies
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The third activity under a one-year partnership agreement between the Caribbean Farmers
Network (CaFAN) and the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA
ACP_EU) was a Regional Workshop on Policies for Improved Business Efficiency in
Agriculture for the Youth. The workshop took place from June 19-21, 2013 in St. Vincent
and the Grenadines (SVG) and had approximately 50 participants who contributed to the
discussions and final recommendations. SVG currently houses the Secretariat for CaFAN.
The two primary objectives of the workshop were:
• To improve participants understanding of the concept, factors and requirements for
improved business efficiency in agricultural value chains.
• To articulate a common policy position, including concrete recommendations, for a
more enabling environment for young people in agri-business.
The workshop featured authoritative presentations and debates on policy dimensions of
agriculture business efficiency in various Caribbean countries with practical experiences
and best practices with young people initiatives, including removing hindrances to youth
participation in business presented as learning cases. From this perspective, the workshop
served as a knowledge sharing exercise between youth-based organizations from 12
Caribbean countries.
Local and regional business analysts, entrepreneurs, consultants, financiers and business
support houses outlined how to reduce costs and maximize business profitability, access
finance for prospective businesses, and understand the regulatory framework for doing
business along agricultural value chains.
Business analyst Dougal James, stressed that good record keeping, knowledge of all cost
incurred by one’s business, money management, and networking, will significantly lower
cost and maximise profitability. In her presentation on “How to set up and develop an
agribusiness”, Erica Mc Intosh emphasized the importance of marketing and financing, and
stressed the importance of producing quality products and supporting local farmers. She
warned that financing can be the deal maker or deal breaker in setting up and developing
an agri-business enterprise, and that this junction should be approached with realist and
honest business plans.
Financiers from local financial institutions were able to iron out this perspective by
outlining the services which are available to the ‘agripreneur’ and the strategies that should
be employed in order to access adequate funding. For instance Cerlin Russel of the Bank of
St. Vincent and the Grenadines expressed that by Building a relationship with one’s banker,
he/she will have a good understanding of the entrepreneurs business needs.
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In his presentation at the end of the workshop, Minister of Parliament, Hon. St. Clair
Leacock, explained that the young professionals of the region must play an integral part in
the regionalization of agricultural production, and a culture of innovation and creativity is
necessary in order to implement practical measures to accelerate the development of
agriculture in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.
At the end of the workshop suggestions were put forward to create policies which CAFAN
and its affiliates can use to engage policy makers under the youth and modernization pillar
of CAP. Among the recommendations, participants expressed that venture capitalist
systems should be set up to ease the burden on entrepreneurs, mentorship and training
should be available to young entrepreneurs on applying for funding, and cohesion among
farming groups and organizations should be fostered.
Participants’ were therefore better informed on how to enter the agri-business sector and
how to develop entrepreneurial skills for engaging in agri-business.
The recommendations will also be presented to the Alliance and the Council for Trade and
Economic Development on Agriculture (COTED) at the upcoming Caribbean Week of
Agriculture to be held in Guyana in October, 2013.
The workshop’s facilitator was Dr. Cleve Scott, Lecturer at the University of the West
Indies, Cave Hill Campus.
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INTRODUCTION
From Wednesday 19th – 21st June, 2013, the Caribbean Farmers Network (CaFAN) in
collaboration with Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) held a
three day workshop titled “Regional Workshop on Policies for Improved Business
Efficiency in Agriculture for the Youth, St. Vincent and the Grenadines” at French’s House in
Kingstown. It was attended by more than fifty persons, with participants spanning the
Caribbean Region, and involved in all spheres of agribusiness.
The two primary objectives of the workshop were:
• To improve participants understanding of the concept, factors and requirements for
improved business efficiency in agricultural value chains.
• To articulate a common policy position, including concrete recommendations, for a
more enabling environment for young people in agri-business.
This report summarizes the key points from each of the workshop sessions which focused
on reducing costs and maximizing business profitability, developing entrepreneurial skills
in agri-business, best practices with young people initiative, setting up and developing agribusinesses, financing youth in agri-business, information needs and requirements for
improved business efficiency, improving the regulatory framework for doing business
along agricultural value chains and policy recommendations for creating an enabling
environment for young people in agri-business.
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OPENING SESSION
The Opening Session was chaired by Dr. Cleve Scott, the workshop’s facilitator. He
introduced each speaker who brought greetings on behalf of their organisations. Below is a
summary of each person:
Ipha Miguel, President of Caribbean Agricultural Youth Forum (CAFY)
• Expressed that Youths across the region should be involved at all levels of decision
making in the development of agriculture. She stressed the importance of youth
involvement in areas such as agriculture, and conveyed CAFY’s pledge to help in the
facilitation of this process.
Anastasia Harry, Actin Head of the SVG Youth Affairs Division
• Applauded CaFAN on the workshop. She explained that her ministry has
implemented projects to help youth who have informal agricultural training, and
stressed that parents must encourage their children to see agriculture as a viable
income earner.
Jethro Greene, Chief Coordinator of CaFAN
• Although the Agriculture sector has been underfinanced and decimated, it is now
“back on the front burner”. He expressed that when properly run, agriculture can be
one of the most profitable and appealing businesses to youths. He expressed that in
their quest to get more youth to see this sector as such, CaFAN has been advocating
for youth and rural modernization, as well as the mainstreaming of youths in policy
making in agriculture. Green further explained that CaFAN is spearheading the call
for rural modernization and the regional mainstreaming of youth in policy making
in agriculture, to not only heighten agriculture as a business, but to further aid in the
development of agriculture locally. He also stressed on the fact that “the people who
control food and water control power”.
Honourable Saboto Caesar, Minister of Agriculture, Forestry Fisheries and Rural
Modernization
• The Honourable Minister commended CaFAN for its work across the Caribbean
region and saluted its Chief Coordinator Jethro Greene as an unsung hero in
agriculture both locally and regionally. He observed the marriage between slavery
and agriculture in the Caribbean. He stressed that the youth have a critical task
ahead of them in breaking this (slave-ish) mentality against agriculture. Like Mr.
Green, Minister Caesar observed that business efficiency in agriculture for the youth
cannot occur independently or in a vacuum, but through networking. This he felt
was necessary to pierce markets and secure the benefits of the economies of scale.
Minister Caesar proposed that CaFAN compile a position paper which he will
present at the upcoming budget in December.
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DAY 1: WEDNESDAY 19TH JUNE, 2013
Session 1: “How to Reduce Costs and Maximize Business Profitability”
This session was conducted by business analyst Dougal James and focused on strategies
which can be employed by young entrepreneurs in agribusiness to reduce costs and
maximize profits.
The following were the key points discussed:
• Good record keeping- makes notes about everything that pertains to your business.
Record keeping is essential for small businesses which do not have capital as a
buffer. It helps with accountability and traceability.
• Know all costs incurred by the business and how much money is generated.
• Have basic knowledge of double entry, money management.
• Have information on prices of potential produce at different times of the year.
• Form cooperatives and partnerships
• Networking- information is no use if you keep it to yourself.
• Partner hand- this traditional system will prevent farmers from harvesting their
crops at the same time, hence this will lower the instances of a glut on the market.
• Eat what you grow
In an effort to find out about problems faced in reducing cost and the strategies used to
mediate such problems the following are the responses provided:
“What are some of the challenges you face in keeping down costs?”
• The Terrain
• Money Management
• Unstructured application of fertilizer
• Inadequate soil testing
• Focus is on production, post harvesting issues
• Unavailability of land for agriculture (eg. Barbados)
• Mother nature
Solutions
• Linking with entities to forge alliances Eg. In technical areas
• Land use policies
• Contract farming
• Green Houses can help to recover costs
• Mechanization
• Partnerships can be formed between farming business houses
An ongoing debate surfaced about the flexibility of organisations whether in the form of
cooperatives and companies, to support agri-business development.
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Session 2: “Developing entrepreneurial skills for engaging in agri-business”
This session was conducted by participant and owner of ‘Siphiwe Honey Gold Farm’,
Raynard Burnside of Bahamas.
Burnside spoke from his experience as a young business owner and expressed that
adaptability, flexibility, creativity, and being innovative were key entrepreneurial skills for
engaging in agri-business. These skills he expressed give way to the development of
analytical, problem solving and decision making skills, all of which are crucial in creating
and managing an agri-business. When employed, Burnside reiterated, the gap between
problem solving and solutions, as well as communication and commitment to work can be
bridged, thereby creating an atmosphere for the establishment of an agri-business.
Session 3: Group Work and Presentation
Participants then dispersed into four groups and worked on ways in which policies can
help in the reduction of costs, policies which can help to create programmes for developing
entrepreneurial skills in agribusiness, decided on concrete initiatives to promote/ enhance
efficiency in agri-business, and on key policy positions to advocate for entrepreneurial
skills.
For instance, Waiving tariffs and offering subsidies was highly suggested for the reduction
of costs in agriculture. Entrepreneurial studies and skill development among others were
raised as valuable tools to develop entrepreneurial skills in agri-business.
Finally, ownership of the entire chain by way of training farmers to accommodate this
change was expressed as a necessary step if policies for improved business efficiency in
Agriculture for Youths were to come to fruition.
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DAY 2 – THURSDAY 20TH JUNE, 2013
Session 1: “Best Practices with Young People Initiatives”
This session was conducted by Dr. Ayanna Young- Marshall of the Student Entrepreneurial
Empowerment Project (SEED) Project of the University of the West Indies Cave Hill
Campus. The focus was on the structure of and participants in SEED, facilitation of some
business ideas, and observations on youth and entrepreneurship in the Caribbean.
The following are the key points which emerged from the session.
• SEED is a motivational programme which encourages self-employment and
represents an alternative to jobs in the private and public sectors.
• At the end of each SEED programme cycle participants should have grasped what
makes a successful entrepreneur.
• Participant sectors in SEED are wide ranging. They include agriculture and agroprocessing, law, fashion, child development etc.
• Innovation is at the heart of the SEED programme.
Group work was initiated as participants were asked to generate words from the concept
“entrepreneur”. Participants came up with the following:
• ‘Nut’- Cashew production (Roasting, cereal, oil) Participant (Nnaker Murphy (SVG
Participant) expressed that after the consumption of these exotic fruits a
dehydration system can be created. The following is an expansion on the ‘Cashew’
concept and was compiled by St. Lucian participant Karl Augustine.
Cashew Concept
The following is a concept which we are hoping to develop in the next couple of years as we
believe that Cashew is a major cash-crop which is not currently being exploited to its fullest
potential. At present, St Lucia has a high abundance of cashew, however only the nuts are
really utilized, the fruit is hardly used and even the current mode of utilizing the nut is
somewhat inefficient as the nut oil is burnt away when roasted.
We are planning therefore to make use of both the nut and the fruit and have done
significant research on the material/equipment requirements to do the utilization
efficiently. We have also developed a concept/approach for procuring the raw material as
well as to promote the planting of more cashew trees. We intend on getting, where
possible, equipment which could process multiple crops as a means of spreading the
portfolio and make use of other fruits which may cheaply procured.
Production plans:
FRUIT
We intend on pulping the fruit to extract the juice, the juice then can then be distilled to
make wine, which could be marketed as is or double distilled to get alcohol of above 80%
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which could be used as fuel additive (flex fuel cars) or utilized in other food production or
in the medical field as a cleaner.
The pulp is then dried and milled, and that flour could be used as a cereal for human or
animal consumption either as is or as a component of some sort of processed food.
NUT
The nuts could be aired dried and shelled raw, since the cashew are raw you could
subsequently roast, salt and package or package raw and sold. With the use of a screw
press the oil can be extracted from the shell and marketed as a cleaner of some sort of
utilized as a part of a renewable fuel. The cake can be dried and either burnt directly as a
fuel or mixed with charcoal dust to make briquettes.
Key Assumptions:
We are aware the startup capital will be somewhat high as this model will require the use
of certain specialized equipment which will have to be sourced overseas. There is also the
fact that there is no one doing this in our region so the technological transfer will have to
happen extra regionally.
We are also aware that this may be energy demanding and since this is expensive in our
region this has to be factored into any plans.
• ‘Ship’- to export commodities
• ‘Tree’- felled trees can be used to make mulching, Agro- tourism
• ‘Net’- Logistics business- take care of logistics for farming businesses
• ‘Pest’- create environmentally friendly fertilizers to remedy the outbreak of diseases
when natural disasters occur
• ‘Entre’- provide finger foods from local produce for special events, business etc
Group work was further used to come up with business models, identify cross and
intersectoral linkages, identify companies, and come up with a marketing plan. The
following is the scenario from which the groups operated.
Mr. Brathwaite is a pig farmer who along with his wife also owns a small traditional rum shop
with a storefront/counter as well as a room next door that is currently empty with old sheets
covering the windows. He sells lunch to nearby workers as well as different types of alcohol.
His operation is located in a country area where many of his neighbours keep gardens of
various sizes.
Group 1 Business Model
• Name of business place - “The Sty”
• Use a biodigester to utilise waste from restaurant and animals
• Restaurant/ Warehouse
• Purchase vegetables from surrounding farmers
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Group 2 Cross sectoral and intersectoral linkages
• Intersectoral- waste from the vegetable farm to be used as feed /waste from animals
as biogas
• Cross sectoral – Tourism/ upgrade rum shop to a classy restaurant, community
based projects in terms of farm tours
Group 3 Companies that will help maximize production
• Technical Support (ICA)
• SRCU (Research) how to skew pens
• Financial associations
• SEDU (Funding) and setting up small franchise
• Pig farmers Association (networking how can he link with other pig farmers)
• Public Health- using the extra space to set up an abattoir
• Involve NGOs
Group 4 Marketing Plan
• Promotion (Sampling of pork& rum)
• Labeling and Branding (We eat what we grow and eat what we know)
• Social Networking
• Sponsor school programmes
• Mr Brathwaite Pork hall intoxication
• Mr. Brathwaite Porkalictic flavours
• Mr. Brathwaite Be Caribbean, Be Porky, Be Drunk
Observations
The SEED project has observed that Caribbean youth are innovative, motivated, and
nationalistic. It has recognized that self-employment is true independence.
Session 2: “How to set- up and develop an agri-business enterprise”
The focus of this session was to sensitize participants about establishing and maintaining
an agribusiness. In her presentation, Erica Mc Intosh, a leader in the agro-business industry
in St. Vincent and the Grenadines outlined the following key points.
• Support local farmers - all raw materials should be local;
• Increase the export of a value added product from St. Vincent;
• Marketing and financing are probably the most important mechanism in setting up
an agri-business. If there is a demand go for it, make your product a quality one;
• Market research is important, check to see the bestselling product on the market.
She expressed that the following must also be seriously taken into consideration:
• Mini exhibition
• Patent/Branding
• Taste testing
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•
•
•
•
•
Packaging/Presentation
Fair Competition
Financing( backbone of your business/ it can make or break the business)
Have a business plan (Must be realistic)
Incentives/tax reduction
Erica Mc Intosh explained that risks are involved in everything that is done and in the agroindustry the following are some limitations.
• Climatic conditions
• Pest infections
• Limited Transportation (difficult/expensive to move products from one island to
the next)
• Seasonality of Fruits
• High electricity cost (Renewable energies (Dries sorrel on a tarpaulin on an open
court)
• Change the values of our people
She also noted the following:
• Be aware of accepting our own, instead of going for foreign based stuff
• Keep up with technology
• Develop websites
• There are many options that we can branch off to in agri-business
• Do not be limited to your environment
• Get involved in sports (useful for networking)
• CARIRI (company in T’dad)– designs machines for agro business
Erica’s Country style - Offers training for students when asked by educational institutions
and one can survive on agriculture but they must have a good market. An export market
that is feasible.
Recommendations to help in the development of agribusiness
• (Jamaican Participant) Agriparks have been set up in Jamaica. Give farmers land
(Tripartite system-land labour technical support by government/ farmer- private
sector)
• (C. Russel) Banker’s perspective- business plan should be a road map for the success
of the business. Let it be realistic, good understanding.
• Extension officers can go out into fields and observe / make suggestions in order to
improve the quality of crops.
• Financing is very difficult for young entrepreneurs. Have the same lending criteria
across the region, bankers can walk producers through the necessary steps
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Session 3: “Financing youth in agri-business”
In this session financiers sought to educate participants about the services they provide to
their clients in agri-business, why financing clients in the agriculture sector is such risky
business, and what they (participants) can do to make lending easier. Beverly Thompson of
the National Development Foundation (NDF), Simone Murray (COMFI), and Cerlin Russel of
the Bank of St. Vincent and the Grenadines (BOSVG) executed this session. This session was
chaired by Afzan Chan.
The following are the salient points which came out of this session:
• Persons engaged in agri- business can borrow money for:
o Start-up
o Material and Labour
o Purchase of equipment
o Farm improvements
N.B. Entrepreneurs are not limited to the actions above.
•
•
•
•
BOSVG offers Shepherding/ Hand holding programmes
COMFI works with entrepreneurs to see what they’re comfortable with. They set up
a payment plan/ tailor the product to suit situations. COMFI has gone to the CDB to
get funds to lend youths in agribusiness.
Financing clients in the agriculture business is risky. This is because of
o Praedial larceny
o Diseases
o Poor business management
o Loss of Market
Entrepreneurs can make financing easier:
o Have a business plan (Where you are, where you want to be, how you plan to
get there)
o Separate personal expenses from business expenses
o invest together through cooperatives and companies
o Networking (They should find other investors who bring equity to the table,
this makes lending less risky)
o Find ways to create synergies through strategic partnership
o Build a relationship with your banker, your banker will have a good
understanding of your business. He/she will be in a better position to
provide financing based on your (entrepreneur’s) needs.
o Have a business plan (Where you are, where you want to be, how you plan to
get there)
o Establish target market
o Know the competition
o How am I going to stand out
o Know all costs
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Feedback from Participants
• Banks should hire someone who is trained in agribusiness;
• Banks should provide some form of cushioning for farmers;
• Models should be formulated that best suit the Caribbean.
Feedback from Chairperson Afzal Khan
• Young Entrepreneurs can go into apprenticeship groups to organize and understand
the business;
• Banks will not take up ideas if they are cost driven, they must see returns.
Session 4: “Information and requirements for improved business efficiency”
The focus of this session was to educate the participants about the necessities to making
one’s business efficient. Nisha Glasgow of the Centre for Enterprise Development expressed
the following:
• Entrepreneurs should get the ‘know how’ and training about their prospective
business;
• Find the financial institution that fits their vision;
• Try not to generalize when it comes to a target group;
• Select the right persons for their business;
• Know every aspect of their business (operations, service etc);
• Understand that profits equal business efficiency.
She outlined that business efficiency can be improved through:
• Outsourcing
• Office Layout
• Social Media
• Technology
• Managing Suppliers
• Market Research
• Access to information
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DAY 3: FRIDAY 21ST JUNE, 2013
Session 1: “Improving the Regulatory Framework for Doing Business along
Agricultural Value Chains - An Insider Perspective
The focus of this session was to dispense information on the rules and regulations and the
means used to enforce them in doing business along agricultural value chains. Presenters
were Mr. Michael Nanton of the SVG Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Dr. Nadia
Anslem, Food safety and Food Law specialist and Honourable St. Clair Leacock offered their
perspective on this area.
Mr. Michael Nanton
In addressing the topic Nanton expressed the following sentiments:
• If you have access to land and you’re under 30 get back to the land;
• We are importing six times more than we are exporting;
• In WWII SVG fed all of the Caribbean. “We need to get back to the land.” We need to
use it when we can sustain ourselves, we can then have spill.
Issues that are important from a regulatory Perspective include:
• Commodity standards of the regional and international place/SPS (standards must
be set about what we have to produce and the levels we have to rise to) Diseases are
one of the biggest threats to agriculture. This is where standards come in.
• Sanitation;
• Training of Personnel;
• Science and technology resource and development;
• Fiscal areas and Price control;
• Income from farming is exempt from taxation. Reduction of cost of transportation
aligned in farming.
Have to make use of resources
• Land, sea, climate, geography, human resources (minimize rural urban migration
drift);
• We need to add value to products (regulation needs to hit the ground)
• Networking
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Dr. Nadia Anselm
A video was showed on international regulation standards. The purpose was to illustrate
the overall idea on the need to have quality and safe goods. She expressed that if you have
a new product some of the things that you should be aware of are:
• Standards in the Market place;
• Countries are concerned about the health of the population/there frontiers;
• The SPS Agreement (look at this agreement).
Hon. St. Clair Leacock
Points made were:
• Farmers bought a plane in WWII- farmers were rich then
• The region lack the will to do what is right in Agriculture.
• We also lack the where it all to do so/ we just don’t know what to do
• There is a serious disconnect between the public and the private sector
• We are not prepared to roll up our sleeves there is almost nothing to attract youths
to work in agriculture.
Capacities we have to put in place:
• We must have a regionalization of agricultural production
• We need to use our young professionals
• Fend off social unrest and upheaval
• We must have the appropriate models to develop agriculture
• We must invest in agriculture
• The Caribbean need to implement practical measures to have agriculture running
• We need to facilitate a culture of innovation and creativity
Hon. Saboto Caesar, Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Hon. Caesar spoke on “Agriculture and Accompanying Measures and Youth in SVG” and
mentioned the following:
• Something must be done in a radical way to encourage youths in agriculture;
• Things that are being done with the resources that we have - Eg. Alternative
sustainable lively hoods programme
• Realized that there were a large number of persons more interested in illegal
farming. We capitalized on the process to repatriate these persons.
• Factors of production in SVG - Land, labour, capital (Evolution of land tenureshipmovement from estates to small holdings).
How are we going to capitalize on agriculture for the future?
SVG will receive 34 million (Banana Accompanying Measures) Grant/Project. A portion will
be used to attract young people to agriculture who need a start-up. For planting, securing
leases, parcels of land, livestock, materials to start-up businesses, trainings, etc. Its
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sustainability will depend on the technical support and work that the Centre for Enterprise
Development (CED) will be doing with them.
Feedback from Participants
• SVG can properly utilize the BAM programme by training and up grading those
already involved in farming. We cannot make farmers. (Dominica participant)
• (Trinidad participant) – Buy local , eat local- agriculture in the region is used as
political football
• Marketing can be used to get youths back in agriculture
Dougal James - politicians present ‘sexy projects’, high flying ideas, training but
monitoring and evaluation is given little attention in research. We come up with projects
that look good on the surface, but they are not properly implemented.
Jethro Greene
• Regionalization of Agriculture- that is why CaFAN is here
• BAM programme-in J’ca (they want roots and tuber in the hotels) in SVG - (This is
not the case)
• Always gage words and action. Budget high for agriculture. The pennies thrown for
agriculture cannot create a dent in agriculture.
• Industry approach to agriculture- we need to put rural modernization and youth
into agriculture
• Put infrastructure in place in the communities to stem the tide of rural urban
migration.
• We have to choose a nonpartisan stance to this issue
Hon. S. Leacock
• The productive sector of the society is starving
• There is money to be made in agriculture- we need to walk the talk
• (Trinidad Participant)- It is problematic when we just talk and not walk the walk
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Session 2: Group Work/ Final Session
The focus of the final session was to come up with policy recommendations that CaFAN,
CAFY and their allies can use to engage with policy makers under the youth and
modernization pillar of CCAP. Brent Theophile of CaRAPN coordinated this session and
advocated that recommendations should add to value, and be sustainable.
Five groups were created and each group was given a specific task to come up with
recommendations for the following:
Task: “Put Forward suggestions for these key areas affecting youth in agriculture,
specifying practical approaches that can be taken”
Group 1: Rural Enterprise development using Youth in Agriculture
• Value adding development of that which already exists
• Integration of Agriculture as part of primary school curriculum
• Infrastructural Development in the area of:
o Alternative energy
o Capital investment
o Marketing extension
o Form Co-operatives
o Communication Dissemination of information
Group 2: Improving Access resources for agribusiness development (starting
agribusiness)
• Venture Capitalist
o Not invest in money
o Not a loan
• Business IncubatorAgribusiness Agency to Provide:
o Business Plan
o Legal Advice
o Technical development
o Marketing
o Offices on different islands
• Clear land retention and land use policy
o % of land is guaranteed for Agriculture
o A share will be dedicated to youth enterprise
o Policy for buying back the Agri Lands from private land owners.
• Networking
o Make you aware of what resources lie around.
o Networking land, telecommunications
o Possibilities for Collaboration
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Group 3: Improving the successfulness of young entrepreneurs in agriculture
• Having Workshops for youths to educate them and build capacity in the area
• Enable the youth with more practical skills than theory
• Identify role models within the society so youths can work alongside with (building
recognition)
• Educational institutes need to play a more active role in educating
(youths/students) in entrepreneurial skills
• There should be an organization/institute to assist in guiding youth in how to set up
or lay out their business plans to reduce failure rate.
• Increase market availability
Group 4: Youth organizations forging linkages for advocacy and representation
• NGO
o Accessing more funding
o Having a proper format structure/proposal
o Documentation of Registration
• Youth Organizations i.e. Jamaica 4H Clubs
o Access to lands
o Technical support
o Financial Aide JSIFT etc.
o Creates Programs in Schools
• Advocacy/ Representation: Youth Parliament
o Having representation focusing on agriculture policies consisting of
members from various sectors 1) Agri 2) Tourism 3) Education 4) Having a
strong skill set
• Forming Agri Groups! And from these groups the Minister appointing youth
representation to set on various states and bodies related to Agri
• More Youth forums just as this; creating policies for local and regional development
Group 5: Gaps in agriculture value chains where youth can produce value
• To meet quality assurance standard (ie. Improved aspects improved value added
chain)
• Training involves capacity building, knowledge transfer, post-harvest, quality
assurance
• Demonstration Plots: farmers field school, research and development, trial and
error(for development of different products)
• Cohesive Farming Groups(say practical meaning different farmers groups)
o Farmers organizatons it will improve the value added production. It will
also improve efficiency of packing. Meaning everyone will not be producing
the same commodities at the same time.
o E.G Trinidad we have some farming areas producing 1) vegetable crops 2)
Roots and Tubers 3) herbs and spices 4) and at the present providing grains
such as rice 5) Livestock rearing
20
CONCLUSION
21
RECOMMENDATIONS
22
AGENDA
Day 1: Wednesday 19th June 2013
Time
Session
08.30-09.00
Registration
09.00-10:00
Opening Session: Brief Remarks by Agricultural Stakeholders
• Sustang Fergus, ECTAD
• Ipha Miguel, President CAFY
• Anastasia Harry, Actin Head of the SVG Youth Affairs Division
• Jethro Greene, Chief Coordinator of CaFAN
• Honourable Saboto Caesar, Minister, Ministry of Agriculture
10:00 – 10:30 Coffee Break
10:30-10:45
Introduction, Objectives and Expected Results - Facilitator
10:45 – 12.00 How to reduce costs and maximize business profitability.
Presenter: Dougal James
12:00 – 13:00 Group work and presentation
13.00 – 14.00
Lunch
14:00 – 15.15
Developing entrepreneurial skills for engaging in agri-business
Presenter: Ray Burnside
Group work and presentation
Coffee Break
Group work and presentation
Wrap-up and Close of Day 1
15:15-16:00
16.00 – 16.15
16.15 – 17.30
Day 2: Thursday 20th June 2013
Time
Session
09:00-09:15
09:15 - 11:00
Recap of day one – Afi Martin
Best practices with young people initiatives
Presenters: Ayanna Young-Marshall ( UWI, Cave Hill SEED);
Coffee Break
11:00-11:15
11:15 - 13:00
13.00-14.00
How to set-up and develop an agri-business enterprise
Presenter: Erica Mc Intosh
Lunch
14:00 – 16:00
Financing youth in agribusiness.
Presenters: National Development Foundation, COMFI, and Bank of
SVG
Chair: Afzal Khan
16:00 – 16:15 Coffee Break
23
16:15 – 17:30
Information needs and requirements for improved business efficiency.
Presenter: Centre for Enterprise Development
Wrap-up and Close of Day 2
Day 3: Friday 21st June 2013
Time
Session
09.00-9.15
Recap of Day 2 Afi Martin
09:15-10:30
12:00-12:30
Improving the regulatory framework for doing business along
agricultural value chains- An insider perspective.
Presenters: SVG Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Nadia Anslem,
Hon. St Clair Leacok
Coffee Break
Improving the regulatory framework for doing business along
agricultural value chains- An alternative view.
Presenter: Hon. St. Clair Leacock, Business Development Specialist
Obstacles and aids to doing business – case studies/group work
12:30 – 13:00
Group Presentations
13.00-14.00
Lunch
10.30-11:00
11:00-12:00
14:00-15:00
A review of existing policies for creating an enabling environment
for young people in agri-business.
Presenter: Conroy Huggins
15:00-16:00
Group work: Policy recommendations that CAFAN, CAFY and their
partners and allies should use to engage with policy makers under the
Youth and Modernization pillar of CAP.
16:00 – 16:15 Coffee Break
16:15 – 17:15
17:15-17:30
Group Presentations of recommendations should be as specific as
possible, not just general/vague recommendations, so that they can be
used for focused advocacy work at the regional level and at the national
level. Advocacy work should result in concrete policy instruments at
the enterprise, cluster, value chain and institutional level.
Official closing
Chair: CaFAN
24
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
No.
Name
Sex
OVERSEAS PARTICIPANTS
1.
Winston J. Laville
M
1.
Samuel T. Braziel
M
Organisation
Position
Country
Member
Public Relations Officer
Antigua
Antigua
Agriculture Science
Teacher
Operations Officer
Bahamas
2.
Raynard C. Burnside
M
Team Fresh Produce Cooperative
Antigua and Barbuda Agricultural
Youth Forum
Ministry of Education
3.
4.
5.
6.
Thedore Fraser
Afi Martin
Cleve Scott
Kadira Marshall
M
F
M
F
Barbados Agricultural Society
University of the West Indies
University of the West Indies
Barbados Youth Business Trust
7.
Ayanna Marshalll
M
Resource Person CaFAN
8.
Mitch Jno-Charles
M
9.
Nadia Anselm
F
National Association of Youth In
Agriculture
DEXIA
10.
F
11.
Dilly-Ann J.
Bartholomew
Joseph Braveboy
12.
Ronn Sullivan
M
13.
Soyanni Holness
F
14.
M
18.
Omar Obrien
Hanson
Mc Pherson Meade
Kevington Alfred
Pemberton
Kristal Myrtilla
Phillip
Imnah V Alexander
19.
Karl Augustine
M
20.
21.
22.
Jeanine Eugene
Tatry Soerani
Siman
Raiza G. Sajonara
23.
24.
Treasure Alcindor
Devica Ria Sookoo
15.
16.
17.
Lecturer
Managing Director of
Fusion Foods
Lawyer, Business
Lecturer (UWI)
Vice President
Barbados
Barbados
Barbados
Barbados
Barbados
Dominica
Trade Promotions
Officer
Extension Officer
Project Coordinator
Youth Co-ordinator
Dominica
Treasurer
Guyana
Production Manager
Jamaica
Centre Manager
Jamaica
Farmer
Ambassador
Montserrat
St. Kitts
General Secretary,
St. Kitts
Shop Keeper/ Market
Official
Outreach Officer
St. Lucia
F
F
Montserrat Farmers Association
CARICOM Youth Ambassadors
Programme
St. Kitts Nevis Agricultural Youth
Forum, Ripple, Capisterre Farm
Belle Vue Farmers’ Co-operative
Society Limited
Saint Lucia Agriculture Forum For
Youth
St. Lucia Agricultural Youth Forum
Foundation Woman in Agriculture
Treasurer
Youth Group Leader
St. Lucia
Suriname
F
Foundation Women in Agriculture
Group Leader
Suriname
F
F
The Agribusiness Society of the UWI
Agricultural Society of Trinidad and
Project Coordinator
Director Assistant/
Trinidad
Trinidad
M
M
M
F
M
Grenada Agriculture Forum for
Youth
North East Farmers Organisation
NEFO
Guyana Forum for Youth in
Agriculture
Christiana Potato Growers
Cooperative
Jamaica 4H Clubs
25
Grenada
Grenada
St. Lucia
25.
26.
Nyamekye Mapp
Brent Theophile
F
M
27.
Shari Racine Niles
F
28.
Nawaz Karim
LOCAL PARTICIPANTS
29.
Naker Murphy
30.
Colville King
31.
Bernard Joseph
32.
Carlos Williams
33.
Chuddie Ash
34.
Ayana Solomon
35.
Dr. Gregory Robin
36.
Tonya Scott
37.
Susana Lavia
38.
Kishore Shallow
39.
Simeon Scipio
40.
Dillon Fredericks
41.
Ashale Latchman
42.
Temara Glynn
43.
Yannick Bacchus
44.
Vereisha Young
45.
Anderson Pares
46.
Stephanie Ince
47.
Michael Dalton
48.
Sabrina Murphy
F
M
M
M
M
F
M
F
F
M
M
M
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
Tobago
Tobago District Agricultural Society
Caribbean Regional Agricultural
Policy Network
CaFAN
Agricultural Society of Trinidad and
Tobago
Board Member
UWI Student
Policy and Agri
Research
Policy and Research
Officer
Director Assistance
Board(Farmer)
SVG Technical College
Ministry of Agriculture
Student
Agri-business Officer
Youth Officer
Ministry of Agriculture
SUSAFY
CARDI
Coordinator
ECTAD
CARICOM Youth Ambassador
Bishop’s College
Bishop’s College
Bishop’s College
Bishop’s College
Bishop’s College
Bishop’s College
C.D.C Tec
ECTAD
IICA
SVGCC/SVGNRWP
Farmer
SVG Ambassador
Student
Student
Student
Student
Student
Student
Student
Farmer
Local Representative
Lecturer
RESOURCE PERSONS – PRESENTERS & CHAIRPERSONS
49.
Anastasia Harry
F
Youth Affairs Department
50.
Hon. Saboto Caesar
M
Ministry of Agriculture
51.
Erica Mc Intosh
F
Erica Country Style
52.
Dougal James
M
Prime Consulting
53.
Nisha Glasglow
F
Center for Enterprise Development
54.
Hermia Neehall
F
National Development Foundation
55.
Cerlin Russell
M
Bank of St. Vincent and the
Grenadines
56.
Michael Nanton
M
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Chamber of Industry and Commerce
57.
Hon. St. Claire
M
Representative of Central Kingstown
Leacock
58.
Conroy Huggins
M
Bishop College Kingstown
59.
60.
Ipha Miguel
Andre Liverpool
F
M
CAFY
IRM/Community Activist
26
Tobago
Trinidad
Trinidad
Trinidad
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
Acting Head of Dept
Minister of Agriculture
Owner/Manager
Manager
Business Dev. Officer
Manager
Manager of Business
Operations
Executive Director
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
Senator – Central
Kingstown
Agronomist,
Agricultural Teacher,
President
Activist
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
Afzal Khan
Shanti Khan
Douglas De Freitas
Angella Ideisha
Jackson
CaFAN SECRETARIAT
Sustang Fergus
Jethro Greene
Patrick Delle Palme
Christophe Carabin
Ketesha Baptiste
LOCAL MEDIA
70.
Dimari Matthews
71.
Susan Lewis
72.
Kenton X-chance
73.
Ricardo Wilson
74.
John Nero
M
F
M
F
Prosperity Concepts
Prosperity Concepts
BDS Co Ltd/Nice Radio
SVG NON State Actors
panel/VINCUPA
Owner/Manager
Owner, Manager
Owner/Manager
Member
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
F
M
M
M
F
ECTAD
CaFAN/ECTAD
CaFAN/ECTAD
CaFAN/ECTAD
ECTAD
Marketing Officer
Chief Coordinator
Intern
Intern
Office Assistant
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
Canada
Guadeloupe
St. Vincent
M
F
M
M
M
Nice Radio
The News
I-Witness News
NBC Radio
Communications Unit
Journalist
Journalist
Journalist
Journalist
Journalist
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
27
Caribbean Farmers Network
C/o Eastern Caribbean Trading Agriculture
and Development Organization (ECTAD)
Beachmont, P.O. Box 827, Kingstown
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
[email protected] or [email protected]
www.caribbeanfarmers.org
Tel: (784) 453-1004
Fax: (784) 453-1239
This document has been produced with the financial assistance of the Technical Centre for Agricultural and
Rural Cooperation (CTA EU_ACP). However, the views expressed herein can in no way be taken to reflect the
official opinion of CTA.
28

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