Comprehensive Plan Section 1

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Comprehensive Plan Section 1
TOWN OF
BROADWAY
2030
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
This Comprehensive Plan provides a general overview of the present and
future land use needs of the Town of Broadway, taking into account the
full realm of physical, social, and economic activity.
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
This report was prepared by the Central Shenandoah Planning district Commission (CSPDC). The CSPDC
was chartered on September 30, 1969 and is comprised of five counties, five cities and eleven towns. For
over forty years, the CSPDC has been providing assistance to local governments and their citizens with
issues including land use planning and regulation, transportation, disaster mitigation and preparedness,
solid waste management, economic development, water and waste water, emergency management,
housing, water resource management and human services. The Central Shenandoah Planning District
Commission makes every effort to respond to the changing needs of the citizens of the Central
Shenandoah Valley. Should you have any questions, please call or email us.
112 MacTanly Place
Staunton, VA 24401
Phone: 540.885.5174
E-Mail: [email protected]
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Table of Contents
2030|COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................................... ii
List of Tables .......................................................................................................................................................iii
List of Figures .....................................................................................................................................................ix
Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................ I
History ............................................................................................................................................................. 1-1
Natural Features.............................................................................................................................................. 2-1
Government Structure .................................................................................................................................... 3-1
Demographics ................................................................................................................................................. 4-1
Economy .......................................................................................................................................................... 5-1
Housing............................................................................................................................................................ 6-1
Transportation................................................................................................................................................. 7-1
Utilities ............................................................................................................................................................ 8-1
Community Facilities ....................................................................................................................................... 9-1
Future Land Use ............................................................................................................................................ 10-1
Urban Development Area ............................................................................................................................. 11-1
Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................................... 12-1
Appendix A – Community Survey .................................................................................................................... A-1
Appendix B – Historic Inventory...................................................................................................................... B-1
Appendix C – Greenways Plan......................................................................................................................... C-1
Appendix D – UDA Memorandums .................................................................................................................D-1
Appendix E – Rockingham County Goals endorsed by Broadway .................................................................. E-1
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
List of Tables
2030|COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
Town Revenue 1997 and 2003 (Table 3.1)...................................................................................................... 3-2
Town Revenue 2009 (Table 3.2)...................................................................................................................... 3-3
Town Expenditures (Table 3.3) ....................................................................................................................... 3-4
Town Tax Rates 2010 (Table 3.4) .................................................................................................................... 3-5
Population Change 1900-2010 (Table 4.1)...................................................................................................... 4-1
Population Growth Estimates 2003-2010 (Table 4.2) ..................................................................................... 4-2
Population Projections 2010-2030 .................................................................................................................. 4-3
Population Density 1900-2010 (Table 4.3)...................................................................................................... 4-4
Summary of Age Grouping 1990-2010 (Table 4.4).......................................................................................... 4-5
Male/Female Distribution 1990-2010 (Table 4.5)........................................................................................... 4-6
Median Household Income 2000-2010 (Table 5.1)......................................................................................... 5-2
Age of Housing Stock 2009 (Table 6.1) ........................................................................................................... 6-2
Housing Value 2000-2010 (Table 6.2) ............................................................................................................. 6-3
Mortgage and Rental Rates 2000-2010 (Table 6.3) ........................................................................................ 6-6
Roadway Geometric Inventory (Table 7.1) ..................................................................................................... 7-5
Railroad Crossings of Public Streets (Table 7.2) .............................................................................................. 7-6
Count Locations (Table 7.3)............................................................................................................................. 7-6
Existing Level of Service 2008 (Table 7.4) ....................................................................................................... 7-8
Existing Deficient Segments 2008 (Table 7.5) ............................................................................................... 7-11
Level of Service 2035 (Table 7.6)................................................................................................................... 7-16
Deficient Segments 2035 (Table 7.7) ............................................................................................................ 7-18
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
List of Maps
2030|COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
Historic Places ................................................................................................................................................. 1-7
Historic Places Insert ....................................................................................................................................... 1-8
Broadway Area Map........................................................................................................................................ 2-2
Environmental Constraints.............................................................................................................................. 2-3
Housing Values ................................................................................................................................................ 6-4
Median Housing Values per Subdivision ......................................................................................................... 6-5
Highway Functional Classification System ...................................................................................................... 7-5
Annual Average Daily Traffic ........................................................................................................................... 7-9
Level of Service.............................................................................................................................................. 7-10
Projected Annual Average Daily Traffic......................................................................................................... 7-14
Projected Levels of Service............................................................................................................................ 7-15
Transportation Recommendations ............................................................................................................... 7-20
Water Utilities ................................................................................................................................................. 8-3
Sewer Utilities ................................................................................................................................................. 8-5
Existing Facilities ............................................................................................................................................. 9-5
Future Land Use .......................................................................................................................................... 10-14
Future Land Use Planned Annexation ......................................................................................................... 10-16
UDA Development Potential Assessment ................................................................................................... 10-17
UDA Conceptual Street Network ................................................................................................................ 10-18
Greenways Map .............................................................................................................................................. C-1
Greenways Map .............................................................................................................................................. C-2
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Introduction
2030|COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
PURPOSE OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
This Comprehensive Plan provides a general overview of the present and future land use needs of the Town of
Broadway, taking into account the full realm of physical, social, and economic activity. One of the most critical
elements in the planning process, the comprehensive plan helps the locality recognize its needs and provides
direction for allocating community resources for meeting those needs. The plan ultimately is a statement of a
community's goals for its future. To be effective, the plan must articulate goals and priorities that are
understood and accepted by the community at large.
This Comprehensive Plan has two primary functions:
Because comprehensive plans are long-range, they must be flexible enough to change or be revised as the
community undergoes change. The plan does not provide specific regulations and restrictions. It does,
however, provide the framework for appropriate ordinances and policies to be developed to prevent
inappropriate development from occurring. It is these policies that help bring the plan to reality.
VIRGINIA LAW AND THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
A comprehensive plan should present the long-range recommendations for the general development of the
territory covered by the plan. Section 15.2-2223 of the Code of Virginia delineates the procedure by which a
locality in Virginia prepares a comprehensive plan:
In the preparation of the comprehensive plan the commission shall make careful and
comprehensive surveys and studies of the existing conditions and trends of growth, and of the
probable future requirements of its territory and inhabitants. The comprehensive plan shall be
made with the purpose of guiding and accomplishing a coordinated, adjusted and harmonious
development of the territory which will, in accordance with present and probable future needs
and resources best promote the health, safety, morals, order, convenience, prosperity and
general welfare of the inhabitants.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
The Code states that the plan may include, but need not be limited to: (1) designating areas for various types
of public and private development and use; (2) designating a comprehensive system of transportation facilities;
(3) designating a system of community service facilities; (4) designating historical areas and areas for renewal
or other treatment; (5) designating areas for the implementation of groundwater protection measures; (6)
incorporating an official map, a capital improvements program, a subdivision ordinance and a zoning ordinance
and zoning district maps; (7) the location of existing or proposed recycling centers; and (8) designating areas
for the implementation of measures to promote affordable housing. The comprehensive plan is general in
nature, in that it designates the approximate location and character of each feature shown on the plan. Once
adopted, section 15.2-2232 of the Code of Virginia designates the following legal status for the comprehensive
plan:
...it shall control the general or approximate location, character, and extent of each feature
shown on the plan. Thereafter... no [streets, public areas, buildings or improvements] whether
publicly or privately owned shall be established, constructed, or authorized [without
being]...approved by the local commission as being substantially in accord with the adopted
comprehensive plan or part thereof.
Therefore, the plan is the general guideline for community development. Once it is adopted, the local
commission has the authority to approve or disapprove proposals for development based on conformance of
the proposal with the plan. The comprehensive plan is the basic planning document upon which other
implementation documents, such as the official map, zoning ordinance, and subdivision regulations, should be
based.
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT AREAS
In 2007, the General Assembly added Section 15.2-2223.1 to the Code of Virginia requiring high growth
localities to designate Urban Development Areas in their comprehensive plans by July 1, 2011 (counties) and
July 1, 2012 (cities and towns). Designated Urban Development Areas (“UDA”) are to be areas of reasonably
compact development that can accommodate 10 to 20 years of projected growth. In 2010, the legislation was
amended to establish density and design criteria for UDAs and to improve the coordination between
transportation and land use.
The UDA legislation defines high growth localities as having either a population of at least 20,000 and a 5%
growth rate, or a decennial growth increase of 15% or more, between the most recent decennial censuses
(§15.2-2223.1 B). According to data currently available from the U.S. Census Bureau the Town of Broadway
grew from 2,192 people in 2000 to approximately 3,691 in 2010, representing a growth increase of 68.4%.
Based on the growth increase and population thresholds outlined in the legislation, Broadway is therefore
required to amend their Comprehensive Plan to incorporate at least one Urban Development Area that will
allow for development at a density of at least four single-family residences, six townhouses, or 12 apartments,
condominium units, or cooperative units per developable acre, and a floor area ratio of at least 0.4 per acre for
commercial development, or any proportional combination thereof.
To assist communities in revising their planning and policy frameworks to comply with the legislation, the
Virginia Department of Transportation (“VDOT”) created the Urban Development Area Local Government
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Assistance Program, which provides consultant assistance to qualifying Virginia localities required to
comply with the legislation. The Town of Broadway was awarded a Tier I grant within this program and
worked with Renaissance Planning Group and Herd Planning & Design, Ltd to develop the UDA component of
this plan. As a participant in the program, the County is expected to revise its comprehensive plan to
incorporate at least one urban development area and revise its zoning and subdivision ordinances to
incorporate the principles of new urbanism and traditional neighborhood design.
PLANNING PROCESS
In February of 2010 the Town of Broadway entered into a contract with the Central Shenandoah Planning
District Commission (CSPDC) for the development and update of the Broadway Comprehensive Plan. Under the
direction of Town Staff and the Broadway Planning Commission the CSPDC the 2030 plan identified and
discussed the changes that have occurred since 2004. The plan explains the current conditions for such major
topics as demographics, economic development, housing, transportation, future land use and more.
Comprehensive Plan Review Committee
Mr. Kyle O’Brien
Broadway Town Manager
Mr. Dale Showalter
Planning Commission, Chairman
Ms. Beverly London
Planning Commission
Ms. Kim Branner
Planning Commission
Mr. Tom Buskirk
Planning Commission
Mr. Gene Nesselrodt
Town Council, Planning Commission
Ms. Monica Plecker
Central Shenandoah PDC
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN STRUCTURE
As outlined by Section 15.2-2223 of the Code of Virginia, this plan contains the elements listed below. This
information and analysis was derived through existing, readily available information, additional detailed studies
and monthly input and review discussions from the Broadway Planning Commission. Combined, these
elements provide a comprehensive analysis of the town of Broadway.
CHAPTER
1 | H I S T O RY
CHAPTER
2 | N AT U R A L F E AT U R E S
CHAPTER
3|GOVERNMENT STRUCTURE
CHAPTER
4|DEMOGRAPHICS
CHAPTER
5|ECONOMY
CHAPTER
6|HOUSING
CHAPTER
7 | T R A N S P O R TAT I O N
CHAPTER
8|UTILITIES
CHAPTER
9 | C O M M U N I T Y FAC I L I T I E S
CHAPTER 10|FUTURE LAND USE
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 1|HISTORY
EARLY DAYS
The geographical features of the Broadway area made it useful to both the native Indians and
European settlers long before its formal incorporation in 1880. Set on a high ridge running the length
of the peninsula formed by the joining of Linville Creek with the North Fork of the Shenandoah River,
the area was fertile, accessible, and easily defended. In 1808, the settlement was called Custer's Mill,
after a mill on the tip of the peninsula. Robert Thompson's general store was next door to the presentday Winfield House. In 1849, the State allocated $333.00 to finish the pass at Brock's Gap, opening up
both a market and a source of raw materials.
Then came the "boom" of 1850, and with it the all-important railroad. Since there was no room for the
railroad on the peninsula, the tracks were laid and the depot built on the east side of Linville Creek.
This effectively moved the Town center. However, the actual operation of the railroad and its
proposed extension into Brock's Gap and south to Harrisonburg were stopped short by the Civil War.
RECONSTRUCTION
Many buildings, including the mill, were burned in Union General Philip Sheridan's raid to destroy the
"breadbasket of the Confederacy." The area recovered slowly after the war. The rebuilding took place
to the east of Linville Creek on land that originally was owned by Dr. John Homan. His heirs sold it to
Dr. John I. Winfield, who laid out streets as a grid based on the location of the tracks, which paralleled
the creek. Houses were built and stores were opened. By 1869, the railroad was in operation to the
end of the line at Harrisonburg. Records show that over 2,000 pounds of walnut kernels were shipped
from Custer's Gap in 1875, and Dr. John Wayland writes that 10,000 dozen eggs left the depot during
March of 1878. These were minor items of commerce compared to grain, flour, livestock, and lumber,
but the economy picked up gradually.
Impetus for growth came not only from the railroad but also from the much less concrete promise of
great mineral wealth. A June 22, 1894 issue of The Rockingham Register illustrates this idea, by
referring to the tradition that during the Revolutionary War a lead mine was worked in the Broadway
area.
INCORPORATION AND BOOM TIME
With Custer's Mill gone, the Town needed a new name more appropriate to the booming economy
and the promise of growth. According to local legend, the new name came out of one characteristic
the Town shared with most frontier boomtowns. The land provided ample ingredients for the
distillation of spirits and most of the inhabitants took full advantage of nature's bounty. Those who did
not insisted that the others were on the "broad-way to hell." However, the more sober residents were
in sufficient control when the Town was incorporated and it came into being a legally "dry" area even
though it was surrounded by the "wet" Plains District.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
The Act of Incorporation, dated March 9, 1880, names the town "Broadway," sets forth the original
boundaries, and designates the form of government to be used. Samuel C. Williams, P. W. Pugh, J. W.
Besore, Michael Zigler, and Michael B. E. Cline were appointed trustees to serve as the first council.
The provision for the appointment of a town sergeant to keep the peace was followed by the section
forbidding the manufacture or sale of "wine, ardent spirits, or malt liquors." The act specifically
prohibited the council from assessing any tax for any purpose, and assured the populace that residence
in Broadway did not in any way excuse them from road work.
No town records survived from the period 1880 to 1896, but other county sources give spotty
information. Broadway had a "Literary Night" to which members brought books to form the nucleus of
a library. The Presbyterian and Baptist churches were both religious and social centers. School records
indicate that 1 colored and 27 white schools were located in the Plains District. The colored school was
in Broadway, as evidenced by an 1898 request to the school board to tear down the unused building.
Broadway's grade school opened in 1884, with a capacity of 100 students. The school-age population
was so large during this period that it became necessary to develop the area to keep the young people
from having to move west.
Every imaginable lure was put out for wealthy northern investors, and most of these lures were based
on the old idea that the area was a bountiful source of almost all of the raw materials necessary to
industry. Iron was reported in large quantities five miles north of Harrisonburg. An "extensive" slate
quarry was reported in Brock's Gap. Timberland in Brock's Gap (selling from $0.30 to $1.00 per acre)
was another drawing card. Firms were established, including the Broadway Machine Company and the
Broadway Manufacturing Company. Several land companies were formed.
Mr. E. D Root, the most prominent of the speculators that arrived in Broadway in 1880, came from
Connecticut to multiply the riches it appeared he already had. He built a home in Broadway, bought
acres of timberland in the Gap, and founded the Town of Yankton, settled entirely by people from
Root's native state. By 1890, Mr. Root had founded the Broadway Building and Improvement
Company. A prospectus for this company, which proposed to develop 400 acres (apparently in the
area newly annexed across Linville Creek) claimed "inexhaustible coal and iron beds" and predicted
"Broadway will have from 8,000 to 10,000 population before two years go by." Mixed in with these
glowing advertisements was a detailed description of the Town at that time:
A beautiful small Town of about 1,000 inhabitants, for years, Broadway has been the
largest shipping point - not excepting the larger Towns of Winchester, Harrisonburg,
Staunton, and etc. - on the Valley Branch of the B & O (Baltimore and Ohio) Railroad.
Within the valley, between two mountain systems and in full view of both, one to the
east, the other to the west, and the rich valley extending to the north and south, as far
as the eye can reach, makes the most charming of sight, commanding as well as
magnificent.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
The following industries are now established at Broadway:
1 large pottery
1 flour mill
1 corn & plaster mill
1 planing mill
1 creamery
1 tannery
4 general stores
1 drug store
1 lime kiln
1 foundry & machine shop
1 broom handle factory
2 wagon manufactories
1 sash, blind, & door factory
1 saddle & harness factory
1 barrel factory
2 weekly newspapers
1 hardware store
1 jewelry store
Also, 3 churches, 1 school, 1 Masonic and Good Templars' Hall, and one Opera House,
all these go to substantiate claims of this company, that Broadway is the nucleus of a
coming city of manufacturing purposes.
Most of Mr. Root's proposals were either toned down to sensible proportions or killed completely by
the economic crises of 1893. In 1893, Mr. Root left Broadway having lost most of his investment when
the railroad failed to extend a line into the gap, making his timber holdings in that area almost
worthless. After a decade of growth and optimism, the area once again faced hard times.
TWENTIETH CENTURY
The population of Broadway climbed relatively slowly in the early portion of the century. The Town
continued to serve as a social and commercial center for rural northwest Rockingham County.
Timberville, a close neighbor just a few miles north, historically has shared much of this role.
Broadway had its own schools, as described earlier. Where the Municipal Building stands now was an
elementary school. Adjacent to it was the high school. The former gymnasium still stands but has
been renovated to house a private business. In addition to Broadway High School were its local rivals,
Linville-Edom High School and Timberville High School. In 1953, these three schools were consolidated
into one high school, the current Broadway High School. The old Broadway High School is now a
middle school and the new Broadway High School was constructed on Springbrook Road.
An important industry in the early twentieth century was the Radford Mammoth Pottery, which was
located on the site of Lantz Building and Supply Yard. The pottery made bathroom fixtures and
tableware. It burned around 1938, but some of the buildings survived.
Another former industry was the Broadway Foundry, which was powered by water from the river. It
made kettle stoves, other kitchen utensils, and a variety of decorative and custom items. In later years,
it apparently made burglar alarms. One of the remaining structures now serves as the Town's
maintenance building.
Poultry operations, which remain a dominant industry not only for Broadway but for the County, began
in the early twentieth century. In 1919, the Broadway Hatchery was established specifically for the
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
raising of turkeys. William Hulvey Processing, the first processing plant in the area, operated from
approximately 1934 to 1940. At that time there also were several slaughterhouses in Town, primarily
for cattle.
In 1938, there were 40 businesses in the Town, according to a map completed for a school project.
Three of those businesses are still in operation: J.M. Hulvey & Sons, BB&T (formerly F&M Bank) and
Broadway Drug Center. A.W. Whitmore & Sons now operates as J & B’s Country Store, a dry goods
store.
The poultry business boomed in the 1940s and after World War II. Rockingham Poultry (now Pilgrims
Pride) set up operations in Timberville in approximately 1940. Feed mills were a necessary adjunct to
the poultry industry. Broadway Mill (now W W Motor Cars and Parts, Inc.), with its location convenient
to the railroad, was one of the major mills operating in the area in the middle of the twentieth century.
The railroad was important to Broadway, which had both passenger and freight service. A depot for
each stood on the east side of the tracks. Broadway also captured fully the importance of the newest
form of transportation, the automobile. The train was even used to deliver cars to the Chevrolet
dealership at its trackside location. At one time, Broadway had three automobile dealerships:
Broadway Motor Company (Ford), Fawleys Chevrolet, and Hoover Motor Co. (Pontiac GMC).
Whereas Broadway in the late nineteenth century had an opera house (in Deering Hall), in the midtwentieth century, the center of entertainment was a movie theater. The theater was on Main Street
in the former Hoover Motor Company. After the theater closed, the building was made into a roller
skating rink. It an unoccupied building.
Between 1960 and 1980, Broadway's population nearly doubled. At the same time, many of the old
businesses on Main Street, such as the mill, faded into obscurity. But this has not spelled a downturn
for the Town. The outskirts of Town have become the preferred locations for new commercial
enterprises, while many downtown businesses continue to provide a variety of smaller-scale services.
The Town has increased public services to meet the needs of a greater population and modern
standards. The water system was expanded using a 1986 Community Development Block Grant. In
the 1990s, major improvements were made to the Broadway Community Park and a new building was
constructed to house the Village Library.
Looking toward the future, Town leaders in the 1980s began exploring options for annexation of
surrounding land. The first annexation took effect January 1, 1991, as 557 residents and 667 acres
were brought into Town. The 1990 "Agreement Defining Annexation Rights" states that the Town can,
at any future date, annex an additional 862 acres.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
RECENT ACTIVITIES
At the turn of the century the Town’s vitality and stability was more apparent than ever with rapid
residential and economic growth. To meet its growing demands, Broadway, in 2000, expanded its
water plant from 500,000 mgd to 648,000 mgd. In addition the Town acquired a new water supply
with a lease purchase of Plains Mill Spring. The development of this spring is in the early stages and
all preliminary engineering has been completed. Additional improvement projects include an Inflow
and Infiltration project, various utility upgrades and the expansion of the Regional Wastewater
Treatment Plant.
In response to this growth, the Town also developed a streetscape and greenway plan. The
purpose of the Master Streetscape Plan is to improve and enhance the beautification and aesthetic
of the Town. The plan focuses on enhancing the downtown area, Broadway Avenue, the Timberville
median and more. The Town has made some progress in the implementation of this plan. The
downtown area had bump-outs and planters constructed to improve the overall aesthetic of the
area. It is uncertain at this time when the Master Streetscape Plan will be fully implemented
because these enhancement projects are dependent on available funding.
As a result of population growth the Town annexed 132 acres in January of 2005 and an additional
261 acres in 2007 making the total acreage of the Town 1,528.6 acres. Broadway now has 449 acres
available for annexation in the future. The remaining acreage lies on the northeast and eastern
boundary of Town. Broadway determines its need for annexation based on a demand and
development basis. Due to the location of the available acreage and its lack of demand, the Town
anticipates no need to annex these areas within the next 20 years.
The Town’s residential and housing growth reached its peak in 2006. At that same time the
population growth reached a plateau and there has been a noticeable decline in the construction
and development of new homes and residential areas. This is explained by the economic recession
and housing crisis that has been felt across the United States.
Other economic activity since 2000 included the Broadway Hometown Partnership, Target Market
Initiative, Small Business Start-Up Advertising Grants, Broadway Web Presence and Business Plan
Assistance. Social and cultural events include Broadway Music Festival, Halloweenfest, Broadway
Farmer’s Market, Valley Fine Arts and Bluegrass Festivals, Chickenstock, Autumn Days, Kids Fishing
Days, Chamber of Commerce Fall Fest and many others.
The Town expanded the recreational opportunities it offered by adding Heritage Park and
constructing a skateboarding park. Heritage Park borders a portion of Linville Creek and offers open
grassy space, a small pavilion, footbridge and walking paths. An additional four acres has been
donated to the Town for the expansion of this heavily utilized park. All of these actions indicate the
Town’s vitality. With more stable population growth and continued diversity of business, the Town
of Broadway continues to play its historic role as a social and economic center in this area of
Rockingham County.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
HISTORIC RESOURCES
From a small settlement in the early eighteenth century, the Town of Broadway developed along the
railway in the late nineteenth century. Broadway was considered a good prospect for growth and a
grand hotel and other structures were planned. The boom never materialized and Broadway
developed a cohesive settlement pattern with the commercial and industrial center along the railroad
and road and residential areas located to the north and east.
Broadway is fortunate to have much of its history still evident in its buildings (see Appendix A). A
wide range of older structures illustrates earlier ways of living. In addition to residential examples
these structures cover commercial, transportation, religious, industrial and social themes. There are
several historic structures located throughout town which are registered as Virginia Landmarks and
Historic Sites. Two sites, the Linville Creek Bridge and the Tunker House, both listed on the National
Register of Historic Places.
Several of the structures illustrate the time in which they were built. Many of the commercial buildings
in town were built around 1900 and were frame with a few brick buildings, such as the A.W. Whitmore
Stores. Most are two stories with a gable entry, some having common storefronts. The bank, now
office space, was built in 1903 and retains some of its original features. The Beanery, a small one-story
square structure has somewhat ornate decoration. It has been moved from its original location on
Main Street to a parking lot behind the commercial buildings.
Deering Hall, built in the 1890s, typifies the meeting halls that were built in rural communities by
groups such as the government or Masons. This frame, two-story building with gable entry that once
housed an enterprise and was a popular meeting place illustrates the functionality of town halls during
that time period.
Broadway has a variety of residential buildings. Several I-houses, both brick and frame, plain and with
sawn decoration were constructed in the Towns early years. A variation of the I-house seemed to be
popular in Broadway. Instead of a central passage, many of the houses had an enclosed central stair
with a small entrance foyer. Additionally, several ornate one-story Queen Anne cottages were found in
the north-end residential area.
The residential area along Lee Street contained a row of worker’s houses. The houses are one-andone-half story, with a three-room plan and board-and-batten siding. These were homes for workers of
the pottery, a major industry in the town for a time.
The oldest and perhaps largest homes are located in the old section of Broadway, between Linville
Creek and the North Fork Shenandoah River. The Winfield House, circa 1800, is located here and is the
oldest house in Broadway. The original section is a three-room Flurkuchenhaus (German house plan).
The Winfield House has added significance as the home of the Town’s founder.
The Tunker House, built between 1802 and 1806 reflects the time when the Tunkers or “dunkers,” who
did not believe in trained clergy or written statement of belief, met in barns and houses. The house
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Town of Broadway
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259
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ork S
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Historic Places
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42
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Lin
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801
Linville Creek Bridge #6154
Tunker House
Hays House (S. Kline House)
)
"
617
Jacob Geil House
Daphna Creek
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259
Roads
)
"
803
Railroad
Rivers and Streams
Town Boundary
Planned Annexation
Historic Places
Sources: Town of Broadway, Rockingham County,
CSPDC, Commonwealth of VA, VA DHR, USGS.
No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
to accuracy, completeness, reliability, or usefulness of any
information depicted in this map. Map prepared and
produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
(April 2010)
Historic Structures
Historic Structures on National Register
Historic Place- Insert Map
¦
0
0.25
0.5
Miles
Town of Broadway
House
Historic Places (Insert)
L.E. Hoover House
Old Foundry Shop
SHEN A N D O A H A
LEE
ST
Winfield House
VE
Jean Fawley House
Jean Davis House
Broadway Presbyterian Church and Cemetery
Montaque House
Edna Fawley House
AVE
T
Minnick Hotel
Dr. Geil House
The Saloon
House, 299 Park St.
CAR
RIE
S
ILL
HO
LLY
H
LOU
ISA S
T
GW Baldwin House
ST
Sandy Planing Mill
Sethman House
Wenger House
Commercial Bldg, 173 Main
Harvey Whitmore House
ST
Sally Williams House
HIG
H
MA
IN
ST
Sambo Williams House
PAR
K
R
EE
K S H IL L D
CR
HA W
K SID
E DR
Cookus Funeral Home Site
Broadway Motor Company
Workers House
Deering Town Hall
CHU
RCH
S
T
Whitmore, AW Store #1
Whitmore, AW Store #2
First National Bank
The Beanery
MIL
LE
NS
T
D
OD
R ST
R
DO
GW
O
Commercial Bldg, 136-138 S Main
Broadway Milling Co.
MA
SO
WAL
NU
T DR
Branner-Crider House
Sources: Town of Broadway, Rockingham County,
CSPDC, Commonwealth of VA, VA DHR, USGS.
No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
to accuracy, completeness, reliability, or usefulness of any
information depicted in this map. Map prepared and
produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
(April 2010)
LLE A
VE
Roads
Railroad
Town Boundary
Radfords Mammoth Pottery
Historic Places
Historic Structures
Planned Annexation
¦
0
310
ST
Rivers and Streams
CLIN
E
CEN
TRA
L ST
Broadway School
BR
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DW
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AV
E
ATLA
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AVE
LINV
I
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VE
AR
CED
620
Feet
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
was outfitted by its owner, Benjamin Yount, with hinged partitions that could be raised to
accommodate religious gatherings. The house is on the National Register.
Broadway has a range of industrial buildings dating from the late nineteenth century. A well-preserved
1870s foundry located near the Winfield is one of the few remaining in the area. The Broadway Milling
Company, built between 1880 and 1910, is a three-and-one-half story frame structure. It produced
“Virginia Gentleman” and “Snowflake” brands.
Radfords Mammoth Pottery is a circa-1890 pottery kiln. Pottery manufacturing had been important in
the Rockingham area since the 1830s. The pottery originally made ceramics but later turned almost
exclusively to bathroom fixtures. The one-story brick building is now owned by a private developer.
Several notable structures relate to transportation. The Virginia Inn and the Minnick Hotel, both built
in the 1870s, provided lodging for those arriving on the railroad. The Linville Creek Bridge,
manufactured in 1898 by the Wrought Iron Bridge Company of Canton, Ohio is Virginia’s only surviving
example of a Whipple metal truss bridge. The Whipple truss is a hybrid system incorporating aspects of
both the double-intersection Pratt and the Warren trusses. Also related to transportation are the two
Main Street buildings used by Broadway Motor Company in the early twentieth century. Similar in
appearance to the other commercial buildings, they were adapted to this influential newcomer. The
two-story frame building used as an early automobile showroom incorporated large windows and a
reinforced second-floor support system to permit automobiles to be stored on the upper story.
GOALS
The Town is fortunate to have a variety of historic buildings. These structure range from residential
to commercial to structural.
1.
The Town should preserve older and historic structures, landscapes and features to help
maintain the Towns rural character.
2.
Increase awareness of the social and economic value of historic preservation.
a.
Offer incentives to developers and owners of historic properties in order to
encourage preservation.
1-9
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 2|NATURAL RESOURCES
LOCATION
The Town of Broadway is located in the northern part of Rockingham County in the Shenandoah Valley of
Virginia. The community is approximately 110 miles northwest of Richmond and 13 miles north of
Harrisonburg, the county seat for Rockingham County.
Broadway is 5 miles south of the
Rockingham/Shenandoah County line.
State routes 42 and 259 intersect in Broadway. The Town can be reached by following State Route 259
northwest from Interstate 81 or by taking State Route 42 north from Harrisonburg.
Physiography
The physiography of an area is a description of its natural phenomena or general geography. The continent
is divided into physiographic provinces that follow natural topographic divisions. Each province has
characteristics of structural geology, land forms, water supply, climate, soil, and vegetation which differ
from other physiographic provinces. Broadway is in the Valley - Ridge Province, which lies between the Blue
Ridge Province to the east and the Appalachian Province to the west.
This natural topographic division is part of the Appalachian Valley, an old geosyncline in which sediments
were deposited, consolidated, and later folded and eroded to form the topography existing today. This
province, controlled by its structural geology, is distinct from its neighboring provinces.
Climate
Broadway enjoys a moderate climate. Daytime temperatures during the summer average 83°(F) with
nighttime lows averaging in the 50s. The average temperature is approximately 66°(F) with recorded
extremes of 105°(F) and -18°(F). Heating degree days average approximately 4,791 per year.
The growing season averages 166 days with the last frost occurring around April 30 and the first frost
occurring approximately October 10. Freezing temperatures have occurred, as late as May 25 and as early
as September 21.
Average annual precipitation is 35.4 inches. Annual rainfall averages 34 inches, and snowfall averages 21.6
inches. Studies indicate that 30 percent of the annual precipitation leaves the watershed in the form of
runoff.
Prevailing winds are southerly to northwesterly at an average velocity of 10 miles per hour (mph); however,
during storms, winds are generally from the northeast with maximum wind velocities in the 80 mph range
not uncommon.
2-1
Town of Broadway
Area Map
Town of Broadway
City
Towns
!
Bergton
!
Populated Places
Interstate
Other roads
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Rail
259
Rivers and Streams
Public Lands
Fulks Run
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Broadway
Sources: Town of Broadway, Rockingham County,
CSPDC, Commonwealth of VA, USGS.
No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
to accuracy, completeness, reliability, or usefulness of any
information depicted in this map. Map prepared and
produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
(April 2010)
81
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Reference Map
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5
10
Miles
Town of Broadway
Environmental Constraints
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Environmental Contraints
Sources: Town of Broadway, Rockingham County,
CSPDC, Commonwealth of VA, USFWS, USGS.
No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
to accuracy, completeness, reliability, or usefulness of any
information depicted in this map. Map prepared and
produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
(April 2010)
100-Year Flood Plain
Depressions
National Wetlands Inventory
¦
0
0.25
0.5
Miles
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
TOPOGRAPHY
The topography of the area is characterized by rolling hills and valleys, paralleled by mountains to the east
and west. Slopes range from 0-45 percent with elevations ranging from 1,010 to 1,250 feet in Broadway.
Maximum relief, therefore, is approximately 240 feet in Broadway.
FLOODPLAINS
During periods of heavy rains or during spring thaws, most streams in the County are subject to flooding.
The Department of Housing and Urban Development publishes Flood Hazard Boundaries in conjunction
with the Flood Insurance Program of the Federal Insurance Administration. Floodplain insurance is required
to secure a loan for a home within the floodplain.
Floodplain maps covering Linville and Daphna Creeks and the North Fork of the Shenandoah River are
available from the Soil Conservation Service. The floodplain in Broadway is created by Linville Creek,
Daphna Creek and the Shenandoah River and is displayed on the Environmental Constraints Map.
DRAINAGE SYSTEMS
Broadway lies within the drainage basin of the North Fork of the Shenandoah River, one of the three major
watersheds in the County. Linville Creek drains a major portion of Broadway and discharges into the
Shenandoah River.
Drainage must be considered during development. Runoff can cause flooding and can increase pollution by
carrying contaminants into water systems. Since development generally increases runoff, development
policies and ordinances need to address stormwater management, erosion and sediment control, and
floodplain management. Drainage patterns also affect the design of sewer systems. Sewers are more
efficient when they are contained within a given watershed to allow gravity flow.
WATER RESOURCES
Surface Water: With Linville Creek flowing through the Town, the North Fork of the Shenandoah River
forming the northern border and Daphna Creek flowing in the southern part of town, Broadway has three
bodies of surface water.
Groundwater: Although Rockingham County has a relatively good groundwater supply, the availability of
groundwater varies with the geologic structure. Wells have been drilled throughout the valley for
residential and other uses. Past history indicates that there are no suitable municipal groundwater supplies
within the Town. This is evident by an effort in 1935 and 2001 to obtain a public groundwater supply;
moreover, this was reaffirmed in 2000 when the Town commissioned a groundwater study.
Springs: There are numerous springs in the County. Holsinger's spring is the closest spring to the Broadway
area of sizable volume. It has been used commercially by water haulers. More recently the Town
purchased a 99 year lease for the development of Plains Mill Spring, which is one of the larger springs in
Rockingham County, with flows averaging 5 million gallons per day. All preliminary engineering studies
have been completed for this project.
2-4
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
DEVELOPMENT CONSTRAINTS
Development constraints are geographic characteristics which limit the use of the land. Such development
constraints are:
•
•
•
•
•
Steep Slopes, 25+%
Drainage Divides
Floodplains
Sinkholes and Faults
Pollution Potential
The Town of Broadway has minimal development constraints. One constraint is the floodplain of Linville
Creek which extends into the area lying between the creek and Main Street, as well as the area paralleling
the west bank of Linville Creek. This is also the major drainage divide and for this reason would limit
development.
Another development constraint would be the floodplain area paralleling the North Fork of the Shenandoah
River. This floodplain interferes with a small portion of land lying on Shenandoah Avenue and also will have
to be considered if future growth is directed west of the old Town boundaries along Route 259. There is
evidence of sinkholes on the eastern side of Town.
In general, soil types are most relevant for development in areas where public water and sewer are not
provided and septic tanks must be installed. In Broadway, however, full utilities are provided throughout
the Town and all new development is required to connect to public water and sewer.
Pollution potential is a greater concern. Like the rest of the Valley floor, the Town of Broadway is underlain
by karst geology. The limestone base can result in sinkholes, caves, and underground streams. Sinkholes
are closed drainage areas with especially high potential for transmitting pollutants into groundwater. With
karst topography, limestone channels allow pollution to travel quickly, often with little or no filtering, in
unexpected directions. Broadway has not experienced specific problems with sinkholes or caves, although
a band of sinkholes stretches along the eastern side of Town.
When development is undertaken, the potential for pollution should be evaluated and guarded against.
The surface water which runs through Broadway (Linville Creek, Daphna Creek and the Shenandoah River)
can be polluted from storm runoff and flood debris. Threats to groundwater also are present.
2-5
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
NATURAL RESOURCES GOALS
The Town experiences runoff problems in several areas of Town (Route 42, Linville Creek, Turner
Avenue, and West Springbrook). Future development in these areas will contribute to the problems.
1.
Promote a clean and healthy environment in Town.
a.
The Town should encourage the cleanup of the portion of Linville Creek that
flows through Town.
b.
Although the County holds enforcement responsibility for stormwater management and
erosion and sediment laws, the Town should encourage the meeting of these standards for
projects undertaken in the Town.
Town ordinances should require the consideration of potential for pollution when
addressing development proposals along the creek and river and near areas of known
sinkholes and should consider overlays to identify these areas.
Development should be planned and constructed in such as way that it does not increase
stormwater runoff or flood potential; regional stormwater management facilities serving
more than one property should be encouraged.
c.
d.
2-6
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 3|GOVERNMENT STRUCTURE
ORGANIZATION The administration and government of the Town of Broadway is vested in the Town Council, which is composed of a Mayor and six Council members, all of whom are elected. The Mayor serves a two‐year term and members of the Council serve a four‐year term. The Town Code further establishes seven standing committees that are answerable to the Mayor and the Council. These committees are: Finance, Properties, Personnel/Police, Utilities, Business/Industrial, Parks/Recreation and The Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission. PERSONNEL Seventeen full‐time employees serve the Town: a Town Manager, a water plant superintendent, two water plant operators, a wastewater plant superintendent, two wastewater plant operators, a project manager, a maintenance supervisor, two maintenance workers, a clerk/treasurer, an administrative assistant, a police chief, and three patrolmen. The direct supervision of the Town employees has been delegated to the Town Manager, with guidance on policy from the Council. ADVISORY BOARDS The Broadway Town Council receives assistance from the Planning Commission, the Board of Zoning Appeals, and the Town Attorney. The Broadway Planning Commission was created April 1, 1969. It currently has five members. The Board of Zoning Appeals is run jointly with the neighboring Town of Timberville. It has two members from each town and one member at large. The Town retains the services of a Town Attorney for consultation on legal issues and to represent the Town in any legal disputes. REVENUES Three major sources of income are available to support the Town of Broadway: local, state, and federal. Tables 3.1 and 3.2 provide data on each source of income for 1997, 2003, and 2009. Due to discrepancies in data sources, two charts are provided. The capacity of a town to engage in public capital improvements is determined by total net wealth, which it is able to accumulate after paying all costs of providing public services. Actual wealth accrues when total revenues flowing to the government exceed the total operating, maintenance, and debt costs of the Town over a period of time. Generally, a town must continue to generate excess revenues if it is to engage in capital improvement programs without having to resort to borrowing funds. When sizable development programs are required, however, borrowing may be necessary even though excess revenues are being generated. This procedure allows those who will benefit from long‐term projects to share in the cost of such projects. 3-1
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
A comparison between Tables 3.1 and 3.2 show the town’s total income has increased by 30.5 percent from 1997 to 2009 ($805,096 in 1997 to $1,050,741 in 2009). Local revenues continue to comprise the largest portion, 88 percent of total income. State revenues increased from $76,090 in 1997 to $142,550 in 2003 and dropped to $123,236 in 2009, an overall increase of 61 percent. From these state funds law enforcement funding has been steadily climbing. The Town received a DMV grant in the amount of $7,028 from the Federal Government in 2009. Table 3.1
Town of Broadway Revenue
1997 and 2003
Revenue
1997
From Local Sources
Personal Property/Real Estate
Taxes
$
119,267
Business License
62,792
Bank Capital Stock
38,374
Utility Tax
59,858
Fines & Forfeitures
6,139
Auto License Fees
35,805
Interest
35,655
Miscellaneous/Rolling Tax
15,781
Connection Fees
54,210
Water/Sewer Rent
301,125
Total Local Revenues
$ 729,006.00
Percent of Total
90.5%
From the Commonwealth
Law Enforcement
Sales Tax
ABC Tax
Fire Assistance
Total Commonwealth
Percent of Total
$
$
20,963
43,943
7,184
4,000
76,090.00
9.5%
2003
$
153,218
48,464
55,576
83,481
15,205
45,812
9,905
1,716
112,800
355,096
$ 881,273.00
86.1%
$
52,847
68,595
15,108
6,000
$ 142,550.00
13.9%
From the Federal Government
Revenue Sharing
Total Federal
Percent of Total
-
-
Total Revenue
% of Total
$ 805,096.00
100%
$1,023,823.00
100%
3-2
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Table 3.2
Town of Broadway Revenue
2009
Revenue
From Local Sources
General Property Taxes
Other Local Taxes
Local Sales and Use
Utility Taxes
Business Licenses
Motor Vehicle Licenses
Bank Stock
Total Other Local Taxes
Permits, privileges fees and regulatory licenses
Fines and forfeitures
Revenues from the use of money and property
Charges for services
Miscellaneous
Total Local Revenues
Percent of Total
From the Commonwealth
Rolling Stock Taxes
Fire Program Funds
Law Enforcement Grants, 599 Funds
Personal Property Tax Reimbursement
Art Grant
Total Commonwealth
Percent of Total
Federal Revenues
DMV Grant
Total Federal
Percent Total
Total (Local, State and Federal)
2009
$
$
$
$
$
245,227
110,543
115,839
81,939
62,155
47,947
418,423
4,489
9,366
32,054
209,914
1,004
920,477
87.6%
1,746
16,000
67,268
33,222
5,000
123,236
11.7%
7,028
7,028
0.7%
1,050,741
EXPENDITURES As shown in Table 3.4, during the year ending in June of 2009, General/Administrative was the largest expense category. This catch‐all category includes line‐item expenditures such as administrative salaries, contributions (park, library, fire & rescue, BHP) legal and professional fees, and all minor expenditures related to general municipal operations. The second largest category, Public Health and Safety, includes the police department expenditures. The third category, public works, includes water and sewer operations, which can be very costly, and also, garbage collection, street maintenance and 3-3
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
snow removal. Table 3.3 also highlights the expenditures for the year 1997 and 2003. For these years, the grouping of categories was not consistent with the 2009. In terms of per capita spending, Town expenditures have decreased from $473.43 per person in 2004 to $347.78 in 2009. This is a difference of $128.65 per person. Total expenditures decreased from $1,220,514 in 2003 to $1,117,092 in 2009, a difference of $103,422. Table 3.3
Town of Broadway
Expenditures
2009
General/ Administrative
Public Health and Safety
Public Works
Capital Expenditures
Cultural and Recreation
Community Development
Debt Service
TOTAL
General/ Administrative
Public Health and Safety
Public Works
Capital Expenditures
Non-operating Expenses
TOTAL
2009
$421,901
$319,769
$227,503
$
$
$
$
% of Total
37.8%
28.6%
20.4%
0.0%
9.4%
3.1%
0.7%
100.0%
2003
272,952
185,586
712,276
49,700
$
1,220,514
$104,551
$35,000
$8,368
$1,117,092
1997
$141,054
$173,201
$341,822
$24,567
$7,610
$688,254
Source: Town of Broadway, 2009 audit
3-4
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
TAX RATES AND ASSESSMENT
Table 3.4 depicts the tax rates for the Town of Broadway. All properties are required by State law to be assessed at 100 percent of fair market value. Table 3.4
Town of Broadway
Tax Rates – 2010
Real Estate
Machinery and Tools
Merchant's Capital
Tangible Personal
Property
(On Fair Market Value)
Source: Town of Broadway
Nominal
Tax Rate
Per $100
0.07
Assessment
Ration
Tax Rate Per
$100
100%
0.07
0.40
-
-
-
-
-
0.51
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES Financial health can be measured in a number of ways. This plan has examined the difference between net assets and liabilities. Over time, increases or decreases in the Town’s net assets are one indicator of whether its financial health is improving or deteriorating. It is important to consider other non‐
financial factors when considering the overall health of the community. The Town of Broadway is an economically stable community. Records indicate that Town assets are growing on a continual basis. Since 2003 the total of all fund assets have increased by $7,889,522 bringing the 2009 net assets total to $11,666,976 which far exceeds the Town’s liabilities. Seventy‐one percent of the Town’s net assets reflect investments in capital assets such as land, buildings, equipment and other improvements. The Town uses these capital assets to provide service to citizens; consequently these assets are not available for future spending. Town assets are directly affected by existing indebtedness. As of June 30, 2009, the Town’s debt totaled $4,158,182. This is a substantial increase from the Town’s 2003 debt of $271,808. 3-5
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
ADMINISTRATIVE GOALS The Town is in good financial shape. Recent studies, however, show the need for additional improvements to the utility systems, which could incur greater costs in the future. 1.
Maintain a strong fiscal balance. a.
The Town Council should continue to plan for capital improvements so that such expenditures can be budgeted in advance. b.
As the Town grows, a broad tax base should be sought to help pay for services. 2. Seek opportunities for Town a.
The Town should take necessary steps in developing its own Board of Zoning Appeals. b.
Expand Town Staffing only as needed; explore consolidation of feasible services with adjoining jurisdictions. 3-6
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 4|DEMOGRAPHICS
INTRODUCTION
Future demands on public facilities, community services, and land will depend in large part on the size
and characteristics of the Town population. Consequently, analysis and projections are fundamental to
planning decisions. This element provides understanding of long term trends and changes that have
taken place in the Town to help anticipate future needs and demands.
The U.S. Census is typically the major source for data regarding population, age, and other
demographic characteristics. The U.S. Census and American Community Survey are used consistently
throughout this chapter. For a more comprehensive understanding of the Town’s population
characteristics, comparative data is provided for Rockingham County and Virginia.
The Town of Broadway estimates Census data to be slightly lower (about 5% on average) from the
Town maintained population estimates. The Town believes the discrepancy in data is a result of fast
paced growth and multiple annexations in the last several years. For this reason, Table 4.2 includes
both Town and Census population estimates.
POPULATION TRENDS
Table 4.1
Population Change
1900-2010
Year
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010
Broadway
400
416
412
498
506
561
646
887
1,234
1,793
2,192
3,691
% Change
3.85%
-0.97%
17.27%
1.58%
9.80%
13.16%
27.17%
28.12%
31.18%
18.20%
40.61%
Rockingham
County
30,006
30,024
30,047
29,705
31,298
35,079
40,485
47,890
57,038
57,482
67,725
76,314
%
Change
0.06%
0.08%
-1.15%
5.09%
10.78%
13.35%
15.46%
16.04%
0.77%
15.12%
11.25%
Virginia
1,854,184
2,061,612
2,309,187
2,421,851
2,644,250
3,318,680
3,966,949
4,651,448
5,346,818
6,189,317
7,078,515
8,001,024
% Change
10.06%
10.72%
4.65%
8.41%
20.32%
16.34%
14.72%
13.01%
13.61%
12.56%
11.53%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table 4.1 illustrates the change in population from 1900-2010. The Town has grown from 400 persons
in 1900 to an estimated 3,691 persons in 2010. The Town experienced its most rapid growth from 2000
to 2010. Reasons for this include two annexations totaling 393 acres and a housing development
boom that peaked in 2006.
4-1
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Historically, the Town population remained fairly stable until 1930, from that point forward the
population grew consistently at a rate greater than or equal to Rockingham County. 1970, 1980 and
1990 were also years where large growth occurred, ranging from 27 to 31 percent growth from the
previous decade. The greatest increases in growth occurred in the past decade. From 2000-2008 the
Town experienced a 40.61 percent increase in population.
Table 4.2
Population Growth Estimates
& County Population Percentages
Town Estimate
Percentage
Change
Census Estimate
Percentage
Change
Rockingham
County
Percentage
Change
Virginia
Percentage
Change
Rockingham
County
Percentage in
Broadway
2003
2,578
2,548
69,477
7,364,600
3.7%
2004
2,675
2005
2,900
2006
3,203
2007
3,328
2008
3,496
2009
3,590
2010
3,691
3.8%
8.4%
10.4%
3.9%
5.0%
2.7%
2.8%
2,699
2,871
3,157
3,182
3,202
3,212
3,691
5.9%
6.4%
10.0%
0.8%
0.6%
0.3%
14.9%
70,135
71,557
72,620
73,673
74,394
75,962
76,314
0.9%
2.0%
1.5%
1.5%
1.0%
2.1%
0.5%
7,481,300
7,564,327
7,640,249
7,698,775
7,795,424
7,882,590
8,001,024
1.6%
1.1%
1.0%
0.8%
1.3%
1.1%
1.5%
3.8%
4.0%
4.3%
4.3%
4.3%
4.2%
4.8%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Town of Broadway, Weldon Cooper
In the past five years the population grew from 2,548 persons to 3,691 persons, this is an increase of
24.9 percent and 820 persons. The Town experienced a 10.5 percent growth from 2005 to 2006 but
quickly stabilized.
Just like the Town, Rockingham County experienced consistent growth in its population. In only six
years the County grew from its 2003 population of 69,477 persons to 76,314 persons in 2009. This is an
increase of 8.2 percent and 6,897 persons. Growth in the County continues to remain consistent.
When comparing Virginia to Rockingham County and Broadway, the Virginia rate of growth is slightly
lower. Growth is occurring consistently, but at a lower percentage than the County. In six years the
Virginia population grew from 7,364,600 persons in 2003 to 8,001,024 persons in 2010. This is an
increase of 11.5 percent or 636,424 persons.
In comparison to Rockingham County and Virginia, Broadway is growing at a faster rate. Change in
growth in Rockingham County on average is slightly higher than that of Virginia. Virginia averages a 1.2
percent annual increase and Rockingham County averages a 1.4. In both cases, percent change is
significantly lower than the Town of Broadway which averages 5.3 percent.
4-2
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
POPULATION PROJECTIONS
As noted earlier in this chapter the Town of Broadway has grown rapidly in the last decade. Reasons for
this include, expanding the town boundary through two annexations and a housing boom. When
looking at the short term growth trend projections are skewed. Because of this, 3.0 percent was
established as the desired rate of growth for this planning period. The chart below shows a
comparison of a 2.0 percent and 3.0 percent increase in population from 2010-2030. The base number
is 3,691, the 2010 Census population figure.
Chart 4.1
Population Projections
2010-2030
7000
6,666 - 3.0%
6500
Population
6000
5500
5,484 - 2.0%
5000
4500
4000
3500
3000
2010
2012
2014
2016
2018
2020
2022
2024
2026
2028
2030
4-3
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
POPULATION DENSITY
Population density is the average number of persons per square mile. Table 4.3 lists the number of
persons per acre and the number of persons per square mile. The number of persons per square mile
is a result of the total population divided by the square miles of the town boundary. In 2008 the Town
of Broadway averaged 2.1 persons per acre or 1,341 persons per square mile.
Table 4.3
Population Density
1990 – 2010
Year
1990*
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005*
2006
2007*
2008
2009
2010
Persons
1,793
1,818
1,838
1,860
1,881
1,915
1,935
1,933
1,923
1,915
2,192
2,330
2,400
2,548
2,699
2,871
3,157
3,182
3,202
3,212
3,691
Acres
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,135
1,267
1,528
1,528
1,528
1,528
Persons/Acre
1.58
1.60
1.62
1.64
1.66
1.69
1.70
1.70
1.69
1.69
1.93
2.05
2.11
2.24
2.38
2.53
2.49
2.08
2.10
2.10
2.42
Persons/Sq. Mile
1,011
1,025
1,036
1,049
1,061
1,080
1,091
1,090
1,084
1,080
1,236
1,314
1,353
1,437
1,522
1,619
1,595
1,333
1,341
1,345
1,546
* Year of annexation; population number reflects the annexation
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Town of Broadway, USGS, CSPDC
POPULATION PROJECTIONS AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT AREAS
The state mandated Urban Development Area legislation requires that the designated urban
development area “shall be sufficient to meet projected residential and commercial growth in the
locality for an ensuing period of at least 10 but not more than 20 years” and specifies that “future
residential and commercial growth shall be based on official estimates of the Weldon Cooper Center
for Public Service of the University of Virginia or official projections of the Virginia Employment
Commission or the United States Bureau of the Census.” The legislation further encourages
consultation and cooperation with adjacent localities to establish the appropriate size and location
of urban development areas to promote orderly and efficient development of their region and states
that “if a town has established an urban development area within its corporate boundaries, the county
within which the town is located shall not include the town’s projected population and commercial
4-4
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
growth when initially determining or reexamining the size and boundary of any other urban
development area within the county.”
The four tables below describe the calculations used to establish the minimum and maximum UDA
acreage for Broadway, as required by the legislation:
Table 4.4 summarizes the percent change and population projections for Broadway and Rockingham
County.
Table 4.4
Population Projections
1990-2030
Actual
Projected
Locality
Rockingham County*
Town of Broadway**
Percent of Population
1990
2000
2010
2020
2030
57,482
1,783
3.1%
67,725
2,192
3.2%
76,314
3,691
4.8%
83,965
4,960
5.9%
92,383
6,666
7.2%
Percent
Change
2000-2010
13%
68%
Average
Annual
Growth Rate
2010-2030
96%
3%
*VEC-State Demographer Projections and Decennial Population Data. Projections for Rockingham were based on applying the VEC
rates to the current 2010 census of 76,314
**US Census 2010 population for Broadway is 3,691
***The 3% annual growth rate is explained in the Population Projections section, page 4-3. The growth rate at 3% represents more than
three times the projected growth rate of Rockingham County for 2010-2030 which is .96%
Table 4.5 contains the underlying assumptions used in UDA area calculations.
Table 4.5
UDA Calculation Factors
Notes
Commercial SF per person*
Household Size**
Dwelling Unit/Acre
Floor to Area Ratio (FAR)
Square Feet/Acre @ .4 FAR
60
2.2
4
0.4
17424
US Census, ACS 2005-2009
Minimum UDA
Minimum UDA
Minimum UDA
*Source: American Community Survey 2005-2009
**Consultants Estimate
4-5
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Table 4.6 calculates future housing and commercial square footage required based on
population projections.
Table 4.6
Future Housing and Commercial Square Footage Projections
10-20 Years
New Population
Town of
Broadway
New Housing
Units**
New Commercial
Sq. Ft.
10 Years
20 Years
10 Years
20 Years
10 Years
20 Years
1,269
2,975
577
1,352
76,164
178,521
*Housing calculated at 2.2 persons per household, per US Census ACS 2005-2009
**New commercial square feet calculated at 60 sq. ft. per capita
Table 4.7 calculates minimum and maximum total acreage requirements for UDA.
Table 4.7
UDA Size Requirements
Residential Acres
Needed @ 4 DUA
Town of
Broadway
Employment
Acreage Needed
@0.4 FAR
Total Acreage
Needed*
10 Years
20 Years
10 Years
20 Years
10 Years
20 Years
144
338
4
10
149
348
*Acres for housing calculated at 4 dwelling units per acre for commercial square feet calculated at 0.4
FAR. Based on the calculation methodology presented above, the current size envelope of the UDA
needs to be larger than 149 acres, and less than 348 acres.
For further information refer to Memorandum 1 in Appendix D.
4-6
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
OTHER NOTABLE DEMOGRAPHIC DATA
Age distribution characteristics are important to consider when planning the future of a community. As people transition from one age group
to another so do their needs. Table 4.8 shows the major age group distributions among Broadway, Rockingham and Virginia populations. The
median age of Broadway residents was 32.9 years in 2010. This is lower than the median age of Virginia, 36.7 years and Rockingham County,
39 years.
Table 4.8
Summary of Age Grouping
1990-2010
2010*
2000
1990
Year
Age Groups
<5 Years
School Age (5-19)
Working Age (18-64)
65+ Years
TOTAL
Age Groups
<5 Years
School Age (5-19)
Working Age (18-64)
65+ Years
TOTAL
Age Groups
<5 Years
School Age (5-19)
Working Age (18-64)
65+ Years
TOTAL
Broadway
Population
90
305
1,147
251
1,793
% of
Population
5.02%
17.01%
63.97%
14.00%
100.00%
159
422
1,299
312
2,192
7.25%
19.25%
59.26%
14.23%
100.00%
242
582
1,993
397
3,214
7.53%
18.11%
62.01%
12.35%
100.00%
Percent
Change
(%-1990)
2.2%
2.2%
-4.7%
0.2%
(%-2000)
0.28%
-1.14%
2.75%
-1.88%
Rockingham
Population
3,923
12,769
33,169
7,621
57,482
% of
Population
6.82%
22.21%
57.70%
13.26%
100.00%
4,246
15,341
38,707
9,431
67,725
6.27%
22.65%
57.15%
13.93%
100.00%
4,610
14,794
45,929
10,319
75,652
6.09%
19.56%
60.71%
13.64%
100.00%
Percent
Change
(%-1990)
-0.56%
0.44%
-0.55%
0.67%
(%-2000)
-0.18%
-3.10%
3.56%
-0.29%
Virginia
Population
443,155
1,369,688
3,710,045
664,470
6,187,358
& of
Population
7.16%
22.14%
59.96%
10.74%
100.00%
461,982
1,576,650
4,247,550
792,333
7,078,515
6.53%
22.27%
60.01%
11.19%
100.00%
521,279
1,546,183
4,982,402
907,858
7,957,722
6.55%
19.43%
62.61%
11.41%
100.00%
Percent
Change
(%-1990)
-0.64%
0.14%
0.04%
0.45%
(%-2000)
0.02%
-2.84%
2.60%
0.22%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey
4-7
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
The percentage of the total population among Broadway’s 65 and older population increased between
1990 and 2000 by a slight 0.23 percent. Rockingham County also experienced a small increase of 0.67
percent. From 2000 to 2010 this age group decreased by 1.88 percent in Broadway and by .29 percent
in Rockingham County.
Broadway’s population of children 5 years of age or less grew from 1990 to 2000. The Town
experienced a growth of 2.2 percent among this population. This change in percent is significantly
higher than Rockingham County and Virginia. Both Rockingham and Virginia experienced a decrease in
this age group. Rockingham County dropped by 0.56 percent and Virginia by 0.64 percent. Between
2000 and 2010 Broadway’s five and under population grew from only minimally by .28 percent.
Growth among this age group continues to remain higher than that of Rockingham County and
Virginia.
The population of persons between the ages of 5 and 19 increased in Broadway and Rockingham
County between 1990 and 2000. The Towns school aged population increased by 2.2 percent which
represents 20 percent of the Town’s total population while Rockingham’s school aged population
increased by 0.4 percent representing 22 percent of the total population. Between 2000 and 2010
Broadway’s school aged population decreased by 1.14 percent and by 3.10 percent in Rockingham
County.
While the percentage of school aged persons was increasing from 1990 to 2000 the working age
population was decreasing. Broadway experienced a 4.7 percent decline and Rockingham a 0.55
decline. 43.9 percent of Broadway’s total town population in 2000 was in the 25-64 year old age group,
this is noteworthy because this group is a significant segment of the workforce. From 2000 to 2010 the
Town experienced a 2.75 percent increase bringing its total working age population to 62 percent of
the Town’s total population. Rockingham County’s working age population also increased by 3.56
percent bringing its total working age population to 60 percent of its total population.
4-8
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
MALE/FEMALE DISTRIBUTION
2010*
2000
1990
Table 4.9
Male to Female Ratio
1990-2010
Locality
Broadway
Rockingham
Virginia
Broadway
Rockingham
Virginia
Broadway
Rockingham
Virginia
Male
837
28,254
3,033,974
1,039
33,340
3,471,895
1,575
36,263
3,794,040
Female
956
29,228
3,153,384
1,153
34,385
3,606,620
1,554
27,307
3,927,690
Total
1,793
57,482
6,187,358
2,192
67,725
7,078,515
3,129
63,570
7,721,730
% Male
46.7%
49.2%
49.0%
47.4%
49.2%
49.0%
50.3%
57.0%
49.1%
% Female
53.3%
50.8%
51.0%
52.6%
50.8%
51.0%
49.7%
43.0%
50.9%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, *American Community Survey
In 1990 the Towns female population was 53.3 percent in comparison to Virginia’s 51 percent. In 2000
the numbers only changed slightly, Virginia’s female population stayed at 51 percent while Broadway’s
was 52.6. On both occasions the Broadway’s male population was lower than Virginia’s male
population of 49 percent
SUMMARY OF TRENDS
The following trends have been identified:
• Although Broadway has experienced recent rapid growth among its population, it is expected
to stabilize.
• Although the elderly population of Broadway is growing the 5 and under age group is growing
at a faster rate.
• The town is aging, but at a fairly slow rate.
4-9
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 5|ECONOMY
INTRODUCTION The purpose of this chapter is to analyze previous, existing and potential economic conditions in the Town. A review of the economic structure of a community serves as a useful tool in forecasting and planning a community’s future. This chapter examines Broadway’s labor force, community facilities, presence of industry and the demand for various goods and services. Economic development is defined as the betterment of a community’s economic vitality. It is growth that is planned and desired. Ways in which a community can strengthen its economic vitality can vary. Job creation, expanding the tax base, increasing industrial opportunities, attracting a diverse base of industries, the nurturing of existing and developing businesses are just a few examples of ways communities are strengthening and revitalizing their economy. The role of local government is large in economic development efforts. All departments and committees should use the Town’s economic development strategy and Comprehensive Plan to guide their policy and decision making. Other agencies like nonprofit organizations or citizen groups also play a sizeable role in a community’s economic development activities. Ideally, a partnership should exist between local officials and outside agencies seeking to achieve the same goals. BROADWAY WORK FORCE AND ECONOMIC PROFILE As shown previously in Table 4.4, approximately 57 percent of the Broadway population is of working age, defined as 18‐65. To better understand the Broadway’s labor force this working age population has been examined on a number of levels such as, educational attainment, median household income, commuting patterns and more. EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Educational attainment is important to this chapter for a number of reasons. Higher levels of education lead to a higher quality work force that is well rounded and highly skilled in a variety of different sectors. Broadway is in a key location for attracting and encouraging a skilled workforce. James Madison University, Eastern Mennonite University, Bridgewater College and Blue Ridge Community College are all in the Harrisonburg‐Rockingham area. According to the 2000 Census Broadway’s working age population totaled 1,488 persons. 73.2 percent of that population had obtained at least a high school diploma. This is slightly higher than the 71 percent of working age residents in Rockingham County that hold at least a high school diploma, but is nearly 10 percent lower than Virginia’s working age population that holds at least a high school diploma. Twenty percent of working age residents in Broadway and Rockingham County hold an Associate’s, Bachelor’s or Graduate degree. This is significantly lower than the 36 percent of Virginia’s working age population. In addition, 11 percent of both working age population in Broadway and Rockingham hold Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
a bachelor’s degree. This is lower than the 18 percent of Virginia’s working age population which holds a bachelor’s degree. INCOME Median Household income levels have been steadily climbing in Virginia, Rockingham County and Broadway. Over the past several years the median household income is the amount which divides the income distribution into two equal groups, half having income above that amount, and half having income below that amount. Median Household Income is also used as an indicator of the current economic state, the higher the income, the better the economy. If the Median Household Income number declines, it is seen as a sign of worsening economic conditions. Table 5.1 shows a snapshot of the median household income for Broadway, Rockingham and Virginia. Table 5.1
Median Household Income
Broadway
Rockingham
Virginia
2000 $40,157 $ 42,290
$ 46,789 2003 ‐ $ 43,624 $ 50,028 2006 ‐ $ 47,739 $ 56,297 2009 $46,208* $ 47,739
$ 59,372
2010** $51,207
$ 51,232
$ 60,316
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, *BAO, **American Comm‐ unity Survey COMMUTING PATTERNS Commuter Information from the 2000 Census (for the pre‐annexation borders only) show that 83.6 percent of the working residents drove alone to work and that the mean travel time to work was 20.8 minutes, up from 17.6 minutes in 1990. Many Broadway residents commute to a variety of locations within Rockingham County, the City of Harrisonburg and elsewhere. The 2009 community survey indicated that 41.3 percent of Broadway’s working residents commute outside of the Town limits for work each day. A majority of workers commute to Harrisonburg or other areas of Rockingham County. OCCUPATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS The dominant occupations among the Broadway workers reflect the locally strong manufacturing sector. Of the 1,195 workers for whom industry data were collected in the 2000 Census (pre‐
annexation borders), 340 were in manufacturing. Some of the other remaining workers include 195 in educational, health and social services, 157 in retail trade, 89 in construction, and 70 in public administration. For the 2000 Census occupation data set, 191 individuals worked production jobs (probably many in the poultry industry). Other large categories included 179 individuals working office and administrative support, 154 individuals working professional and related, 137 workers held jobs in transportation and material moving, and 121 workers held jobs in management, business, and financial operations. 5-2
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
BUSINESS SECTOR As of May 1, 2011, 163 Business License had been issued in Town; this is an increase of 63 licenses from 2004. Of the 163 licenses issued, 35 are classified as contractor, 10 are wholesale, 18 are professional, 47 are retail, 39 are personal, 9 are other and 5 are ABC. RETAIL/SERVICE The traditional "downtown" along Main Street provides the bulk of the retail services available in Town. Other areas of commercial activity include the strip along Route 259 across from the middle school, and Route 259 on the east side of Town. Most of the retail stores are small‐scale, non‐franchise operations. These businesses are sufficient to meet the basic, everyday needs of the Broadway populace. However, the small scale of the stores, with corresponding limitations on selection and hours, indicates that residents shop elsewhere for many items. The proximity to Timberville means that some services, such as fast‐food restaurants and a franchised grocery store, can be provided in one community for the benefit of both. For larger items, Harrisonburg is approximately 15 minutes away. The health of the downtown area is usually a critical issue in small towns because traditional businesses have to compete with strip malls and large discount stores, often located just outside the corporate limits. In the past Broadway’s Main Street businesses have not suffered like other towns and cities, but more recently it has become increasingly difficult to compete with “one‐stop shopping.” INDUSTRIAL The Town is home to several manufacturers. The poultry industry is the dominant industry in Broadway as it is in many parts of Rockingham County. Pilgrim’s Pride has a hatchery and laboratory within the Town limits. Virginia Poultry Growers Cooperative now operates a feed mill. The closest poultry processing plant is in nearby Timberville. Tyson Foods also has a poultry operation in the area. Below is a list of all manufacturing and industries located within the Town boundary. MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS IN THE BROADWAY AREA Agri‐of‐Virginia, Inc. Broadway Metal Works, Inc. Lantz Construction Co. Superior Concrete, Inc. Trumbo Electric Co., Inc. Pilgrim’s Pride INDUSTRIES NEAR BROADWAY Broadway Electric, Inc. Tyson Foods C.S. Mundy Quarries, Inc. Neff Lumber Mills, Inc. Bay Pottery & Jewelry, Inc. Branner Printing Services, Inc. Frazier Quarry, Inc. 5-3
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
GROWTH POTENTIAL The Town historically has had vacant tracts zoned industrial within the Town limits. However, recent analysis by the Town confirms that Broadway has limited ability to attract major industry due to its limited access and roadways. The Towns proximity to Interstate 81 provides several challenges for growth. However, Broadway is fortunate to have one of the best roads leading into town from the south, Route 42. Through past annexations the Town gained frontage on Route 259, this area contains vacant acreage, increasing its potential for future commercial uses. The potential for industrial sites remains limited and in recent years, the strongest interest by industries has been for sites near, but not inside the town boundary. Broadway has come to realize that its market niche is for small industry and commercial ventures; it is currently unrealistic and undesirable to attract large industries. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS In 2001, the Broadway Hometown Partnership (BHP) was established to create social and economic viability in Broadway while maintaining its hometown atmosphere. Additionally, the Broadway Industrial Development Authority was established in 2000 to assist businesses. In 2001 a low interest revolving loan was established to spur new business endeavors in the downtown area. Recently, the Broadway Hometown Partnership has focused their efforts on hosting a number of social community events like the Broadway Music Festival, Halloweenfest, Valley Fine Arts and Bluegrass Festivals, Autumn Days, Kid’s Fishing days and several others. BHP continues to focus on social events, but the organization is starting to focus their resources on stimulating economic development in the downtown area. To achieve this, the Partnership has started hosting marketing seminars, which are to help small business identify marketing resources and strategies. BHP has also started educating commercial property owners with identifying competitive rental rates which helps to attract other small businesses to the area. Another focus area of BHP is to aid in the re‐development of older and abandoned buildings. By doing so, the Towns history and character will be preserved as the Town evolves. Future plans include developing a systematic way to prioritize the development of diverse business sectors through creating a business plan. Attracting new and diverse restaurants and emphasizing tourism are also goals the Partnership has set for the near future. These combined efforts have created a significant impact within the Town’s business community. Many new businesses have opened, existing businesses have expanded, facades have been renovated, and a general feeling of excitement continues to abound in Broadway’s business community. 5-4
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
GOALS The Town needs a strong business sector to provide jobs and services for citizens and to maintain a broad tax base. Distinction was made between the industrial sector and the service/professional sector. The Town contains several major industries, including Hartz, two hatcheries, and two feed mills. The potential for additional industries is limited due to distance from the interstate, lack of appropriate sites, and lack of additional water and sewer capacity. The Town does not benefit in taxes from industries, as they pay no business license fee. For these reasons, the Town's main concern is to maintain its current industrial sector rather than to seek new industry. Broadway is a center of service and retail activity. Town leaders and citizens see this as a positive role for Broadway. Strengthening the town by attracting more community enhancing businesses was the goal that registered the strongest support of any of the questions on the survey, along with the desire to remain a small town and improve downtown’s appearance. Also, because business licenses add to the tax base, the businesses downtown and on the major roads are essential to the Town's fiscal health. While the Town contains banks, a post office, restaurants, stores, and various retail and service establishments, some important services and professions are not represented. Furthermore, the uneven level of maintenance and the lack of attention to the downtown's overall appearance keep the area from looking like a thriving business area and make it difficult to attract new investment. Other obstacles may be taxes, zoning regulations, difficulty of reusing old buildings, parking, and perceived advantages of new sites. 1. Retain existing commercial/business. a. The Town should consider industrial needs when upgrading utilities. b. The Town should consider the needs of white collar and blue collar pursuits. 2. Seek additional commercial/business. a. The Business and Industrial Development Committee of Town Council, in conjunction with the Planning Commission, should develop criteria for compatibility with the community, such as utility use, size, type of process, and skill level of the jobs. b. The Planning Commission should ensure that sites are zoned appropriately. c. Town officials should work through Broadway Hometown Partnership to field prospects. d. Town officials should meet with the County and the Town of Timberville to evaluate sites in the area that might need utilities or other services. e. Town officials should work with the County and/or Timberville to market a joint industrial site. f. To the extent financially feasible, the Town Council should consider potential industrial demands when upgrading utilities. 3. Strengthen Broadway, particularly the downtown, as a center of retail and service activity; remove obstacles to downtown’s success. 3‐A. Provide a positive business climate for existing and potential businesses. a. The Planning Commission should ensure that sites are appropriately zoned. 5-5
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
b. The Planning Commission should review ordinances to ensure that the Town does not unnecessarily hamper business activity. c. Town officials should continue the low‐interest loan program to encourage property maintenance and capital investment downtown. d. Representatives of Council and the Planning Commission should discuss with the Broadway Hometown Partnership the results of the town‐wide survey, particularly such requests as specific types of businesses and evening hours. e. The Town Council should seek to coordinate public improvements with private investment and business needs. 3‐B. Ensure that parking is available and convenient. a. The Planning Commission should analyze whether there is a parking problem, and deal with both the perception and the reality. b. The Planning Commission should review parking requirements and their hindrance to reusing empty buildings. c. Town officials should seek to obtain parking lots by lease or by purchase, especially the Southern Railway Depot property in the center of Town. 5-6
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 6|HOUSING
INTRODUCTION A housing profile is a useful tool for communities and is important to the planning process since housing market needs are ever changing. The goal of this chapter and housing profile is to provide a summary of the housing resources in the Broadway community. Characteristics such as location, type, age and affordability are a few characteristics examined among Broadway housing stock. This chapter also identifies the relationship between housing and other elements of this plan. HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS The Town of Broadway has a variety of housing types and, overall, the condition of the housing is good. For this chapter housing figures were obtained from the 2000 Census, the 2010 American Community Survey, the Town of Broadway and Rockingham County. During the 1980’s a number of apartments were constructed and in the 1990’s steady construction of single‐family homes occurred. More recently, Broadway experienced its largest population and residential growth, which occurred between 1998 and 2005. Recent Town data shows The Town of Broadway continued to experience steady growth through 2007, but growth slowed significantly in 2008 and 2009. For those two years combined only 41 building licenses were issued. From 2003 to 2009 the housing stock in Broadway grew from 1,180 units to an estimated 1,548 units in 2009. This is an increase of nearly 31 percent. According to the 2000 Census there were 2.42 persons per unit (total housing units), which is slightly lower than Rockingham County’s 2.61 persons per unit. Although more recently new growth has slowed, Rockingham County and Town anticipate moderate residential growth over the next several years. HOUSING STOCK Examination of the Broadway housing stock shows the Town is fortunate to have less than 40 percent of its homes built before 1970. Depending on the continued maintenance of older structures, this can be seen as an influential factor in the future. In large part, demographic changes trigger changes among the housing market. For instance, the needs of a community change as its population ages. This is the same for housing, as the housing stock ages, so do needs. Also, as the age of a structure increases, so does the need for maintenance. Older buildings face unique challenges. In general, the sales of houses built more than 30 years ago are not as high as those built more recently. Reasons for this include the lack of modern amenities and appeal that most middle‐aged homebuyers are seeking. How the aging of housing is addressed contributes to either neighborhood vitality or decline. The physical condition of housing contributes to a neighborhood being an attractive place to live and it increases housing values. In Broadway significant construction in past decade has pushed Broadway in the direction of a “younger” housing stock. In fact, almost 60 percent of homes have been built since 1980 and almost a quarter of all homes were constructed between 2004 and 2005. A younger housing stock represents Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
viability in the housing market, and with the steady growth in population Broadway has recently experienced it seems the Town is in an ideal situation for attracting and maintaining residents. Table 6.1 Age of Housing Stock 2009 Year Structures Percent 2000‐2009 544 35.1% 1990‐1999 279 18.0% 1980‐1989 110 7.1% 1970‐1979 225 14.5% 1960‐1969 102 6.6% 1940‐1959 134 8.7% 1939 and Earlier 155 10.0% TOTAL 1549 Source: Census and Town Building Records HOUSING AS IT RELATES TO OTHER PLAN ELEMENTS It has already been established that the housing elements is critical to a community’s planning process, but it is also important to understand how housing is related to other plan elements such as Demographics, Economic Development, Infrastructure and Historic Resources. Demographics and housing are the most interrelated. This is because in large part, demographic changes trigger changes in the housing market. For instance, housing needs change with age. Each stage in life brings the need for different types of housing in terms of size, cost and location. Younger households, those under the age of 35 tend to be in need of affordable rental housing or starter homes. Middle age households, those between the ages of 35 and 54 are generally larger and more affluent. Empty nesters and young retirees between the ages of 55 and 74 are in large part homeowners who will age in place and seniors, those ages 75 and older face the challenges of home maintenance and as a result often times downsize or seek alternative housing options like retirement communities. The relationship between demographics and housing is also important to understand because of the sizes of successive generations can change significantly. As these changes occur, the demand for certain types of housing changes as well. According to the 2000 Census 39.2 percent of Broadway’s population was between the ages of 35 and 64 and 19.9 percent of the population was between the ages of 20 and 34 and nearly 20 percent are between the ages of 5 and 19. Broadway’s housing needs have recently been for middle aged homes, but in the future affordable housing will see a greater increase in demand than in the past. Infrastructure also shares and important relationship with housing. The amount and location of new housing can potentially cause strain and create concern for different types of infrastructure. For 6-2
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
instance, the community’s transportation network should be considered when planning residential growth. It is important consider the capacity of the roadway network to and from these newly developed areas. Aside from transportation, the availability of water, wastewater and electric utilities should also be considered. Economic development shares an important role with housing as well. Different types of housing attract various types of buyers and tenants; therefore housing costs should reflect the salaries of those in the community. Also, the availability of different types of housing is important to consider, especially when trying to attract and retain a well‐balanced work force. Housing and historic resources share an important relationship. Often times historic buildings such as office buildings, stores, schools, warehouses or homes can be modified, where appropriate, for affordable housing and mixed use opportunities. Housing Affordability The Town of Broadway has a rather young housing stock, with several attractive and modern day homes. According to the 2000 Census the median value of a home was $101,100. This number is expected to rise; the 2009 ESRI estimate stated the median value would increase to $157,514 in 2009. Projections estimate by 2014 the median value will reach $187,407. Additionally, the 2009 property assessment information was used to establish the most recent housing values for the Town (see table 6.2, Housing Values Map and Median Housing per Subdivision Map) Table 6.2 Housing Value by Percent of Total Households 2000‐2010 Value Census 2000 2009 CSPDC ACS 2010 Less than $50,000 1.6%
1.6% 2.0% $50,000‐99,999 47.2%
11.9% 7.5% $100,000‐149,999 39.3%
38.4% 20.9% $150,000‐199,999 8.6%
26.8% 24.6% $200,000‐299,999 2.9%
19.1% 30.6% $300,000‐499,999 0.4%
3.1% 11.8% $500,000‐999,999 0%
0.2% 2.6% Median Value $101,100
‐ $188,300 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey 6-3
Town of Broadway
Housing Values
TRL
Roads
Railroad
SP
AR
MI
NE R
D
CC T
URN
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Rivers and Streams
Town Boundary
N RD
Subdivisions
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TH P
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$300,000.00 - $499,999.99
$500,000.00 - $999,999.99
$1,000,000.00 and up
Broadway
81
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38.44%
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26.83%
19.18%
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803
11.93%
0.16%
< $49,999
LOG CA B
AR
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45.00%
40.00%
35.00%
30.00%
25.00%
20.00%
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
$150,000.00 - $199,999.99
HWY
CO
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TR
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Reference Map
$150,000$199,999
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0
$200,000$299,999
IN L
N
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NT
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Daphna Creek
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$100,000.00 - $149,999.99
ROYAL VIEW ESTATES
BROADMOOR VILLAGE
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$50,000.00 - $99,999.99
JAD
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less than $49,999.99
42
N
Property Value
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MOUNTAINEER HEIGHTS
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HousingValues
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T
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WI
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EL L
N
T
3RD
ST
T
Sources: Town of Broadway, Rockingham County,
CSPDC, Commonwealth of VA, USGS.
No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
to accuracy, completeness, reliability, or usefulness of any
information depicted in this map. Map prepared and
produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
(August 2010)
AL
D
LN
MI L
L LN
BR
1ST S
T
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GA P
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PL
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HERITAGE HILLS
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WALNUT RIDGE TRUMBO
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I & J HEIGHTS
BRO
CKS
GA
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LORY MATHIAS LN
S TR O
3.06%
$300,000$499,999
UPHI LL DR
0.25
0.16%
0.24%
$500,000$999,999
>$1,000,000
0.5
Miles
Town of Broadway
Median Housing Values per Subdivision
TRL
Roads
SP
AR
MI
NE R
D
CC T
URN
ER
O PTOW
Ã
259
Railroad
Rivers and Streams
N RD
Town Boundary
S
HERITAGE HILLS
ER
R
R
ATLA
NTIC
AVE
HO
D
U
T
W AL N
CLIN
E
HERITAGE VILLAS
GR IF
FIN
LN
0
$500,000.00 - $999,999.99
0
$1,000,000.00 and up
0
Broadway
CO
NS
TR
UC
TIO
N
NT C
IR
TAG
R
HILL
Y
A RD D R
SUBDIVISION
MEDIAN HOUSE VALUE
ALGER LANE TOWNHOMES
$92,907.69
Broadland
$219,225.00
BROADMOOR VILLAGE
$217,252.94
BROADVIEW
$171,128.57
BROADWAY SOUTH
$205,736.96
COYOTE RUN
$184,033.33
GAP VIEW
$220,770.59
259
GRIFFIN
$104,896.00
HEARTHSTONE HILL
$180,688.89
HERITAGE HILLS
$264,687.50
HERITAGE VILLAS
$119,517.65
HOMESTEAD VILLAGE
$208,942.86
I & J HEIGHTS
$163,900.00
MOUNTAINEER HEIGHTS
$194,501.79
RUSTIC KNOLL
$260,400.00
SMITHLAND HEIGHTS
$213,411.11
N
L
SUNSET VILLAS
$92,875.00
IN
LOG CA B
TRIMBLE HEIGHTS
$197,275.00
TRUMBO
$155,100.00
WALNUT RIDGE
$158,995.74
WEST VIEW
$171,133.33
WINDERMERE U
$183,720.00
PHI LL DR
LN
TH D
R
TRIMBLE HEIGHTS
HE R
I
JOB
EL L
N
DAPHNA
RD
DR
ELM
ST
AVE
LN
ER
D
WE
NT
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OR
Daphna Creek
FRE
EMO
BROADMOOR VILLAGE
)
"
803
AR
D S LN
W
BONNY
BRAE LN
JAD
8
$300,000.00 - $499,999.99
Sources: Town of Broadway, Rockingham County,
CSPDC, Commonwealth of VA, USGS.
No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
to accuracy, completeness, reliability, or usefulness of any
information depicted in this map. Map prepared and
produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
(August 2010)
MOUNTAINEER HEIGHTS
T
EC
CREST
OVE R
Ã
10
PIN
HAR
NOR
- $299,999.99
TH $200,000.00
POIN
TE D
R
DR
ING
ILL LN
RD
Y
$150,000.00 - $199,999.99
E HW
HEARTHSTONE HILL
KR Y
S
EH
D
AN
2
UST
RIAL
LN
$100,000.00 - $149,999.99
BROADVIEW
ST
OR
2
5TH
N
$50,000.00 - $99,999.99
T
MO
OAD
BR
0
4TH
S
T
N
YA
RA
less than $49,999.99
T
WI
NS
YL
MA
IN
D
# of
Subdivisions
SE E LN
R
G LN
E T HREN RD
R
LD
TA
42
by Subdivision
Property
Value
2ND
S
EA ST
5TH
S
BROADLAND
HousingValues
Median Housing Value
T
3RD
ST
T
BR
LN
MI L
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RD
1ST S
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1ST S
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617
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801
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HOMESTEAD VILLAGE
)
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UNIV
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BRO
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ALGER LANE TOWNHOMES
BROADWAY SOUTH
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DD
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D
LSI
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GA P
PL
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ST
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GRIFFIN
SUNSET VILLAS
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ROSEM NT D R
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WALNUT RIDGE TRUMBO
LINV
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I & J HEIGHTS
BRO
CKS
GA
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LORY MATHIAS LN
S TR O
81
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Reference Map
¦
0
0.25
0.5
Miles
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
To shed more light on housing values, mortgage and rental payment data was also collected to better understand the current state of housing affordability in Town. According to the 2000 Census, 44.8 percent of mortgage payments account for less than 15 percent of the average household income. For those who rent, 26.5 percent are paying less than 15 percent of their household income, 37.9 percent use 16‐24 percent of their household income towards rent and 18.8 percent of Broadway renters have 35 percent or more of the household income towards rent. Gross Rent Mortgage Table 6.3 Mortgage and Rental Rates 2000‐2010 2000 2010 Less than $200 3 Less than $200 $200‐299 5 $200‐299 $300‐499 165 $300‐499 $500‐699 95 $500‐749 $700‐999 9 $750‐999 $1,000‐1,499 0 $1,000‐1,499 $1,500‐2,000 0 $1,500 or more $2,000 or more 0 Median (Dollars) $472 Median (Dollars) 2000 2010 Less than $200 0 $200‐299 0 Less than $300 $300‐499 26 $300‐499 $500‐699 101 $500‐699 $700‐999 124 $700‐999 $1,000‐1,499 51 $1,000‐1,499 $1,500‐2,000 30 $1,500‐1,999 $2,000 or more 2 $2,000 or more Median (Dollars) $793 Median (Dollars) 0 0 94 285 151 41 0 $647 7 0 32 82 254 105 53 $1,253 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 6-6
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
HOUSING AND HOUSING AFFORDABILITY GOALS Housing issues for the Town are closely linked to general growth. Because of this growth the town is expected to face housing challenges in the future that will have been unseen. Reasons for this include changing needs and demographics of the Town. Nearly 20 percent of Broadway’s population is between the ages of 20 and 34. This age group will continue to increase. For this age group specifically there must be affordable housing options for rental properties and starter homes. 39.2 percent of the Town’s population is between the ages of 35 and 64. Currently it seems that housing needs for this age group are being adequately met, but as this group ages the town will need to make sure that housing options are available to meet the needs of retirees. 1. Ensure building codes and standards are being met. a. The Town should take measures to ensure that older structures are being maintained to ensure safety. 2. Promote Homeownership a. The Town should encourage desired new growth. b. The Town should encourage redevelopment of aging or abandoned structures. 3. Ensure affordable housing options. a. The Town, in partnership with groups like the Hometown Partnership should inventory rental options, and educate landlords and property owners on acceptable rental rates. b. The Town should encourage the redevelopment or rehabilitation of neighborhoods through grant programs like Community Development and Block Grants (CDBG). c. Support programs to encourage maintenance and renovation of existing housing. d. Historic buildings such as hotels, office buildings, stores, schools, warehouses or homes can be modified for affordable housing and mixed use opportunities. e. Provide incentives for the development of affordable housing. 4. Promote a healthy housing market to help with economic development efforts. a. Encourage available housing to retain and attract a well‐balanced work force. 5. Coordinate housing growth with land use planning. a. Encourage the use of PUD zoning designation to accommodate innovative approaches to housing development; ensure that PUD designation is not “overzoned,” and thus ensures enough remaining available space for other developments. b. Retain no more than the current ratio of single to multi‐family units. 6-7
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 7| TRANSPORTATION
The Broadway Comprehensive Plan provides guidance for the development and maintenance of the transportation system in Broadway that supports existing and projected travel demands to the year 2035. Transportation improvement recommendations were developed to meet current needs and the horizon year, 2035, needs. The transportation plan provides details on the study methodologies and recommendations, including:  Identification of existing transportation needs,  Forecasting of future travel demands,  Identification of future travel demands, and  Development of transportation improvement recommendations for the Town’s transportation system. PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE STUDY The Broadway Transportation Plan was developed as a cooperative effort between the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission and the Town of Broadway. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the transportation system in Broadway and to recommend a set of transportation improvements that will best satisfy existing and future transportation needs. The plan will identify multi‐modal transportation needs based on capacity, safety, and functional requirements (including the effectiveness and efficiency of the overall transportation system). Improved transportation systems are vital to continued local and statewide economic growth and development. Providing effective, safe and efficient movement of people and goods is a basic goal of all transportation programs in the Commonwealth of Virginia. This guiding principle, together with consideration of environmental issues and local mobility needs, was the basis for the development of this portion of the Comprehensive Plan. The recommendations of this chapter may be used in the statewide transportation planning process so that the magnitude of local needs can be better quantified. SUMMARY OF APPROACH AND ANALYSIS METHODS The transportation plan is developed as part of a structured approach with five basic components: 1. Data collection. 2. Forecasting of future traffic demands. 3. Development of recommendations to satisfy existing and future transportation needs. 4. Coordination with Broadway citizens and government. 5. Environmental overview and Plan documentation
7-1
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
1. Data Collection: Data pertaining to the Broadway transportation system was collected as part of this chapter. Data collection included traffic counts, roadway inventory and conditions, accident data, preliminary identification of environmental and socioeconomic constraints, and information obtained from a review of land use plans and previous transportation planning documents. 2. Forecasting of Future Traffic Demands: Based on historic trends and expected changes in population and employment in the Town, traffic volumes were forecast for the study horizon year of 2035. Any expected changes in demand for other modes of transportation were developed as appropriate. 3. Development of Recommendations to Satisfy Existing and Future Transportation Needs: Based on an assessment of current and projected traffic operations and safety, recommendations for improvements to the Broadway transportation system were developed. Improvements to system connectivity, other modes of travel, and accommodation of tourist traffic and goods movement were developed based on interviews and needs identified as part of the data collection process. 4. Coordination with Broadway and Government Officials: Through a series of meetings with Town officials, existing and future transportation needs were identified and reviewed, and recommendations for transportation improvements were developed. 5. Environmental Overview and Plan Documentation: Recommended improvements were subjected to an environmental overview to identify potential environmental and socioeconomic constraints that could affect the implementation of the recommendations. EXISTING TRANSPORTATION NETWORK OPERATING CONDITIONS Based on the data collection and existing conditions inventory and assessment, an analysis of operating conditions was conducted for the following items:  Existing traffic volumes and roadway operations  Safety conditions  Pedestrian mobility  Transit service and facilities  Current transportation plans and projects  ROADWAYS The primary focus of the comprehensive plan chapter is the functionally classified urban thoroughfare system, with analysis and recommendations limited to existing thoroughfare improvements and/or recommendations for new thoroughfares. The urban thoroughfare system is a subset of Broadway’s overall road network that is designated by VDOT, the Federal Highway Administration, and the Town of Broadway. The thoroughfare system includes roads that are functionally classified as arterials or collectors. Arterials serve as the major traffic‐carrying facilities 7-2
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
in the area. Collector roads carry a lesser volume of traffic and feed traffic to arterial roadways. Broadway’s thoroughfare system and functional classifications are shown in Map 1. Roadway Network and Inventory Broadway is located at the junction of U.S. Route 42 and U.S. Route 259 and is also located near one major interstate, Interstates 81. In the Town, Route 42 is referred to as Main Street and serves as the primary route to access the downtown commercial core of Broadway. Route 259 is referred to as Mayland Road, Brocks Gap Road and Lee Street. VDOT maintains an inventory of the Broadway thoroughfare system and is shown as Table 7.1. Each segment of the road is defined by major intersecting roadways or by significant changes in the geometry of the roadway segment (number of lanes, pavement width, etc.). The inventory contains information about the entire roadway segment. The inventory contains the following characteristics: 













Pavement Width – the width of pavement from curb to curb measured in feet (total roadway pavement width) Number of Through Lanes – the number of lanes available for through traffic in both directions of permitted travel Access Control – the type of access control provided on the road (local streets have no access control, freeways and major divided highways usually have full and limited access control respectively). Type of Operation – the type of roadway operation (one or two‐way travel) Median Type – the type of median the road contains (none, raised, depressed, flush, or center turn lane) Median Width – the width of the median, from edge to edge, measured in feet Left Shoulder Width – the width of the left shoulder of the road measured from the ditch line to the travel lane edge Right Shoulder Width – the width of the right shoulder of the road measured from the ditch line to the travel lane edge Curb and Gutters – the presence of curb and gutter along the roadway (none, both sides of the street, left side only, or right side only) Sidewalks – the presence of sidewalks along the roadway segment (either none, both sides of the street, left side only, or right side only) Number of Traffic Signals – the number of traffic signals located on the road, including the beginning and ending intersections of the road segment Posted Speed Limit – the speed limit posted along the road segment General Terrain – the terrain type of the area, whether level or rolling. Number of traffic signals and railroad crossings for this particular road segment. 7-3
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Map 1: Functional Classification for Broadway 7-4
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Table 7.1: Broadway Roadway Geometric Inventory Route 00042
00042
00042
00042
00042
00042
00259
00259
00259
00259
00259
00259
00259
00617
00617
00617
00617
00617
00803
01421
00259
01421
Name
Harpine Highway
West Ave
West Ave
N. Main St
W. Lee St
Timber Way
Mayland Rd
Mayland Rd
Mayland Rd
Mayland Rd
Mayland Rd
W. Lee St
Brocks Gap Rd
S Sunset Rd
S Sunset Rd
S Sunset Rd
N Sunset Rd
Spar Mine Rd
Daphna Rd
E Springbrook Rd
Brocks Gap Rd
Springbrook Rd
Segment From
Rte 809
SCL Broadway
Rte T‐1421
Rte 259 Alt
Rte 259 West
Rte 259 South
Route 42
Old ECL Broadway
Route 1421
ECL Broadway
Rte 259 Alt
Rte 42 West
WCL Broadway
Rte 786
SCL Broadway
Rte T‐1421
NCL Broadway
Rte 259 North
Rte 1437
Rte 803
Rte 617 North
Rte 42
Segment To
SCL Broadway
Rte T‐1421
Rte 259 Alt.
Rte 259 West
Rte 259 South
SCL Timberville
Old ECL Broadway
Rte 259
ECL Broadway
Rte 259 Alt.
Rte 42 East
WCL Broadway
Rte 617 North
SCL Broadway
Rte T‐1421
NCL Broadway
Rte 259 South
NCL Broadway
Rte 1421
Rte 259
Rte 613 South
Rte 803
Segment Operation Thru Pavement Length
Type
Lanes
Width
2
0.29
0.52
0.32
0.62
1.21
0.53
0.19
0.03
0.1
0.35
0.36
0.29
0.39
0.24
0.66
0.22
0.1
0.23
0.37
2.63
0.43
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
2W
4
2
2
2
2
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
48
36
40
40
20
48
40
40
24
24
20
20
20
18
18
20
16
21
16
36
22
36
Avg. Lane Width
Median Type
Right Shldr. Width
12
12
12
12
10
12
12
10
11
11
10
10
10
9
9
10
8
10
8
12
11
12
D
C
N
N
N
R
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
C
N
C
6
0
0
0
4
0
0
3
5
4
2
2
4
2
2
1
2
2
1
0
6
0
Left Shldr. Gen. Width Terr.
3
0
0
0
3
0
0
3
4
4
4
4
6
2
2
2
1
1
2
0
4
0
R
L
L
L
L
L
L
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
L
R
L
R
L
Access Cntrl.
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
% No Num. Num. Pass
Sig.
RR
0
100
100
100
100
0
100
100
79
100
100
100
36
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
80
100
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Posted Speed Limit
55
35
25
25
35
45
35
35
45
45
45
35
45
30
30
30
30
55
55
35
55
35
7-5
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Railroad Crossings There are four railway crossings; these crossings are listed in Table 7.2. All railroad crossings have been equipped with gates and flashing lights as safety precautions. Table 7.2 RAILROAD CROSSINGS OF PUBLIC STREETS
Location of Crossing Type of Crossing
Route 42 (South Main Street) At‐grade
Route 259 (West Lee Street) At‐grade
Route 1421 (West Springbrook Road) At‐grade
Route 1414 (Turner Avenue) At‐grade
Existing Traffic Volumes and Roadway Operations Traffic count data has been obtained for 22 roadway segments from VDOT and was conducted in the winter, 2008. The count locations are listed in Table 7.3. Table 7.3 COUNT LOCATIONS Roadway Segments – Machine Counts – 48 continuous hours (weekday)
Brocks Gap Road, between Route 618 North and Route 613 South
Brocks Gap Road, between the west town limits and Route 617 North
Daphna Road, between Route 1437 and Route 1421
E. Springbrook Road, between Route 803 and Route 259
Harpine Highway, between Route 809 and the south town limits
Mayland Road, between Route 42 and the old east town limits
Mayland Road, between Route 1421 and the east town limits
Mayland Road, between the east town limits and Route 259 alt.
Mayland Road, between the old east town limits and Route 259
Mayland Road, between Route 259 alt. and Route 42 east
N. Sunset Road, between the north town limits and Route 259 south
N. Main Street, between Route 259 alt and Route 259 west
S. Sunset Road, between the south town limits and Route T‐1421
S. Sunset Road, between Route T‐1421 and the north town limits
S. Sunset Road, between Route 786 and the south town limits
Spar Mine Road, between Route 259 north and the north town limits
Springbrook Road, from Route 42 to Route 803
Timber Way, between Route 259 south and the south town limits
W. Lee Street, between Route 259 west and Route 259 south
W. Lee Street, between Route 42 west and the west town limits
West Avenue, between the south town limits and Route T‐1421
West Avenue, between Route T‐1421 and Route 259 alt.
7-6
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Based on these traffic counts, an analysis was performed to quantify traffic congestion using standard traffic engineering level of service analysis. Level of Service (LOS) is a qualitative measure of traffic flow describing operational conditions. Six levels of service are defined by FHWA in the Highway Capacity Manual for use in evaluating roadway operating conditions. They are given letter designations from A to F, with LOS A representing the best operating conditions and F the worst. A facility may operate at a range of levels of service depending on time of day, day or week or period of the year. A qualitative description of the different levels of service is provided below.  LOS A – Drivers perceive little or no delay and easy progress along a corridor.  LOS B – Drivers experience some delay but generally driving conditions are favorable.  LOS C – Travel speeds are slightly lower than the posted speed with noticeable delay in intersection areas.  LOS D – Travel speeds are well below the posted speed with few opportunities to pass and considerable intersection delay.  LOS E – The facility is operating at capacity and there are virtually no useable gaps in the traffic.  LOS F – More traffic desires to use a particular facility than it is designed to handle resulting The approach used to determine deficient segments in Broadway was to analyze the volume of traffic on the roadway segments compared to the capacity of those segments, also known as the V/C ratio. For daily operating conditions, levels of service A, B, or C are acceptable. Levels of service D, E, or F represent deficient operations on those particular segments. Existing average annual traffic volumes (2008) are shown in Map 2. The existing analysis shows that two roadway segments can be expected to operate at or below LOS D under daily conditions. Table 4 and Map 3 display the level of service analysis for Broadway roadway segments. It should be noted that a level of service was not performed for all roadway segments in Broadway. A level of service analysis was performed for all roadway segments within the VDOT thoroughfare system for Broadway. Traffic count data was only available for these particular roadway segments. 7-7
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Table 7.4 Existing (2008) Level of Service Analysis Roadway Brocks Gap Road Brocks Gap Road Daphna Road E. Springbrook Rd Harpine Highway From Route 617 N. WCL Broadway
Route 1437 Route 803 Route 809 Mayland Road Route 42 Mayland Road Route 1421 Mayland Road ECL Broadway
Mayland Road Mayland Road N. Sunset Road N. Main Street Old ECL Broadway Route 259 alt.
NCL Broadway
Route 259 alt. S. Sunset Road SCL Broadway
S. Sunset Road Route T‐1421
S. Sunset Road Route 786 Spar Mine Road Route 259 N. Springbrook Road Timber Way Route 42 Route 259 S. W. Lee Street W. Lee Street Route 259 W.
Route 42 W. West Avenue SCL Broadway
West Avenue Route T‐1421
To Route 613 S.
Route 617 N.
Route 1421
Route 259
SCL Broadway Old ECL Broadway ECL Broadway Route 259 alt. Route 259
Volume(1) 8024
8024
1355
8650
9019
V/C 0.28 0.28 0.09 0.29 0.18 LOS C
C
B
C
A
1821
0.07 A
8282
0.59 A
8282
0.59 B
1821
0.10 B
Route 42 E.
Route 259 S.
Route 259 W. Route T‐
1421 NCL Broadway SCL Broadway NCL Broadway Route 803
SCL Timberville Route 259 S.
WCL Broadway Route T‐
1421 Route 259 alt. 8282
1155
6754
0.62 0.07 0.44 B
A
B
670
0.04 A
1155
0.07 A
670
0.04 A
2173
0.07 B
5086
12,132
0.25 0.34 C
A
7845
8024
0.53 0.28 B
C
9019
0.34 D
9019
0.83 B
(1) – Two­way volumes. 7-8
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Map 2: Current AADT ‐ 2008 7-9
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Map 3: Current LOS ‐ 2008 7-10
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Table 7.5 shows one deficient roadway segment operating at LOS D during daily operating conditions. All other roadway segments studied in Broadway are currently operating at an acceptable LOS, which is defined as LOS A, B or C. Table 7.5 Existing (2008) Deficient Segments Roadway From To Volume(1) V/C LOS West Avenue SCL Route T‐
9019
0.34 D
Broadway 1421 (1) – Two­way volumes. PARKING AND RIDESHARE Parking is allowed on Town streets except where indicated. Many businesses in the central business district rely on street parking for their customers. There are no ridesharing programs or park‐and‐
ride lots specific for the Town of Broadway. However, a regional rideshare was started in 2009 by the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission. The regional rideshare program services all of Rockingham County and matches commuters to any other destination within the five county Planning District Commission boundary. BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES Broadway has no bicycle lanes on its streets or pathways designed for bicycle use. Furthermore, there are no principal pathways in Broadway are used for walking and hiking. TRANSIT, SOCIAL SERVICE TRANSPORTATION, AND TAXI 1) There are less than 10 community service agencies in Broadway that provide some transportation for their own programs. Most agencies are located in Rockingham County and Broadway is included in their service area to provide transportation services for their clientele. 2) There are no taxi companies that are located in Broadway. 3) There is no fixed‐route service or deviated route service located in this section of Rockingham County. AIR TRAVEL AND RAIL There are no regional airports within a 30‐mile radius of the town. The closest regional commercial airport to Broadway is located in Weyers Cave, about 35 miles to the southeast. Two other smaller local airports are located near Broadway, the Bridgewater Air Park and the New Market Airport. There are two rail spurs that provide rail access in Broadway. Both are Norfolk and Southern corporation spurs, with one feeding Virginia Poultry Growers Cooperative, and the other feeding the Westvaco Wood Yard. 7-11
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
GOODS MOVEMENT Broadway has historically functioned as a manufacturing town that experiences significant truck traffic generated from industries in the general vicinity, as well as through trucks from outside the area. Truck movement through the Town generally follows either Route 259 east or Route 42 south of the Town. Most goods shipments to and from Broadway and the immediate area are by truck. CURRENT TRANSPORTATION PLANS AND PROJECTS One transportation projects for the Town is included in the Virginia Transportation Six‐Year Program (FY 2010‐2015). The Six‐Year Program is a listing and six‐year funding allocation for projects across Virginia. In addition, being a member of the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission, planning efforts that encompass the Town of Broadway are performed by this organization. The project included is the bridge replacement over Linville Creek on Route 1421. Construction is projected to begin in 2012 with a total project cost of $3.5 million dollars. COMPREHENSIVE PLANS The Town adopted the most recent Broadway Comprehensive Plan in 2004. The plan details the existing transportation network as well as identifies some transportation goals, but makes no recommendations for improvements or changes. 7-12
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
FUTURE TRANSPORTATION CONDITIONS (2035) In order to determine transportation needs for the Town of Broadway, traffic projections were made to analyze the operations of the transportation system in 2035. Transportation needs through 2035 were identified based on this analysis. These projected needs as well as existing needs formed the basis for the recommendations in this section. FORECAST METHODOLOGY Traffic volumes for 2035 were developed based on an analysis of historic traffic data for Broadway roadways. All available traffic data for the period from 1980 to 2008 was collected and summarized. A trend‐line analysis was performed and growth rates for major roadways were developed. These growth rates were analyzed and checked against population and employment projections for the Town. Based on this analysis and to ensure that reasonable levels of traffic growth can be accommodated by the Broadway transportation system, all roadways in the Town were anticipated to incur traffic growth between 1.5 percent and 2.0 percent per year. Traffic trend analysis using historic counts for major roads in Broadway was used. Population trends and forecasts were used as an additional tool in determining an appropriate growth rate to use for Broadway roads. For evaluation of future (2035) traffic conditions, traffic volumes were projected for the 20 year period. Growth factors were determined for the 22 separate road segments by performing a linear trend analysis using traffic data from 1980 to 2008. The results of this analysis were growth factors, one for each roadway section along the route. The 2008 traffic volumes were then multiplied by the respective growth factor to obtain the 2035 traffic projection for that segment of the roadway. In order to evaluate the future (2035) roadway conditions, projected traffic volumes were used to calculate LOS on the roadway corridors in the study area. As with the existing traffic conditions evaluation, capacity analysis was used to determine the LOS in the study area. YEAR 2035 VOLUMES AND NEEDS Daily traffic volumes for 2035 are shown in Map 4. The forecasted traffic volumes show that eight roadway segments are anticipated to operate at a deficient level of service in 2035. Table 6 and Map 5 display the 2035 level of service for the Town of Broadway roadway segments. Similar to the existing level of service analysis, traffic volume calculations and LOS determinations were only done for those roadway segments within the VDOT thoroughfare system. The approach used in the capacity analyses for this study was to use the planning‐level analysis techniques of the Highway Capacity Software (HCS), Version 5.3. If, by using this planning level analysis, the intersection was identified as operating at either near or over capacity conditions (defined as deficient) the analyst would run HCS “operations” analysis to identify and test improvement recommendations. 7-13
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Map 4: Projected AADT 2035 7-14
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Map 5: Projected LOS – 2035 7-15
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Table 7.6 Year 2035 Level of Service Roadway From To Volume(1) Brocks Gap Road Route 617 N. Route 613 S.
12,800
Brocks Gap Road WCL Broadway
Route 617 N.
12,800
Daphna Road Route 1437 Route 1421
2300
E. Springbrook Rd Route 803 Route 259
12,400
Harpine Highway Route 809 SCL 14,200
Broadway Mayland Road Route 42 Old ECL 2500
Broadway Mayland Road Route 1421 ECL 14,900
Broadway Mayland Road ECL Broadway
Route 259 14,900
alt. Mayland Road Old ECL Route 259
2500
Broadway Mayland Road Route 259 alt.
Route 42 E.
11,200
N. Sunset Road NCL Broadway
Route 259 S.
1450
N. Main Street Route 259 alt. Route 259 9100
W. S. Sunset Road SCL Broadway
Route T‐
900
1421 S. Sunset Road Route T‐1421
NCL 1450
Broadway S. Sunset Road Route 786 SCL 900
Broadway Spar Mine Road Route 259 N. NCL 2800
Broadway Springbrook Road Route 42 Route 803
6500
Timber Way Route 259 S. SCL 15,400
Timberville W. Lee Street Route 259 W.
Route 259 S.
11,100
W. Lee Street Route 42 W. WCL 12,100
Broadway West Avenue SCL Broadway
Route T‐
12,600
1421 West Avenue Route T‐1421
Route 259 12,600
alt. (1) – Two­way volumes. V/C 0.44 0.44 0.35 0.41 0.29 LOS D
D
B
D
A
0.1 B
1.12 D
1.12 D
0.15 B
0.88 0.08 0.62 B
B
B
0.09 B
0.08 B
0.05 A
0.08 B
0.24 0.45 C
A
0.78 0.44 B
D
0.5 D
1.22 D
7-16
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Table 7.7 shows the eight deficient roadway segments operating at LOS D during daily operating conditions. All other roadway segments studied in Broadway are operating at an acceptable LOS, which is defined LOS A, B, or C. Table 7.7 Year 2035 Deficient Segments Roadway From To Volume(1) V/C LOS Brocks Gap Road Route 617 N. Route 613 12,800
0.44 D
S. Brocks Gap Road WCL Route 617 12,800
0.44 D
Broadway N. E. Springbrook Rd Route 803 Route 259
12,400
0.41 D
Mayland Road Route 1421 ECL 14,900
1.12 D
Broadway Mayland Road ECL Route 259 14,900
1.12 D
Broadway alt. W. Lee Street Route 42 W. WCL 12,100
0.44 D
Broadway West Avenue SCL Route T‐
12,600
0.5 D
Broadway 1421 West Avenue Route T‐1421 Route 259 12,600
1.22 D
alt. (1) – Two­way volumes. 7-17
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
TRANSPORTATION RECOMMENDATIONS Based on analysis of the highway capacity, safety, geometry, and other local issues affecting the performance of the transportation system serving the Town, recommendations were developed in conjunction with Broadway officials. The proposed transportation plan recommendations are described below. The recommendations have been developed based on existing and future transportation needs. These include flow and safety conditions, multimodal transportation deficiencies, and goods movement. The transportation system recommendations for Broadway are divided into three phases (see Map 6). Phase One recommendations relate to the most important needs of the Town that are based on relatively low costs and impacts and ease of implementation. Phase Two improvements are midterm improvements intended to correct existing deficiencies but, based on projected costs and/or potential impacts, would require a greater number of years to plan and fund. Phase Three improvements are long‐term projects that are intended to correct deficiencies to the year 2035. Short Term (Prior to 2015) Recommendations Five projects were identified as short‐term, immediate improvements that could be implemented prior to 2015 and are described below.  Broadway Avenue at Route 259 (Mayland Road): This intersection is one targeted for an increase in safety measures. The recommendation is to convert this intersection into a stop light controlled intersection. This is intended to improve safety by mitigating accidents due to the left turn movement from Broadway Avenue to Route 259 North.  Springbrook Road and Main Street: The recommendation is to install crosswalks at this location to provide a safer pedestrian environment near the downtown area of Broadway.  Broadway High School Entrance Road and Springbrook Road: The recommendation is to install crosswalks at this location to provide a safer pedestrian environment near Broadway High School.  Holly Hill Street: The recommendation is to install sidewalks along the complete section of this roadway to provide a safer pedestrian environment near Hillyard Middle School.  Turner Avenue from the Intersection of Turner/Holly Hill to Turner/Broadway Community Park: The recommendation is to install sidewalks at this location to provide a safer pedestrian environment near John C. Myers Elementary School and the Broadway Community Park. Long Term (Following 2015) Recommendations The Long Term recommendations are intended to support more pedestrian and multimodal needs of the community while enhancing both the appeal and traffic operations of Broadway’s residential areas. Three projects are in this phase and are anticipated to be implemented following 2015. 7-18
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan



Multi‐use Trail along Linville Creek: The recommendation is to reconstruct a multi‐use trail following Linville Creek from Heritage Park on Turner Avenue to W. Springbrook Road. W. Springbrook Road: The recommendation is to install sidewalks along W. Springbrook Road connecting to the Multi‐use Trail along Linville Creek. W. Springbrook Road/Sunset Drive: The recommendation is to install crosswalks at this location to provide a safer pedestrian environment. Additionally, pedestrian signage should be installed on Sunset Drive to alert drivers to pedestrian traffic. Further Study/Implementation Recommendations For consideration in future transportation planning efforts, there are two recommended studies and two points of consideration for implementation of future transportation accommodations. The three study efforts are: 1. Route 259 (Mayland Road) Corridor Study: This corridor presents several safety, capacity and environmental deficiencies ranging from heavy vehicle usage to mudslides to sight distance issues at various intersections. The recommendation is to study this corridor in‐depth, develop recommendations and cost estimates for proposed recommendations. 2. Lee Street and Holly Hill Avenue: Complete intersection study to review possible recommendations to accommodate an acceptable intersection level of service. Recommendations may include all‐way stop control, intersection signalization, hours of restricted turn movements or left turn lane installation. 3. Complete a sidewalk connectivity study to identify where “gaps” exists in the sidewalk network and prepare a prioritized list of locations where new sidewalk construction would improve the pedestrian facilities within Broadway. Additionally, future transportation implementation policies should include, where appropriate, design standards for on‐street parking to ensure adequate sight distance, particularly at intersections. As well, all newly constructed curb ramps should be within ADA compliance standards. 7-19
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Map 6: Proposed Transportation Improvements 7-20
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
TRANSPORTATION PLAN GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Summary: The Town will foster the road improvements that are necessary to accommodate the expected future levels of development and traffic. All major land development projects within the Urban Growth Areas may be required to design and build an on‐site street system that provides sufficient capacity for the proposed on‐site traffic, provides for street connections to all adjoining properties, and provides the appropriate linkage to the surrounding road network that will contribute toward the ultimate grid network for the Urban Growth Area. The street network should be an extension of the town grid networks wherever possible. Goal 1. Provide a safe and secure transportation system. Strategy 1.1 Give transportation safety issues priority in funding decisions. Objectives and Actions for Implementation:  Adopt standards for rezonings that include road and bridge capacities as criteria for approval.  Identify dangerous transportation mode/user conflicts within the transportation system.  Increase safety awareness of users and providers of transportation systems.  Use traffic calming measures at appropriate locations.  Determine appropriate level of signage to enhance transportation safety conditions. Goal 2. Enhance the connectivity of the existing transportation network within the Town across all modes for both people and freight. Strategy 2.1 Protect existing public investments in roads by: Objective:  Coordinating land use commitments with transportation capacity.  Defining and protecting potential future road corridors for long term needs.  Designing a transportation system that serves all modes (motor vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians) by locating roads, paths, lanes and sidewalks according to need. Actions for Implementation:  Prepare corridor development plans as elements of the Comprehensive Plan for major roads so as to foster a parallel road network to provide alternative routes to the arterial and primary road system to reduce the number, and control the location of entrances.  Encourage proposed employment centers locate in close proximity to existing or planned major roads.  Require building setbacks that reflect the right‐of‐way. This will likely ensure corridor preservation by identifying and preserving right‐of‐way for future transportation improvements.  Require minimum separation of entrances in accord with the roadway classification and the adopted corridor plan and consider the use of secondary roads, inter‐parcel connection, and 7-21
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan



shared commercial streets/entrances to preserve the capacity within the transportation network. Encourage the design of a road system to meet agricultural needs. Design local streets to give priority to both vehicles and pedestrians. Require traffic impact studies for major development proposals. The Town will coordinate preparation of guidelines for development applicants in preparing traffic impact studies. Applicants will be required to analyze site access elements and to coordinate such findings with adopted Town policy. Strategy 2.2 Bring greater resources to transportation planning and funding. Objectives and Actions for Implementation:  Encourage regional transportation planning, investment, and projects that support new and/or expanding economic development opportunities.  Coordinate transportation planning between the Town and other jurisdictions to improve mobility.  Share planning and costs with other jurisdictions when Town road improvements have mutual benefits.  Solicit private financial participation in projects.  Require identification of initial and long‐term transportation impacts associated with proposed developments. Strategy 2.3 In planning and designing the road system, consider public roads to be public spaces, which serve multiple public purposes in addition to carrying motor vehicles. Objectives and Actions for Implementation:  Promote and establish attractive gateway/entrance corridors.  Promote and adhere to the policies in the Broadway Streetscape Plan. Strategy 2.4 Promote alternative modes to reduce traffic volumes on roadways. Objectives and Actions for Implementation:  Encourage the use of bicycles in the design of new roads and developments.  Require pedestrian access and circulation in development areas.  Work with adjoining localities to extend bus service where practical. Encourage initiatives for public transportation and transit alternatives initiated by private sector or community groups, including public/private partnerships.  Encourage the use of rail by industry, and deference to new industries, to use rail instead of solely trucks. Encourage the coordination of adjacent land uses to best facilitate the maximum use of the railroads.  Designate community parking areas to facilitate ride‐sharing. 7-22
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Goal 3. Ensure continued quality of life during project development and implementation by considering natural, historic, and community environments, including special populations. Objectives and Actions for Implementation:  Design developments and transportation facilities that are compatible with the aesthetic, historic, and physical characteristics of area localities.  Minimize transportation impacts to historic, cultural, and environmental resources and local communities.  Develop a set of design criteria, including landscaping, setbacks, and buffers, specifically for rural roadways that improve mobility and safety while keeping rural aesthetic conditions intact.  Formulate and adopt Context Sensitive Design criteria in transportation planning and project development. Goal 4. Encourage land use and transportation coordination, including but not limited to, development of procedures or mechanisms to incorporate all modes, while engaging the private sector. Objectives and Actions for Implementation:  Promote the coordination of transportation improvements as land use changes and focus the majority of improvements within designated growth areas.  Within designated growth areas, encourage mixed‐use developments with adequate internal circulation systems to minimize the length and number of vehicular trips and optimize traffic flow.  Promote street design in proposed new developments that facilitates non‐motorized trips and investments in an interconnected transportation network (transit and bicycle/pedestrian facilities).  Consider innovative land development patterns and site designs to prevent additional congestion and improve accessibility.  Coordinate planning and development with governmental transportation agencies at all levels, environmental land use plans and regulations. Goal 5. Take over the maintenance of streets from VDOT. Actions for Implementation:  Provide necessary resources for the takeover of maintenance once it has been approved. 7-23
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 8|UTILITIES
INTRODUCTION
The Utilities component is an important part of any comprehensive plan. The Towns infrastructure is a
key component in its ability to ensure clean, safe and abundant supplies of drinking water which
ultimately relates to the prosperity of a community. This chapter takes also into account solid waste
and wastewater.
The utilities chapter relates to several other plan elements, including, but not limited to, natural
resources, economic development, and housing. The development of water supplies sometimes affects
other natural resource goals. In such cases, one should be aware of sensitive areas and resources.
Access to water and sewer infrastructure is directly related to economic development and a
community’s ability to attract a diverse business base. Such infrastructure can often determine the
Towns ability to expand both residentially and commercially. When planning for development, a
community must always be aware of their water and wastewater resources.
WATER
The Broadway Water Plant treats water by conventional methods in the operation of a rapid sand
filtration plant. The Water Plant has a treatment capacity of 674,000 gallons per day (gpd) and is
located at 350 Shenandoah Avenue. The plant operates an average of 10 hours per day and is staffed
by two Class I operators and one Class II operator. The plant provides water service to approximately
3,700 people and has a total of 1,452 residential, business and commercial metered connections.
The current raw water source for the plant is the North Fork of the Shenandoah River. To date, this
source has provided adequate water for the Town; however, records indicate that during periods of
low flow conditions (less than 233,200 gallons per day), the North Fork will not provide adequate water
to allow operation of the plant at peak capacity. Linville Creek is an alternate and/or additional raw
water source for the Town. The calculated safe yield of Linville Creek is 880,000 gpd which will more
than satisfy the peak demand of the Town's water plant.
In 2002, the Town entered into a long-term lease on a new spring, which should adequately serve the
residents for the foreseeable future. Plains Mill Spring is one of Rockingham County’s larger springs,
with flows averaging 5 mgd. A legal issue with a downstream property owner has put this project on
hold for the time being.
The original water distribution system was installed in 1935 and currently consists of cast iron and
ductile iron pipes, one elevated and two ground storage tanks with a combined capacity of 1,010,000
gallons, and two booster pump stations creating three different distribution pressure zones. No major
improvements have been made to the treatment facility recently.
Pipe sizes in the system range from 2 to 12 inches in diameter. The 160 fire hydrants scattered
throughout the system are tested routinely to assure they are working properly. Records for the
8-1
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
calendar year 2010 confirm that Broadway treated an average of 153,000 gallons per day and sold an
average of 125,020 gpd. The difference is due to use within the treatment plant, use for fire fighting
and training and any leakage within the distribution system.
In order to supplement the businesses the Town of Broadway purchases water from the Food
Processor’s Water Cooperative located in Timberville. The Town provides water to all areas within the
Town and some areas that are identified in the annexation boundary. Mapping of all Town line
locations is available in the Town office. The party desiring the connection must make all necessary
excavations and pay for all materials necessary for connection. The Town's Development Regulations
require developers to extend utilities. The water billings are computed on a bi-monthly basis, with
2011 rates as follows:
BIMONTHLY WATER RATES
0 - 3,000 Gallons .............................................................................. $13.80
3,001 - 100,000 ....................................................................... $3.27/1,000
100,000 – 400,000 .................................................................. $3.33/1,000
Above 400,000........................................................................ $3.73/1,000
CONNECTION CHARGES
Residential ................................................................................. $3,150.00
Commercial...............................................................................$3,150.00+
8-2
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
FUTURE NEEDS
The following information was obtained from the Upper Shenandoah River Basin Water Supply Plan
which was developed in accordance with 9-VAC 25-780, Local and Regional Water Supply Planning. The
plan is a comprehensive analysis of water sources and is designed to:
• Ensure that adequate safe drinking water is available
• Encourage and protect all beneficial uses.
• Encourage and promote alternative water sources.
• Promote Conservation
POPULATION PROJECTIONS
The Town of Broadway has grown rapidly in the last decade. Reasons for this include, expanding the
town boundary through two annexations and a housing boom. When looking at the short-term growth
trend, projects are skewed. Because of this, a 3.0 percent growth rate has been established as the
desired rate of growth for the planning period (See 2030 Broadway Comprehensive Plan, Chapter 4).
Assuming a 3.0% annual growth rate, population projections are presented in Table 8-1.
Table 8-1
Current and Projected Population Estimates
Year
Population
2000
2,192
2010
3,691
2020
4,960
2030
6,666
2040
8,959
Note: Assumes a 3 % annual rate of growth.
Source: Upper Shenandoah River Basin Water Supply Plan.
DEMAND PROJECTIONS
Assuming a 3.0% annual growth rate, demand projections are presented in Table 8-2.
Year
2010
2020
2030
2040
Table 8-2
Projected Water Demand
Water Demand (mgd)
0.37
0.50
0.67
0.90
Note: Assumes a 3 % annual rate of growth
Source: Upper Shenandoah River Basin Water Supply Plan.
8-3
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Total demand is projected to increase 140 percent over the period (2010-2040). Based on information
provided by the Town of Broadway, the current demand is disaggregated into the categories presented
in Table 8-3.
Table 8-3
Current Demand Disaggregation
User Category
% of Total Demand
Residential
70
Commercial
7
Industrial
10
Lost and Unaccounted-for Water
13
Sales to Other Communities
0
Total
100
Source: Upper Shenandoah River Basin Water Supply Plan.
It is assumed that the same percentage breakdown between each user category will remain constant
over the planning period. Based on this assumption, projected demands, by demand sector, for the
Town of Broadway are presented in Table 8-4.
Table 8-4
Disaggregated Water Demand Projections –
Year
Demand Sector
Residential
Commercial
Industrial
Lost and
Unaccounted-for
Water
Sales to Other
Communities
Total
2010
0.26
0.03
0.04
2020
0.35
0.04
0.05
2030
0.47
0.05
0.07
2040
0.63
0.06
0.09
0.05
0.07
0.09
0.12
0
0
0
0
0.37
0.50
0.67
0.90
Source: Upper Shenandoah River Basin Water Supply Plan.
8-4
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
STATEMENT OF NEEDS AND ALTERNATIVES
This section addresses the adequacies of existing water supplies to meet demands through the
planning period, based on the data presented in previous sections of this report.
Projected Year 2040 water demands and current permitted capacities of each locality are compared in
Table 8-5
Table 8-1
Adequacy of Existing Water Supplies
Locality
Broadway
Planning Region
Projected Year
2040 Water
Demand (mgd)
VDH Permitted
Capacity (mgd)
Year 2040 demand
as % of Permitted
Capacity
0.90
42.09
0.67
44.18
134
95
Source: Upper Shenandoah River Basin Water Supply Plan.
Based solely on these data, the region as a whole, will meet its projected 2040 water demand with the
existing regional supply. However, that would assume that the necessary infrastructure was in place to
move water around the region as necessary to meet individual community deficits. Realistically, that is
not an appropriate manner for the region to view its future supply needs.
When reviewing the data by locality, Broadway shows a deficits in the Year 2040 compared to existing
permitted sources. It should be emphasized that these 2040 demand numbers are based on the
assumption of 3 percent annual growth. Therefore, a change in projection methodology could result in
a change in the 2040 demand projection. The methodology used herein is a logical, reasonable
manner in which to project demands. As a result, the Town has taken initial planning steps for future
water supplies and expansions of its system. In 2002, the Town entered into a long-term lease on a
new spring, which would adequately serve the residents for the foreseeable future. Plains Mill Spring is
one of Rockingham County’s largest springs, with flows averaging 5 mgd. All preliminary engineering
studies have been completed for this project.
8-5
Town of Broadway
Water Utilities
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Planned Annexation
Water Utilities
Water Facilities
Sources: Town of Broadway, Rockingham County,
CSPDC, Commonwealth of VA, USGS.
No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
to accuracy, completeness, reliability, or usefulness of any
information depicted in this map. Map prepared and
produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
(April 2010)
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8" waterline
10" waterline
12" waterline
¦
0
0.25
0.5
Miles
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
SEWER
In October 1998, the Town of Broadway acquired a deep aeration Modular Wastewater Reclamation
and Reuse System. The system had an initial capacity of treating and storing a minimum of 1,923,000
gallons of wastewater per day. The system is unique in that it reclaims the wastewater (by way of land
application practices) that spills pollutants into the north fork of the Shenandoah River, a tributary of
the Chesapeake Bay. The Virginia Environmental endowment endorsed the system. Operation of the
system is mandated to be in compliance with all provisions of the State Operating Permits issued by
the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality.
Recently, the facility, now named the Broadway Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility, located at
15524 New Market Road, has undergone a 12 million dollar upgrade, which will make the finished
facility state of the art. The system is owned by the Town of Broadway and receives sewage from
Broadway, Timberville and two poultry plants, Pilgrim’s Pride and Cargill. In winter 2010, New Market
connected to the Regional facility. A map of line locations is available in the Town office. There are
1,359 sewer connections.
BIMONTHLY SEWER RATES
0 - 3,000 Gallons .............................................................................. $13.33
3,001 - 100,000 ....................................................................... $3.14/1,000
100,001 – 400,000 .................................................................. $3.03/1,000
Above 400,000........................................................................ $3.39/1,000
8-7
Town of Broadway
Sewer Utilities
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259
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)
"
803
L
%
"
Railroad
Rivers and Streams
Town Maintenance
Town Boundary
Planned Annexation
Water Utilities
Sewer Utilities
?
!
Sources: Town of Broadway, Rockingham County,
CSPDC, Commonwealth of VA, USGS.
No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
to accuracy, completeness, reliability, or usefulness of any
information depicted in this map. Map prepared and
produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
(April 2010)
2
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A
Manholes
Valves
Emergency Stand Pipe
Regional WWTP
Sewerlines
2" Forced Sewer Line
4" Sewerline
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6" Sewerline
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8" Sewerline
8" Forced Sewerline
10" Sewerline
12" Sewerline
15" Sewerline
15" Forced Sewerline
¦
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Miles
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
SOLID WASTE
Broadway uses Rockingham County's landfill located at 2400 Grassy Creek Road to dispose of solid
waste. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality has promulgated new regulations which
address siting, construction, operation, monitoring, and closing of landfills and other solid waste
management facilities. These regulations outline a policy promoting a comprehensive waste
management system which includes planning, source reduction, reuse, recycling, incineration, and
landfilling. These regulations mandate that every local government, either singly or in a combined
effort, develop solid waste management plans outlining comprehensive programs which meet the new
standards. Rockingham County and the seven incorporated towns within the County have opted to be
considered a single planning body, the Greater Rockingham Waste Management Planning Region, and
have adopted the 2010 Greater Rockingham Solid Waste Management Plan. This plan provides
direction and establishes goals for source reduction, reuse, and recycling in Rockingham County and
the incorporated towns.
Garbage collection is provided to all residential properties within the Town. In an effort to reduce the
waste stream, the Town also provides curbside collection of recyclables (paper, aluminum, plastic, and
glass) to its residents. Both services are funded through service fees and are provided by Waste
Management of Virginia. Garbage collection service is available outside the Town limits and to
businesses within the Town by private agreement with Waste Management of Virginia. To assist in
waste stream reduction County residents may deliver their recyclables to one of the container sites
located in Rockingham County, one of which is located at 142 Mayland Road (Rt. 259), west of North
Valley Pike (Rt. 11) in Mauzy.
8-9
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
UTILITIES GOALS
Broadway provides water and sewer service throughout its boundaries. These utilities are one of
the greatest responsibilities of the Town government and constitute the bulk of the Town's finances.
Utilities also are an important growth factor, especially for businesses.
For the water system, a raw water intake on Linville Creek, to be used as an alternate water source, has
been developed and allows for additional capacity during low flow periods. The regional wastewater
facility with the Town of Timberville, Town of New Market, Pilgrims Pride and Cargill will provide costeffective sewer service to area residents, as well as bring local wastewater discharges up to DEQ
permitting standards.
1.
Continue to provide a safe supply of drinking water to all Town residents and businesses.
a.
Town staff should continue to ensure that the water system meets all state and federal
requirements.
b. The Town should plan for appropriate expansion to meet foreseeable needs.
c. The Town should coordinate regional efforts to ensure adequate needs are met.
.
2.
Continue to provide sewer service to Town residents and businesses.
a. Town staff should ensure that the sewer system meets all state and federal requirements.
b. The Town should plan for appropriate expansion to meet foreseeable needs.
c. The Town should encourage routine maintenance and improvements to aging
infrastructure.
3.
Seek any available state or federal funding for system improvements.
a. The Town should encourage routine maintenance and improvements to aging
infrastructure.
8-10
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 9|COMMUNITY FACILITIES
INTRODUCTION
Communities provide a variety of services to its residents and businesses. Services include, fire and
police protection, park and recreation programs, schools, libraries and emergency services. These
services are often carried out in community owned buildings. Diversity in community facilities allows
for thoughtful community collaboration, design, maintenance and administration. A community can
take the initiative to bring people together to service a community’s best overall long-term interests.
TOWN HALL
The Town Hall is located in the Municipal Building constructed in 1984 and is located at 116 Broadway
Avenue. This facility consists of 2,800 square feet and includes the Town offices, police department,
and the council room; however, with the current growth rate the facility will no longer be adequate in
the coming years.
The maintenance building is located at 201 Fifth Street. The water plant is located at 350 Shenandoah
Avenue. Broadway’s main sewage lift station is also located on Shenandoah Avenue. Raw sewage is
transferred to the Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant located at 15524 New Market Road.
The Town of Broadway participates in many joint programs with Rockingham County. Examples include
membership in the Greater Rockingham Waste Management Planning Region, use of the County
landfill by the Town, assistance from the Rockingham County Sheriff's Department, use of the county
jail, assistance from the Massanutten Regional Library, recreational assistance, building inspection,
health department assistance, and the assistance of the County dog warden.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Early Town records indicate that Broadway has always had a police officer, first referred to as Town
Sergeant. This was an elected position until 1954 when the Town Charter was amended to allow the
appointment of a Chief of Police. Today Broadway has four full-time police officers, paid entirely by
the Town: one Police Chief, one Sergeant, two Patrolmen and 3 part-time officers and 1 part-time
employee. The police officers work in shifts to provide as much coverage as possible. The service area
of the Broadway Police Department is within the Town Limits, unless otherwise requested as back-up
by another law enforcement agency such as the State Police, Rockingham County Sheriff's Department,
or Timberville Police Department.
Police personnel are required to complete courses in police protection, become state certified within
one year of employment, and routinely comply with re-certification requirements. Officers must also
complete 40 hours of in-service every two years. Five of those hours must be considered “legal.”
Presently, the space in use as the police headquarters is barely adequate. It consists of a large office
area and a records room in the Town Hall. There are no jail facilities in Broadway, as the Rockingham
County Jail is used. Police equipment consists of a 2008, 2009, 2010 Ford Crown Victoria and a 2006
Ford Explorer and one mobile radar unit.
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
BROADWAY EMERGENCY SQUAD
The Broadway Emergency Squad is an entirely volunteer organization which was founded in 1953.
Currently there are approximately 40 active members. In Rockingham County all rescue companies
work together although they have specific service areas. The Broadway Emergency Squad serves 280
square miles in the Broadway-Timberville area. It extends north to the county line, east to Tenth
Legion and Lacey Spring, south to Wengers Mill on Route 42, (Harpine Highway) and west to the West
Virginia line. In 2010, the Broadway Emergency Squad and Bergton Substation responded to
approximately 2,000 calls for emergency assistance, including medical, traffic crashes, fires and public
service request.
The Broadway Emergency Squad is located between Fourth and Fifth Streets in Broadway at 525 South
Main Street. The facility includes eleven bays, a banquet room, men’s and women’s bunk rooms with
showers, a kitchen, a lounge, radio room, offices, and a training room. To provide more efficient
coverage, the Broadway Emergency Squad opened a substation in the Bergton area in 1976. The
Squad is equipped with one Basic Life Support and five Advanced Life Support ambulances, a medium
duty crash unit, a heavy duty crash/disaster unit, one basic first response SERV unit, one advance life
support first response SERV unit, and an 6 wheel gator EMS unit for mountain rescue located at the
Broadway station. The substation at Bergton currently has one advance life support ambulance, one
basic ambulance, and one basic first response SERV unit.
Squad members are well trained. There are multiple types of membership in the squad, each with
different levels of training. Probationary members must be trained in CPR and EMT Basic. To become
a full member of the rescue squad, volunteers must complete the probationary period and training (an
in agency mentoring package with a senior member and a EVOC class). Further training is optional to
the member. These include Emergency Medical Technician Enhanced, Emergency Medical Technician
Intermediate, and Emergency Medical Technician Paramedic. These courses require anywhere from
100 hours to more than 400 hours of additional training. Additional shorter courses are available in the
use of specific equipment and techniques. Monthly drills are held each month to review skills and
introduce members to new procedures and policies.
Additionally, all EMT’s from Basic through Paramedic must complete additional hours of continuing
education each year in order to maintain their current level of certification.
Other memberships include, Junior member, for those age 16 to 18 years of age and requires CPR and
EMT Basic training and Associate members, which do not have to undergo any medical training, and
can assist with fund raising and functions other than ambulance calls. The squad has multi members
trained at the EMT-Enhanced level and above. Every eight days, each member has mandatory squad
duty at the station from 6:00 p.m. until 5:00 a.m.
The Broadway Emergency Squad operates on a budget of approximately $150,000 annually. This does
not include capital improvement projects of replacing aging equipment and ambulances. The BES
receives monies from Rockingham County, soft billing from the patient’s insurance company, and
donations from the community. Additional monies are raised by members through projects such as
8-2
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
auctions, an annual fund drive letter each May, chicken barbecues, and catering events by the
Broadway Emergency Squad Ladies Auxiliary.
Additionally, Rockingham County Fire and Rescue provides assistance to the BES by staffing the station
with two crews at all times consisting of two fire/rescue personnel on each crew. One crew works
Monday through Friday, 6 am till 6 pm each day. The second crew works Monday through Sunday, on
rotating 24 hour shifts to assist the Broadway Emergency Squad in answering the approximately 2000
calls per year for emergency assistance that we answer.
The BES is always looking for new volunteers to join the squad and serve their community in providing
emergency medical services to those in need in our community. These members can be associate
members providing non-medical support to members providing Advance Life Support medical
assistance. New members are always welcome.
BROADWAY VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT
The Broadway Volunteer Fire Department protects the Town of Broadway and the surrounding
communities of Cootes Store, Fulks Run, Mayland and environs. The protection district encompasses
154 square miles in the first due area. The Fire Department routinely responds with adjoining fire
departments for mutual aid assistance in Bergton, Timberville, New Market, Orkney Springs,
Harrisonburg, and portions of West Virginia.
The present-day Fire Department was chartered in 1936 but fire protection in the Town can be traced
back as far as 1905, using a hand-drawn chemical extinguisher. The Fire Department is made up of 50
members consisting of 42 firefighters and 8 non-firefighters. The volunteer force is supplemented by
two career firefighters from the County of Rockingham who provide coverage of the day shift.
The Department is equipped with a fleet of eight vehicles:
• 1987 Pierce Arrow pumper, 1,250 GPM
• 2001 Pierce Saber Pumper: 1,250 GPM
• 2001 International/Pierce Tanker: 500 GPM & 2.000 Gallon Water Tank
• 2006 Ford/CET Brush Truck: 250 GPM
• 2001 Ford Crown Victoria SERV (Specialized Emergency Response Vehicle)
• 1990 Ford Super Duty Squad (Light Duty Squad)
• 2003 Ford Expedition (SERV)
Members continuously train in all phases of firefighting, rescue, and emergency medical services. The
Fire Department conducts in-station drills encompassing fire and medical skills. This training is not
considered a certification class, but a refresher to skills already obtained. This is given to new members
of the department as well, to assist in future certification courses he/she may attend. Required
training consists members have completed the Virginia Department of Fire Programs Firefighter 1
certification course. For member to operate vehicles they must have successfully completed the
Emergency Vehicle Operator Course (EVOC). All remaining training opportunities are left to the
decision of each individual.
8-3
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
The Fire Department operates from the main station located at 117 North Central Street in Broadway.
The station is outfitted with two apparatus bays, communications and engineering room, officer's
room, a bingo hall, kitchen, two restrooms, and a lounge. The Fire Department is funded through
allocations from the Town of Broadway, County of Rockingham, State of Virginia, as well as public
donations.
RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE
A well-planned park and open space system is an essential part of any sound community development
plan. Open space serves a number of functions for the community in addition to the role of safe,
convenient, and well-equipped recreation areas. The Town continues to seek new projects that would
expand recreation opportunities to its citizens. In 2011 the Town submitted a Rural Business Enterprise
Grant seeking USDA funding to create a permanent farmers market promenade.
The Town of Broadway contains a variety of recreational facilities. In addition, the Rockingham
Recreation Department makes available a wide range of team and individual sports, summer
playground programs, and extensive creative classes.
Recreation Facilities in Broadway
1.
Broadway Community Park: This 13-acre park is owned by the Town of Broadway and was
previously leased by the Broadway Park Corporation. The Park Corporation has renovated the
equipment shed into handicapped accessible restrooms and a snack shack. Recent
renovations have been made to the pool, tennis courts, and baseball field. An additional
entrance/exit to the Park was constructed by VDOT in the fall of 1993 using recreational access
funds. This park contains the following:
• Community Center, used by Broadway's civic groups and citizens
• Junior Olympic size pool with a bathhouse
• Three pavilions along with 36 picnic tables
• Trainer, softball, and Little League ball diamonds
• Paved basketball court
• Three tennis courts
• Croquet court
• Various playground equipment, including kids’ castle
• Walking trail around perimeter of park
• Skateboard Park
2.
Heritage Park: Heritage Park borders a portion of Linville Creek and offers open grassy space, a
small pavilion, footbridge and walking paths. An additional 4 acres has been donated to the
Town for the expansion of this heavily utilized park.
8-4
Town of Broadway
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No warranty expressed or implied is made or assumed in concerns
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produced at the Central Shenandoah Planning District Commission
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
3
School grounds: The community makes significant use of the public school facilities, especially
for recreation and meetings and banquets. The grounds provide the following:
• Open space
• Six tennis courts
• Three baseball diamonds
• Playground equipment
3.
Rockingham County Park - Main Street (J. Frank Hillyard Ballpark). Nighttime lighting was
installed for greater usage. Located here are the following:
• Softball diamond
• Picnic area
4.
J. Frank Hillyard Gardens. Owned by the Town of Broadway, this park adjacent to the
Municipal Building is used for Christmas festivities and other pertinent activities.
5.
New Pocket Park/Greenway. Plans are currently being developed. (See Appendix C)
VILLAGE LIBRARY
The Village Library opened on February 17, 1975. It was originally housed in the old Municipal
Building as a part of the Massanutten Regional (formerly Rockingham Public) Library System. In
1991 a new facility was constructed located at 113 South Central Street. Currently, the library is
open six days a week and is staffed by a full-time branch coordinator and two part-time
employees. The Village Library also has a strong network of volunteers and an active Friends
group.
The Village Library is a highly utilized branch serving the Towns of Broadway and Timberville and
the northern portion of Rockingham County. The facility offers many services and materials
including public computers with internet access, copying, research resources, interlibrary loan, a
wide range of books, videos, dvds, cds, audiobooks, magazines, local history and genealogy
materials.
A story hour is held each Thursday morning for young children. The library hosts a number of field
trips from pre-schools and elementary schools and sponsors home school programs. Each
summer, the library offers a popular summer reading program with special activities including
stories, crafts, games and refreshments.
Local businesses and the Friends of the Village Library help support the program with volunteers,
goods, services and cash contributions. The Friends group is very active in seeking funding for the
library. They organize a number of fundraisers and events which include book sales, yard sales and
more. Other sponsored events include Halloween Fest and the Open House which is done in
concurrence with the Towns Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony.
8-6
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
SCHOOLS
Public schools for the citizens of Broadway are provided through the Rockingham County School
Board. John C. Myers Elementary School, J. Frank Hillyard Middle School and Broadway High
School are located within Broadway's town boundaries. The school facilities include open space,
sports complexes and playgrounds. The facilities can also be used to house community meetings
and events.
COMMUNITY FACILITIES GOALS
1.
2.
Continue to invest in public facilities and services.
a.
Invest in facilities and services that bring people and functions of a community
together to make the community a more desirable place to live.
b.
The Town should plan for appropriate expansion to meet foreseeable needs.
c.
Public investment should favor services not provided by a community’s private
sector.
Connectivity of community facilities.
a.
3.
Link government offices, schools, libraries and other community facilities.
Seek any available state or federal funding for facility improvements.
a.
Consider sharing investments, services and facilities to connect people, extend
resources and share costs.
8-7
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
CHAPTER 10|Land Use
INTRODUCTION
The Utilities component is an important part of any comprehensive plan. The Towns infrastructure is a
key component in its ability to ensure clean, safe and abundant supplies of drinking water which
ultimately relates to the prosperity of a community. This chapter takes also into account solid waste
and wastewater.
ROLE OF THE LAND USE PLAN
This Land Use Plan, which covers the period from 2010 to 2030, is the guide for the future physical
development of the community. Many factors must be considered in this attempt to envision an
optimum pattern of development. Residential, commercial, and employment opportunities must be
balanced with the desire to preserve the natural environment and character of Broadway.
The Land Use Plan consists of two parts: 1) a written explanation of policy guidelines in relation to
development and 2) the Land Use Map, which shows the general location of anticipated land uses
within the growth area. The specific purpose of this Land Use Plan is to help citizens, town and county
officials, and businessmen make sound development decisions. It attempts to delineate a pattern of
land use that should encourage and accommodate orderly growth, minimize long-range public
development costs, and result in a healthy and attractive community.
The Land Use Plan should not be confused with the Town's zoning map and zoning ordinance. As a
policy guide, it focuses on general areas suitable for broad use categories. In contrast, the zoning map
shows exact locations by tax parcel for specifically defined land uses. The zoning ordinance and zoning
map are intended to be the primary means of implementing the general policies outlined in the Land
Use Plan.
AREA COVERED
The area covered by this Land Use Plan is the current Town boundary, and the remaining acreage
available for annexation along the eastern Town boundary. On an even broader scale, the Town must
consider the growth and development of the greater Broadway-Timberville area. While the entire area
is not shown on the Land Use Map, the Analysis and Goals & Objectives section of this Plan serve to
describe some of the Town's concerns and goals for the development of northwestern Rockingham
County.
DESIRED GROWTH RATE
The Town wishes to grow, but not at the expense of its small-town atmosphere and quality of life.
Essentially, the Town wishes to maintain its status as a community center within the general area of
northwestern Rockingham County. Its growth rate would therefore be linked closely to the overall
factors that will attract new residents and businesses to the area. This policy recognizes the need to
coordinate policies with the County and the Town of Timberville to work together for the best overall
growth pattern. The annual growth rate from 2000 to 2008 averaged 4.0 percent, which represented
10-1
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
a period of unprecedented growth for the Town. For the coming decades, the Town can expect a
mixture of limited growth potential in the traditional borders and high growth potential within the
annexed areas because of the sizeable amount of vacant land present there.
The 2004 Comprehensive Plan stated a desired growth rate of 3.5 percent per year for both the Town
and the growth area, or 3,289 by the year 2010 and 5,325 by 2024. However, the 2010 projection is
less than the 2010 Census figure, which states the Town has an estimated population of 3,691.
For the current planning period, the Town has chosen a desired growth rate of 3.0 percent per year.
Using the 2010 Census population as a base (3,691) this rate would result in a population of 4,279 by
2015 and 6,666 by 2030, an increase of 2,975 people, or approximately an average of 148 people per
year. With the smaller sizes of families, this rate could not be achieved unless approximately 55
dwelling units were added each year.
FACTORS IN ACHIEVING A GROWTH RATE
Many of the factors that will determine how fast and in what manner development occurs will be
outside of the Town's control. Such factors can include economic conditions, distance or proximity to
the interstate, natural features, and the actions of individuals. Nevertheless, the Town must attempt
through the Comprehensive Plan process to recognize the steps that it can take to provide incentives
or disincentives that will help result in the level and type of development desired. This Land Use Plan is
particularly important as the foundation of the zoning and subdivision ordinances and other Town
policies that directly affect development proposals.
DESIRE GROWTH PATTERN
The growth projection above plans for an average of 55 additional dwelling units per year. Different
densities would accommodate the projected 55 housing units per year using the following amounts of
land:
DENSITY
(Dwellings Per Acre)
ANNUAL USAGE
(x 55 Dwellings)
PLAN PERIOD TOTAL
(x 20 Years)
4 dwellings per acre
13.75 acres
275 acres
1 dwelling per acre
55 acres
1,100 acres
1 dwelling per 5 acres
275 acres
5,500 acres
PLAN CONSIDERATIONS
The policies affecting vacant tracts will be crucial to the long-term development of the Town. For
example, if the land is developed rapidly in a low-density pattern, the Town will have used up many of
its options for future development. On the other hand, the higher-intensity options that would
accommodate greater population in the long run would have to be considered carefully. Because
much of the vacant land in Broadway is in large tracts, it is especially important that the community
have deliberated on the appropriate uses of the land, because a change in ownership or decision
to develop can come suddenly and the impact on the Town can be substantial.
10-2
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
The Planning Commission agreed upon a number of principles to serve as guidelines as the Land Use
Plan was being developed. In addition, where appropriate, the planning commission considered the
many goals and objectives listed in the earlier section, to the extent that they relate to land use.
The primary way for the Town to grow is for construction to occur on previously undeveloped land.
However, it is important to ensure that this land is developed in responsible ways that take into
account the current and future needs of the community. Certain factors in particular should be
considered in determining the land use plan and reviewing prospective development. Some of these
factors are described below.
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
a desire to grow
a desire to preserve the Town's atmosphere
the need to enhance commercial, residential, and employment opportunities in Town
the need to accommodate the varied housing needs of all citizens
the need to develop a strong economic base
a desire to provide an efficient, safe, and convenient street and highway system.
1)
DEVELOPMENT FACTORS
Slope - Slopes in excess of 25 percent are generally not appropriate for intensive development.
2)
Floodplains - Federal programs restrict the construction of residences within the 100-year
floodplain unless the structure is properly flood-proofed. Intensive development of all kinds
should generally be discouraged in the floodplain. Appropriate uses for floodplains include
agriculture, forestry, recreation, and open space.
3)
Drainage - Stormwater runoff causes problems in some areas of Broadway and additional
development can be expected to increase potential for flooding and standing water.
Furthermore, pollution of groundwater supplies may also occur in drainage areas when oils,
fertilizers, topsoil, and other pollutants are washed into water supplies. Means of preventing
these problems should be addressed at the time of development.
4)
Utilities - Many private investments, particularly industrial and commercial establishments and
coordinated residential developments, cannot be expected to occur without adequate public
water and sewer. Conversely, it should be recognized that poorly planned or executed private
or public development can result in increased costs to the public.
5)
Other Infrastructure - Public investment in roadways, schools, and other public buildings can
be essential to attracting additional private investment. The quality of the public infrastructure
can therefore be a good indicator of the potential for private development to follow.
6)
Impacts on Existing and Future Development - New development should be compatible with
the existing development and should be in keeping with major infrastructure plans.
10-3
Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
DESCRIPTION OF PLANNING AREAS
South Route 42 - Much of this area is zoned industrial and it does contain poultry facilities, a
construction company, and many of the traditional industrial uses in Town. Although the constraints of
the railroad and floodplain make this area too small to offer a significant industrial site on the
remaining vacant land, development of the Fifth Street Industrial Park provides approximately six
smaller commercial sites.
West Springbrook Road - This portion of the Town is currently being developed. Sunset Drive on the
western border is mostly developed with single-family homes. In addition, the Linville Creek floodplain
imposes development constraints on the eastern border. The bridge on West Springbrook Road
crossing Linville Creek is inadequate for significant increases in traffic. Important community facilities
are in this planning area, including the elementary school and the community park.
Turner Avenue/Holly Hill Street - This section of Broadway is fairly developed, with a mixture of singlefamily homes and apartments. The western area between Sunset and Hartz-Broadway is undeveloped.
A major concern for this area is traffic, particularly the Holly Hill/Turner Street intersection, as Holly Hill
Street must accommodate residential traffic, including bicycles and pedestrians, as well as traffic from
the schools. The Town constructed a new sidewalk in this area. A new 90-unit single family
development is under construction.
West Lee Street - This area contains the middle school, the Hartz-Broadway plant, and a commercial
strip. Some of the area is undeveloped and has limitations because of floodplains. Shenandoah
Avenue contains some of the oldest structures in the Town and now contains a mixture of residences
and the water plant.
Downtown - This area is bounded by Broadway Avenue on the south, Linville Creek on the west, Lee
Street on the north, and High and Central streets on the east. The Main Street contains a mixture of
commercial and residential structures, most of which abut the sidewalk. This traditional plan is
appropriate for pedestrian shopping and would provide the core of any efforts to promote the Town's
historical context. Some of the side streets also have businesses. The mixture of business and
residential use is a traditional pattern. A variety of churches and public buildings, including the Town
Hall, are in this area.
East Springbrook/Numbered Streets - Lindsay Avenue and East Avenue and the numbered cross
streets make up one of the larger residential sections in the Town. Along the northern side are
apartments and duplexes, while the new development off of Elm Street is single-family in fairly large
lots. Springbrook Road handles a high volume of traffic. Since the former Alger farm is now the
location of the new Broadway high school, the predominant land use will remain residential. A primary
concern for planning the future development of the Town lies in assessing increased traffic flow
patterns associated with the school.
High School and Alger Subdivision - This area has the highest density in Town. It is divided into four
parcels zoned for B-1 usage, and another 18 acres zoned R-3. Two developments have been granted
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
permits. The total number of apartments in this area is 94, and currently 125 new townhouses are
under construction.
East Lee Street - This busy through road functions as part of the downtown grid at one end. Until the
early 1990’s, there was not much development at the eastern end; but that has changed, with new
residential subdivisions being built on both sides of Lee Street.
Route 42 Corridor - Newer commercial businesses are filling in around the older businesses such as
Broadway Motors and Trumbo Electric. The east side of Route 42, however, could be developed
further. This section is probably the most likely area for future commercial growth of any intensity.
Phase II Northeastern Quadrant - Along Route 42 north, a variety of commercial uses are in place and
the trend is for more such uses. Land at the northwest corner of Route 42 and 259 is limited by
topography.
Phase II Southeastern Quadrant – Residential development is currently in this area, but substantial
areas remain vacant, such as between the low-density development at Broadmoor and the industrial
uses off of Route 42. There are several options for roads through this area, increasing its development
potential. To the east along Route 803 there are a number of established single family homes. A sewer
pump station has been established and public facilities are in place to enhance development
opportunities.
Phase II Southwestern Quadrant - The area south of West Springbrook Road between Sunset Drive
and the railroad contains one of the most sizeable areas of vacant land in the Growth Area.
Floodplains at the lower end and the distance from main roads and facilities decrease development
potential, but utilities could be extended to the area.
Phase II Route 259 West – The northern side of Route 259 in this area is prone to flooding, which limits
its potential for development. Sunset Drive has an established pattern of strip lots of single-family
homes. Plans were submitted for development at the intersection of Route 259 West and Sunset
Drive. The plans are reflective of approximately 70 residential homes with a request from the
developer to serve the area with public water and sewer. Utilities have been extended into this area,
and the subdivision is under construction.
THE LAND USE GUIDE
The following Land Use Categories describe the types of land uses that are desired in the Town of
Broadway. These descriptions correspond to the Future Land Use Map developed as part of this
Comprehensive Plan.
1.
Low-Density Residential (R-1 Zoning Designation). These areas of single-family detached
dwellings are designated in order to maintain the existing character of established
neighborhoods and to provide traditional areas for home ownership.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Low-Density Residential Policies:
•
•
•
2.
Maintain residential areas of single-family, low-density development.
Infill lots within these areas should be used for single-family residential development.
Encourage the provision of single-family residential units which are affordable by all
segments of the population.
Traditional Downtown Residential (R-1 and R-2 Zoning Designations). This category would
accommodate extension of the original development pattern of Broadway.
Traditional Downtown Residential Policies:
• Maintain areas of compact, predominantly single-family development convenient to the
center of town.
• Encourage the use of large older homes as two-family structures.
• Encourage a grid pattern of streets and small lots to enhance pedestrian access and traffic
circulation.
3.
Medium-Density Residential (R-1 and R-2 Zoning Designations). This category is intended to
provide more flexible residential development alternatives, while at the same time preserving
the basically quiet nature of a residential neighborhood. Permitted dwelling types include
single-family detached dwellings, single-family attached duplex dwellings, and duplex
apartment units.
Medium-Density Residential Policies:
• Provide an alternative to conventional single-family dwellings while protecting the
character of the residential neighborhood from encroachment of commercial and
industrial uses.
• Encourage the development of attractive low to moderate density dwellings with adequate
open space and off-street parking while limiting the development density to a maximum of
five (5) residential living units per acre.
4.
High-Density Residential (R-2 and R-3 Zoning Designations). These areas encompass mediumto-high-density residential development. The densities in these areas can accommodate
townhouses, two-to-three-story apartment buildings, and multi-story, family-type apartments.
These areas should provide a suitable environment for persons desiring the amenities of
apartment living and the convenience of being close to shopping and employment centers.
High-Density Residential Policies:
• Encourage high-density residential development in designated areas.
• Provide for higher-density development suited to the needs of the population.
5.
Mobile Home Residential. This category is intended to apply to a mobile home park of
approximately 30 single-wide mobile homes that is an existing nonconforming use in the Phase
I annexation area.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
6.
Planned Unit Development (PUD) (R-5 Zoning Designation). This category includes a variety of
dwelling types, developed in clusters to make the most efficient use of the land. This type of
development allows for the sharing of open space, security systems, utilities, and maintenance
structures. Single-family homes, townhouses, and two-to-three-story apartment buildings can
be accommodated in this area as well as businesses that would serve these residents. The
units can be clustered but the maximum gross density must be no more than 8 units per gross
acre.
PUD Policies:
• Encourage developments with a diversity of dwelling types and layout within designated
areas.
• Encourage planned unit developments with smaller lots surrounded by common open
space as a means to hold down site development costs.
• Provide expanded community facilities to encourage these developments.
• Encourage mix of land uses compatible with adjoining residences.
• Encourage pedestrian access and links to other development.
7.
Downtown Commercial (B-1 and B-2 Zoning Designations). Commercial uses include retail,
wholesale, or service functions. The Town business areas should be diverse and well balanced,
offering business, commercial, and residential uses.
Downtown Commercial Policies:
• Encourage a central shopping area of diverse, but compatible, uses.
• Accommodate residential uses, but give priority to commercial uses.
• Promote the downtown business district.
• Keep development regulations flexible to encourage the reuse of older buildings and the
development of infill lots.
• When establishing additional zoning districts, the Planning Commission and Town Council
should weigh carefully the impact that additional areas zoned for commercial development
could have on the downtown area.
8.
Highway Commercial (B-1 and B-2 Zoning Designations). Intended for businesses oriented to
car traffic, this category addresses the need for road access, ample parcel size, and offstreet
parking.
Highway Commercial Policies:
• Designate areas appropriate for these uses.
• Provide development guidelines to reduce negative impacts on traffic and on aesthetics.
• Facilitate growth corridor between Broadway and Timberville.
9.
Light Industry (M-1 Zoning Designation). Industrial areas are designated to permit certain
industries that do not detract from residential desirability.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Light Industry Policies:
• Encourage additional industrial jobs within the area.
• Seek industrial firms which are compatible with the Town's goals for maintaining a quality
environment for its citizens.
• Use of industrially zoned land for ther uses should be resisted.
10.
Agriculture (A-1 Zoning Designation). Agricultural areas are those lands currently being
farmed, and which because of topography or other considerations are best suited for this use.
11.
Public/Semi-Public. In addition to buildings and sites owned by the Town or other public body,
this category includes buildings used for public or community purposes, such as churches.
12.
Flood Hazard Area (FH-1 Zoning Designation). The flood hazard area, as defined by the HUD
Flood Insurance Program, is superimposed on other land use categories. Developments in the
hazard zone must be floodproofed in accordance with the flood hazard area.
Flood Hazard Area Policies:
•
13.
Limit occupancy development in the 100-year floodplain.
Urban Development Area: Urban Development Areas are designated areas within the planned
annexation area adjacent to the Town. It is planned for compact, mixed use development at
urban development densities and intensities and intended to serve as a focal point for growth
over the next 10-20 years. Development within the UDA must be compact, using Traditional
Neighborhood Design principles, and designed to accommodate pedestrian and vehicular
traffic with a full complement of services and amenities. Urban Development Areas are served
by or planned for central sewer and water service, and transportation infrastructure.
Growth will be directed toward the Urban Development Areas through a variety of incentives.
Such incentives may include but not be limited to density bonuses, reduced application fees,
fast track permitting and plan review. Targeted public investments in amenities such as street
lighting, landscaping, street furniture, sidewalks and trails may be focused in UDA areas to
attract and augment private investment and to support community design in keeping with the
traditional design principles outlined in the UDA legislation. Additionally, public investment in
utilities and capital facilities may be focused in UDA areas as appropriate to promote compact
development and to encourage, attract and leverage private investments. Offering such
incentives only or primarily within Urban Development Areas, increases the likelihood that
these areas will be the focal point for future growth and help the County to meet established
goals of reducing public costs and improving service delivery while accommodating population
growth in a planned manner.
Policies:
• Promote a mix of land uses including dwellings, commercial and office uses, personal and
household service establishments, institutional uses, public facilities, parks, playgrounds
and other similar uses meeting the needs of the adjoining neighborhoods.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Provide connections between all sites and all uses, especially pedestrian and bicycle access
along the public street network
Create an inviting and attractive built environment that encourages and accommodates
people living, working, shopping, and visiting, these areas;
Accommodate vehicular parking without dominating the streetscape or landscape;
Reduce front and side yard building setbacks; and,
Encourage narrow street widths and shorter turning radii at street intersections. Proximity
to public infrastructure including utilities, services, parks and similar facilities;
Bicycle and pedestrian-friendly street and road design;
Interconnect new streets with existing local streets and roads in a logistical network;
Integrate residential, retail, office and commercial development with public spaces and
open spaces;
Support development densities that improve rates of walking, bicycling and transit use.
Create incentives, such as expedited review for applications that employ TND concepts,
increased density, height allowances, narrower streets, limited parking and smaller
setbacks, to encourage and facilitate compact, mixed use development in the Urban
Development Areas.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
TRADITIONAL NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT
Following are some examples of development projects that illustrate some of the principles of
Traditional Neighborhood Development that the Town desires for the UDA, as well as for key infill sites
within the existing corporate limits. These features include but are not limited to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
narrow street sections
sidewalks with street trees
interconnected street networks
small front setbacks with front porches
parking on street or to the rear of buildings, including alley access
mixed-use buildings (residential and commercial combined)
variety of housing unit types
buildings located so as to spatially define the open space of pocket parks and greens
all dwellings should have garage access on site
Figure 10-1: Single-family detached houses fronting a green,
Purcellville, Virginia
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Figure 10-2: Modest-size single family detached houses,
Celebration, Florida
Figure 10-3: Single-family detached houses fronting a local street,
Leesburg, Virginia
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Figure 10-4: Alley providing rear access to single-family detached houses,
Gainesville, Florida
Figure 10-5: Retail uses fronting a central green, Lansdowne Town Center,
Leesburg, Virginia
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
Figure 10-6: Diagram of typical preferred frontage
and rear access conditions for single-family housing.
Figure 10-7: Concept Plan for Daleville Town Center, Virginia, showing
interconnected streets, small greens/pocket parks, central green, alleys, mixed-use
areas, and relegated parking areas (behind the buildings).
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Figure 10-8: Old Trail Village, Crozet, Virginia
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Town of Broadway
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
LAND USE POLICY GOALS
The 2009 Survey on the Future of Broadway results indicate that the people of Broadway wish for
the town to maintain its small town character and charm and that growth and development should
be controlled and managed. The following policy statements were developed to assist the local
officials in their deliberations on future development proposals, capital improvements, and other
land use determining activities.
Area-wide
1.
Develop a shared vision with the County of how Broadway will function as a growth area;
seek to make zoning and other policies compatible with this vision.
2.
Continue the pursuit of cooperative agreements with the County and the Town of Timberville
to address “inter” and “intra” governmental land use issues.
3.
Coordinate with Rockingham County, the Town of Timberville, and the Central Shenandoah
Planning District Commission on establishing Urban Development Areas (UDAs) and identifying
opportunities for regional cooperation on infrastructure improvements, transit and
transportation improvements to support development in UDAS as focal point for regional
growth.
Housing
1.
Encourage higher density and alternative with a variety of housing types
‐ including single
family, townhouse, and multi‐family dwellings ‐ that meet the requirements for UDA s as
identified in the Code of Virginia (15.2 ‐2223.1).
2.
Consider creating and encourage the use of zoning districts that allow and provide incentives
for mixed-use developments and neighborhoods with a mix of housing types, densities, styles
and price points.
3.
Encourage the use of the PUD zoning designation to accommodate innovative approaches to
housing development; ensure that PUD designation is not “overzoned,” and thus ensures
enough remaining available space for other developments.
4.
Provide affordable housing for the area.
5.
Retain no more than the current ratio of single to multi-family units.
6.
Support programs to encourage maintenance and renovation of existing housing.
Economic
10.
Encourage land uses that contribute to the vitality of the Town and the convenience of its
citizens.
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
11.
Designate additional area(s) for commercial growth to complement the existing business
development.
Environmental
12.
Discourage development of land in areas inappropriate because of environmental constraints.
13.
Encourage the preservation of National Register and other historic properties.
14.
Seek ways to encourage landscaping.
15.
Encourage the designation of additional green areas, greenways, pocket parks, or open space
as land is developed.
16.
Adopt a property maintenance ordinance.
Community Development
17.
Encourage a mixture of uses within the UDA in a pedestrian-oriented manner.
18.
Promote connectivity in neighborhood design and establishment of sidewalks and walking
trails within and between developments.
19.
Encourage traditional neighborhood design principles that promote a mix of uses and
pedestrian friendly road design
20.
Develop one or more new zoning districts for the UDA featuring traditional neighborhood
design principles that will allow:
a.
Mixed-use neighborhoods including mixed housing types and values accommodating
all residents and workers in the County;
b.
Integration of residential, retail, office and commercial development with public
spaces and open spaces;
c.
A built environment that encourages and accommodates people living, shopping,
visiting, and enjoying time in the UDA;
d.
Development densities that improve rates of walking and bicycling;
e.
Proximity to public infrastructure including utilities, services, parks and similar
facilities;
f.
Bicycle and pedestrian-friendly street and road design;
g.
Interconnection of new streets with existing local streets and roads in a logical
network;
h.
Design features that accommodate and prepare for an aging population within the
Town;
i.
Preservation of environmentally sensitive areas;
j.
Opportunities to redevelop existing underutilized and previously developed land;
k.
Satisfaction of requirements for stormwater management through the use of low
impact techniques such as bioretention areas, rain gardens, gravel wetlands, and
pervious pavements;
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Town of Broadway|2030 Comprehensive Plan
l.
m.
n.
Vehicular parking accommodated without dominating the streetscape or landscape;
Reduced front and side yard building setbacks; and,
Narrowed street widths and shorter turning radii at street intersections, with street
sections designed to provide pedestrian convenience and safety, while also
providing adequate mobility and access of emergency vehicles and snow removal,
consistent with according to VDOT Secondary Street Acceptance Requirements
(SSAR).
21.
Encourage a blend of land uses that complements existing development and contributes to a
sense of community.
22.
Develop Phase II annexation by developers extending utilities in that area.
10-21