Halloween The Night

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Halloween The Night
Grisly Gristle, 3.ɀɆ Paddlers in Peril, 3.ɀɈ Milk Men, 3.ɂɄ
c a s c a d i a
REPORTING FROM
THE HEART OF CASCADIA
WHATCOM
SKAGIT ISLAND COUNTIES
*{10.28.15}{#43}{V.10}{
*
FREE}
THRILLINGHAM
The dead
can dance, P.16
The Night
GALLERY
Scary sights at
Fourth Corner, P.18
Halloween
HAUNTS
Sounds like a
Spooktacular, P.20
FOOD 34
c
a
s
c
a
B-BOARD 27
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
i
a
ThisWeek
A glance at this week’s
happenings
FILM
Rocky Horror Picture Show: 8pm and 12am, Mount
Baker Theatre
WEDNESDAY [10.28.15]
DANCE
Celebrate the 40th anniversary of The Rocky
Horror Picture Show with viewings Oct. 29-31
at the Mount Baker Theatre (the film version) and
the Lincoln Theatre (the stage version)
ONSTAGE
Standing on Ceremony: 7:30pm, DUG Theater, WWU
WORDS 12
d
MUSIC
Jamie Stillway, Ben Bonham: 7:30pm, Roeder Home
THURSDAY [10.29.15]
Scream Fair: 6:30-9:30pm, NW Washington Fairgrounds, Lynden
Clown Bar: 7:30pm, iDiOM Theater
Standing on Ceremony: 7:30pm, DUG Theater, WWU
Good, Bad, Ugly: 8pm, Upfront Theatre
Rocky Horror Show: 8pm, Lincoln Theatre, Mount
Vernon
The Project: 10pm, Upfront Theatre
MUSIC
Fidalgo Youth Symphony: 1pm, McIntyre Hall
WORDS
COMMUNITY
Family Activity Day: 10am-4pm, Whatcom Museum’s
Lightcatcher Building
Haunt the Park: 5-7pm, Pioneer Park, Ferndale
A Masquerade Eve: 6pm, Fairhaven Middle School
Bellwether Halloween: 7-11pm, Hotel Bellwether
FILM
GET OUT
Rocky Horror Picture Show: 8pm and 12am, Mount
Baker Theatre
Boneshaker Bike Fest: 9am, La Conner Channel
Lodge
Haunted Garden: 9am-6pm, Garden Spot Nursery
Fall Family Fun: 10am-6pm, Glen Echo Garden,
Everson
Trick-or-Treat: 2-4pm, downtown Anacortes
Trick-or-Treat: 3-5pm, downtown Ferndale
Halloween Trick-or-Treat: 3-6pm, historic
Fairhaven
Trick-or-Treat: 3-5pm, downtown Mount Vernon
Gore & Lore Tour: 6pm, downtown Bellingham
WORDS
Murders in the Fourth Corner: 7pm, Ferndale Library
Spooks & Spirits: 5-7pm, Whatcom Museum’s Old
City Hall
FOOD
Final Lynden Farmers Market: 12-5pm, Front Street
FOOD
FRIDAY [10.30.15]
ONSTAGE
Nightmare on Railroad: 6:30-11:30pm, Boundary
Bay Brewery
Scream Fair : 6:30-10:30pm, NW Washington Fairgrounds, Lynden
Clown Bar: 7:30pm, iDiOM Theater
Standing on Ceremony: 7:30pm, DUG Theater, WWU
Rocky Horror Show: 8pm, Lincoln Theatre, Mount
Vernon
Hellingham: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre
Whodunit? Find out when the
perennially popular improvised
murder mystery known as
Hellingham shows Oct. 30-31 at
the Upfront Theatre
Pancake Breakfast: 8-10:30am, Lynden Community
Center
Bellingham Farmers Market: 10am-3pm, Depot
Market Square
SUNDAY [11.01.15]
DANCE
Open Rep Rehearsal: 12-1:30pm, Firehouse Performing Arts Center
MUSIC
FILM
Festival of Music: 2pm, St. John’s Lutheran Church
John Reischman & Friends: 2pm, YWCA Ballroom
Rocky Horror Picture Show: 8pm and 12am, Mount
Baker Theatre
WORDS
Halloween Book Sale: 1-5pm, Ferndale Library
DANCE
FOOD
Witch’s Ball: 8-11pm, Bellingham Dance Company
MUSIC
Creepy Cabaret: 6:30-8:30pm, Bellingham High
School
A Nightmare Before Halloween: 7-11pm, Depot Arts
Center, Anacortes
Peter Mawanga: 7:30pm, McIntyre Hall, Mount
Vernon
Community Breakfast: 8-11am, Rome Grange
Taste of Skagit: 4-7pm, Maple Hall, La Conner
Grape & Gourmet: 5-8:30pm, Silver Reef Event
Center
PHOTO BY MATT MCDANIEL
CURRENTS 8
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
DO
DO IT
IT 22
10.28.15
#43.10
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Halloween Contra Dance: 7-10:30pm, Fairhaven
Library
Thrillingham: 8pm, Maritime Heritage Park
Halloween Book Sale: 10am-5pm, Ferndale Library
Extremely Scary Stories: 7-8:30pm, Fairhaven
Library
ONSTAGE
COMMUNITY
2
Scream Fair: 6:30-10:30pm, NW Washington Fairgrounds, Lynden
Nightmare on Railroad: 6:30-11:30pm, Boundary
Bay Brewery
Clown Bar: 7:30pm, iDiOM Theater
Hellingham: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre
Rocky Horror Show: 10pm, Lincoln Theatre, Mount
Vernon
MONDAY [11.02.15]
Bingo Spooktacular: 5:30-8:30pm, Bellingham
Senior Activity Center
WORDS
Halloween Book Sale: 10am-6pm, Ferndale Library
GET OUT
COMMUNITY
Wild Things: 9:30-11am, Stimpson Nature Reserve
Trick-or-Treat: 3-5pm, downtown Bellingham
Night of the Running Dead: 6pm, Aslan Brewing Co.
Monster Mash: 4pm, Village Books
Gore & Lore Tour: 6pm, historic Fairhaven
SATURDAY [10.31.15]
ONSTAGE
42nd Street: 7pm, Mount Baker Theatre
Guffawingham: 9:30pm, Green Frog
ONSTAGE
WORDS
Standing on Ceremony: 2pm and 7:30pm, DUG
Theater, WWU
Rick Steves: 7pm, Bellingham High School
Poetrynight: 8pm, Bellingham Public Library
3
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
FOOD 34
THISWEEK
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 27
Editor & Publisher:
Tim Johnson
ext 260
{ [email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
In a story custom-made for Halloween, this week a deer in
Rochester, NY, staggered through automatic doors into a
hospital emergency room after being hit by a vehicle near
a local cemetery. After being strapped to a gurney by two
sheriff’s deputies, animal control was called and the injured
deer was euthanized.
VIEWS & NEWS
4: Monstrous Mailbag
6: Gory gristle, Views
8: Paddle to Paris
GET OUT 14
11: Police Blotter
ARTS & LIFE
WORDS 12
CURRENTS 8
VIEWS 6
14: Full moon fever
16: Thrillingham
18: Scary sights
20: Spooktacular!
22: Clubs
24: Milk Men
26: Film Shorts
REAR END
MAIL 4
27: Bulletin Board
10.28.15
#43.10
LETTERS
STAFF
28: Wellness
Music & Film Editor:
Carey Ross
ext 203
{ [email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
Production
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Jesse Kinsman
{ [email protected]
kinsmancreative.com
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cascadiaweekly.com
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cascadiaweekly.com
Distribution
Distribution Manager:
Scott Pelton
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cascadiaweekly.com
Whatcom: Erik Burge,
Stephanie Simms
28: Crossword
Skagit: Linda Brown,
Barb Murdoch
30: Free Will Astrology
Letters
31: Advice Goddess
Send letters to [email protected]
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32: Comix
Grisly Gristle, 3.ɀɆ Paddlers in Peril, 3.ɀɈ Milk Men, 3.ɂɄ
CASCADIA WEEKLY
TOC
Arts & Entertainment
Editor: Amy Kepferle
ext 204
{ [email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
12: Dead or disappeared?
DO IT 2
Cascadia Weekly:
360.647.8200
Editorial
10: Last Week’s News
4
mail
Contact
33: Slowpoke, Sudoku
34: Pumpkin power
c a s c a d i a
REPORTING FROM
THE HEART OF CASCADIA
WHATCOM
SKAGIT ISLAND COUNTIES
*{10.28.15}{#43}{V.10}{
*
FREE}
THRILLINGHAM
The dead
can dance, P.16
The Night
GALLERY
Scary sights at
Fourth Corner, P.18
©2015 CASCADIA WEEKLY (ISSN 1931-3292) is published each Wednesday by
Cascadia Newspaper Company LLC. Direct all correspondence to: Cascadia Weekly
PO Box 2833 Bellingham WA 98227-2833 | Phone/Fax: 360.647.8200
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NEWSPAPER ADVISORY GROUP: Robert Hall, Seth Murphy, Michael Petryni, David Syre
Halloween
HAUNTS
Sounds like a
Spooktacular, P.20
COVER: Illustration by
Angel Bolligan
PROP. 8 IS GREAT
Your assessment of the proposed Charter
Amendments, published last week, accurately described the majority of the choices placed before
Whatcom County voters on this year’s ballot. Your
publication does a great public service by helping the voting public understand these complex
issues. However, I must take great and personal
issue with the way that Proposition 8, regarding
the Districting Committee, was characterized.
Your statement that Prop. 8 “appears to be
another way of gaming the County’s political
districts” is both unfair and inaccurate. As the
Charter Review Commissioner responsible for introducing and championing this amendment, I’d
like to clarify its intent and purpose.
The system is already being “gamed” by two
political parties, who hold all of the seats on the
Districting Committee under the current charter.
In fact, the charter allows for only four members of this body, “two from each major political
party,” despite the fact that Washington State
has had more than two “major” political parties
active in recent elections.
We have nonpartisan elections and nonpartisan
offices, so why do we have a partisan Districting
Committee? Is our County well-served to sustain a
charter that allows the two parties that fight to
divide us to strengthen that divide through backroom handshakes? Proposition 8 was intended
to give access to those other parties, provided
they have support in our county, and bring more
transparency and compromise to the process. This
proposition fixes a broken section of our charter
and is not driven by ulterior motives.
Proposition 8 received multi-partisan support
from the commission and the public. Not only was
the “pro” statement in the voter’s pamphlet written with support from both sides of the political spectrum, there were no volunteers to write a
“con” statement. This is important to point out,
considering the vast divide on the Commission on
almost every other proposed amendment.
I urge you, and your readers, to read the voter’s pamphlet and listen to the commission’s recorded debate prior to casting your vote. If you
choose to stand by your recommendation of a
“no” vote, that is your prerogative and I respect
your editorial view. However, making that suggestion based on an insinuation of impropriety,
some vague charge of “gaming the system,” is in
my view irresponsible coming from a respected
and influential publication such as yours.
—Eli Mackiewicz, Bellingham
Charter Review Commissioner, District 1
STAKE OUT THE MIDDLE GROUND
Don’t be fooled by partisan organizations in
the election.
Vote yes on Propositions 1 and 9, and no on
—Richard Morgan, Bellingham
MORE PARTICIPATION,
NOT LESS
It is important to reject Propositions 1,
2, and 3, which were placed onto the ballot by the conservative majority of Charter Review commissioners who, all but
one, received the benefit of independent
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 27
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
WORDS 12
The recent Gristle provides all of the
necessary details to demonstrate the
slimy performance of Jack Louws as County Executive.
He must go before he completely
wrecks the county governing system. His
mismanagement of Lake Whatcom water
issues, the jail construction debacle combined with the outrageous sales tax increase, and his cozy relationship with the
sole-source contractor manipulating the
entire voting dialogue reveals the depth
of incompetence and corruption of his
dictatorial reign.
No more Jack Louws! No more sales
tax increase without true financial information of all aspects of a new jail complex! The blatant corruption has been revealed, now its up to the voters to fix it.
CURRENTS 8
LOUWS MUST GO
VIEWS 6
—Doug Karlberg, Lynden
LETTERS, CONTINUED ON PAGE 25
MAIL 4
I normally vote Republican. This election I am voting for two democratically
endorsed candidates, Satpal Sidhu for
County Council and Bobby Briscoe for Port
Commissioner. Both are fiscally conservative, and hold strong family values. Both
hold the common taxpayers interest in
the highest regard.
For Satpal, his education in engineering
and having a Masters of Business Administration puts him in a unique position to
save us millions on the jail. Satpal is frugal and a friend of the farmer. He understands that pouring five million gallons
of water a day on a pile of coal would be
put to better use obtaining water rights
for our farms, which many do not have
today. Farming is the economic backbone
of Whatcom County, and without water,
farming would wither.
Briscoe understands that the port has
spent itself into a hole, and the port’s
revenue predictions have failed for the
last three major projects. Now the port
finds itself in triple the debt that it
started this ill-conceived waterfront
project and $100 million still to go. His
opponent, Mayor Gary Jensen, while a
good man, left Ferndale buried in debt
also. Ferndale went from $11 million to
$28 million during his tenure.
Mayor Jensen is supported by two port
commissioners who want to continue to
build the new yacht marina at a cost of
$50 million to provide parking spots for
350 million-dollar yachts. Yacht parking,
luxury condos, and water to pour on coal.
And more debt.
It is time to change course at the port,
and Jensen is more of the same. We should
DO IT 2
ELECT FISCAL CONSERVATIVES
expenditure advertising from the coal
terminal interest-funded SAVEWhatcom/
Whatcom First affiliated Political Action
Committees when they ran for the Charter
Commission in 2014.
Prop. 1 district-only voting would result in disproportionately minor representation for the City of Bellingham and
would render Bellingham voters mute to
a large degree when voting for County
Council members.
Conservative commissioners created
two mechanisms to try to lock-in district-only voting indefinitely—Props. 2
and 3. Originally, the conservative commissioners attempted to outright prohibit the County Council from proposing
Charter amendments to previous Charter
amendments that have been approved
by two-thirds majority of voters, and to
prohibit Council from proposing Charter
amendments pertaining to nominating
and electing County Council members. In
July, our County Attorney explained to
the commissioners that was against our
state constitution, so they revised the
language to then require a 7-0 unanimous vote by Council. A unanimous vote
is a ridiculously high bar to impose on the
Council, ultimately resulting in the constriction of voters’ rights.
Proponents of Props. 2 and 3 often mislead the public, saying that Props. 2 and 3
make it harder for the Council to “overturn”
district-only voting as they claim the Council did eight years ago. That is incorrect.
The Council cannot “overturn” a proposition; the Council can only place a Charter
amendment, via ordinance, on the ballot,
thereby giving voters the power to decide.
What actually occurred eight years
ago, was that district-only voting was
approved by voters in 2005; voters experienced district-only voting in the next
10.28.15
—James Gibson, Bellingham
be refocusing the port on improving the
daily lives of all taxpayers who support
the port, not grandiose projects which
only benefit a few.
Both of these candidates understand
that water is the future for Whatcom
County, and we should not be wasting
such a valuable resource on a pile of
coal. Water for food production should
be priority number one. Only once that
is secured on paper should we be talking
about other uses.
Please consider joining me in supporting
Satpal for Council, and Briscoe for Port.
#43.10
dismissed the question.
Remember to vote by Nov. 3.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Propositions 2, 3 and 10. Prop. 9 creates five county council districts. Supporters of this amendment claim that
every community of interest would be
represented on the County Council with
five districts. That is undoubtedly the
truth. However, they also oppose Prop.
1, which would provide for district-only
voting instead of countywide voting for
County Council members. If everyone in
Whatcom County gets to decide on the
representatives from other communities of interest, then it totally defies
the point of five fair and equal districts.
Communities of interest would not
choose their own representative with
countywide voting. Props. 2, 3 and 10
are all proposals that limit power of voters—vote against all three of them.
Vote Todd Donovan and Kathy Kershner for Whatcom County Council. Todd
Donovan is simply better qualified than
his opponent, having very pragmatic approaches to local issues. Voters are misled about Kathy Kershner and Satpal Sidhu. Highly partisan organizations hope
to brainwash voters into thinking that
Kathy Kershner is a tea party Republican
who cares nothing about the environment, while Satpal Sidhu is a qualified
environmental hero. However, after thoroughly looking through Kershner’s voting
record, she always looked out for Whatcom County during her four years on the
council, and has made many decisions
to protect the environment of Whatcom
County. Satpal Sidhu has very few environmental accomplishments, and tries to
appeal to large conventional non-organic
berry farmers who pollute our environment, while at the same time supporting
very heavy regulations. He also comes
across uneducated on issues. At the Tea
Party forum, when asked about flood issues, Sidhu didn’t have an answer and
5
views
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 66
VIEWS
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
FOOD 34
THE GRISTLE
6
TRICK OR TREATY: The coal industry zombies and their
hobgoblins were haunting Cherry Point again last
week—Montana delegates and corporate shills arriving in hungry packs to scan our coast with red-rimmed
eyes, drooling it might someday be theirs. They brought
with them an infection, dark money in greasy wads of
campaign contributions dumped into vampiric political
action committees and onto Frankensteinian political
operatives by the carpetbag.
Pacific International Terminals (the PIT, and its pendulum that slices but one way) in 2014 dumped about
$17,000 into the election of the obscure Charter Review
Commission, an amount sufficient (thanks to the partitions of district-only voting) to elect a hunchbacked
horde who immediately set to work to queer all future
elections on behalf of the coal industry. In March and
again in October, PIT shoveled nearly $30,000 to Whatcom Republicans, who are then free to launder the cash
among spurious shell PACs like DOVE and dark money
operatives like Common Threads NW that proliferate
like contagion, making it all but impossible to follow
the money in a transparent and timely manner. On Oct.
19, PIT opened yet another Orwellian PAC—Clear Ballot
Choices—and larded it with $25,000 in cash and $13,500
in in-kind contributions, according to filings with the
Public Disclosure Commission. This week, PIT contributed another $20,000. The PAC also received a large contribution from the Affordable Housing Council, the political arm of the building industry and contractor lobby.
All told, the coal industry and their allies and associates have shoveled nearly $130,000 onto local
elections over the past two cycles, distributed by a
bewildering network of spontaneously created special-purpose PACs.
They have a plan, and its design is to cripple the
ability of citizens to participate fully in an informed
democracy and in their choices for who represents
them. In slasher films, the victim carelessly wanders
through the house without lights; and these folks are
here to turn the lights off permanently.
The goblins try to mask their bubbling black cauldron of outside money by conjuring the phantom bugbear of California gazillionaire liberal Tom Steyer, oh
my!, everyone’s doing it! But Steyer has not pitched one
mouldy red nickel into the reeking backwaters of Whatcom County politics. It’s a lie, a complete lie; but lies
never stopped liars.
What can’t be easily hidden through thimblerigging
and in-kind logrolling simply goes unreported, or reported in slipshod way that serves as concealment.
The cryptkeepers who hope to collect $100 million
in sales tax revenue in support of a new jail have been
shambling in their accounting, another red flag against
the jail. The laws governing campaign contributions require filing to be electronic when amounts are in excess
of $5,000, to allow the public to timely understand who
is financing their elections. The Humane & Safe Jail
Now PAC has not only ignored this requirement, they’ve
been scofflaws indifferent to every reporting deadline,
setting a horrible standard for financial accountability
that only feeds other public concerns about financial
accountability related to the jail. The PAC’s utter contempt for the rights of voters prompted detailed multiple complaints to the PDC, but those complaints will
not be resolved until after the election.
As of last week, Gary Jensen hadn’t filed a finance
disclosure in his campaign for Port of Bellingham Com-
YOUR VIEWS
THE GRISTLE
BY APRIL MITCHELSON
Jail Déjà Vu
WRONG TAX, WRONG RESPONSE TO MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS
AS BALLOTS for the November
election roll out this month and we
consider the Jail Tax Measure, one
gets the feeling we’ve been here before. More than 10 years ago Sheriff
Bill Elfo, along with other county
officials, painted a grim picture
regarding the state of the Whatcom County Jail: It’s unsafe—for
inmates and corrections staff alike;
it’s unsanitary, out of date and “literally falling apart.”
As any officer or deputy who
works in this county will tell you,
that’s exactly the case. Which is
why, in 2004, all of us supported
the Jail Tax. In fact, we convinced
our friends and family to vote in
favor and put signs in our yards
showing support.
The tax passed, authorizing 0.1
percent sales tax to be collected in
a special fund set aside to build a
brand new jail. That was the message to the public and to local law
enforcement.
This year is different: None of
the largest local law enforcement
organizations have supported this
new tax measure, and the Bellingham Police Guild and Bellingham/
Whatcom Firefighters Local 106 ask
that you vote no on Proposition
2015-1, the Jail Tax.
Why are we opposing the Jail Tax in
2015? If this passes, all of our public
safety tax authority will be locked up
for 30 years, yet some of our most
critical needs—for mental health
or substance and alcohol abuse
treatment—are left unanswered. As
our community grows we may need
to fund a police station, a mental
health treatment facility or new fire
stations to serve our neighborhoods.
But if this tax passes, we may find
that we can’t pay for programs and
If this tax passes,
we may find that we
can’t pay for programs
and facilities that will
keep your family safe
and the mentally ill
out of jail”
facilities that will keep your family
safe and the mentally ill out of jail.
We can’t even be certain we’ll
have the new jail. Since 2004, $31.5
million has been collected for that
purpose. Land was purchased (at
an astronomical price) and our old
jail is still unsafe, overcrowded and
“literally falling apart.” Unfortunately, the same loopholes that allowed the 2004 jail sales tax to be
squandered on other things are in
this ballot measure, too.
We believe any fiscally responsible plan must include mental
health and substance abuse treatment facilities.
There is currently a mental health
crisis in our community. Routinely
half of the calls for service our officers, deputies and fire personnel
respond to are people in varying
stages of crisis due to mental illness. Many times officers are unable to offer available respite or
resources because they are simply
unavailable and so people in crisis
often end up in jail. This community is in dire need of a secure, safe
mental health facility.
VIEWS EXPRESSED ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF CASCADIA WEEKLY
The Bellingham Fire Department
recently implemented a Community
Medic Program. This offers many
homeless and mentally ill individuals a chance to receive non-emergent treatment in the field when
they would otherwise not have it.
Sometimes it’s just as simple as a
blood sugar check and a ride to a
place of shelter. Other times it may
identify a medical condition requiring immediate treatment.
The Bellingham Police department
has recently outfitted their officers
with body worn cameras, in an effort
to provide transparency in policing
and maintain the public trust.
These are examples of pressing
public safety needs. All of these
come at a cost, and many will be
ignored for decades if we vote for
the Jail Tax.
The members of the Bellingham
Police Guild and your Local 106
Firefighters know for certain that
we need a new jail. We support a
fiscally responsible new jail and ask
that the 2004 sales tax be used exclusively to build the new jail from
this point forward.
We cannot support another new
jail tax that locks up 100 percent
of our public safety tax capacity
for the next 30 years. As careful
stewards of your tax dollars we ask
you to vote No on the Jail Sales Tax
Measure.
April Mitchelson is president of the
Bellingham Police Guild. She has been
an officer of the Bellingham Police
Dept. for 15 years. Robert Glorioso
is president of IAFF Local 106 Bellingham Whatcom County Firefighters
and a professional Fire Fighter Paramedic for 12 years. He has served the
Bellingham Fire Dept. since 2010.
Receive 5x Points for all your play, all day! Friday, Oct 30 and Saturday, Oct 31. Winners Club members MUST register at the Winners Club prior to playing to be eligible for bonus points.
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FOOD 34
DO IT 2
10.28.15
5x Points 2 Days In October!
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
FUN
B-BOARD 27
GO NORTHWOOD
FOR CASINO
!
#43.10
missioner since Aug. 31. His opponent,
Bobby Briscoe, has filed nearly two dozen reports in the same period. This is a
complete abdication of Jensen’s legally
binding responsibility to disclose the
source of his receipts and spending in a
timely manner. What’s most discouraging, the man knows better. The Mayor
of Ferndale is no amateur, no newcomer
to the obligations of public disclosure;
and the PDC reporting procedures and
tools are not the arcane stuff of mad
scientists.
When he was legally required to file
by the close of the reporting window
for candidates, Jensen produced a
document littered with thousands of
dollars in campaign contributions from
allies, consultants and beneficiaries—
shells and shills—to the coal industry, including Whatcom Republicans
and their infusion of cash from PIT.
Payoff for Jensen’s full-throated support of coal export as CAO of Ferndale
and influential lead on the Caucus of
Small City Mayors? Or, as some observers have considered, insurance in some
obscure but vital role the port commission may one day play in the siting of
a coal dump on the county’s shoreline?
It’s a lot of political mucking, but to
what end?
The Gateway Pacific Terminal is like a
seized gear, the broader environmental
studies required for permitting stalled
indefinitely pending review by the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers of the project’s potential impacts to tribal fishing
rights protected by treaty. Either could
proceed independently, but neither will.
The Corps is under no deadline requirement to produce a speedy determination of de minimis impacts of the coal
pier project to tribal treaty rights (and,
indeed, one could surmise the federal
government is well served in holding off
that determination and the precedents
it might establish for energy exports),
and the Corps’ finding holds such potential to be a project-killer there’s little
purpose in PIT pressing forward with
the environmental review required by
Whatcom County and the state Dept.
of Ecology. The shambling state of the
zombie coal export industry suggests
the pier may never be built, but all this
dark money acts as a form of pollution
in political outcomes that have little to
do with GPT.
The important takeaway is the violations are not symmetrical—“everyone’s
doing it.” No; they’re of a pendulum
that cuts but one direction, favoring a
particular political outcome. Other campaigns, other candidates follow the law,
a law created to assist voters.
End the tricks. Honor the treaty.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
THE GRISTLE
7
FOOD 34
currents
POLITICS
FUZZ BUZZ
INDEX
COURTESY JASON FINKBONNER
Kaiden Finkbonner, 12,
stands in a Lummi Nation
youth canoe and asks for
permission for his canoe
family to come ashore.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.09
10.28.15
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MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
NEWS
youth program called The Awakening. For
him, the protest, which culminated two
days later, was more than just a chance
to speak out. It was a powerful teaching
moment for the youth in his program.
The emotional power of canoe travel
was demonstrated when Finkbonner instructed his crew to paddle within a few
hundred yards of the skyscraper high oil
rig instead of remaining some distance
away at the mouth of the Duwamish River.
“Bill Moyer, head organizer of the Backbone Campaign, said to lead the kayaks to
the mouth of the river, stop and do our
speeches. I said, ‘Hell no! I’m going up
the river to the rig and bring the kayakers
up there to surround it.’ The kayakers followed, hence the pictures.”
A picture of Finkbonner standing in a
Native canoe at the base of the oil rig,
surrounded by kayakers and canoe families
was shared widely on social media after
8
PADDLE
TOPARIS
LUMMI YOUTH JOIN
THE KAYAKTIVISTS
BY FRANK HOPPER
BEFORE THERE
were roads, interstate highways, light rail systems and airports, there were... canoes. For thousands
of years, Native people living on the Salish
Sea, the area along the southwest coast of
British Columbia and the northwest coast
of the United States, used canoes not just
for travel, but also as a profound form of
cultural expression. Their creation and use
were spiritual, teaching respect, camaraderie and selflessness. They used no fossil fuels and created no pollution. And they were
powered by the most mysterious of engines,
the human heart. So what could be more
fitting to use when confronting a 307-foottall giant capable of poisoning vast areas of
ocean and shoreline?
That’s what happened when Royal
Dutch Shell brought the massive offshore
oil-drilling rig, Polar Pioneer, to Seattle’s
Terminal 5 on May. A flotilla of Natives in
canoes joined the ranks of environmental
activists in kayaks that day to protest the
rig’s arrival. Among them was Justin Finkbonner, a member of the Lummi Nation,
a canoe skipper and creator of a Lummi
Bill Moyer, head organizer
of the Backbone
Campaign, said to lead
the kayaks to the mouth
of the river, stop and
do our speeches. I said,
‘Hell no! I’m going up the
river to the rig and bring
the kayakers up there to
surround it.’ The kayakers
followed.”
—JUSTIN FINKBONNER
the protest. The passion exhibited by this
bravado has roots that go back decades.
Many Natives have painful memories
of the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989 that
dumped 11 million gallons of crude oil
into Alaska’s Prince William Sound. Because of the resulting loss of marine life,
the subsistence lifestyle of the local Alaska Native people collapsed, resulting in
long-term emotional trauma, increases
in domestic violence, drug and alcohol
abuse, and damage to social relationships.
But Royal Dutch Shell doesn’t appear
concerned about that tragedy, nor about
the spill caused by British Petroleum’s
Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of
Mexico in 2010. Not to mention the May
19 oil pipeline rupture in Santa Barbara
County that released more than 20,000
gallons of oil into the Pacific. When the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management recently
granted conditional approval for Shell to begin exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea
off the northern coast of Alaska, the multinational energy corporation began moving
the Polar Pioneer to Seattle, where it’s currently being prepped and outfitted for drilling in the Arctic. Protesters liken this to preparing a time bomb to go off in a heretofore
untouched and pristine environment.
“But the greater story is about the Duwamish tribe,” Finkbonner revealed.
This article originally appeared in Indian Country Today and is reprinted with permission.
HELP THEM GO
The Lummi Youth Canoe Family will be
traveling to Paris for the United Nations
climate negotiations, Dec. 5-12, 2015.
They are joining the Indigenous Environmental Network’s Indigenous Delegation
to Paris and their Canoes to Paris action.
The 17 members of the Lummi Youth
Canoe Family will have their great 38foot traveling canoe barged to Europe
to paddle to Paris together with other
indigenous canoe people from Norway,
the Amazon, Great Lakes and kayaktivists
from Europe.
“Our canoe family will travel to Paris
to inform the world about our waters,
our air, our lands and impacts of global
warming in our community, said Justin
Finkbonner, skipper of the canoe family.
“It will be an honor to usher our kids into
a once in a lifetime opportunity to see
leadership on a global scale and learn
about other activities that the world is
working on. I dream that our youth will
return home to our Salish communities
wanting to unite youth councils from
around the territory to learn about how
they can make a difference.”
The group needs help covering the
cost of shipping the canoe across the
ocean and covering the costs of travel,
lodging and food. You can assist them at
gofundme.com
B-BOARD 27
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
Lummi youth leader, Justin Finkbonner, relaxing
with his son, Liam, during a break in the
protest activities.
appliancedepotbham.com
GET OUT 14
Your donated appliance supports our job training program,
helps protect the environment, and strengthens the local economy.
WORDS 12
802 Marine Drive
Bellingham, WA
CURRENTS 8
OF YOUR OLD APPLIANCES
PICKUPS
(Free pickups available in
Bellingham and Ferndale)
VIEWS 6
FREE
MAIL 4
Terminal 5 sits on land the Duwamish people had lived on for an estimated 10,000
years. In 1855, the Duwamish and several
other tribes from the area signed the Treaty
of Point Elliott, in which they gave up 54,000
acres of land in return for hunting and fishing rights and four reservations. Since then
the tribe has seen the river that bears their
name turned into a sewer, where byproducts
of manufacturing processes were dumped indiscriminately for years.
Finkbonner, a Lummi and resident of the
Lummi Reservation, first became involved
with the Duwamish when he worked for the
Potlatch Fund, a Native grant-making and
leadership development organization in Seattle. Representatives of several local foundations approached him asking if he would
assist the Duwamish in applying for grants to
build a longhouse. He worked with Duwamish
chairwoman Cecile Hansen and together they
raised 2 million. In 2009, the Duwamish Longhouse and Cultural Center was opened near the
mouth of the Duwamish River.
“They were given [federal] recognition by
the Clinton administration, but then turned
over when Bush Jr. came into power and vetoed the bill,” Finkbonner said. “Now the
government is holding them back for another
seven to 10 years from being considered.”
Finkbonner’s frustration is understandable. Gaining federal recognition as a tribe
strengthens sovereignty, creating a government-to-government relationship with the
United States and facilitating federal budget
assistance and other services.
To this atmosphere of political oppression
and environmental recklessness, Finkbonner
brings the healing power of the Native canoe. In his program, The Awakening, young
people of his tribe learn the old way of travel, pulling together as one unit to bring help
and healing to another tribe. Their common
destination is as much internal as it is external: “Ignite the people. Bring fire to our
hearts. Cedar smoke from our collective spirit
will rise to the edge of the sky, where our
ancestors are dancing forever.”
In all the hoopla surrounding the controversy and protests, it’s good to be reminded of
the bigger picture, of which the mountainous
oil rig is just a little piece.
Call to
schedule
527-2646
DO IT 2
ALONG THE DUWAMISH
10.28.15
Forget Me Not Salon and Spa is a unique one-woman salonspa near the heart of downtown Bellingham
#43.09
INFO/SEASONAL SPECIALS AT
www.forgetmenotsalonspa.com or call 360-393-0298
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Quality integrative bodywork (MA 60464679) for
relaxation and wellness, manicures/pedicures, haircuts, women's waxing.
axing.
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FOOD 34
FORGET ME NOT SALON AND SPA
9
The W
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
last week’s news
t
k
h
e
e
LAST WEEK’S
NEWS
OCT20-25
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
BY TIM JOHNSON
10.20.15
TUESDAY
An inmate in Whatcom County Jail who tried to flood his cell broke
the seal in a valve in the jail over the weekend, causing water to
leak into the sheriff’s offices below. A few ceiling tiles were saturated with water and at least one broke and fell to the floor, allowing
water to leak onto desks in the major crimes detectives’ office, according to Sheriff’s officials.
10.21.15
CenturyLink must pay for an outage in the San Juan islands in
2013. The utility must provide customer credits totaling $271,000,
pay a $50,000 fine and do nearly $3 million in repairs and improvements. An investigation found a 10-day service outage in 2013
resulted from a severed underwater cable. Regulators say the company broke laws related to major outages and communicating with
the public.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.09
10.28.15
DO IT 2
VIEWS 6
A big and complex ballot means a heavier piece of mail, but you
won’t need to double up on stamps to vote. Whatcom County Auditor
Debbie Adelstein says just one stamp is needed for general election
ballots. The county will help pick up the cost for heavier ballots with
insufficient postage.
MAIL 4
CURRENTS 8
Wa
at s
B-BOARD 27
FOOD 34
currents
10
Bertha gets her head examined. Seattle’s broken-down tunnel-boring machine won’t resume digging a replacement for Seattle’s Alaskan Way Viaduct until late December, a month later than transportation officials initially said the delayed work would restart. The latest delay would push
back the opening date for the $3.1 billion downtown tunnel replacement project to April 2018. The four-lane toll tunnel was supposed to open
to traffic at the end of 2015. Bertha broke down in December 2013, and crews have been struggling to repair it ever since.
WEDNESDAY
10.23.15
FRIDAY
A Bellingham woman is kidnapped and brutally assaulted for
more than two days before she escaped, according to the Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office. Police say Robert McGlothern lured the
30-year-old woman to his home and locked her in a closet. Over
the course of two days, McGlothern beat her with a baseball bat,
which left injuries to her head, face, hands and arms, according to
investigators. McGlothern, 31, has a history of arrests for assaults
involving former girlfriends. He is arrested after a brief stand-off
with deputies and booked into Whatcom County Jail on charges of
kidnapping and assault.
Seeking to change Whatcom County’s governing documents, Pacific International Terminals creates the Clear Ballot Choices political
action committee and floods it with more than $58,500. Today,
The sixth orca calf born since December—and the fourth born into J pod—is spotted off the west coast of San Juan Island. Two years of robust
chinook salmon runs are being credited for the baby boom. Researchers believe the healthy calf has a good chance of survival.
they’ll report another $20,000 contribution. The
company intends to build a coal export facility
at Cherry Point. Whatcom County government will
approve the permit.
would bring 16 new trains a day to Longview, 840
additional ships on the Columbia River annually,
and ultimately export 44 million metric tons of
coal a year.
Cowlitz County and the Washington Dept. of
Ecology propose a new environmental review
schedule for the proposed Millennium Bulk
Terminals coal export facility in Longview. The
plan divides federal and state timelines in a
manner that allows the county and Ecology to
move forward at a more rapid pace, competitive
with Cherry Point. Millennium’s proposed project
10.25.14
SUNDAY
Five British nationals are dead after a
whale-watching boat carrying 27 people sinks
off the coast of Vancouver Island near Tofino.The
cause of the deadly sinking in calm, sunny conditions remains a mystery.
BATHROOM BREAK
On Oct. 12, Anacortes Police checked on
a report of a man inside a woman’s restroom. Police approached a woman and
asked if she had seen anything reference the restroom incident. Police later
learned the woman had a warrant for her
arrest and returned to find her. “At the
time of contact, she was hiding behind a
bush and appeared to be trying to hide
something,” police reported. “She was
FOOD 34
IntelliJent and supemely Tualiȑed.
On Oct. 23, a man who was banned
from Walmart for stealing merchandise
in 2013 returned and stole a bottle of
Hennessy Whiskey. He was detained by
store security. Bellingham Police arrived
to remind the 28-year-old of his previous
lifetime trespass notice and booked him
into jail on changes of burlgary.
On Oct. 23, a man concealed a bottle
of vodka in his pants and left the Barkley Haggen with the concealed merchandise. “He was detained and cited
for shoplifting and issued a lifetime
notice of trespass from all Haggen
Food stores and locations,” Bellingham
Police reported.
Satpal Sidhu
Bobby Briscoe
Will refocus port emphasis on blue collar jobs.
ISSUES
INITIATIVE ɁɃɆɆ
Blackmail the Legislature
[ ] No
INITIATIVE ɁɄɀɁ
Protect Endangered Animals
[ ] Yes
ESSB ɁɄɄɉ
Oil Spill Response Tax
[ ] Yes
SSB ɅɀɅɂ
Medical Marijunana Fee
FAHRENHEIT 451
[ ] Yes
On Oct. 23, a custodian discovered the
remains of a burned box of papers by the
fire exit door of the downtown branch of
the Bellingham Public Library. “No damage was noted to the building.”
Fuel Tax for Transportation
Improvements
ASPHALT GESTALT
ESSB ɆɁɃɈ
On Oct. 15, Bellingham Police took a
woman to the hospital, involuntarily, for
a mental health exam after she insisted
on sleeping on the pavement in an active
parking lot near the County Courthouse
at 2pm in the afternoon.
THAT’S THE
GOVERNMENT FOR YOU
On Oct. 26, Bellingham Police “got several calls from citizens today that the
IRS scam is making the rounds again.”
SSB ɅɉɈɇ
[ ] Yes
Close Special Business Tax Exemption
[ ] Yes
PROPOSITION Ɂ
District-Only Voting
[ ] No
PROPOSITION ɂ
Restrict County Council
[ ] No
A farmer, a businessman and a
representative for an important north
county community.
PROPOSITION Ƀ
Additionally Restrict County Council
[ ] No
PROPOSITION Ʉ
Word Limit for Ballot Questions
[ ] Yes
PROPOSITION Ʌ
Lower Signature Requirement for
Referendums
[ ] Yes
PROPOSITION Ɇ
Lower Signature Requirement for Charter
[ ] Yes
PROPOSITION ɇ
WORDS 12
On Oct. 26, a transient entered a hotel
on Lakeway Drive and began to drink tequila and smoke cigarettes in their lobby. He was contacted by police and cited
for consuming alcohol in public. He was
escorted from the hotel.
GET OUT 14
HIGH LIFE
STAGE 16
ART 18
On Oct. 21, a man was reported shoplifting Huggies diapers from the Rite
Aid store on Telegraph Road north of
Bellingham.
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
COUNTY COUNCIL
'ISTRICT ɂ
MUSIC 20
PORT OF BELLINGHAM
COMMISSION
CURRENTS 8
On Oct. 26, Whatcom County Sheriff’s
deputies learned of a man who was reported walking around the parking lot
of a church, apparently on drugs. He entered a Mercury Cougar that was not his
and drove off northbound on the Guide
Meridian. “Two deputies were able to
catch up to the stolen vehicle to make
a stop,” deputies reported. “The vehicle
then accelerated away at speeds up to
80 mph, and then cut through a parking
lot at Guide and Smith roads. The vehicle then went west on Smith Rd. The
deputies terminated the pursuit due to
increasing speeds and the danger created to the public due to erratic driving. The vehicle was observed a short
time later,“ deputies reported, driving
at a slower rate. Deputies were able to
get into position and perform a pursuit
intervention technique (PIT) maneuver
and get the vehicle stopped.” They took
the suspect into custody without further incidents. He appeared to be high
on methamphetamine.
Steady and capable administration across
a broad number of county activities.
VIEWS 6
PIT STOP
Todd Donovan
MAIL 4
On Oct. 26, Bellingham Police checked
on a man near Safeway at Sunset
Square. The man was reportedly “air
shooting” with a make-believe rifle.
“The male was ‘tweaking’ but cooperative,” police reported. “He admitted to
having used meth earlier. He declined
officers assistance.”
Jack Louws
WHATCOM COUNTY EXECUTIVE
DO IT 2
AIR RIFLE
COUNTY COUNCIL 'ISTRICT Ɂ
Term Limits for County OȞȑcer
[ ] No
PROPOSITION Ɉ
Alter Redistricting Commission
[ ] No
PROPOSITION ɉ
Five Fair and Equal Districts
[ ] Yes
PROPOSITION Ɂɀ
Supermajority Requirement for Charter
[ ] Yes
CITY OF FERNDALE PROP ɂɀɁɅ-Ɂ
Create Metropolitan Parks District
[ ] Yes
10.28.15
On Oct. 26, a Whatcom Community College student formerly with U.S. Customs and Border Protection dropped
his handgun in class, according to the
school. The handgun was concealed in
the student’s holster but not properly
secured. It fell to the floor when he got
out of his seat during class, Bellingham
Police reported. The 47-year-old immediately recovered the weapon and apologized. He had a concealed carry permit, but Whatcom Community College
prohibits firearms on campus.
CANDIDATES
#43.09
GUN GAFFE
YOUR GUIDE TO THE ELECTIONS
CASCADIA WEEKLY
FUZZ
BUZZ
arrested without incident and a search
incident to arrest yielded some baby aspirin and one Oxycodone pill. Officers
asked the woman if there was anything
else on her person they should know
about and she told them that there was
not.” The woman was transported to the
Skagit County Jail on her warrant and a
single charge of violation of the Controlled Substance Act. Further searching
at the jail revealed that the woman had
concealed a plastic baggie containing a
white crystal substance presumed to be
methamphetamine in one of her body
cavities,” police noted. She was additionally charged for possession of methamphetamine.
11
FOOD 34
words
B-BOARD 27
COMMUNITY
LECTURES
WOR DS
WED., OCT. 28
WILD POE TRY: Lorna Crozier’s poems and Ian
McAllister’s photographs can be experienced
at a reading for The Wild In You: Voices from the
Forest and the Sea at 7pm at Village Books, 1200
11th St.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
THURS., OCT. 29
WORDS 12
CURRENTS 8
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
10.28.15
#43.10
CASCADIA WEEKLY
12
BOOKS
doit
EMMA HEALEY
REVIEWED BY CHRISTINE PERKINS
Where’s Elizabeth?
OF MYSTERIES AND MADWOMEN
ELIZABETH IS Missing, the title of British author Emma Healey’s debut
novel, makes it clear: This is a mystery. Someone is missing. What happened?
Whodunnit?
We’re introduced to Maud, an elderly woman still
living at home despite increasing dementia. Her
house is covered with Post-It notes to remind her of
everyday things—“Eggs. Milk? Chocolate.” and “Coffee
helps memory.”
Maud passes her time watching TV, boiling eggs
and waiting for people to visit her. The one thing
she knows for sure is that Elizabeth, her best and
last-surviving friend, has not visited in a long time.
“Haven’t heard from Elizabeth,” Maud tells everyone.
Elizabeth is missing.
It’s not hard to understand why nobody seems too
troubled by Maud’s revelation. Maud, after all, cannot seem to remember that she’s already bought innumerable cans of tinned
peaches and stockpiled them in her pantry. She eats the cheese-and-tomato
sandwich her carer prepared for her lunch as soon as Carla heads out the door
in the morning, not comprehending the note Carla left her atop the Saran Wrap:
“Lunch for Maud to eat after 12pm.” Maud revisits themes over and over, asking,
“Did you ever grow summer squash?” until her daughter Helen is at wit’s end.
But Maud can’t let it go, the nagging worry that something has happened to
Elizabeth, so each day she writes herself
more notes, bits of evidence she’s found
that may lead to Elizabeth’s whereabouts.
She darts out of her house to look for her
friend, files numerous police reports and
gets lost repeatedly. As the book goes on,
Maud’s memory becomes increasingly fragmented, yet certain flashbacks figure vividly in her mind. There’s her sister Sukey,
married to a rough sort. There’s Sukey’s
compact, and a box of her
clothing. There’s Ma and
Dad, worry etched into
their faces. And there’s
a madwoman, lurking in
the bushes.
Healey does an excellent
job building susGET IT
pense,
dropping clues
WHERE: You
can find library
and drawing readers into
copies of Elizathe mystery—or mysterbeth is Missing
ies—of Maud’s life. At
in several
the same time, Healey
formats: book,
delivers a remarkable
eAudiobook,
and eBook
portrait of one woman’s
MORE: Use the
experience with demenfree Library
tia, exploring the boundNow app to
aries of memory and the
place a hold
power of love that enfrom your
mobile device,
dures even when one’s
or visit www.
mind is failing. Scenes
wcls.org (or
in which Maud struggles
bellingham
to understand that the
publiclibrary.
woman talking to her is
org if you live
in the city limher daughter are particuits of Bellinglarly poignant. The readham) to search
er sees Maud’s internal
your library
dialogue, and hears the
catalog
words people are saying
to her, and feels the frustration of all as
they try to comprehend one another.
While Elizabeth is Missing is fiction, it
does raise many issues about the difficulties of caring for a family member with
dementia. In Whatcom County, there’s help
available from the Northwest Regional
Council’s Family Caregiver Support Program;
information is online at www.nwrcwa.org/
family-caregiver-support-program.
Christine Perkins is Executive Director of the
Whatcom County Library System. She loves
a good mystery, particularly one with a
twist at the end. Her own imperfect memory
means she can sometimes enjoy the same
book over and over without remembering
how it ends. She also reviews fiction for Library Journal.
MORE MURDERS: Mature audiences can hear
more about true crime stories from the 19th and
early 20th centuries in Bellingham and Whatcom
and Skagit counties when Todd Warger reads
from More Murders in the Fourth Corner at 7pm at
the Ferndale Library, 2125 Main St.
WWW.WCLS.ORG
SEAT TLE JUST ICE: Former King County prosecuting attorney Christopher T. Bayley shares
ideas from Seattle Justice: The Rise and Fall of
the Police Payoff System in Seattle at 7pm at Village Books, 1200 11th St.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
OCT. 30-NOV. 1
HALLOWEEN BOOK SALE: Hundreds of
paperbacks in perfect condition by all the best
authors are dying to belong to you—get them at a
Halloween Book Sale taking place from 10am-6pm
Friday, 10am-5pm Saturday, and 1-5pm Sunday at
the Ferndale Library, 2125 Main St.
WWW.WCLS.ORG
SAT., OCT. 31
HALLOWEEN TALES: While you’re trick-ortreating in the Fairhaven district this year, drop
by to listen to pros from the Bellingham Storytellers Guild share ghoulish “Halloween Stories”
for all ages from 3-6pm at Village Books, 1200
11th St.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
EX TREMELY SCARY STORIES: The brave of
heart are invited to listen to “Extremely Scary
Stories” by members of the Bellingham Storyteller’s Guild from 7-8:30pm at the Fairhaven
Library, 1117 12th St. These stories are so truly
scary, the event is recommended for adults only!
Entry is free.
WWW.BELLINGHAMSTORYTELLERSGUILD.ORG
SUN., NOV. 1
NOVEL WRIT ING MONTH: Attend a kickoff for
NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) from
1-5pm at the SkillShare Space at the Bellingham
Public Library, 210 Central Ave. The library will
be offering many “Come Write In” sessions and
other events throughout the month, as well as
opportunities to meet local authors and hear
about their adventures in writing.
778-7217 OR
WWW.BELLINGHAMPUBLICLIBRARY.ORG
MON., NOV. 2
RICK STEVES: Travel guru and bestselling
guidebook author Rick Steves presents “Europe
Through the Back Door: Celebrating European
Travel on a Budget” at 7pm at Bellingham High
School, 2020 Cornwall Ave. Tickets to the presentation and slideshow are $5.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
POE TRYNIGHT: Those looking to share their
creative verse as part of Poetrynight can sign
up at 7:45pm at the Bellingham Public Library,
210 Central Ave. Readings start at 8pm. Entry is
by donation.
WWW.POETRYNIGHT.ORG
doit
TUES., NOV. 3
FOOD 34
PONDERABLES: Robert Erickson reads from his
new collection of poetry, Ponderables, at 7pm at
Village Books, 1200 11th St.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
B-BOARD 27
OLD T IMERS’ TALES: The Burlington Historical
Society hosts a free “Old Timers’ Tales” gathering at 7pm at the Burlington Public Library, 820
E. Washington St. Duane Stowe, Jim Neff, and
Don Mapes are planning an entertainment stroll
down memory lane for the community to enjoy.
WWW.BURLINGTON-CHAMBER.COM
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ing place from 5:30-8:30pm at the Bellingham
Senior Activity Center, 315 Halleck St. Tickets
are $15.
ART 18
733-4030 OR WWW.WCCOA.ORG
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
COM M U N I T Y
WED., OCT. 28
ARCHAEOLOGY FAIR: Kids of all ages will
engage with hands-on activities, learn about
archaeological projects and more at an Archaeology Fair taking place from 5-7pm at the Syre
Student Centre Auditorium at Whatcom Community College, 237 W. Kellogg Rd. Entry is free.
WWW.WHATCOM.CTC.EDU
THURS., OCT. 29
SPOOK S & SPIRITS: Attend a 5th Thursday
gathering focusing on “Spooks & Spirits” from
5-7pm at Whatcom Museum’s Old City Hall, 121
Prospect St. Attendees can sip cocktails provided by Bellewood Distilling and delve into the
shadier side of the building’s history. At 7pm,
those who want to can head out with the Bureau
of Historical Investigation for a 30-minute
walking tour around the neighborhood to learn
more about spooky local history. Entry is $5-$10
(plus an extra $5 for the after-tour).
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
HAUNT THE PARK: Prepare to get spooked
at the inaugural “Haunt the Park” event from
5-7pm at Ferndale’s Pioneer Park, 2004 Cherry
St. Visit a haunted jail and other buildings in
the park, take part in family-oriented activities
such as Pin the Tail on the Black Cat, and take
tours of decorated houses. Entry is free.
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
A MASQUERADE EVE: Rooted Emerging
hosts “A Masquerade Eve” starting at 6pm at
Fairhaven Middle School, 110 Parkridge Ave. The
fourth annual event will feature food by Richard
Balogh of Rifugio’s Country Italian Cuisine,
entertainment by Bellow Wing and Gallowglass,
fortune-telling, mask-making, bobbing for
apples, a photo booth and more. Entry to the
all-ages event is by donation.
WWW.ROOTEDEMERGING.ORG
BELLWE THER HALLOWEEN: Live music by
the Atlantics, a costume contest with prizes,
dancing and more will be part of a Halloween
Party taking place from 7-11pm at the Hotel
Bellwether Ballroom, One Bellwether Way. Entry
is $10 in advance or $15 at the door.
WWW.HOTELBELLWETHER.COM
NOV. 4-5
MONSTER MASH: Kids ages 6 and up can wear
their Halloween costumes to a “Monster Mash”
Costume Party and Parade starting at 4pm at
Village Books, 1200 11th St. .
GREEN BUILDING CONFERENCE: Earth Day
founder Denis Hayes and Common Agenda’s
Corey Weathers will be the keynote speakers at
Sustainable Connections’ “Green Building Conference” taking place from 8am-5pm Wednesday
and Thursday at Settlemyer Hall at Bellingham
Technical College, 3028 Lindbergh Ave. Entry is
$145-$175.
BINGO SPOOK TACULAR: Bingo, karaoke, a
Halloween costume contest and more will be
part of a “Bingo Spooktacular” fundraiser tak-
tomorrow
exchange
buy * sell*trade
WWW.FERNDALE-CHAMBER.COM
FRI., OCT. 30
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
WORDS 12
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
MAIL 4
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
FAMILY AC T IVIT Y DAY: Come dressed as your
favorite story character (or in other costumes)
at “Family Activity Day” events from 10am-4pm
at Whatcom Museum’s Lightcatcher Building,
250 Flora St. “Tell a Tale of Halloween!” will
feature “positively un-frightful” Halloween
stories, face-painting, bookish arts and crafts
and more. Entry is $3.
DO IT 2
CHUCK ANUT RADIO HOUR: Simon Winchester, the author of Pacific: Silicon Chips and
Surfboards, Coral Reefs and Atom Bombs, Brutal
Dictators, Fading Empires and the Coming Collision
of the World’s Superpowers, will be the featured
guest at the live taping of the Chuckanut Radio
Hour at 7pm at Whatcom Community College,
237 E. Kellogg St. Tickets are $5.
SAT., OCT. 31
10.28.15
WWW.BUF.ORG
(360) 305-3637
#43.10
NATURE’S TRUST: Christina Wood, author of
Nature’s Trust, will present a free public talk at
7pm at the Bellingham Unitarian Fellowship,
1708 I St. Professor Wood has published extensively on climate crisis, natural resources, and
native law issues.
FRIGHT NIGHT: Middle and high school
students can attend a “Halloween Fright Night”
gathering from 6:15-9pm at the Blaine Library,
610 3rd St. Sign up in advance for the free
event.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
THURS., NOV. 5
WWW.SUSTAINABLECONNECTIONS.ORG
CURRENTS 8
COWED: Denis and Gail Hayes share ideas from
Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on
America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture and
Environment at 7pm at Village Books, 1200 11th
St. In the book, the couple offers a revealing
analysis of how our mutually beneficial, 10,000year relationship with bovines has become
tragically dysfunctional.
Todd Warger shares spooky stories from More Murders in the Fourth Corner: True Stories of Whatcom
& Skagit Counties’ Earliest Homicides Oct. 29 at the
Ferndale Library and Nov. 6 at Vinostrology
VIEWS 6
WED., NOV. 4
13
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FOOD 34
outside
B-BOARD 27
HIKING
RUNNING
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
WORDS 12
CURRENTS 8
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
10.28.15
#43.10
CASCADIA WEEKLY
GARDENING
WED., OCT. 28
GROUP RUN: All levels of experience are welcome at a weekly Group Run beginning at 6pm in
Mount Vernon at the Skagit Running Company,
702 First St. The 3- to 6-mile run is great for beginners or for others wanting an easy recovery.
Entry is free and no registration is required.
WWW.SKAGITRUNNERS.ORG
FRI., OCT. 30
STORY AND IMAGE BY TRAIL RAT
14
CYCLING
doit
Moonstruck
THE NIGHT THAT WOULDN’T END
SHADOWS CREPT into the valley early that evening, shrouding the
snow-glazed peaks and frostbitten ridges above us in a vaporous veil.
From the damp, meadowy side slope where my trusty assistant and I were
working, all we could see of the sunset was a faint molten-pink glow smoldering through the drizzle to our west.
“Looks like an airplane crash over there,” my helpmate shouted over the
engine noise as we maneuvered our walk-behind mini-excavator through the
muddy trough of rocks and roots into resting position for the night.
“Either that or some kind of cataclysmic nuclear explosion,” I added,
groping around the control panel for the kill switch.
“Yeah,” he chortled, as the droning roar of our fancy machine whirred mercifully to a puttering halt, “Maybe being stuck here on this soggy old mountainside is actually the safest place in the world for us to be at the moment.”
“Truer words were never spoken, brother,” I said, stepping triumphantly
off the operator’s platform into a fetid pool of boot-sucking muck. “Clearly,
we’ve both got our priorities right.”
“Funny thing about it, though,” my assistant mused as we crawled back to camp
a few minutes later, “If earlier this summer
you’d told me I’d still be grubbing trails in
the North Cascades come mid-October, and
loving it, I wouldn’t have believed you at all.
“I mean, what happened to me? My clothes
are rotting off my back, my once-brand-new
tent smells like a pack of wild dogs have been
living in it, and right now I’m so bleeping
hungry I could eat a horse!”
“Mmmm,” I concurred, splashing shin-deep
through a burbling freshet. “A carcass that
size would certainly get the job done. Although if I had my druthers, you could throw
some fresh greens in there as well. I’m more
of a Cobb salad man, myself.”
Dinner happened in a flash.
One minute we were huddled beneath our
kitchen tarp beside a roaring campfire obliterating a potful of beef ravioli, and the next,
we were dead to the world in our collapsible
camp chairs sawing logs.
I thought the night was finished. But it
had only just begun.
It was just a shade past midnight when I finally stirred. Overhead, the starry sky blazed
crystal clear. Peering over the ashen remnants of our campfire, I gazed deep into the
shimmering vault of the cosmos and beheld
its infinite expanse.
Across the ridge line to my north, Big Dipper pointed the way to Polaris and I could see
Great Bear winking at me. Just behind and
eastward of those burly sky-bound haunches, I
traced the queenly M-shape of Cassiopeia that
gleamed so alluringly above the orbital plane.
Perseus stood guard nearby, brandishing
his sword in one hand and the disembodied
head of Medusa in the other. Then, just as
the blue-hued eeriness of the Pleiades came
stealing into my sightline, a full moon of extraordinary eminence came creeping through
the timber to beguile me with its transcendent beams of luminescence.
It’s hard to say exactly what sort of hocuspocus that bloodless blazing orb played on
me up there, but I haven’t been the same
man since.
I went hiking through the moon-dappled
topography for a while, I remember that
much. But just when exactly I decided to
fire up the excavator and go chewing my way
across the illuminated mountainside—until
my buddy showed up at the crack of dawn
to snap me out of it—is a mystery that will
forever remain unsolved.
WILD THINGS: Kids, adults and adventurers can join Wild Whatcom Walks for a “Wild
Things” excursion from 9:30-11am at the Stimpson Nature Reserve. Suggested donation is $5.
WWW.WILDWHATCOM.ORG
DOWNTOWN TRICK-OR-TREAT: Costumed
kids and their keepers are invited to collect
candy and goodwill as part of the annual
“Downtown Trick-or-Treat” event taking place
from 3-5pm at businesses throughout Bellingham’s urban core. Look for the balloons!
WWW.DOWNTOWNBELLINGHAM.COM
RUNNING DEAD: Avoid the zombies at all
costs at the inaugural “Night of the Running
Dead” event starting at 6pm at Aslan Brewing
Co., 1330 N. Forest St. Runners and zombies
taking part in the “urban adventure” will be
making their way from ground zero to three
checkpoints, and then back to the start. Entry
is $50; day-of registration is available.
WWW.DATABAREVENTS.COM
MART IN VOLKEN VISIT: Attend “An Evening
with Martin Volken” at 7:30pm at Backcountry
Essentials, 214 W. Holly St. The professional
guide and guidebook author will be sharing stories and expertise gained from a lifetime in the
mountains and raising awareness for Bellingham
Mountain Rescue Council, a volunteer organization dedicated to saving lives through rescue
and mountain safety education. Entry is $10.
WWW.BACKCOUNTRYESSENTIALS.NET
OCT. 30-31
GORE & LORE TOURS: Find out more about
the spooky side of local history when the
Good Time Girls present “Gore & Lore” Tours
for the final weekend starting at 6pm Friday
in historic Fairhaven and 6pm Saturday at the
Bureau of Historical Investigation, 217 W.
Holly St. Entry is $15.
WWW.THEBUREAUBELLINGHAM.COM
SAT., OCT. 31
BONESHAKER BIKE FEST: Tour the “bootiful” Skagit Valley as part of the fourth annual
“Boneshaker Metric” ride starting with a mass
start at 9am at the La Conner Channel Lodge,
205 N. First St. Riders can choose from a 25K,
50K or 100K—routes include views of the countryside and hypnotic Cascade Mountains. Costumes are strongly encouraged, and there will
be a variety of festive tour stops along the way.
From 3-6pm, attend a post-event celebration at
Hellam’s Vineyard. Entry is $35-$40 per person,
$70-$75 for families of four; funds raised benefit the La Conner Library Foundation.
WWW.BONESHAKERBIKEFEST.COM
HAUNTED GARDEN: Expect spooky twists and
turns around every corner at a “Haunted Garden
Spot Halloween” taking place from 9am-6pm
at the Garden Spot Nursery, 900 Alabama St.
Activities for ghouls and goblins of all ages, a
photo booth and tricky treats will take place
throughout the day. At 1pm, there’ll also be a
Costume Contest. Entry is free.
WWW.GARDEN-SPOT.COM
doit
FOOD 34
to their houses will encounter a “more gentle and
inclusive version of traditional trick-or-treating.”
Maps identifying participating homes can be
found online.
WWW.PUMPKINPOLKA.COM
WWW.ANACORTES.ORG
DIG INTO FALL: “Micro Climates” will be the
focus of a multimedia presentation with Skagit
County Master Gardener Sheri Hunter as part of a
“Dig Into Fall” series at 6:30pm at the Mount Vernon City Library, 315 Snoqualmie St. Come learn
about the ways pockets of climate exception
create special challenges and special surprises all
over Skagit County. Entry is free.
WWW.MOUNTVERNONWA.GOV
FERNDALE TRICK-OR-TREAT: Kids in costume
can drop by more than 40 Ferndale Chamber of
Commerce businesses participating in a “Downtown Trick-or-Treat” event from 3-5pm throughout
downtown Ferndale. Entry is free.
WWW.FERNDALE-CHAMBER.COM
FAIRHAVEN TRICK-OR-TREAT: Kids and adults
in costume are invited to take part in the annual
“Halloween Trick-or-Treating” event from 3-6pm
throughout historic Fairhaven. Shops in the
district will be decorated for the holiday; look for
posters at participating locales. Since Fairhaven
Pharmacy closed its doors after 126 years recently, the annual Halloween photos will be taken
in the Finnegan’s Alley Atrium (just across Harris
Avenue from the pharmacy and Dos Padres).
Photos will be printed immediately and given to
parents. Entry is free.
WWW.FAIRHAVEN.COM
MOUNT VERNON TRICK-OR TREAT: Skagit
County residents are invited to participate in a
safe “Trick-or-Treating” event from 3-5pm on First
Street—from Kincaid to Division—in downtown
Mount Vernon. At 5pm, kids are also invited to
join in the annual Costume Contest at the Lincoln
Theatre, 712 S. First St. Prizes will be awarded in
a variety of age categories.
WWW.LINCOLNTHEATRE.ORG
PUMPK IN POLK A: All children—especially
children with disabilities—are invited to the inaugural “Pumpkin Polka” from 4:30-6:30pm in the
Sunnyland neighborhood. Participating homes
will be handing out non-candy treats, have their
porches well-lit, and ensure that the kids coming
TUES., NOV. 3
ALL-PACES RUN: Staffers and volunteers are
always on hand to guide the way at the weekly
All-Paces Run starting at 6pm every Tuesday at
Fairhaven Runners, 1209 11th St. The runs are 20
minutes out and back on two key routes—by the
water or through the woods. Entry is free.
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
AA/EO DISABILITY ACCOMMODATION: 360-650-6146, [email protected]
STAGE 16
(360) 650-6146 | WWU.CFPA.EDU/THEATREDANCE
WWW.FAIRHAVENRUNNERS.COM
WED., NOV. 4
GARDEN CLUB MEE T ING: “The Wonders of
Hellebores” will be the focus of a presentation
by Danielle Young from Skagit Gardens at a Birchwood Garden Club meeting at 7pm at Whatcom
Museum’s Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St. All are
welcome.
WWW.BIRCHWOODGARDENCLUB.ORG
THURS., NOV. 5
TRAVELOGUE: “Traveling to the Top of the
World” will be the focus of a Travelogue Series
presentation from 7-9pm at Whatcom Museum’s
Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St. Jeannie Dodd will
be sharing her visit and understanding of the
Jhamste Gatsal Children’s Community in northeastern India. Suggested donation is $3.
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
FITNESS FORUM: Watch The Forgotten Four Minute Mile movie and then listen to and ask questions of Jim Bailey—the man who ran the first
sub-four-minute-mile on U.S. soil in 1956—at
a free Fitness Forum at 7:15pm at Fairhaven
Runners, 1209 11th St. Bailey currently lives in
Bellingham.
WWW.FAIRHAVENRUNNERS.COM
MAIL 4
ANACORTES TRICK-OR-TREAT: A “Downtown
Trick-or-Treat” event takes place from 2-4pm
throughout downtown Anacortes. At 4pm, kids 12
and under can attend a Halloween Party featuring
ghoulishly fun treats and prizes at the Majestic
Inn and Space, 419 Commercial Ave.
$12 - $15
STUDENTS $5 OFF
GET OUT 14
(360) 778-7217
778-7105
PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
DUG THEATRE
WORDS 12
HIDDEN GEMS: Discover hidden parks, trails,
restaurants and more at a “Hidden Gems in
Whatcom County” presentation at 5:30pm at
the SkillShare Space at the Bellingham Public
Library, 210 Central Ave. Your guides will provide
a treasure map for you to leave with so that you
can see for yourself what you’ve been missing.
Entry is free.
SAT
DO IT 2
WORK PART Y: Join Bellingham Parks and
Recreation to remove invasive plants and mulch
at a Work Party from 1-3pm along Padden Creek.
Come in costume, and organizers will provide the
treats. Park on Harris Street and look for signs to
the trailhead.
MON., NOV. 2
SAT
10.28.15
WWW.GLENECHOGARDEN.COM
WWW.MTBAKERBIKECLUB.ORG
2:00PM OCTOBER 24 & 31
#43.10
FALL FAMILY FUN: Hot dog and marshmallow
roasting, leaf pile jumping, hay rides, sheep
feeding, games, huge stump history and photo
opportunities will be part of “Fall Family Fun”
events from 10am-6pm Saturdays through Nov. 21
at Everson’s Glen Echo Garden, 4390 Y Rd. Entry is
$10 per family (up to four kids).
RABBIT RIDE: Join members of the Mount Baker
Bicycle Club for a “Rabbit Ride” starting at 8am
every Sunday at Fairhaven Bike, 1108 11th St.
The 32-mile route takes riders down Chuckanut
and back via Lake Samish. The group also holds
weekly rides Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays,
and Saturdays.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Ghouls and gals will have plenty of trick-or-treating choices Oct. 30-31 in downtown Bellingham,
Fairhaven, Mount Vernon, Anacortes, and beyond
7:30PM OCTOBER THURS
22 -– 23,
28
- 31
FRI
WED – SAT
CURRENTS 8
WWW.MOUNTBAKERCLUB.ORG
VIEWS 6
LAKE ANNE HIKE: Join members of the Mount
Baker Club for a hike to Lake Anne today. Meet
at 8am at Sunnyland Elementary to carpool; suggested carpool fee is $6. A NWF Pass is required
for trailhead parking.
B-BOARD 27
SUN., NOV. 1
15
FOOD 34
stage
DANCE
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
THEATER
16
BY AMY KEPFERLE
Thrillingham
DARKNESS FALLS ACROSS THE LAND
I’VE SEEN some weird and wonderful things in the years I’ve attended “Thrillingham” performances in downtown Bellingham.
For example, the first time I encountered the spectacle of a horde of dancing
zombies recreating Michael Jackson’s spooky “Thriller” dance—the same year the
troubled 50-year-old singer accidentally overdosed on prescribed meds and left
his earthly remains behind for his siblings to fight over—the resulting hubbub
shut down a good portion of the Holly Street corridor. For blocks, all that could
be seen in the urban core were costumed revelers and the undead dancing (and
partying) in the streets.
In recent years, those organizing the annual event have moved off of public
roadways and made the amphitheater at Maritime Heritage Park the nexus of the
scary spectacle. It’s a good call, as there are plenty of places to perch for bird’seye views of the marvelous madness—which include, but are not limited to, the
performers taking part in the undulating of the undead.
Last Halloween was a doozy. In addition to the hordes of dancers shuffling
around as in-sync zombies during the execution of “Thriller,” other area performers also shared their moves and musical talents prior to the main event, making
the night come alive with sound and spectacle.
But that’s wasn’t all; not by a long shot. “Thrillingham” crowds tend to get into
PROFILES
the Halloween spirit. This means that
part of the fun of coming to Maritime
Heritage Park after darkness falls across
the land is sussing out the amazing costumes that are on display—whether it’s
a person who painted themselves blue to
more closely make themselves resemble
Papa Smurf, a human-turned-Pterodacyl,
a man-sized bear or an eerily spot-on
child vampire.
I’m still not sure if it was a hallucination, but something especially weird happened at the culmination of last October’s “Thrillingham.” After the performers
had left the stage and a community dance
party had commenced in the same space,
out of nowhere a man on a horse—along
with a woman sitting behind him on the
saddle who looked like
she was hanging on for
dear life—rode his giant steed up the main
walkway of the park.
People got out of his
way as he approached
stage, so I’m pretty
ATTEND the
sure
they saw him, too.
WHAT:
But
almost as quickly
“Thrillingham”
WHEN: 8pm Sat.,
as the cowboy and his
Oct. 31
panicked
passenger
WHERE: Maritime
had
entered
the
party,
Heritage Park,
they
soon
departed,
500 W. Holly St.
disappearing into the
COST: Donations
collected during
night. Only hoofbeats
the event will
could be heard as peobenefit Lydia
ple turned to each othPlace. Raffle ticker murmuring, “Did you
ets will be sold
just see what I saw?”
at Lydia Place
and the Bureau of
My point is this: Part
Historical Invesof the fun of “Thrilltigation the week
ingham”—which also
of Halloween
acts as a fundraiser for
INFO: www.thrill
Lydia Place and sees a
ingham.com
variety of community
members practicing their moves for up to
a month to make Halloween memorable
for the masses—is never knowing exactly
what to expect.
While you’re guaranteed to see approximately 100 zombies groaning, moaning,
snarling, dancing and generally acting
like they’re hungry for brains, brains and
more brains, what you don’t know is how
the night will end, or who else will make a
Halloween-night visit to downtown Bellingham. It could be a man on a horse—or
it could be your worst nightmare.
doit
STAGE
OCT. 28-31
STANDING ON CEREMONY: Experience
unique takes on the moments before, during
and after “I do” when Standing on Ceremony:
The Gay Marriage Plays concludes this week with
showings at 7:30pm Wednesday through Friday,
and 2pm and 7:30pm Saturday at Western
Washington University’s DUG Theater in the
Performing Arts Center. The short plays “are
vows to the blessings of equality, the universal
challenges of relationships and the often
hilarious power of love.” Tickets are $7-$12.
650-6146 OR WWW.TICKETS.WWU.EDU
THURS., OCT. 29
GOOD, BAD, UGLY: Watch “The Good, the
Bad and the Ugly” at 8pm every Thursday at
the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. At 10pm,
stick around for “Haunted House.” Bring your
ghost stories to give the performers, and it
could be played out right there. Entry is $8 for
the early show, $5 for the late one.
733-8855 OR WWW.THEUPFRONT.COM
OCT. 29-31
SCREAM FAIR: Brave souls can journey into
the darkness as they come face-to-face with
creepy creatures and the undead at the annual
Scream Fair Haunted House taking place from
6:30-9:30pm Thursday and 6:30-10:30pm Friday
and Saturday at the Henry Jansen Building at
Lynden’s Northwest Washington Fairgrounds,
1775 Front St. Tickets are $10-$13 at the door.
WWW.LASTCHANCEPRODUCTIONS.COM/
SCREAMFAIR
CLOWN BAR: Watch what happens when a
former clown named Happy returns to the seedy
underground clown world to find his brother’s
killer when Adam Szymkowicz’s Clown Bar
continues this weekend with shows at 7:30pm
Thursday through Saturday at iDiOM Theater,
1418 Cornwall Ave. Tickets to see the “gritty,
violent film noir mob drama—about clowns”
are $12 in advance and $15 at the door. Additional showings take place through Nov. 7.
WWW.IDIOMTHEATER.COM
ROCK Y HORROR: Celebrate the 40th anniversary of the cult classic known as The Rocky
Horror Picture Show at viewings at 8pm and
midnight Thursday through Saturday at the
Mount Baker Theatre’s Walton Theatre, 104 N.
Commercial St. Bellingham actors—including
Miss Betty Desire as the criminologist—will
help bring the film to life in front of the
movie screen. Tickets are $15; $5 “survival
kits” will be available at the door.
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
ROCK Y HORROR SHOW: The Theater Arts
Guild presents The Rocky Horror Show at 8pm
Thursday and Friday, and 10pm Saturday at
Mount Vernon’s Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St.
Audiences are encouraged to come in costume
to view the story of a “sweet transvestite from
Transylvania” and an eclectic cast of characters
who will bring the cult classic to life. Be ready
to dance to “The Time Warp” and participate
in audience shout-outs. Tickets are $12-$25.
Additional showings take place Nov. 6-7.
WWW.LINCOLNTHEATRE.ORG
OCT. 30-31
BAAY HAUNTED HOUSE: Students from
the Bellingham Arts Academy for Youth will
present “The Nightmare on Railroad” Haunted
House & Show from 6:30-9:30pm (all-ages)
1-2p enter online $10 entry winners take pot
CIDER BREWING BASICS
$15 2-4p
Robert Arzoo of Northcorner Brewing
Fill your carboy @ BelleWood!
B-BOARD 27
FOOD 34
doit
(360) 510-4711 OR WWW.KUNTZANDCO.ORG
SUN., NOV. 1
OKLAHOMA: In partnership with Rodgers &
Hammerstein, Tony and Emmy Award-winner
Kristin Chenoweth will produce an exclusive,
bonus featurette that will precede a showing of
Oklahoma at 2pm in Mount Vernon at the Lincoln
Theatre, 712 S. First St. The performance footage
will be interspersed with Chenoweth singing a few
of the classic songs at the Rodgers & Hammerstein
warehouse with backstory about the history of the
film and musical. Tickets are $12-$16.
WWW.LINCOLNTHEATRE.ORG
MON., NOV. 2
42ND STREE T: A new touring production of the
quintessential backstage musical comedy classic
42nd Street can be seen in Bellingham at a 7pm
performance at the Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N.
Commercial St. During the play, expect to hear
classic songs such as “We’re in the Money,” “I
Only Have Eyes for You,” and “Lullaby of Broadway.” Tickets to the show are $30-$69.
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
GUFFAWINGHAM: A weekly open mic for comedians, “Guffawingham!,” takes place at 9:30pm
every Monday at the Green Frog, 1015 N. State St.
Entry is free.
WWW.ACOUSTICTAVERN.COM
WITCH’S BALL: All witches, wizards, ghosts
and ghouls are invited to a “Witch’s Ball”
taking place from 8-11pm at Bellingham Dance
Company, 1705 N. State St. Dance lessons in
swing, ghoulish treats and a costume contest
(with prizes) will be part of the Halloween
fun. No partner is necessary, and all levels are
welcome. Entry is $8-$10.
WWW.BELLINGHAMDANCECOMPANY.COM
SAT., OCT. 31
HALLOWEEN CONTRA DANCE: Join the
Bellingham Country Dance Society for an all-ages
Halloween Contra Dance from 7-10:30pm at the
Fairhaven Library, 1117 12th St. Costumes are optional; no partner is needed, and no experience
is necessary. Entry is $6-$10.
WWW.BELLINGHAMCOUNTRYDANCE.ORG
LAST DAYS OF MELVILLE: The world premiere
of Glenn Hergenhahn-Zhao’s The Last Days of
Melville Malloy can be seen at 7:30pm Wednesday through Friday at the iDiOM Theater, 1418
Cornwall Ave. Described as a “drug-fueled
mystery about a famous singer gone missing,”
the story reconnects the playwright with former
Bellinghamster Nate Smith. Tickets are $12-$15;
additional showings happen through Nov. 21.
WWW.IDIOMTHEATER.COM
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
SUN., NOV. 1
REP REHEARSAL: See how professional dancers
prepare for a performance at a Bellingham Repertory Dance open rehearsal taking place from 121:30pm at the Firehouse Performing Arts Center,
1314 Harris Ave. The company’s members can
be seen practicing and refining dances for their
upcoming 10th Anniversary Fall Performance
taking place Nov. 19-21.
WWW.BHAMREP.ORG
NOV. 4-6
WORDS 12
PARK INSON’S DANCE CLASS: Kuntz and Company’s Pam Kuntz leads a dance class for people
with Parkinson’s disease and other movement
or neurological disorders at 10am at Ballet Bellingham, 1405 Fraser St., suite #103. Suggested
donation is $5-$7. No registration is necessary;
just show up ready to dance.
CURRENTS 8
FRI., OCT. 30
VIEWS 6
(360) 380-0456
MAIL 4
WWW.THEUPFRONT.COM
FOLK DANCE: Join the Fourth Corner Folk
Dancers to learn lively folk dances from Eastern
Europe, Greece, Turkey, and Israel from 7:1510pm every Thursday at the Fairhaven Library,
1117 12th St. Suggested donation is $5; students
and first-timers are free.
TUES., NOV. 3
SK AGIT FOLK DANCERS: Join the SkagitAnacortes Folk Dancers for a weekly International
Folk Dancing event from 7-9:30pm at Bayview
Civic Hall, 12615 C St. No partners are needed;
just show up and dance. Entry to the drop-in
event is free for the first session, $3 afterwards.
WWW.SKAGITFOLKDANCERS.ORG
[email protected]
10.28.15
HELLINGHAM: Help figure out whodunnit
when the perennially popular improvised murder
mystery known as “Hellingham” returns to the
stage for 8pm and 10pm shows every Friday and
Saturday through October at the Upfront Theatre,
1208 Bay St. Tickets to view the comedic carnage
are $10 in advance and $12 at the door.
THURS., OCT. 29
#43.10
WWW.BBAYBREWERY.COM
DA NCE
CASCADIA WEEKLY
and 9:30-11:30pm (21 and over) at Boundary Bay
Brewery, 1107 Railroad Ave. Lisa Markowitz’ BAAY
Dance Company will start festivities with a “dazzling and artfully ghoulish” performance, then
audiences will be led down a scary road to the
Garden of Doom Dungeon, laden with scary rooms
of unspeakable horrors (with BAAY students and
other actors providing the spirit). Entry is $5;
proceeds raise scholarship money for students.
DO IT 2
Students from the Bellingham Arts Academy for Youth will present “The Nightmare on Railroad” Haunted
House & Show Oct. 30-31 at the beer garden at Boundary Bay Brewery
FILM 24
3-5p
17
B-BOARD 27
FOOD 34
visual
OPENINGS
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
18
“MERCURIAL,” BY LAURIE POTTER
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
GALLERIES
BY AMY KEPFERLE
The Night Gallery
SCARY SIGHTS AWAIT YOU
“UNUSUAL” AND “startling”
are two of the adjectives used to describe
the word “outre.”
All three of the descriptions are apropos when it comes to talking about the
art on display at Fourth Corner Frames & Gallery’s latest exhibit, “The Night Gallery,” which pays homage to Rod Serling’s television series of the same name.
“We invited a handful of regional artists to help us create our own ‘shadowy
museum of the outre,’” read the press release that caused me to venture through
the doors of the Holly Street business on the Saturday preceding Halloween.
In the early 1970s-era program—which focused more on stories of horror and
the supernatural, rather than the science-fiction tales that made Serling’s The
Twilight Zone series so popular—the host appeared in an art gallery setting,
where he’d introduce the creepy tale that would be brought to life that night by
unveiling a few of the paintings that it depicted.
“Good evening, and welcome to a private showing of three paintings, displayed
here for the first time,” Serling would typically say. “Each is a collector’s item in
its own way—not because of any special artistic quality, but because each capture on a canvas, suspend in time and space, a frozen moment of a nightmare.”
At the end of each episode, the art was also what viewers saw before the
PROFILES
show went off the air, with the camera
pausing on the strongest image before going to black.
I wondered what Serling would make
of Trish Harding’s oil painting “Decoy,” in
which a character that
looks a lot like Little
Red Riding Hood bares
her fangs to someone
outside of the realm
of the viewers’ vision.
She’s got pigtails and a
SEE IT
red cape, but she also
WHAT: The Night
has a long tail, a pistol
Gallery
strapped to her waist
WHEN: 10amand a basket full of curi5:30pm, through
Sat., Oct. 31
ous piglets.
WHERE: Fourth
“The pigs are only too
Corner Frames &
happy
to help,” reads a
Gallery, 311 W.
missive
accompanying
Holly St.
the
painting,
helping
INFO: www.
fourthcorner
further the story of this
frames.com
particular (and peculiar) fairytale. “They are
acutely aware of the peril they have put
themselves in. If only its hunger were no
so insatiable. If only it were not so driven
by envy, because then and only then, such
covert actions would not be necessary.”
In Laurie Potter’s pastel work, “Mercurial,” a bare-chested madman with dark
lips, aviator glasses and Medusa-esque hair
looks to be cackling into the cosmos. “What
do you believe is happening in this moment
of his life?” the artist questions in a note
underneath the painting. (If pressed, I’d
say he just pressed the big red button that
obliterates the world, and is happy about
going nuclear.)
Other pieces that made me want to
know more about the stories behind the
artworks included Potter’s “The Magpie
Thinks She’s Queen Bee;” Francis X. Donovan’s big-headed multimedia “Trotsky”
sculpture; multiple works by Erin Libby
with maritime themes (including “Dinner
at Sea,” an oil-on-wood painting with a
fish whose face is more human than piscine); and a wonderfully complex work
by George Jartos, in which it’s not clear
whether it’s humans or alien-like creatures being sucked into some sort of
gravity-defying vortex.
“The Night Gallery” is only up through
Halloween, so if, like Rod Serling, you’d like
to ponder unusual and startling works of
art, please be aware that time is running
out to do so.
doit
ONGOI NG E X H I BI TS
A.C.M.E. CREAT IVE SPACE: View the
“Steamroller Block Printing Project” through
October at A.C.M.E. Creative Space, 705 Commercial Ave. The exhibit features work created
curing the Anacortes Arts Festival.
WWW.ACMECREATIVE.COM
ALLIED ARTS: View “Whimsey” through
Oct. 31 at Allied Arts, 1418 Cornwall Ave. The
exhibit features work by Helen Dorn, Christen
Mattix, Ellen Clark, Brian Simpson, and Nathan
Waterstreet.
WWW.ALLIEDARTS.ORG
ART WOOD: Dining tables and chairs will
be highlighted through October at Artwood
Gallery, 1000 Harris Ave. Paintings by Francy
Blumhagen will also be on display.
WWW.ARTWOODGALLERY.COM
BISON BOOK BINDING: A retrospective of
letterpress show posters is currently on display
at Bison Bookbinding & Letterpress’ new locale
at 112 Grand Ave., #101.
WWW.BISONBOOKBINDING.COM
CHUCK ANUT BREWERY: Nature and landscape photographs by Damian Vines are on
display through Nov. 27 at Chuckanut Brewery,
601 W. Holly St.
WWW.CHUCKANUTBREWERYANDKITCHEN.COM
DAKOTA ARTS: View work by artists who took
part in this month’s Whatcom Artist Studio
Tour through October at the Dakota Art Store
Gallery, 1322 Cornwall Ave.
WWW.DAKOTAARTSTORE.COM
DEMING LIBRARY: Oil paintings inspired by
a collection of old black-and-white photos
that feature families and their automobiles
can be seen at Helen Dorn’s “Snapshot” exhibit
through Oct. 30 at the Deming Library, 5044
Mt. Baker Hwy.
WWW.WCLS.ORG
FISHBOY GALLERY: Check out the contemporary folk art of RR Clark from 1:30-5pm every
Mon.-Fri. at the FishBoy Gallery, 617 Virginia St.
714-0815 OR WWW.FISHBOYGALLERY.COM
FOURTH CORNER: “The Night Gallery,” a takeoff of Rod Serling’s television series of the same
name, shows through Oct. 31 at Fourth Corner
Frames & Gallery, 311 W. Holly St.
WWW.FOURTHCORNERFRAMES.COM
GALLERY C YGNUS: Maggie Wilder will show a
“feast” of new paintings through Nov. 1 in La
Conner at Gallery Cygnus, 109 Commercial St.
WWW.GALLERYCYGNUS.COM
GOOD EARTH: Rob Beishline’s “Broadcast
News: Prints and Patterns on Clay” will be
highlighted through October at Good Earth
Pottery, 1000 Harris Ave.
WWW.GOODEARTHPOTS.COM
HONE Y SALON: Multimedia artist and entrepreneur Rebecca Ogden’s “Sound the Alarm”
can be seen at Honey Salon, 310 W. Holly St.
WWW.HONEYBELLINGHAM.COM
I.E. GALLERY: An exhibit featuring works by
Warren Dykeman and James Reisen is on display through Nov. 15 in Edison at i.e. Gallery,
5800 Cains Court.
(360) 488-3458
doit
STILL GOING STRONG!
MUSIC 20
“RESTING RED”
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
FOOD 34
FRESH LOCAL PRODUCE • FINE LOCAL CRAFTS • READY TO EAT FOOD
(360) 647-8137
STAGE 16
SATURDAY, 10AM TO 3PM, THRU DECEMBER 19
DEPOT MARKET SQUARE, 1100 RAILROAD AVE, BELLINGHAM, WA
2015
WWW.SCOTTMILO.COM
BELLINGHAM FARMERS MARKET PROUDLY ACCEPTS FOOD STAMPS WIC/SFMNP ACCEPTED
MATZKE GALLERY: The multi-artist “Visual
Poetry and Abstract Expressionism” exhibit
shows from 11am-5pm weekends through Nov.
8 at Camano Island’s Matzke Fine Art Gallery &
Sculpture Park, 2345 Blanche Way.
CURRENTS 8
WWW.SCULPTURENORTHWEST.ORG
SK AGIT MUSEUM: “Mysteries of the Museum”
is showing through November 8 at La Conner’s
Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S.
Fourth St.
VIEWS 6
WWW.MAKESHIFTPROJECT.COM
SCULPTURE NORTHWEST: “Emerge”—an
eclectic show of figurative, non-objective and
experimental sculpture by regional artists
in bronze, stone and wire —shows through
Nov. 22 at Sculpture Northwest Gallery, 203
Prospect St.
WWW.SKAGITCOUNT Y.NET/MUSEUM
MAIL 4
MAKE.SHIF T: View “Working Stiffs” and Daniel Whitsell’s “Bundles in the Rafters” through
Oct. 31 at Make.Shift Art Space, 306 Flora St.
The exhibit features works by staff at its local
business sponsors, including the RE Store, Toni
& Guy Academy, and more.
WWW.MATZKEFINEART.COM
MONA: “Not Vanishing: Contemporary Expressions in Indigenous Art” shows through Jan.
3 at La Conner’s Museum of Northwest Art,
Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St. The
exhibit features more than 40 artists from
tribes throughout the region.
WWW.MONAMUSEUM.ORG
QUILT MUSUEM: “Best of the
Festival,””Illusions and Shadows,” and “Great
Lakes Seaway: War of 1812 International Challenge” are currently on display at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 703 S. Second St.
WWW.LACONNERQUILTS.ORG
RAGFINERY: A variety of textile-related
workshops happen on a regular basis at Ragfinery, 1421 N. Forest St. This week’s workshops
BELLIN
B
EL
E
L L IIN
N GHAM
GHAM
WWW.SMITHANDVALLEE.COM
MOUNT BAKER THEATRE
FRIDAY | NOV.
NOV
O 13
3 | 7:30
30 PM
WESTERN GALLERY: “The Art of Seating”
shows through Dec. 11 at the Western Gallery
on the Western Washington University campus.
Entry is free and open to the public.
#43.10
WWW.MINDPORT.ORG
SMITH & VALLEE: View “Boats and Water,”
featuring vessels by Lummi Island-based
sculptor Anne Morris and castings made by
Allen Moe, through Oct. 31 at Edison’s Smith &
Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave.
WWW.WESTERNGALLERY.WWU.EDU
WHATCOM ART MARKE T: From 10am-6pm
every Thursday through Monday, stop by the
Whatcom Art Guild’s Art Market at Fairhaven’s
Waldron Building, 1314 12th St.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
MINDPORT: San Francisco-based artist Romy
Randey’s “Umbra” is currently on display at
Mindport Exhibits, 210 W. Holly St. The exhibit
features an interactive wall panel made from
fused glass, bamboo, sensors and LEDs. Admission is $2.
GET OUT 14
SCOT T MILO GALLERY: Marie Powell’s new
monoprints will be highlighted through
October in Anacortes at the Scott Milo Gallery,
420 Commercial Ave. Also showing are abstract
pastels by Amanda Houston, oils by Brooke
Borcherding, pastels by Jan Wall, oils by Keith
Sorenson, and steel mesh with glass tables by
Lanny Bergner.
WORDS 12
LUCK Y MONKE Y: Photographer Jeanne
McGee’s “Sanguine Landscapes” exhibit and
images taken during the Day of the Dead in
Mexico show through October at the Lucky
Monkey, 312 W. Champion St.
WWW.RAGFINERY.COM
WWW.WHATCOMARTGUILD.ORG
WHATCOM MUSEUM: “Helmi’s World: Symbol,
Myth, Fantasy,” “The Owl and the Woodpecker:
Photographs by Paul Bannick,” “Unhinged:
Book Art on the Cutting Edge” and “Chipping
the Blck, Painting the Silk: The Color Prints of
Norma Bassett Hall” can currently be viewed
on the Whatcom Museum campus.
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
DO IT 2
WWW.LUCIADOUGLAS.COM
include “Nuno Felt a Wingy Scarf” (Oct. 28);
and “Blooming Scraps for Kids” (Oct. 29). A
“Beginning Quilting” series begins Wed., Nov.
4. See more details and register online.
10.28.15
LUCIA DOUGLAS: An exhibit featuring the
work of regional artists working in a variety
of mediums—including Cathy Schoenberg, Michael Clough, Mary Moore Bailey, Janel Bragg,
Chloe French, Margaret Van Patten, Sheryl
Funkhauser and more—shows through Dec. 19
at Lucia Douglas Gallery, 1415 13th St.
ART 18
Sculptor Ann Morris incorporates seaweed, cedar, willow and other organic matters incorporating the
“fecundity of nature, carrying remnants of its decaying life into a new dimension” as part of a “Boats
and Water” exhibit on display through the month at Edison’s Smith & Vallee Gallery
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music
AS USUALLY HAPPENS when I get word of a big
RUMOR HAS IT
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC
20
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
SHOW PREVIEWS
rumor has it
20
BEATS ANTIQUE
BY CAREY ROSS
It’s Spooktacular!
HAVE A HAUNTING GOOD TIME
I’VE LIVED in Bellingham half my life, so you’d think that by this
point, I would have some insight or understanding as to why this
town straight loses its mind when it comes to celebrating Halloween.
But I don’t.
As a person who neither tricks nor treats, I am more observer than
participant in this yearly bacchanal. But that doesn’t keep me from
hitting the streets in search of hot Halloween action—although you
won’t see me donning a costume anytime soon. And with this year’s
holiday taking place on a Saturday, I expect the Halloween-loving
masses to reduce this town to smoldering rubble by the time November gets underway. Here’s your lowdown on the Halloween hoedown.
BOUNDARY BAY BREWERY: I’ve said it before and I will no doubt say
it many more times before I’m done: Ain’t no party like a Boundary
Bay party because a Boundary Bay party don’t stop. Bellingham’s
longstanding brewpub is ground zero for most holiday happenings
around these parts, and Halloween is second only to St. Patrick’s
Day when it comes to occasions the fun-mongering Boundary crew
loves most. As has become tradition in the past few years, the beer
garden will be transformed into the Nightmare on Railroad on Oct.
30 and 31 (with a little help from the creative cadre at Bellingham
Arts Academy for Youth), and Scary Monster &
the Super Creeps will headline what is always
a righteous party on Halloween proper. Will it
top the year the Thriller dancers showed up outside for an unexpected flash-mob performance?
That remains to be seen. WHERE: 1107 Railroad Ave.
INFO: www.bbaybrewery.com
CABIN TAVERN: If ever Bellingham had a zombie
band, it would have to be Clambake. Just when I
think we’ve heard the last from these local rockers, Halloween happens—and so does Clambake.
Always good for an entertaining evening, this
time Clambake takes their show to the Cabin
Tavern, where they will no doubt roar back to
life with their own inimitable, swaggering style.
But lest you think you’ve heard the last from
this capable quartet, it should be known they’re
already hard at work on their annual Christmas
extravaganza, not to mention a new album titled
Too Dumb to Die, an appropriately cheeky name
for Bellingham’s own walking dead. WHERE: 307 W.
Holly St. INFO: www.facebook.com/clambake
GLOW NIGHTCLUB: Like the broken record that
I am, I have a habit of repeating the same thing
about Glow, time and again: When it comes to
being able to observe the shit-show that is Halloween in downtown Bellingham, there is no
show—this time via a slip of the tongue of one
of the bands in question—it gets announced
about five minutes after I say something about
how I’m not allowed to announce it.
Such is the case with a Dec. 30 show at the
Shakedown featuring Red Fang and Black Breath.
Even as I type that sentence, I feel excitement
welling up inside me. In case you’re math and
commonsense deficient (it’s O.K., I am generally
deficient in both those areas as well), here are a
few bits of info you might find pertinent.
On their own, Red Fang is a surefire, guaranteed sellout at the Shakedown. For certain,
beyond the shadow of a doubt. On their own,
Black Breath is a surefire, guaranteed sellout
at the Shakedown. Also for certain, beyond the
shadow of a doubt. The show was announced
by the venue last week,
and two days later, a
quarter of the tickets
had already been sold.
What I’m trying to say
here is, I know tickets
for the show run $22
(approximately
$17
more than most people
BY CAREY ROSS
are willing to pay in
this town to see any band) and I’m also aware
the show is two months away. However, none
of that makes a difference when it comes to
the following piece of advice: for the love of
whatever it is you love the most, buy your
tickets early. This is the number of tickets that
will be left at the door the night of: zero. This
is the number of eye rolls I have to dole out
to everyone who does not heed my advice and
then complains to me that they’ve waited too
long to buy their tickets: infinite. And no one
likes it when I roll my eyes at them. Just ask
my mother.
Here’s a question: When was the last time you
saw a show at the Sudden Valley Dance Barn?
While the Sudden Valley jazz series (which recently announced its 2016 lineup) makes good
use of the venue, you’re more likely to find tai
chi classes or knitting clubs there than you
are live music. However, up-and-coming local
pop-punk band Trust Me I’m Scared is trying to
change that, in part by hosting a Nov. 6 albumrelease event at the barn. The show is the first
in a purported “Sudden Valley Nightlife” series, and will also feature Minor Plains, a band
I continue to love despite the fact that they’ve
apparently become a barefoot band of late, in
direct opposition to my personal squickiness
about bare feet in public. (Seriously, Minor
Plains, do you even know where that stage has
been?) Footwear (or lack thereof) aside, Minor
Plains’ math rock remains impeccable, they remain extraordinarily skilled and seeing them
play is well worth the trip to Sudden Valley.
Encourage a new band, see a known quantity
and help foster a new(ish) location for live music—it might just be the best five bucks you’ve
ever spent in Sudden Valley.
1053 N. State St. INFO: www.facebook.com/
honeymoonmead
MAKE.SHIFT ART SPACE: Given the success of the Valentine’s Day Cover Show
that has happened for the past five years
or so at Make.Shift, it only makes sense
that the arts nonprofit would decide
to rope another holiday into the coverband action, and what more appropriate
holiday than Halloween, when everyone
dedicates considerable effort to being
something or someone they’re not? The
all-ages show, which takes place Fri.,
Oct. 30, will feature music by Bauhaus,
Danzig, My Chemical Romance, the Cure,
and more, all performed by your favorite
local musical luminaries. WHERE: 306 Flora
St. INFO: www.makeshiftproject.com
PRESENCE STUDIO: For those who desire a kinder, gentler way to celebrate
601 West Holly St. • Bellingham, WA
360-75-BEERS (752-3377)
ChuckanutBreweryAndKitchen.com
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
FOOD 34
Sunday-Thursday 4-6pm
MUSIC
20
MUSIC 20
Family Friendly
HoPPY Hour
WWW.MCINT YREHALL.ORG
FEST IVAL OF MUSIC: St. John’s Ensemble,
Bellingham Damekor, Men of Immanuel, Bellingham Mannakor, and pianist Nick Swanson
will be among the performers taking part in a
“Festival of Music” concert at 2pm at St. John’s
Lutheran Church, 2530 Cornwall Ave. The free
concert will celebrate St. John’s 125 years of
service to Whatcom County.
WHERE: 118 W. Holly St. INFO: www.facebook.
com/swillery.whiskeybar
MUSIC CLUB CONCERT: Hear Martin Kuuskmann on bassoon and Jeffrey Gilliam on piano
at a Bellingham Music Club concert at 10:30am
at Trinity Lutheran Church, 119 Texas St. Entry
is by donation.
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/STJOHNSBELLINGHAM
POWER TRIO: The power trio of mandolinist
John Reischman, guitarist Scott Nygaard, and
bassist/mandolinist Sharon Gilchrist can be
heard at a 2pm concert at the YWCA Ballroom,
1026 N. Forest St. Tickets are $15.
(360) 733-5960
WORK WITH YOUR WHOLE MIND!
7-DAY GROUP
MEDITATION
RETREAT
with Holly Gayley & Rick Merrill
IMMERSE YOURSELF IN THIS
MINDFULNESS-AWARENESS
WEEK-LONG EXPERIENCE
for new & seasoned meditators
Sat. Dec. 26 - Saturday Jan. 2
8am to 6pm each day
~ Please register online ~
STAGE 16
YOUTH SYMPHONY: Talented students from
Skagit, Island, and Snohomish counties will
take part in a Fidalgo Youth Symphony Concert
at 1pm at Mount Vernon’s McIntyre Hall, 2501
E. College Way. Tickets are $1-$10.
GET OUT 14
SAT., OCT. 31
SUN., NOV. 1
208 W. Holly St. INFO: www.wildbuffalo.net
oon!
WWW.MCINT YREHALL.ORG
THE SWILLERY: Do I know what kind of
Halloween-specific action the Swillery
has in store for us all? Nope. Seems to
be a bit of a mystery. But with a musical lineup that includes Eagle Teeth,
Cat Bomb, and Second Hand Suits, you’ll
get original music rather than covers,
strong drinks from the bar and horror
movies shown on the wall all night long.
The Swillery also bears the distinction
of being the place where a kindly man
once told me I was beautiful—right
before he tumbled off his barstool
and onto the floor—and I wasn’t even
dressed as a naughty nurse at the time.
WILD BUFFALO: Never ones to be outdone by, well, anyone, the Wild Buffalo
is going all out this year for Halloween.
The holiday starts early, on Fri., Oct.
30, when Beat Connection will take the
stage. But that’s just a warmup for Halloween itself, when Polecat—the wildly
popular bluegrass stomp band that has
come to rule Halloween around these
parts—will don what will no doubt be
some wildly inventive costumes and
bring down what is sure to be a soldout house. If all that were not enough,
somehow the powers that be at the
Buff nabbed Beats Antique for a postHalloween, Sunday-night show, which is
also sure to sell out. Yes, that’s a lot to
cram into one weekend, but you can always recover at work on Monday. WHERE:
Ra
Laguech
r
on Ta
pS
ART 18
PE TER MAWANGA: Traditional Malawian
rhythms can be heard when Peter Mawanga &
the Amaravi Movement perform at 7:30pm in
Mount Vernon at McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College
Way. Tickets are $22-$30.
m
1 at 9 p
Oct. 3
Costu
WORDS 12
HONEY MOON: Bellingham’s low-key
meadery might not be the first place
one thinks of when one thinks of places
that go all out for Halloween, but making such assumptions would be dead
wrong for a couple of reasons. The first
is the Scary Stories for Adults event
happening Fri., Oct. 30, which promises
to highlight “true ghost and fairy tales”
for the aforementioned adults and “mature children willing to be spooked.” The
second is the yearly Dead Musicians Halloween Party taking place on Halloween
that encourages musicians (and comedians, poets, etc.) to not only perform
music as their favorite bygone artist,
but also to dress as them too. WHERE:
WWW.BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM
n
loweoentest
Halm
eC
CURRENTS 8
www.shakedownbellingham.com
NIGHTMARE BEFORE HALLOWEEN: A rare
performance by Captain Fathom will be part
of “A Nightmare Before Halloween” taking
place from 7-11pm in Anacortes at the Depot
Community Center, 611 R Ave. The Openers will
also perform, and there’ll be costume contest,
a photo booth, a no-host bar provided by Anacortes Brewery, and more. Tickets are $8-$12.
4LYPKPHU:\P[L‹
meditation center
bellingham.shambhala.org
WED., NOV. 4
VIEWS 6
INFO: www.acoustictavern.com
(360) 676-6575
MAIL 4
THE SHAKEDOWN: As Halloween plans
firmed up at venues all over town, and
I didn’t see Horror Business listed anywhere, I began to be concerned that this
longtime Halloween tradition had finally met an undesirable and unwelcome
end. But then the Shakedown came to
the rescue with a lineup that includes
the Misfits tribute band (devillocks and
all), as well as Flannel (who will play
a set of Weezer songs) and Ween cover
band Brown Town. Bands in Bellingham
come and go, but Horror Business will
never die. WHERE: 1212 N. State St. INFO:
CREEPY CABARE T: Lively entertainment and
delicious food combine at the fifth annual
“Creepy Cabaret” taking place from 6:30-8:30pm
at Bellingham High School, 2020 Cornwall Ave.
While you’re enjoying a chili dinner, talented
students will entertain with solo and ensemble
performances. Entry is $10.
CHUCKANUT BREWERY
& KITCHEN
DO IT 2
THE GREEN FROG: Halloween is probably
thought of as a holiday with no soul, but
that’s all going to change if Baby Cakes
has anything to do with it. Bellingham’s
eight-piece funk, soul and R&B band will
no doubt pack the Green Frog’s stage to
capacity—and most likely the venue
itself as well, so you may not want to
be tardy to this party. However, you’ll
want to make certain your costume is
not so restrictive that it keeps you from
dancing, as that’s the main item on this
Halloween menu. WHERE: 1015 N. State St.
FRI., OCT. 30
WWW.BELLINGHAMMUSICCLUB.ORG
10.28.15
www.sacredbass.org
doit
THURS., NOV. 5
MVHS JAZZ: The Mount Vernon High School
jazz bands perform at a “Live at the Lincoln”
concert at 7pm at the town’s Lincoln Theatre,
712 S. First St. Entry is by donation.
WWW.LINCOLNTHEATRE.ORG
SAPPHIRE WINDS: Listen to works by Reich,
Shapiro, Kurtag, and Davidovsky when Sapphire
Winds performs at a free concert at 7:30pm at
WWU’s Performing Arts Center Concert Hall.
WWW.CFPA.WWU.EDU
NIGHT BEAT: Grammy-nominated bassoonist
Martin Kuuskmann, accompanied on piano by
WWU professor Jeffrey Gilliam, will perform at
a Bellingham Music Club “Night Beat” concert
at 7:30pm at the First Congregational Church,
2401 Cornwall Ave. Tickets are $20.
WWW.BELLINGHAMMUSICCLUB.ORG
5 Year Old Goat Cheddar
Organic Delicata Squash
Black Market Hot Sauces
High Spirit Cedar Flutes
Hand Carved Bird Houses
Pizza Stones & Paddles
Local Fireweed Honey
Your One Stop Shop
360-592-2297
www.everybodys.com
Hiway 9 – Van Zandt
#43.10
www.glowbellingham.com
PAGE 20
CASCADIA WEEKLY
better vantage point than the Holly
Street hotspot. They’ll be celebrating
all weekend long with Halloweekend
Ghouls and Ghosts parties happening
Friday and Saturday that will feature
dance music, drink specials and more.
And when you need to take a break from
dancing, order a cocktail and wander upstairs to watch the spectacle unfolding
in the streets below. Trust me, you will
not regret it. WHERE: 202 E. Holly St. INFO:
All Hallows Eve, Sacred Bass Sessions is
planning the party for you. Taking place
Fri., Oct. 30 at Presence Studio, the
costume ball and dance party is dubbed
“Lifting the Veils Between the Worlds”
and will offer yoga, a community circle,
live art and, of course, music (by the
likes of Yaima, Subaqueous, Mr. Moo,
and more) pumped through Boogie Universal’s formidable sound system. Art,
music and community will converge to
create an event that is all-ages, familyfriendly and an alternative to the rowdy
bar scene. WHERE: 1412 Cornwall Ave. INFO:
SPOOK, FROM
21
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 27
musicvenues
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
FILM 24
MUSIC
20
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
10.29.15
THURSDAY
Anelia's Kitchen &
Stage
Boundary Bay Brewery
Aaron Guest
10.30.15
10.31.15
The Sky Colony
Live Music
The Nightmare on Railroad
The Nightmare on Railroad,
Halloween w/Scary Monster
& the Super Creeps
FRIDAY
11.01.15
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
Brown Lantern Ale
House
Open Mic
Cabin Tavern
Open Mic
The Sweaty Westerns
Clambake, The Ellis Deviants
Hawksley Workman, Fiona
Bevan, The Passenger
Mac DeMarco
Mac DeMarco (early), The
Bacardi Boohaha (late)
Marcia Kester
Haunted Hundred Years Side
Show
Haunted Hundred Years
Side Show
Commodore Ballroom
Conway Muse
Corner Pub
Glow Nightclub
DJ J-Will
DJ FXL, more
11.03.15
Irish & Folk Night
Paul Klein
Patty Griffin, Darlingside
Leon Bridges
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Halloween w/DJ Ontic
LACHE CERCEL
Nov. 3/Green Frog
Knut Bell and the 360s
Edison Inn
11.02.15
Steve Frame
Gin Gypsy Halloween Bash
Halloweekend Ghouls and
Ghosts Party
Halloweekend Ghouls and
Ghosts Party
Ron Bailey/Al Kaatz &
The Tangents
Anelias Kitchen & Stage 511 Morris St, La Conner, WA • (360) 466-4778 | Bellewood Acres 6140 Guide Meridian, Lynden • (360) 318-7720 | Bobby Lee’s Pub & Eatery 108 W Main St, Everson • 966-8838 | Boundary Bay
Brewing Co. 1107 Railroad Ave • 647-5593 | Brown Lantern Ale House 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 293-2544 | The Business 402 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 293-9788 | Cabin Tavern 307 W. Holly
St. • 733-9685 | Chuckanut Brewery 601 W Holly St. • 752-3377 | Commodore Ballroom 868 Granville St., Vancouver • (604) 739-4550 | Conway Muse 18444 Spruce/Main St., Conway (360) 445-3000 | Corner Pub
14565 Allen West Road, Burlington
Immerse Yourself in Live Entertainment.
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
10.28.15
WEDNESDAY
HUGE
MAIL 4
BROADWAY
CAST
FUN
FOR THE
WHOLE
FAMILY!
Stunt Dog Experience - Nov 21
DO IT 2
“A stage
extravaganza.”
SHOW
IN WA
22
Photo by Chris Bennion
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
-The New York Times
ONLY
Melissa Etheridge: This is M.E. Solo - Nov 23
42nd Street
Monda\ NoYemEer 2 ŏ 00Sm
SPONSOR: MARVIN
& JOAN WAYNE
STAR
TICKETS
START AT
$30
POWER
SEASON
SPONSOR:
Visit MountBakerTheatre.com or call 360-255-5607 for tickets.
0oXQt %aker 7Keatre is a 50c3 QoQ-Sro¿t orJaQi]atioQ GeGicateG to tKe SerforPiQJ arts.
AND
HOLIDAY
CHEER
LeAnn Rimes: Today is Christmas Tour
with Ellee Duke - Dec 5
10.29.15
10.30.15
10.31.15
11.01.15
11.02.15
11.03.15
Periscope
Hot Damn Scandal, The
Resident Rogues
Rabbit Wilde, Lil Smokies
A Babycakes Halloween
Eo
Open Mic (early), Guffawingham (late)
Lache Cercel (early),
Terrible Tuesday Soul
Explosion (late)
The Mix
Karaoke
KC's Bar and Grill
Karaoke
Karaoke
Quickdraw Stringband
The Devilly Brothers
Main St. Bar and Grill
Jack Benson
Make.Shift Art Space
Spooky Cover Show
Old World Deli
Yogoman Burning Band
The Blackouts
MAC DEMARCO/
Oct. 30-31/
Commodore Ballroom
Live Music
Poppe's 360
Chantel Renee
Rockfish Grill
Fidalgo Swing
Royal
Benjie Howard
The Haunting w/DJ Clint
Westwood
Vincent Black Shadow
The Groovetramps
Karaoke
Country Night
DJ Jester
Rumors Cabaret
Throwback Thursday
DJ Postal, DJ Shortwave
DJ Robby Clark
The Shakedown
Vinyl Williams, Jjuujjuu
The Cave Singers, Draemhouse
Horror Business, Flannel,
Brown Town
4 More
4 More
The Spencetet
Halloween Party w/Soul
Shadows
Pukesnake, Reptilian Children,
more
Eagle Teeth, Cat Bomb,
Second Hand Suits
M80s
M80s
DJ B-Mello
DJ B-Mello
Karaoke
Karaoke
Karaoke
Karaoke
Jam Night
Karaoke
Na'an Stop, The Austerman File
Beat Connection, Phantoms,
Vision Field
Polecat, Crow and the
Canyon
Beats Antique, Moon
Hooch, Pinky D'Ambrosia
Roger Quiggle
Swillery Whiskey Bar
Swinomish Casino and
Lodge
The Underground
Via Cafe and Bistro
Karaoke
The Village Inn
Wild Buffalo
’90s Night
Karaoke w/Zach
VIEWS 6
Aireeoke
MAIL 4
Skagit Valley Casino
Skylark's
Open Mic
DO IT 2
Karaoke
Jessie Chandler
B-BOARD 27
FILM 24
Dead Musicians Halloween
Party
WORDS 12
Kulshan Brewing Co.
Scary Stories for Adults
MUSIC
20
MUSIC 20
Louis Ledford
TUESDAY
CURRENTS 8
Open Mic
MONDAY
BEAT CONNECTION/Oct.
30/Wild Buffalo
Lip Sync Battle
Blues Jam w/Andy "Badd
Dog" Koch
The Green Frog 1015 N. State St. • www.acoustictavern.com | Edison Inn 5829 Cains Ct., Edison • (360) 766-6266 | The Fairhaven 1114 Harris Ave • 778-3400 | Glow 202 E. Holly St. • 734-3305 | Graham’s
Restaurant 9989 Mount Baker Hwy., Glacier • (360) 599-3663 | H20, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 755-3956 | Honey Moon 1053 N State St. • 734-0728 | KC’s Bar and Grill 108 W. Main St.,
Everson • (360) 966-8838 | Kulshan Brewery 2238 James St. • 389-5348 | Make.Shift Art Space 306 Flora St. • 389-3569 | Main Street Bar & Grill 2004 Main St., Ferndale • (360) 384-2982 | McKay’s
Taphouse 1118 E. Maple St. • (360) 647-3600 | Nooksack River Casino 5048 Mt. Baker Hwy., Deming • (360) 354-7428 | Poppe’s 714 Lakeway Dr. • 671-1011 | Paso Del Norte 758 Peace Portal Dr. Blaine •
(360) 332-4045 | The Redlight 1017 N State St. • www.redlightwineandcoffee.com | Rockfish Grill 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 588-1720 | The Royal 208 E. Holly St. • 738-3701 | Rumors Cabaret
1119 Railroad Ave. • 671-1849 | The Shakedown 1212 N. State St. • www.shakedownbellingham.com | Silver Reef Casino 4876 Haxton Way, Ferndale • (360) 383-0777 | Skagit Valley Casino Resort 5984 N.
Darrk Lane, Bow • (360) 724-7777 | Skylark’s Hidden Cafe 1300 11th St. • 715-3642 | Star Club 311 E Holly St. • www.starclubbellingham.com | Swillery Whiskey Bar 118 W. Holly St. | Swinomish Casino
12885 Casino Dr., Anacortes • (888) 288-8883 |Temple Bar 306 W. Champion St. • 676-8660 | The Underground 211 E. Chestnut St. • 738-3701 | Underground Coffeehouse Viking Union 3rd Floor, WWU | Via
Cafe 7829 Birch Bay Dr., Blaine • (360) 778-2570 | Village Inn Pub 3020 Northwest Ave. • 734-2490 | Vinostrology 120 W. Holly St. • 656-6817 | Wild Buffalo 208 W. Holly St. • www.wildbuffalo.net | To get your
live music listings included, send info to [email protected] Deadlines are always at 5pm Friday.
10.28.15
Honey Moon
SUNDAY
ART 18
H2O
SATURDAY
STAGE 16
FRIDAY
GET OUT 14
THURSDAY
#43.10
Green Frog
10.28.15
WEDNESDAY
CASCADIA WEEKLY
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
FOOD 34
musicvenues
23
FOOD 34
film
FILM SHORTS
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
MOVIE REVIEWS
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
DO IT 2
BY CAREY ROSS
24
Milk Men
OF FILMS AND FARMS
I FIRST met documentary filmmaker Janice Haaken a few months ago at a screening
of a rough cut of her latest effort, Milk Men, at the PFC’s Limelight Cinema. The showing brought together those involved in the movie—which documents the challenges
and day-to-day lives of commercial dairy farmers, both in this area and beyond—from
people who provided financial support to crew members to dairy farmers themselves.
Since that first meeting, Haaken has been hard at work further polishing Milk
Men in hopes of reaching an expanded audience with her insightful documentary.
The public will have a chance to view her labor of love at sneak-preview screenings
taking place Oct. 30 and 31 at the Pickford Film Center. Haaken will be on hand at
the showings to answer audience questions, but first she answered a few of mine.
Cascadia Weekly: This is not your first foray into documentary filmmaking, but it does
seem a bit removed from your previous subject matter. What drew you to dairy farmers
and the dairy industry, and what made you realize there was a story to be told here?
Janice Haaken: In terms of my background professionally as a filmmaker, I am professor emeritus of psychology at Portland State University and have a long history
of field research and documentary films
focused on stressful jobs, particularly
jobs carried out in places that have become the focus of public controversy and
confusion. I have carried out projects
in refugee camps, war zones, centers for
asylum seekers, psychiatric hospitals,
VA clinics, hip-hop clubs and drag bars.
These are all places where people are
dealing with complex and challenging
human issues, and I’m interested in
how people in such
settings can provide
insights on what is
going on. I try to find
bridges between the
unique features of a
locale and the people
that inhabit it and the
world beyond
ATTEND larger
its
borders...
WHAT: Milk Men,
I became very
w/director Janice
Haaken
curious about what
WHEN: 6:15pm
was going on with
Fri., Oct. 30; 1pm
dairy farms since
Sat., Oct. 31
many of my stuWHERE: Pickford
dents...expressed
Film Center, 1318
Bay St.
deep moral concern
COST: $7.50about dairy farm$10.75
ing—and most of
INFO: www.
their information was
pickfordfilm
coming from highly
center.org
sensationalized or
over-simplified online sources. So as
an academic as well as a filmmaker, I
thought I could contribute to a more
thoughtful and complex look at what
is going on with some of these farms
as they deal with intense economic
and technological pressures… Many
of the progressive documentaries on
dairy farmers tend to over-idealize the
small farmer, with his handful of cows,
and do not really address the dilemmas of commercial dairy farmers. The
more I learned about surviving dairies,
the more I became aware there was an
important story to be told from their
point of view about modernity itself.
CW: Your documentary focuses on a variety
of dairy operations. How’d you come to
choose farms in Whatcom and Skagit
counties? What are your ties to this area?
JH: Part of my motivation for making Milk
Men was in using the medium of film to
help bridge the deep cultural divides in
this country as well between urban and
rural people. There are crude stereotypes on both sides. (In my extended
family, we were the “city slickers” and
they were “country hicks.”) I have deep
family roots in the Whatcom and Skagit
areas. My grandparents, John and Ragla
Hawkinson, settled in Whatcom County
as immigrants from Norway. My mother’s
parents, Sigrid and Gunhard Gunderson,
were also Norwegian immigrants who
settled in Whatcom County. Many of my
relatives from both sides of the family
are still in the Whatcom area, as well as
in the Skagit Valley. My parents moved
to Seattle where my dad worked in
fisheries and then for the airlines, but
we spent most summers and holidays
up in the Skagit and Whatcom areas.
I remember my Uncle Chap and Aunt
Annie (Dykers)—dairy farmers in Mount
Vernon—because they were one of the
hubs for family gatherings.
Milk Men uses the storytelling device
of the personal journey—in this case
the journey of returning to a place in
childhood to understand how things
have changed... But this personal history was also the basis of engaging
local dairy producers in the project. The
first producer that I approached—Alan
Mesman—knew my Uncle Chap. His dad
and my uncle had farmed together in
Mount Vernon. I also asked relatives in
the area about farmers they knew and
respected and then visited them to see
if they might be interested in being part
of a documentary film project. I ended
up selecting four families that captured
some of the diversity in size of farms
and different personality characteristics. The participants saw work samples
at different phases of the project and
stayed with me in part because they believed in the importance of community
education about farming.
CW: What drives you to make documentaries, and what’s next for you?
JH: A big part of the joy of making
documentaries is in using the medium
of film to stimulate dialogue on issues
that people care passionately about.
The challenge—as a filmmaker and psychologist—is to help people to be able
to listen to each in the midst of intense
emotions, particularly where whole ways
of life are at stake.
Milk Men is my sixth feature-length
documentary film. My most recent films
are Guilty Except for Insanity (focused on
patients and staff at the Oregon State
Hospital and their explanations for how
people get in and out of that facility)
and Mind Zone (a film focused on combat
stress control in the U.S. military)... Milk
Men is being submitted to festivals and
under review by several distributors. I am
currently working with the University of
Michigan Ann Arbor on a new documentary about women’s health care in East
Africa, expected to begin in January.
—Harvey Schwartz, Bellingham
send your letters
B-BOARD 27
FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
GET OUT 14
WORDS 12
Bellingham · Mount Vernon
Friday Harbor
CURRENTS 8
1.800.230.PLAN
mbpp.org
VIEWS 6
The Bellingham Herald recently reported, “the state Department of Social and
Health Services (DSHS) very rarely takes
17-year-olds into foster care, too often
leaving them to their own devices. But
consider this: Washington leads the nation in jailing kids for non-criminal offenses, such as running away.”
Community involvement in a jail plan
is essential. “Build it and they will
come” should not be the design for a
jail. Like death, most people do not want
to think about the incarcerated, “they
are someone else’s problem.” But these
people are part of our community and we
must be aware of their situations. Public policy, poverty, social constructs and
disassociation with other people manifests as our growing incarceration rate:
our war against “bad” people. The solution is not larger jails, it is in looking at
causes, alternatives and doing the work
it takes as families and communities to
stop disenfranchising our neighbors and
their kids.
America has a proud tradition of independence. It also has a tradition of defending the troubled and those in need of
defense. We can focus this tradition locally, not just letting mechanical government policy dictate the community and
world we want.
Vote no more taxes for this jail and demand community involvement in the vision and creation of a justice system that
represents our values.
Here are direct quotes from CBC Radio.
“After the long 11-week election season,
election day is finally here. If you’re not
registered, it’s not too late. Go to any
polling place today.” This is an interesting contrast to our system of endless elections and difficulty registering for some.
Justin Trudeau favors lower taxes on
the middle class and higher taxes on the
ultra-rich and a generous benefit system.
Does that remove the incentive to work
and create jobs?
Denmark has universal health care, free
college education, and heavily subsidized
daycare. The ultra-rich are highly taxed.
Employment percentages and happiness
(via numerous studies) are much higher
than here.
Locally there is a flood of coal company
money coming into our election to support Propositions 1, 2, and 3. They want
to pillage Whatcom County’s pristine
coastline and the planet for a few years
of profitability, before leaving us with a
monumental environmental cleanup.
Support sanity and Propositions 9 and
10. Elect leaders that will think ahead,
such as Todd Donovan and Satpal Sidhu.
MAIL 4
REJECT THE JAIL TAX
END THE INSANITY
make Planned
Parenthood
your health
care provider
DO IT 2
—Sandy Robson, Blaine
—Tom Goetzl, Bellingham
IS GETTING ANNUAL
EXAMS AND FREE
PREGNANCY TESTS
10.28.15
County Council election and were dissatisfied with it. So, in 2007, the County
Council placed a Charter amendment for
countywide voting on the 2008 election
ballot, and the voters of Whatcom chose
to return to countywide voting after having experienced district-only voting. Voters exercised their will.
Whatcom voters deserve to have as
many options as possible available to
them. Props. 2 and 3 are specifically designed to limit voters’ options, by severely restricting the County Council’s ability
to offer those options to voters.
Please don’t allow coal terminal interests and their supporters to try and stack
our County Council makeup in their favor.
“Reject” Propositions 1, 2, and 3.
the police chiefs of some of America’s largest cities (including New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, and
Seattle) have joined in a nationwide call
to reduce the prison population.
Our Top Cops have concluded that we
are jailing too many people. They argue
that criminalizing so much nonviolent
behavior and long mandatory sentences
fail to improve public safety and cost too
many tax dollars.
This is one more reason to oppose the
construction of this oversized and tooexpensive proposed new county jail.
Please pause long and hard before you
tax yourselves, and then join me in voting NO on Whatcom County Prop 2015-1.
#43.10
PAGE 5
CASCADIA WEEKLY
LETTERS, FROM
FOOD 34
mail ›› your views
—Donna Starr, Blaine
25
The United States has the highest rate
of incarceration in the world. That is a
fact. It is so high that just yesterday it
was reported in the New York Times that
But keep ‘em short (300 words or less). Send
them to [email protected] or mail
to P.O. Box 2833, Bellingham, WA 98229
FOOD 34
film ›› showing this week
BY CAREY ROSS
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
FILM SHORTS
FREE
Mezzanine
Large Party
Reservations
1317 Commercial St.
[email protected]
5,&.
67(9(6
At Bellingham
High School
Join travel expert Rick Steves—
acclaimed for his bestselling
guidebook series, and public TV
and radio shows—as he shares the
latest in smart European travel.
Monday,
Nov. 2nd,
Includes
Slide Show!
Tickets $5
available at Village Books
& BrownPaperTickets.com
7:00pm
7LFNHWVSURFHHGVWR
EHQHÀW%+6376$
Globally Recognized Environmentalists
'HQLV+D\HV
*DLO%R\HU+D\HV
Coordinator of the first Earth
Day, Denis was selected by Time
as a “Hero of the Planet.”
Wed., Nov. 4th, 7pm
A Br illiant Young Mind: This heart-warming and
life-affirming story follows the unconventional
and hilarious relationship between student and
teacher—whose roles are often reversed—and the
unfathomable experience of first love—even when
you don’t understand what love is. ++++ (Unrated
• 1 hr. 51 min.)
The Assassin: An intensely beautiful, robustly stylish and thoughtfully paced samurai movie the likes of
which you’ve never seen before from one of cinema’s
unsung (but rarely underestimated) greats, Hou
Hsiao-hsien. +++++ (Unrated • 1 hr. 47 min.)
Br idge of Spies: Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks
team up for the fourth time to tell the true(ish) story
of a lawyer, a spy and some seriously suspenseful
1950s Cold War “diplomacy” in what is seen by some
as the first big contender of this year’s Oscar season.
+++++ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 43 min.)
Burnt: Somehow, Bradley Cooper has transformed
himself from the epitome of a comedic playboy and
lightweight rom-com star into the kind of actor with
four Oscar noms to his credit. That said, although
harmlessly entertaining, this movie is not going to
earn him a fifth nod from the Academy—but as food
porn goes, it’s not so bad. ++ (R • 1 hr. 40 min.)
Cr imson Peak: You can have your artless, lowestcommon-denominator torture porn; I’ll take my horror
movies made with extraordinary vision and creepiness to match by writer/director Guillermo del Toro.
++++ (R • 1 hr. 59 min.)
Doctober: This week in Doctober offerings you’ll find
a study of dairy farmers (Milk Men), the story of those
with and without disabilities coming together to film
a Western (Becoming Bulletproof), a look at counterintelligence in the War on Terror from the point of view
of an FBI informant ((T)error), a glimpse at a great art
collection and the remarkable life of the woman who
cobbled it together (Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict),
the story of country-music royalty the Carter Family
(The Winding Stream), and more. +++++ (Unrated)
Join us for the live taping of the
Chuckanut Radio Hour
You’ll enjoy live music, fun skits, poetry,
and an interview with author...
SIMON
WINCHESTER
Tickets $5
available at
Village Books &
BrownPaperTickets.com.
From the author of
Krakatoa and The
Professor and The
Madman is now
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
DO IT 2
a FREE EVENT at Village Books
PACIFIC.
Thursday, Nov. 5th, 6:30pm
26
Read more at villagebooks.com
in the WCC Heiner Theater
VILLAGE BOOKS
1200 11th St., Bellingham
360.671.2626
Exper imenter: I will watch anything that stars Peter
Sarsgaard, even when he’s portraying Stanley Milgram,
made famous for conducting experiments in which he
compelled ordinary people to shock the hell out of
strangers in the name of studying obedience. ++++
(PG-13 • 1 hr. 30 min.)
Freeheld: New Jersey police lieutenant, Laurel
Hester, and her registered domestic partner, Stacie
Andree, both battle to secure Hester’s pension benefits when she is diagnosed with terminal cancer. ++
(PG-13 • 1 hr. 43 min.)
Goosebumps: Maybe you didn’t grow up on R.L.
Stine’s Goosebumps books. Maybe you didn’t have a
childhood. That’s perfectly fine—now you can watch
all of them at once (well, maybe not quite all of the
200-something of the tomes currently in existence)
with Jack Black playing the role of the prolific and
iconic kid-lit author. +++ (PG • 1 hr. 43 min.)
Hotel Transylvania 2: On the one hand, this
animated sequel has Adam Sandler (kiss of death)
attached to it. On the other, it’s a kids movie with
a Halloweenish theme, and how much damage can
THE ASSASSIN
Sandler do as just one member of an ensemble cast?
It’s not like he wrote the script or voices the main
character. Oh wait... ++ (1 hr. 29 min.)
The Intern: This comedy finds Robert De Niro starring as a business owner and widower who somehow (I’m sure you’ll probably have to suspend your
disbelief to buy this plot conceit) becomes an intern
at Anne Hathaway’s fashion website. I suppose bigger
crimes in Hollywood have been committed by those
far less qualified than De Niro and Hathaway. ++ (PG13 • 2 hrs. 1 min.)
Jem and the Holograms: Jem is neither excitement
nor adventure, glamour, glitter, fashion or fame in
this ill-advised live-action adaptation of the shortlived ‘80s cartoon. Truly outrageous. Truly, truly, truly
outrageous. + (PG • 1 hr. 58 min.)
The Last Witch Hunter: Quoting directly from
the synopsis, this is a movie in which “Vin Diesel is
all that stands between humanity and the combined
forces of the most horrifying witches in history.” The
jokes, they make themselves. + (PG-13 • 1 hr. 46
min.)
Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse:
Directed by Michael Landon’s son and with a cast that
includes Cloris Leachman, Tye Sheridan, and David
Koechner, this horror comedy is either real bad or so
bad it’s good. +++ (R • 1 hr. 33 min.)
Steve Jobs: Does the world need another movie
about Steve Jobs? No. But is the Steve Jobs movie the
world needs the one written by Aaron Sorkin, directed
by Danny Boyle, starring Michael Fassbender, and
lauded by critics far and wide? I’d argue the answer is
yes. +++++ (R • 2 hrs. 2 min.)
Woodlawn: An Alabama high school desegregates,
all racial hell breaks loose and the entire fabric of
society is on the verge of collapse until a football
player leads the team to a religious awakening and
likely some kind of athletic glory as well. This is
purportedly based on a true story. I’m sure no artistic
license was taken because God sees all. ++ (PG • 2
hrs. 3 min.)
The Mar tian: Based on a bestselling book (by Andy
Weir), directed by a master of large-scale, cinematic
sci-fi (Ridley Scott), starring a universally competent
and compelling actor (Matt Damon) and an excellent
ensemble cast (Jessica Chastain, Jeff Daniels, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Kristen Wiig), this is the sci-fi epic you’re
looking for. ++++ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.)
Our Brand is Cr isis: Based (loosely) on the excellent 2005 documentary of the same, this mediocre
adaptation starring Sandra Bullock is worthy neither
of the story nor its star, but it probably won’t make
you scorn your entire existence either. ++ (R • 1 hr.
48 min.)
Pan: All I have to say about this movie is, if you’re
going to give critics such a pun-worthy title to work
with, you’d better make a real good film. Critics, cue
the pan puns. ++ (PG • 1 hr. 51 min.)
Rock the Kasbah: Even Bill Murray can’t save this
one. + (R • 1 hr. 40 min.)
Showtimes
Regal and AMC theaters, please see
www.fandango.com.
Pickford Film Center and
PFC’s Limelight Cinema, please see
www.pickfordfilmcenter.com
bulletinboard
200
200
200
200
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Jean Christensen discusses “Craniosacral Therapy” at 6:30pm Wed., Nov. 4
in Mount Vernon at the Skagit
Valley Food Co-op, 202 S.
First St. She will discuss how
the cranial bones and the sacrum move in relation to one
another and why dysfunction
in this system and their surrounding structures can have
profound effects throughout
the body. Entry is free; register in advance. More info:
www.skagitfoodcoop.com
“Clear Toxic Emotions for
Sound Sleep” will be the subject of a discussion with Santosha Nobel from 6:30-8pm
Wed., Nov. 4 at the Community Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St. Entry is $5. More info:
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B-BOARD 27
FREEHELD (PG-13) 103m
"Michael Almereyda dissects the life of
controversial psychologist Stanley Milgram
in a stylized biopic worthy of its subject."
Starring Julianne Moore and Ellen Page
Jonny Lee Miller as Creature
Starring Benedict Cumberbatch
Sat: 4:00 - Halloween!
Wed: 6:30
Fri: (3:45), 6:30
Sat: (1:30), 6:30, 8:15; Sun: 3:30, 6:00
Fri: (4:00), 9:00
Mon: (3:45), 6:30, 8:45
Sat: (11:00AM), 9:00; Sun: 4:45, 8:30 Tue: (3:00), 6:30; Wed: (3:45), 9:00
Mon & Tue: (4:00), 9:00
Thu: (3:45), 6:30, 8:45
Wed: (4:00), 7:45; Thu: (4:00), 9:00 BLEEDINGHAM - Sun: 7:30
FRANKENSTEIN (National Theatre)
HAMLET (National Theatre) 185m
WITH IMPUNITY 60m
Presented by B'ham Whatcom County
Visit our website for tickets, trailers & more: Commission Against Domestic Violence
SNEAK PREVIEW: MILK MEN 80m
With Filmmaker Jan Haaken
THE WINDING STREAM 75m
Fri: 6:15; Sat: (1:00)
The story of the American roots music
dynasty, the Carters and the Cashes.
ORION: THE MAN WHO WOULD BE
KING 88m - Book giveaway!
Fri: 9:00
BECOMING BULLETPROOF 80m
t •i •c •k •e •t
ASCADIA
Presented by Whatcom Center for
Early Learning
Sat: 3:45
(T)ERROR 93m - Behind the scenes of
an FBI counterterrorism sting operation.
Sat: 5:45 - Halloween Doc!
AFFORDABLE TICKETING OPTION FOR
Sun: 2:15 - Q+A to follow
PEGGY GUGGENHEIM: ART ADDICT
Sun: (Noon)
Mon: 6:30
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
EXPERIMENTER (PG-13) 90m
STAGE 16
Oct 30 - Nov 5
GET OUT 14
3004 Cinema Pl. Bellingham | 360.306.8676
Next to Regal Cinemas!
WORDS 12
Cerise Noah
Prime Rib Thursday Nights Starting @ 5pm
CURRENTS 8
The Arthritis Foundation
presents a “Better Joints:
Strategies for Living with
Arthritis” series from 3:305:30pm Tues., Nov. 3 and
Tues., Nov. 10 at St. Luke’s
A Grief Support Group
meets at 7pm every Tuesday
at the St. Luke’s Community Health Education Center,
3333 Squalicum Pkwy. The
free, drop-in support group is
for those experiencing the recent death of a friend or loved
one. More info: 733-5877
VIEWS 6
Love
animals?
Love
Mother Earth? They need
you! Learn to think and act
vegan. Experienced teacher
available. More info: (360)
733-3305
Jim Ehmke focuses on “Detox and Fasting” at a class
from 6:30-8:30pm Wed., Nov.
4 at the Cordata Community
Food Co-op, 315 Westerly Rd.
He’ll discuss colon cleansing,
enemas, colonics, and other
gut-cleansing systems. Learn
why longevity is directly linked
to calorie restriction and the
advantages of intermittent
fasting. Entry is $5. More info:
www.communityfood.coop
Co-Dependents Anonymous meets from 7-8:30pm
most Mondays at PeaceHealth St. Joseph’s Community Health Education Center,
3333 Squalicum Pkwy, conference room B. More info:
(360) 676-8588
MAIL 4
Abby Staten leads “Yoga
for Multiple Sclerosis” classes from 10-11am Tuesdays
and 11am-12pm Fridays at
Christ the Servant Lutheran
Church, 2600 Lakeway Dr. The
weekly events are free for
people with MS, and no registration is required. Please
bring a blanket or yoga mat.
More info: [email protected]
cmo
“Neurofeedback” will be
the focus of a presentation
with Joan Cross at 6:30pm
Thurs., Oct. 29 at the Skagit
Valley Food Co-op, 202 S.
First St. If your identity is
gripped by hyperactivity, insomnia, post trauma, mood
swings, anger, headaches, inefficiency, etc., find out how
you can change your persona
drug-free. More info: www.
skagitfoodcoop.com
Michelle Mahler schools
attendees on “Natural Skin
Care” at 6:30pm Tues., Nov.
3 at the Skagit Valley Food
Co-op, 202 S. First St. Learn
to make luxurious and healing
skin and hair care products
with essential oils, jojoba oil,
Vitamin E oil, borageseed
oil, and more! Entry is free;
there’s an optional supply fee
of $10-$20. The class happens
again. Nov. 19. More info:
www.skagitfoodcoop.com
www.communityfood.coop
MIMI AND DONA 65m
Indie Lens Pop-Up Series
Discussion after the film with PFC
Executive Director, Susie Purves
Tue: 5:30 - Free Admission!
PEACE OFFICER 109m
Wed: 6:30
BIKES VS. CARS 90m
Presented by AS Transportation
Thu: 6:30
PICKFORD FILM CENTER | 1318 Bay St. | 360.738.0735 | www.pickfordfilmcenter.org
DO IT 2
Come relax and meet other
breastfeeding mothers in a
warm, inviting and respectful environment at Breastfeeding Cafe from 9am-12pm
every Tuesday at the Bellingham Center for Healthy
Motherhood, 1012 Dupont
Street. Entry is free. More
info: www.centerforhealthy
motherhood.com
Community Health Education Center, 3333 Squalicum
Pkwy. Topics in the series
include: weight loss strategies & anti-inflammatory diet
tips; arthritis and exercise;
staying active for a better
life; and helpful equipment
and home modifications. Preregistration is appreciated.
Entry is free. More info: (360)
788-6024
10.28.15
A “Yoga for Daily Living”
class takes place from 6:307:45pm Wednesdays at Lynden’s Jansen Art Center, 321
Front St. The class consists of
breathing practices, physical
exercises, and mental focus.
No experience is necessary.
Entry to the ongoing event is
$60 for six classes. More info:
www.jansenartcenter.com
Sex Addicts Anonymous
(SAA) meets at 7pm Tuesdays and Thursdays and 9am
Saturdays at the Bellingham
Unitarian Fellowship, 1207
Ellsworth St. More info: (360)
420-8311 or www.pugetsoundsaa.org
Everyday
11:30am - 5:30pm
#43.10
Attend a Healing Hour from
5:30-6:30pm every Wednesday at Simply Spirit Reading &
Healing Center, 1304 Meador
Ave. Drop in anytime during
the hour to receive an aura/
chakra healing. Entry is $5.
More info: www.simplyspiritcenter.com mustachioed
Sun - Thurs 11:30am - 10pm
Fri & Sat 11:30am - 10:30pm
FOOD 34
Business Hours Happy Hour
YOUR CONNECTION TO EVENTS,
BACKED BY THE REGION'S #1
SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT!
THE ASSASSIN (Nie yinniang) 107m
"Combining Hou's patient,
observant style with a historical
martial arts tale, the film is a
fascinating hybrid of craft, genre
and story. Beautiful to look at and
with deeply felt emotions, the film
has a meditative aura punctured by
sharp bouts of fighting." LA Times
Fri: 9:00; Sat: (1:30), 9:00
Sun: 8:15; Mon - Thu: 9:00
A BRILLIANT YOUNG MIND 111m
"Novel-rich, so bristling with life."
Fri: (4:00), 6:30; Sat: 4:00, 6:30
Sun: (3:15), 5:45; Mon: (4:00)
Tue - Thu: (4:00), 6:30
THE MARRAIGE OF FIGARO
(Royal Opera House)
Sun: 11:00AM
WANDERING REEL FILM FESTIVAL
With festival curator Michael Harrington
Mon: 6:30
PFC’S LIMELIGHT CINEMA: 1416 Cornwall Ave. | Parentheses ( ) denote bargain pricing
CASCADIA WEEKLY
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WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
ART 18
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
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MAIL 4
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FILM 24
MUSIC 20
ART 18
STAGE 16
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
Last Week’s Puzzle
©2015 Jonesin’ Crosswords
VIEWS 6
1 Dope
2 Setting for a
1992 Fraser/Shore
comedy
3 Pepsi Center
player
4 Boarding pass
datum
47 Ground-based
unit?
51 Cornell of Cornell
University
52 Fr. holy women
53 “Consarnit!”
55 Some printers
56 He played “The
Ugly” opposite
Clint’s “The Good”
and Lee’s “The
Bad”
57 Monster container
MAIL 4
DOWN
29 Flowering
groundcover
plants in the apt
genus Pulmonaria
33 Clean
34 Dress rehearsal
35 2006 appointee,
to friends
40 “Brave New
World” feel-good
drug
43 Best Western
competitor
44 Some long-haired
dogs, for short
45 Coca-Cola bottled water brand
DO IT 2
in that!”
32 Phrase in French
cookery
33 Pkg. measures
36 Lets in a view of
37 Photographer
Goldin
38 Coaching legend
Parseghian
39 Hairpieces in old
portraits
41 Type of card for
a smartphone
42 Travel widely
46 Actor Lukas of
5 Source of a Shakespearean snake
bite
6 “Whatevs”
7 That thing, to
Torquemada
8 Wrestling victories
9 Animals in the
game “The Oregon
Trail”
10 “___ to Be You”
11 Like some buildings with arches
and columns
12 California city
where Erle Stanley
Gardner wrote
his Perry Mason
novels
14 Guides around
the waistline
15 “WKRP in Cincinnati” news director Les
19 #696969, in
hexadecimal color
code
22 Djokovic rival
23 Poisonous plant
also known as
monkshood
24 “Oh yeah?”
27 Calcutta coin
28 Army officer
below captain, in
slang
10.28.15
1 TV room
4 Decider in a
tennis match,
perhaps
13 Shiba ___ (such
breed. many doge.
wow.)
14 Hexadecimal
16 “Charlie’s Angels” director
17 #15 on AFI’s
“100 Years ... 100
Movie Quotes,”
from a 1982 film
18 Shake your hips
20 Drum kit components
21 Sluggish
22 Musical notes
after mis
25 Dropbox files,
often
26 Schwarzenegger
movie based on
a Philip K. Dick
story
30 Tight-lipped
31 Sentiment akin
to “Ain’t no shame
“Witness”
48 “Can’t Fight This
Feeling” band ___
Speedwagon
49 Berkshire Hathaway headquarters
50 Skateboarding
101 jumps
53 Some Emmy winners
54 Ralph Bakshi
movie that was
the first X-rated
animated feature
58 Arkansas governor Hutchinson
59 Long-term aspirations
60 D.J.’s dad, on
“Roseanne”
61 Solid yellow
line’s meaning, on
the road
62 “___ Came
of Age” (Sarah
Brightman album)
#43.10
ACROSS
“Word Jubilee”— freestyle in action
CASCADIA WEEKLY
rearEnd
29
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FOOD 34
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MUSIC 20
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BY ROB BREZSNY
FREE WILL
ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): On a January morning in 1943, the town of Spearfish, South Dakota
experienced very weird weather. At 7:30am the
temperature was minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit. In the
next two minutes, due to an unusual type of wind
sweeping down over nearby Lookout Mountain, thermometers shot up 49 degrees. Over the next hour and
a half, the air grew even warmer. But by 9:30, the
temperature had plummeted back to minus 4 degrees.
I’m wondering if your moods might swing with this
much bounce in the coming weeks. As long as you
keep in mind that no single feeling is likely to last
very long, it doesn’t have to be a problem. You may
even find a way to enjoy the breathtaking ebbs and
flows. Halloween costume suggestion: roller coaster
rider, Jekyll and Hyde, warm clothes on one side of
your body and shorts or bathing suit on the other.
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CASCADIA WEEKLY
#43.10
10.28.15
DO IT 2
VIEWS 6
t h i s w e e k at G r e e n e ’ s
MAIL 4
CURRENTS 8
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 16
TAURUS (April 20-May 20): How dare you be
30
so magnetic and tempting? What were you thinking
when you turned up the intensity of your charm to
such a high level? I suggest you consider exercising
more caution about expressing your radiance. People
may have other things to do besides daydreaming
about you. But if you really can’t bring yourself to
be a little less attractive—if you absolutely refuse to
tone yourself down—please at least try to be extra
kind and generous. Share your emotional wealth.
Overflow with more than your usual allotments of
blessings. Halloween costume suggestion: a shamanic
Santa Claus; a witchy Easter Bunny.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the last 10 days
of November and the month of December, I suspect
there will be wild-card interludes when you can enjoy
smart gambles, daring stunts, cute tricks, and mythic
escapades. But the next three weeks will not be like
that. On the contrary. For the immediate future, I
think you should be an upstanding citizen, a wellbehaved helper, and a dutiful truth-teller. Can you
handle that? If so, I bet you will get sneak peaks of
the fun and productive mischief that could be yours
in the last six weeks of 2015. Halloween costume
suggestion: the most normal person in the world.
CANCER (June 21-July 22): Members of the
gazelle species known as the springbok periodically
engage in a behavior known as pronking. They leap
into the air and propel themselves a great distance
with all four feet off the ground, bounding around
with abandon. What evolutionary purpose does this
serve? Some scientists are puzzled, but not naturalist
David Attenborough. In the documentary film Africa,
he follows a springbok herd as it wanders through the
desert for months, hoping to find a rare rainstorm.
Finally it happens. As if in celebration, the springboks
erupt with an outbreak of pronking. “They are dancing for joy,” Attenborough declares. Given the lucky
breaks and creative breakthroughs coming your way,
Cancerian, I foresee you doing something similar.
Halloween costume suggestion: a pronking gazelle, a
hippety-hopping bunny, a boisterous baby goat.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “A very little key will
open a very heavy door,” wrote Charles Dickens in his
short story “Hunted Down.” Make that one of your
guiding meditations in the coming days, Leo. In the
back of your mind, keep visualizing the image of a
little key opening a heavy door. Doing so will help
ensure that you’ll be alert when clues about the real
key’s location become available. You will have a keen
intuitive sense of how you’ll need to respond if you
want to procure it. Halloween costume suggestion:
proud and protective possessor of a magic key.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The ancient Hindu
text known as the Kama Sutra gives extensive advice
about many subjects, including love and sex. “Though a
man loves a woman ever so much,” reads a passage in
chapter four, “he never succeeds in winning her without
a great deal of talking.” Take that as your cue, Virgo. In
the coming weeks, stir up the intimacy you want with
a great deal of incisive talking that beguiles and entertains. Furthermore, use the same approach to round up
any other experience you yearn for. The way you play
with language will be crucial in your efforts to fulfill
your wishes. Luckily, I expect your persuasive powers
to be even greater than they usually are. Halloween
costume suggestion: the ultimate salesperson.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I encourage you to be
super rhythmical and melodious in the coming days.
Don’t just sing in the shower and in the car. Hum and
warble and whistle while shopping for vegetables and
washing the dishes and walking the dog. Allot yourself
more than enough time to shimmy and cavort, not just
on the dance floor but anywhere else you can get away
with it. For extra credit, experiment with lyrical flourishes whenever you’re in bed doing the jizzle-skazzle.
Halloween costume suggestion: wandering troubadour,
street musician, free-styling rapper, operatic diva,
medicine woman who heals with sound.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I expect you to be
in a state of continual birth for the next four weeks.
Awakening and activation will come naturally. Your
drive to blossom and create may be irresistible, bordering on unruly. Does that sound overwhelming? I don’t
think it will be a problem as long as you cultivate a
mood of amazed amusement about how strong it feels.
To help maintain your poise, keep in mind that your
growth spurt is a natural response to the dissolution
that preceded it. Halloween costume suggestion: a
fountain, an erupting volcano, the growing beanstalk
from the “Jack and the Beanstalk” fairy tale.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Just as a
snake sheds its skin, we must shed our past over and
over again.” So says Buddhist teacher Jack Kornfield.
Can you guess why I’m bringing it to your attention,
Sagittarius? It’s one of those times when you can do
yourself a big favor by sloughing off the stale, wornout, decaying parts of your past. Luckily for you, you
now have an extraordinary talent for doing just that.
I suspect you will also receive unexpected help and
surprising grace as you proceed. Halloween costume
suggestion: a snake molting its skin.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Speaking on
behalf of your wild mind, I’m letting you know that
you’re due for an immersion in revelry and festivity.
Plugging away at business as usual could become
counterproductive unless you take at least brief
excursions to the frontiers of pleasure. High integrity
may become sterile unless you expose it to an
unpredictable adventure or two. Halloween costume
suggestion: party animal, hell raiser, social butterfly,
god or goddess of delight. Every one of us harbors a
touch of crazy genius that periodically needs to be
unleashed, and now is that time for you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I hope you will
choose a Halloween costume that emboldens you
to feel powerful. For the next three weeks, it’s in
your long-term interest to invoke a visceral sense of
potency, dominion, and sovereignty. What clothes
and trappings might stimulate these qualities in you?
Those of a king or queen? A rock star or CEO? A fairy
godmother, superhero, or dragon-tamer? Only you
know which archetypal persona will help stir up your
untapped reserves of confidence and command.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s time to stretch
the boundaries, Pisces. You have license to expand
the containers and outgrow the expectations and
wage rebellion for the sheer fun of it. The frontiers
are calling you. Your enmeshment in small talk and
your attachment to trivial wishes are hereby suspended. Your mind yearns to be blown and blown and
blown again! I dare you to wander outside your overly
safe haven and go in quest of provocative curiosities.
Halloween costume suggestions: mad scientist, wildeyed revolutionary, Dr. Who.
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WAKING UP RUSTED
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WORDS 12
My girlfriend loves to “spoon” when we
sleep. She says it makes her feel safe and
loved. I have recently developed spinal
problems and have to sleep on my back like
a corpse with this weird neck pillow. I’ll
put my hand on her thigh to make her feel
connected, but it’s not really cutting it. I
suspect this reminds her of her marriage falling apart and her now ex-husband sleeping
on the other side of the bed with a bunch of
pillows between them.
—Ouch
Sometimes a person’s need feel to
safe and loved has to be forgone for
the other person’s need to not be an
Oxy-addicted hunchback at 45.
You can surely understand where
she’s coming from. Nothing like going
from sleeping lovingly intertwined
with somebody to feeling as if you’re
sleeping next to an open casket. This
may feel even worse for your girlfriend if she does associate physical
distance with emotional distance,
having had an ex who built a Berlin
Wall of pillows between them and
would only have been farther away in
bed if he’d slept on the floor.
What you can do is promise to make
it up to her with extra affection when
you’re out of bed—and do that: Go to
cuddlesville when you’re watching TV
together; shower with her; put your
arms around her and kiss her head
while she’s washing a mug. (P.S. This
is also a smart practice for men who
don’t sleep on a foam log.) Love does
involve making sacrifices, but one of
them probably shouldn’t be no longer
being able to feel your toes.
B-BOARD 27
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DO IT 2
Just like women, men often verbalize complex emotions—for example, “I
want sausage and pepperoni on that.”
The truth is, men have feelings; they
just don’t hang them out to dry on the
balcony railing like big cotton granny
panties. Developmental psychologist
Joyce Benenson, who studies sex differences, notes in Warriors and Worriers
that men, who evolved to be the warriors of the species, typically express
emotions less often and with less
intensity than women. Men are especially likely to put a lid on fear and
sadness, emotions that reflect vulnerability—though it’s also the rare man
you’ll hear chirp to his buddy, “OMG,
those are, like, the cutest wingtips!”
Men’s emotional coolness is an
evolved survival tactic, Benenson explains. “Emotions communicate feelings to others. They also affect our
own behavior.” In battle, “a person
who loses control of his emotions
cannot think clearly about what is
happening around him. Revealing to
the enemy that one feels scared or
sad would be even worse.”
Women, on the other hand, bond
through sharing “personal vulnerabilities,” Benenson notes. Men and women do have numerous similarities—like
having the adrenaline-infused fightor-flight reaction as our primary physiological response to stress. However,
psychologist Shelley Taylor finds that
women also have an alternate stress
response, which she named “tendand-befriend.” “Tending” involves
self-soothing through caring for others, and “befriending” describes “the
creation of and maintenance of social
networks” to turn to for comforting.
(And no, she isn’t talking about Facebook or Instagram.)
So, as a woman, you may long to
snuggle up to somebody for a restorative boohoo, but for a man, opening
up about his feelings can make him
feel worse—and even threatened.
The problem is we have a tendency to
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Sometimes, when my boyfriend is upset, he
wants comforting, just like I would. He’ll
vent or lay his head in my lap, and I stroke
his hair. But sometimes, he just sits on the
couch and says nothing. How do I know
what he needs, and how do I feel better
about it when it isn’t me?
—Man Cave Confusion
by Evening Magazine & King 5 TV!
#43.10
THE ALONE RANGER
10
THE ADVICE
GODDESS
assume other people are emotionally
wired just like us. Being mindful of
that and of the evolutionary reasons
a guy might need to go off in a corner to lick his wounds might help you
avoid taking it personally: “I’m upset
about how you’re upset!” (Great! And
now his problem has a problem.)
It would be helpful if an upset man
would hang a “Do not disturb” sign on
his face when he just wants to drink
a beer (or four) and watch South Park.
You could try to read his body language—like crossed arms and stiff
posture saying “go away.” But if his
body isn’t speaking up all that clearly,
you could say, “I’m here if you wanna
talk—or if you don’t.” If it’s the latter,
stock the fridge; make him a sandwich;
make him some sex. In other words,
comfort him in the way a clammed-up
guy needs to be comforted. It beats
being the girlfriend version of the enthusiastic good Samaritan who, on a
slow day, forces little old ladies across
the street at gunpoint.
S
BY AMY ALKON
CASCADIA WEEKLY
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CASCADIA WEEKLY
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BY ARI LEVAUX
Pumpkin Power
MORE THAN JUST A SCARE TACTIC
As I was leaving his farm a few weeks ago, the farmer tossed me a parting gift
in the form of a large green and orange orb.
“It’s a special variety of pumpkin, called a Kakai, grown specifically for its
seeds,” he told me.
It was curiously light for its size, suggesting a big air cavity inside. My wife
and kids carved it into a scary face. She then came into the house and announced how good the seeds were.
“I’m not surprised, dearest,” I prepared to lecture. “It’s a special pumpkin bred
for—wait, are you eating the seeds raw?”
Indeed she was. I munched on one myself, had another, and was struck not
only by how delicious they were, but also how soft. They were a bit slimy, too,
but that air-dried away in a few minutes. Roasted, the seeds were divine pumpkin seed glory. They puffed out in the heat, into oblong chunks of seed meat
that were bereft of the usual seed coat. Alas, there were surprisingly few seeds
inside, for such a large pumpkin.
Pumpkins are a powerhouse plant in human history, one that can produce
tremendous amounts of edible material in the flowers, flesh and seeds. A Native American food, pumpkins were one of Christopher Columbus’ most valuable
New World acquisitions. They were originally cultivated in Spain, but soon found
their way to Austria, where they were adopted in a major way.
The province of Styria in southeast Austria became ground zero for all things
pumpkin seed oil. By the 1700s, Styrian bureaucrats were regulating its production.
In the late 1800s, a mutant came along in
which the seed’s hard shell was replaced
by a soft membrane, and the naked-seeded
pumpkin was born. Its soft-seeded descendants became the progenitors of the finest
edible and oilseed pumpkins in the world.
Today, there are about a dozen varieties of
naked-seed pumpkins, all of Austrian descent, according to Jay Gilbertson of Hay
River Pumpkin Seed Oil company in Prairie
Farm, Wis. And despite its recent tune-up
in Europe, pumpkin is more American than
apple pie, he told me on the phone.
When they got started in 2006, Gilbertson and his partner Ken Seguine planted as
many pumpkin seed varieties as they could
get their hands on, and finally settled on a
variety that grew well on their land. While
he wouldn’t tell me which variety—“it’s
our only secret”—he said the seeds are
considerably larger and more plentiful than
the ones in a Kakai pumpkin.
I went to the store and picked up a few
bottles of pumpkin seed oil, one Austrian
and one domestic, and played around with
them. The domestic, Omega Nutrition
brand, is lighter; the Austrian Castelmuro
brand is darker and stronger. Both have a
deeply toasted smell that’s almost burnt,
almost smoky, but not quite. It is a nutty,
oily chord, in baritone, and I could see why
it’s occasionally used as a replacement for
toasted sesame oil in Asian dishes.
The culinary uses of pumpkin seed oil
are limited by the fact that you can’t cook
with it, as it readily breaks down in heat.
So it’s often added raw to dishes as a finishing touch. In Austria, pumpkin seed oil
is added to various preparations of meat,
like rare slices of beef, or mixed into salad dressings, often with cider vinegar. It
is even added to sweets like vanilla ice
cream, to which it imparts its nutty flavor
in a pleasing way.
That night I went Styrian style and put
Kürbiskernöl, as they call it, on everything.
I drizzled it on salad, salmon and squash,
dipped tomato slices into it, and tried to
follow a recipe for pumpkin seed and walnut oil mayonnaise, which failed.
The flavor of pumpkin seed oil is not for
everyone. My wife thinks it is quite disgusting, and busts me whenever I try to
adulterate with it. That didn’t sound right,
but in any case, I at least am a fan. And it
seems I’m not alone.
“If I had a million bottles, I could sell
every one,” Erickson said. Unfortunately,
the pumpkin-farming conditions in his area
have not been favorable recently. “The last
two years have been disastrous,” he says.
“Cool summers and too much moisture.”
This made me appreciate my Kakai pumpkin all the more deeply. Those seeds. While
they are quite edible raw, cooked they are
straight-up spectacular, thick and meaty
and bursting with flavor. Straight out of
the oven and dressed with olive oil, salt
and garlic salt, they exploded in my mouth.
It also made me appreciate all pumpkin
and squash seeds. Well, the yummy ones,
anyway. They really are worth eating, so
don’t forget the seeds when you carve that
pumpkin. At the farmers market, growers
can direct you to the pumpkins and squash
with the best seeds.
And yeah, those seeds will probably have
husks. I chew them up and swallow, husks
and all. With all the pumpkin pie I’ll soon be
eating, I could use a little extra fiber.
(360) 354-4501
BELLINGHAM FARMERS MARKE T: Peruse and
purchase a plethora of locally grown produce,
ready-to-eat foods, crafts and more at the
Bellingham Farmers Market from 10am-3pm at
the Depot Market Square, 1100 Railroad Ave. The
market runs every Saturday through Dec. 19.
WWW.BELLINGHAMFARMERS.ORG
SUN., NOV. 1
COMMUNIT Y BREAKFAST: Meet and greet local
politicians as they serve you coffee and madefrom-scratch pancakes, french toast, sausage,
eggs and more at the monthly Community Breakfast taking place from 8am-1pm at the Rome
Grange, 2821 Mt. Baker Hwy. Entry is $2 for kids,
$5 for adults.
(360) 354-4501
TASTE OF SK AGIT: Those 21 and over can
celebrate fine wine, spirits and artisan food
procured locally at the Cantabile Chamber Choir’s
“Taste of Skagit Valley” fundraiser taking place
from 4-7pm at La Conner’s Maple Hall, 104 Commercial. Attendees will be enjoying the bounty
of the Skagit Valley as they support musical
excellence in the community. Live jazz and songs
by the choir will be part of the fun. Tickets are
$30 and include five beverage tastings, a variety
of food, a souvenir tasting glass, access to local
vendors, a raffle and a silent auction.
WWW.CANTABILEOFSKAGITVALLEY.ORG
GRAPE & GOURME T: Sip on selections from more
ART 18
GET OUT 14
WORDS 12
WWW.WHATCOMCOMMUNIT YED.COM
TUES., NOV. 3
CARIBBEAN K ITCHEN: Fried plaintains with
Trinidad callalo soup, garlic cassava, and stew
pork with red beans will be on the menu when
Trinidad native Sarah Chen leads “The Caribbean
Kitchen: Classic Creole Cuisine” from 6:30-9:30pm
at the Community Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St.
Entry is $39.
WWW.WHATCOMCOMMUNIT YED.COM
WED., NOV. 4
ADVANCED KNIFE SK ILLS: Chef Erik Morris
helms a hands-on “Advanced Knife Skills” course
from 6:30-8:30pm in Mount Vernon at Gretchen’s
Kitchen, 509 S. First St. Students will practice on
fruits, vegetables and meat that will be put to
good use in a communal meal at the end of class.
Registration fees are $40.
WWW.GRETCHENSKITCHEN.COM
THURS., NOV. 5
HEALTHY HOLIDAY FEAST: Alissa Segersten of
Whole Life Nutrition demonstrates recipes that will
boost your health and keep you balanced during
the holidays at a “Healthy Holiday Feast” class
from 6:30-9pm at the Community Food Co-op, 1220
N. Forest St. Winter quinoa salad, pumpkin soup,
brined turkey breast, raw chocolate truffles, and
dandelion root chai tea will be made. Entry is $39.
WWW.WHATCOMCOMMUNIT YED.COM
NOV. 5-6
BAKE SALE: Homemade baked goods (including
Dutch specialties) can be purchased at a Holiday
Baked Goods & Crafts Sale happening from
9am-3pm Thursday and Friday at the Lynden Community Center, 401 Grover St. Lunch will also be
available for $5. Entry to the event is free.
WWW.LYNDENCOMMUNIT YCENTER.ORG
CURRENTS 8
PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Attend a Community
Pancake Breakfast from 8-10:30am at the Lynden
Community Center, 401 Grover St. On the menu
are all-you-can-eat pancakes or French toast,
biscuits and gravy, eggs, sausage, orange juice
and coffee. Entry is $3 for kids and $5 for adults;
funds raised benefit senior programs and services
at the center.
VIEWS 6
SAT., OCT. 31
SMALL PLATES: Chef Jesse Otero focuses on the
culinary culture of the countries of the Eastern
Mediterranean at a “Small Plates of the World:
Meze” course from 6:30-9pm at the Community
Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St. Grilled haloumi
cheese with pomegranate and za’atar, grape-leaf
pie with mint-yogurt sauce, and merguez lamb
sausages will be on the menu. Entry is $45.
MAIL 4
WWW.WHATCOMCOMMUNIT YED.COM
MON., NOV. 2
DO IT 2
FUN WITH BUNS: Mary Ellen Carter focuses
on “Chinese Steamed Buns” at a course from
6:30-9pm at the Community Food Co-op, 1220 N.
Forest St. Entry to the hands-on class is $45.
WWW.BELLINGHAMBAYROTARY.COM
10.28.15
WWW.LYNDENFARMERSMARKET.COM
#43.10
LYNDEN FARMERS MARKE T: Procure goods
from local growers at the final Lynden Farmers
Market of the season from 12-5pm at 324 Front
St. (across from the Jansen Art Center).
than 35 regional wineries and eat fare from some
of Whatcom County’s best restaurants at Bellingham Bay Rotary’s annual “Grape & Gourmet” fundraiser from 5-8:30pm at the Silver Reef Casino,
4876 Haxton Way. Entry is $80-$100; funds raised
benefit local charitable organizations.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
THURS., OCT. 29
STAGE 16
Carve time into your schedule for an “Advanced Knife Skills” course with Chef Erik Morris Wed., Nov. 4 at
Gretchen’s Kitchen in Mount Vernon
MUSIC 20
FILM 24
B-BOARD 27
FOOD
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