day three

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day three
COLLABORATE.
INNOVATE.
TRANSFORM.
DAY THREE
APRIL 4-6, 2016
THE ALLSTREAM CENTRE, TORONTO, ON
#tophc2016
DAY THREE OVERVIEW
THEME: TRANSFORM
7:30 a.m.
Registration
8:30 a.m.
Concurrent sessions
10:00 a.m.
Break and exhibits
10:45 a.m.
Concurrent sessions
12:15 p.m.
Lunch and exhibits
1:15 p.m.
Plenary Session: Timothy Caulfield, Keynote Speaker
2:15 p.m.
Remarks - Dr. Bob Bell, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Health and Long-Term-Care
2:30 p.m.
Closing ceremony
DAY THREE
2
Welcome to Day 3
Sheela Basrur Centre
Leadership and
Communications
General and Foundational Pathway
8:30 - 10:00
Environmental
Health Pathway
Session 43
Session 44
Session 45
Session 46
Session 47
Session 48
Session 49
Session 50
Workshop
Workshop
Workshop
Four 15 Minute
Presentations
Workshop
Workshop
Workshop
Workshop
Panel
Four 15 Minute
Presentations
Room 203AB
Room 206D
Room 201
Room 204AB
Room 202AB
Room 205BC
Room 200AB
Room 206C
Room 206B
Room 206A
Use of evidence
Improving collaboration
between public health
and local physicians:
Innovative strategies for
success
The Healthy Human
Development (HHD)
Table interactive
discussion about the
status of perinatal
mental health programs,
activities and supports in
Ontario
Post-landing tuberculosis
medical surveillance
among new immigrants
to Ontario: Findings and
implications of a mixed
methods provincial
review
Safe water and public
transparency
Putting the party in
participatory evaluation
with youth
Network mapping and Engaging and supporting
municipalities to
analysis: A tool to
develop, promote, and
support the
adopt healthy public
implementation
policies
Lambton Public Health’s
2014-2019 Strategic Plan
Creating mentally
Bringing evidence into
healthy workplaces:
action: Knowledge
translation strategies to Strategies for managers
and supervisors
facilitate healthier
school environments
Emergency
Preparedness
Pathway
Break and Exhibits
Session 51
Panel
Session 52
Panel
Session 53
Workshop
Room 206A
Room 206D
Room 203AB
Health impact
assessment: A tool to
promote healthy public
policy
Endto-end public health
practice: A local health
unit’s approach to
solving public health
problems
Session 52
Workshop
Room 204AB
Session 55
Workshop
Session 56
Panel
Session 57
Four 15 Minute
Presentations
Session 58
Panel
Session 59
Four 15 Minute
Presentations
Session 60
Four 15 Minute
Presentations
Room 202AB
Room 201
Room 200AB
Room 205BC
Room 206C
Room 206B
See Session 55
Ethics for evaluators
Youth engagement
Exploring the application
theatre: Collaborating
of a framework to
with youth to transform
promote effective
public health education communication of public
health guidance to
emergency department
clinicians at the local
level in the setting of
emerging public health
incidents
Hot TOPHC 2016:
Public health in a
transformed Ontario
health system
Mental Health and
addictions
Lunch
1:15- 2:15
Plenary Session: Timothy Caulfield
2:30 - 2:45
Infectious Disease
Pathway
Session 42
12:15- 1:15
2:15- 2:30
Family Health
Pathway
Session 41
10:00 - 10:45
10:45 - 12:15
Chronic Disease Injury Prevention
Pathway
Assessing the equity
impact of health risks
and interventions
Remarks - Dr. Bob Bell, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
Closing Ceremony
Supporting children and
families
Technology and
Infectious diseases
DAY THREE
PLENARY SPEAKER:
TIMOTHY CAULFIELD
#tophc2016
Professor Timothy Caulfield is an unrivalled communicator who debunks myths and assumptions about
innovation in the health sector—from research on stem cells to diets to alternative medicine—for the
benefit of the public and decision-makers.
Professor Caulfield is a Canada Research Chair in Health Law
and Policy and a Professor in the Faculty of Law and the School
of Public Health at the University of Alberta. He has been the
Research Director of the Health Law Institute at the University
of Alberta since 1993.
Over the past several years, he has been involved in a variety
of interdisciplinary research endeavours that have allowed him
to publish over 300 articles and book chapters. He is a Fellow
of the Trudeau Foundation and the Principal Investigator
for a number of large interdisciplinary projects that explore the ethical, legal and health policy issues
associated with a range of topics, including stem cell research, genetics, patient safety, the
prevention of chronic disease, obesity policy, the commercialization of research, complementary and
alternative medicine, and access to health care.
Professor Caulfield is and has been involved with a number of national and international policy and
research ethics committees, including the Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee; Genome
Canada’s Science Advisory Committee; the Ethics and Public Policy Committee for International
Society for Stem Cell Research; and the Federal Panel on Research Ethics. He has won numerous
academic awards and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of
Health Sciences.
He writes frequently for the popular press on a range of health and science policy issues and is
the author of The Cure for Everything: Untangling the Twisted Messages about Health, Fitness and
Happiness (Penguin, 2012) and his most recent book, Is Gwyneth Paltrow Wrong About Everything?:
When Celebrity Culture and Science Clash (Penguin, 2015).
DAY THREE
4
DAY THREE SESSIONS
#tophc2016
SESSION 41
SESSION 42
Putting the party in participatory evaluation
with youth
Network mapping and analysis: A tool to support
the implementation of Lambton Public Health’s
2014-2019 Strategic Plan
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 203AB
Room 206D
Presented by
Allison Meserve, Kristy Ste Marie
Presented by
Sudit Ranade, Nancy Wai, Penny Scott
Organization
Public Health Ontario
Organization
Lambton Public Health, Health Nexus
Format
Workshop
Format
Workshop
Want to include youth as active stakeholders in
your evaluations, but don’t really know how?
In this workshop, we will be examining participatory
evaluation − a method of evaluation that calls for
the inclusion of stakeholders throughout the
evaluation process. We will review how the Ministry
of Health and Long-Term Care’s 11 principles of youth
engagement can inform participatory evaluation,
with a particular emphasis on data collection.
The workshop will highlight the benefits and barriers
to participatory evaluation with youth. We will also
provide participants with tangible tools for use with
youth in participatory data collection. This workshop
will be of interest to those who conduct evaluations
of youth programs and are interested in enhancing
their skills in participatory evaluation methods.
Lambton Public Health (LPH) partnered with Health
Nexus to conduct a social network analysis survey
with their internal staff over the summer of 2015.
The overall goal of the project was to apply the
learnings from the generated data and associated
visual maps as a resource to the implementation
of the 2014-2019 organizational strategic plan.
Respondents were asked about their internal team;
program linkages and connections; and external
organizational networks that they collaborate with
on a regular basis. This workshop will discuss the
process and outcomes of the mapping, and the
practical applications as LPH continues to integrate
and build on the results of the survey into their
ongoing planning.
DAY THREE
5
#tophc2016
SESSION 43
SESSION 44A
Engaging and supporting municipalities
to develop, promote and adopt healthy
public policies
Can cartoons build capacity to interpret research
evidence? An evaluation of the Understanding
Research Evidence videos from the National
Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 201
Room 204AB
Presented by
Nina Jain-Sheehan, Lindsay Garofalo,
Gillian Chappell, Lisa Gallant
Presented by
Jeannie Mackintosh
Organization
Niagara Region Public Health
Organization
National Collaborating Centre for
Methods and Tools
Format
Workshop
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Do you work in a health unit that encompasses
multiple municipalities and want to increase
your skills to engage municipal partners when
developing and promoting healthy public policies?
This workshop will showcase different strategies to
engage municipal partners and give participants
the opportunity to work through a case study to
practice those strategies.
As part of its mandate to build capacity for
Evidence-Informed Public Health (EIPH), the National
Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT)
offers workshops and webinars to public health and
allied professionals. Topics include a step-by-step
approach to incorporating evidence into practice; how
to search for and critically appraise research evidence;
and how to apply the EIPH process to specific issues.
Despite the overall positive feedback on the workshops,
facilitators have noted a recurring challenge as many
participants report difficulties understanding some key
terms commonly included in research papers. The
series of Understanding Research Evidence (URE)
videos was created to explain some terms and
concepts commonly encountered when looking at
research evidence. Ideas that might otherwise be
intimidating or misunderstood are presented in a
non-threatening way, using concise plain language
narration and cartoon visuals to illustrate realistic
public health examples.
DAY THREE
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#tophc2016
SESSION 44B
SESSION 44C
Building capacity to support evidence-informed
public health: An innovative knowledge broker
mentoring program
Finding research evidence efficiently
using search pyramids
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 204AB
Room 204AB
Presented by
Olivia Marquez
Presented by
Maureen Dobbins
Organization
Health Evidence
Organization
National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Anticipated prior level of knowledge
None required
Anticipated prior level of knowledge
None required
One approach to support Evidence-Informed Decision
Making (EIDM) in public health is knowledge
brokering. This session will describe a 16-month
Knowledge Broker (KB) mentoring program. Executed
in two phases, the program provided mentorship to
teams of public health professionals from five public
health departments in Ontario. Phase one assessed
the organizational culture in each health unit for
EIDM and identified key aspects of the organization
requiring change to support EIDM. Phase two
involved implementing the 16-month program
consisting of face-to-face workshops at McMaster
University monthly webinars and monthly phone
and email support. Changes in EIDM knowledge
and skills from baseline to follow-up will be reported.
Participating health departments have gained
internal KB expertise to independently work through
the EIDM process and address ongoing high-priority
practice-based questions, transforming evidence
use in public health decision-making.
As part of a broader knowledge translation (KT)
strategy, the National Collaborating Centre for
Methods and Tools (NCCMT) created seven free online
Search Pyramid (SP) tools. The SP support efficient
and effective literature searching by providing links
to freely available sources of research evidence.
Links are arranged by the level of evidence (guidelines,
systematic reviews and single studies). They also show
users which sources contain pre-appraised evidence
and which sources contain evidence that requires
critical appraisal. This presentation will highlight data
on the use of SP to inform public health practice.
DAY THREE
7
#tophc2016
SESSION 44D
SESSION 45
Are online learning resources effective to build
capacity for evidence-informed decision making?
Improving collaboration between public health and
local physicians: Innovative strategies for success
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 204AB
Room 202AB
Presented by
Maureen Dobbins
Presented by
Jill Gumbley, Sharon Lobo
Organization
National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools
Organization
Toronto Public Health
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Format
Workshop
This presentation will provide an overview of
innovative, accessible and effective resources
available in the Learning Centre −an online learning
management system developed by the National
Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT).
The resources and their built-in functionality feature
support knowledge and skill development related to
evidence-informed decision-making by public health
professionals engaged in various roles and positions
in Canada, and worldwide.
Collaboration and communication between public
health and primary care increases accessibility to
health promotion and illness prevention programs and
services. It may also engage non-public health sectors
to adopt a population health approach. However, public
health professionals are often faced with the challenge
of ensuring that their organization is a trusted and
influential source of public health information for local
physicians. In response to this challenge, Toronto
Public Health (TPH) and Peel Public Health (PPH) have
developed evidence-based organizational physician
outreach strategies that were informed by best
practices, literature reviews, key informants and
anecdotal evidence. The purpose of this workshop is to
discuss the process of developing and implementing a
health unit-wide physician outreach strategy; shar key
lessons learned from TPH and PPH; outline best
practices for communicating effectively with physicians;
and work through examples of physician outreach.
Participants communicating with other types of
primary care providers may also benefit from this
session. Although the evidence base is primarily with
physicians, it is expected that communication strategies
with other groups of primary healthcare providers
would be similar.
DAY THREE
8
#tophc2016
SESSION 46
SESSION 47
Bringing evidence into action: Knowledge
translation strategies to facilitate healthier
school environments
Creating mentally healthy workplaces:
Strategies for managers and supervisors
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 205BC
Room 200AB
Presented by
Taryn Orava, Rachel Laxer
Presented by
Sue Freeman
Organization
University of Waterloo
Organization
CCOHS
Format
Workshop
Format
Workshop
Knowledge translation (KT) is about bringing the
right information to the right people, in the right
format andat the right time. Public health nurses
(PHN) can play an integral role in KT, not only in
disseminating research to knowledge users, but
also as change agents — they can ensure that best
practices are embedded in the delivery of all health
interventions. Despite their mandate to promote
school health, PHNs sometimes lack the tools
required to understand the school environment or
the capacity to implement contextually-relevant
public health interventions within schools. To most
effectively improve student health behaviours,
knowledge producers should disseminate research
findings to knowledge users in a user-friendly format
(i.e., through customized feedback reports). They can
also link schools and PHNs with a knowledge broker
that has experience in research and public health/
education. The purpose of this workshop is to
showcase the importance of KT in facilitating
behaviour change and the role of public health
in the process.
As a collaborative approach, new frameworks and
practices in health and safety leadership include
providing a transformative experience at work—
psychologically-safe workplaces are now part of the
total healthy work environment. Designed for
managers and supervisors, this session can help you
understand how to build a positive mental health
environment for all staff and support those who
experience mental distress or illness. Learn how to
identify workplace factors that affect mental health.
By taking action and being innovative, you can help
reduce the stigma of mental health and in turn
enhance worker well-being within your organization.
Discover how to develop communication strategies
that help facilitate health protection, and promote
positive mental health in a healthy workplace by
learning what areas are within your influence.
DAY THREE
9
#tophc2016
SESSION 48
SESSION 49
The Healthy Human Development (HHD) Table:
An interactive discussion about the status of
perinatal mental health programs, activities and
supports in Ontario
Post-landing tuberculosis medical surveillance
among new immigrants to Ontario: Findings of a
mixed-methods provincial review
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 206C
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 206B
Presented by
Ingrid Tyler, Andrea Feller , Cindy-Lee Dennis
Presented by
Liane Macdonald, Lawrence Loh, Natalie Bocking,
Elizabeth Rea, Lisa Fernandes, Kamran Khan
Organization
Public Health Ontario
Organization
Public Health Ontario
Format
Workshop
Format
Panel
Are you interested in improving the emotional
environment of children in your region? There is strong
evidence to show that the mental health of caregivers
can significantly affect child development outcomes.
The Healthy Human Development (HHD) Table invites
you to a discussion about the status of perinatal
mental health programs in Ontario. Public Health
Ontario will present the findings from their recent
survey. This session will connect representatives from
academia and public health at the local and provincial
levels, engaging them in a discussion of priorities and
service gaps related to perinatal mental health issues
in the province. We would especially encourage
anyone working in mental health, child health and/or
family health program areas to attend this session to
help shape the HHD Table’s future work in the field.
What is the goal of post-landing medical
surveillance for tuberculosis (TB) among new
immigrants? How is it currently being conducted
across Ontario, and in other jurisdictions? What is
perceived to be working well? What are the
opportunities for improvement? Is there evidence
that the current TB medical surveillance contributes
to decreasing TB in our immigrant communities? In
the first part of this session, we present the
methods and key findings of a mixed-methods
review that included a literature review; analysis of
Ontario reportable disease data; a survey of
Ontario’s 36 public health units; and key informant
interviews with clinicians. The second part of the
session will feature an interactive panel discussion
integrating clinical as well as local and provincial
public health perspectives.
DAY THREE
10
#tophc2016
SESSION 50A
SESSION 50B
The Raw Water Contaminants Mapping Application:
A tool to support public health during inspections of
small drinking water systems
Advancing public transparency through provincial
public health inspection disclosure
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 206A
RooM 206A
Presented by
Elaina MacIntyre
Presented by
Elizabeth Choi
Organization
Public Health Ontario
Organization
Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Format
Workshop
The Environmental and Occupational Health team
at Public Health Ontario has developed an interactive
on-line mapping application. It was designed to
facilitate exploration of Ministry of Environment and
Climate Change data on environmental contaminants
in raw (untreated) water bodies across Ontario.
This tool is intended to support evidence-based
decision-making during inspections of small drinking
water systems, and was tested by public health
practitioners during Fall 2014. This presentation will
unveil an updated version of this tool. We will present
results from our testing evaluation and highlight the
changes that have been made to the new version,
based on public health unit feedback. We will
demonstrate how public health practitioners can gain
access to the new version. This session will also include
a more general discussion of the challenges inherent in
applying a public health lens to routine monitoring data
and invite participants to comment on the public health
utility of such data.
Under the Ontario Public Health Standards and
Protocols, a key responsibility of Public Health Units
(PHUs) is the protection and promotion of health
through the mandated inspection of public settings.
In the absence of a provincial disclosure program,
many PHUs have independently developed disclosure
systems resulting in a highly variable landscape of
public disclosure. Access to inspection information is
important in supporting Ontarians to make informed
choices, and holding business owners and operators
accountable for their compliance with applicable
regulations or standard practices. The Ministry of
Health and Long-Term Care led a project involving
all 36 PHUs in order to comprehensively understand
disclosure programs to inform the development of
a provincial approach. A province-wide approach to
disclosure would increase access to inspection results
to the public, provide consistency and promote
compliance to improve public health outcomes.
DAY THREE
11
#tophc2016
SESSION 50C
SESSION 50D
Geared towards compliance:
Using evidence-informed strategies to
teach pool and spa operators
The relationship of E. coli and total coliform culture
to the quantitative molecular detection of various
fecal indicators, sources and pathogens in private
drinking water wells
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 206A
Presented by
Anne-Maria Quin, Fatih Sekercioglu
Organization
Middlesex-London Health Unit
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Are you facing regulatory compliance issues at your
recreational water facilities? How can public health
work together with operators towards a common goal?
The relationship between public health units and
facility operators is multidimensional, but from any
angle, it is directly related and essential to health and
safety. Facility owners and operators, as well as public
health professionals, are considered partners in
ensuring that facilities are operated and maintained in
accordance with regulations. This speaks to the training
and support role of public health inspectors in addition
to their inspection and enforcement responsibilities.
This presentation showcases the approach the
Middlesex-London Health Unit took to develop a
comprehensive, innovative and evidence-informed
regulatory training program that addresses operator
needs and learning styles. Find out how engaging
facility operators helped create an encouraging
environment that helped make facilities healthy and
safe for patrons.
Time
8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 206A
Presented by
Sophie Felleiter, Anna Majury
Organization
Queen’s University
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Water remains the predominant vector for most
human enteric infections in both developing and
affluent nations. Although largely unstudied, almost
million residents rely upon private drinking water
as their primary drinking water source in Canada.
These individuals may be at a higher risk of
waterborne infectious diseases, although little to
no systematic surveillance exists for enteric infections
or outbreaks related to this source. Prior research
has identified regions in southern Ontario with
increased relative risk for E. coli contamination in
private wells. Current work has investigated these
same regions, exploring the relationship between
reported fecal coliform contamination of private
well waters as quantified by culture and molecular
methods, for fecal indicators E. coli and Bacteroidales.
The detection of potential human pathogens
including Shiga toxin producing E. coli (STEC),
Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella species is
also ongoing.
DAY THREE
12
#tophc2016
SESSION 51
SESSION 52
Health impact assessment:
A tool to promote healthy public policy
End-to-End Public Health Practice: A local health
unit’s approach to solving public health problems
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 206A
Room 206D
Presented by
Graeme Stewart, Julie Amoroso,
Josephine Archbold
Presented by
Monali Varia, Julie Stratton, Maria Morais,
Vanessa Secan
Organization
Toronto Public Health
Organization
Peel Public Health
Format
Panel
Format
Panel
This panel session will present the experience gained in
applying a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) framework
to different municipal undertakings including urban
renewal, expanding access to gambling and urban
infrastructure. It will also provide an opportunity for
participants to share their experience in influencing
municipal decisions. Panelists will describe the
approach taken, highlight the impact on the
decision-making process and discuss the lessons
learned from their experience. Discussion will focus
on ways health evidence can be used to better
influence decision-making and the opportunity that
health impact assessment provides to more effectively
promote health in municipal decision-making.
Public health units have a big job to do – a mandate
to provide a wide spectrum of programs and services
as well as the broad responsibility for the health of
our population. End-to-End Public Health Practice
was included in Peel Public Health’s (PPH) strategic
plan to build workforce capacity in solving public
health problems within a local context. Over the past
five years, PPH has developed the infrastructure to
help staff describe a health problem; identify and
develop policy or programming options; set priorities;
and implement and evaluate changes. Presenters will
describe how they have applied End-to-End Public
Health Practice and used health data, research
evidence and findings from an environmental
scan and community assessment to develop and
implement a workplace tobacco cessation strategy
in Peel. An interactive discussion will provide
participants with an opportunity to provide input
into this work ,and reflect on the public health
practice needs in their own organizations.
DAY THREE
13
#tophc2016
SESSION 53
SESSION 54
Ethics for evaluators
Youth Engagement Theatre: Collaborating with
youth to transform public health education
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 203AB
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Presented by
Charoula Tsamis, Allison Meserve,
Nancy Ondrusek
Room 204AB
Organization
Public Health Ontario
Organization
Algoma Public Health
Format
Workshop
Format
Workshop
With increasing demands for evidence-informed
public health, evaluators today are faced with new and
sometimes challenging ethical dilemmas. Traditionally,
evaluation has been placed outside the scope of formal
research ethics review processes and guidelines,
leaving evaluators without proper guidance regarding
the ethical conduct of evaluations. During this
workshop, evaluation practitioners will be introduced
to core ethics principles to guide evaluation within a
public health context. Key ethics concepts used to
apply those principles will include risk; conflict of
interest; privacy and confidentiality; and consent.
Ethical challenges that may arise in evaluation will be
identified as well as strategies that address these
challenges and the role of evaluators in ensuring
ethical integrity. This workshop will provide evaluators
the opportunity to apply ethical principles and concepts
to case descriptions of ethical challenges during key
stages of a public health evaluation, and introduce
solutions that can strengthen evaluations.
Since Algoma Public Health (APH) launched their Youth
Engagement Theatre (YET) pilot project in 2010, over
6,000 teens from across the Algoma district have
attended performances based on the Healthy Living
strand of the Ontario Health and Physical Education
curriculum. More than 90 youth volunteers have been
recruited and trained as public health advocates to
deliver theatre-based, peer-to-peer knowledge sharing
presentations. Topics have centered around substance
use and misuse including addictions; safe partying
practices; sexual health; mental health; and positive
assertiveness skills. Guided by the theories and
evidence-based studies supporting youth engagement
and the practical application of theatre as a public
health promotion, APH’s Communications Specialist
will provide an overview of the development of this
creative cross-sectoral collaborative initiative. Portions
of YET presentations will be performed by actual cast
members who will facilitate interactive forum theatre
segments with workshop participants, followed by a
question and answer period with the students and
their adult support.
Presented by
Tim Murphy
DAY THREE
14
#tophc2016
SESSION 55
SESSION 56
Applying a framework to promote effective
communication of public health guidance
to emergency department clinicians
Hot TOPHC 2016: Public health in a transformed
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 202AB
Room 201
Presented by
Yasmin Khan, Brian Schwartz, Doug Sider,
Gary Garber, Moira Grant
Presented by
Brent Moloughney, Rachel Partridge,
Michael Barrett, Chris Mackie
Organization
Public Health Ontario
Organization
Public Health Ontario
Format
Workshop
Format
Workshop
This workshop will aim to expand participants’
knowledge regarding the findings from this empirical
study and the developed framework for effective
communication of public health guidance in the setting
of emerging local public health incidents. Opportunities
for participants to seek clarification and provide
feedback on the framework will be provided through
a plenary discussion. The major portion of the
workshop will be conducted in small groups with the
aim of providing an opportunity to apply knowledge
of study findings to a small group activity using case
scenarios. Scenarios will be developed that highlight
different types of relevant incidents in various local
public health and health care settings. Small groups
will be given the opportunity to brainstorm on
developing an implementation plan for their scenario
usingcomponents of the framework. At the end of the
session, participants will collaborate to produce insight
into an action plan for the application of the
framework in practice.
The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s Patients
First Discussion Paper proposes to better integrate
public health with other health services through
alignment within Local Health Integration Networks
(LHINs). This session will explore the opportunities and
challenges for public and population health and
integration at the local level through three brief
presentations and dedicated time for open discussion.
The session will begin with Brent Moloughney
outlining models currently used for delivering public
health services in Canada. Rachel Partridge will then
discuss recent changes to public health services in
England and highlight the lessons learned from the
experience. Finally, Michael Barrett will outline his role
in the Southwest LHIN and discuss how public health
and LHINs can work more closely together. Following
these three presentations, there will be ample time for
discussion and debate on how public health can best
contribute in a transformed Ontario health system to
promote the health of all Ontarians and address
inequities.
Ontario health system
DAY THREE
15
#tophc2016
SESSION 57A
SESSION 57B
Pathways to promoting mental health:
A 2015 survey of Ontario Public Health Units
Canada’s National Alcohol Strategy:
It’s time to assess progress
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 200AB
Room 200AB
Presented by
Tamar Meyer, Linda Yoo, Monica Nunes
Presented by
Catherine Paradis
Organization
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Health Promotion Resource Centre
Organization
Canadian Center on Substance Abuse
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
There is an increasing focus on the role of public
health in mental health promotion (MHP) in Ontario.
Thus, there is a need to better understand how MHP
work occurs within the provincial public health system
in terms of scope, prioritization, collaboration and
alignment with the Ontario Public Health Standards.
This presentation will highlight results of a 2015
provincial survey conducted as a partnership between
the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s Health
Promotion Division and the Centre for Addiction and
Mental Health’s Health Promotion Resource Centre.
The survey documents current MHP activities in public
health that are being delivered to Ontarians of all ages
and at different stages, and identifies specific MHP
activities occurring for adults 18 years and older.
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
The purpose of this research presentation will be to
describe the current state of an evaluation framework
developed to track the implementation and effects of
the National Alcohol Strategy (NAS). The presentation
will describe the chosen method to assess whether
the NAS is effective in promoting moderation and
reducing overall harm from alcohol. The discussion
will focus on current challenges associated with
the monitoring system as well as the project’s
achievements made so far. The framework should
lead to more informed discussions between alcohol
stakeholders for the development of a culture of
moderation in Canada.
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SESSION 57C
SESSION 57D
Building internal cross-directorate partnerships:
Using a peer-to-peer approach to support staff
professional development regarding the Low Risk
Alcohol Drinking Guidelines (LRADG) and Fetal
Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)
Taking municipal action on intimate partner
violence in the community and the workplace
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 200AB
Room 200AB
Presented by
Mary Ann Gatbonton, Angela Pisan
Presented by
Dia Mamatis, Rosie Mishaiel
Organization
Toronto Public Health
Organization
Toronto Public Health
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
In 2013, Toronto Public Health’s Healthy Families
directorate (Maternal Infant Health stream) and
Healthy Communities directorate (Substance Misuse
Prevention team) came together to merge expertise
and resources. The objective was to develop and
launch a professional development initiative for
Healthy Families staff regarding the LRADG and the
prevention of FASD (leading cause of preventable
disability in Canada). This presentation will outline
the benefits and strengths of collaborating across
directorates and using a peer-to-peer approach to
support innovative staff professional development in
public health practice.
In Canada, one in seven women have been abused,
and every six days, a woman is killed by her partner.
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an urgent yet
preventable public health concern. Intimate partner
violence has immediate and long-lasting detrimental
social, health, and economic effects on victims, their
families and society. Given the complexity of IPV,
an effective approach goes well beyond the scope
of public health. Housing, employment, child care,
social services, policing, education and recreation
are all integral components of a comprehensive plan.
As municipalities play a critical role in providing these
services, a coordinated effort that brings all these
sectors together is paramount. We will share the
experiences of Toronto Public Health in developing
and implementing a municipal action plan, describe
the challenges encountered and outline valuable
lessons learned that can guide other public health
units interested in leading action to address IPV at
the municipal level.
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SESSION 58
SESSION 59A
Assessing the equity impact of health risks
and interventions
The design, creation and evaluation of three
on-line breastfeeding courses for targeted
populations: Fathers and partners, young
mothers and indigenous families
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 205BC
Presented by
Doug Manuel, Peter Tugwell, Vivan Welch,
Laura Rosella, Pegeen Walsh
Organization
University of Ottawa
Format
Panel
Improving health equity is a key objective of public
health. Interventions may either reduce or increase
health inequities. This panel will discuss current and
upcoming tools and infrastructure to perform health
equity assessments. International, national, provincial
and local perspectives will be included. Discussion will
start with the presentation of key equity findings from
a new report on the impact of health behaviours and
health care use in Ontario.
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 206C
Presented by
Jennifer Abbass-Dick, Fangli Xie
Organization
University of Ontario Institute of Technology
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
The transformation of prenatal education, from
in-class to on-line, is a growing trend. In collaboration,
a team from the University of Ontario Institute of
Technology, Durham Region Health Department
and the University of Toronto have designed and
created three on-line breastfeeding courses for
new and expectant parents. Not only do these
courses include a variety of innovative methods of
information delivery, they were designed based on
recommendations from the target populations.
These courses have been evaluated with the target
populations. Preliminary evaluations have found
positive results in course design, consent and usability
as well as effectiveness in increasing breastfeeding
attitude, knowledge and self-efficacy. Although these
results are encouraging, larger scale evaluations are
necessary in diverse settings.
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SESSION 59B
SESSION 59C
Access to inclusive and accessible
playgrounds as a synergist of individual
and community strengths
Not as easy as it sounds? Exploring
parent-reported barriers to supporting
their child’s health
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 206C
Room 206C
Presented by
Melanie Hood, Nicole Yantzih
Presented by
Jocelyn Jarvis, Karen Deng,
Daniel Harrington, Heather Manson
Organization
Sudbury & District Health Unit
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Public health has traditionally promoted outdoor play
as a means of reducing childhood obesity through
physical activity. This approach has undermined the
integral role of recreation and parks in the
enhancement of holistic health and social
connectedness. The purpose of this research was to
examine the impact of a new accessible playground
on the well-being of individuals and families within a
northern Ontario community. Overall, study
participants perceived the new play space as a
community asset, contributing to their physical health
and growing social connections. New and accessible
playground facilities can afford children opportunities
for independent outdoor play through reduced
parental safety concerns. The results of this
investigation support a broader role for public health
promotion of inclusive outdoor recreation as a
synergist of individual and community strengths.
Organization
Public Health Ontario
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Parents can influence the health behaviours of
their children by engaging in supportive behaviours.
Whether or not parents engage in supportive
behaviours can be a function of barriers they perceive
at the child, parent or community level. The purpose
of this study is to explore barriers to parental support,
and to characterize how barriers differ depending on
the type of child health behaviour. This presentation
will discuss the results of a recent Computer
Assisted Telephone Survey of Ontario parents
(3,206 respondents). The survey focused on four
child health behaviours (physical activity, screen time,
healthy eating and sleep) including parental support
for these behaviours. Results will focus on the
frequency of barriers being reported within and
across behaviours, and characterizing the similarities
and differences in the barriers between behaviours.
How programs that promote child health can integrate
strategies for overcoming barriers to parental support
behaviours will be discussed.
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SESSION 59D
SESSION 60A
Empowering teen mothers: Implications
for practice in public health
Social network analysis of anti-vaccination groups
and pro-vaccine agencies on Twitter
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 206C
Room 206B
Presented by
Suzanne Lemieux
Presented by
Melodie (Yun-Ju) Song, Julia Abelson
Organization
Sudbury & District Health Unit
Organization
McMaster University
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
This presentation is intended for participants who
are interested in using photovoice and digital story
telling methods for health research and empowerment
of individuals from marginalized communities. It is also
for those who are involved in preconception health
programs or working with vulnerable populations.
The presentation is based on a qualitative study that
focused on the perspectives and experiences of teen
mothers living in Sudbury, Ontario. The focus will be
on the study results as they pertain to the barriers
these moms faced in obtaining and receiving
information and support, as well as their
recommendations for improvement. In order to
illustrate these findings, we will share excerpts from a
digital story that was created by the participating teen
moms as a result of this study. Lastly, we will discuss
recommendations and tips for ensuring preconception
health programs and health services are inclusive and
supportive for all mothers, regardless of age.
It is unknown to what extent public health agencies
who are proponents of childhood vaccination are
engaging in conversation on social media (e.g., Twitter)
with anti-vaccination agencies. This study aims to map
out the level of interaction on Twitter between
pro-vaccine and anti-vaccine agencies in Canada.
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SESSION 60B
SESSION 60C
Data quality in a shared provincial
immunization system
Using technology to reach families to update
immunization records
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 206B
Room 206B
Presented by
Ellen Braaten, Rose D’souza, Soma Sarkar
Presented by
Kerry Kennedy, Rosa Malheiro
Organization
Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
Organization
Ottawa Public Health
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
This presentation will show that the implementation
of Panorama, Ontario’s first provincially shared
immunization database, set a precedent in developing
a unique stakeholder partnership amongst public
health units and provincial partners. The results have
led to meticulously identifying and resolving data
quality issues for immunization data collected by
public health.
Ontario’s Immunization of School Pupils Act requires
students in the province to provide proof of
immunization against nine designated diseases.
Like other health units, Ottawa Public Health (OPH)
has been working to transition old immunization
records into the new provincial database Panorama,
and verify that the records are accurate and up to
date. Collecting, assessing and notifying parents of
the 150,000 school pupils in Ottawa’s four public
school boards and private schools has created a
significant resource burden. OPH utilized automated
dialer software TelAsk to contact families of children
with incomplete records. TelAsk generates 6,000 calls
per day with the capability to leave a voice message
on a client’s answering machine, and for answered
calls to be transferred to a live nurse. OPH was able
to reach families in a more efficient manner over
summer months to effectively update, clean and
verify records in Panorama. The result is more
reliable and accurate data.
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SESSION 60D
Benefits of an integrated vaccine
inventory management
Time
10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Room 206B
Presented by
Catalina Trevizan, Sana Tauseef, Angela Belo,
Mihaela Adragna, Hope Kelly, Sonia Peña-Orr
Organization
Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
Format
Four 15 minute presentations
This session will explore how, through the
implemntation of an integrated solution for vaccine
inventory management among public health units,
the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care is
strengthening the collective ability to respond to
infectious disease outbreaks. The implementation
included initiating targeted and mass immunization
response plans and strategies ensuring effective
and timely vaccine distribution; and inventory
management.
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