Appendix 2 - International Animal Rescue

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Appendix 2 - International Animal Rescue
Table of Contents
1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................ 2
1.1 International Animal Rescue (IAR) ............................................................................. 2
1.2 Objectives of International Animal Rescue ............................................................... 2
1.3 Volunteers ........................................................................................................................... 3
2. IAR INDONESIA.............................................................................................................. 5
2.1 Foundation .......................................................................................................................... 5
2.3 Funding ................................................................................................................................ 6
2.4 Animal species of IAR Indonesia .................................................................................. 6
3. VOLUNTEER PROGRAMME AT IAR INDONESIA .................................................. 8
3.1 IAR Indonesia Requirements......................................................................................... 8
3.2. General information and recommendations ........................................................... 8
3.3 Staying in the guesthouse in Ciapus ..........................................................................10
3.4 Internet service at IAR ...................................................................................................11
4. LEGAL REQUESTS TO TRAVEL TO INDONESIA
............................................... 12
4.1 Visa ......................................................................................................................................12
5. MEDICAL INFORMATION.......................................................................................... 12
5.1 Vaccinations......................................................................................................................12
5.2 Health certificate .............................................................................................................13
6. VOLUNTEER ACTIVITIES .......................................................................................... 14
Appendix 1: Animal species of IAR Indonesia ....................................................... 16
Appendix 2: Social Budaya Visa Application Instructions ................................ 26
Appendix 3: Indonesian Vocabulary ........................................................................ 31
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1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 International Animal Rescue (IAR)
International Animal Rescue was first registered as a charity in the UK in 1988. IAR comes to
the aid of wild and domestic animals with hands-on rescue and rehabilitation. Wherever
possible we return rehabilitated animals to the wild but we also provide permanent
sanctuary for those that can’t fend for themselves. We have offices in the UK and the US and
ongoing projects in India, Indonesia and Malta.
IAR works to educate the public in the compassionate and humane treatment of all animals.
We use sound scientific evidence to inform our decisions and determine the course of our
rescue operations. In all that we do we aim to find lasting solutions that benefit both
animals and people.
IAR has programmes in India, Malta and the UK. In 2006, IAR started a project helping
macaques in Indonesia and in 2008, IAR established as a formal local NGO with the name
Yayasan IAR Indonesia (YIARI).
IAR Indonesia currently runs two rehabilitation facilities, both of which focus on the rescue,
rehabilitation and release of captive primates in Indonesia. One centre is for macaques and
slow lorises in Ciapus, West Java and one for orangutans in West Kalimantan, Indonesian
Borneo which is currently still operating from a temporary facility until the permanent
centre is set up. Education is a vital part of our work and we try to achieve a deeper
understanding about these animals and their threats by delivering presentations about
animal welfare and biodiversity conservation, giving seminars about the wildlife trade for
government authorities to facilitate law enforcement and conducting awareness activities at
the local markets.
1.2 Objectives of International Animal Rescue

To come to the aid of wild and domestic animals with hands-on rescue and
rehabilitation.
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
To return rescued animals to their natural environment wherever possible, but also to
provide sanctuary for animals that are no longer able to survive in the wild.

To provide comprehensive sterilisation and inoculation programmes for stray dogs and
cats, particularly in developing countries.

To educate the public in the compassionate and humane treatment of all animals.

To work with decision-makers and government departments to develop sound animal
welfare laws and support law enforcement efforts by providing vital equipment and
caring for confiscated animals.

To increase our capacity to help suffering animals by joining forces with other likeminded groups and individuals wherever possible.

To use sound scientific evidence as the basis for our rescue and rehabilitation
operations.
1.3 Volunteers
Through our volunteer programme, we intend to provide valuable extra support at the
centre and provide an opportunity for students and other individuals to gain experience in
the care of wild animals. IAR will also benefit from the knowledge and new ideas of
volunteers from overseas.
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2. IAR INDONESIA
2.1 Foundation
Following the creation of IAR Indonesia, a plan was agreed to build a new rescue and
rehabilitation centre and a veterinary clinic on a piece of land that was available to lease for
15 years. Our primate rescue centre in Ciapus, near Bogor in West-Java was built with the
objective of protecting species which were not often considered by other conservation
organisations. We rescue and rehabilitate macaques and slow lorises that have been caught
from the wild and sold at markets to become pets or abused as tourist attractions. Some of
the animals which arrive in the centre were confiscated from pet owners or traders; others
were surrendered by their owners.
In spite of our determination to focus on the underdogs of the conservation world, it
seemed inevitable to extend our field of activity. West Kalimantan is one of the most heavily
deforested areas of Borneo, where forests are cleared in large tracts for logging and
conversion to oil palm plantations. In the beginning of 2009, IAR took over a centre from a
local NGO with the intention of functioning as a transit facility for orangutans before the
animals would be passed on to other rescue centres. However, due to the high numbers of
rescued orangutans the capacities of these centres were full and as a result animals
remained in this facility without appropriate long-term accommodation. Improvements to
the living conditions were sought by building better and bigger enclosures, but in order to
provide enhanced housing situations and to be able to prepare the animals for future
reintroduction to the wild, building work began at the end of 2011 for a new rehabilitation
centre in Ketapang, West Kalimantan.
2.2 Contact details
Yayasan IAR Indonesia Bogor
PO Box 125, Bogor 16001, Indonesia
Telephone: +62-(0)251-838 9232
Email: [email protected]
Yayasan IAR Indonesia Ketapang
Jl. Woltermongonsidi,RT.09/RW.03, Kel. Kauman
Kec. Benua Kayong, Kab. Ketapang, Indonesia
Telephone: +62-(0)534-3038075
Email: [email protected]
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2.3 Funding
Funding sources for IAR Indonesia include IAR UK which raises money through direct
marketing in the UK as well as several big funding bodies like the Ocean Park Conservation
Foundation Hong Kong, the Australian Orangutan Project, Rufford Small Grants for Nature
Conservation and others. Further information about the charity’s financial activity can be
found in the Annual Review posted on the website under Publications in the Media section.
2.4 Animal species of IAR Indonesia
Please see Appendix 1
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3. VOLUNTEER PROGRAMME AT IAR INDONESIA
3.1 IAR Indonesia Requirements

Experience in animal care. To become a volunteer for IAR Indonesia, you must first send
your Curriculum Vitae to: [email protected]
You will then be asked to attend an interview either personally or via Skype conference.

Fluent spoken English. Most of the people who work for IAR Indonesia are local people
and they only speak a little English. We recommend that you learn some Indonesian
before travelling to the country (please see Appendix 3).

Volunteers must obtain a sosial budaya (social cultural) visa you cannot come on a
tourist visa.

Volunteers should be physically fit.

The minimum time required to volunteer at one of our IAR centers in Indonesia is one
month. It is advised to stay at least two months or longer as there is a period of
adjustment and you will need some time to familiarize yourself with the work.

IAR provides accommodation and vegetarian food (once a day). We ask volunteers to
pay 3.000.000 rupiahs (approximately 250 Euros) per month to stay at our centre in
Java and 5.000.000 rupiahs (approximately 425 Euros) per month to stay at our centre
in Kalimantan. Volunteers will be charged for a minimum of one month by the finance
manager in Indonesia, either Ciapus or Ketapang upon receiving payment. Payment will
ONLY be received in Indonesian Rupiah.

We do not accept volunteers who want to work with the orangutans in Ketapang unless
they have previous work experience with orangutans. Our aim is to release the animals
back into the wild and we want to make sure they have little contact with humans.
Volunteers that prove themselves in Ciapus, Java working with Macaques and Slow
Lorises may be considered for any vacancies in Ketapang. However, if you really want to
do something to help our orangutans you can assist with building our desperately
needed new rehabilitation centre. For more information on this volunteer opportunity
please visit: http://www.thegreatprojects.com/projects/iar-orangutan-project
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3.2. General information and recommendations

Money: There are ATM machines in bigger cities and at the airport on which you can
draw out money. Additionally, it is always good to bring a small amount of cash
(preferably US Dollars).

Tropical climate: humidity and high temperatures all year. Also a lot of rain if you stay in
the rainy season. However, you should bring 1-2 jumpers if you are going to stay at
Ciapus as it can get chilly in the evenings.

Different work rhythm: in Indonesia everything is done in a more relaxed fashion than
in Western Countries; you may find it hard to adjust at first. You will need to be very
patient!

Both of our centers are quite remote. There aren’t many people to talk to - but there
are lots of insects.

To keep in contact with your friends and family at home it is the easiest that you get an
Indonesian SIM-card as soon as you are in the country.

We have a guesthouse in Ciapus but there is presently no guesthouse in Ketapang.
However, you can get a room in one of the IAR rented houses. Accommodation is
simple but comfortable: bedrooms are made of bamboo and there is no hot running
water.

In order to prevent diseases you must pay attention to point 5.1 about vaccinations. To
avoid possible transmission of diseases from animals to humans and vice versa it is
important that you follow our hands-off protocol and you stick to the centre’s hygiene
measures.

We recommend having a dental check-up before departure.
We advise you to bring:

Comfortable clothes. Please keep in mind, that Indonesia is a predominately Muslim
country, therefore women will be expected to dress modest (not to wear clothing
like skimpy tops, singlet t-shirts, shorts or mini-skirts). If you are going to work in the
forest your clothes should be suitable i.e. long-sleeves and preferably have forest
colours (green/browns) as bright and colorful clothing might disturb wildlife.

Rucksack

Mosquito net and insect repellent

Torch/head torch

Sleeping bag (in Ketapang preferably sleeping bag liner)
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
Waterproof jacket

Wellington-, or trekking boots and sandals.

Medication kit:
Most medical supplies will be available at the pharmacies in Bogor and Ketapang.
However, you should bring a personal first aid medical kit including pain killers, antiinflammatory, anti-diarrheal tablets, sachets of re-dehydration powder to
compensate dehydration due to diarrhea or excessive perspiration etc.
We recommend that you ask a professional for advice on the medicines to bring.
You should also ensure to bring sufficient quantities of any medication which is
routinely used e.g. inhalers for asthma.
3.3 Staying in the guesthouse

The IAR guesthouse in Ciapus is made out of bamboo. Each room has an en suite
bathroom. The guesthouse in Ketapang is made out of stone and concrete with a shared
bathroom. You will have your own room but there is no running hot water in both
facilities.

You are required to clean your own room and keep the general area tidy.

All utensils should be cleaned and put back in its appropriate places.

We have washing machines at both sites which you can use for your laundry.

As you will be sharing a common area with other volunteers or researchers, please keep
track of your food and do not take the food of others. If you must, label your food in the
fridge or cupboards.

We have many lovely dogs at the guesthouse in Ciapus, they are considered to be
residents too, please do not get upset if they come into your rooms. They will leave if
you ask them to. Keep your doors closed or potential dog toys (which could literally be
everything) out of reach.

Please be very considerate when staying in the guesthouse, do not make noise after 10
pm in-, or outside the house. If you are going to play music or watch a movie, please use
headphones as your room mates may not want to participate.
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3.4 Internet service at IAR

The IAR centres and the guesthouse in Ciapus have WIFI service.

During heavy storms and lighting the WIFI will be switched off for safety reasons.

Volunteers are allowed to use the internet at their own will but are not allowed to
download movies during working hours. If you choose to do so you can do this during
the weekend. Please be considerate as downloading slows down the internet for others
as well.

You are NOT allowed to access pornographic websites using the centre’s network.
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4. LEGAL REQUESTS TO TRAVEL TO INDONESIA
It is compulsory to submit a legal request to travel to Indonesia and this can take a
considerable length of time. IAR Indonesia recommends that you start the process at least
two months before travelling.
4.1 Visa
The Indonesian authorities stipulate that anyone who would like to do voluntary work in
Indonesia must obtain a sosial-budaya (social-cultural) visa. Please check the website of the
Indonesian Embassy in your home country for details and requirements. You can find
instructions how to complete the sosial-budaya visa application form in Appendix 2. You will
be asked for a letter of recommendation from the organisation for which you are
volunteering. IAR Indonesia will provide you with this letter. With this visa you will be
allowed to stay first for two months and with the possibility to extend this visa up to six
months while you are still in Indonesia. After six months you are obliged to leave the
country. In this situation, you can apply for a new visa in any Indonesian embassy abroad.
We recommend that you inform the embassy of your country in Indonesia about your stay
as a precautionary measure in case of emergencies. You can find out about the process of
registration on the website of your embassy.
5. MEDICAL INFORMATION
5.1 Vaccinations
As a recommendation of the World Health Organization (WHO), you must be vaccinated
against hepatitis A and B, tetanus, diphtheria, polio, rabies, meningitis and typhoid and take
the malaria prophylaxis to travel to certain areas in Indonesia. There is no malaria in Ciapus
but there is in Ketapang. Prophylactic anti-malarial tablets do not provide total protection
therefore you should take precautions to avoid being bitten, especially in the evenings.
Mosquitoes can also transmit other diseases like dengue fever. As an additional precaution
IAR Indonesia recommends that you consult a professional medical service in your country
before making a trip to Indonesia.
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5.2 Health certificate
The centre’s regulations stipulate that anyone working hands-on with the animals must be
free from HIV, hepatitis A, B, C and tuberculosis, and must be vaccinated against hepatitis A,
B, rabies and tetanus. Upon arrival at the centre, you will be required to show an official
health certificate with the proof of vaccinations and test results (including hepatitis B
antibody titer). In the case of tuberculosis, a tuberculin test result or a chest x-ray must be
provided (if already vaccinated, only chest x-ray).
Volunteers arriving from a different continent will be required to go through a period of
quarantine in which they will not be allowed to have close contact or handle the animals or
their food. This quarantine period is stipulated as 10 days for Ketapang and 5 days for
Ciapus. Common viruses and other microbes (like flu viruses) are different in different
regions of the globe. In particular the baby orangutans at the centre are immunecompromised and very susceptible to becoming infected with these “new” pathogens.
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6. VOLUNTEER ACTIVITIES
First of all, remember to allow yourself time to adjust and adapt to the way of living and
working in Indonesia. As long as you’re prepared for a different way of life, you’ll make the
most of this wonderful opportunity. Activities at the centre can be subject to change for any
number of reasons – unpredictable weather, poor transport, or a variety of other
unforeseen events. So it’s very difficult to draw up a timetable. However, below are some of
the many activities you can be involved in. If you have any other ideas, please do not
hesitate to make other suggestions. We want you to get the most out of this experience.
Enrichment:
Enrichment is every addition to the environment of an animal in captivity that offers it the
opportunity to behave naturally and therefore improve its welfare. The best is to start
working with the animal keepers for one week to get familiar with their routines, the
different types of food we offer the animals (which might be used in enrichment) and to
recognize abnormal or problematic behaviour. Enrichment can have different purposes; we
use enrichment mainly to stimulate natural behaviour, decrease abnormal behaviour,
reduce boredom and to encourage activity. Since the animals will be released back into the
wild, enrichment out of natural objects which stimulates natural behaviour is preferential.
Please discuss your ideas with a member of staff; they can help you and give advice.
Animal care:
Helping the animal keepers at the centre. There is a daily schedule of activities, which for the
macaques starts at 07.00 o’clock until 16.00 o’clock. For the nocturnal slow lorises, the
keepers have two shifts that run from 2 pm to 3 am. Activities include preparing food,
feeding of the animals, cleaning of the enclosures and surroundings and doing behavioural
observations.
Behavioural observations:
Conducting behavioural observations might contribute to a current project at IAR, or to a
specific purpose for which you might want to do the observations. Observations can be done
on the macaques or on the slow lorises. IAR uses a standard method for noting observations.
This way, the data gathered over the years can be compared and saved in one database.
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Assisting veterinarians:
Veterinarians or veterinarian assistants can help the IAR veterinary in the daily medical
activities like giving medication, check-ups, routine tests and quarantine protocols, rescue
operations and surgeries. It is not possible to predict what sort of medical activities will take
place during your stay and when. Therefore, this can best be combined with any of the other
activities, to prevent from getting bored when it is quiet at the clinic.
Teaching English:
The staff at IAR Indonesia is predominantly local. Although many understand at least some
English, a lot of them want to practice and learn more. English lessons can be given after 16
o’clock, when the animal keepers are off. In the office is a writing board you can use, or you
can use a laptop with projector.
Helping with educational program:
The educational program at IAR Indonesia focuses mainly on the schools around the village.
Do you have experience as a teacher, or can you come up with ideas how to convey
knowledge to children? Our educational staff can always use input! Or do you want to
organize an activity for the children in the village? Basic Indonesian is useful if you want to
organize a specific activity. But for other input for the educational program, this can be done
in English!
Writing activities:
You don’t have to be a journalist or writer to help us with updating our website blogs about
the work at the centre and the progress of the animals. We have many ideas for stories and
articles but no time to write them all. After the story has been written in English, it will be
translated to Indonesian. We can also always use help with grant proposals and funding
applications. If you like to write we can find something that suits you.
Documenting the life at the centre:
Are you skilled with a video camera? Then you might like to document the life at the centre
and compose short videos we can use to show others what we do in our centre.
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Appendix 1: Animal species of IAR Indonesia
Slow lorises (Nycticebus coucang, Nycticebus menagensis & Nycticebus javanicus)
Lorises are small, nocturnal primates which belong together with the galagos (bushbabies)
and pottos of Africa to the infraorder Lorisiformes. Considered cute exotic pets, they are
high in demand. The slow loris is in Indonesia also known as malu-malu or ‘the shy one’.
Until 2007 there were only two species recognised, however, due to the remarkable
diversity in their morphology there has been a major taxonomic revision resulting in five by
IUCN recognised species.
Since the 1950s, Borneo, Java, Sumatra and their surrounding islands were thought to be
inhabited by a single slow loris species, the greater slow loris Nycticebus coucang but there
are at least three species native to this region: Nycticebus coucang, Nycticebus menagensis,
and Nycticebus javanicus.
Due to a lack of knowledge regarding morphological differences between the three species,
they are still managed as one, with serious affects to wild populations, as hard-release of
individuals of unknown geographic origin is common.
Classification:
Order: Primates
Infraorder: Lorisiformes
Family: Lorisidae
Genus: Nycticebus
Distribution and Habitat:
Lorises live in the tropical, primary and secondary forest, in the bush and amongst bamboo
forests. They can be found in Indonesia in the islands of Java, Sumatra, and Kalimantan, but
there are no data of their current population in the wild. Their habitat can be used as an
indicator of the wild population, but the trafficking is decreasing the populations and makes
this work more difficult.
The main poaching locations in Indonesia are Kabupaten Sumedang (Sumedang Regency)
and Sukabumi in West Java.
Morphology:
Slow lorises are covered with short, thick, woolly fur, which is found in a wide variety of
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colors from light brownish gray to deep reddish brown, sometimes with a hoary effect
produced by the tips of individual hairs. They have a dark stripe down their back and their
tail is reduced to a stump. They have extra vertebrae in their backs, giving them a greater
tree-climbing advantage since they can twist around above and below branches with wide
range and extension of movement. This genus produces a toxin from brachial glands on its
arms, and a toothcomb on the lower jaw may help the loris transfer the toxin. The large eyes
of the lorises help them to see at night. They have a crystalline layer at the back of their eyes
between the retina and choriod layer that reflects light back through the retina, increasing
the stimulation of its photoreceptors and allowing vision at low light levels.
Diet:
Besides being active by night, all members of this group are relatively small tree-dwellers
that feed alone. All lorises eat some animal protein, whether in the form of invertebrate or
vertebrate prey. The energy value of invertebrate food is high, and most species will select
invertebrates over other food types if given a choice. They supplement their diet with fruit,
which can be found in large quantities. Eating vertebrate prey is generally rare, thought
some species have been known to take small birds and reptiles.
Behaviour:
They are small animals, stealthily stalking insects or seeking fruit at night and spending the
day in hollow trees or clinging to branches. Lorises climb with deliberate, hand-over-hand
movements, never leaping between branches. While their actions are usually slow and
deliberate, they are capable of moving rapidly if necessary, especially when disturbed or in
search of food. The hands and feet of lorids are capable of powerful grasping, and these
animals travel along the underside of branches as easily as along the top. Their tails are very
short, seemingly absent in some species.
Slow lorises live solitarily, but form stable social units (‘spatial groups’), consisting of one
male, one female and up to three younger individuals.
Because of their solitary behaviour they mark trees with their urine to avoid direct conflict
with other individuals. This is done by urinating on their hands and wiping it onto tree trunks
and branches. They are completely nocturnal and sleep during the day curled up in hollow
trees, crevices, or simply along a branch. Lorises may protect themselves and their young
from predators using a toxin.
Slow lorises have communication systems typical of prosimians. They use scent cues to
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communicate and to mark territories. They use vocalizations, including calls and whistles, to
attract mates. Tactile communication in grooming and aggression are common. The role of
visual signals in this species' communication has not been identified, but body postures and
facial expressions are likely to be communicative.
Conservation and trade:
In the past considered as “Least Threatened” all taxa are now listed by IUCN as
“Endangered” (N.javaniscus) due to a suspected decline of at least 50% over the last three
generations or “Vulnerable” (N. bengalensis, N. coucang, N. menagensis, N. pygmaeus) due
to a decline of more than 30% as a result of habitat loss and unsustainable levels of
harvesting for the pet trade and traditional medicines. They also have been transferred to
CITES Appendix I precluding all international commercial trade.
Lorises are not difficult to discover in areas of secondary forest or forestry plantations and
they make easy targets as, being nocturnal, they are sleeping during the day. To avoid being
bitten and to give the false impression to prospective buyers that slow lorises are tame,
traders cut off or extract the animals’ teeth using pliers. Many animals suffer from infections
following the teeth extraction. In addition to a severe level of stress and inappropriate
handling and housing of the animals the mortality rates are high.
Beside being traded as exotic pets, slow lorises are also killed for bush meat and “traditional
medicine”. It is believed that the meat of slow loris increase male power and acts as an
aphrodisiac. The bone of the slow loris is also believed to have the magical power to avert
danger or is used as a lucky charm to give peace in the household.
Greater Slow Loris (Nycticebus coucang)
Conservation status: Vulnerable (IUCN), Appendix I (CITES)
Distribution: Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. In Indonesia found on Batang,
Pulau Tebingtinggi, Batam and Galang in the Riau Archipelago, Belitung, Bangka and
Bunguran in the North Natuna Islands, Panang, and Sumatra.
Habitat: Primary and secondary lowland rainforest, lower freshwater swamp forest,
secondary Padang savanna and resin plantations.
Morphology: Head–body length: 30–34 cm; Weight: 635–850 g
N. coucang is the most richly colored of the lorises, with pelage light brown to crimson red
with slight frosting on the flanks, and not paler on the neck. The chest is a little grayer than
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the belly. The ears are short.
Diet: The diet includes mainly fruits, supplemented with leaves, shoots, saps, gums, flowers,
seeds, bird’s eggs, and animal prey (including insects and the occasional bird).
Social structure: One to three animals interact in overlapping home ranges varying from
about 10 ha to 25 ha. Their social organization is uni-male, uni-female, but mating is
promiscuous, with multiple males pursuing a single estrus female. Social behaviors include
allogrooming, foraging together and contact during the night, adult/infant play, and
interactive vocalizations.
Javan Slow Loris (Nycticebus javanicus)
Conservation status: Endangered (IUCN),
Appendix I (CITES)
Distribution: West and Central Java
Habitat: Tropical rainforest, primary and secondary forests, and plantations. Primary and
secondary disturbed lowland to highland rainforest, bamboo forest, mangrove forest and
plantations, including chocolate plantations. The Javan Slow Loris can thrive in cultivated
areas.
Morphology: Weight: 750-1150 g; Head and body length: 223-346mm
The neck is creamy, and the dorsal stripes and head forks are reddish to blackish, thin and
sharply marked. The pale color of the head, neck and upper back often cause confusion with
bengalensis, especially in museum collections. The diamond pattern that forms between the
eyes is a defining character of the species. The ears are small with tufts. The second incisor is
always absent.
Diet: Omnivorous. The species gouges gum from legumes such as Albizia (Fabaceae) and can
create enormous holes doing so. They can survive in farmbush where they also drink palm
wine and eat domestic crops. Reintroduced animals have been seen to spend 90% of the
time licking up nectar, especially from Calliandra calothyrsus (Fabaceae) flowers.
Social structure: Javan Slow Lorises have been seen in sleeping groups in bamboo of up to
seven animals (sex and age
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unknown). Wounds are very common in both males and
females, suggesting territorial fights. These wounds may be inflicted by the slow loris’
venom. Animals are heavily hunted and it is not known what disruption and impact hunting
has on social organization, and thus on fighting. A whistle or irritated “chitter” is used during
conflict. Other vocalizations include an affiliative (friendly) “krik” call. Slow lorises also
sometimes produce a low buzzing hiss or growl when mildly disturbed (e.g., when pushed
out of a nest box). On making contact with other individuals, they emit a single high-pitched
rising tone, and females use a high whistle when in estrus.
Bornean
Slow
Loris
(Nycticebus
menagensis)
Conservation
status:
Vulnerable
(IUCN),
Appendix I (CITES)
Distribution: Brunei, Indonesia (Kalimantan
Borneo), Malaysia (Sabah
Borneo),
and
the
and Sarawak
Philippines
(Sulu
Archipelago). Ethnographic survey records
suggest local extinction on some islands of the Tawitawi group (Philippines), though the
species is still likely found on some other small islands. Old reports from Mindanao are
erroneous.
Habitat: Primary, secondary, tropical, moist, montane, evergreen, peat swamp, submontane
evergreen,
coastal lowland, riparian, dry coastal, gallery, and deciduous forests.
Morphology: Weight: 265-800 g; Head and body length: 270-300 mm
The fur is pale golden to red and the head markings are virtually lacking but a dark dorsal
stripe is almost always present. The ears are short and close to the head, almost giving the
appearance that the animal has no ears. There is a consistent absence of a second upper
incisor.
Diet: One observation was made of these lorises eating gum. Based on its cranio-dental
morphology, it has been proposed that this species might be more insectivorous than its
congeners.
Social structure: Very little is known about its social organization. The species is very
reluctant to enter traps and has not yet been held in captivity.
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Macaques (long-, and pig-tailed macaques)
Classification:
Order: Primates
Family: Cercopithecidae
Subfamily: Cercopithecinae
Genus: Macaca
Distribution and Habitat:
Aside humans macaques are the most widely spread primate genus worldwide, ranging from
Japan to Afghanistan. Barbary macaque is the only species that can be found in Africa.
Macaques inhabit a wide range of habitats, from equatorial to temperate ecosystems, and
from evergreen primary forests to grasslands, mangrove swamps, semi-deserts or areas
settled by humans. Long-, and pig-tailed macaques have extensive distributions, which
include diverse types of habitat.
Morphology:
Macaques are semi-terrestrial. They possess powerful jaws, with an arrangement of muscles
designed to give an effective “nutcracker” action between the back teeth. Their face is
rather long.
The coat is generally grey-brown, but the naked skin on face and rump may be bright red;
females develop a sexual swelling around the vulva. In animals normally swelling increases in
size during the first, follicular phase of the menstrual cycle and decreases after ovulation;
adult males will not usually attempt to mate with a female unless she has a swelling. Tails
are mostly shorter than body length or totally absent, depending on species. Males are
somewhat larger than females.
New born macaques have short, velvety fur, often of a colour that contrasts with the pelage
of the adult: olive-brown. The infant male macaque has a very large empty scrotum. In the
third month, the natal coat begins to be replaced by a juvenile coat, which is usually a
fluffier version of the adult pattern.
Diet:
Macaques are primarily frugivorous, but they are opportunistic feeders. Their diet includes
plenty of other things that are edible in any forest: seeds, flowers, buds, leaves, bark, gum,
roots, bulbs and rhizomes, insects, snails, crabs, fish, lizards, birds and small mammals;
anything that is digestible and not poisonous is fair game. Most food is caught or gathered
with the hands. Selection and preparation of food is learned from observation, initially of
21 | P a g e
the mother. This transmission of information is a crucial function of group living: the troop is
primarily an educational establishment. Species that live near water use aquatic foods.
Behaviour:
Macaques are slow to mature, slow to reproduce and live a long time. Most macaques
conceive during a limited mating season. It is climate that drives breeding seasonality
through its effects on food supply. A single infant is born after a gestation of 5-6 month
(twins are very rare). The newborn infant is furred, and its eyes are open; it often grasps at
the mother’s hair with its hand even before the legs and feet have emerged. Infants cling to
the mother’s belly immediately, and usually support their own weight, although the mother
typically puts a hand to the infant’s back, supporting it as she moves about during the first
few hours.
In a lot of macaque species, females form matrilines, i.e., subgroups of relatives of relatives
who help one another in contests. As a result of this, the dominance status of individuals
depends on their support of their allies, and strict rules of rank inheritance determine the
social status of females.
The mother-daughter bond typically lasts for life; in contrast the mother bond with her son
lasts only until sexual maturity, when the young adult males of most species leave their natal
groups and enter another one or become solitary for a while. Beyond infancy, the bond is
seen in the frequency of grooming or sitting together, and in mutual defence. Juveniles also
form bonds with their siblings, and where hierarchies are in evidence, a female may rank
just below her mother but just above her older sisters. Males lose their inherited rank when
they leave the troop, but a young male may join the same new troop as his older brother,
who helps with his introduction. The basic unit of macaques’ social organisation is the
matriline, in which daughters stay with their mother as long as they live, while males usually
leave the natal groups at around adolescence.
In general, troops live within a defined home range. The range is the “property” of the
females which form the permanent nucleus of the troop. The male troop members are more
transitory. They may remain in a troop for periods ranging from a few weeks to as long 2-3
years, but rarely more. Macaques have been categorised into one-male and multi-male
group species. Males will tolerate each other’s presence in a troop; nonetheless, a small
troop may still include only a single fully adult male. Males living together in a troop will
establish a hierarchy based on the outcome of competitive interactions. The rank order is
not very stable, but changes with age, or as males join or leave the group. When there are
fewer than 4 adult males in the group, the dominant male is able to monopolise most of the
22 | P a g e
matings, providing not too many females are receptive at the same time; when there are
more the dominant male cannot keep all his rivals away from the females, and matings are
more widely distributed.
Conservation and trade:
All primates can be considered threatened by the severe rate of habitat loss and are
particularly vulnerable due of their slow reproductive rate. Macaques are highly hunted for
bush meat, traditional medicine, pet trade and are the most widely primate genus used for
medical research. Whilst the threats to macaques are well-known, little is known about the
status, density and distribution of wild populations. The classification of some macaque
species as Least Concern is often based on deficient data and could therefore be misleading.
23 | P a g e
Long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis)
Conservation Status: Least Concern (IUCN), Appendix
II
Distribution: Long-tailed macaques are widespread
throughout the islands of Southeast Asia into
mainland Asia: Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam,
Cambodia, India, Indonesia; Lao People's Democratic
Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore,
Thailand, Timor-Leste, Vietnam, Mauritius, Palau, Papua New Guinea.
Habitat: The species is extremely adaptable and inhabits a broad variety of habitats:
primary, secondary, coastal, mangrove, swamp, and riverine, forests up to 2000m. These
macaques are tolerant of humans and may be found near villages.
Morphology: The body of long-tail macaques varies from gray to reddish brown, with lighter
underparts. The hair on the crown of the head grows directly backward, often resulting in a
pointed crest. The face is pinkish. Males have cheek whiskers and a mustache, females have
a beard. Infants are born black.
Diet: Fruit: 64%; seeds, buds, leaves, other plants parts, and animal prey such as insects,
frogs and crabs. These macaques can be crop raiders.
Life History:
Weaning
1 months
Age 1st birth
6 months
Sexual maturity: 50-52 months
Birth interval: 12-24 months
Estrus cycle
Life span
days
1,1 years
Gestation: 160-170 days
Social structure: Mulitmale-mulitfemale groups with 2,5 females to 1 male in the average
troop. Groups often split into subgroups. All juvenile males emigrate latest by age 7, most at
age 4-5.
Group size: 10-48, up to 100
Home range: 25-200ha
Day range: 150-1500m to 1900m
24 | P a g e
Pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina)
Conservation Status: Vulnerable (IUCN), Appendix II
Distribution: Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia,
Thailand, Singapore
Habitat: Lowland primary and secondary forest and
coastal, swamp, dry land, and montane forests up to
1700m.
Morphology: Pig-tailed macaques are olive brown
above, with white underparts. The top of the head is dark brown. The tail is short, slender,
and thinly furred or naked.
Diet: Fruit and seeds 73,8%, animal prey (insects, nesting birds, termite eggs and larvae and
river crabs, 12,2% leaves; 5,4 % buds; 3& flowers; 1,1% other plant matter. More than 160
plants are used. In Sumatra these macaques may raid ripe corn crops and oil palms.
Life History:
Weaning
1 months
Se ual maturity
Estrus cycle
estation
months
days
Age 1st birth: 44-47 months
Birth interval: 12-24 months
Life span
6, years
171 days
Social structure: Multimale-multifemale groups, with a ratio of 1 male to 5-8 females.
Females have a matrilineal dominance hierarchy. Males emigrate when they are 5-6 years
old and remain solitary or peripheral to a group.
Group size: 15-40
Home range: 62-828ha
Day range: 2000m
25 | P a g e
Appendix 2: Social Budaya Visa Application Instructions
These instructions are meant to assist you in the process to apply for a social/cultural (social
budaya) visa. A lot of visa applications get refused due to false statement but if you follow
this guidance you should not have problems. However, please note that IAR cannot be held
responsible for the case your visa gets rejected. If you print off the application form
(available on the Indonesian Embassy website) it is essential that it is double sided on one
sheet of A4 paper, single sided application forms will automatically be rejected. Please
attach your photo with glue, do not staple it to the form.
I. General
Port of Entry Into Indonesia:
This is the airport your international flight arrives (Jakarta)
Date of Entry:
This is the date you arrive at port of entry above
Length of Stay in Indonesia:
This is the number of days you are in Indonesia. When
calculating this you should count the day you arrive as day
number one. Fill in the day box only and leave the month
and year box blank.
Type of Visa:
Put a tick in the ‘Single Visit’ bo
For Transit Purposes
Country of Destination:
Leave this blank
Port of Departure:
Leave this blank
Flight/Vessel Name and No:
Leave this blank
For Visit Purposes
Type of Visit:
Put a tick in the ‘Family/Social’ bo
Country of Destination:
Indonesia
Place of Visit:
West Java
Flight/Vessel Name & No:
This is the name of the airline and the flight number of the
flight that you will arrive with in Jakarta. For example, if you
will arrive on Emirates Airlines flight EK750 you should write
‘Emirates EK7 0’
26 | P a g e
For Limited Stay Purpose
Purpose of Stay:
Put a tick in the ‘Social’ bo
Address in Indonesia:
Yayasan International Animal Rescue,
Ciapus: Jl. Curug Nangka, Kp.Sinarwangi, RT.04/05
Ketapang: Jl. Wolter Mongosidi, RT.09/03
City:
Ciapus: 16610 Ciapus-Bogor
Ketapang: 78821 Ketapang
Province:
Ciapus: West Java
Ketapang: West Kalimantan
Phone Number:
Ciapus: +62 (0)251-8389232
Ketapang: +62 (0)534-3038075
II. Personal Data
First Name:
This is your first name as it appears on your passport
Middle Name:
This is your middle name as it appears on your passport. If
you do not have a middle name leave this blank
Family/Surname:
This is your surname as it appears on your passport
Sex:
Put a tick in the correct box
Marital Status:
Put a tick in the correct box
Place of Birth:
This is your place of birth as it appears on your passport
Date of Birth:
This is your date of birth in the Day/Month/Year format
Nationality:
Put down your nationality
Address in XY:
This is your address in the country of your residence
City:
This is the city part of your address.
County/Postcode:
This is the county/postcode part of your address
Phone Number
This is your home phone number. If you do not have a home
phone leave this blank
Mobile Number:
This is your mobile phone number. If you do not have a
mobile phone leave this blank
Occupation/Position:
If you are a student tick the bo that says ‘Student’. If you
are not a student put a tick in the bo that says ‘Other’
Name of Company:
If you are a student this is the name of the University that
you attend. If you are not a student this is the name of the
27 | P a g e
company you work for
Address:
This is the first line of the address for the academic
institution/company that you wrote down above
City:
This is the city part of the address for the academic
institution/company that you wrote down above
County/Postcode:
This is the county and postcode parts of the address for the
academic institution/company that you wrote down above
Phone Number:
This
is
the
phone
number
for
the
academic
institution/company that you wrote down above
Fax #:
This is the fax number for the academic institution/company
that you wrote down above
III. Passport Information
Please Note: If you have dual nationality only put down one set of passport details. This is
the passport that you will be travelling to Indonesia on.
Passport/Travel
Document
This is your passport number
Number:
Place of Issue:
This is the place your passport was issued from
Date of Issue:
This is the date your passport was issued as it appears on
your passport
Date of Expire:
This is the date your passport will expire as it appears on
your passport
Type of Passport:
Put a tick in the correct box. For most people this will be
‘Personal’
Family details for holder of
If you put a tick in the ‘Personal’ bo above, leave this blank.
Family Passport:
If you put a tick in the ‘Family’ bo above, fill in the details
IV. Sponsorship In Indonesia
Type of Sponsor:
Put a tick in the NGO box
Sponsor’s Name:
Yayasan International Animal Rescue
Address:
Ciapus: Jl. Curug Nangka, Kp.Sinarwangi, RT.04/05
Ketapang: Jl. Wolter Mongosidi, RT.09/03
28 | P a g e
City:
Ciapus: 16610 Ciapus-Bogor
Ketapang: 78821 Ketapang
Province:
Ciapus: West Java
Ketapang: West Kalimantan
Phone Number:
Ciapus: +62 (0)251-8389232
Ketapang: +62 (0)534-3038075
V. Miscellaneous
Have you ever been to
Put a circle around the correct answer
Indonesia before?
Are you in possession of
Put a circle around the correct answer.
other
travel documents could be visa’s to enter other countries,
countries’
Travel
Documents?
work permits for other countries etc.
Do you have previous visa to
Put a circle around the correct answer
Other counties
enter Indonesia?
Have your visa application
For most people the answer will be No. If you have had a
been denied before?
visa application for Indonesia denied in the past you should
contact the IAR Management
Have you ever been forced to
For most people the answer will be No. If you have ever
leave Indonesia?
been forced to leave Indonesia you should contact the IAR
Management
Have you ever committed a
Put a circle around the correct answer. Please note that
crime or any offence?
traffic offences are not to be included
Return/Through
Write Return then the name of the airline that you are using.
Ticket/Airline Company:
For e ample; ‘Return, Emirates’
Place of Issue:
This is the name and location of the travel agent from whom
you purchased your tickets. For e ample; ‘Flight Centre,
O ford’. If you bought your tickets online then the location
is online. For e ample; ‘Emirates, Online’
Date of issue:
This is the date your tickets were issued. This is usually the
date they were purchased
29 | P a g e
Date of expire:
This is the date the tickets expire. This is usually either six or
twelve months after the tickets were issued. If you are
unsure please check with your travel agent
Please do not forget to sign the application form before you send it in
30 | P a g e
Appendix 3: Indonesian Vocabulary
Verbs:
ENGLISH - INDONESIAN
ENGLISH
INDONESIAN
ENGLISH
INDONESIAN
TO AGE
BEREMUR
TO GO TO SLEEP
PERGI TIDUR, PERGI KE
TEMPAT TIDUR
TO ASK
BERTANYA,
MENANYAKAN
TO GO WORKING
PERGI BEKERJA
MEMESAN
TO HAVE
MEMILIKI/MEMPUNYAI
TO BE
ADA
TO HAVE
PUNYA
TO BE
ADALAH
TO HAVE A SHOWER
MANDI
TO BE HUNGRY
LAPAR
TO
MAKAN PAGI
,MINTA
TO
ASK
FOR
SOMETHING
HAVE
BREAKFAST
TO BUY
MEMBELI
TO HAVE DINER
MAKAN MALAN
TO CAN
DAPAT
TO HAVE LUNCH
MAKAN SIANG
TO CLEAN YOUR TEETH
MENYIKAT GIGI, MENGGOSOK
TO HEAR
MENDENGAR
TO COME FROM
BERASAL (DARI)
TO JUMP
MELOMPAT
TO COOK
MEMASAK
TO KNOW
MENGETAHUI, TAHU
TO CRY
MENANGIS
TO
KNOW
MENGENAL
SOMEONE
TO DIE
MENINGGAL
TO LIKE
SUKA
TO DRINK
MINUM
TO LISTEN
MENDERGARKAN
TO EAT
MAKAN
TO LIVE
HIDUP
TO FLY
TERBANG
TO LIVE IN, TO STAY
TINGGAL
IN
TO GO
PERGI
TO LOVE
CINTA
TO GO HOME
PULANG
TO PLAY
BERMAIN
TO SPEAK
BERBICARA
TO STUDY
BELAJAR
TO SPELL
MENGEJA
TO SWIM
BERENANG
TO THROW
MELEMPARKAN
INDONESIANENGLISH
TO WRITE
MENULIS
MAKAN PAGI
TO HAVE BREAKFAST
TO WORK
BEKERJA
MAKAN SIANG
TO HAVE LUNCH
31 | P a g e
TO SPEAK
BERBICARA
MAKAN MALAM
TO HAVE DINER
TO UNDERSTAND
MENGERTI
MELOMPAT
TO JUMP
TO WAKE UP
BANGUN
MEMASAK
TO COOK
TO WALK
BERJALAN, JALAN
MEMBACA
TO READ
BERANGKAT
MEMBELI
TO BUY
TO WANT
MAU
MEMESAN
TO ASK FOR SOMETHING
TO WRITE
MENULIS
MEMILIKI/MEMPUN
TO HAVE
TO
WALK
OUT,
TO
LEAVE
YAI
TO WORK
BEKERJA
MENANGIS
TO CRY
TO SPEAK
BERBICARA
MENDENGAR
TO HEAR
TO SPELL
MENGEJA
MENDERGARKAN
TO LISTEN
TO STUDY
BELAJAR
MENGATAKAN
TO SAY
TO SWIM
BERENANG
MENGEJA
TO SPELL
TO THROW
MELEMPARKAN
MENGENAL
TO KNOW SOMEONE
TO UNDERSTAND
MENGERTI
MENGERTI
TO UNDERSTAND
TO WAKE UP
BANGUN
MELEMPARKAN
TO THROW
TO WALK
BERJALAN, JALAN
MELOMPAT
TO JUMP
BERANGKAT
MEMASAK
TO COOK
MAU
MEMBACA
TO READ
MEMBELI
TO BUY
MEMESAN
TO ASK FOR SOMETHING
MEMILIKI/MEMPUN
TO HAVE
TO
WALK
OUT,
TO
LEAVE
TO WANT
YAI
MENDERGARKAN
TO LISTEN
MANDI
TO HAVE A SHOWER
MAU
TO WANT
MENGEJA
TO SPELL
MENGETAHUI, TAHU
TO KNOW
MENINGGAL
TO DIE
MENJUAL
TO SELL
MENULIS
TO WRITE
MENYIKAT
GIGI,
TO CLEAN YOUR TEETH
MENGGOSOK
MINUM
32 | P a g e
TO DRINK
MENANGIS
TO CRY
MENDENGAR
TO HEAR
PERGI
TO GO
PERGI BEKERJA
TO GO WORKING
PERGI TIDUR
TO GO TO SLEEP
PULANG
TO GO HOME
PUNYA
TO HAVE
SUKA
TO LIKE
TINGGAL
TO LIVE IN, TO STAY IN
TERBANG
TO FLY
TIDUR
TO SLEEP
VOCABULARY:
ENVELOPE
AMPLOP
HAIR
RAMBUT
MAGAZINE
MAJALAH
EYE
MATAHARI
HAND
TANGAN
MAN
PRIA
HAT
TOPI
MAP
PETA
F
FACE
WAJAH
HEAD
KEPALA
MARKET
PASAR
FAMILY
KELUARGA
HOLE
LUBANG
MASK
TOPENG
FAT
GEMUK
HORSE
KUDA
MEAT
DAGING
FISH
IKAN
HOUSE
RUMAH
MEDICINE
OBAT-OBATAN
FLOUR
TEPUNG
I
MIRROR
CERMIN
FIRE
API
ICE
ES
MONEY
UANG
FLOWER
BUNGA
INK
TINTA
MOON, MONTH
BULAN
FLY
LALAT
INSECT
SERANGGA
MOSQUITO
NYAMUK
FOOD
MAKANAN
ISLAND
PULAU
MOTHER
IBU
FOREST
HUTAN
J
MOUNTAIN
GUNNUNG
FORK
GARPU
JUNGLE
MOUSE
TIKUS
FOUNTAIN
PANCURAN
K
MUSCLE
OTOT
FOX
RUBAH
KEY
KUNCI
MUSHROOM
JAMUR
FRUIT
BUAH
KING
RAJAWALI
N
FUEL
BAHAN BAKAR
KITCHEN
DAPUR
NAIL
KUKU
NEEDLE
JARUM
G
RIMBA
L
GHOST
HANTU
LAKE
DANAU
NEST
SARANG
GIFT
KADO
LEAF
DAUN
NET
JARING
GLASS
GELAS
LEMON
JERUK SITRUN
NIGHT
MALAM
GOLD
EMAS
LINE
BARIS
NOISY
GADUH
GRAPES
ANGGUR
LIQUID
ENCER
NOSE
HIDUNG
H
33 | P a g e
M
O
NICE
ENAK
POCKET
SAKU
OFFICE
KANTOR
OIL
MINYAK
QUICK
CEPAT
SHOE
SEPATU
ONION
BAWANG
R
SHOP
TOKO
ORANGE
JERUK
RABBIT
SHORTS
CELANA
KELINCI
PENDEK
ORCHID
ANGGREK
RADIO
RADIO
SIGNATURE
TANDA
TANGAN
P
RAIN
HUJAN
SING
TANDA
PAINT
CAT
RAINCOAT
JAS HUJAN
SIT
DUDUK
PAINTING
LUKISAN
RESCUE
PERTOLONGAN
SKIRT
ROK BAWAH
PALACE
ISTANA
RICE
NASI
SKY
LANGIT
PANT
CELANA
ROAD
JALAN RAYA
SLEEP
TIDUR
PAPER
KERTAS
ROCK
KARANG
SMILE
SENYUMAN
PARK
TAMAN
ROOM
KAMAR
SMOKE
ASAP
PEANUT
KACANG TANAH
ROOM
RUANGAN
SNAIL
SIPUT
PENCIL
PENSIL
ROOT
AKAR
SNAKE
ULAR
PHARMACY
APOTEK
RUBBISH
SAMPAH
SNOW
SALJU
PICTURE
GAMBAR
S
SOAP
SABUN
PIG
BABI
SACK
KARUNG
SONG
LAGU
PILLOW
BANTAL
SALT
GARAM
SPIDER
LABA-LABA
PINEAPPLE
NANAS
SAND
PASIR
SPINACH
BAYAM
PLANE
KAPAL TERBANG
SANDAL
SANDAL
SPOON
SENDOK
PLATE
PIRING
SAUCE
SAOS
SRIMP
UDANG
POLICEMAN
POLISI
SCHOOL
SEKOLAH
STAR
BINTANG
PURSE
DOMPET
SCISSORS
GUNTING
STEAM
UAP
PUSH
DORONG
SEAFOOD
MAKANAN
STONE
BATU
STRAW
SEDOTAN
LAUT
Q
SHADOW
BAYANGAN
MINUMAN
QUEEN
RATU
SHIP
KAPAL LAUT
STRAWBERRY
ARBEI
QUESTION
PERTANYAAN
SHIRT
KEMEJA
STREET
JALAN
34 | P a g e
USEFUL PHRASES:
ENGLISH INDONESIAN:
ALRIGHT
BAIKLAH
I´M ALONE
SAYA SENDIRIAN
ARE YOU THIRSTY?
APAKAH ANDA HAUS?
I´M READY
SAYA SUDAH SIAP
BE CAREFUL
HATI-HATI
I´M SORRY, HE IS
MAAF, DIA TIDAK ANDA
NOT IN
BIG
BESAR
I´M SURE
SAYA YAKIN
COME ON
AYO
I´M TIRED
SAYA LELAH
DO YOU MIND?
APAKAH ANDA KEBERATAN?
I´M WRONG
SAYA SALAH
DON´T TOUCH
JANGAN SENTUH!
IT´S COLD
HARI DINGIN
DON´T WORRY
JANGAN KHAWATIR
IT´S DANGEROUS
ITU BERBAHAYA
GO AWAY
PERGI
IT´S FUNNY
INI LUCU
GO ON!
TERUSKAN
IT´S HOT
HARI PANAS
HE IS MY FRIEND
DIA TEMAN SAYA
IT´S IMPORTANT
ITU PENTING
HOW LONG?
BERAPA LAMA?
IT´S IMPOSIBLE
ITU TIDAK MUNGKIN
HOW LONG HAVE YOU
BERAPA LAMA ANDA DI SINI?
IT´S OVER THERE
ITU DI SANA
I AM SICK
SAYA SAKIT
IT´S UP TO HER
TERSERAH PADANYA
I GO WITH YOU
SAYA PERGI DENGAN ANDA
IT´S URGENT
INI MENDESAK
I HAVE A PROBLEM
SAYA MEMPUNYAI PERSOALAN
IT´S VERY CHEAP
ITU SANGAT MURAH
I HAVE NO TIME
SAYA TIDAK PUNYA WAKTU
IT´S
ITU SANGAT MAHAL
BEEN HERE?
VERY
EXENSIVE
I KNOW
SAYA MENGERTI
LET´S
CHANGE
MARI KITA MENUKAR
THIS
INI
I LIKE IT VERY MUCH
SAYA SANGAT SUKA ITU
LET´S TAKE A REST
MARI KITA ISTIRAHAT
I MUST GO HOME
SAYA HARUS PULANG
LITTLE
KECIL
I NEED A REST
SAYA PERLU ISTIRAHAT
MAY
REPEAT THAT
ULANGI ITU
SHE IS EMBARRASSED
DIA DIPERMALUKAN
THAT´S NOT NECESSARY
ITU TIDAK PERLU
THAT´S YOURS?
ITU KEPUNYAAN ANDA
TRANSLATE THIS
TERJEMEHKAN INI
WAIT A MINUTE
TUNGGU SEBENTAR
WE ARE LOST
KAMI KESASAR
WHAT DO YOU WANT?
ADAKAH JANJI?
35 | P a g e
I
SMOKE
BOLEH SAYA MEROROK
HERE?
DI SINI?
SIGN HERE
TANDA TANGANI DI SINI
WHAT TIME IS IT?
JAM BERAPA?
WHAT´S THAT FOR
UNTUK APA ITU?
WHAT´S THAT?
APA ITU?
WHAT´S YOUR JOB?
APA PERKERJAAN ANDA?
WHEN DID YOU ARRIVE?
KAPAN ANDA TIBA?
WHEN WILL SHE BE BACK?
KAPAN DIA KEMBALI
WHERE ARE YOU GOING?
KEMANA ANDA PERGI?
WHERE DO YOU LIVE?
DI MANA ANDA TINGGAL?
WHERE DO YOU COME
DARI MANA ASAL ANDA?
FROM?
WHERE IS IT?
DIMANA ITU?
WHO ARE YOU?
SIAPA ANDA?
WHY NOT?
MENGAPA TIDAK?
YOU LOOK SO LONELY
ANDA NAMPAKNYA KESEPIAN
SPEAK LOUDER
BERBICARA DENGAN KERAS
INDONESIAN-ENGLISH:
ADAKAH JANJI?
WHAT DO YOU WANT?
ITU BERBAHAYA
IT´S DANGEROUS
ANDA
YOU LOOK SO LONELY
ITU DI SANA
IT´S OVER THERE
WHAT´S THAT?
ITU
THAT´S YOURS?
NAMPAKNYA
KESEPIAN
APA ITU?
KEPUNYAAN
ANDA
APA
PERKERJAAN
WHAT´S YOUR JOB?
ITU PENTING
IT´S IMPORTANT
APAKAH ANDA HAUS?
ARE YOU THIRSTY
ITU SANGAT MAHAL
IT´S VERY EXENSIVE
APAKAH
DO YOU MIND?
ITU SANGAT MURAH
IT´S VERY CHEAP
AYO
COME ON
ITU TIDAK MUNGKIN
IT´S IMPOSIBLE
BAIKLAH
ALRIGHT
ITU TIDAK PERLU
THAT´S
ANDA?
ANDA
KEBERATAN?
NOT
NECESSARY
BERAPA LAMA ANDA
HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN
DI SINI?
HERE?
BERAPA LAMA?
BERBICARA
DENGAN
KERAS
36 | P a g e
JAM BERAPA?
WHAT TIME IS IT?
HOW LONG?
JANGAN KHAWATIR
DON´T WORRY
SPEAK LOUDER
JANGAN SENTUH!
DON´T TOUCH
BESAR
BIG
KAMI KESASAR
WE ARE LOST
BOLEH SAYA MEROROK
MAY I SMOKE HERE?
KAPAN ANDA TIBA?
WHEN
DI SINI?
DARI
YOU
ARRIVE?
MANA
ASAL
WHERE DO YOU COME FROM?
KAPAN DIA KEMBALI
ANDA?
DI
DID
WHEN WILL SHE BE
BACK?
MANA
ANDA
WHERE DO YOU LIVE?
KECIL
SHE IS EMBARRASSED
KEMANA
LITTLE
TINGGAL?
DIA DIPERMALUKAN
ANDA
PERGI?
DIA TEMAN SAYA
HE IS MY FRIEND
MAAF,
WHERE IS IT?
ARE
YOU
GOING?
DIA
TIDAK
ANDA
DIMANA ITU?
WHERE
MARI
I´M SORRY, HE IS NOT
IN
KITA
LET´S TAKE A REST
KITA
LET´S CHANGE THIS
ISTIRAHAT
HARI DINGIN
IT´S COLD
MARI
MENUKAR INI
HARI PANAS
IT´S HOT
MENGAPA TIDAK?
WHY NOT?
HATI-HATI
BE CAREFUL
MUNGKIN TIDAK
PERHAPS NOT
INGATKAN SAYA
REMIND ME
PERGI
GO AWAY
INI LUCU
IT´S FUNNY
SAYA
HARUS
I MUST GO HOME
PULANG
INI MENDESAK
IT´S URGENT
SAYA PERGI DENGAN
I GO WITH YOU
ANDA
SAYA PERLU ISTIRAHAT
I NEED A REST
SAYA SAKIT
I AM SICK
SAYA SALAH
I´M WRONG
SAYA SANGAT SUKA
I LIKE IT VERY MUCH
ITU
SAYA SENDIRIAN
I´M ALONE
SAYA SUDAH SIAP
I´M READY
SAYA
I HAVE NO TIME
TIDAK
PUNYA
WAKTU
SAYA YAKIN
I´M SURE
SIAPA ANDA?
WHO ARE YOU?
SILAHKAN
BICARA
PLEASE SPEAK SLOWLY
PELAN
SILAHKAN
MENUKAR
INI
37 | P a g e
PLEASE CHANGE THIS
SAYA LELAH
I´M TIRED
TANDA
TANGANI
DI
SIGN HERE
SINI
TERJEMEHKAN INI
TRANSLATE THIS
TERSERAH PADANYA
IT´S UP TO HER
TERUSKAN
GO ON!
TIDAK APA-APA
NEVER MIND
TUNGGU SEBENTAR
WAIT A MINUTE
ULANGI ITU
REPEAT THAT
UNTUK APA ITU?
WHAT´S THAT FOR?
NUMBERS:
1
SATU
....
.....
2
DUA
100
SERATUS
3
TIGA
101
SERATUS SATU
4
EMPAT
110
SERATUS SEPULUH
5
LIMA
155
SERATUS
LIMA
LIMA
6
ENAM
......
.......
7
TUYU
1.000
SERIBU
8
DELAPAM
10.000
SEPULUH RIBU
9
SEMBILAN
100.000
SERATUS RIBU
10
SEPULUH
1.000.000
SATU JUTA
11
SEBELAS
12
DUA BELAS
13
TIGA BELAS
........
20
DUA PULUH
21
DUA PULUH SATU
22
DUA PULUH DUA
.....
.....
30
TIGA PULUH
40
EMPAT PULUH
38 | P a g e
PULUH
39 | P a g e
40 | P a g e