Oct 30 - Nov 6 - Cascadia Weekly

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Oct 30 - Nov 6 - Cascadia Weekly
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Dreams Unlimited, P.16 * Thrillingham, P.18 * The Corner Pub, P.34
c a s c a d i a
REPORTING FROM
THE HEART OF CASCADIA
*
*
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WHATCOM SKAGIT ISLAND LOWER B.C.
{10.30.13}{#44}{V.08}{FREE}
Art's Alive!
La Conner's creative
smorgasbord, p.18
Frankie
Avalon:
A crooner sings the
classics, p.22
Cheat Sheet:
A handy guide for
voters, p.12
OILTRAINS
TROUBLE ON THE TRACKS? P.10
ONSTAGE
c
a
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a
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i
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New Directions Veterans Choir: 7:30pm, Mount
Baker Theatre
A glance at what’s happening this week
Haunted Forest: 7-10pm, Nugent’s Corner River
Access Park
ONSTAGE
STAGE 18
ART 20
Nightmare at the Spark Museum: 7pm, Spark
Museum of Electrical Invention
Nightmare on Railroad Avenue: 7-11pm,
Boundary Bay Brewery
Hellingham: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre
Rocky Horror Picture Show: 8pm and 11:59pm,
Mount Baker Theatre
Get a closer look at climate
change at a reception for
“Hot Water—The Tipping
Point” during the downtown
Art Walk Nov. 1 at Studio UFO
Theatre, Mount Vernon
GET OUT 16
DANCE
Thrillingham: 8:30pm, Maritime Heritage Park
DANCE
COMMUNITY
Folk Dance Party: 7:30-10:30pm, Fairhaven
Library
Cabaret: 8pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU
WORDS 14
Trick or Treating: 3-5pm, First Street, Mount
Vernon
Trick or Treating: 3-6pm, downtown Bellingham
Trick or Treating: 3-6pm, historic Fairhaven
Trick or Treating: 3:30pm, La Conner
MUSIC
Leo Kottke: 8pm, Performing Arts Center Concert Hall, WWU
COMMUNITY
GET OUT
Haunted Forest: 7-10pm, Nugent’s Corner River
Access Park
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
GET OUT
THURSDAY [10.31.13]
Scandinavian Fair: 10am-5pm, Hampton Inn’s
Fox Hall
FOOD
FRIDAY [11.01.13]
The magic of movement will be highlighted when
the modern dance company known as MOMIX
presents its “Botanica” show Nov. 4 at the
Mount Baker Theatre
DO IT 2
10.30.13
#44.08
CASCADIA WEEKLY
2
Nightmare at the Spark Museum: 7pm, Spark
Museum of Electrical Invention
Nightmare on Railroad Avenue: 7-11pm,
Boundary Bay Brewery
MUSIC
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
WEDNESDAY [10.30.13]
ONSTAGE
No Exit: 8pm and 10pm, iDiOM Theater
Blender: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre
Rocky Horror Picture Show: 8pm and 11:59pm,
Mount Baker Theatre
SUNDAY [11.03.13]
ONSTAGE
Annie: 2pm, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon
Dynamo: 8pm, Upfront Theatre
DANCE
Witch’s Ball: 7:30pm, Bellingham Dance Company
Cabaret: 8pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU
MUSIC
Acclaimed
acoustic
guitarist
Leo Kottke
returns to
Bellingham
for a Nov.
2 show
at WWU’s
Performing
Arts Center
Concert Hall
Bellingham Farmers Market: 10am-3pm, Depot
Market Square
Sanford-Hill Piano Series: 7:30pm, Performing
Arts Center Concert Hall, WWU
MUSIC
John Reischman, John Miller: 2pm, YWCA
Ballroom
Whatcom Symphony Orchestra: 3pm, Mount
Baker Theatre
Drumartica: 8pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU
GET OUT
VISUAL ARTS
Art’s Alive: Today through Sunday, throughout
La Conner
Arts & Crafts Fair: 9am-5pm, Bellingham Senior
Activity Center
Gallery Walk: 6-9pm, downtown Anacortes
Art Walk: 6-10pm, downtown Bellingham
Padden Mudfest: 10am, Lake Padden Park
FOOD
Community Breakfast: 8am-1pm, Rome Grange
Wine & Food Gala: 2-4:30pm, Old World Deli
Grape and Gourmet: 5-8:30pm, Silver Reef
Casino Events Center
VISUAL ARTS
SATURDAY [11.02.13]
Vanishing Ice Opening Day: 12-5pm, Whatcom
Museum’s Lightcatcher Building
ONSTAGE
Annie: 7:30pm, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon
No Exit: 8pm and 10pm, iDiOM Theater
Blender: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre
Rocky Horror Picture Show: 8pm and 11:59pm,
Mount Baker Theatre, and 8pm at the Lincoln
MONDAY [11.04.13]
DANCE
Momix: 7:30pm, Mount Baker Theatre
3
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
FOOD 34
THISWEEK
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
Rock icon Lou Reed, 71, died last weekend in Long Island.
The Velvet Underground leader’s songwriting and guitar
talents helped shape nearly 50 years of rock music, and
although he collaborated with luminaries such as David Bowie
and Andy Warhol—who produced the band’s debut album—it
was as a solo artist that he found the most success. He is
survived by his wife, musician Laurie Anderson.
VIEWS & NEWS
4: Massive mailbag
8: Gristle & Views
GET OUT 16
WORDS 14
CURRENTS 10
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13: Last week’s news
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14: Wild things
16: Global dreaming
20: Art action in La Conner
22: A classic crooner
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27: Film Shorts
REAR END
28: Bulletin Board
29: Wellness
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Dreams Unlimited, P.16 * Thrillingham, P.18 * The Corner Pub, P.34
c a s c a d i a
#44.08
REPORTING FROM
THE HEART OF CASCADIA
CASCADIA WEEKLY
STA F F
Production
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4
L E T T E RS
Music & Film Editor:
Carey Ross
ext 203
{[email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
12: Police blotter, Voter Guide
26: An interstellar battle
VIEWS 8
TOC
Arts & Entertainment
Editor: Amy Kepferle
ext 204
{[email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
18: This is “Thriller”
MAIL 4
mail
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ext 260
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ARTS & LIFE
DO IT 2
Cascadia Weekly:
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Editorial
10: Transport troubles
10.30.13
Contact
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WHATCOM SKAGIT ISLAND LOWER B.C.
©2013 CASCADIA WEEKLY (ISSN 1931-3292) is published each Wednesday by
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NEWSPAPER ADVISORY GROUP: Robert Hall, Seth Murphy, Michael Petryni, David Syre
{10.30.13}{#44}{V.08}{FREE}
Art's Alive!
La Conner's creative
smorgasbord, p.18
Frankie
Avalon:
A crooner sings the
classics, p.22
Cheat Sheet:
A handy guide for
voters, p.12
OILTRAINS
TROUBLE ON THE TRACKS? P.10
COVER: Art by Riber Hansson
more people, so why not single-payer coverage?
SINGLE-PAYER BEATS
WASTE AND FRAUD
Healthcare in America is a $2.6 trillion a year
industry. Of that, $750 billion is estimated to
be the amount that was spent on procedures,
medicine and equipment, that was unnecessary.
And another $60 billion is lost thru Medicare and
Medicaid annually because of fraud.
Until the Affordable Care Act, the average administrative cost to provide you with insurance
has been 37 percent of your policy. Under the
new law that drops to 20 percent. But in the
cases of Medicare and Medicaid they cost only 3
percent to administer your coverage.
O.K., let’s do the math: 37 percent of $2.6
trillion is roughly $957 billion for administrative costs and profit for insurance companies
and their investors. At 20 percent, the amount
is roughly $520 billion dollars for the same. Now
if we had a single-payer system that cost only 3
percent for administrative costs, that would be
roughly $72 billion.
The Obama Administration currently has budgeted $250 million dollars a year to reign in
Medicare and Medicaid fraud. My question, why
not a billion dollars, in an effort to reduce $60
billion dollars in fraud, down to $5 billion?
Even without reducing unnecessary costs, that
leaves almost a trillion dollars to cover Americans
who don’t have insurance. It saves money, covers
—Bill Walker, Maple Falls
SAVE US ALL FROM SNAKE OIL
It’s now official. The Snake-Oil-Salesman-InChief continues to be delusional about his government-dictated health care scheme and he’s
more than willing to throw millions of Americans
under the bus to salvage his Obamacare disaster.
President Barack Obama took to the airwaves
on Monday to address the problems with his
health care scheme—but he didn’t apologize,
he didn’t say he was sorry, he didn’t even have
the courage to admit his government takeover of
health care is a disaster.
Calling Obamacare a “good product” that is
“exceeding expectations,” he repeatedly lauded
the phantom accomplishments of his scheme
to destroy our nation’s health care system and
“transform” our great nation.
God help us!
—Wayne Farber, Bellingham
SCHOOL DISTRICT COSTS
UNCONTROLLED
Cascadia Weekly’s endorsement claims that
Steve Smith “has brought rigor to their (Bellingham School District) budget.”
There’s not much rigor to be seen when you
consider the district’s central office costs. Steve
Smith voted to hire Greg Baker, a rookie superin-
—Ken Kaliher, Bellingham
MORE ON GMOS
“Genetically
modified
organisms
(GMOs), which are the byproduct of splicing genes from one species into the DNA
of another, is a technology fraught with
unknown and possibly disastrous consequences for our health and the environment.” These words, written by Arran
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
GET OUT 16
WORDS 14
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
When slick “Vote No on 522” flyers hit
my mailbox, I got curious, and looked for
more information. I found the flyers were
intentionally confusing the very important issue of GMO labeling. Some truths:
• At least 64 countries, including the
EU, Japan, India, and even Russia and
China require GMO labeling, and some
have even stronger restrictions.
• I-522 needn’t cause higher prices.
It doesn’t require anyone to change
crops, ingredients, or purchases. It
simply requires labels. Manufacturers
already change their packaging regularly, and would have 18 months to
conform. (And the EU reports that labeling in Europe has not caused higher
prices.)
• I-522 is not “badly written.” Rather,
it is written so carefully to withstand
court challenges that it scares the hell
out of the Monsanto cabal.
• Hundreds of real Washington farmers
are endorsing I-522.
• I-522’s exceptions simply conform to
existing food labeling practices and
common sense. Delivered pizzas aren’t
labeled now, and wouldn’t require GMO
labels under I-522.
Monsanto and junk food makers are
spending a record $17 million trying to
distract and confuse voters with misleading charges. They hope we’re too
stupid or lazy to look for the truth.
I-522 is not about banning GMOs, or
controlling their use in any way. It is simply about mothers’ and other consumers’
right to know what we and our children
are eating. What do 64 other countries
know that Monsanto and friends don’t
want us to know?
DO IT 2
SUPPORT FOOD LABELING
10.30.13
John Blethen is the right choice for Bellingham School Board and I shall explain
why. I have questions for Steve Smith:
Steve, you did not think that we need
more technical schools because now we
send our technical students down to
Skagit Valley. Really, how is that not
costly to the schools and to the young
people who must travel away from home
when often they are of the age when
they need part-time local jobs?
John, as a businessman, carpenter and
community activist, knows that technical schools can be extremely dangerous,
something you as a mathematician did
not seem to know. My husband, son and
friends have all described harrowing incidents of young students potentially
causing horrible hazards in technical
classes they took. During the League of
Women Voters debate, Blethen wisely
warned of hazards in technical classes.
Such classes, like welding and those running power equipment, are wise classes
to have closely monitored. They should
not be large classes. Do you know this?
Steve, as an accountant on the school
board, how did you allow the $232,261
total composition for the 2012-13 salary
for Superintendent Baker—a higher salary
than even our governor receives? Did you
argue against this unreasonable salary?
And another question:
Why did you vote to close Larrabee?
In the debate, you stated, “There will be
no votes to close any schools in this dis-
—Barbara Perry, Bellingham
#44.08
—David Marshak, Bellingham
trict for the foreseeable future. None. No
votes at all, so that fact that we’re going
to look at small schools and they’re giving this threat of closure, that’s fear tactics. There will be no votes whatsoever.”
Yet you don’t mention Larrabee, our
small neighborhood school. Why did
you just vote this spring to have this
small school closed? Why do you think
voters are concerned about your stance
on small schools?
Smith, you have a polished, smooth
style as you are used to performing in
front of a classroom, but you are not the
right choice for our school board.
Blethen is.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
tendent, and pay him more than $232,000
in total compensation for 2012-13 to lead
a district with about 11,000 students.
Everett enrolled more than 18,600 students last year. The superintendent there
got $210,000. Federal Way enrolled more
than 22,000 students, more than twice
as many as Bellingham. The superintendent there got $213,000. Tacoma enrolled
more than 29,000 students, almost three
times as many as Bellingham. There the
superintendent earned essentially what
Baker did, $234,000. For three times as
many students.
With a budget Steve Smith approved,
Bellingham employs eight central office
administrators with compensation of
$118,000 a year or more (not including
the three high school principals). The
Olympia district, with about 9,500 students, employs only three district administrators whose compensation is more
than $118,000. Olympia is 86 percent the
size of Bellingham—but we have more
than twice as many highly paid central
office administrators.
The Weekly says they “love and support
John Blethen.” I agree. I’m voting for
John because we do need school board
members who will bring rigor and discipline to the district’s expenditures and
not be “yes men” for the superintendent.
5
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
mail ›› your views
6
Stephans, start the preface of Jeffrey
Smith’s book Seeds of Deception, exposing Industry and Government lies about
the safety of the genetically engineered
foods you’re eating. Smith goes on to recount a meeting between Monsanto and
their consulting firm Arthur Anderson
Consulting where Monsanto executives
described their ideal future as a world
with 100 percent of all commercial seed
genetically modified and patented.
Smith reveals that integral to this plan
was Monsanto’s influence in government,
whose role was to promote the technology worldwide and to help get the foods
to the marketplace quickly, before resistance could get into the way. A biotech
consultant was quoted as saying, “The
hope of the industry is that over time,
the market is so flooded that there’s
nothing you can do about it. You just sort
of surrender.”
Voting yes on 522 is choosing to not
surrender.
Mostly at issue in the need to label
GMO food is Monsanto’s genetically modified corn, soy and canola (rape) seeds.
These are seeds where they have inserted
a protein into the DNA which makes them
resistant to Monsanto’s herbicide, Roundup. It was a handy little package of seed
and herbicide that Monsanto started
selling to farmers in the United States,
especially when Monsanto’s patent on
Round-up was expiring. The promise to
farmers of higher yields is false. Farmers
who use Round-up-ready seed are using
more chemicals each year not less. Look
up the facts. Monsanto also neglected to
tell farmers that they couldn’t store their
seed from the previous year, a time-honored practice since farming began.
The Washington State GOP urges Republicans to vote no on 522.
I guess they didn’t read the book or
watch the film The World According to
Monsanto by Marie-Monique Robin, where
farming communities in mostly Red (Republican) states, have been under constant attack by the “Gene Police,” employees and private investigators hired
by Monsanto to police farmers. Many
farmers have been sued by Monsanto,
some have lost their family farms and
this oppressive policy has turned neighbor against neighbor and is destroying
once-peaceful communities.
Look at the bottom of all those “vote
no” ads on TV. See who is spending so
many millions of dollars on them. Then
ask yourself why? They say to look at
the facts, but I guess the people in
those ads forgot to.
If you eat Doritos, you are eating GMO
food. If you are eating anything with
partially hydrogenated soybean oil found
in most processed food, you are eating
GMO food or non-organic meat where suppliers use GMO feed, you are eating GMO
food. Get the real facts. Vote yes on 522.
—Marty Weber, Bellingham
Edited for length
VOTE FOR CARL
Like so many others, I yearn for a candidate who is experienced, trustworthy,
honest, fair, sound of judgment and a
true public servant. How lucky for me,
and others, that we already have such a
person on Whatcom County Council, and
have the opportunity to re-elect him.
Carl Weimer has already demonstrated
in two terms on the council his understanding of the needs of all county constituents (farmers, business people and
city dwellers) and his commitment to
protecting the environment that makes
Whatcom the special place we call home.
At this moment, we need good council
members more than ever.
We face big money and big pressure
to establish a coal port with greatly
increased numbers of coal trains that
will pollute fishing grounds, create new
health risks, and block access to commerce and emergency services.
This election is a very big one for the
future of Whatcom County. We need our
best team on the Council. We need to
re-elect Carl Weimer and elect Barry Buchanan, Ken Mann and Rud Browne.
—Myra Ramos, Lummi Island
ELECT MICHELLE LUKE
Michelle Luke understands our local
businesses need to be the highlight of
Whatcom County, not devoured by government taxes and regulations. That is
why I support the election of Michelle
Luke for County Council.
As chair of Whatcom County Planning
Commission, Michelle worked hard to
read between the lines and produce plain
language plans that are actionable and
would improve our county. She stands in
the gap and insists that future projects
be efficient and beneficial to protect
taxpayer dollars from bureaucratic cash
dumps.
Join me by voting for Michelle Luke
for County Council and let’s get Whatcom
County working.
—Abigail Ungersma, Lynden
RE-ELECT BILL KNUTZEN
I have been a friend of Bill Knutzen’s
for many years. I appreciate voting for
a candidate with a business perspective,
someone who understands budgets and
how to contain operating costs.
Bill is a council member who understands that government doesn’t create
jobs, people do. He is not a career politician, but has real world knowledge and
tells it like it is.
He is reasonable, smart and principled.
He has the backbone to stand up to outside interests and put Whatcom first.
Bill is supported locally, he understands
Whatcom County.
Join me in voting for a remarkable fellow citizen who will put Whatcom County first. I’m voting for Bill Knutzen for
County Council.
—Bob VanWeerdhuizen, Everson
YOUR VOTE CAN CHANGE THE
WORLD
It comes as no surprise to many of us
that the coal industry has poured hundreds of thousands of dollars into the
conservative campaigns for our local
County Council. After all, there can be
no doubt that climate change will be the
defining crisis of our generation. It is
fortunate for those of us who recognize
these threats that they have brought this
fight to us.
The conservatives in the race, as they
so often do, are hoping to appeal to our
basest fears, to pander to our deepestseated hatreds and to, in a flurry of slick
advertising, cloud out the hope so many
of us share for a better home and better world. The coal industry’s cynics have
sought to distract and deny the vision of
a world where the short-sightedness of
coal or the devastation of poverty are not
any longer the only options open to us,
to keep us confined in the chains where
the full realm of possibility—for prosperity and natural beauty, both—is denied
and rejected by a far-off corporate and
political elite.
But this vision remains. It persists and
endures. There is the very real and deeply
held hope for a world where we can meet
the needs of the present without dishonoring our past nor depriving our future.
That world is possible if only we have
the courage, the strength and the love
to make it a reality. We are a community
that is ready to stand up and fight for
a future we can all be proud of, to pass
down to our children a cleaner, safer
and healthier world. That world is necessary—the best available science tells
us there is no other future in which our
economy, and the ecosystem on which it
depends, may survive. It is the way forward. It is the hope that feeds the soul
and keeps us working for the future. It
is one worth fighting for, and at times,
worth living for and worth dying for.
Believe once more in your imagination.
Embrace our community’s spirit and ingenuity. Stand up for your principles and
protect your community. Join us. Vote for
Rud Browne, Ken Mann, Barry Buchanan,
and Carl Weimer by Nov. 5. So often we
only get one shot at this. Let us rise to
the occasion. Your vote can change the
world.
—Matt Petryni, Bellingham
A REFERENDUM ON COAL
I’m excited for the Whatcom County
Council race. Their future power to deny
a permit for the Cherry Point terminal has
made national news.
Instead of clear party lines, I’m pleased
to find a diverse crowd opposes the coal
terminal.
The terminal would hurt our economy
by devastating herring populations, thus
endangering salmon and Washington’s
fishing industry, which supports 66,000
jobs. The contaminants that threaten
herring would harm agriculture all along
the train corridor. Waterfront businesses
would be blocked by rail traffic.
Coal trains would damage our infrastructure and property values, and could
force Bellingham to build bridges over
tracks at taxpayers’ expense. More vibration and pollution would cause wear on
property near tracks and decrease property values. Entrepreneur Magazine found
the worth of homes near rails decrease 5
to 7 percent.
Federal law prohibits railroads from
paying more than 10 percent of the cost
of safety improvements. Heavier coal
trains wear out tracks faster, causing expensive repairs, more squealing and derailing.
Coal trains would impact the waterfront redevelopment thaat represents
more jobs than the terminal. We need
investors to pay premium prices for real
estate near the railway—trains would decrease its value and drive away real job
creators.
Let’s set a precedent for moving from
coal to cleaner energies. Becoming a
leader in the growing green energy market could be a great step for our economy.
I believe conservatives and liberals
alike will choose Rud Browne, Ken Mann,
Barry Buchanan, and Carl Weimer.
—Alissa French, Bellingham
Send us your letters
But keep ‘em short (300 words or less). Send
to [email protected] or mail to P.O.
Box 2833, Bellingham, WA 98229
VoteRudBrowne.com
Paid for by Vote Rud Browne, 1313 East Maple St., Suite 201, MAC 594, Bellingham, WA 98225-5708
‘Ti’e ne-xwi’eqen shqwelten’
( t h i s
i s
m y
l o u d
v o i c e )
The Lummi Nation
wishes to congratulate
All the Candidates in our local races.
We ask you to Support our Friends
WHATCOM COUNTY
Barry Buchanan
Ken Mann
Carl Weimer
Rud Browne
CITY OF BELLINGHAM
Pinky Vargas
Roxanne Murphy
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
GET OUT 16
Endorsed by over
350 Community Leaders
WORDS 14
Paid for by the Committee to elect
John Blethen for School Board
Proven Values We
Want in Our Leaders
Created family wage jobs, in an
awarding winning workplace, while
protecting our environment.
CURRENTS 10
“It is past time
that we looked at
addressing the needs
of the more than 25%
of students who are
not graduating”
VIEWS 8
Proven Environmental Leader
Bellingham/Whatcom Green
Business of the Year (2007). An
original sponsor of Sustainable
Connections “Towards Zero Waste”
program. Received many Best
Place to Work awards.
MAIL 4
“our children are
our most important asset”
DO IT 2
Proven Leadership in Creating
Whatcom Jobs
Founder of Ryzex (360 jobs, 140
in the County). Whatcom County
Business Person of the Year (2004)
Endorsed by the Whatcom County Democrats
10.30.13
FOR WHATCOM COUNTY COUNCIL
#44.08
for School District Director
RUD BROWNE
CASCADIA WEEKLY
John Blethen
7
THE GRISTLE
views
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 88
VIEWS
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
ET TU, BLUTO?: With the petty malice of a ruffian,
8
Port Commissioner Scott Walker sent out a letter to
supporters last week, attempting to drive a shank
under the ribs of fellow Commissioner Mike Mc Auley.
Walker is getting pretty practiced in the role of a
scoundrel, employing sly tactics similar to those he
used when he plunged a bloody knife through the
lungs of Port of Bellingham Executive Director Charlie Sheldon in 2010.
In a letter to supporters, Walker sketched his petty
grievances with McAuley, encouraging them to vote
for McAuley’s opponent. In particular, Walker took
umbrage at McAuley advocating for a more thorough
cleanup of Whatcom Waterway and pursuing a more
circumspect approach to economic development that
champions blue-collar jobs.
“Everything that I just said is a proven fact,”
Walker breezily characterized his fabrications and
distortions. “That’s all I can do: tell the truth.”
McAuley, in his typical style, responded at great
length, fisking each of Walker’s spurious claims.
“McAuley voted to stop final negotiations for an
environmental permit to allow cleanup of the Whatcom Waterway,” Walker complained. “He wanted to
start over! This would have doomed this project for
many years.”
“Not even close to true,” McAuley replied of a plan
that predates his time on the commission. His concern is primarily that the failure to more thoroughly
dredge the channel forever forecloses on marine uses
of Whatcom Waterway. “The port fanatically bundles
projects together, which means if anything needs to
change it cannot without throwing the entire project out,” he noted.
Bellingham City Council continues to suffer under
this particular form of extortion, finding themselves
burdened to move the waterfront master plan one
inch under threat the entire plan could unwind.
“I won’t speculate on why staff didn’t include basic,
necessary infrastructure in the plan given that that is
the port’s role, but the plan was established under the
watchful eyes of Walker,” McAuley commented.
“McAuley voted against the partnership with
Western Washington University to create a waterfront campus,” Walker complained.
“I voted against giving six acres of land to Western
Crossing, which is not Western Washington University,” McAuley clarified. “There is an incredibly important distinction between WWU and Western Crossing
which Walker conveniently fails to describe. Western
Crossing is a development entity with a handful of
university and port board members representing the
port, Walker is a board member.”
Walker installed himself on the board, then used
his vote on the commission to approve their memorandum of agreement in June, a matter upon which
he clearly should have recused himself.
“I didn’t support the land grant in the center of
the former Georgia-Pacific property because, as of
the time of that vote, WWU didn’t have a plan for
using that property,” McAuley explained.
Others have observed that the university is allowed to squat on six acres of the waterfront with
little more commitment than a handshake. Walker’s
position on a shell corporation ensures he’ll continue to puppeteer waterfront outcomes long after he
has been driven off the commission.
OPI N IONS
T H E G R IST L E
BY SHERIFF BILL ELFO
521 Beds
MANY FACTORS INFLUENCE JAIL SIZE
s Whatcom County seeks
citizen input on the proposed 521-inmate jail, it is
important to highlight the process
used to determine the size of the
facility and measures taken to offer
alternatives and reduce the growth
of future jail needs.
After nearly two years of research,
community input and consultation
with national experts, the 13-member Council-created Jail Planning Task
Force unanimously reported on “critical life-safety” issues requiring that
the jail be replaced; concluded that
a 500-700 inmate facility operating
at 80-85 percent of its design capacity was needed; emphasized including
space for expanding mental health,
educational/ vocational/work programs; highlighted the need to plan
for future long-term expansion; and
recommended the county retain a jail
planner to refine projections and facilitate recommendations.
The county hired a leading jail
planning firm who assessed that
Whatcom County needs a jail to accommodate 521 inmates with a longterm expansion capacity to 649 inmates. It further recommended the
inclusion of space for all of the educational/mental health programming
recommended by the task force.
Despite legislation that continually
shifts responsibility for housing felons from state prisons to county jails
and that mandates arrests and sets
minimum sentencing requirements
for misdemeanor offenses (primarily
domestic violence/DUI), components
of our local law and justice system
implemented programs that successfully reduced the growth in our jail
population and lowered previous projections on jail capacity needs.
The Prosecutor’s “Fast-Track” program expedited the process of bring-
A
ing felony cases before the courts
and contributed to reducing the average length of pre-trial detentions
from 26 to 20 days. Drug court offers eligible offenders the option of
treatment rather than incarceration.
District Court Probation has enjoyed phenomenal success with mental health specialists that work with
the mentally ill (including veterans
suffering PTSD) who otherwise would
occupy a disproportionate amount of
jail space. Success rates increased
from 28 percent to 75 percent. One
person with schizoaffective disorder
and a long history of DUI was booked
into jail 53 times. Since entering the
program he has been clean, sober
and out of jail for 18 months. At the
Sheriff’s Office, mental health professionals now work with offenders
to diagnose, treat and connect them
with community based services upon
their release—reducing the likelihood of returning to jail.
The Sheriff’s Office operates the
most robust jail-alternative programs in Washington that include
the use of electronic home monitoring in lieu of incarceration, the option of avoiding jail time by working on community projects and jail
work crews that perform thousands
of hours of public service work. Jail
work and education programs allow
eligible offenders to retain their jobs
or continue their education.
Despite successes, many challenges and opportunities remain.
The number of dangerously violent
VIEWS EXPRESSED ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF CASCADIA WEEKLY
mentally ill offenders held in jail
has dramatically increased as state
funding for Western State Hospital
has decreased. Resulting backlogs
for diagnosis and treatment can now
take months. In the interim, the jail
is ill-equipped to house, treat or effectively supervise these offenders.
The proposed jail will provide 14
rooms to more effectively and safely
facilitate these services.
People should not have to be arrested to access mental health services. Dramatic reductions at state
and federal levels have reduced options for community-based treatment. The County has filled some
of these voids by funding a variety
of programs that include behavioral
health services at all seven school
districts; community-based mental
health and substance abuse treatment; and services for the chronically
homeless and chemically dependent.
Evidence-based research demonstrates that juvenile detention alternative programs can successfully
reduce the number of incarcerated
juveniles and enjoy enormous success
in preventing adult crime. Initiatives
at the state level are proposing to restore funding for these programs and
I am serving on a committee that is
working on a series of recommendations to the Legislature and counties.
The law and judges determine
“who” is in jail. The Sheriff and the
county have the responsibility to
operate the jail in a safe and constitutional manner. While various
programs have achieved success in
changing lives, most function on
a “carrot-and-stick” model and it
is necessary to maintain a facility
where those representing risk to the
community can be safely held.
Bill Elfo is Whatcom County Sheriff.
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Divorce & Mediation
CURRENTS 10
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And build the next.
STAGE 18
ART 20
Out of court solutions that help you close one chapter of your life…
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Divorce is an ending,
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C
In chutzpah of a cosmic scale, Walker complains that “McAuley politicized
the commission decision to replace
executive director Charlie Sheldon. He
was an active player in prolonging a
controversy that was notable only in
the fact that public officials took action against a failed director.”
Of course Walker is the one who
politicized his dissatisfaction with
a port director the agency had spent
thousands of dollars to obtain, taking to the airwaves of KGMI in the
fall of 2009 to air his complaints
loudly and publicly. Months later, he
engineered a moment when a majority of port staff were absent to walk
Sheldon off a pier.
“I don’t understand the ‘politicized’
terminology,” McAuley commented,
“but if Walker means I reached out
to the community and asked for their
support, then I guess I politicized his
work on removing Sheldon.
“The day Sheldon was officially
ousted the commission chambers were
packed to standing room only, with
more outside,” he said. “And, this
wasn’t just a crowd of bleeding hearts,
it was the most wide representation of
people from the left and right, from
the environmental community and the
chamber of commerce, and so on.”
“McAuley and Sheldon engineered
the public subsidy of commercial
fishermen who no longer pay even
break even for their moorage, taking
money from people with less to subsidize those with more, many who are
wealthy,” Walker complained.
Now we get to the heart of Walker’s
dissatisfaction with McAuley and Sheldon—a reordering of priorities that
might reconnect the port authority
with its roots in the fishing community, employers with heavy multipliers
for marine trades, including shipbuilding and vessel refitting.
Walker notes that thousands of dollars have been contributed to McAuley’s reelection by the fishing community and alludes it is payback for the
“taxpayer charity” of reduced moorage
rates. And it is true the fishing community strongly supports McAuley,
the first commissioner in decades who
hasn’t gouged the life out of their industry in order to finance marina operations for wealthy yacht owners.
The current port plan for the waterfront envisions well over $100 million
in taxpayer investments, all in subsidy
to luxury yachts.
The port’s plan for the waterfront is
a shameful inversion of social justice.
A new commission could fix this. Good
riddance to the old commission.
Halloween Celebrations Oct 31
Costumers (21yrs+) get $3.50 pints
Costume Contest 9pm
Nov 2 Chuckanut Beer Dinner
@Harbor House, San Juan Island
S
THE GRISTLE
*Offer valid 7 days a week (holidays excluded) For additional offers visit www.granaio.com
CALL FOR RESERVATIONS
Lunch hours
11am–3pm
Dinner hours
3pm–10pm
360.419.0674
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FOOD 34
currents
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I N DE X
CASCADIA WEEKLY
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10
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N E WS
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BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
oil TRAINS
MORE TRAIN SHIPMENTS EXPECTED
IN WASHINGTON
undreds of trains carrying crude oil could soon be chugging
across the Northwest, bringing potential jobs and revenues but
raising concerns about oil spills, increased train and vessel traffic and other issues.
With five refineries, Washington has long received crude oil from
Alaska and elsewhere by ship, barges and pipelines. But ports and refiners are increasingly turning to trains to take advantage of a boom in
oil from North Dakota’s Bakken region.
Three terminals—in Anacortes, Tacoma, and Clatskanie, Ore.—are already receiving crude oil by trains. Other facilities are proposed at the
ports of Grays Harbor and Vancouver, and at refineries at Cherry Point.
The BP and Phillips 66 refineries at Cherry Point have received approval from the Northwest Clean Air Agency to build facilities to handle
crude oil by rail. To comply with its current air operating permit, the
refineries won’t be allowed to increase the amount of oil it can process,
an agency spokeswoman said.
Company spokesman Rich Johnson said Phillips 66 is building a rail
offloading facility capable of handling 30,000 barrels per day of crude
oil. “The refinery has received all necessary permits for the project and
expects the rail offloading facility to be in operation in the fourth
quarter of 2014,” he said in an email.
The Shell Puget Sound refinery in Anacortes is also exploring bringing crude oil by rail to replace some supply currently brought in by ship,
the company said in materials it submitted to Skagit County planners
over the summer.
H
An oil train typically has about 100 rail cars
and each car can hold about 28,000 gallons.
Together, the 10 proposed projects would be
capable of moving nearly 800,000 barrels per
day, said Eric de Place, policy director at Sightline Institute. “It’s a lot of oil that we’re talking
about moving by train in Washington. It raises
new questions about how the state can handle
a spill.”
The Washington Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council is reviewing a proposal by Tesoro
Corp. and Savage Cos. for a terminal at the Port
of Vancouver to handle as many as 380,000
barrels a day of crude oil. Oil arriving by train
would be unloaded, stored temporarily and then
loaded onto marine vessels to be shipped to refineries on the West Coast.
“We are committed to building and operating
in a safe and environmentally responsible manner,” said Kelly Flint, senior vice-president of
Savage. He said the project would not only benefit the local community but move the country
ahead in energy independence.
Public hearings took place this week in Clark
County. The council will make a recommenda-
tion to Gov. Jay Inslee, who has the final say.
Construction could begin by late 2014.
Critics say shipping oil by train is risky and
could cause environmental harm from leaking
oil tanker cars or derailments.
“It’s very dangerous to move this stuff by rail,”
said Sierra Club spokesman Eddie Scher, pointing to the fiery train disaster in Quebec. In July,
47 people were killed when an unattended train
rolled away and derailed in the town of Lac-Megantic and several of its oil cars exploded.
The Association of American Railroads says
99.9977 percent of all shipments of hazardous
materials, including crude oil, get to their destination without a leak caused by accidents.
BNSF Railway is committed to safety and preventing accidents, said spokeswoman Roxanne
Butler. BNSF has invested millions of dollars in
its infrastructure and trained employees across
its network to respond to hazmat incidents,
she said. It frequently inspects tracks, uses
technology to detect potential equipment failure and maintains special emergency response
equipment along routes, she added.
Butler said BNSF currently handles 600,000
barrels of crude oil a day across its entire network. Most of that oil heads to other parts of
the country; in the Pacific Northwest, “we average over one train per day to this area,” she said
in an email.
As the transportation of oil shifts from ships
and pipelines to trains, officials say they have
to change how they prepare for potential oil
spills.
“We’re monitoring the way that the movement
of oil is changing. And we have to think about
what changes we need,” said Linda Pilkey-Jarvis, manager of Ecology’s spills preparedness
section.
She said the state has been focused on oil
coming into the state on ships and pipelines but
will need to refocus attention to planning for a
crude oil spill in the inland areas.
“The scale of the oil by rail is completely unprecedented and the state is not prepared to
deal with a spill,” said Brett VandenHeuvel, executive director for Columbia Riverkeeper.
Environmentalists and others have challenged
oil shipping terminals proposed at the Port of
Grays Harbor by Westway Terminal Co. and Imperium Terminal Services. They say the projects
will bring tens of millions of barrels of crude oil
through the area each year, increasing train and
barge traffic and the risk of oil spills.
The groups won a victory this month when a
state hearings board said it would reverse permits issued by Hoquiam and the state to Westway and Imperium. The groups had argued that
the agencies failed to do a more complete environmental review.
Kristen Boyles, an Earthjustice attorney representing the groups, said the board identified
serious flaws in the permitting and environmental review.
Svend Brandt-Erichsen, an attorney with Marten Law representing Westway, said the decision would create delays but that it wouldn’t
be hard to get the information needed. “There’s
not a whole lot of new substantial requirements
that will come out of this,” he said.
"LJBBUMILOBQEB
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FOOD 34
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Farm, Store, Bistro & Distillery
y
BUY - SELL - TRADE
District 4 EMS Vote YES
www.wcfd4.com
Paid for and authorized by IAFF Local #106
P.O. Box 1024 Bellingham, WA 98227
Your Local Fire Fighters
Local #106 representing:
Bellingham Firefighters | Lynden Firefighters | North Whatcom Fire & Rescue Firefighters
Fire District #8 Firefighters | South Whatcom Fire Authority Firefighters | Port of Bellingham Firefighters
Bellingham Senior Activity Center
315 Halleck Street ΠBellingham
November 1 & 2
Friday & Saturday
9 am - 5 pm
FREE ADMISSION
Embrace the sights and scents of Fall!
Shop for gifts and support local crafters!
Listen to live music and enjoy soup
and sandwiches from our Café.
Downtown: State St & Chestnut
Seattle: 8QLYHUVLW\QRUWKRIWK6Wê0DUNHW6W%DOODUG
BuffaloExchange.com
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For more information
360-733-4030
or [email protected]
or www.wccoa.org
STAGE 18
GET OUT 16
WORDS 14
South Whatcom Fire Authority
Commissioner Dist. 5
Jim Peeples
CURRENTS 10
Bellingham City Council
Gene Knutson
Ward 2
Pinky Vargas
Ward 4
Michael Lilliquist
Ward 6
Roxanne Murphy
Ward At Large
Port of Bellingham Commissioner
Renata B. Kowalczyk Dist. 1
Mike McAuley
Dist. 2
VIEWS 8
Whatcom County Council
Barry Buchanan
Dist. 1, Pos. A
Ken Mann
Dist. 2, Pos. A
Rud Browne
Pos. At Large
MAIL 4
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online for
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10.30.13
(10 min North of Bellingham)
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FOOD 34
FUZZ
BUZZ
On Oct. 23, Bellingham Police officers were
approached by a 12-year-old girl, “who
wished to donate her stuffed animal collection to the Bellingham Police Department in
the event that officers have contacts with
child crime victims during the upcoming
holiday season,” police reported. “It was her
wish that should officers have contacts with
children who needed comfort, that her donations be used to help in that process.”
On Oct. 27, a woman reported that an unknown person dressed in colorful clothing
and a mask pulled out a meat cleaver and
stared at her.
FREE MONEY
On Oct. 26, Bellingham Police learned someone had paid for purchases at a business
near Bellis Fair Mall using a counterfeit bill.
On Oct. 28, a 54-year-old man was arrested
for stealing socks and beer from a store near
Bellis Fair Mall.
THE CONTINUING CRISIS
On Oct. 26, Bellingham Police broke up a
loud party near Western Washington University. One of the renters was cited for disorderly conduct for the loud party and being
a minor in possession of liquor. Police cited
three other minors in possession of alcohol.
One had earlier been cited for MIP. Police
frogmarched him to jail.
On Oct. 26, Bellingham Police broke up another loud party near WWU campus. University Police assisted.
BELLINGHAM CITY COUNCIL
Ward 2
GENE KNUTSON
Ward 4
CLAYTON PETREE
Ward 6
MICHAEL LILLIQUIST
At-Large
ROXANNE MURPHY
PORT OF BELLINGHAM COMMISSION
District 1
RENATA KOWALCZYK
District 2
MIKE MCAULEY
WHATCOM COUNTY COUNCIL
On Oct. 27, Bellingham Police impounded a
counterfeit bill received by the same business on Samish Way.
On Oct. 27, someone ordered food at a restaurant in Cordata Center and paid for it with
a counterfeit $20 bill.
On Oct. 25, Bellingham Police broke up a
loud party on E Street.
On Oct. 27, Bellingham Police impounded a
fake $20 used at Sunset Square.
On Oct. 25, Bellingham Police broke up a
loud party in Roosevelt neighborhood.
On Oct. 27, a woman used a counterfeit bill
to purchase some clothing at a store in Sunnyland.
On Oct. 23, Bellingham Police scolded three
people who were hosting a loud party near
Cordata neighborhood.
CARL WEIMER
On Oct. 25, Bellingham Police recovered a
counterfeit $20 that was passed to a business near Civic Field.
ANOTHER SATISFIED
CUSTOMER
RUD BROWNE
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
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On Oct. 26, an employee reported receiving a
counterfeit bill at a business on Samish Way.
On Oct. 21, a shoplifter assaulted an employee at the Rite Aid in Birchwood neighborhood. Bellingham Police caught up with her
and reported she appeared to be on drugs.
Cascadia Weekly
Voter Guide
CURRENTS 10
GET OUT 16
ART 20
KILLER CLOWN
STAGE 18
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
PLUSH POLICE
Police when he saw a customer behaving
suspiciously, possibly preparing to shoplift
merchandise. “His suspicions were confirmed
when the woman left without paying for the
items and was stopped outside by store
personnel,” police reported. The 25-yearold Blaine resident was arrested, cited and
released pending her appearance in court.
Fifty dollars of merchandise was recovered
by the business.
12
On Oct. 24, Bellingham Police recovered a
counterfeit bill used at a business at Cordata
Center.
On Oct. 21, Bellingham Police learned someone attempted to purchase merchandise at
Cordata Center using a counterfeit bill.
WHO NEEDS MONEY?
On Oct. 26, Bellingham Police arrived to collect three girls who were detained by security
for theft at Bellis Fair Mall. “During the contact
with the girls’ store, representatives located
stolen property from nine other stores,” police reported. “The three girls were arrested for
theft and released to parents.”
On Oct. 16, a store employee called Blaine
On Oct. 26, Bellingham Police broke up a
loud party in York neighborhood.
On Oct. 24, Bellingham Police arrived to collect a drunk who had passed out on the sidewalk outside a bar on Holly Street.
ALIEN SKIES
On Oct. 15, a skywatcher observed a bright
yellow disk or saucer in the skies over Blaine.
“I was out on my back porch smoking and
searched the sky as I always do for any
activity and as I was doing so I noticed a
bright light coming from the southwest,”
the witness reported. “After a few minutes
it climbed slowly and lit up a small area of
the cloud cover above it. The cloud cover was
actually marine overcast. It was at this time
that the object had a clear outline. It was a
saucer or disk shape,” the report continued.
“I could not see any dome or other appendage on the UFO. I listened for engine noise
but never heard anything.”
District 1
BARRY BUCHANAN
District 2
KEN MANN
District 3
At-Large
STATE INITIATIVES
I-517
Concerning petitions and petition gatherers
NO
I-522
Concerning the labeling of GMO foods
YES
BELLINGHAM SCHOOL BOND
Proposition No. 2013-1
$160 million bond to renovate aging schools
APPROVE
LAST WEEK’S
NEWS
Blaine Police investigate a rise in thefts of tools and copper wire.
Thefts from storage yards, marinas and construction sites have more than
doubled over last year, the department reports. Stolen materials are easy
to pawn or sell as scrap. Reported losses total more than $13,000.
A Bellingham land-use judge conditionally approves an application
to construct university housing in Puget neighborhood. The Hearing
Examiner approves the 576-bed dormitory-type boarding house for university students, limiting the number of dwelling units to 176, with
a maximum of three bedrooms in each unit. The decision sets height
limits for the proposed University Ridge complex at the centerline for
residences along Puget Street and requires the construction of a pedes-
W inners
LO U N G E
Bill Taylor of Taylor Shellfish Farms was inducted
into the 2013 Oyster Hall
of Fame at Chicago’s Shaw
Crab House's 25th Annual
Oyster Festival, which
took place Oct. 14-18.
Taylor was honored at a
special multi-course dinner that included Pacific
Northwest shellfish from his own company.
*&YJUtUIFTLBHJUDPNt
Must be 21 or older with valid photo ID.
A Skagit County couple accused of starving,
beating and forcing their adopted daughter
outside as punishment are handed long prison
sentences. Larry and Carri Williams were convicted Sept. 9 of manslaughter in the death
of a teenage girl, Hana Williams, they adopted
from Ethiopia. Carri Williams is sentenced to the
maximum of 36 years, 11 months. She had also
been convicted of homicide by abuse. Larry Williams is sentenced to 27 years, 9 months, far
more than the 14-18 months prosecutors were
seeking. He was not home when Hana died.
J OIN US AND WATCH THE GAMES ON THE BIG SCREEN !
ENTERTAINMENT
FOOTBALL
SUNDAY 11/3
THURSDAY 11/7
Seahawks vs. Buccaneers Redskins vs. Vikings
Tampa Bay at Seattle: 1:05 pm
Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe
PHOTO BY JON ROWLEY
THURSDAY
MONDAY 11/4
Bears vs. Packers
Chicago at Green Bay: 5:40 pm
8BTIJOHUPOBU.JOOFTUPUB5:25 pm
GAME TIME SPECIALS
Food and drink specials available in the
lounge and at the bar top from Kick-off
‘til end of the Game!
THURSDAY 10/31
Open Mic Karaokee
Special Halloween Theme
me
8 pm - midnight
Costumes that disguise the identity of the
wearer (i.e. full face paint, masks, etc.) and
real or toy weapons are not permitted ON
THE CASINO FLOOR.
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
TUESDAY
NORTHWEST PASSAGES
10.24.13
CW
10.29.13
VIEWS 8
WEDNESDAY
Work began last week to contain oil intermittently seeping from
the Bellingham shoreline, leaving a sheen on the bay. The oil seep
is in an intertidal area on the RG Haley cleanup site, which is
contaminated with wood treatment chemicals from past industrial
activities. Crews are at work installing a sand and clay layer over
the shoreline. They will cover it with gravel, and surround it with
a rock berm. The sand and clay will absorb oil. The Washington
Dept. of Ecology is overseeing the work, and will reimburse half
of the city’s costs through the state’s Remedial Action Grant
program. The interim project is designed to contain the seep until
a site-wide cleanup begins in 2015.
FRIDAY 11/1
DJ Clint Westwood
Classic & Contemporary Dance
9 pm - 1 am
SATURDAY 11/2
Latigo Lace
Contemporary Country Dance Band
9 pm - 1 am
MAIL 4
10.23.13
Bellingham City Council continues to receive
public comments about the proposed Waterfront District master plan in lengthy worksessions. Council President Seth Fleetwood says
the council hopes to complete work sessions
and vote on a final plan and related documents
before the end of 2013.
DO IT 2
Whatcom County Council postpones a decision to use economic development funds to kickstart the construction of low-income rental
housing projects. Council sought more details on how economic development investment (EDI) funds might be earmarked and the terms of
how EDI loans might be repaid. Whatcom’s caucus of small cities supports the effort, but Bellingham officials—where most of the rentals
are likely to be built—expressed concerns that the maximum income to
qualify for the homes was set too high.
Governor Jay Inslee joins the governors of
Oregon and California and the premier of British Columbia in a pledge to pursue clean energy and carbon-reduction policies. The nonbinding agreement is signed by Inslee, Oregon
Governor John Kitzhaber, California Governor
Jerry Brown, and B.C. Premier Christy Clark.
Inslee says the goal is to make sure that the
Earth’s atmosphere “is no longer allowed to be
an unlimited dump for carbon polluters.”
10.30.13
TUESDAY
MONDAY
#44.08
10.22.13
10.28.13
CASCADIA WEEKLY
BY TIM JOHNSON
PHOTO COURTESY WASHINGTON DEPT. OF ECOLOGY
OCT22-29
FILM 26
The Bellingham Fire Department is offered
a federal grant to purchase a boat designed
to provide increased firefighting and marine
security capabilities on Bellingham’s waterfront. The grant provides $750,000 to leverage
the purchase of a $1 million marine response
and firefighting vessel, requiring $250,000 in
local matching funds. Bellingham City Council
will consider accepting the grant award for a
new fireboat.
MUSIC 22
t
k
h
e
e
trian path to transit connections. The decision
could be appealed in superior court.
Wa
at s
The W
currents ›› last week’s news
13
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words
L ECT U R ES
HALLOWEEN STORIES: Members of the
Bellingham Storytellers Guild will share family
friendly tales for small goblins, fairies and
witches from 4-6pm at Village Books, 1200
11th St. At 7pm, they’ll tell extremely scary
stories for adults and “those brave at heart”
at the Fairhaven Library, 1117 12th St. Both
events are free.
FRI., NOV. 1
BY CHRISTIAN MARTIN
The Nature of Writing
LYANDA LYNN HAUPT’S URBAN BESTIARY
STAGE 18
GET OUT 16
WORDS
WORDS 14
14
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
10.30.13
#44.08
CASCADIA WEEKLY
14
BOOKS
THURS., OCT. 31
WWW.BELLINGHAMSTORYTELLERSGUILD.ORG
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
COM M U N I T Y
WOR DS
live in a home on the outskirts of Bellingham, nestled between Galbraith Mountain to one side and the Whatcom
Creek corridor on the other. It takes me less than 10 minutes to reach the heart of downtown, and yet my neighborhood
feels removed, bucolic and even a little bit wild.
My yard is full of squirrels by day and raccoons at night. Deer
wander the neighborhood, feasting on the shrubbery without
fear. At night I can hear owls and frogs calling, and daytime
brings a parade of flickers, chickadees, varied thrush, juncos
and towhees to my feeder. Though I haven’t seen or heard them
yet, I would be surprised if coyotes and bobcats weren’t patrolling just beyond the edge of pavement.
This wildness continues into downtown: salmon pulsing up
Whatcom Creek every fall, peregrine falcons hunting pigeons on
Cornwall, seals hauled out on the edges of the shuttered mill.
I
WRIT TEN IN STONE: Portland-based author
Rosanne Parry reads from Written in Stone
at 7pm at Village Books, 1200 11th St. The
cultural survival story is set in 1923 among
the Quinault and Makah tribes of the Olympic
peninsula.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
One of the goals of Lyanda Lynn
Haupt’s new book, The Urban Bestiary:
Encountering the Everyday Wild is to
explore the overlappings between our
settlements and the wildlife we share
these places with. More than a field
guide, the literary form Haupt has
chosen takes the full measure of an
animal: “Entering a bestiary,” she exATTEND
WHAT: Nature of
plains, “we cross the threshold into a
Writing Series with
world in which our imaginations, our
Lyanda Lynn Haupt
art, our bodies, our science, our myWHEN: 4pm Sun.,
thology, all have an exuberant place.”
Nov. 3
Through extensive research and
WHERE: Village
Books, 1200 11th St.
personable prose, Haupt uncovers
COST: Free
both the natural and cultural hisINFO: www.
tory of several species we tend to
villagebooks.com or
take for granted because of their
lyandalynnhaupt.com
oftentimes pesky proximity to our
civilization: moles, crows, opossum, pigeons, starlings,
rats and even backyard chickens.
“It’s my passionate belief that daily connection with the
natural world makes us healthier, more vibrant, more intelligent and even happier,” the Seattle-based scribe explained when I asked what inspired her new book.
“Urban/suburban dwellers, including myself, often seek
this connection in remote wilderness, and such journeys
are essential,” she says. “But it is just as essential to
realize that we are intimately connected with nature
through the wild creatures in our midst every day, no
matter where we live.“
As a modern-day nature writer, Haupt has found her beat
in taking a deeper look at creatures most of us tend to overlook, and reminding us of their inherent wonderfulness.
Her first book’s title—Rare Encounters with Ordinary Birds—
serves as a mission statement for much of her work that
has followed, including 2009’s lauded Crow Planet: Essential
Wisdom from the Urban Wilderness. The author is gifted in
helping us see our wild neighbors in a new light, a renewed
relationship that benefits both parties.
“The more we know about the animals that co-inhabit our
urban neighborhoods, the more we can act in their presence
with common sense,” she elucidated. “Instead of emphasizing potential conflicts, we are drawn into a sense of lively
participation with the natural world, a recognition that
we are part of a great conversation, an unfolding story in
which humans and urban wildlife can flourish in conviviality and delight.”
SAT., NOV. 2
OYSTER BAY AND PARIS: Writer and
anthropologist Llyn De Danaan reads from her
history-based tome, Katie Gale: A Coast Salish
Woman’s Life on Oyster Bay, at 4pm at Village
Books, 1200 11th St. At 7pm, acclaimed novelist Susan Conley reads her new book of fiction,
Paris Was the Place. Both events are free.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
WED., NOV. 6
SHADOW OF THE CROSS: Social justice
activist and award-winning author Paul Kivel
shares ideas from Living in the Shadow of the
Cross: Understanding and Resisting the Power
and Privilege of Christian Hegemony at 7pm at
Village Books, 1200 11th St.
671-2626
THURS., NOV. 7
BOOK OF DAYS: Jeopardy! champion and book
maven Tom Nissley reads from A Reader’s Book
of Days at 7pm at Village Books, 1200 11th
St. Each page of the book features original
accounts of events in the lives of great writers
and fictional events that took place within
beloved books.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
COM M U N I T Y
WED., OCT. 30
DOWNTOWN MEE T ING: The Downtown
Bellingham Partnership will host its monthly
community meeting at 6pm at the Leopold
Retirement Residence, 1224 Cornwall Ave.
Candidates for City Council and the Port will be
invited to listen to downtown residents, businesses, and patrons about issues important to
downtown.
WWW.DOWNTOWNBELLINGHAM.COM
THURS., OCT. 31
DOWNTOWN TRICK OR TREAT: More than
100 downtown businesses will open their
doors for kids from 3-6pm as part of the annual Downtown Trick or Treat throughout the
urban core. From 4-6pm, there will also be a
Halloween Carnival at the Depot Market Square,
1100 Railroad Ave. Entry to that event—which
features 13 booths, a bouncy house, face
painters, balloon artists and circus performers—is $3.
WWW.DOWNTOWNBELLINGHAM.COM
FAIRHAVEN TRICK OR TREAT: From 3-6pm,
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FOOD 34
costumed kids and their keepers can head
to Fairhaven for the annual Trick or Treat
event. Shops will be decorated for the holiday, and there will be treats at participating
locations. Don’t forget to stop by Fairhaven
Pharmacy to get your photo taken.
Downtown Art Walk
)ULGD\VW
Lost River
6DWXUGD\QG
independent service & repair
VMZLQHPHUFKDQWVFRP
FRI., NOV. 1
WWW.DAUGHTERSOFNORWAY.ORG
WED., NOV. 6
GREEN DRINK S: Network with likeminded
environmentally conscious community
members at the monthly “Green Drinks”
gathering from 5-7pm at the auditorium of
Explorations Academy, 1701 Ellis St., #101.
WWW.RE-SOURCES.ORG
TAPPED VIEWING: Travelers Against
Plastic (TAP) and Students for Sustainable
Water present a showing of the documentary TAPPED at 6pm at Western Washington
University’s Artnzen 100. The free event will
also feature speakers from TAP, the Student
Recycling Center, and more. All are welcome.
Join Us for Dinner & Wine with
Shannon Borg
The
GREEN
VINE
SMART GROW TH CONFERENCE: Sustainable Connections will partner with the NW
American Institute of Architects for today’s
“Green Building and Smart Growth Conference” from 8am-4:30pm at the Bellingham
Cruise Terminal. Entry is $15 for students
and $100-$120 general.
WWW.SCONNECT.ORG
CAREER FAIR: Job-seekers looking for ways
to connect with employers are invited to
attend Western Washington University’s Fall
Business Career Fair from 1-5pm at the Wade
King Student Recreation Center. Admission is
free and the event is open to the public.
650-3240 OR WWW.WWU.EDU
6SRQVRUV+RVWHGE\
Tickets: $30 includes dinner. Available
through Nov. 7th at brownpapertickets.com.
Friday, Nov. 8th, 6:30pm
at the Book Fare Café in Village Books
5,&.
67(9(6
Join travel expert Rick
Steves—acclaimed for
his bestselling guidebook
series, and public TV
and radio shows—as he
shares the latest in smart
European travel.
GET OUT 16
Must be at least 21. ID will be checked at the door
Tuesday,
Nov. 19th,
7:00pm
at Bellingham
High School
• Enjoy dinner and travel conversation with Rick Steves
Nov. 13-14. See Willows-inn.com
for details and registration information.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
THURS., NOV. 7
Best Western CottonTree Inn, Mount Vernon
VIP Hour 3:00-4:00pm / General Admission 4:00-8:00pm
$40* per person / $70* per couple / 9,38SJUDGHSHUSHUVRQ
Hotel Packages Available Online
www.MountVernonChamber.com 360.428.8547
A Guide to West Coast
Sustainable, Organic
and Biodynamic Wines
WWW.TRAVELERSAGAINSTPLASTIC.ORG
7LFNHWV,QFOXGH:LQH%HHU)RRG&KRFRODWH&KHHVH6DPSOLQJV
WORDS 14
14
WORDS
SAT., NOV. 2
SCANDINAVIAN FAIR: The Nellie Gerdrum
Lodge of Daughters of Norway will host its
14th annual Scandinavian Fair from 10am4pm at Hampton Inn’s Fox Hall, 3985 Bennett
Dr. Nordic gifts and crafts, a Scandinavian
bakery and cafe, entertainment and prize
drawings will be part of the fun. Entry is $1.
Join us in welcoming this
Jeopardy! champion and
book maven to town.
BOOK
DAYS Thursday, Nov. 7th, 7pm
of
CURRENTS 10
READER’s
VIEWS 8
A
STAGE 18
Tom Nissley
MAIL 4
WWW.ROOTEDEMERGING.ORG
A Free Event at Village Books
DO IT 2
A MASQUERADE EVE: Celebrate youth
rites of passage, meet mentors, and
enjoy Halloween-style music, storytelling,
performances and games at “A Masquerade
Eve” gathering with Rooted Emerging staring at 7pm at the YWCA Ballroom, 1026 N.
Forest St. Entry to the all-ages event is by
donation.
10.30.13
360.671.2420
(360) 336-3801
MUSIC 22
Wine Tasting
SUBARU
#44.08
MOUNT VERNON TRICK OR TREAT: Mini
ghosts, goblins, princesses and superheroes
can traverse downtown Mount Vernon from
3-5pm throughout First Street. A costume
contest hosted by the Lincoln Theatre takes
place at 4:30pm; a variety of prizes will be
awarded.
FILM 26
New Group show
WWW.LACONNERCHAMBER.COM
ART 20
LA CONNOR TRICK OR TREAT: Head to La
Conner for holiday fun today starting with
a Halloween Parade beginning at 3:30pm at
the north end of First Street. Afterwards,
kids are invited to trick or treat at participating businesses in town.
B-BOARD 28
WWW.FAIRHAVEN.COM
Read more! VillageBooks.com
15
Tickets $5 available at Village
Books & BrownPaperTickets.com.
7LFNHWVSURFHHGVWREHQHÀW
%+6376$
$OVR
VILLAGE BOOKS
1200 11th St., Bellingham
360.671.2626
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outside
RU N N I NG
C YC L I NG
B-BOARD 28
H I K I NG
HAUNTED FOREST: Dress for the weather
when you take part in the “Haunted Forest”
happening from 7-10pm at Nugents Corner
River Access Park on Hwy 542. Entry is $6.
WWW.NORTHWESTWILDLIFE.ORG
FRI., NOV. 1
FILM 26
MOUNTAIN RESCUE FUNDRAISER: Alan
Kearney will focus on his eight-day ski traverse
of the Pickett range last winter at a fundraising presentation for the Bellingham Mountain
Rescue Council at 7pm at Backcountry Essentials, 214 W. Holly St. Admission is $5.
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
WWW.WCSAR.ORG
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
10.30.13
#44.08
CASCADIA WEEKLY
16
OCT. 30-31
BY AMY KEPFERLE
Dreams Unlimited
OF BIKES AND BUCKET LISTS
ome people spend a lot of time talking about their dreams, but
don’t make a whole lot of progress when it comes to making them
come true.
Others quit their jobs, sell everything they own, acquire bicycles and set
out on global journeys to change the world. At least that what longtime
friends Tay (Siang Hui Tay), 35, and Val (Xin Hui Tan), 29, did when they
left Singapore in March 2010 with donated Polygon bikes and a notion
to use their various talents—which included filmmaking, storytelling and
public speaking—to help open other people’s eyes to the possibility of
making their own dreams come true.
More than three years later, the friends have visited Taiwan, Japan,
Hawaii, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, and Costa Rica, and are currently
making their way across the United States touting their project, “I Believe
S
that Dreams Can Come True.”
With an aim to collect, share and inspire the
“dreams of the world” via workshops, speaking engagements and art displays, Tay and Val
have collected more than 3,000 dreams—often
written on the dreamer’s palms—and are committed to continuing their journey until they’ve
reached all 50 of the United States.
Since first coming to
Bellingham last summer
to speak at Western Washington University, the two
have already collected a
number of dreams—which
have ranged from “I want
to be a teacher” to “Live a
life worthy of my calling”
ATTEND
to “I want to be a mom.”
WHAT: “Dreams
When they bring their
Unlimited”
WHEN: 7pm Tues.,
“Dreams Unlimited” preNov. 5
sentation to Whatcom
WHERE: Syre
Community College Tues.,
Auditorium,
Nov. 5, those who haven’t
Whatcom Community
yet met the dynamic
College
COST: $5-$10
duo can share their own
INFO: www.
dreams, as well as hear
ibelievethat
more about the chaldreamscan
lenges Tay and Val have
cometrue.com
faced while traversing
the globe on foldable bikes.
“There have been days when we’d stop in the
middle of a highway and fought and wouldn’t
budge for a few hours,” Tay says. “But every
morning when we wake up, we have always been
grateful that we have each other as companions
who share a common vision on this journey.”
“I believe that the experiences on this journey have helped us bring out the best in each
other, even when we couldn’t or wouldn’t believe in ourselves; the other would,” Val adds.
“And that’s how we keep going, keep growing
and keep evolving.”
When asked how many miles they’ve traversed
on their quest to help people realize that it is
possible to check off most items on their individual bucket lists, Tay says they stopped counting when they reached their second country.
“One day, we simply took off our odometers to
remind ourselves that we set out to touch and
inspire the hearts of people, not with the intention to clock mileage,” she says. “We do not
know how far we have cycled across 12 destinations, but we definitely can share stories of the
dreams of most of the people we have met.”
NOV. 2-3
CROSS BORDER CLASH: Cyclocross will take
center stage at Cascade Cross’s “Cross Border
Clash” happening in Canada from 9:30am-3pm
Saturday and Sunday at the headquarters of
Transition Bikes at the Delta Tech Industrial
Park. Camping will be available Saturday night.
Fees vary.
WWW.CASCADECROSS.COM
SUN., NOV. 3
PADDEN MUDFEST: Dirty conditions and
challenging hill climbs can be expected at the
11th annual “Padden Mudfest” stating at 10am
at Lake Padden Park. Entry is $10. Day-of registration will be available starting at 8:45am.
WWW.GBRC.NET
WED., NOV. 6
W TA SOCIAL: The Washington Trail Association will host a Social and Volunteer Appreciation gathering from 6-8pm at the Bellingham
Cruise Terminal, 355 Harris Ave. Bring a dish
to share and a story from your favorite hike
this summer. You can also find out what WTA
is working on locally and how you can help
protect and restore the trails you love. Entry is
free and open to the public.
WWW.WTA.ORG
RECREAT ION PLANNING: Attend a Nooksack
River Recreation Plan Open House from 6-8pm
at the Bellingham Public Library, 210 Central
Ave. The gathering will focus on engaging
the public in the recreation planning efforts
that have begun to take shape in the upper
Nooksack River basins.
WWW.AMERICANRIVERS.ORG
GARDEN CLUB MEE T ING: Member Ira Penn
will offer up a “Bloomin’ Nuts!” presentation at the Birchwood Garden Club’s monthly
meeting at 7pm at Whatcom Museum’s Rotunda
Room, 121 Prospect St. Expect anecdotes,
jokes and off-the-wall observations. All are
welcome.
WWW.BIRCHWOODGARDENCLUB.ORG
THURS., NOV. 7
TREE ARMY: Janet Oakley will talk give a
presentation on “Tree Army: The Civilian
Conservation Corps in Washington State, 193342” at noon at the Bellingham Public Library,
210 Central Ave. The free event will focus on
our state’s natural resources and the men who
worked to preserve them.
778-7236
SK I CLUB MEE T ING: All are welcome at the
Nooksack Nordic Ski Club’s monthly meeting
at 7pm at the WECU Education Building, 511
E. Holly St. Show up at 6:30pm if you’re interested in becoming a member.
WWW.NOOKSACKNORDICSKICLUB.ORG
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
GET OUT 16
WORDS 14
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
Chocolate Necessities
Chuckanut Brewery & Kitchen
Colophon Café
The Community Boating Center
Community Food Co-op
Community Strength Painters
Custom Rx Shoppe
Dakota Art Store
D’Anna’s Café Italiano
Diego’s
Downtown Emporium
Dutch Cleaners
Earl’s Bike Shop
Elliott Health Care Associates
The Equipment Shop at the
American Alpine Institute
Everybody’s Store
Fairhaven Bike & Ski
Fairhaven Runners & Walkers
10.30.13
A Lot of Flowers
A1 Builders and Adaptations
Design Studio
Applied Digital Imaging
Avenue Bread & Deli
Banfield Pet Hospital
Barlean’s Fishery
Belle Flora & Home Interiors
Bellingham Auto Parts
Bellingham Bay Collectibles
Bellingham Counseling
The Bellingham Herald
Bellingham Pasta Company
Boundary Bay Bistro & Brewery
Bumblebees Kids
Café Akroteri
Care Medical Group Massage &
Physical Therapy
Cedarwoods Canine Schools
#44.08
...to businesses that encourage us to walk, bicycle,
share rides, and ride the bus, by offering great
discounts to Smart Trippers and WTA pass holders.
The Nuthouse Grill
Painting by Randy’s Maintenance
Paper Dreams
Pickford Film Center and
Limelight Cinema
Plum Massage Therapy
Pure Bliss Desserts
The RE Store
Rebecca’s Flower Shoppe
Record-Journal
REI Bellingham
Jennifer Reid, LMP
Rhythms of Life Wellness Studio
Rising Sun Motors
Robeks Fruit Smoothies &
Healthy Eats
S&H Carquest Auto Parts
The Salvation Army Thrift Stores
San Juan Cruises
Seven Loaves Pizzeria
Shawmanee Charters, LLC
Silhouettes
Erin Simpson, DC
Skylark’s Hidden Café
Sparkle Cleaners
Stockton’s Paints
The Table
Tails-A-Wagging
TD Curran
Terra Organica
Total Confidence Martial Arts
Trapeze Cafe Bakery Deli
Unlimited Service Downtown
Village Books
Village Lighting & Lamps
Vital Source Natural Medicine
Walkers Carpet One
Washington Divers, Inc.
Whatcom Family YMCA
Wild Bird Chalet
Wild Blueberries
Wonderland Teas & Spices
Yoga Northwest
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Thanks!
Fanatik Bike Co.
FeatherStone Touch
Ferndale Massage &
Wellness Clinic
Final Touch Auto Spa
Fresh Start Espresso
Grandview Golf Course
Great Harvest Bread Co.
Griggs Office Supplies
Mystique Grobe, ND, Lac
Susan Guttzeit, LMP
Hannegan Seafoods
Hardware Sales, Inc.
Heating Green
Holmes, Laurel
The Hub Community Bike Shop
India Grill Restaurant
Jack’s Bicycle Center
Joy of Pilates Studio
Joy of Pilates Studio Massage
Therapy
Juice It
KATZ! Coffee & Used Books
Therese Kelliher, LMP
Kulshan Brewing Company
Kulshan Cycles
Little Tiger Toys
Living Earth Herbs
Louis Auto Glass
Lynden Dutch Bakery
Lynden Paint and Decorating
Center
Lynden Pioneer Museum
Lynden Skateway
Lynden Tribune
Mallard Homemade Ice Cream
Midline Design
Mobile Medicine
Mt Baker Planned Parenthood
Mt. Baker Lanes
Natural Health Clinic
Northwest Chiropractic Clinic
Northwestern Clinic of
Naturopathic Medicine
17
Learn more at WhatcomSmartTrips.org or 756-TRIP.
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B-BOARD 28
T H E AT E R
DA NCE
OCT. 30-31
NIGHTMARE AT SPARK: A Cage of Death,
mad scientists, and shocking sounds and
displays will be part of Frankenstein-inspired
electrical show, “Nightmare at the Spark Museum,” at 7pm Wednesday and Thursday at the
Spark Museum of Electrical Invention, 1312
Bay St. Tickets are $8-$10.
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
WWW.SPARKMUSEUM.ORG
PHOTO BY GENARO PHOTOGRAPHY
GET OUT 16
WORDS 14
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
10.30.13
#44.08
CASCADIA WEEKLY
18
PROF I L ES
ONSTAGE
BY AMY KEPFERLE
Thrillingham
DANCING LIKE THE DEAD
ellingham has an affinity for zombies. For proof of this, I hearken
back to the first live “Thriller” performance I saw a handful of years
ago. In that instance—the year singer Michael Jackson departed
from his mortal coil—“Thrillingham” performers stopped traffic on Holly
Street on Halloween night in order to shuffle like the undead for the crowd
of costumed revelers.
In the years since, “Thrillingham” performers have transformed themselves into fearsome, flesh-eating zombies and turned up in locales in
Fairhaven and downtown Bellingham every Oct. 31, ready to share their
spooky song-and-dance routine.
Kamea Black, the coordinator for this year’s “Thrillingham,” says the years
she’s spent being part of the party—two as a performer and two as an organizer—have shown her that pretty cool things happen when Bellinghamsters gather together for a common cause.
Black says there are a variety of reasons the dancers practice their moves
through October and spend their Halloween nights dressing up like zombies.
“We have the ‘I am new to Bellingham and I need to get out,’ the single
mom dancing with her kids, the zombie enthusiasts, the ‘I was brought into
this by someone who wouldn’t dance alone,’ the coffeehouse manager, the
girlfriends, the introverts trying to break out of their comfort zone, lots of
students, and, of course, a few Michael Jackson fans,” she says.
B
“The neatest thing is watching these people
as they struggle with all of the steps—there
are a lot of steps—and then seeing them get
it,” Black adds. “When they stick with me, and
they practice, they get more and more confident in themselves and their body movements.
Seeing them so happy,
so excited and proud of
themselves literally brings
tears to my eyes.”
Although not everybody
who learns the moves
chooses to share them on
the horrifying holiday,
most do, and Black says
SEE IT
those who can meet up a
WHAT:
couple hours before the
“Thrillingham”
performances to eat, do
WHEN: 8:30pm
each other’s makeup, shred
Thurs., Oct. 31
costumes and take part in
WHERE: Maritime
Heritage Park, 500
last-minute rehearsals.
W. Holly St.
From there, the horde
COST: Free
of 100-plus zombies—
INFO: www.
who have been taught to
bellinghamzombies.
groan, moan, snarl and
com
generally act like they’re
crazy for brains—march from a secret locale
through downtown.
“It is like something from a movie, and it feeds
on itself, so by the time everyone gets to the
park they are ready to thrill your socks off,” Black
says of the big reveal.
Diverging from past years, this Thursday’s
performance will take place at one locale only—
Maritime Heritage Park. Attendees should secure a spot before 8:30pm, when “Thrillingham”
will get underway. (Another change this year
is that a percentage of funds raised by dancer
contributions, donations and onsite merch and
beverage sales will go to Womencare Shelter of
Whatcom County.)
Black says other surprises are in store for those
who brave the zombies at Maritime Heritage
Park, including additional dance performances
from several local studios, Michael- and Janet
Jackson-inspired dancers, and more.
“Think Halloween variety show, followed by a
community dance party,” Black says.
When asked why she thinks viewers should add
Maritime Heritage Park’s zombie party to their
Halloween haunts, Black recalls a moment before last year’s show when one of the youngest
zombies rushed up to her and, with a huge smile,
pointed out all the people that were there to see
her dance.
“She reminded me why I was there,” Black
says, “Why we were all there—to create community, and have some Halloween fun!”
HAUNTED BEER GARDEN: Boundary Bay and
Make.Shift team up for “Nightmare on Railroad
Avenue: A Haunted House” from 7-11pm
Wednesday and Thursday at the brewery’s
beer garden at 1107 Railroad Ave. Live actors,
chilling details and unbelievable scares will be
part of the fearsome fun. Entry is $5.
WWW.BBAYBREWERY.COM
THURS., OCT. 31
HALLOWEEN HELLINGHAM: The improvised
murder mystery known as “Hellingham” comes
back to life for a final night at 8pm and 10pm
shows at the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St.
Tickets are $10-$12.
733-8855 OR WWW.THEUPFRONT.COM
OCT. 31-NOV. 2
ROCK Y HORROR: Local actors will act out
key scenes and sing songs at viewings of the
classic camp film known as The Rocky Horror
Picture Show at 8pm and 11:59pm Oct. 31-Nov.
2 at the Mount Baker Theatre’s Walton Theatre,
104 N. Commercial St. Tickets are $9.
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
NOV. 1-2
NO EXIT: Northwest Passage Theater Collective presents a newly translated version of
Jean-Paul Sarte’s existential masterpiece, No
Exit, this weekend at 8pm and 10pm shows
Friday and Saturday at iDiOM Theater, 1318
Cornwall Ave. Tickets to the performance—
which was directed by Glenn Hergenhahn, and
features actors he’s been working with in New
York City—are $10.
WWW.IDOMTHEATER.COM
BLENDER: Improvisers from throughout
Washington and Canada will join local performers for “Blender” shows 8pm and 10pm
Friday and Saturday at the Upfront Theatre,
1208 Bay St. Additional shows happen Nov.
8-9. Tickets are $10-$12.
733-8855 OR WWW.THEUPFRONT.COM
SAT., NOV. 2
ROCK Y HORROR REDUX: If you missed the
viewings in Bellingham, head to Mount Vernon
for an interactive showing of The Rocky Horror
Picture Show at 8pm at the Lincoln Theatre,
712 S. First St. Iconic drag queen Betty Desire
will emcee the event. Tickets are $8-$12, and
$5 prop bags will also be available.
WWW.LINCOLNTHEATRE.ORG
NOV. 2-3
ANNIE: Lyric Light Opera presents showings
of the perennially popular musical known as
Annie at 7:30m Saturday and 2pm Sunday at
Mount Vernon’s McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College
Way. Tickets are $22-$25 and additional showings happen through Nov. 17.
WWW.MCINT YREHALL.ORG
SUN., NOV. 3
DYNAMO: Liven up your Sunday nights at
“Dynamo” shows at 8pm at the Upfront The-
DA NCE
FRI., NOV. 1
WITCH’S BALL: Don a costume and dance
to fabulously wicked tunes at a “Witch’s
Ball” starting with an American Tango
lesson at 7:30pm at the Bellingham Dance
Company, 1705 N. State St. Tickets are
$5-$7.
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One Surprise After Another
360-592-2297
www.everybodys.com
Hiway 9 – Van Zandt
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WWW.BELLINGHAMDANCECOMPANY.COM
NOV. 1-2
CABARE T: Attendees can expect to see collaborative performances focusing on everything from dance to theater, song, poetry
and improvisation at semiannual “Cabaret”
performances at 8pm Friday and Saturday at
Western Washington University’s Performing
Arts Center, room 16. Tickets are $5.
Aperture Electrical
Cultivating symbiotic relationships
to improve community and the
environment
650-6146 OR WWW.TICKETS.WWU.EDU
B-BOARD 28
‡†‹–ƒ–‹˜‡—•‹…
FILM 26
WWW.ACOUSTICTAVERN.COM
MUSIC 22
GUFFAWINGHAM: A weekly open mic for
comedians, dubbed “Guffawingham!,” takes
place at 8pm Mondays at the Green Frog,
1015 N. State St. Entry is free.
Local Blueberry Mead
Beautiful Floral Aprons
Skillets & Sauce Pans
Bracelets & Necklaces
Sandwiches & Espresso
Cajun Chicken Sausage
Award Winning Cheeses
ART 20
MON., NOV. 4
STAGE 18
733-8855 OR WWW.THEUPFRONT.COM
GET OUT 16
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›•–‹…ƒŽ•’‡…–•‘ˆŠ”‹•–‹ƒ”ƒ†‹–‹‘
atre, 1208 Bay St. The performances feature
12 improvisers vying for the “Dynamo” title
through a series of games and elimination
rounds. Entry is $5.
FOOD 34
‘‘‹‰ˆ‘”ƒ‡•’‹–‡‹›‘—”‡‡ǫ
doit
MOMIX: Modern dance will take center
stage when the MOMIX returns to Bellingham with its “Botanica” show at 7:30pm at
the Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St. The piece by the acclaimed dance
company will “conjure a world of surrealistic
images using light, shadow, props, humor
and the human body. Tickets are $20-$42.
734-6080 OR
Garrett Chomka
[email protected]
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
360-421-3963
CURRENTS 10
MON., NOV. 4
VIEWS 8
Electrical
*Preventative Maintenance
*Systems Testing & Analysis
*Construction
*NFPA 70e Updates
*Thermal Imaging
MAIL 4
380-0456
Photographic
*Site Management
*Incident Response
*Real Estate/Marketing
*Weddings, Events
& Artistic Ventures
DO IT 2
FOLK DANCE PART Y: Orkstar RTW will
play traditional dance and folk music from
Bulgaria, Macedonia, and Serbia at tonight’s
Folk Dance Party from 7:30-10:30pm at the
Fairhaven Library, 1117 12th St. All ages are
welcome, and no experience or partner is
necessary. Suggested donation is $15.
WORDS 14
SAT., NOV. 2
19
Find out why "Hell is other people" when the
Northwest Passage Theater Collective presents
showings of Jean-Paul Sartre's No Exit Nov.
1-2 at iDiOM Theater
doit
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
visual
OPEN I NGS
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
JOEL BROCK
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
G A L L ER I ES
BY AMY KEPFERLE
Art’s Alive!
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
ANOTHER REASON TO LOVE LA CONNER
20
t press time, the powers that be at La Conner’s Skagit County Historical Museum were in a quandary. They’d recently heard that celebrated
Skagit County painter and multimedia artist Joel Brock had passed
away over the weekend, and the exhibit of his they had planned to open Nov.
1 suddenly took a backseat to the fact that a supremely creative talent was gone.
Ultimately, the museum decided not to present the full exhibit at this time,
and are working on putting together a retrospective of Brock’s paintings, with
a tentative plan for a Friday evening reception at the museum (for confirmation, call (360) 466-3365 or go to www.skagitcounty.net/museum).
Brock’s untimely passing will likely be a subject of many conversations and
fond remembrances this weekend, when the town presents the 29th annual
Art’s Alive!, a three-day celebration of Northwest art and artists that sees
both locals and visitors exploring art at a variety of venues throughout the
scenic small town.
“It’s a small community, but we’ve got big dreams”—a comment made by
a participating artist on a short video touting the event—might as well be
the tagline for the shindig, which aims to highlight both longtime profes-
A
P ROF I L E S
sional artists (such as Jack Gunter, Theodora Jonsson, Steve Klein, Becky Fletcher,
Roger Cocke, Kathleen Faulkner, and others) as well as those who are still “emerging” and making names for themselves (Dee
Doyle, Mit Harlan, Dassy Shellenberger, Gary
Giovane, Lindsay Kohles, and Patti Sayre are
on the list).
The aforementioned artists will all be
showing their works
at Maple Hall starting
Nov. 1 and continuing through Nov. 3, but
that’s only the tip of
the artistic iceberg.
For example, Gallery
Cygnus will be highlightATTEND ing a one-woman show
WHAT: 29th
by printmaker and sculpannual “Art’s
tor Jean Behnke through
Alive!”
the weekend (and beWHEN: Nov. 1-3
yond). At the Museum of
WHERE:
Northwest Art (MoNA),
Throughout La
Conner
there will be demos by
COST: Most
glass artists, carvers
events are free
and fiber artists. EarthINFO: www.
works Gallery, Salon
lovelaconner.com
Rouge, Caravan Gallery,
Wood Merchant and others will also open
their doors.
Additionally, groups such as Skagit Artists Together and Art League North will
be exhibiting and demonstrating various
works at community gathering venues
such as the La Conner Civic Garden Club
and the La Conner Retirement Inn. And the
list goes on (visit the website listed in the
info box to see the full roster of events).
Also worth mentioning are demonstrations by Guinness World Record fire walker
Trevor McGhee at various times throughout
Saturday and again at the end of the long
weekend, when art has been perused and
those who have bought works to share in
their homes or for early Christmas gives
have safely stowed away their fine art finds.
While there’s no doubt the weekend-long
event would be even richer if Joel Brock
were there to share his art at the Skagit
County Historical Museum, Art’s Alive! is
the perfect time to pay your respects to a
Skagit Valley artist who took in the beauty
of his surroundings and translated them
into his own unique visions. Raise your
glasses to him, and take a moment to realize how blessed we all are to live in a corner of the world that inspires so many.
U P COM I NG E V EN TS
FRI., NOV. 1
GALLERY WALK: Peruse a variety of works
at various venues from 6-9pm as part of the
monthly Gallery Walk happening throughout
downtown Anacortes. Entry is free.
WWW.ANACORTESART.COM
ART WALK: Fourth Corner Frames, Dreamspace Studios, Downtown Emporium, the
Stamp & Coin Place, Make.Shift, Dakota Art
Store, Studio UFO, and others will take part in
the monthly Art Walk from 6-10pm throughout downtown Bellingham. Entry is free.
WWW.DOWNTOWNBELLINGHAM.COM
STUDIO UFO: View new work speaking to the
catastrophe of climate change at an opening
reception for Trish Harding’s “Hot Water: The
Tipping Point” from 6-10pm at Studio UFO,
301 W. Holly St. Music and refreshments will
be part of the event.
WWW.STUDIOUFO.NET
MAKESHIF T: A second reception for
“Mutants ‘R’ Us” takes place from 6-10pm at
Make.Shift Art Space, 306 Flora St. The group
show featuring works based on superheros
(with a few twists) will continue to show
through Nov. 23.
WWW.MAKESHIFTPROJECT.COM
IDEAL: Western Washington University
Industrial Design students will show off the
toys they’ve created with repurposed materials as part of the annual ReMade Project at an
opening reception from 6-9pm at Ideal, 1227
Cornwall Ave.
WWW.ANIDEALSHOP.COM
FISHBOY GALLERY: Head out of downtown
proper to view the works of contemporary
folk artist RR Clark from 6-10pm at the
FishBoy Gallery, 617 Virginia St. (near Trader
Joe’s).
714-0815 OR WWW.FISHBOYGALLERY.COM
NOV. 1-2
ARTS & CRAF TS FAIR: Works by local
artisans and crafters will be for sale at this
weekend’s Harvest Arts & Crafts Fair from
9am-5pm Friday and Saturday at the Bellingham Senior Activity Center, 315 Halleck St.
Admission is free.
733-4030
UNCOMMON THREADS: The Whidbey Weavers Guild will host its 10th annual “Uncommon Threads” Show & Sale from 10am-7pm
Friday and 10am-4pm Saturday at Greenbank
Farm, 765 Wonn St.
WWW.WHIDBEYWEAVERSGUILD.ORG
TEN THOUSAND VILLAGES: Fair-trade jewelry, pottery, home decor and much more will
be part of the 26th annual Ten Thousand Village Crafts of the World Sale from 9am-8pm
Friday and Saturday at Good News Fellowship
Church, 1252 W. Axton Rd.
WWW.TENTHOUSANDVILLAGES.COM
SAT., NOV. 2
ARTS & CRAF TS FAIRE: An Arts & Crafts
Faire occurs from 9am-3pm at Saint James
Presbyterian Church, 910 14th St. All proceeds benefit local charities for women and
children.
733-1325
doit
FOOD 34
SMITH & VALLEE OPENING: View new
furniture in a variety of styles and woods at
a reception and wood shop open house from
5-8pm at Edison’s Smith & Vallee Gallery,
5742 Gilkey Ave.
WWW.SMITHANDVALLEE.COM
B-BOARD 28
NOV. 2-3
CRAF T BAZAAR: The Chuckanut Square
Activity Club will host its annual Craft Bazaar
and Bake Sale from 9am-4pm Saturday and
10am-3pm Sunday at Chuckanut Square, 1400
12th St.
FILM 26
922-7940
SUN., NOV. 3
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
VANISHING ICE OPENING: The long-anticipated “Vanishing Ice: Alpine and Polar Landscapes in Art 1775-2012” opens today from
12-5pm at Whatcom Museum’s Lightcatcher
Building, 250 Flora St. The exhibit introduces
the rich artistic legacy of the planet’s frozen
frontiers now threatened by climate change,
a phenomena understood by the public primarily through news of devastating climactic
events. The engaging exhibit will be on
display through March 2.
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.COM
GET OUT 16
ONGOI NG E X H I BI TS
ANCHOR ART: The multi-artist “Dry Ice:
Shaping the Northwest Landscape” exhibit
will be up through Nov. 24 in Anacortes at
Anchor Art Space, 216 Commercial Ave.
GOOD EARTH: Jayme Curley’s works will be
highlighted through November at Good Earth
Pottery, 1000 Harris Ave.
WWW.GOODEARTHPOTS.COM
LUCIA DOUGLAS: View new sculptures
by Lummi Island artist Ann Morris and new
paintings by Matthew Waddington and E.V.
Wick through Nov. 9 at Lucia Douglas Gallery,
1415 13th St.
New Clone Connection
Largest selection
of clones in
Bellingham
MAIL 4
714-0815 OR WWW.FISHBOYGALLERY.COM
VIEWS 8
FISHBOY GALLERY: Check out the contemporary folk art of RR Clark from 1:30-5pm
every Mon.-Fri. at the FishBoy Gallery, 617
Virginia St.
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
WWW.ANCHORARTSPACE.OR
DO IT 2
WWW.LUCIADOUGLAS.COM
ST. JOSEPH’S: “Contemporary Aboriginal Art:
Australian Dreamings” shows through Jan. 26 at
PeaceHealth St. Joseph’s Medical Center,.
WWW.LUCIADOUGLAS.COM
WESTERN GALLERY: “Looking Back:
Photography in the ’70s” shows through Nov.
22 on the Western Washington University
campus at Western Gallery.
First Time Patients
recieve free Edible
and
Refer a patient for
a free pre-roll.
WWW.WESTERNGALLERY.WWU.EDU
WHATCOM MUSEUM: “Treasures from the
Trunk: The Story of J.J. Donovan” and “Romantically Modern: Pacific Northwest Landscapes” can currently be viewed at Whatcom
Museum’s Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St.
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
Open 10am-7pm Mon-Sun
360-733-3838
1326 E. Laurel St.
Bellingham, WA 98225
samishwayholistic.com
CASCADIA WEEKLY
WWW.MUSEUMOFNWART.ORG
#44.08
10.30.13
MONA: Spokane artist Ric Gendron’s “Rattlebone” exhibit can be seen through Jan. 5 at
La Conner’s Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S.
First St. “Geology from the Permanent Collection” is also on display.
21
FOOD 34
music
BY CAREY ROSS
Frankie Avalon
CROONING THROUGH THE AGES
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC
22
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
SHOW PREVIEWS › › RUMOR HAS IT
22
hen one thinks of Frankie Avalon, it’s likely an image such
as the one above is what comes to mind: him, on a beach
with costar Annette Funicello, looking like they’re about
to scare up some good, clean—and probably musically inclined—fun.
The image is certainly an iconic one—and not just for those of the
era when “beach party” movies ruled the silver screen. In fact, the duo
of Frankie and Annette looms large across time and generations, this
squeaky-clean pair symbolizing a simpler time and harmless—albeit
somewhat sandy—antics by the sea.
But I’m getting a little ahead of myself here, because before Avalon
was a beach-blanket heartthrob, he’d already had an entire successful
musical career. Indeed, his pairing with Funicello was the second act
in a career that has had many acts and is still ongoing, even though
he’s left the beach behind for good.
Before he became Beach Blanket Frankie, Avalon was Teen Idol
Frankie, a distinction he wore with seeming ease and a role for which
he was actually better suited than many of his contemporaries. Avalon notched his status as a teenage dream neatly between the Twist
craze of 1960 and the Beatles-led British Invasion of 1964. Avalon
was the first of the massively popular pretty boys that would characterize this musical era, however, unlike his counterparts who would
come later—such as Fabian and Bobby Rydell—Avalon had the musical
W
chops to match his perfectly coiffed hair
and matinee-idol looks.
In fact, Avalon got his start, not as
a dreamy crooner of love songs, but as
a trumpet prodigy, and it was as a horn
player that he’d planned to make his musical mark. However, fate intervened in
the form of Bob Marcucci, who discovered
Avalon for his pipes rather than his horn,
eventually giving the aspiring musician his
first record deal.
What would follow would be an unprecedented string of hits including “Dede Dinah,” “Venus” (his biggest hit and the first
to nab the number-one slot of the Top 40
chart), and more. In fact, during that first
year, Avalon would chart an astonishing
six records in the Top 40, and his reign of
supremacy over popular music would continue for the next couple of years.
However, it wasn’t long before four lads
from Liverpool came along, effectively
Rumor Has It
As I type this, Bellingham is gearing up for the
collective insanity known as Halloween. Which is
really just an excuse for the City of Subdued Excitement to shed its mild-mannered exterior for one
night, revealing a strange and sordid underbelly.
In other words, you people are about to go a
little crazy.
Because they asked me nicely and I generally
do everything they tell me, Make.Shift would like
me to tell you that if: 1. You’re reading this before Nov. 1 and 2. You’re a person who thinks a
haunted house is the best time you can have that
might involve both crying and peeing your pants
(read: you’re pretty much everyone), they’re taking
over Boundary Bay’s beer garden at 7pm Oct. 3031 and transforming it into a haunted house. The
entrance is a paltry $5—which is a screaming deal
if you know anything about the going rate for admission at haunted
houses. Make.Shift
claims the whole
thing is a fundraiser, but I’m pretty
sure it’s just an excuse to scare the
dickens out of the
general population.
BY CAREY ROSS
As proof of that is
the warning that their haunted house, while open
to all ages, might scare the little ones into a lifetime of sleeping at the foot of their parents’ bed.
If you opt to bring the kids, it might be prudent
not to make them lead the way or bring up the rear
because you will hear about that shit for the rest
of your lives, much like I’ve never let my mother
forget about the time she left me at the bowling
alley and didn’t realize it until she got home.
As usual, I digress.
In other pertinent Make.Shift matters comes
word that one of the fire exits they’re currently
building into the space is done—a fact I can verify, having seen it with my own two eyes. Work
continues to get the space up to code, but the
nonprofit hopes to resume live music there by the
turn of the New Year. That date is, of course, tentative pending continuing renovation and inspection and a whole lot of sweat and maybe a little
magic, but all-ages music is once again on the
near-term horizon, and lo, we all rejoice.
Continuing the theme of things people would
like me to tell you is the Wild Buffalo urging you
to invest in tickets for the Nov. 8 Vanessa Carlton
show should you have an interest in doing such
a thing. I’d like to remind you that Carlton has
walked a thousand miles to be with you. Which is
the exact same distance the Proclaimers walked
to fall down at your door, but on the whole, I’d
rather find Carlton on my porch after a thousandmile hike than the Proclaimers—unless they were
there to explain, once and for all, exactly what
“havering” is. What I’m trying to say here is get
your Vanessa Carlton tickets while you still can or
the Proclaimers will show up at your doorstep and
haver all over you.
And with that, I’ve pretty much gone off the
rails completely. I guess my work here is done.
WED., OCT. 30
100 N. Commercial St. next to Mount Baker Theatre X 360-594-6000 X bellinghampasta.com
s&URNITURE
FRI., NOV. 1
SANFORD-HILL PIANO SERIES: Internationally renowned Italian pianist Benedetto
Lupo performs at the first Sanford-Hill Piano
Series of the season at 7:30pm at Western
Washington University’s Performing Arts
Center. Tickets are $9-$24.
#ONSIGNBY!PPOINTMENT
s/UTDOOR
360-650-1177
s#OLLECTIBLES
s!NTIQUES
#ORNWALL!VENUEs"ELLINGHAM7!
AMPM-ONDAYTHROUGH3ATURDAY
s!RT-ORE
650-6146 OR WWW.TICKETS.WWU.EDU
LEO KOT TKE: Acclaimed acoustic guitarist,
singer and composer Leo Kottke returns to
Bellingham for a solo performance at 8pm at
Western Washington University’s Performing
Arts Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $32.
650-6146 OR WWW.TICKETS.WWU.EDU
SUN., NOV. 3
REISCHMAN AND MILLER: Mandolin
master John Reischman and guitar guru John
Miller will perform at a CD release concert
for their Road Trip album at 2pm at the YWCA
Ballroom, 1026 N. Forest St. Tickets will be
$15 at the door.
PEP PER
SISTERS
COOKING OUTSIDE THE BOX
Open Nightly Except Monday
WWW.JOHNREISCHMAN.COM
MAIL 4
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKERTHEATRE.COM
650-3130
B’ham 671-3414
VIEWS 8
WHATCOM SYMPHONY: Grammy awardwinning violin virtuoso Gil Shaman will be
the featured performer at today’s Whatcom
Symphony Orchestra concert at 3pm at the
Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St.
Tickets are $12-$49.
DRUMART ICA: The Slovenian percussion
duo known as Drumartica will play a variety
of pieces by international composers as well
as a commissioned work by WWU faculty
composer Bruce Hamilton at a free concert
at 8pm at the school’s Performing Arts Center, room 16. The public is welcome.
1055 N State St
SINCE 1988
CURRENTS 10
SAT., NOV. 2
MUSIC 22
MUSIC
22
Quality Household Furnishings
s(OUSEHOLD
ART 20
WWW.JANSNARTCENTER.ORG
STAGE 18
ANDY KOCH: Bluesman Andy “Badd Dog”
Koch performs at a free gig from 5:307:30pm at Lynden’s Jansen Art Center, 321
Front St.
FILM 26
THURS., OCT. 31
GET OUT 16
734-6080 OR WWW.MOUNTBAKETHEATRE.COM
Every plate
made from
scratch,
Everyday
WORDS 14
VE TERANS CHOIR: Renditions of doo-wop,
soul, gospel and pop tunes can be heard
when the award-winning New Directions
Veterans Choir perform at 7:30pm at the
Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St.
Tickets to see the a cappella ensemble—
many of whom are veterans who became
homeless following their military service—
are $20-$39.
Remember
to Vote.
#44.08
WED., NOV. 6
MUSIC CLUB CONCERT: Cellist Nick Strobel
and pianist Nancy Heyer will be joined by
fellow musicians for a free Bellingham Music
Club concert at 10:30am at Trinity Lutheran
Church, 119 Texas St.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
ending the stint of classic crooning that
characterized Avalon and his ilk. However,
unlike most of his contemporaries, Avalon’s
career was to experience a second coming,
thanks, in large part, to the considerable
talent and charm of a beloved Mouseketeer.
The Disney darling
was, of course, the incomparable Annette Funicello, and she and Avalon would spend most
ATTEND of the mid-’60s starring
WHO: Frankie
in such sandy cinematic
Avalon
classics as Beach Party
WHEN: 8pm Fri.,
and Beach Blanket Bingo.
Nov. 8
The
iconic pairing furWHERE: Silver
Reef Casino,
ther cemented Avalon’s
Haxton Way at
status as not only an
Slater Road,
engaging singer and enFerndale
tertainer, but also one of
COST: $32.50
the good guys. Proof of
MORE INFO:
www.silver
that could be found in
reefcasino.com
the enduring friendship
between the matinee idol and the Mouseketeer, one that continued until Funicello’s
death earlier this year.
Most performers only get one career arc,
much less two, and if Avalon had faded
into respectable semi-obscurity, content
that he’d earned his place in musical history, no one would’ve been surprised.
But the crooner-turned-matinee-idol
had other plans.
Avalon’s next iteration would also involve the big screen, and although his role
would be smaller, his performance would
have that iconic quality that has characterized so much of his life as a performer.
The year was 1978, the character was simply dubbed “Teen Angel,” and “Grease” was
most definitely the word.
In a scene that screams “somehow we
got Frankie Avalon to film a cameo and we
are going to make the most of it,” Avalon
sings “Beauty School Dropout” to Frenchy
with all the panache of a career crooner.
Grease was an immediate and resounding
success, and in the time it took Teen Angel
to direct Frenchy to “Turn in your teasin’
comb and go back to high school,” Avalon
had introduced himself to a whole new audience. And, given the kind of longevity
Grease has enjoyed, that is an introduction
that is made over and over again from one
generation to the next.
These days, Avalon has come full circle.
Instead of redefining himself yet again,
he’s mining his various past lives for the
ample material that makes up his concerts.
He knows people come to hear the classics, and unlike some artists that have to
reconcile themselves to all aspects of their
back catalogs, Avalon revels in his. Now 73
years old, he remains the charming, babyfaced crooner—and he’s still one of the
good guys.
FOOD 34
Ravioli Night
every Thursday
5-9pm
B-BOARD 28
RESTAURANT X RETAIL X CATERING
DO IT 2
musicevents
10.30.13
FRANKIE AVALON, FROM PAGE 22
671-0252
MIKE ALLEN QUARTE T: Renowned
trombonist Julian Priester will join the Mike
Allen Quartet for a 7:30pm concert at the
Bellingham Arts Academy for Youth, 1059 N.
State St. The gig is part of a monthly concert series with the quartet, which recently
reconvened after a year on sabbatical.
Tickets are $8-$10.
WWW.JAZZPROJECT.ORG
A message from the
23
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
10.30.13
10.31.13
11.01.13
11.02.13
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Karaoke w/Kristina
Karaoke w/Kristina
Karaoke w/Kristina
Bobby Lee's Pub &
Eatery
Boundary Bay
Brewery
Make.Shift Haunted House
(Beer Garden), Aaron
Guest (Taproom)
Brown Lantern Ale
House
ART 20
Commodore Ballroom
Conway Muse
Pacific High
The Dark Blue
Kevin Lawell
Billy Talent, Mystery
MacHine
Halloween Party
AFI, Touche Amore, Coming
Iron and Wine, Laura
Mvula
Megan Hicks
Dark Stories, Acts; Halloween Party
Dan Rixon (early)
GET OUT 16
TUESDAY
Glow Nightclub
Halloween w/Boombox
Boy Meets Girl
IRON AND WINE/
Nov. 3/Commodore
Ballroom
Tim Hicks, Blackjack
Billy
Ben Starner
Scary Monster and the Super
Creeps
SmokeWagon
Boombox
Bellewood Acres 6140 Guide Meridian, Lynden • (360) 318-7720 | Blue Horse Gallery 301 W. Holly St. • 671-2305 | Bobby Lee’s Pub & Eatery 108 W Main St, Everson • 966-8838 | Boundary Bay Brewing Co. 1107
Railroad Ave • 647-5593 | Brown Lantern Ale House 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 293-2544 | The Business 402 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 293-9788 | Cabin Tavern 307 W. Holly St. • 733-9685 |
Chuckanut Brewery 601 W Holly St. • 752-3377 | Commodore Ballroom 868 Granville St., Vancouver • (604) 739-4550 | Conway Muse 18444 Spruce/Main St., Conway (360) 445-3000
Pick Out A Free Gift November 2!
Pic
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
MONDAY
Paul Klein (Taproom)
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
10.30.13
#44.08
SUNDAY
Make.Shift Haunted House
(Beer Garden), Halloween
Bash (Taproom)
Edison Inn
CASCADIA WEEKLY
11.03.13 11.04.13 11.05.13
Open Mic
Cabin Tavern
STAGE 18
MUSIC
22
MUSIC 22
musicvenues
Pick A Birthday
Present & Win
Up To $1000!
Every Friday and Saturday in
November, hourly from 7pm to
10pm. Drawing winners will get to
pick a present and win cash up to
$1000! Winners Club Members get a
FREE entry the day of each drawing.
Starting at 3pm and
S
St
while
w
h supplies last,
Winners Club MemW
mbers
b
be
e can choose from
om
m
our
o
ou
u selection of free
ee
gifts!
g
gi
iff Choose from
om
m
wine glasses, rollwi
llll-ing
in
g cooler bags,
picture frames and
pi
nd
nd
more! One item
m
per person.
pe
The Best Of Land And
Sea Every Friday!
Northwood’s Surf & Turf Buffet features a different shrimp and shell¿sh specialty each week,
fresh seafood entrees, and a carving station
with rotating beef specialties. Lunch is served
from 11am to 2pm and dinner is served from
5pm to 9pm. Only $16.95.
24
Where the fun and food never ends!
P P P' G H H D L : < D < : L B G H L ' < H F
2 0 . ) G H K M A P H H = K H : = E R G = > G P :
1 0 0' 0 0 0' 2 1 - 0
11.02.13
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Jon Dee Graham and Mike
June
Polecat, Br'er Rabbit
McTuff, Crack Sabbath
Bradford Loomis, The Local
Strangers
Slow Jam, Open Mic (late)
Penny Stinkers
DJ Yogoman's Terrible
Tuesday Soul Explosion
DJ Triple Crown
Richard Allen and the Louisiana Experience (early), DJ
Sainte (late)
Live Music
Live Music
Pretty Little Feet
The Shadies
Halloween Party w/Mudflat
Walkers
McKay's Taphouse
Live Music
Rumors
The Shakedown
Rattletrap Ruckus
GET OUT 16
DJ Dgas
WORDS 14
DJ Dgas
Art Walk w/DJ Windham Earle
Karaoke
Karaoke
Karaoke, DJ
Karaoke, DJ Partyrock
GIFT OF GAB/
Nov. 2/Shakedown
Leveled w/Owlets, 49th
Parallel, Shortwave
Halloween Party
DJ Postal, DJ Shortwave
DJ Mike Tolleson
DJ Postal
Karaoke w/Zach
Heavy Rotation
Horror Business, Pantera
Lives, Motley Crew
Purple Rain, Bone Machine,
Pictures of You
Gift of Gab, Landon Wordswell,
more
PIMPS OF JOYTIME/
Nov. 1/Wild Buffalo
Tom Waits Monday
Aireeoke
The Guy Johnson Band
The Guy Johnson Band
DJ Clint Westwood
Latigo Lace
Steve Faucher
Stirred Not Shaken
Karaoke
Open Mic
Pimps of Joytime, Megatron
Dance Yrself Clean
Square Dance w/Lucas
Hicks
Mic Night
Comedy in the Buff
Silver Reef Hotel
Casino & Spa
Skagit Valley Casino
Skylark's
EDM Night
Karaoke
Halloween Party
The Village Inn
Wild Buffalo
Wild Out Wednesday w/
Blessed Coast
Acorn Project, Medium Troy,
more
The Green Frog 1015 N. State St. • www.acoustictavern.com | Edison Inn 5829 Cains Ct., Edison • (360) 766-6266 | Glow 202 E. Holly St. • 734-3305 | Graham’s Restaurant 9989 Mount Baker Hwy., Glacier • (360)
599-3663 | H20, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 755-3956 | Honey Moon 1053 N State St. • 734-0728 | Kulshan Brewery 2238 James St. • 389-5348 | Make.Shift Art Space 306 Flora St. • 389-3569 | Lighthouse
Bar & Grill One Bellwether Way • ( 360) 392-3200 | Main Street Bar & Grill 2004 Main St., Ferndale • ( 360) 384-2982 | McKay’s Taphouse 1118 E. Maple St. • (360) 647-3600 | Nooksack River Casino 5048 Mt. Baker
Hwy., Deming • (360) 354-7428 | Poppe’s 714 Lakeway Dr. • 671-1011 | Paso Del Norte 758 Peace Portal Dr. Blaine • (360) 332-4045 | The Redlight 1017 N State St. • www.redlightwineandcoffee.com | Rockfish Grill
320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes • (360) 588-1720 | The Royal 208 E. Holly St. • 738-3701 | Rumors Cabaret 1119 Railroad Ave. • 671-1849 | The Shakedown 1212 N. State St. • www.shakedownbellingham.com |
Silver Reef Casino 4876 Haxton Way, Ferndale • (360) 383-0777 | Skagit Valley Casino Resort 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow • (360) 724-7777 | Skylark’s Hidden Cafe 1300 11th St. • 715-3642 | Swinomish Casino 12885
Casino Dr., Anacortes • (888) 288-8883 |Temple Bar 306 W. Champion St. • 676-8660 | The Underground 211 E. Chestnut St. • 738-3701 | Underground Coffeehouse Viking Union 3rd Floor, WWU | Village Inn Pub
3020 Northwest Ave. • 734-2490 | Washington Sips 608 1st. St., La Conner • (360)399-1037 | Wild Buffalo 208 W. Holly St. • www.wildbuffalo.net | To get your live music listings included in this esteemed newsprint,
send info to [email protected] Deadlines are always at 5pm Friday.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
The Underground
Boogie Sundays
Live Music
Paso Del Norte
Royal
Live Music
Electric Fuzz
Old World Deli
Redlight
The Devilly Brothers
STAGE 18
Country Karaoke
The Heebie Jeebies
MUSIC 22
MUSIC
22
16 Sparrows
CURRENTS 10
Main St. Bar and Grill
Dead Musicians Costume
Party
VIEWS 8
Kulshan Brewery
Open Mic w/Tad Kroening
MAIL 4
Honey Moon
ART 20
H2O
11.03.13 11.04.13 11.05.13
FOOD 34
11.01.13
FILM 26
10.31.13
DO IT 2
Green Frog
10.30.13
10.30.13
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
B-BOARD 28
musicvenues
25
FOOD 34
film
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
MOVIE REVIEWS › › SHOWTIMES
ART 20
,
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
At face value, the film
presents an electrifying
star-wars scenario while at
the same time managing
to deliver a higher
pedagogical message
about tolerance, empathy
and coping under pressure
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 8
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
10.30.13
#44.08
CASCADIA WEEKLY
26
doing so by focusing on the interpersonal dynamics between the various squad
members. Though Card may have publicly
revealed his own prejudices, the casting
department has assembled a wonderfully
diverse group of actors—male and female,
they come in all colors, shapes and sizes—
to serve alongside Ender. Generally speaking, these aren’t your typical Teen Nick
selects; instead, the film counts two teen
Oscar nominees (Hailee Steinfeld as squadmate Petra and Abigail Breslin as his sister
Valentine) among its solid young ensemble.
So much youthful energy onscreen makes
Ford seem tired and weary by comparison.
Still, it’s a treat to discover Han Solo all
buttoned up and back to do more space
REVIEWED BY PETER DEBRUGE
Ender’s Game
THIS KID’S NO KATNISS
n anti-bullying allegory writ on the largest possible scale, Ender’s
Game frames an interstellar battle between mankind and pushy ant-like
aliens, called Formics, in which Earth’s fate hinges on a tiny group of
military cadets, most of whom haven’t even hit puberty yet. At face value, the
film presents an electrifying star-wars scenario—that rare case where an epic
space battle transpires entirely within the span of two hours—while at the
same time managing to deliver a higher pedagogical message about tolerance,
empathy and coping under pressure.
Card’s novel assumes a situation where, in the wake of a massive Formic attack, the world’s children are somehow best suited to protect their planet from
an imminent second strike. The most promising young recruits train on elaborate
videogame-like simulators while a pair of officers—Col. Hyrum Graff (Harrison
Ford) and Major Gwen Anderson (Viola Davis)—monitor their techniques in search
of “the One,” a child with the strategic instincts to save his species. The leading
candidate is Ender Wiggin (Asa Butterfield), a runt-like outsider whose behavior
toward his aggressive classmates reveals his true potential.
Like The Hunger Games, the film peddles the unseemly idea of watching kids
thrust into life-and-death situations. Though they’re not instructed to kill one
another, these moppets’ prime directive should also give parents pause, raising
the stakes from hand-to-hand combat to the potential genocide of an unfamiliar
race. Fortunately, Hood (who also penned the adaptation) factors these weighty
A
themes into the story without making
them the primary focus. Between the officers, Graff’s agenda is more complicated
than he lets on, while Anderson represents
the voice of reason, remarking, “It used to
be a war crime to recruit anyone under the
age of 15.” But these are not soldiers, per
se, but highly skilled Junior ROTC types,
training on virtual conflict scenarios.
Butterfield—who has grown into his big
blue eyes, if not the rest of his body, since
Hugo—makes ideal casting for Ender: He’s
scrawny and physically unimposing, yet
there’s an intensity to his stare that suggests he might indeed be masking deeper
(or darker) gifts. It’s nothing so powerful
as the Force, or Neo’s Matrix-bending abilities, though Ender’s Game dedicates nearly
its entire run time to Battle School, where
our hero and his fellow recruits practice
various drills, including an antigravity
game (the rules of which aren’t terribly
clear) that looks like the next best thing
to Quidditch.
Despite the obvious “be all you can be”
subtext, Ender’s Game manages to make
these training sequences compelling without veering into pro-military propaganda,
battle—not that anyone here is quite as
lively or memorable as the characters Bmovie fans discovered in Star Wars three
dozen years ago. Butterfield’s Hugo costar
Ben Kingsley also pops up for a late cameo,
sporting an Australian accent and an elaborate Maori tribal tattoo across his entire
face (a poor man’s Darth Maul, perhaps?).
It might not seem fair to compare what
Hood has created to someone as visionary
in all things sci-fi as George Lucas, and yet,
considering the sizable budget expended
on Ender’s Game, one could have hoped for
something a bit more groundbreaking.
Sequences involving the swarming alien
ships, both in flashback to the earlier Earth
invasion and in the movie’s white-knuckle
finale, look plenty stunning, but somehow
lack the sense of imminent threat the film
sorely needs. The kids never seem to be in
any real danger; nor does their home planet.
Perhaps that’s for the best, considering how
intense it already is for them to be marching about, saluting and spouting dialogue
that normally belongs in the mouths of
grown soldiers. Certainly, intergalactic war
must qualify as what the MPAA calls “adult
situations,” and yet, the film handles the
showdown responsibly enough—including
an open-ended epilogue about the consequences of Ender’s actions—that kids may
come away from it better equipped to handle conflict on an interpersonal scale.
FOOD 34
film ›› showtimes
BY CAREY ROSS
B-BOARD 28
FILM SHORTS
FILM 26
2 Guns: Buddy movies can either be entertaining
or totally terrible. This one stars Denzel Washington
and Mark Wahlberg, so even if everything else about
the movie is bad, those two are sure to be pretty
darn good. +++ (R • 1 hr. 49 min.)
Bellis Fair: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
MUSIC 22
Captain Phillips: Alert the Academy, Tom Hanks is
in full-on Oscar-baiting mode in this dramatic, basedon-actual-events recounting of a man caught between
guns and more guns when he’s kidnapped at sea by
Somali pirates. ++++ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 13 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Enough Said: After years of playing Tony Soprano
(maybe the most memorably complex character
ever seen on the small screen) on television, James
Gandolfini had a whole second career as a leading
man ahead of him when he died of a heart attack
in June. This film, also starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus
and directed by Nicole Holofcener, shows just how
promising that career would’ve been. +++++ (PG13 • 1 hr. 33 min.)
Pickford Film Center: See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
Escape Plan: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester
Stallone get together to out-action all other action
movies. Too bad they fall short of the mark. ++ (R
• 1 hr. 56 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
The Fif th Estate: Julian Assange, the subject of
this fictionalized recounting of the WikiLeaks scandal, has torn this film’s alleged abundant inaccura-
Haute Cuisine: What happens when a renowned
French chef is chosen to be the personal cook for
the President of the Republic? Politics and fine food
combine in this charming French comedy. ++++
(PG-13 • 1 hr. 35 min.)
PFC’s Limelight: See www.pickfordfilmcenter.com for
showtimes.
House (Hausu): In America, we like to lace our
horror flicks with a liberal helping of gore. In Japan,
they prefer to skew in the direction of skin-crawling
creepiness and outright weirdness, and no film puts
that penchant on display quite like this 1977 head
trip about six schoolgirls, a creaky country house,
evil spirits and one seriously possessed house cat.
+++++ (Unrated • 1 hr. 28 min.)
Pickford Film Center: Oct. 31 @ 8:00
Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa: Johnny Knoxville somehow made a better movie than Cormac McCarthy and Ridley Scott and now the world is coming
to an end. +++ (R • 1 hr. 33 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
HAUTE CUISINE
Last Vegas: While I’d love to spend 90 minutes
watching Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan
Freeman, and Kevin Kline hang out in a room
together sans script, watching them in yet another
played-out Vegas bachelor party comedy seems way
less enticing. ++ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 30 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Monsters University: The prequel to Monsters,
Inc.—if these monsters don’t graduate with a ton of
student-loan debt and no job prospects I’m going to
think this Pixar story isn’t very true to life. ++++
(G • 1 hr. 42 min.)
Bellis Fair: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters: Another installment in a second-tier film franchise that I’d all
but forgotten about. + (PG • 1 hr. 50 min.)
Bellis Fair: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Planes: Despite the presence of John Lasseter and
the fact that it’s a spinoff of the Cars franchise, this
is not a Pixar film. I repeat: it is not a Pixar film.
And within that sentence is all the information you
need to know. +++ (PG • 1 hr. 32 min.)
Bellis Fair: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
The Summit: K2 is the second-highest mountain
on Earth—and the second most dangerous, with one
in four climbers meeting their death on its snowy
flanks. This documentary details an August 2008
incident in which 24 people went up the mountain,
but only half of them made it off alive in the deadliest incident in this unforgiving mountain’s history.
+++++ (R • 1 hr. 35 min.)
PFC’s Limelight See www.pickfordfilmcenter.com for
showtimes.
Wadjda: This first feature film shot entirely in
Saudi Arabia is the story of a young girl living in
a suburb of Riyadh determined to raise enough
money to buy a bike in a society that sees bicycles
as dangerous to a girl’s virtue. ++++ (PG-13 • 1
hr. 38 min.)
Pickford Film Center: See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
We’re the Millers: I cannot suspend my disbelief
far enough to ever buy Jason Sudeikis as a pot
dealer, Ed Helms as a drug kingpin or Jennifer Aniston as a stripper. Try harder, Hollywood. Or just try
at all. + (R • 1 hr. 40 min.)
Bellis Fair: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
Grown Ups 2: It seems to me that real grownups
would know a sequel to the first installment is a bad
idea. If you persist in acting like a child, Hollywood,
then that’s how we’ll treat you. You’re grounded. Go
to your room. + (PG-13 • 1 hr. 41 min.)
Bellis Fair: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Smur fs 2: This smurfin’ movie is full of smurfin’
smurfs who smurf around like mothersmurfers. + (PG
• 1 hr. 45 min.)
Bellis Fair: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
CURRENTS 10
Grav ity: Without even seeing what the remainder of
2013 has to offer, I can pretty well say this will make
my short list for the best films of the year. If Alfonso
Cuaron is trying to become my favorite filmmaker, he’s
going about it the right way. Shell out to see it in 3D.
You will not regret. +++++ (PG-13 • 91 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
VIEWS 8
Rush: Given the generally cheesy nature of Ron
Howard’s films, it’s rare that I find myself wanting
to see one of them. However, pretty much from the
moment I laid eyes on the preview for this drama
about the rivalry between two race-car drivers, I
found myself transfixed. Opie may redeem himself
yet. ++++ (R • 2 hrs. 3 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
MAIL 4
Free Birds: Time-traveling turkeys is a weird
enough plot conceit for an animated adventure, but
these gabby gobblers prove themselves unworthy of
a Thanksgiving Day pardon. ++ (PG • 1 hr. 30 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
DO IT 2
Ender ’s Game: See review previous page. +++ (PG13 • 1 hr. 54 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
Riddick: With eyes that shine brighter than any
laser cat, Vin Diesel reprises the role that made him
famous(ish). Critics respond by saying, “It’s good
precisely because it’s not as bad as it could be.”
Sounds about right. +++ (R • 1 hr. 59 min.)
Bellis Fair: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
10.30.13
Doctober: Supposedly, Doctober is over with the
striking of the witching hour on Oct. 31, but like a
ghost, its offerings continue to haunt the PFC in the
form of The Pervert’s Guide to Ideology, a showing of
Money for Nothing: Inside the Federal Reserve, the nonfiction short film festival GE Focus Forward, encore
showings of GMO OMG (your wish, the Pickford’s command), and a full week’s run of what was possibly this
year’s most-talked-about Doctober film, Muscle Shoals.
Pickford Film Center: See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
cies to shreds. Critics pretty much shredded the rest.
+ (R • 2 hrs. 4 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
#44.08
The Counselor: All right, apparently this movie
blows and its deficiencies have something to do with
Cormac McCarthy’s screenplay. This coming from a
writer so good he eschews the basic rules of punctuation and somehow gets away with it, time and
again. The mind reels. ++ (R • 1 hr. 51 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
FREE BIRDS
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2: I was
pretty surprised when this children’s book was
adapted for the big screen. I am no less surprised that
it somehow merits a sequel. ++ (PG • 1 hr. 35 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
ART 20
Carr ie: The 1976 horror classic features a pair of
Oscar-nominated performances by Sissy Spacek and
Piper Laurie and crackerjack creepy direction by
Brian DePalma. I believe its working title was For the
Love of God, I’m Good Enough. Please Resist the Urge
to Remake Me. Forever. Naturally, here’s your remake.
+++ (R • 1 hr. 32 min.)
Barkley Village: See www.fandango.com for showtimes.
27
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
NOW SHOWING November 1 - 7
28
bulletinboard
100
MIND & BODY
Attend a clairvoyant reading demonstration at a
“Reading Hour” from 5:306:03pm Wednesday, Oct. 30
at Simply Spirit Reading and
Healing Center, 1304 Meador
Ave., B-11. No registration is
required, and guests are invited to ask a question of the
reader. Entry is $5. More info:
www.simplyspiritcenter.com
Bellingham Tennis Club
owner and personal trainer
and cycling coach Robin Robertson leads a “Thinner Next
Year: Your Action Plan” presentation at 5:30pm Wednesday, Oct. 30 at Village Books,
1200 11th St. Entry is free.
More info: www.villagebooks.
com
Attend a Reiki Share with
Jelan Fri., November 1, at
6:30pm at Mount Vernon’s
Skagit Valley Food Co-op.
Reiki Shares are a gathering to give and receive Reiki
Treatments. They are a time
of sharing, learning and healing that is brought to the table
by each person regardless
of the individual experience.
Entry is free. More info: www.
skagitfoodcoop.com
“How Healing Happens”
will be the focus of a free
workshop with therapist and
group facilitator Marianne
Shapiro at 10am Saturday,
Nov. 2 at Mount Vernon’s
Skagit Valley Food Co-op. Everyone called to this topic is
welcome to attend. Register
in advance. More info: www.
skagitfoodcoop.com
Registered dietician and
nutritionist Lisa Dixon will discuss lifestyle and diet strategies for preventing diabetes
at a “Delaying Diabetes” clinic
from 6:30-8:30pm Monday,
100
MIND & BODY
Nov. 4 at the Community
Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St.
Snacks, recipes and handouts
will also be provided. Entry is
$15. More info: 734-8158 or
www.communityfood.coop
Learn how to better manage stress and anxiety by
stabilizing mental conditions
via Neurofeedback with InnerWave Center’s Joan Cross
at 6:30pm Tuesday, Nov. 5 at
ANNUAL
PARTY
SAVE THE DATE
Friday, Nov. 8
6-9 pm
The Leopold Ballroom
1224 Cornwall Ave.
Everyone Welcome
Free for Members!
Refreshments
Revelry
Gratitude
Family Fun
100
MIND & BODY
100
MIND & BODY
Mount Vernon’s Skagit Valley
Food Co-op. Entry is free; register in advance. More info:
www.skagitfoodcoop.com
a variety of workshops in Bellingham. The ongoing series
meets on the second Sunday
of the month at the Mount
Vernon Center for Spiritual
Living and from 1-5pm on the
fourth Sunday at the Bellingham Center for Spiritual Living, 2224 Yew Street Rd. More
info: www.eftsettings.com
“Healthy Aging: Reducing
and Preventing Pain” will be
the focus of a free interactive
workshop with Dr. Richard
Tran from 6:30-8pm Tuesday,
Nov. 5 at the Community Food
Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St. Participants will discover natural
methods to reduce and prevent pain, and speed recovery
from injuries, as well as look
at patterns of chronic pain
and effective ways to track
your health to head off problems before they start. More
info: 734-8158
A Grief Support Group
meets at 7pm every Tuesday
at the St. Luke’s Community
Health Education Center. The
free, drop-in support group is
for those experiencing the recent death of a friend or loved
one. More info: 733-5877
Learn about Emotional
Freedom Techniques (EFT) at
MUSCLE SHOALS (PG) 111m - Doctober Encore
“Overall, it’s joyous, uplifting – and as funky as the music
at its heart.” Telegraph
Fri: 8:25; Sat: (11:15), 8:25; Sun: 5:10
Mon - Thu: 8:45
WADJDA (PG) 98m “A genuinely pioneering debut from
a female Saudi filmmaker and a striking piece of work by
any standards.” Empire
Fri: (3:30), 6:00; Sat: (1:20), 6:00
Sun: (2:45), 7:45; Mon - Thu: (4:00), 6:20
Co-Dependents Anonymous meets from 7-8:30pm
every Monday at PeaceHealth
St. Joseph’s South Campus,
809 E. Chestnut St. Entry is by
donation. More info: 676-8588
ENOUGH SAID (PG-13) 93m
Starring Julia Louis Dreyfus and James Gandolfini!
Fri: (4:10), 6:30, 8:55; Sat: 3:45, 6:30, 8:55
Sun: (3:20), 5:40, 8:00; Mon: (4:10), 8:55
Tue: (2:55), 9:15; Wed: (4:10), 8:55
Thu: (4:10), 6:30, 8:55
Intenders of the Highest
Good Circle typically meets
at 7pm on the second Friday
of the month at the Co-op’s
Connection Building, 1220 N.
Forest St. Len-Erna Cotton,
part of the original group in
Hawaii, is the facilitator. More
info: www.intenders.org
THE TALE OF ZATOICHI 95m - The Zatoichi Series
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Series Pass for $100 and get your name on the big screen!
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Sat: (1:45); Sun: (1:00)
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MONEY FOR NOTHING: Inside the Federal Reserve 104m
Sat: 4:00 - Doctober Late Addition
REALTOR ®
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Sun: 11:00AM - Opera in Cinema
Professional,
knowledgeable,
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to work with.
GE FOCUS FORWARD: Short Films, Big Ideas
Mon: 6:30 - 30 x 3 minute stories of innovators
HARRY SMITH: Heaven and Earth Magic
Tue: 6:30 - Stop motion masterpiece by an experimental legend
360-671-5600
www.KulshanCLT.org
THE STONE ROSES: MADE OF STONE
Wed: 6:30 - Their reunion documented by Shane Meadows
Windermere Real Estate Whatcom, Inc.
(360) 393-5826
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Box Office is Open 30 Minutes Prior to F irst Showtime
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“Coquettishly flirts with comedy while sprinting in the
direction of dry, sophisticated charm. “ Wall Street Journal
Fri: (4:00), 6:15; Sat: (1:40), 6:15; Sun: (3:00), 5:15
Mon - Wed: (4:00), 6:15 Thu: (4:00)
THE SUMMIT (R) 95m
“A pulse-pounding success.” New York Times
Fri: 8:30; Sat: 4:00, 8:30; Sun: (12:45), 7:30
Mon - Thu: 8:30
I AM DIVINE (NR) 90m
“A fine, touching tribute to John Waters’ larger-than-life
drag diva, Divine.” New York Post
Thu: 6:30
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ART 20
YOGA
FOOD 34
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Across
1 Drill sergeant’s
syllable
4 Formal promise?
10 Casablanca’s
country: abbr.
13 Land on the Med.
Sea
14 He wrote of
Walden Pond
16 Diminutive ending, in Italian
17 Pop artist who
used faceless
stick figures
19 Big shot in the
office
20 Serial piece
21 Budget brand of
Intel CPUs
23 “Comfortably
___” (Pink Floyd)
24 Jazz great with
the album “High
Priestess of Soul”
27 Location finder,
briefly
28 High-rated
search engine,
once
29 Hip hop fan,
maybe
30 Increasingly hard
to find net surfer
31 Calvin and Naomi
33 “The Devil’s Dictionary” author
36 ___ and Guilder
(warring “The
Princess Bride”
nations)
37 They may include
twists
38 Dip ___ in the
water
39 Handout after a
checkup
40 Choke, or a joke
43 15th-century
Flemish painter
46 “Damn Yankees”
vamp
47 Vlad, as the
legend goes
48 Green energy
type
49 You, to Yves
50 He played Locke
on “Lost”
54 “I’d like to buy
___” (“Wheel”
request)
55 With great skill
56 Battle (for)
57 Ave. crossers
58 Had a debate
59 Superlative ending
Down
1
2
3
4
Outdoors activity
Depletes
Rainbow creators
“Am ___ only
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
B-BOARD 28
FOOD 34
rearEnd ›› ”In the Cards”— I’m kind of a big deal
one?”
5 “Keep it down!”
6 Condo grp.
7 Part of ETA
8 German cameras
9 Highway sections
10 Of small organisms
11 Two-person basketball game
12 Andy and Mickey
15 “Unattractive”
citrus
18 Margarine holder
22 Campfire remains
24 Parachute fabric
25 Finishes a cake
26 Message response that’s not
really a response
28 “Footloose”
actress Singer
30 Cold sore-fighting brand in a tiny
tube
31 Mall booth
32 “___ get this
party started”
33 “Gimme Shelter”
speedway
34 Oft-mocked
treats
35 “Helicopter”
band ___ Party
36 Dish served with
a distinct sound
39 “Cyrano de
Bergerac” star Jose
40 Become available to the general
public, as a new
website
41 “Thank U” singer
Morissette
42 January birthstone
44 Utah ski resort
45 “I ___ drink!”
46 Reed recently
deceased
48 Flooring meas.
51 D&D, e.g.
52 “___ Mama Tambien”
53 “Bravo, matador!”
©2013 Jonesin’
Crosswords
Last Week’s Puzzle
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
DO IT 2
Join the Whatcom Dispute Resolution Center in celebrating people
who are putting the pieces together Ior creatiYe conÁict resolution
30
our little
world
is now online:
cascadiaweekly.com
$40 in advance,
$50 at the door
Purchase tickets at
www.whatcomdrc.org
or (360)676-0122
Honor our 2013 recipients & enjoy:
Dinner, Live Music, Youth Peaceful
Poetry Presentations, Silent Auction
experiment? Not just on Halloween, but for a week
afterwards, be scarier than your fears. If an anxious
thought pops into your mind, bare your teeth and
growl, “Get out of here or I will rip you to shreds!”
If a demon visits you in a nightly dream, chase after
it with a torch and sword, screaming “Begone, foul
spirit, or I will burn your mangy ass!” Don’t tolerate
bullying in any form, whether it comes from a critical little voice in your head or from supposedly nice
people who are trying to guilt-trip you. “I am a brave
conqueror who cannot be intimidated!” is what you
could say, or “I am a monster of love and goodness
who will defeat all threats to my integrity!”
CANCER (June 21-July 22): Are you ready to
be amazed? Now would be an excellent time to shed
your soul’s infantile illusions...to play wildly with
the greatest mystery you know...to accept gifts that
enhance your freedom and refuse gifts that don’t...
to seek out a supernatural encounter that heals your
chronic sadness...to consort and converse with sexy
magical spirits from the future...to make love with the
lights on and cry when you come. Halloween costume
suggestion: the archetypal LOVER.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Some people in your
vicinity are smoldering and fuming. The air is heavy
with emotional ferment. Conspiracy theories are ripening and rotting at the same time. Hidden agendas
are seeping into conversations, and gossip is swirling
like ghostly dust devils. Yet in the midst of this mayhem, an eerie calm possesses you. As everyone else
struggles, you’re poised and full of grace. To what do
we owe this stability? I suspect it has to do with the
fact that life is showing you how to feel at home in the
world no matter what’s happening around you. Keep
making yourself receptive to these teachings. Halloween costume suggestion: King or Queen of Relaxation.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Unification should
be a key theme for you in the coming weeks. Anything you do that promotes splicing and blending
and harmonizing will get extra help, sometimes from
mysterious forces working behind the scenes. The
more you work to find common ground between opposing sides, the stronger you’ll feel and the better
you’ll look. If you can manage to mend schisms and
heal wounds, unexpected luck will flow into your
—‡•–‹‘•ǫƒŽŽ͹͵͵ǦʹͺͻͲšͳͲͳͻ
ƒ†›‘—™‹ŽŽ”‡…‡‹˜‡ƒ…ƒŽŽ„ƒ…ǡ‘”
‡ƒ‹Žǣ‡”‹…Š‡–̷–ƒ—Ž•‡ŽŽ‹‰ŠƒǤ‘”‰
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I invite you to
try the following exercise. Imagine the most powerful role you could realistically attain in the future.
This is a position or niche or job that will authorize
you to wield your influence to the max. It will give
you the clout to shape the environments you share
with other people. It will allow you to freely express
your important ideas and have them be treated seriously. Let your imagination run a little wild as you
visualize the possibilities. Incorporate your visions
into your Halloween costume.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the course of
earning a living, I have worked four different jobs as a
janitor and six as a dishwasher. On the brighter side, I
have performed as a songwriter and lead singer for six
rock bands and currently write a syndicated astrology
column. According to my analysis of the astrological
omens, you Aquarians are primed to cultivate a relationship with your work life that is more like my latter
choices than the former. The next eight months will
be a favorable time to ensure that you’ll be doing your
own personal equivalent of rock singer or astrology
columnist well into the future. Halloween costume
suggestion: your dream job.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Author Robert Louis Stevenson loved the work of poet Walt Whitman,
recommending it with the same enthusiasm as he did
Shakespeare’s. Stevenson also regarded Whitman as
an unruly force of nature, and in one famous passage,
called him “a large shaggy dog, just unchained, scouring the beaches of the world and baying at the
moon.” Your assignment is to do your best imitation
of a primal creature like Whitman. In fact, consider
being him for Halloween. Maybe you could memorize
passages from Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and recite
them at random moments. Here’s one: “I too am not a
bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, / I sound my barbaric YAWP over the roofs of the world.”
FOOD 34
B-BOARD 28
GET OUT 16
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I had a dream
that you were in the film O Brother, Where Art Thou?
You were like the character played by George Clooney
after he escaped from a prison chain gang. Can you
picture it? You were wearing a striped jailbird suit,
and a ball and chain were still cuffed around your
ankle. But you were sort of free, too. You were on the
lam, making your way from adventure to adventure
as you eluded those who would throw you back in
the slammer. You were not yet in the clear, but you
seemed to be en route to total emancipation. I think
this dream is an apt metaphorical depiction of your
actual life right now. Could you somehow use it in
designing your Halloween costume?
FILM 26
STAGE 18
—’’‘”–‹˜‡˜‹”‘‡––‘…‘—”ƒ‰‡†—…ƒ–‹‘
MUSIC 22
‘”ƒ††‹–‹‘ƒŽ‹ˆ‘”ƒ–‹‘ǡ’Ž‡ƒ•‡˜‹•‹–ǣ
™™™Ǥ–ƒ—Ž•‡ŽŽ‹‰ŠƒǤ‘”‰Ȁ
ART 20
”‘ŽŽ‡–‹•Ž‹‹–‡†Ǥ
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On Nov 5th you’ll have hard choices to make.
One will be easy. You need to eat lunch.
Exercise your constitutional right
by getting a traditional
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WORDS 14
GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Are you up for an
+ ƒ‹‰—†‰‡–‡˜‡‘ƒ–‡•ǡ‘ƒ–‡•ƒ†‹‡• CURRENTS 10
like? Get clear about that. What don’t you want to
do? Make definitive decisions. What kind of person
do you not want to become and what life do you
never want to live? Resolve those questions with as
much certainty as possible. Write it all down, preferably in the form of a contract with yourself. Sign the
contract. This document will be your sacred promise,
a declaration of the boundaries you won’t cross and
the activities you won’t waste your time on and the
desires that aren’t worthy of you. It will feed your
freedom to know exactly what you like and what you
want to accomplish and who you want to become.
Halloween costume suggestion: the opposite of who
you really are.
+ ‡–Ž‡‘‰ƒš’‡”‹‡…‡†›‘‰ƒ‹•–”—…–‘”Ǥ‹–Š
+ ‘‘‹‰‡Ž‹…‹‘—•‘—’•Ǥ
Š‘Žƒǡ‡†‹–‡””ƒ‡ƒ’Ž–‹‡•
VIEWS 8
TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What don’t you
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What if you had the
power to enchant and even bewitch people with your
charisma? Would you wield your allure without mercy?
Would you feel wicked delight in their attraction to
you, even if you didn’t plan to give them what they
want? I suspect these questions aren’t entirely rhetorical right now. You may have more mojo at your disposal than you realize. Speaking for your conscience,
I will ask you not to desecrate your privilege. If you
must manipulate people, do it for their benefit as well
as yours. Use your raw magic responsibly. Halloween
costume suggestion: a mesmerizing guru; an irresistible diva; a stage magician.
+ ‡…”‡–•–‘—……‡••ˆ—Ž‹‡•ƒ•–”›…Š‡ˆǤƒ˜‹†•‘
MAIL 4
hiking through Maui’s rain forest, I spied a majestic
purple honohono flower sprouting from a rotting log.
As I bent down close, I inhaled the merged aromas of
moldering wood and sweet floral fragrance. Let’s make
this scene your metaphor of the week, Aries. Here’s
why: A part of your life that is in the throes of decay
can serve as host for a magnificent bloom. What has
been lost to you may become the source of fertility. Halloween costume suggestion: a garbage man or
cleaning maid wearing a crown of roses.
7DL]p
‘™‘ˆˆ‡”‹‰–Š‡ˆ‘ŽŽ‘™‹‰Ž‘™Ǧ–—‹–‹‘…Žƒ••‡•‹‘˜‡„‡”ǣ
DO IT 2
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Once when I was
––Ǥƒ—Žǯ•’‹•…‘’ƒŽŠ—”…Š
10.30.13
ASTROLOGY
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): What do you think
you’d be like if you were among the one-percentwealthiest people on Earth? Would you demand that
your government raise your taxes so you could contribute more to our collective well-being? Would you
live simply and cheaply so you’d have more money to
donate to charities and other worthy causes? This Halloween season, I suggest you play around with fantasies like that—maybe even masquerade as an incredibly rich philanthropist who doles out cash and gifts
everywhere you go. At the very least, imagine what
it would be like if you had everything you needed
and felt so grateful you shared your abundance freely.
Š‡‘—‹–›”‹…Š‡–‡–‡”
#44.08
FREE WILL
life. To encourage these developments, consider
these Halloween disguises: a roll of tape, a stick of
Krazy Glue, a wound that’s healing, a bridge.
No fillers or cereal
Pure Bologna, no phony baloney
With just a hint of garlic-you’ll never regret this vote
1319 Railroad • 360-676-5288
CASCADIA WEEKLY
BY ROB BREZSNY
31
rearEnd ›› comix
FOOD 34
Sudoku
B-BOARD 28
HOW TO SUDOKU: Arrange the digits 1-9 in such a way that
each digit occurs only once in each row, only once in each
column, and only once in each box. Try it!
5
FILM 26
3
4
MUSIC 22
9
1
ART 20
1 9
5
6
8 3
8
5
STAGE 18
7
3 5
5 4
GET OUT 16
7
2
3
WORDS 14
1
9 1
5 6
CURRENTS 10
BELLINGHAM
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
MOUNT BAKER
THEATRE
FILM TOUR
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#44.08
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B-BOARD 28
FILM 26
MUSIC 22
ART 20
STAGE 18
GET OUT 16
WORDS 14
CURRENTS 10
A first date like theirs raises some
questions for the second date, such
as, “Who should pay the invoice for
the side-by-side burial plots?” Be
prepared to wear out your face trying
to talk sense into your friend. The
problem is “confirmation bias”—our
tendency to seek information that
supports what we already believe and
toss information that does not. In
other words, your time would be better spent painting a wall and speaking meaningful thoughts to the paint
as it dries. Another productive use of
your time would be adding up how
much of it you’re spending worrying
about this woman’s problems. It isn’t
mercenary or ugly to expect a friendship to be mutual and to influence
you in positive ways. If how she lives
is dragging you down, you may want
to give her a little less prominence in
your life. Then, when you do see her,
you can just admire her ring and
share in her happiness at reaching
that milestone golden anniversary—
celebrating 50 joyous minutes of
knowing a man.
VIEWS 8
A friend of a year has a pattern of raving
about people she meets and then completely cooling on them. Last week, she
met a man online. On their first date, he
took her shopping, buying her a gold ring
and a key ring he had engraved with both
their names and “Thinking of you always.”
She describes him as perfect, brilliant,
etc., and said she loves him and would
marry him. I said things like “Take some
time to get to know him,” but I don’t
think she really heard me.
—Concerned
MAIL 4
I guess when you ask a woman
whether she’d like to use the power
outlet, she should just come right out
and say, “I would, but I don’t find you
very attractive.”
Why go after what you want when
you can dance around it, do it favors
and hope it figures out that you’ve
made a secret agreement with it in
your head? There are girls who would
respond in a way you’d consider honorable—who would not only show
appreciation when you provide them
with complimentary food and beverages, but even follow you home. Unfortunately, they’re the sort of girls
who catch a Frisbee in their teeth.
Like the sign spinner on the corner in the Statue of Liberty suit, you
think you need to lure women with a
special offer, except instead of “Cash
for gold!” it’s “Snake your drain for
a date!” You’re apparently convinced
that no woman would want you for
you. This probably isn’t entirely off
base, since the “you” you currently
are is a guy who thinks instilling a
sense of obligation in a woman for
favors rendered is your best hope of
WAIT PROBLEMS
DO IT 2
I’ve tried to be open-minded, but I’ve decided that men are givers and women are
takers. I study at my local coffeehouse. I
am interested in this woman who comes in
and often unplug my computer and offer
to let her use the outlet. Two weeks ago,
I decided to make my interest clearer by
buying her coffee. She said, ”Oh! Thanks!”
Then she put her nose back in her books.
The next time she came in, I offered her
my large table because she had tons of
books. She blushed as girls do, asking,
“Are you sure?” I said, “Of course!” I then
worked at a small, cramped table next to
her. She made no effort to talk, except
when she asked me to watch her computer
while she went to the restroom. Finally,
I decided to be really clear and asked if
she’d like to grab a bite sometime. She
smiled and said she’d just see me here,
but thanks. Yeah, she’ll see me there and
expect me to give her my big table. I’m
sick of this take, take, take. A woman
needs to tell a man right away if she’s not
interested and not let him sit there like
an idiot, planning to make her life easier.
—Irate
10.30.13
MOUSE ADO ABOUT
NOTHING
#44.08
THE ADVICE
GODDESS
having sex again before you forget
where the parts go.
Stop grumbling that women are
conniving takers, and work on accepting yourself, flaws and all. Once
your self-respect is no longer trailerhitched to whether women want you,
you can be direct—just talk to a
woman, let her see who you are, and
ask her out. She may turn you down,
but if you feel O.K. about yourself,
you’ll see her rejection as your cue—
simply to find the next girl to hit
on, not to storm out behind the coffeehouse, shake your fist at the sky,
and yell, “Hey, weren’t the meek supposed to inherit the earth? Where’s
mine?!”
CASCADIA WEEKLY
BY AMY ALKON
FOOD 34
rearEnd ›› comix
33
©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171
Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA
90405, or e-mail [email protected]
doit
FOOD 34
34
FOOD
chow
B-BOARD 28
RECIPES
REVIEWS
PROF I L ES
THURS., OCT. 31
THE FUTURE OF FOOD: Attend a “Climate Change
and the Future of Food: Recipe for Tomorrow”
symposium today starting at 8am at St. Luke’s Community Center, 3333 Squalicum Pkwy. Representatives from fisheries, shellfish produces, farmers,
grocery owners, food distributors and professors
will provide their perspective on the challenges we
face. Online tickets sales are full; a limited number
of tickets will be available at the door.
WWW.RE-SOURCES.ORG
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#44.08
10.30.13
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 8
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
SAT., NOV. 2
34
STORY AND PHOTOS BY JESSAMYN TUTTLE
The Corner Pub
BURGERS AND BARGAINS IN BOW
’ve been vaguely aware of the Corner Pub for a number of
years. It looks like one of those ubiquitous roadside bars you
drive past in rural areas pretty much everywhere. A great
hangout for Bow-area locals, but not necessarily somewhere you’d
go out of your way for.
Then last spring I heard the pub had been bought by sisters
Nicole and Maggi Holbert, who own Adrift in Anacortes. Adrift
is a wildly popular restaurant known for locally sourced ingredients, so I assumed the Corner would go through some changes. I
recently rounded up a group of friends and went there for dinner.
The Corner has live music frequently, but the night we went had
nothing scheduled. While surprisingly empty for a Friday night,
there were still several tables of extremely raucous locals, although the bar was empty and the shuffleboard table was quiet.
The place had the classic bar ambience of stale smoke and fry oil.
Despite the presence of televisions in every corner, the volume
was low and the screens didn’t seem particularly obtrusive. We
pulled up our stools and checked out the menu.
Beverage options include wine, beer in bottles and on draft,
and a full bar. We shared a pitcher of Boundary Bay IPA, which we
drank from mason jar-style mugs. I gather there’s a beer garden
out back, and occasionally customers would wander in through the
I
back door and grab a beer out of the cooler.
The appetizer list is extensive, and includes every deep-fried pub starter you can think of: deep
fried pickles, jalapeño poppers, battered mushrooms, and mozzarella sticks are all there, plus
the Corner’s specialty, deep fried chicken gizzards
($8.50). We ordered the fresh potato chips ($2.50),
which were hot and crispy and quite good dipped
into blue cheese sauce, and macaroni and cheese
bites ($8), which tasted exactly like deep fried
Kraft mac and cheese out of a box—in a good way.
Burgers were a must-try (the menu specifically
mentions that they’re made with Best Foods mayonnaise, definitely a selling point with our group).
One of our party got the bacon cheeseburger
($9), while another ordered the French Onion
burger ($8.75, plus $1.25 for sautéed mushrooms),
and reviews were good. Another companion ordered a patty melt and, while wishing it came on
a darker rye, liked the deep brown, extra-sweet
caramelized onions. All burgers and sandwiches
here come with fries, but you
can upgrade to a different
side for $2, which all three of
my tasters did. Coleslaw came
in a generous portion, onion
rings were crisp and sweet, and
sweet potato waffle fries were
perfectly fried.
I, acting as the maverick
EAT
WHAT: The
of the group, decided to try
Corner Pub
fish tacos, which were writWHERE: 14564
ten up on a piece of paper over
Allen West Rd.,
the bar with a few other daily
Bow
specials (along with buy-oneINFO: (360)
757-6113 or
get-one-free jello shots). They
bowcornerwere excellent, and at only six
[email protected]
bucks a real bargain: two flour
com
tortillas liberally coated with
cheese and toasted until crisp and gooey, then
topped with perfectly fried fish and plenty of
coleslaw, with salsa and sour cream on the side.
My plate arrived a bit later than my friends’
meals, but the cook/server explained that he
didn’t want to make the tacos too greasy by cooking them at the same time as the burgers. I was
impressed, and wondered whether the new owners are introducing new ideas gradually through
their specials. I know if these were on the regular
menu I would get them repeatedly.
The verdict? This is a place that really knows
how to handle their deep fryer, and they serve
well-prepared classic pub food. I look forward to
hearing how their menu develops over time. Not
a destination restaurant, yet, but worth keeping
an eye on when you happen to be passing through
Skagit farmland.
BELLINGHAM FARMERS MARKE T: The Bellingham
Farmers Market can be visited from 10am-3pm
every Saturday through Dec. 21 at the Depot Market
Square, 1100 Railroad Ave.
WWW.BELLINGHAMFARMERS.ORG
FILM & FOOD: As part of a “Film & Food” Series,
attend a showing of Babette’s Feast at 1pm at Mount
Vernon’s Lincoln Theatre, 501 S. First St. After the
film, head to Gretchen’s Kitchen, where you’ll find
out how to cook up highlighted recipes from the
flick. Entry is $40.
WWW.GRETCHENSKITCHEN.COM
SUN., NOV. 3
COMMUNIT Y BREAKFAST: Meet and greet local
politicians as they serve you coffee and food at the
monthly Community Breakfast from 8am-1pm at the
Rome Grange, 2821 Mt. Baker Hwy. Entry is $2 for
kids, $5 for adults.
739-9605
WINE AND FOOD GALA: Thirty wines and eight
purveyors will be on hand for sampling at today’s
Wine & Food Gala from 2-4:30pm at the Old World
Deli, 1228 N. State St. Tickets are $20.
WWW.OLDWORLDDELI1.COM
GRAPE AND GOURME T: Bellingham Bay Rotary
will host its 10th annual “Grape and Gourmet”
food and wine tasting event from 5-8:30pm at the
Event Center at the Silver Reef Casino. Wines from
more than 30 wineries and gourmet food from local
restaurants will be part of the edible excitement.
Tickets are $75-$125.
WWW.SILVERREEFCASINO.COM
TUES., NOV. 5
ART OF WINE: Wine expert and artist Ryan Wildstar leads “The Art off Wine: A World Tour” starting
tonight from 6:30-8pm at the Cordata Community
Food Co-op, 315 Westerly Rd. Entry is $119; additional classes happen Nov. 12 and 19 and Dec. 3.
383-3200
CANNING & COCK TAILS: Master food preservers
Katharine Isserlis and Ann Darlin Leason will helm
a “Canning & Cocktails: Gifts & Alcohol Preserves”
course from 6:30-8:30pm in Mount Vernon at
Gretchen’s Kitchen, 501 S. First St. Cost is $30.
WWW.GRETCHENSKITCHEN.COM
WED., NOV. 6
THAI CLASSICS: Chef Robert Fong focuses on
“Thai Classics” at a cooking course from 6:30-9pm
at the Community Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St.
Fees are $39.
383-3200
THURS., NOV. 7
VEGAN LIVING: “How to be Healthy on a Vegan
Diet” will be the focus of a class with raw foodist
and longtime vegan Doug Walsh from 6:30-8:30pm
at the Cordata Community Food Co-op, 315 Westerly
Rd. Register in advance for the free workshop.
WWW.COMMUNIT YFOOD.COOP
FOOD
FOOD 34
34
B-BOARD 28
Check bellinghambond.org
to see the growing list of community
members who support this
iimportant investment.
FFind us on Facebook:
VVote-Yes-for-Bellingham-Schools
PO Box 1082 – Bellingham 98227
Paid for by Citizens Advisory
Committee, Treasurer Susanne Lucke
t Improve health and safety for students and staff
approve
t Upgrade neighborhood schools
approve
t Capture significant savings through energy
efficiency improvements
approve
t Make space for at-risk students
approve
t Support research-based educational goals like early
childhood education, collaborative teaching and learning
models, technology-enabled engagement, outdoor
activity and nutritious food
approve
t Take advantage of record low bond rates
approve
t Join fellow citizens and organizations (listed below) who
are voting to sustain our quality public schools with
adequate facilities
t Mayor Kelli Linville
t City Council Member
Michael Lilliquist
t Bellingham Administrators
Organization
t Bellingham Association of
School Employees
t Bellingham Education
Association
t Bellingham Public
School Foundation
t Bellingham School Board
t Bellingham-Whatcom County
Prof. Fire Fighters Local 106
t Cascadia Weekly
t Community Food Co-op
t DIS Corporation
t Service Employees
International Union Local 925
approve
t Teamsters Local 231
t Whatcom Farm-to-School
t Whatcom County Youth
Soccer Association
t Whatcom FC Rangers
t Whatcom County Democrats
t and a growing number
of more than 300 school
supporters!
#44.08
10.30.13
approve
Pick up a
copy each
Wednesday
for our
Art & Event
Listings
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Adequate facilities that support
learning and draw quality educators
is part of Bellingham’s reputation for
great public schools. Thank you for
taking care of our schools!
t Support students and staff as educational needs evolve
MAIL 4
Vote to approve the Bellingham Public Schools facilities bond.
DO IT 2
Invest Wisely, Build Smart
WE
SUPPORT
THE
ARTS
VIEWS 8
Choose local businesses taking action for a healthy community.
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 14
GET OUT 16
STAGE 18
ART 20
MUSIC 22
FILM 26
Coming soon! 2014 Where the Locals Go! Coupon Book
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