Troup doubles down for primary elections

Comments

Transcription

Troup doubles down for primary elections
It was a winning weekend for Troup County’s youth baseball teams. Page 9
LaGrange Daily News
MONDAY
July 19, 2010
T om o r r ow ’ s
we a t he r
High 90
Low 69
lagrangenews.com
50 cents
‘It can make any woman feel like a girl’
Troup
doubles
down for
primary
elections
30% chance of rain
Today’s artist: Tywakneqwa
Reed, third grade, Franklin
Forest Elementary School.
By Joel Martin
Senior writer
Send us your
dog photos
Dawn Guinn leads her students in traditional bellydancing techniques two nights a week at the
Mike Daniel Recreation Center.
Robyn Miles / Daily News
The deadline nears for
submitting pictures of
your favorite pooch for
the ‘Dog Days of Summer’ photo spread in
LaGrange Daily News.
The deadline for submissions is 5 p.m. Friday. Photos may be
dropped off at the
Daily News office at
105 Ashton St., where
we have a drop box
for after-hours submissions. Photos also
may be e-mailed to
[email protected]
ws.com, but must be
in JPEG format.
Be sure and include
the dog’s name and
some information on
what inspired the picture, along with your
name and contact
information.
Nation
After three long
months, the bleeding
from the bottom of the
Gulf of Mexico has
been finally, mercifully
stanched. But in so
many ways, the prognosis remains uncertain.
ÛÓPØ Î
Bellydancers stress exercise benefits
By Becky Holland
Lifestyle editor
A few doors down
from the registration
desk at the Mike Daniel
Recreation Center, a
group of girls jump and
shout. Not far from that
door is a room full of
women jumping and
moving in Zumba. The
music is loud, the room
is packed.
On the same hall,
there is a door that
leads to a smaller, cooler room with about a
dozen women moving
and swaying. Bells jingle and the music is a
twist of everything from
“Bollywood” to Dollywood.
The women are of all
shapes, sizes and ages.
Their movements are
almost meditative in
quality. The women
raise their hands from
their sides and lift them
high.
They are bellydancing, although they are
dressed in simple workout wear.
Dawn Guinn, 54, has
been bellydancing for
more than 30 years and
instructing a class in
LaGrange for eight.
“Bellydancing is very
friendly for women.
The movements come
naturally,” she said.
Although it has a negative image due to
movies, “bellydancing
is not stripping, or at
least that is not the way
I take it or my students
take it,” she said, decrying Hollywood’s image
of bellydancers as
women who are scantily dressed seductresses.
Guinn and her students can attest to that.
Bellydancing began
as a way to exercise,
tone up bodies and lose
weight.
“There are a lot of
benefits to bellydancing. One is that you
tone up your body and
it keeps you limber,”
she said.
Before beginning the
dance part of class,
Guinn leads her students through a series
of stretches similar to
yoga.
“There is also a spiritual benefit,” she said.
Guinn said bellydancing helps reduce
stress.
“The rhythms, which
can be subtle, are calming, and the movements
of the dance and concentration needed to do
them can help a mind
filled with daily stress
to let go for awhile and
relax,” she said.
Guinn said she loves
Voters will be seeing double in
Tuesday’s primary elections in
Troup County – double referendums, even double polling places
for some voters in the Gardner
Newman precinct.
Troup Elections Superintendent
Donald Boyd moved the Gardner
Newman polling place from Gardner Newman Middle School to
Hoofers Gospel Barn in 2007, but
LaGrange City Council wouldn’t go
along with the move for municipal
elections.
About 450 of the precinct’s 1,500
eligible voters live in the city. Those
people will vote at the school in the
referendum on granting redevelopment powers to the city government, but they’ll go a couple of
miles up the road to Hoofers to
vote on the county referendum and
everything else, including the races
for governor and several other state
and federal offices.
The only local contested race is
between incumbent Richard English and Richard Kimbrough for the
District 5 seat on the County Commission.
The Republican ballot includes a
SEE VOTE, PAGE 2
Martha Peel has been bellydancing for more
than three years and has performed at events
locally.
to dance.
“I tried Hawaiian
dances, but I didn’t look
Hawaiian. They were
doing the bellydancing
in the clubs in Miami,
where I was at the time,
and I became so
entranced by it. I found
someone to teach me,”
she said.
Within a few weeks,
Guinn had picked up
the movements and
soon was leading workshops and seminars.
“I made my income
during my 20s and 30s
doing that all around
the world,” she said.
She leads classes at
the Recreation Center
from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays.
“The cost per class is
SEE DANCE, PAGE 2
Man, son
sentenced
for stabbing
incident
By Joel Martin
Senior writer
A LaGrange man and his son
received probated sentences for
beating and stabbing another man
on Oct. 3 outside the Family Dollar
store at 916 Hogansville Road.
Several character witnesses testified and wrote letters on behalf of
Arthelma Cato Jr., 45, and Jasmon
D. Swanson, 25, who pleaded guilty
to aggravated assault charges Friday in Troup Superior Court.
Superior Court Judge Allen Keeble sentenced Cato to 10 years’
probation, a $1,000 fine, 150 hours’
community service and restitution
SEE STAB, PAGE 2
Opinion
Attorney or general?
Georgia’s attorney
general election offers
both, says columnist
John A. Tures.
ÛÓPØ Ï
INDEX
Calendar . . . . . 3
Classifieds . 11-12
Comics . . . . . . . 7
Community . . . 3
Crossword . . . . 7
International . . . 5
Local . . . . . . 2, 8
National . . . . . . . 5
Obituaries . . . . 2
Opinion . . . . . . . 6
Sports . . . . . 9-10
State . . . . . . . . .4
TV Listings . . . . . 8
For home delivery,
call (706) 882-5624
Printed on 100%
recycled paper
Vol 167 Issue 152
12 Pages
Student attends conference, ‘wants to change community’
■ Neighbors
By Trey Wood
Staff writer
It’s not often you get a
chance to change the lives
of an entire middle school
community, but Troup
County student Chelsea
Jones got to do just that
and more.
Jones, a recent Troup
High School graduate, was
selected through the Leadership Troup program of
the LaGrange-Troup County Chamber of Commerce
to attend the National Student Leadership Conference.
This is the first time the
chamber has sent a representative to this workshop.
Jones spent a week
beginning at the end of
June at the University of
Maryland in College Park,
Md., outside Washington,
D.C., mastering leadership
and learning how to inspire
others to follow.
Surprising to her as a
recent high school graduate, she was the oldest of
the potential leaders.
“I thought it was a wonderful experience,” she
said.
The students went to
Johnson Middle School in
Washington, painting the
walls and lockers and
cleaning the entire thing.
They traveled to the
underprivileged school situated a few blocks across
the Anacostia River to fix it
up, giving its students
something to look forward
to.
Besides helping the community, they participated in
leadership-fostering activities including a ropes
course and different workshops.
The leadership conference was not for the weak
or the faint of heart.
“I came back, and I wanted to change the world,”
Jones said with a smile.
To that end, she wants to
start a program that will
allow younger students a
place to go after school and
continue to learn, but feel
safe at the same time.
Whether
LaGrange,
Hogansville or West Point,
she wants to see every student have a proper place to
learn and grow after
school.
“I wanted to come back
and change our community,” Jones said.
She said she had a great
time. Jones will take her
experiences and make
them her own, adding in
Chelsea Jones, second from right, sits on a fountain in Washington, D.C., with a
group of other students. She represented the area at the National Student Leadership Conference in early July.
what she learned to what
she already knows about
leadership. And she was
certainly appreciative of the
chamber for allowing her
to go.
“They signed me up to go
to this,” she said. “It was a
wonderful experience, and
I’m very glad I got to go.”
Trey Wood can be
reached at twood @
lagrangenews. com or (706)
884-7311, Ext. 228.
■ “Neighbors” is a feature
of LaGrange Daily News
which spotlights people who
are in the news, have unusual hobbies or are otherwise
interesting.
To suggest a person who
could be profiled, contact
Becky Holland at [email protected]
lagrangenews or (706) 8847311, Ext. 229.
Local
2 - Monday, July 19, 2010
LaGrange Daily News
Lightning blamed
for house fire
Lightning was blamed
for a fire that destroyed a
house at 101 Gallant St.
LaGrange Fire Capt.
John Brant said Dutchess
and Cokena Fields and a
15-year-old girl lived in the
house. One of the women
heard a loud bang during
the middle of a strong
thunderstorm about 6:30
p.m. Friday and saw
flames coming from a bedroom. She ran outside and
called 911.
The fire resulted in
$45,000 worth of damage,
including $10,000 in contents. No injuries were
reported.
Mobile home fire
injures three
Three family members
were injured about 3 a.m.
Saturday in a fire that
destroyed their mobile
home at 373 Power Plant
Road near Hogansville.
Dustin Chapman, 29,
who suffered smoke
inhalation, was admitted
to West Georgia Medical
Center in stable condition
and later discharged. Jeffery Johnson, 10, suffered
a deep laceration to the leg
while escaping through a
window and Jason Tumlin,
13, suffered minor cuts to
the arm and face from the
same window. Both were
treated and released.
“The 13-year-old woke
the 10-year-old up and
broke out a window and
helped the 10-year-old out,
then he climbed out,” said
Troup County fire Capt.
Early Harris. “It was pretty heroic of him to do it.”
Chapman and his girlfriend, Amanda Johnson,
had been sleeping on the
other side of the residence,
Harris said. They pushed
an air-conditioning unit
through the bedroom window and escaped.
The fire started in the
living room and “could
have trapped them all,”
Harris said. He said the
cause of the fire had not
been determined, but may
have been lightning-related.
The structure and contents were valued at
$17,000.
The Red Cross provided
assistance with housing,
clothing and meals.
Man robbed
of bicycle
Two men stole a man’s
bicycle after learning that
he didn’t have any money.
Police said the man was
walking beside his bike
near Ware Street, when he
saw two men sitting on a
wall. The two jumped off
and told the victim to give
them what he had.
When he told them he
didn’t have anything, the
pair said they were going
to get something. The victim threw his bike down
and told the two he didn’t
have anything.
The two said, “Well, we
are going to take your bike
cause we are going to get
something,” and rode
away down Union Street.
The bicycle was valued
at $70. Anyone with information was asked to call
detective Colleen Hewett
at (706) 883-2674 or Sgt.
Mark Cavender at (706)
883-2630.
Arrests
■ Tylon Kendra Partridge, 26, of Greenville
was charged with possession of cocaine with intent
to distribute.
■ Troup County sheriff ’s deputies Sunday
arrested Joshua Craig
Carothers, 18 of West
Wynngate Drive on
charges of possession of
methamphetamine with
intent to distribute and
misdemeanor possession
of marijuana.
$5 bill altered
A man tried to use a
counterfeit $100 to purchase food at Burger King
at 528 Lafayette Parkway.
The manager noticed the
bill was a $5 bill altered to
■ Obituary
Information for obituaries is written
and provided by funeral homes and
family members of the deceased.
Lakes-Dunson
LakesRobertson
DunsonFuneral Home
Robertson 201 Hamilton Street
■ Public safety
look like a $100 bill.
The man paced back
and forth waiting for
police to arrive, then left.
LaGrange, Georgia 30240
706 882-6411
Damage
Willie S. Norwood
Rocks were used to
break panes of glass out of
a window in Ideal Electric
at 200 E. Depot St. Damage was estimated at more
than $500.
Thefts, burglaries
■ Various electronics
and a bulldog puppy were
stolen from a house in the
200 block of Wright Street.
The items were valued at
$1,550.
■ A thief stole various
electronics, including a
Sony DVD player, a 32inch Vision flat-screen TV
and several video games,
from a residence in the
first block of Thornton
Street. The items were valued at $2,750.
■ Sheriff ’s deputies
responded to a burglar
alarm at 1:50 a.m. Sunday
at Tri-City Motors at 7809
West Point Road. A video
surveillance
camera
showed two males breaking into the business, but
nothing appeared to be
missing.
Children from Benjamin Harvey Hill and Lucy Morgan homes gather for a photo
with Stuart Little, portrayed by Jaay Gladney.
LSPA brings ‘Stuart Little’ to life
for children in reading program
From staff reports
More than 20 children got to see the
characters in a book they have been
reading come to life.
The students, who are participants in
a summer reading program at Benjamin
Harvey Hill and Lucy Morgan Homes,
were guests Saturday for the Lafayette
Theater Company’s production of “Stuart
Little” at Lafayette Society for Performing Arts’ black box theater.
Directed by Ryan McWhorter, the play
brought Stuart, his parents and his
friends to life for the children. McWhorter spoke of the important role reading
has played in his life saying, “Reading
sparked my imagination as I was grow■ It is the policy of ing up. It is important for every child to
LaGrange Daily News to read as much as possible so they might
print the names of people experience that same sense of wonderment.”
charged with felonies.
VOTE
FROM
1
nonbinding straw poll on
whether the state Constitution should be amended “to
provide that the paramount
right to life is vested in each
human being from their
earliest biological beginning
until natural death.”
City Council kept the
polling place at the middle
school because of its convenience and familiar surroundings, Mayor Jeff
Lukken said, and “we
always want to do everything we can to encourage
the highest number of
people to vote.”
City Manager Tom Hall
noted that Hoofers isn’t a
public building and lies
outside the city. If not for
the referendum, it wouldn’t be an issue since
STAB
FROM
1
municipal elections are
held in off years when
nobody else in the county
goes to the polls.
Boyd said he moved the
polling place because of
traffic congestion and
school safety, among other
issues. He said there have
been four elections at
Hoofers and no complaints.
“I told them if we ever
have a county and city
election at the same time
and did not have the same
polling locations, it could
create a situation where
voters would have to go to
two polling places to vote
and that time has come,”
Boyd said.
LaGrange didn’t have
municipal elections last
year because no candidates
had opposition. But if the
elections had occurred “it
stick and hit Rivers, but
Rivers knocked it away.
Cato grabbed the stick and
hit Rivers, and then Swanson got the knife and
stabbed Rivers in the back.
“I ask for forgiveness
and have mercy on me
and my father in your
courtroom,” Swanson told
the judge.
At Keeble’s behest, both
men turned and apologized to the victim, who
was sitting on the first row
of the courtroom. Rivers
accepted the apology, saying, “Y’all good, man.”
The self-employed electrician said he could have
died in the attack and left his
two children without a
father.
“I didn’t take it that far,
they did,” Rivers said.
The judge blamed Cato
for the incident, saying,
“You’re the one that got
your son involved. … It’s
your fault that you’re here
and your fault that your
son is here. Your son was
brought into this because
of your stupidity. You
might ought to be apologizing to your son for getting him involved in this.”
Keeble said the taxpayers would have to feed and
house the defendants if he
sent them to prison and
“you have to set priorities.
I’m going to give you a
break here.” The defendants were given firstoffender status, meaning
their convictions will be
erased if they successfully
complete their probation.
“It’s OK they didn’t go to
jail,” Rivers said afterward.
“It’s a good thing I ain’t
dead.”
estimated at no more than
$1,500 for the victim’s
medical bills. His son
received five years’ probation, a $500 fine, 80 hours’
community service and
restitution.
“We believe when someone gets stabbed in the
back, the offender should
go to prison,” senior assistant district attorney
Lynda Caldwell had told
the judge.
Keeble said that would
normally be the case, but
“it’s not a hard-and-fast
rule.”
Defense witnesses at Friday’s sentencing said the
crime was out of character
for the father and son.
“I’ve seen these two people show remorse,” said
Alton West, LaGrange’s
director of community
development. “… I ask for
leniency for the defendants.”
Juanita Harrell, owner
of West Georgia Mortuary,
said, “I feel they acted on
impulse. … I feel so sorry
for both of them because
they’re good people.”
Prosecutors said the victim, Dereck Rivers, 29, of
LaGrange, had run out of
gas and was walking to a
service station across the
street when the defendants drove by and saw
him. Rivers previously had
accused Cato of having an
affair with his girlfriend.
“Words
were
exchanged,” Caldwell said.
“… The defendants
jumped out of their car to
attack Rivers.”
She said a knife and
stick were in Cato’s trunk,
but before he could get to
Joel Martin can be
the trunk, Rivers punched reached at [email protected]
him and he fell to the lagrangenews.com or
ground. Swanson got the (706) 884-7311, Ext. 235.
The reading program is sponsored by
the Certified Literate Community Program.
“Mama Jama,” alter ego of Debbie Burdette, executive director of Troup CLCP,
welcomed the audience of all ages with
her trademark song, “Hey Mama Jama.”
She thanked the play’s performers, saying, “We appreciate the efforts of the cast
and crew as they bring this children’s
classic to life.”
Support from LSPA extended beyond
the stage as the organization sponsored
a book drive and pledged to donate $1
from every adult ticket sold, all to benefit Troup CLCP.
“We’re very grateful to the LSPA board
for their commitment to literacy through
donations of books, financial support and
for making it possible for the children to
attend the performance” Burdette said.
would have thrown up a
red flag” and the polling
place issue could have
been resolved, Boyd said.
By the time he spoke with
city attorney Jeff Todd in
May, it was too late to get
the required U.S. Justice
Department approval for
polling changes.
“We both dropped the
ball on that and we’ll try
not to let it happen again,”
Boyd said.
He said he’ll work with
the city on a mutually
acceptable location for the
Gardner Newman polling
place.
Voters in LaGrange and
Hogansville will have two
referendums Tuesday
because they have to
decide whether to grant
redevelopment powers to
both the city and county
governments.
Voters in the unincorporated area and West Point
will get only the county
question. West Point voters approved the city’s referendum last year.
Under the Redevelopment Powers Law, local
governments with voter
approval can create tax allocation districts as an incentive for retail and housing
development that might not
otherwise happen.
Eligible projects would
Mr. Willie S. Norwood,
67, of 120 Norwood Drive
in the Whitesville Community, passed away Sunday at Hospice LaGrange.
The family will be at
their home.
Arrangements will be
announced by the LakesDunson-Robertson Funeral Home.
DANCE
FROM
1
$5. I try to keep it inexpensive and also make it
easier for the women who
come to class,” she said.
Women in Guinn’s classes range from their 20 to
the late 50s.
“Anyone can do it. The
girls help each other out
with the movements, and
it is women friendly,” she
said.
Guinn and her students
have formed a group
called A.M.E.N.A Fusion
Dance Group. A.M.E.N.A.
stands for American, Middle Eastern and North
American.
“The dances we do are
from each country represented, and it is like a
fusion,” she said.
They have performed
locally and in other parts
of Georgia and Alabama.
A.M.E.N.A. has also sponsored several dance events
to promote awareness and
raise funds for breast cancer in honor of a class
member.
On Saturday, the group
will sponsor a “hillbelly
dance,” in which Guinn
said, “We’re fusing clogging with bellydancing.”
Guinn’s eyes light up
with delight as she
described the event, “I like
to get the girls to have
some fun and challenge
them with something.”
Donations taken at the
door will go to breast cancer survivors in West Georgia and East Alabama.
After the show, the V.F.W.
will sponsor a dance with
the Pirates of the Chattahoochee.
Of her class, “I try to
implement beginning techniques with the advanced
techniques so that everyone has something to
learn and do.”
Bellydancing “can make
any woman feel like a
girl,” Guinn said.
pay existing taxes on the
property, but could use the
additional tax revenue
generated by the development to finance a bond
issue that would pay for
infrastructure and other
up-front costs. Once the
bond issue is retired after
20 or 30 years, the local
governments would get
the full tax benefit.
“There’s no tax money
in it and if the development fails, there’s no
recourse on the taxpayer,”
County
Commission
Chairman Ricky Wolfe
said Friday. “I’ve studied
this in detail and I just
can’t find any reason for
concern. … It would be
very helpful if the voters
allow us to use that tool
when and if the opportunity arises.”
He said Troup County
“desperately needs jobs
and we desperately need
to keep sales tax dollars in
Troup County.”
“I know we lose millions
to Newnan, Auburn and
north Columbus because
we don’t have the shop■ For more about the
ping amenities,” Wolfe
hillbelly dance from 6 to 8
said.
p.m. Saturday at the V.F.W.
Joel Martin can be Post 4629 at 305 Haralson
reached at [email protected] St. or Guinn’s classes at
lagrangenews.com or the recreation center, email [email protected] yahoo.
(706) 884-7311, Ext. 235.
com.
Lo c al we at h er
Wednesday Thursday
Friday
Becky Holland may be
reached at [email protected]
lagrangenews.com and
(706) 884-7311, Ext. 229.
■ Setting it straight
High 92 High 95 High 90
Low 69 Low 68 Low 50
Mostly sunny Partly sunny
Rainfall
Partly sunny
Extremes
In downtown LaGrange Yesterday at LaGrangeCallaway Airport
48 Hrs 2.8
Month 6.3
Year to date 32.11
High 91
Low 72
West Point Lake Levels
7 a.m. yesterday
634.56 ft.
■ LaGrange Daily News
24-hr. change
Up 0.17
The LaGrange Daily News (USPS 299-320) is published Mondays through Saturdays
except Thanksgiving and Christmas by Heartland Publications, LLC, with headquarters
at 105 Ashton St., LaGrange, Ga. 30240. Periodicals postage paid at LaGrange, Ga.
Postmaster: Send address changes to LaGrange Daily News P.O. Box 929, LaGrange,
Ga. 30241
The answer to the Weekend Trivia question in the
weekend edition was
incorrect. It should have
said President Franklin
Roosevelt was an only
child.
We regret the error.
The Daily News is committed to
reporting information fairly and
accurately. It is our policy to correct errors, omissions or misleading statements. Corrections
should be reported at (706)
884-7316 or via e-mail to
[email protected] lagrangenews.com
Community
LaGrange Daily News
Woman in love with man who
wants nothing to do with her
your relationship. Talk to
your father, and ask him to
intercede. He needs to
explain to Mom that when
she barges in without
knocking, it creates
tremendous resentment.
Assure your mother that
she is welcome in your
room, but it is a sign of
respect to knock first. We
Kathy Mitchell and hope you can move out
Marcy Sugar are long- soon.
■ Annie’s Mailbox
time editors of the Ann
Landers column.
home. I’ve just finished
paying off my college debt
and, with the way the
economy is, am not in a
position to move out,
despite working two jobs.
I love my family a lot,
but I also appreciate it
when they respect my
space and privacy. My
father and siblings understand that when my bedroom door is closed, they
need to knock before
entering. The problem is
my mother. She thinks a
closed door is an invitation
to barge into my room
whenever she feels like it,
with no notice whatsoever.
I’ve tried talking with
her about it, but she gets
defensive and accuses me
of hiding something.
Annie, I am open with my
parents, but I am also 20
years old. I don’t tell them
everything. I’d certainly
like to have private phone
conversations.
I began locking my door
in the hope that Mom
would understand, but
now she is threatening to
change the locks if I do it
again. Since I can’t afford
to move out, what can I
do? – No Locks
Dear No Locks: Your
mother seems so paranoid
about your private activiDear Annie: I am 20
ties that she is damaging
years old and still living at
Snapshot
Dear Annie: “Appreciate
the Cleaning Ladies” wonders why she never gets a
raise or a holiday bonus. I
am sure most of her
clients feel she is compensated fairly. Her clients
probably
have
not
received a raise themselves in several years and,
in this economy, are being
squeezed. I have not
received a raise in more
than two years, and my
husband has taken a cut in
pay.
My
cleaning
lady
charges more per hour
than I make and always
receives a Christmas
bonus.
My husband and I work
long hours, and this is one
luxury we feel justified in
spending. However, if she
were to ask for a raise, we
would either have to cut
her hours or terminate her
services.
I would advise her to
take each individual
client’s situation into
account and then talk to
them about a raise. –
Appreciate my Cleaning
Lady
E-mail questions to
[email protected], or write to:
Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777 W.
Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Cousins Angel Brown and Kayla Smith, cool off at the pool on a hot day.
■ Have you done something fun this summer? We want to know how
you have spent your time this summer. Did you take a vacation? Play in
the sprinkler? Swim at the pool or go for a boat ride at the lake? Walk the
dog? Take a motorcycle ride?Send us your summer fun photo via e-mail
to [email protected] lagrangenews. com or drop off at our offices at 105 Ashton St.
■ In our community
Meetings
Today
The Troup County Board of Education holds a caucus meeting at 5:30 p.m.
at 100 North Davis Road, Building C.
Troup County Association of Beekeepers meets at 7 p.m. at the 4-H Agricultural Building on Vulcan Road. (706)
882-2493 or (706) 883-1675.
Good for you
Tuesday
The Troup County Commission meets
at 9 a.m. in the first-floor commission
meeting room in the Government Center
at 100 Ridley Ave.
E-mail items to [email protected]
news.com or fax it to (706) 884-8712 or
drop it by our office at 105 Ashton St.
Call Becky Holland at (706) 884-7311,
Ext. 229.
■ Around town
Papa Moon, a resident
of Newnan, will be on
hand froom noon to 2 p.m.
Saturday at Bookland in
the LaGrange Mall at 1501
Lafayette Pkwy to sign his
new children’s book. The
book, “My Window,”
details a little girl’s life as
she stands in the window
and watches her friends
go outside to play, and she
can’t.
■■■
The LaGrange Art
Museum sponsors “Just a
Pigment of Your Imagination,” Thursday July 29
from 1:30- 3 p.m. at the
Center for Creative Learning.
Registration fee is $25
per individual. Deadline
for registration is July 23.
Other classes are being
offered as well. (706)8823267 or art @lagrangemuseum.org.
Think green –
Luke Hewett, 8 months, hangs out by the swimming pool watching his older siblings and his
parents swim and play.Luke is the son of
Hanna Hewett, who said her family is having
lots of fun this summer.
■ ‘Snapshot’ features
photos of neighborhood gatherings and
club
and
social
events. Send photographs to ‘Snapshot,’
LaGrange
Daily
News, P.O. Box 929,
LaGrange, GA 30241
or to Daniel Baker at
[email protected]
lagrangenews.com, or
bring it to our office at
105 Ashton St.
Here are a few guidelines:
■ Get in close to the
subject. Have the
photo fill the frame.
■ Informal or action
shots are preferable
to those of people
standing in a line.
■ Printed or typewritten notices are requested.
3
Summer fun
■ Include full names
and identification of
everyone in the photo,
as well as a brief description of what’s
going on in the photo.
■ Include a name and
daytime
telephone
number.
■ Do not use tape or
staples, or write on
the back of the photo.
■ Photos taken with
cell phones should
not be submitted.
■ Photos may be retrieved at our office
after they run.
■ E-mailed photos
must be in JPEG format and sent as attachments.
■ Photos run on a
space-available basis,
but usually within a
week of receipt.
Recycle
Vernon Woods hosted a ‘Lifesavers’ luncheon in July to honor a number
of local emergency management workers. From left, front, 1st Firefighter
Lamar Casper; Ruth Huckabee, life enrichment director at Vernon Woods;
and Deputy Chief Buddy Baker; back, Troup Co. 911 Deputy Director
Jerry Presnal; Lt. Ken Pound; American Medical Response Director Lance
Harrison; Lt. Dusty Helton; Fire Chief Chris Smith, Firefighter Troy
Reynolds; Sgt. Jon Williamson; and Firefighter Charles Mallory
■■■
‘Good for you’ recognizes individuals and groups for good deeds or
personal achievement. To submit a
photograph, send it to ‘Good for
You,’ LaGrange Daily News, P.O.
Box 929, LaGrange, GA 30241 or
to Daniel Baker at [email protected], or bring it to our
office at 105 Ashton St.
Here are a few guidelines:
■ Typed or printed submissions
are requested.
■ Give details of what the recognition is for.
July 20th
Paid and endorsed by Troup Together.
■ Include full names and identification of everyone in the photo.
■ Also include a name and daytime
telephone number.
■ Do not use tape or staples, or
write on the back of the photo.
■ Photos may be retrieved at our
office after they run.
■ E-mailed photos must be in
JPEG format and sent as attachments.
■ Photos run on a space-available
basis, but usually within a week of
receipt.
Emory Clark-Holder Clinic
314248
Dear Annie: For the past
year, I have been involved
with “Mr. H.,” who
appears to care very little
for me. He started off calling and visiting regularly,
but six months into the
relationship, he began distancing himself.
Mr. H. never wants to do
what I like, refuses to let
me come to his home,
doesn’t like to be seen with
me in the daytime and
wants to come to my
house after 6:30. He never
invites me out or to his
family gatherings. At the
moment, we speak to each
other sporadically, and I
don’t know what to say to
him. He never expresses
his feelings and has
stopped doing the things
he did when we first met.
He is very private and
secretive. I have treated
him with kindness and
respect, but no longer
believe I am the person he
wants to be with. He has
been single for 20 years
and apparently doesn’t
want to give up womanizing. Unfortunately, I’m in
love with this man, but he
shows no emotion toward
me. I feel rejected. Should
I continue this one-sided
relationship or move on? –
Need Advice
Dear Need: You already
know the answer. Mr. H
could be married or seeing
someone else and doesn’t
want her to know about
you (which means he considers her more important). Love is a two-way
street, honey, and any relationship that is completely one-sided is not genuine
love. You are infatuated
with someone who treats
you poorly. You deserve
better. Move on.
Monday, July 19, 2010 -
303 Smith Street
706-882-8831
313056
State
4 - Monday, July 19, 2010
LaGrange Daily News
Final
shots
fired in
debates
Boneville Pond was once the town's main attraction for area children.
Augusta Chronicle
Boneville community
‘dried up like bones’
DEARING (AP) – “It’s
just a little hole in the
road,” said Sara Cranford,
lay leader at Boneville’s
only church.
The community’s post
office and only store have
closed in the past three
years. All that’s left is a
Methodist church and a
few scattered dwellings.
“People are still (in
Boneville),” said Gail Higdon, Boneville’s last postmaster, “but what the
future holds, I don’t
know.”
One hundred years ago,
it was a different story.
Boneville in the late
1800s to early 1900s was
a resort community said to
have been named for
Jones Bones, an Augusta
investor in the factory
there.
According
to
the
McDuffie County Driving
Tour, wealthy Georgians
would ride the train to
Boneville during the summer to enjoy fishing and
swimming and stay at the
inn.
The Boneville Mill was
also in its prime, having
become the first incorporated industry in McDuffie
County in 1872. It was
erected before the Civil
War as a card factory for
wool and cotton and later
changed to a grist mill and
cotton gin, according to
Historic McDuffie County,
GA .
But in 1922, the Georgia
Railroad discontinued
Boneville’s train station,
and things began to
change.
“Since
that
time,
Boneville kind of dried up
– like bones,” said Jenny
Lindsay, the director of the
McDuffie Museum.
According to Columbia
County historian Charles
Lord, a bus replaced the
lost stop to help residents
who depended on the
train for work, but it was
discontinued in the 1960s.
“I remember I was
working in Fort Gordon,
standing in a doorway,
when I saw the last bus,”
Lord said. “It would bring
a tear to your eye. It was
like watching the passing
of time.”
The
community,
halfway between Thomson and Dearing, is now
just a remnant of the past.
Only fragments are left of
the historic mill, but other
buildings still stand.
The old inn stands with
its doors wide open and
graffiti covering its walls.
Legend says it’s haunted,
and YouTube videos show
kids in the area venturing
there in search of ghosts
and floating orbs.
The post office closed in
o
ike t
We L es!
Y
y
Sa
Marilyn Freeman, who has been the pianist at
Boneville Methodist Church since she was 13,
stands next to a sign posting the attendance from
the previous service.
2007 because of mold
infestation, a collapsing
roof and brick deterioration, but it still stands by
the railroad, with its windows boarded.
When it closed without
warning, Higdon said customers tried to protest and
preserve what was left of
the community. She
described it as the community’s “meeting place.”
“I miss all my friends at
the post office,” said Higdon, who transferred to
the Dearing post office,
along with all the
Boneville mail.
“When you live in a
small town, everybody
shares all your problems
and happiness. You see
children grow, and then
you see them have their
own children. I can still see
them now, but it’s not like
when I was in Boneville.”
A small, green sign pointing to the Boneville historic district is the community’s only marker on
U.S. Highway 78.
What used to be
Boneville Grocery also
closed after its owners,
Tommy and May Sue
Clark, died last year.
The Boneville Methodist
Church, which has been
open since 1902, is down
to fewer than 10 regular
attendees, but members
said they’re determined to
keep it alive.
“We’ve always been able
to do something to keep
the doors open,” Otis Freeman said, standing amid
leftover churchyard sale
items.
“We had something
recently where we got
down to the brass tacks,
but
everything
just
seemed to fall into place.”
The church has been
relying on rotating lay
speakers since 2004. Freeman’s daughter has been
the pianist since she was
13.
“There are times she
isn’t there because she’s a
nurse,” Freeman said of
his daughter. “Sometimes
she has to work Saturday
nights, so we just sing a
cappella.”
Although many consider Boneville a “ghost
town,” 80-year-old Harold
Harbin still calls it home.
He
described
the
Boneville of his youth as an
“active, close-knit community” that never had a population of more than 150.
He recalled how active
the pond was in the summer and how the young
boys would gather to
play baseball in the afternoon.
At a time when the highway still went through the
community, there were
three stores and Harbin
recalled traveling salesmen stopping in the area
for several days to work
the Boneville stores.
“Of course, the history
of time deteriorated and it
never did grow from
there,” he said. “All the old
people died out.”
Without new residents
coming in, Harbin said
there’s little hope for the
community to return to
the one he knew as a
child, but that doesn’t
affect the place that
Boneville
holds
in
Harbin’s heart.
His own children moved
away years ago, but he
said he understood.
“There’s nothing here
for them,” he said with a
grin.
“It would be nice if we
could put it back on the
map,” said Higdon, a 30year Boneville resident.
“That’s what my desire
would be – to go back to
Boneville, have a post
office there and build it up.”
ATLANTA (AP) – Former Secretary of State
Karen Handel appears to
be riding a wave of
momentum heading into
the Republican governor
primary, bolstered by the
last-minute endorsement
from GOP power broker
Sarah Palin.
Pa l i n’ s
endorsement last
Monday
looks to
h a v e
helped
Handel
surge to a
lead in the Handel
race just
d a y s
before the
Tu e s d a y
primary. A
p o l l
released
Sunday by
MasonD i x o n
Polling & Barnes
Research
Inc. shows Handel with 29
percent of the vote. Insurance Commissioner John
Oxendine trails with 22
percent, while former congressman Nathan Deal
logged 20 percent.
The results mark a significant change from an
earlier poll by the same
firm that was partially
taken
before
Palin
announced her endorsement through a Facebook
post. That poll showed
Oxendine leading with 31
percent of the vote, while
Handel captured 23 percent and Deal had 18 percent.
“It looks like Palin may
have transformed the
race,” said Charles Bullock, a University of Georgia political scientist. “She
makes her endorsement
and Handel begins to
move up in the polls. The
cause and effect is there.
Most voters don’t begin to
focus on their decision
until right before the election, so it was well-timed.”
On the Democratic side,
where polls show former
Gov. Roy Barnes has a
commanding lead, the top
candidates have largely
avoided direct clashes and
instead stuck to familiar
messages of improving
the economy and bolstering education that they
hope will appeal to voters.
As the seven GOP candidates and seven Democratic contenders for the
state’s top job approached
the campaign’s final days,
many stumped at local
churches before getting
some rest in the run-up to
a final debate scheduled
for Sunday evening.
The GOP race has continued to escalate as the
leading candidates vied
for a spot in an expected
runoff. A runoff is needed
between the top two votegetters if no candidates
get more than 50 percent
of the vote.
The race has been colored by ethics allegations
aimed at Oxendine,
charges that Handel is a
secret liberal and even a
late accusation of sexism.
Handel accused Deal of
sexism by pointing to a
press release from his
campaign over the weekend saying that “real
women” support his campaign – giving her an
opportunity to remind voters of Palin’s support.
Meanwhile, a fourth candidate in the race – state
Sen. Eric Johnson – has
countered by claiming that
Handel is playing the gender card.
As Handel’s poll numbers rise, attack ads from
her opponents are increasingly targeting her instead
of Oxendine, who has
long been the perceived
front-runner thanks to his
immense name recognition.
The latest poll, which
showed Handel catapulting in front of Oxendine,
was conducted on Thursday and Friday and was
paid for by 13 daily newspapers with readership
across Georgia. It surveyed 400 Republicans
who plan to vote in Tuesday’s primary.
State still missing
money after glitch
ATLANTA
(AP)
–
Almost two years after a
computer glitch caused
the Georgia Department of
Labor to issue 46,373
duplicate unemployment
check deposits, the state
still has not recovered all
of its money.
The glitch in September
2008 initially cost the state
more than $12 million.
The Labor Department
said that most of the
money was recovered
within five days, but the
department is still trying
to get back $115,000.
A Labor Department
spokesman, Sam Hall,
said the department has
asked benefit recipients
through letters and telephone calls to give the
money back. The department also has garnished
state income tax returns of
people who got too much
money.
Hall said it cost taxpayers more than $19,000 to
send out the notices alerting people of the mistake.
State
bookkeepers
found the $12 million mistake in December 2009
during the yearly check of
Labor Department books.
Auditors took a random
sample of 77 unemployment
accounts
and
checked to see if any
recipient was paid more
than the maximum $330
benefit in a single week.
Carl Winter, a computer
engineer at the Labor
Department, said the high
number of unemployment
claims at the time caused
a computer malfunction.
“We looked into the
problem and we had it
fixed before lunch,” Winter said.
But getting the money
back was more difficult.
Hall said the state recovered about $10.4 million
within a week of the mistake.
But, according to state
reports, about 2,000 people still owed the state
money in March, 18
months after the incident.
Recommend our Services to
a Friend, if we make the
loan, we will pay you $20.00
LaGrange Loans
& Income Tax
LaGrange, GA 30240
Loans from
$100-$500
Phone Service
1st Month Free
309852
706-884-7336
311152
ATLANTA (AP) – With
Georgia’s primary just 36
hours away, the candidates running for governor took their parting
shots Sunday night in separate Democratic and
Republican debates.
The presumed front
runners in each race
found themselves under
fire – including one who
wasn’t even in the room.
Republican Karen Handel has refused to share
the stage with a longshot
rival candidate accused
of an inappropriate relationship with a teenager.
Handel – who emerged
as the Republican to beat
in a new poll out on Sunday – was represented by
an empty podium at Sunday night’s debate sponsored by the Atlanta
Press Club.
But the former secretary of state was clearly
on the mind of her rivals.
State Insurance Commissioner John Oxendine
began the assault with
his first question to
Nathan Deal: “Mr. Congressman, why do you
think that Karen Handel
is unfit to be the next
governor?”
Deal, of Gainesville,
was only to happy to
answer.
“I think it’s important
for the Republican Party
to nominate someone
who demonstrates the
conservative values that
most Republicans hold
dear,” Deal said. “I believe
that Ms. Handel does not
demonstrate that kind of
solid background.”
Republican Eric Johnson piled on, calling it
“incredible” that she
would not stand before
the people of Georgia.
“Not going toe-to-toe
with your opponents is
not a good sign when it
comes to facing the Democratic nominee much
less Barack Obama,” the
Savannah Republican
said.
Johnson also took aim
at his fellow Republicans
for failing to release their
past years of tax returns
as he had done.
Oxendine defended his
acceptance of a large
number of campaign contributions from those in
insurance, saying that in
his 16 years regulating the
industry he has cracked
down hard and been an
advocate for the consumer.
The Republicans are
brawling for one of two
spots in an expected
runoff Aug. 10, which will
be necessary if no candidate wins more than 50
percent of the vote.
In the Democratic
debate, former Gov. Roy
Barnes had a bulls’-eye on
his back.
Barnes’ rivals took aim
at his vote against making
Martin Luther King’s
birthday a holiday, efforts
to weaken teacher tenure
and making promises he
can’t deliver.
Attorney
General
Thurbert Baker said
Barnes can’t pay for the
education reforms he is
pushing.
“What I’d like to know
governor is which taxes
will you raise to pay for
your promises or which
promises will you break?”
Baker asked.
Baker is pushing a proposal to add bingo to the
lottery to pay for classroom
improvements.
Barnes has said he would
repeal tax exemptions to
pump up school funding
but he has yet to say
which ones from the $10.9
billion to choose from.
Barnes, meanwhile,
kept his eye on the
Republicans he hopes to
face in November ripping
into a plan backed by
Oxendine and Handel to
eliminate the state income
tax, which brings in half
of the state’s revenue.
Poll: Handel
surges to
lead in GOP
LaGrange Daily News
National, International
5
Higher risk
for cancer in
test-tube kids
Cap to
remain
closed
NEW ORLEANS (AP) –
The federal government
today allowed BP to keep
the cap shut tight on its
busted Gulf of Mexico oil
well for another day
despite a seep in the sea
floor after the company
promised to watch closely
for signs of new leaks
underground, settling for
the moment a rift between
BP and the government.
The Obama administration’s point man for the
spill, retired Coast Guard
Adm. Thad Allen, said
early today that government scientists had gotten
the answers they wanted
about how BP is monitoring the seabed around the
mile-deep well, which has
stopped gushing oil into
the water since the experimental cap was closed
Thursday.
Late Sunday, Allen said
a seep had been detected
a distance from the busted oil well and demanded
in a sharply worded letter
that BP step up monitoring of the ocean floor.
White House energy adviser Carol Browner said the
seep was found less than
two miles from the well
site.
The concern all along –
since pressure readings on
the cap weren’t as high as
expected – was a leak elsewhere in the well bore,
meaning the cap may have
to be reopened to prevent
the environmental disaster from becoming even
worse and harder to fix.
An underground leak
could let oil and gas
escape through bedrock
and mud.
“When seeps are detected, you are directed to
marshal resources, quickly investigate, and report
findings to the government in no more than four
hours. I direct you to provide me a written procedure for opening the
choke valve as quickly as
possible without damaging the well should hydrocarbon seepage near the
well head be confirmed,”
Allen said.
When asked about the
seep and the monitoring,
BP spokesman Mark Salt
would only say that “we
continue to work very
closely with all government scientists on this.”
Early today, Allen said
there had been an
overnight conference call
between the federal science team and BP.
“During the conversation, the federal science
team got the answers they
were seeking and the commitment from BP to meet
their monitoring and notification obligations,” Allen
said.
He said BP could continue testing the cap,
meaning keeping it shut,
only if the company continues to meet their obligations to rigorously monitor for any signs that this
test could worsen the overall situation.
Both Allen and BP have
said they don’t know how
long the trial run will continue. It was set to end
Sunday afternoon, but the
deadline came and went
with no official word on
what’s next.
Browner said Allen’s
extension went until this
afternoon. She said on
ABC’s “Good Morning
America” that monitoring
was crucial to make sure
the trapped oil doesn’t
break out of its pipe.
“Clearly we want this to
end. But we don’t want to
enter into a situation
where we have uncontrolled leaks all over the
Gulf floor,” Browner said.
BP PLC said today that
the cost of dealing with the
oil spill has now reached
nearly $4 billion. The company said it has made payments totaling $207 million to settle individual
claims for damages from
the spill along the southern coast of the United
States.
Monday, July 19, 2010 –
Oyster fishermen work in Apalachicola Bay in Apalachicola, Fla. With the oil spill
temporarily capped, the recovery of the gulf states remains in doubt.
MCT Direct
Now what for gulf ?
NEW ORLEANS (AP) –
After three long months,
the bleeding from the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico
has been finally, mercifully stanched. But in so
many ways, the prognosis
remains uncertain.
Which species will
rebound, and which have
been pushed beyond the
brink? Has the oil accelerated the die-off of marshlands that protect one of
America’s great cities and
make this the nation’s second most-productive fishing region? What effect
will the BP spill have on
the future of deep-sea
drilling – at once boon and
bane – in the Gulf?
And, of more immediate
concern to people along
the nation’s southern
coast, where will the millions of as-yet uncollected,
unburned, unseen gallons
of oil from the blown-out
Deepwater Horizon well
end up?
Second-generation
Plaquemines Parish resident Sandy Reno isn’t sure
she wants to wait around
to find out the answers.
“I’m ready to pack up
and leave,” says Reno, 43,
whose shrimper husband,
like so many others along
this coast, is now dependent on cleanup work from
the company held responsible for the disaster.
“When you’ve had enough,
you’ve had enough. I’ve
had enough already.”
Just as the stumbling
federal response to Hurricane Katrina five years
ago exposed not just
chinks, but spider web
networks of fissures in our
national armor, the failure
to prevent and then quickly stop the spill has shaken
many people’s faith in
American might.
“We’re a superpower –
the United States,” New
Orleans chef and sometime fishing guide Eric
Schutzman said recently
as he took a break from
carving up a batch of black
drum and redfish caught
in an unclosed section of
Black Bay. “We put a man
on the moon. You’d think
we’d have enough brilliant
minds to get it all cleaned
up and get on with it.”
Since the Deepwater
Horizon exploded on April
20 and sank 50 miles off
the tip of Louisiana, as
much as 184 million gallons of crude have hemorrhaged into the gulf.
To get an idea of what
Gulf Coast residents might
be facing, many have
looked back to the
region’s last worst drilling
accident – the 1979 Ixtoc
spill. It took Pemex, Mexico’s state-owned oil company, 10 months to contain the spill. By then, 140
million gallons of crude
had bled into the gulf.
Wes Tunnell, associate
director of the Harte
Research Institute for Gulf
of Mexico Studies at Texas
A&M University-Corpus
Christi, is traveling the
region, looking for traces
of the spill and speaking
to people who lived
through it. His blog is plastered with photos of red
mangrove roots clogged
with thin, weathered tar
mats – possibly from Ixtoc.
Tunnell and his colleagues interviewed 74year-old Jose Chay, a longtime fisherman in Celestun, Yucatan. Chay told
Tunnell that the spill
forced locals to switch to
jobs like salt mining, crabbing in the lagoon or making charcoal from the
region’s lush forests.
“They did these things
for varying periods of
time,” Tunnell wrote, noting that some started back
fishing in about two
years,. “Others got back to
fishing in 4-5 years when
things seemed to be back
to usual for the fin fish but
not shellfish.”
Microneedles may make
getting flu shots easier
WASHINGTON (AP) –
One day your annual flu
shot could come in the
mail.
At least that’s the hope
of researchers developing
a new method of vaccine
delivery that people could
even use at home: a patch
with microneedles.
Microneedles?
That’s right, tiny little
needles so small you don’t
even feel them. Attached
to a patch like a Band-Aid,
the little needles barely
penetrate the skin before
they dissolve and release
their vaccine.
Researchers led by
Mark Prausnitz of Georgia
Institute of Technology
reported their research on
microneedles in Sunday’s
edition of Nature Medicine.
The business side of the
patch feels like fine sandpaper, he said. In tests of
microneedles without vaccine, people rated the discomfort at one-tenth to
one-twentieth that of getting a standard injection,
he said. Nearly everyone
said it was painless.
Some medications are
already delivered by
patches, such as nicotine
patches for people trying
to quit smoking. That’s
simply absorbed through
the skin. But attempts to
develop patches with the
flu vaccine absorbed
through the skin have not
been successful so far.
In the Georgia Tech
work, the vaccine is still
injected. But the needles
are so small that they don’t
hurt and it doesn’t take
any special training to use
this kind of patch.
So two problems are
solved right away – fear of
CHICAGO – For the first
time, a large study suggests a higher rate of
childhood cancer among
test-tube babies, but
researchers said the reason probably has nothing
to do with how the infants
were conceived.
More likely, it’s related
to the genetics of the parents who turned to in vitro
fertilization because of
infertility, the study’s
Swedish authors and
other experts said Also,
test-tube infants often are
born prematurely and
have breathing problems
at birth – traits linked in
other
studies
with
increased cancer risks.
Still, cancer in these
children is rare despite
any elevated risks.
“It’s rather reassuring,”
said Dr. Bengt Kallen, the
study’s lead author and a
researcher at the University of Lund. The risk “is
so small that it can’t matter much for the individual parents or parents-tobe.”
The study examined
Swedish children conceived by IVF, in which
eggs are fertilized with
sperm in a lab dish and
then implanted in the
womb. Research on possible health risks including
cancer and birth defects in
IVF children has had
mixed results.
Dr. Tommaso Falcone,
the Cleveland Clinic’s
obstetrics and gynecology
chief, said it’s uncertain
whether similar results
would be found in the
more racially diverse United States. About 57,000
infants are born after IVF
each year in the United
States, or roughly 1 percent of all births
The results of the new
study were published
online today in Pediatrics.
It analyzed more than 2.4
million births in Sweden
between 1982 and 2005,
including almost 27,000
IVF babies, along with
cancer data in children
tracked for up to 19 years.
Overall, 53 IVF children
developed cancer versus
38 that would be expected
in other children of the
same age, a 42 percent
increased risk. Leukemia
and brain cancers were
among the most common.
Kallen said possible reasons for the link include
unidentified traits in the
parents that might be
related to infertility and
cancer risks.
Absolute risks for cancer in these children are
still very low, “far less than
1 percent,” Falcone noted.
Dr. Elizabeth Ginsburg,
medical director of the IVF
program at Harvard’s
Brigham and Women’s
Hospital, said patients
nonetheless should be
counseled about the study.
■ U.S., world digest
Afghan will ask for aid money
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) – At an international conference on Tuesday, the Afghan government will ask
donors to put 80 percent of aid money behind programs
that the Afghans – not foreign capitals – deem important
to development.
It’s a high-stakes meeting for the Kabul government, which wants to show the world leaders attending that it’s making strides toward running its own
affairs.
Displaying a new streak of independence, Afghan
officials are seeking to take the driver’s seat to guide
their nation out of three decades of conflict. Having
spent billions and lost so many troops in nearly nine
years of war, the international community remains
uneasy about letting go of the wheel. Still, the U.S. and
other donor nations believe that strengthening the
Afghan government is the only way to end their military
involvement in Afghanistan.
Countries sign trade deal
ISLAMABAD (AP) – Pakistan and Afghanistan sealed
a landmark trade deal Sunday as U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton pushed the two neighbors to
step up civilian cooperation and work together against
al-Qaida and the Taliban.
Shortly after kicking off a South Asia trip aimed at
refining the goals of the increasingly unpopular war in
Afghanistan, Clinton looked on as the Afghan and Pakistani commerce ministers signed the trade agreement.
It was reached only after years of negotiation with
recent and very active U.S. encouragement.
Elsewhere
MIcroneedles like this one may one day allow
patients to painlessly self-administer vaccines.
Georgia Tech
needles, and disposal of
leftover hypodermic needles.
“The goal has been a
means to administer the
vaccine that is patient
friendly,” Mark R. Prausnitz of Georgia Tech said
in a telephone interview.
That means “not only
not hurting or looking
scary, but that patients
could self-administer,” he
said, and people would be
more likely to get the flu
vaccine.
■ Germany’s autobahns are renowned for average
speeds well in excess of 80 miles an hour. But the average dropped near zero Sunday as tens of thousands
of people sat at a 37-mile table for a cultural celebration
titled, appropriately enough, “Still Life.”
■ Gunmen stormed a party in northern Mexico on
Sunday and massacred 17 people, authorities said. The
gunmen arrived at the party in Torreon in several cars
and opened fire without saying a word, the Coahuila
state Attorney General’s Office said in statement. At
least 18 people were wounded.
■ A suicide bomber ripped through a line of anti-alQaida Sunni fighters waiting to collect their paychecks
Sunday near an Iraqi military base as nearly 50 people
were killed in violence west of Baghdad.
EARN UP TO
9.09%
apy
The Money Tree Inc.
*Series B Variable Rate Subordinated Debentures- Maturity date in four years
subject to automatic extension for one additional four-year period. Interest
rate varies depending on the interest adjustment period selected.
Redemption without penalty only at the end of each adjustment period.
*Subordinated Demand Notes- Interest rate varies depending upon the daily
average balance held. Payable or redeemable at any time. Interest paid at
the time of redemption.
Investments by Prospectus Only
FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS ONLY
422A New Franklin Road
Lagrange, GA 30240
www.themoneytreeinc.com
Toll Free 1-877-468-7878
SERIES B VARIABLE RATE
SUBORDINATED DEBENTURES
INTEREST
ADJUSTMENT
TERM
ANNUAL
EFFECTIVE
YIELD *
ANNUAL
INTEREST
RATE
MINIMUM
AMOUNT
1 Year
5.13
5.00
$500.00
2 Years
5.65
5.50
$500.00
4 Years
9.09
8.70
$500.00
Debentures: These are fixed rates for these terms.
SUBORDINATED DEMAND NOTES
$ 1.00
$ 10,000 $ 50,000 $100,000
to
to
to
AND
$ 9,999 $ 49,999 $ 99,999
OVER
DAILY
BALANCE
ANNUAL
EFFECTIVE
YIELD
3.05
3.30
3.82
4.08
ANNUAL
INTEREST
RATE
3.00
3.25
3.75
4.00
*
Subordinated Demand Note rates listed are current rates and are subject to
change at anytime over the life of an investment at the Company’s option.
* Compounded daily based on a 365 day year
THE MONEY TREE INC.
114 S. Broad St.
Bainbridge, GA 39817
THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS NEITHER AN OFFER TO SELL NOR A SOLICITATION OF AN OFFER TO BUY THE SECURITIES DESCRIBED ABOVE.
AN OFFER MAY ONLY BE MADE BY PROSPECTUS DATED JULY 2, 2010 AND THE RELATED PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENTS. THESE
SECURITIES HAVE NOT BEEN APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED BY THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE COMMISSION OR ANY STATE SECURITIES
COMMISSION NOR HAS THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION OR ANY STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION PASSED UPON THE
ACCURACY OR ADEQUACY OF THESE SECURITIES. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE. THESE
SECURITIES ARE NOT CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT OR SIMILAR OBLIGATIONS OR GUARANTEED BY ANY DEPOSITORY INSTITUTION, AND
THEY ARE NOT INSURED BY THE FDIC OR ANY OTHER GOVERNMENTAL OR PRIVATE FUND OR ENTITY.
312822
Opinion
6 - Monday, July 19, 2010
LaGrange Daily News
Attorney or general? Georgia race offers both
All the Georgia attorney general candidates have the experience for the job.
They have similar ideological views consistent with their party’s positions. But
there are differences on what each would
emphasize if elected in November.
Some of the candidates are more like
“attorneys,” focusing their effort on civil
issues with a political flavor to them. Others are more like “generals,” pinpointing
law enforcement and prosecutorial experience in a declaration of war on crime.
Of course, the “attorneys” aren’t procrime. They support law enforcement
and want crime reduced, but choose to
focus on issues more likely to be seen on
CNN than on CourtTV (or is it TruTV).
It’s just that crime doesn’t factor in as the
top subject. And those “generals” aren’t
apolitical. Each has taken a position on
a particular ideological issue. But crime
cases are more likely to find their way to
the top of their agenda.
Cobb County Commission Chairman
John A. Tures is associate professor of political
science
at
LaGrange College.
Sam Olens, for example, seems to focus
more on the civil concerns, or the “attorney” side of the job. His mailer “leads”
with a description of his fight with the
ACLU on school prayer. The second
biggest concern for Olens seems to be
“ObamaCare.” When it comes to crime,
it’s more about public corruption and
immigration concerns than crimes
against people. He touts Cobb County’s
low crime and creating state grand juries
to combat gang and drug crimes, but
they are down the list.
His GOP opponent, Max Wood, fits the
description of someone leading with the
crime issue. Wood leads by touting his
prosecutorial record as a U.S. attorney
and assistant district attorney. He even
notes his military experience and service in Operation Iraqi Freedom as a Justice Department attache, placing him
squarely in the “general” category. Of
course, Woods shares similar concerns
about immigration, ObamaCare, abortion and gun ownership, but he leads
with the crime issue.
It’s harder to categorize Republican
state Sen. Preston Smith as more of an
“attorney” or “general,” as he touts his
legislative experience and accomplishments in the service of both concerns.
Let’s say he’s playing a 50-50 strategy on
both issues,
The Democratic Party race also has a
contest between an “attorney” and a
“general.” Ken Hodges is clearly running
in the “general” category; the former
Dougherty Circuit district attorney has
devoted the bulk of his campaign on
We can do it!
New Mexico offers
model for tax
reform in Georgia
By Mark King
When it comes to the
tax climate, Georgia
ranks middle of the
road or worse in several
categories, according to
the Tax Foundation.
The state ranks 29th (50
being the worst) in the
State Business Tax Climate Index, a judge of
the state tax structure’s
promotion of economic
growth, and has the
23rd highest top income
tax rate at 6 percent.
The middle of the road
is better than the ditch,
but why not strive for
the fast lane?
When Georgia is
compared with neighboring states, the
urgency of tax reform is
evident. Tennessee and
Florida have no taxes
on wages; Georgia
taxes 6 percent of
income. Georgia ranks
worst among its border
states in state and local
tax burden, according
to the Tax Foundation.
Clearly, it’s time to do a
better job of encouraging economic growth
through tax reform.
For a shining example
of tax reform, “Go
West” to New Mexico.
In 2003, Gov. Bill
Richardson signed into
law a set of income tax
reductions. The legislation lowered the top
income tax rate from
8.2 percent to 4.9 percent by 2008. Despite
dire predictions that the
state would lose revenue, during the years
of this tax reduction
revenues increased and
New Mexico experienced a period of substantial
economic
growth.
The simple explanation could be that the
increases in New Mexico’s tax revenue reflect
the economic boom of
the mid-2000s. Yet,
when compared with
Georgia’s economic
growth over the same
time period, New Mexico shows far superior
growth.
Georgia’s top income
tax remained constant
at 6 percent from 2003
to 2008 while New Mexico’s top income tax
dropped 3.3 percentage
points. Analysis of the
personal income per
capita and gross domestic product per capita
growth in both states
shows that New Mexico
experienced significantly higher rates of
economic growth.
Personal income per
capita in New Mexico
grew 33 percent, from
$25,049 in 2002 to
$33,385 in 2008. Georgia’s personal income
increased just 19 percent, from $29,264 to
$34,849. GDP expansion shows an even
more dramatic difference: From 2002 to
2008, GDP per capita
grew a whopping 42
percent in New Mexico
compared with just 15
percent in Georgia.
New Mexico had a
lower starting point
with both metrics, but
has nearly surpassed
Georgia with no sign of
slowing down.
The Rio Grande
Foundation, a free-market policy group in New
Mexico, recently proposed phasing out the
income tax all together
in order to compete
with the likes of
Wyoming, Nevada and
Texas, all zero-incometax states. According to
a study by the group, a
4.5 percent cap on
annual
spending
growth would enable
the state to eliminate
the income tax within
five years.
Because of the recent
recession plans of this
nature have most likely
been placed on the back
burner. Nevertheless,
New Mexico has situated itself to better weather the storm by fostering economic growth
over the past six years.
Economic
growth
means more jobs, the
central need for its citizens in hard times. The
remarkable increase in
personal income per
capita is compelling evidence for lowering
income
taxes
to
improve the standard of
living. Simply put, people want jobs, and when
they have a job they
want to increase their
income.
To put things in perspective, had Georgia
enjoyed the economic
growth of New Mexico
over the past six years,
personal income per
capita would be more
than $4,000 greater
than the current level.
Certainly, many Georgians could desperately
use that difference in
income. Too, more people would begin to
understand the economics in not taxing
income, investment and
production.
A more viable solution is to focus more on
taxing consumption.
Consumption taxes
incentivize
saving,
investment and fiscal
responsibility. Broadening the tax base would
also help reduce volatility in tax revenue.
Tough times call for
tough decisions. Tax
reform is not an easy
Sunday drive, it’s a hard
fought and, hopefully,
well
thought
out
process. Georgia’s current income tax structure hinders kinds of
gains enjoyed by New
Mexico and its proactive policies. Now, especially, is a time to
change gears and drive
economic
growth
across the state.
Mark King, who is
completing his master’s
degree at the University
of Georgia, is a summer
intern with the Georgia
Public Policy Foundation. The foundation is
an independent think
tank that proposes practical, market-oriented
approaches to public
policy to improve the
lives of Georgians.
stopping violent crime. His opponent,
state Rep. Rob Teilhet, is somewhere
between Smith and Sam Olens’ strategy,
noting law enforcement support in the
legislature, but perhaps more emphasis
on civil concerns than crime coverage.
One might think that running a campaign that is even more attentive to crime
might be a risk. After all, statistics on the
subject shows a decrease in lawbreaking
in the last 20-plus years than they were a
half-century ago (and even since 2008
nationwide). The FBI reported in May
that violent crime had decreased more
in the South than any other region in
2009. Hot-button political issues are more
likely to bring voters to the polls, some
say. But public perception is that crime
is on the increase; such subjects “lead”
on local and national newscasts.
On Tuesday, we’ll see which strategy
will pay off in an election where the difference isn’t so much about issue position than issue emphasis.
NAACP’s descent
The NAACP’s decision to condemn “racist” elements within the
Tea Party movement is about as
surprising as the U.N. Human
Rights Council voting to condemn
Israel. Still, there’s a difference.
The U.N. Human Rights Council
never had moral authority to lose.
The NAACP did.
The NAACP was formed on the
centennial of Abraham Lincoln’s
birth, in 1909, in a small New
York apartment. “The Call” proclaimed the organization’s mission: “If Mr. Lincoln could revisit
this country in the flesh, he would
be disheartened and discouraged.
He would learn that on January
1, 1909, Georgia had rounded out
a new confederacy by disfranchising the Negro, after the manner of all the other Southern
States … Added to this, the
spread of lawless attacks upon the
Negro, North, South and West –
even in the Springfield made
famous by Lincoln – often accompanied by revolting brutalities,
sparing neither sex nor age nor
youth, could but shock the author
of the sentiment that ‘government
of the people, by the people, for
the people; should not perish
from the earth.’”
The NAACP’s role in fighting
racism was a noble one. The
organization was the moving
force behind anti-lynching laws.
The Legal Defense Fund’s Thurgood Marshall argued and won
the case of Brown v. Board of
Education in 1954, marking a new
legal era in the United States.
But the glory days are long
gone. In recent decades, the
NAACP has transformed itself
into just another liberal advocacy
group, absurdly dragging “racial
justice” into nearly every public
policy argument.
In 1994, the NAACP filed suit
against the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority,
claiming that a proposed fare
increase would discriminate
against minorities.
That same year, an NAACP
spokesman suggested that raising the retirement age for Social
Security could “exacerbate racial
divisions” because blacks tend to
have shorter life expectancies.
When Ohio passed a law requiring high school students to pass
a ninth-grade level exam in order
to get a high school diploma (yes,
sad), the NAACP sued. Julian
Bond, the organization’s chairman, described the Reagan
administration as “crazed locusts”
waging “an assault on the rule of
LaGrange
Daily News
ESTABLISHED 1842
EDITORIAL BOARD
Lynn McLamb, Publisher
Daniel Baker, Editor
Mona Charen is
a columnist with
Creators Syndicate.
law.”
If the NAACP were to make its
case on honest grounds – that it
likes and believes in big government liberalism – that would be
inoffensive. But the NAACP
frames its policy preferences in
the language of fighting racism
and bigotry, and accordingly
engages in serial slanders.
In 2000, the NAACP ran scurrilous, highly inflammatory radio
and television ads against George
W. Bush, suggesting that he tolerated the horribly brutal lynching of James Byrd in Texas. The
rationale, if you can call it that,
was that Bush declined to sign a
hate crimes bill. But a) Texas
already had a hate-crimes bill;
and b) of the three perpetrators,
two were sentenced to death, and
one to life imprisonment on
Bush’s watch.
Now come the Tea Parties –
overwhelmingly peaceful, orderly,
and spontaneous demonstrations
against overweening government,
the Obama health-care bill, accumulating debt and federal
bailouts. Though tens of thousands of Americans have rallied
and marched, there has been
almost no violence or vandalism.
Of thousands upon thousands of
signs and banners, a tiny handful
have been offensive, and an even
smaller percentage of those –
maybe one or two of those I’ve
seen on the Web – have been
arguably racist.
So what is the NAACP talking
about? Many of the signs mentioned as racist refer to Barack
Obama as a Nazi. While it is no
more acceptable to fling the accusation of Nazism at Obama than
it was to use it against Bush
(which was commonplace), how
exactly does it amount to racism?
Worse, the resolution (the text
of which has not, as of this writing, been released by the NAACP)
reportedly cites the bogus namecalling alleged by members of the
Congressional Black Caucus.
This charade has been amply
exposed by bloggers (see for
example Powerlineblog.com).
Alas for the congressmen who
claimed that the Tea Party crowd
shouted racial epithets at them, a
number of videos from different
angles have captured the events
of that evening. None of them
recorded the “n” word or anything
similar. All of the evidence suggests that the congressmen lied
in order to libel as racists those
who opposed Obama-care.
Racism was a stain on the
American character. But the wanton smear of racism against your
political opponents when you are
losing the argument on points is
pretty ugly as well.
The co-chairmen of President Obama’s
Debt and Deficit Commission painted a
gloomy picture of the economy last weekend
when they appeared at the closing session of
the National Governors Association meeting
in Boston. Former Wyoming Republican Sen.
Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles, former
White House chief of staff under Bill Clinton,
called the current budgetary trends a cancer
“that will destroy the country from within”
unless checked by tough action in Washington.
So the place that gave us the problem is
now going to provide the solution? I have as
much faith in Washington curing its overspending as I do a bartender helping an alcoholic swear off drinking.
Cancer is the wrong diagnosis. With the
exception of those who are heavy smokers,
most cancer patients get the disease through
no fault of their own. The
proper diagnosis of what ails
Washington and too many
Americans is addiction. Congress is addicted to spending
and they have “hooked” too
many Americans on their bad
habit.
Conservatives fear the debt
commission will be a cover for
raising taxes after minimal Cal
spending cuts. Thankfully, sev- Thomas is
eral of the nation’s governors a columnist
are demonstrating a much bet- with Tribune
ter approach to overspending
Media Servand overtaxing.
New Jersey Republican ices.
Gov. Chris Christie wants to
privatize state parks, psychiatric hospitals
and turnpike tollbooths as part of a major
reconsideration of what government should
and should not do. The recommendations are
part of a 57-page proposal on privatization
ordered by the governor and obtained by the
Newark Star-Ledger. Under the proposal,
pre-school classrooms would be shifted to
private hands; state employees would start
paying to park and private vendors would
serve food, deliver health care and run education programs in state prisons. Estimated
saving: $210 million.
The rule should be that if you can find a
product or service in the Yellow Pages, see if
the private sector can do the job government
has been doing at lower cost and higher efficiency. Doesn’t that make more sense than
the state doing a job at greater cost with less
efficiency?
In Indiana, Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels
has provided a test case for government doing
less while lowering costs. Daniels hasn’t
raised taxes and has cut spending, maintained
quality government services and created a
budget surplus.
According to Bloomberg Businessweek,
Indiana “is one of ten states that has seen its
unemployment rate go down in the past year.”
In addition to its budget surplus, Indiana has
a triple-A bond rating. Even property and state
payroll taxes have been reduced. And “for the
first time since the 1970s, more people are
moving to Indiana than leaving.”
In Virginia, Gov. Bob McDonnell has been
busy. In office for only six months, the governor’s office announced that McDonnell has
“defeated former governor Tim Kaine’s proposed $2 billion increase in the state income
tax, kept existing car tax relief in place and
brought Democrats and Republicans together to close the shortfall through spending
reductions, and without a single tax increase.”
According to government figures, Virginia’s
state budget ended the 2010 fiscal year on
June 30 with a surplus of about $220 million,
which is an amazing turnaround in half a year.
Republicans are on the cusp of a political
transformation – in Congress and in state legislatures – that potentially could rival their
1994 victory. Former Clinton pollster Dick
Morris flatly predicts Republicans will capture both houses of Congress. If they do, they
should conduct town hall meetings in every
state, asking what government programs people would be willing to give up and then hold
hearings where heads of all federal agencies
are asked to justify the continued existence
of those programs.
Diets can be painful and liposuction uncomfortable. Just as we must sometimes suffer to
improve our physical health, so must we put
big government on a diet and make sure it
never again becomes obese. This should not
be a partisan issue, but if Democrats make it
one, then a new Republican majority should
do what it failed to do the last time it controlled Congress: break our big government
addiction and restore the liberty that we’ve
lost.
Diversions
LaGrange Daily News
BLONDIE
Monday, July 19, 2010 -
7
Dean Young/Denis Lebrun
BEETLE BAILEY
Today’s Answers
Mort Walker
FUNKY WINKERBEAN
Tom Batiuk
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
O
A
0
9 0
Chris Browne
HI & LOIS
Brian and Greg Walker
THE LOCKHORNS
MUTTS
William Hoest
Patrick McDonnell
Jacquelene Bigar’s
ZITS
3
9
8
5
5 8
7 4 3 2
5
9
2
5 7 1
5
8
4
2 7 1
8
5
9
1 3 6 8
5 4
4
9
7
3
Difficulty Level
2010 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
by Dave Green
7/19
2
4
6
5
1
3
9
7
8
8
3
9
7
2
6
4
5
1
6
2
8
1
9
5
3
4
7
7
1
3
6
8
4
2
9
5
9
5
4
3
7
2
8
1
6
1
8
2
4
6
7
5
3
9
4
9
5
8
3
1
7
6
2
7/19
3
6
7
2
5
9
1
8
4
2010 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
5
7
1
9
4
8
6
2
3
DENNIS THE MENACE
Hank Ketchum
CONCEPTIS SUDOKU
Difficulty Level
THE FAMILY CIRCUS
Bil Keane
Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday,
July 19, 2010:
This year, solutions and great ideas
seem to bubble forth naturally and
weave together. You are a source of
ideas for many. As a result, others frequently seek you out for feedback and
a different perspective. Be careful with
spending, as errors could occur when
handling money. If you are single,
you’ll have your share of admirers to
pick from. Don’t settle. Enjoy the
process of dating. If you are attached,
the two of you become much closer.
You feel as if your significant other
becomes much more caring. SCORPIO
often triggers your imagination.
The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll
Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average;
2-So-so; 1-Difficult
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
#### Deal with associates directly.
You’ll gain much more information,
and others will reveal what they need
in order to forge ahead. Your creativity
soars, though you might not be up for
the risk you conjure up. Tonight: Make
sure you and another person are on the
same page.
TAURUS (April 20- May 21)
##### Defer to others rather than
get into a potential power play. A soft,
understanding manner draws a child
or loved one out. Communication with
roommates and family members could
become confusing. Tonight: Accept an
invitation.
GEMINI (May 22-June 20)
### Throw yourself into a project,
whether working at home or in the
office. Gain comes through your home
and family. You might add to your
home in some manner. You might opt
for a puppy, or maybe a new plant.
Don’t make any excuses for not going
to the gym. Tonight: Head home.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
##### You have answers where
others might not. Allow greater giveand-take in a conversation. Make it OK
to be vulnerable and more open about
your feelings. Maintain a strict budget;
you could hit a snafu. Tonight: Indulge
in a favorite hobby or pastime.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
### Stay close to home if possible.
If you can work from home, do. Stop at
some point and buy a card or gift for a
friend or loved one. Don’t stand on ceremony with a misunderstanding.
Tonight: Close to home.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
##### You don’t need to be anyone but the real you, and express your
Ad goes here
HOROSCOPE
thoughts and feelings. Others, especially during the workday, prove to be
unusually responsive. Be sensitive and
open to a sibling or neighbor who
needs to speak to you. Tonight:
Confirm plans before heading out.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
### Curb a need to possess someone or to be better than another person.
Honor who you are. That is quite special in itself. Build your security rather
than be dependent on others for your
self-image. Tonight: Treat yourself to a
new item for your wardrobe, or go for
a gym membership.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
##### A friend comes through
for you in a rather special way.
Everyone could use a supporter, and
this person lets you know how much
he or she is there for you. Confusion
surrounds a boss or older person.
Confirm a get-together before heading
out. Tonight: What would make you
happy?
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
### Having an exit strategy from
a situation could be most useful right
now. Others could drag you down,
even when just talking. Screen your
calls. A boss or someone you look up to
might come to the rescue. Tonight:
Float with changing plans.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
##### Meetings prove to be
instrumental. Someone has a totally
different perspective on an issue than
you do. A brainstorming session
evolves. You could be delighted by
everything that comes up. Confirm a
late-day meeting. Tonight: Where people are.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
#### You seem to be the one who
everyone seeks out. Others need your
feedback and understanding. A key
associate, friend or loved one shares his
or her perspective, but also gives you
his or her support no matter what.
Tonight: Let another person express his
or her stress openly.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
##### Reach out for more information, especially if what you are hearing doesn’t quite fit. An alternate perspective also could be helpful. Many
people in your daily life express their
support. A caring gesture makes you
smile. Tonight: Opt for something different. Someone could cancel at the last
minute.
Jacqueline Bigar is on the Internet
at http://www.jacquelinebigar.com.
8 - Monday, July 19, 2010
Local, State
On the road ... to Columbus, Florida
The West Point all-stars took LaGrange Daily News to Columbus, to compete in the 16 and under Little League softball state tournament. From
left are, front, Katelyn Thomas, Hannah Easterwood and Taylor Morris;
back, Elizabeth Novelli, Kalah Mingo, Jordan Self, Christalyn Clark, Rachel
Coleman, Meagan Self, Tye’esha Palmer, Heather Brumfield, Chasity
Copeland and Lacey Striblin. The tournament began Saturday and will
end Wednesday.
LaGrange Daily News
■ Food-service inspections
Comments: None
Explanations:
Here is an explanation of food service
inspection violations used by Troup
County Health Department.
1. Food-borne illness risk factors and
public health interventions: Risk factors
are food preparation practices and
employee behaviors most commonly
reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as contributing factors in food-borne illness outbreaks. Public health interventions are control measures to prevent illness or injury.
2. Good retail practices are preventive
measures to control the introduction of
pathogens, chemicals and physical
objects into foods.
N/A, not available
■ Blimpie, 803 New Franklin Road,
LaGrange
Date inspected: June 29
Score: 89, B; Previous score: 89, B
Risk factors
Comments: Thoroughly clean baking
pans between use. Spray bottles must be
labeled.
Good retail practices
Comments: Clean bottom of refrigerators more often.
■ Waffle House, 4560 Hamilton Road,
LaGrange
Date inspected: July 8
Score: 83, B; Previous score: 90, A
Risk factors
Comments: Cooler holding at 46
These are the most recent inspections:
■ Captain D’s, 104 Commerce Ave., degrees; all food removed and repair
service called. Out-of-date milk in font
LaGrange
cooler next to serving line.
Date inspected: July 13
Good retail practices
Score: 95, A; Previous score: 95, A
Comments: Replace missing ceiling
Risk factors
Comments: Date-mark all ready-to-eat tiles in kitchen. Flies in restaurant;
ants and roaches found in back store
foods stored in refrigerator.
room.
Good retail practices
Comments: Repair cooler door gas■ IHOP, 1513 Lafayette Parkway,
kets. Repair walls in kitchen and door
LaGrange
jambs. Paint chipping on walls.
Date inspected: July 9
Score: 90, A; Previous score: 93, A
■ Burger King, 801 New Franklin
Risk factors
Road, LaGrange
Comments: First cooler holding at 54
Date inspected: July 13
degrees; second cooler holding at 48
Score: 96, A; Previous score: 100, A
degrees; food moved to walk-in and
Risk factors
Comments: Date-mark cheese when it repair service called.
Good retail practices
is rewrapped.
Comments: Post hand-washing sign at
Good retail practices
employees’ hand sinks.
Comments: None
■ Waffle House, 1540 Lafayette Park■ Zaxby’s, 1488 Lafayette Parkway,
way, LaGrange
LaGrange
Date inspected: July 9
Date inspected: July 13
Score: 94, A; Previous score: 96, A
Score: 96, A; Previous score: 98, A
Risk factors
Risk factors
Comments: None
Comments: None
Good retail practices
Good retail practices
Comments: All employees must wear
Comments: Keeps bags of food in
freezer closed. Replace torn gaskets on full baseball caps or visors with full hair
net. Flies in kitchen.
ice machine.
Nicole Bell of Duluth and her cousin Halle Hicks of LaGrange, the daughter of Shannon and Julie Hicks, took LaGrange Daily News on vacation to
New Smyrna Beach, Fla.
■ Burger King, 1703 Roanoke Road,
■ Mike’s Elite, 120 W. Main St.,
LaGrange
Hogansville
Date inspected: July 12
Date inspected: June 30
Score: 97, A; Previous score: 98, A
Score: 91, A; Previous score: 97, A
Risk factors
Risk factors
Comments: None
Comments: Cooler holding at 51
Good retail practices
degrees.
Comments: Flies in kitchen.
Good retail practices
303573
MONDAY EVENING JULY 19, 2010
7 PM
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8) WPCH
(9) WTVM-9
(10) WCAG-33
Slone and Jace Raper celebrated the Fourth of July in Panama City
Beach, Fla., with their parents, Shane and Wendy Raper, and grandparents Tommy and Wanda O’Neal.
■■■
■ ‘On the road’ features photos of photo was taken.
residents with a copy of LaGrange ■ Include a name and daytime teleDaily News at an out-of-county lo- phone number.
cation. Send a photograph showing ■ Do not use tape or staples, or
the front page of the paper to ‘On write on the back of the photo.
the Road,’ LaGrange Daily News, ■ Photos taken with cell phones
P.O. Box 929, LaGrange, GA 30241 should not be submitted.
or to Daniel Baker at [email protected] la- ■ Photos may be retrieved at our
grangenews.com, or bring it to our office after they run.
■ E-mailed photos must be in
office at 105 Ashton St.
JPEG format and sent as attachHere are a few guidelines:
■ Printed or typewritten notices are ments.
■ Photos run on a space-available
requested.
■ Include full names and identifica- basis, but usually within a week of
tion of everyone in the photo, as receipt.
well as some details of where the
■ Georgia digest
Experts: Bears
little threat
CARROLLTON (AP) –
There have been at lease
two sightings of black
bears in West Georgia in a
month, but state Department of Natural Resources
officials say there is no
cause for concern.
A bear seen crossing a
street in Bremen was likely the same bear spotted
near a truck stop in Temple, said Department of
Natural Resources Sgt.
Danny Crook.
Crook said bear sightings in West Georgia are
not uncommon and the
animals typically are
scared of humans.
Crook said bears spotted
in the area are usually
young, smaller animals
who have been chased out
of their territory by older
dominant male bears.
People who spot bears
should leave the animals
alone and try to remove
food sources from the
area, he said.
Roof collapses
at store
CARTERSVILLE (AP) –
A big store in a shopping
center closed because the
roof collapsed in a heavy
storm.
The storm that dumped
several inches of rain
apparently caused the roof
to collapse at the Hobby
Lobby store in the Market
Square shopping center
Sunday night.
The roof collapse also
brought down a large
chunk of the back wall of
the store.
A fire captain said the
damaged area is about 50
feet by 70 feet. The damage was being assessed
today and it was not
known when the store
would reopen.
7:30
ABC World Ent.
News
Tonigh t
Jeopardy! Wheel of
WRBL-3
Fortune
A l a b a m a T h e I n s id e r
WLTZ-38 First News
Access
TMZ
WAGA-5 Hollywood
Two and a Two and a
WUPA-69 Half Men Half Men
Half & Half Half & Half
WXTX-54
(2) WSB-2
(11) WXIA-11
(12) WGCL-46
(13) WJSP-26
(18) WATL-36
(19) LGTV
(20) WPXA
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
The Bachelorette (N)
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
True Beauty (SF) (N)
News
(:35) News
CSI: Miami
News
(:35)
Dateline NBC (N)
LateSh.
News / (:10) (:35) Jay
Raymond Leno
News
TMZ
Nightline
Met Your Rules of
Mother
Engage.
America's Got Talen t
Two and a Big Bang
Half Men Theory
Last Comic Standing
(N)
Lie to Me (N)
The Good Guys (N)
Fox 5 News at 10
90210
G o s s ip G i r l
Frank&Wanda Show
FOX 54
News
Seinfeld
Everybody Half & Half The Bernie
Hate Chris
Mac Show
The Good Guys (N)
Seinfeld The Office King of the
Lie to Me (N)
Hill
Family Guy Family Guy House of House of Law & Order: Special
Seinfeld <++ Mimic ('97) Josh
Payne
Payne
Victims Unit
Brolin, Mira Sorvino.
I n s id e
Ent.
The Bachelorette (N)
True Beauty (SF) (N)
News
(:35) News
Edition
Tonigh t
Nightline
News
Parkway
BeachTV 33 News C am era-33 < T o B e Announ ced
M i ts u b i sh i
wood
News
(:35) Jay
Daily 11 Extra
America's Got Talen t Last Comic Standing Dateline NBC (N)
Leno
(N)
(:35)
T h e I n s id e r I n s id e
Met Your Rules of Two and a Big Bang CSI: Miami
News
LateSh.
Edition
Mother
Engage. Half Men Theory
George Shultz Pt. 2 of 3 Tavis
Charlie
Antiques Roadshow Antiques Roadshow Pt. Perilous Fight
3 of 3 from July 12
cont'd July 26 (N)
Smiley
Rose
Wheel of Jeopardy! Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order: Criminal My 11Alive That '7 0s Friends
Raymond
1/2
Fortune
Intent
Intent
News
Show
Local Government In fo Job TV
L.Gov. Info W.P. Lake LaGrange L.Gov. Info Job TV
Report
College
Without a Trace
Without a Trace
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
CABLE CHANNELS
F u nn i e s t H o m e V i d eo s F u nn i e s t H o m e V i d eo s F u nn i e s t H o m e V i d eo s W G N N e w s
Scrubs 1/2 Scrubs 2/2
Young & Restless
All My Children
One Life to Live
General Hospital
Days of Our Lives
E! News Daily 10 Kourtney Kourtney Holly
Holly
Kimora: The Fab Lane C. Lately E! News
America's Got Talen t Dance Your Ass Off
Dance Your Ass Off
Dance Your Ass Off (N) (:55) DanceYourAssOff
Reba
Reba
Reba
Reba
< The Client List ('10) Jennifer Love Hewitt.
Drop Dead Diva
Bones
The Closer
The Closer (N)
Rizzoli & Isles (N)
The Closer
NCIS
NCIS
WWE Raw
WWE Raw
(:05) Covert Affairs
(6:00) < The Waterb... <+++ 27 Dresses (2008, Comedy) James Marsden, Katherine Heigl.
< 27 Dresses
The Kudlow Repo rt
Business Model
Biography
American Greed: Scam Mad Money
Hardball
C o un td o wn
Rachel Maddow
C o un td o wn
Rachel Maddow
John King, USA
Campbell Brown
Larry King Live
Anderson Cooper 360
MonsterQuest
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars American Pickers
Pawn Stars P awn Stars C hasing Mummies
C o ps
C o ps
Op Repo Op Repo Op Repo Op Repo Worked Up Wor ked Up F.Files
F.Files
The First 48
Intervention
Intervention (N)
Obsessed (N)
Obsessed (N)
Housewives/NewJersey Housewives/NewJersey Housewives/NewJersey Housewives NJ (N)
Watch
Wives NJ
(5:30) < The Bone C ... Mad Men
Mad Men
Mad Men
Mad Men
(6:00) < 201 0: The ... <+++ C ap tain Horatio Hornb lower
<+++ Captain Newman, M.D.
Dirty Jobs
Ultimate Car Build-Off Car Build-Off (N)
Cars
Cars
Ultimate Ca r Build-Off
Drugs, Inc.
America Before Columbus
Monste r Fis h
B e fore C olu mb us
Cupcakes Cupcakes Cake Boss Cake Boss Cake Boss Cake Boss Fabulous Cakes (N)
Cake Boss Cake Boss
Anthony Bourdain
Asia
Anthony Bourdain
Anthony Bourdain
T h e H u m a n J ou rn e y
Challenge
Kid/Candy Kid/Candy BestAt e BestAte Diners
Diners
Good Eats Unwrapd
House
HouseH
Property Property HouseH
First Sale HouseH
House
Selling NY My Place
Sanford Sanford Cosb y
Cosb y
Raymond Raymond <++ Turner & Hooch ('89) Tom Hanks.
Life of the Teenager Life of the Teenager (N) Huge (N)
Make It or Break It (N) The 700 Club
Touched By An Angel Touched By An Angel < Mending Fences ('09) Laura Leighton.
G. Girls
G. Girls
Animal Cops
Last Cowboys
Pit Boss
River Monsters
Pit Boss
W i z a rd s H a n n a h M . M o n ta n a M o n ta n a S o n n y W i th a C h a n ce W i z a rd s W i z a rd s S u i te L i f e S u i te L i f e
V i c to ri o u s S p o ng e B ob P e ng ui ns F a m M a t. C h ris
Chris
G. Lopez G. Lopez The Nanny The Nanny
Scooby
Johnny
Adventur Flapjack T. D.
Stoked
King of Hill King of Hill Family Guy Family Guy
G h o s t W h i sp e rer
G h o s t W h i sp e rer
G h o s t W h i sp e rer
Warehouse 13
M o ns te r M o ns te r
Entourage Entourage Entourage Entourage <++ Kung Fu Hustle ('04) Stephen Chow.
MANswers MANswers
Tosh. O
Tosh. O
Tosh. O
Tosh. O
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Chappelle Chappelle
True Life
True Life
R Dyrdek R Dyrd ek RJ Berger Warren
R Dyrdek RJ Berger
(6:00) 10 6 & P ark (L) <++ Rememb er the Titans ('00) Denzel Washington.
The Game The Mo'Nique Show
(6:30) Ochoc T.O. Show Behind the Music (N) Do Something Awards (N)
You're Cut Off
Ext. Makeover: Home Ext. Makeover: Home <+++ Coal Miner's Daughter ('80) Sissy Spacek.
(:45) Music
D.Cuando XH Derbez Vida Salvaje
En Portada
Las Noticias por Adela Sabias Que Noticie.
CABLE SPORTS CHANNELS
(32) ESPN
MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies vs. St. Louis Cardinals (L)
Baseball Tonight (L) SportsCenter
(33) ESPN2 C. Football NFL Live ESPY Awards
Poker '09 World Series Poker '09 World Series
(35) FXSS
WPT Poker Bellagio Cup HeadHead HeadHead Sport Science
Game365 Final Score Gold Age Final Score
(36) SPSO
NCAA Softball ACC Women's Championship Ga.T./Fla. S.
L ights
Under the Lights
N-S Shootout
(37) CHSSE NCAA Football Classics Florida vs. Tennessee
SportsNite (L)
Talkin' Football
(38) GOLF
The Golf Fix (L)
Big Break Sandals
Big Break Sandals (N) The Golf Fix
Golf Cent. Learn
(40) SPEED NASCAR Race Hub (N) Ultimate Fac tories
Ultimate Fac tories
Racing
NASCAR Ultimate Factories
(82) VS
Whack
TourFrance Cycling Tour de France
The Daily Line (L)
(21) WGN
(25) E!
(26) OXY
(27) LIFE
(29) TNT
(30) USA
(31) FX
(34) VH1
(42) CNBC
(43) MSNBC
(44) CNN
(47) HIST
(48) TRU
(49) A&E
(50) BRAV
(51) AMC
(52) TCM
(53) DISC
(54) NGEO
(55) TLC
(56) TRAV
(57) FOOD
(58) HGTV
(59) TVLD
(60) FAM
(61) CMT
(62) ANPL
(63) DISN
(64) NICK
(65) TOON
(66) CMDY
(67) SYFY
(68) SPIKE
(70) MTV
(71) BET
(127) SOAP
(137) HALL
(221) GALA
LaGrange Daily News
www.lagrangenews.com
9 - Monday, July 19, 2010
Sports
ON
TAP
Tuesday
Baseball
Padres at Braves, 7 p.m.
(Peachtree TV)
Troup County wins state title
The Troup County 13-14 year-old all-star team won the Dixie Boys Baseball state tournament in Covington. The win earns the team a berth to the Dixie Boys Baseball World series. Team members include Carson Aldridge,Caleb Buchanan, Jaylen Colton, Drew Elliston, Dre Leonard, Matt Morton, Jake Norton, Hayden Olive,Chas
Pardue, John Patterson, CJ Tatum, Clayton Vaught and Dustin Vaught. The head coach is Andy Buchanan, and the assistants are Jeff Buchanan and Matt Aldridge.
For more on the team’s winning performance, see page 10.
Troup’s rolling
By Kevin Eckleberry
Sports Editor
DALTON – They’re making it look
awfully easy.
The Troup County National 1112-year-old all-stars continued their
march through the Dixie Youth
Baseball state tournament on Sunday, crushing Grayson 12-1 to improve to 3-0 in the tournament.
Troup isn’t just winning, it’s dismantling the opposition.
In the three tournament games,
Troup has outscored its opponents
35-2, and it hasn’t allowed a hit in
two of those games, making it the
clear favorite to advance out of its
side of the bracket to the championship series that begins Thursday.
Today at 8 p.m., Troup will face
Peachtree Ridge, a team it beat 13-1
on Saturday.
Troup needs to win that game,
and another game on Tuesday, to
advance to the best-of-three cham-
Kevin Eckleberry / Daily News
Ben Anderson follows through for a base hit Saturday. Anderson has yet Troup National’s Kevin Craft tip-toes around a bat to
score a run during Saturday’s tournament game.
SEE TROUP, PAGE 10 to make an out in three tournament games.
Still
alive
From staff reports
Kevin Eckleberry / Daily News
Troup American’s 11-12-year-old all-star team is 2-1 in the state tournament. Above left, second baseman Willis Kemp follows through on a
throw to first base after making a terrific play. Above right, Winston Turner pitches in Saturday’s win over Albany.
DALTON –
There’s
more baseball to play.
That’s the good news
for Troup American in
light of Sunday’s disappointing 8-6 loss to Duluth in the Dixie Youth
Baseball state tournament.
Troup won its first two
tournament games before stumbling Sunday in
the double-elimination
tournament.
Troup still has a chance
to win the state championship, though, the task is
just a bit more difficult
now.
Troup will have to win
SEE STATE,
PAGE
10
Troup’s players are introduced before Sunday’s game against Whitfield County. Troup is 2-0 in the tournament.
It’s two up, two down
By Kevin Eckleberry
Sports Editor
Kevin Eckleberry / Daily News
Troup American shortstop Ellis Matthews makes a
throw to first on Sunday. Troup beat Whitfield 9-0.
SUWANEE – After giving their
fans some last-inning thrills the
night before, the Troup American
all-stars got it done in more con-
vincing fashion Sunday evening on ton to take a 9-8 victory.
One day later, Troup again
Day 2 of the Dixie Youth Baseball
jumped out to the lead, but the sto11-12-year-old state tournament.
On Saturday, Troup was up 8-1, ryline was vastly different.
but after losing all of that lead, it
got a walk-off hit from Jarred HelSEE DIXIE, PAGE 10
Sports
10 - Monday, July 19, 2010
■ Dixie Boys Baseball
The best
in state
By Robert Griffin
Sports Writer
COVINGTON – After
two epic baseball games,
including one that featured a combined 33 runs,
the Troup County 13-14year-old all-stars are state
champs.
Troup came into the
championship round Friday with two chances to
beat Newton County.
Turns
out,
Troup
needed both of those opportunities.
After Newton County
won a wild 17-16 game in
the opener, Troup got a
strong pitching outing
from Dustin Vaught and
Jake Norton to win the
second and deciding
game 5-3 that ended after
midnight on Friday.
“It’s a great thing. I am
so proud of the boys and
happy for
t h e m , ”
T r o u p
coach Andy
B u c h a n an
said. “This
is what you
work to do,
Buchanan to see the
joy and excitement on
their faces when it’s all
over. That’s what you
work hard for. They are a
great bunch of boys. They
are great athletes and this
is a wonderful time in
their lives.”
For many of the players, this will be the third
year in a row they’ll get to
experience World Series
play.
In 2008, Troup’s 11-12year-old team served as
the host team in the World
Series in LaGrange, and a
year ago, the 13-year-old
team won a state title.
“It’s an honor to be out
there and to be able to
represent Georgia again,”
Buchanan said. “We have
some great parents who
help us out a lot, and we
are thankful for everything that they do for us.
It has been a great three
years.”
Heading into Friday,
there was every indication
Troup was going to cruise
to the title.
Troup hadn’t lost in the
tournament, and it had already beaten Newton
County 13-3.
In the rematch, though,
Newton jumped out to a
five-run lead in the first
inning thanks to some errors and a grand slam.
“We made some errors
in that first inning,”
Buchanan said, “and that
kind of opened the flood
gates.”
Troup tied it at 5-5, but
Newton County scored
six runs in the fourth inning and five in the fifth to
take a 16-5 lead.
Troup needed to score a
couple of runs just to
avoid the 10-run mercy
rule.
With its back against
the wall, Troup rose to the
occasion.
Dre Leonard and Jaylen
Colton led off the inning
with back-to-back singles,
and C.J. Tatum walked to
load the bases.
That’s when Caleb
Buchanan blasted a grand
slam that got Troup
going.
“He (Caleb) really got
us back in the game,”
Buchanan said. “He really
helped us to get energized
and get going.”
Buchanan finished with
three hits and six RBIs in
the game.
After holding Newton
scoreless in the top of the
sixth, Troup added five
more runs in the bottom
of the inning to bring the
score to 16-14.
Newton score a run in
the top of the seventh, and
Troup was down 17-14
heading into its final atbat.
After five straight hits,
Newton’s once daunting
Dustin Vaught was the
starting and winning
pitcher in the championship game.
lead was down to 17-16.
With all the momentum
on Troup’s side, Mother
Nature, as she had done
throughout the week-long
tournament reared its
head.
Play was suspended for
30 minutes due to lightning in the area that had
increased as the game
wore on.
“We had all the momentum in the world,”
Buchanan said, “and that
break kind of took the
wind out of our sails.”
When play resumed,
Newton brought in a new
pitcher, and he closed the
door, getting the final two
outs to preserve the win
and force a deciding
game,
which
began
shortly after 10 p.m.
Norton finished the first
game with three hits and
three RBIs, and Colton
had two hits and three
RBIs.
Chas Pardue, Tatum,
Leonard, Matt
Morton
and Drew Elliston added
hits, with Elliston driving
in a run and Tatum scoring four runs.
Buchanan said he knew
his team had a good
chance in the second
game from the moment
the first game ended.
“You could see that they
wanted
that
game,”
Buchanan said. “They
came in from the second
game, drank some water,
then went right back on
the field to warm up. They
were fired up and ready to
go.”
Troup drew first blood
of the game in the third
inning, leading off with
two singles.
Dustin Vaught reached
on an error, which scored
the first run of the game
for Troup.
Norton followed with
an RBI single, and after
Pardue and Morton drew
walks, Leonard was hit by
a pitch with the bases
loaded.
Troup led 4-0 by the
time the inning ended.
Vaught pitched 4 2/3 innings, and Norton went
the rest of the way to pick
up the save.
Vaught gave up five hits
and three runs, and Norton was brilliant, striking
out six of the seven batters he faced while not
giving up a hit.
“Dustin just did a stellar
job out there for us,”
Buchanan said. “He was
lights out.
Leading 4-3, Troup got
a big insurance run in the
sixth.
Leonard led off with a
single, stole second and
third, and Hayden Olive
brought him home with a
single.
“It’s that type of play
that kept us in this game
and helped us to win,”
Buchanan said. “We were
taking advantage of our
opportunities out there.”
TROUP
FROM
LaGrange Daily News
9
pionship series.
“We’ve had good pitching, and
they’ve played solid defense,” said
Troup head coach Jay Anderson.
Back tremendous pitching and
stellar defense up with a lineup
that Anderson said has been “real
balanced” and it’s no wonder
Troup has been winning so convincingly.
Troup started its tournament
stay with a 10-0 win over Lee
County Friday night, with Wyatt
Frailey pitching a four-inning nohitter.
Frailey gave up a leadoff walk,
but he didn’t allow another baserunner.
Frailey retired 12 of the 13 batters he retired, and he had eight
strikeouts.
Jake Farrar and C.J. Gallatin
each had a pair of hits, while Kevin
Craft and Brandon Gay each had
doubles. Troup had 10 hits and
walked nine times.
A day later, Troup put up eight
runs in the third inning on the way
to the 13-1 win over Peachtree
Ridge.
Ben Anderson, who has yet to
make an out in the tournament,
got things started with a two-run
double in the third, and Gallatin,
Ty McCann and Parker Pearson
followed with RBI singles.
Jackson Shelnutt capped the
rally with an RBI double.
Craft started and pitched two innings, and Matthew Anderson and
Shelnutt also pitched for Troup.
Ben Anderson had a double, a
triple, a walk, and he also made a
Kevin Eckleberry / Daily News
Troup National first baseman Jake Farrar tosses a ball to pitcher Kevin
Craft for an out during Saturday’s game.
couple of nice plays in center field.
Craft had a pair of hits, and McCann, Gallatin and Jake Farrar
each had doubles.
Jake Howard and Frailey also
had hits for Troup.
During the eight-run second,
Troup kept the pressure on
Peachtree Ridge with its aggressive base-running.
“We really ran the bases well,”
assistant coach Kevin Howard
said. “Guys were running, and
reading the ball.”
On Sunday, Troup handled
Grayson 12-1 to make it three
blowout victories in three days.
Pearson and Dylan Johnson
combined for a no-hitter.
Pearson went the first three innings, striking out five, and Johnson pitched a perfect fourth.
After scoring three runs in the
first inning and three more in the
second, Troup put it away with six
runs in the third.
Once again it was a balanced attack, with everyone in the lineup
producing something.
Ben Anderson continued to get
on base with two hits and a walk.
Frailey had a couple of doubles,
Shelnutt had a pair of hits, and
Howard had a single while walking three times.
Galatin, McCann, Craft, Johnson, Matthew Anderson and Pearson also had hits.
■ Baseball
Braves
find
offense
Kevin Eckleberry / Daily News
Troup American pitcher Mack Reese waits for a popup to come down during Saturday’s win over Albany.
STATE
FROM
9
games today, Tuesday and Wednesday
to advance to the best-of-three championship series that starts Thursday.
Troup and Newton play again today
at 6 p.m.
“We are going to have to take advantage of the opportunities when we get
them,” Troup American coach Curt
Longshore said. “We are going to have
to have some big hits. Our defense and
pitching has been carrying us the
whole tournament. You have to figure
that sooner or later the bats are going
to wake up.”
Despite Sunday’s loss, it was a successful weekend for Troup.
On Friday, Troup beat Newton
County 3-1.
Troup was down 1-0 through five innings, but it tied it on a Colby Darda
base hit, and Zack Callaghan gave his
team the lead with a two-run base hit.
Bo Halcomb, Mack Reese and Winston Turner each pitched.
“The team played outstanding defense out there tonight,” Longshore
said after the game. “We were able to
get some timely hits, and that sealed
the game for us.”
DIXIE
FROM
On Saturday, it was all about pitching
in a 4-1 win over Albany International.
Turner started and pitched four innings of one-hit ball, and Reese went
the final two innings.
Clinging to a 2-1 lead, Troup got a
couple of big insurance runs in the
sixth.
Turner walked, Logan Carson
reached on an infield single, and Reese
walked to load the bases.
Graham Oliver walked to drive in a r
un, and Courtney Laye followed with a
sacrifice fly for the final run.
In the fifth, ,Colby Heath had an RBI
single to break a 1-1 tie, and earlier in
the game, Halcomb reached on an
error to drive in a run.
“Winston pitched great on the mound
for us,” Longshore said.
On Sunday, it was all about missed
opportunities, Longshore said.
“We had plenty of chances to capitalize,” Longshore said. “We should have
won the ball game, but we didn’t get big
hits when we needed them. “
The game was tied at 6-6 after six innings, and Newton scored a couple of
runs to win it in the seventh.
Halcomb started the game and
pitched two innings, Laye went three
innings, and Reese pitched two innings.
9
With three pitchers
combining to throw a
gem, Troup cruised to a 90 victory over Whitfield
County to remain in the
winner’s bracket of the
tournament.
Troup, which won the
district title to qualify for
state, remained unbeaten
in tournament play heading into today’s showdown
against
North
Macon at 8 p.m.
“They know how to
play together, and they
never give up,” Troup
head coach Perry Prather
said. “It’s been a good
group.”
On
Sunday, Troup
scored three runs in the
bottom of the first, and
that was plenty thanks to
the performance of the
pitchers.
Helton started and
pitched two innings, Ellis
Matthews went the next
two innings, and Colson
Jarred Helton was the
winning pitcher Sunday.
Blackburn went the final
two innings.
At the plate, Helton had
a big day with three hits,
including a pair of doubles.
David Sweat, Ellis
Matthews, Daniel Swann,
Blackburn and John
Crawford each had two
hits, and Swann reached
base four times.
Seth Prather added an
RBI single.
“The pitching was good,
and the bats came
through,” Prather said. “It
was a really good win.
Whitfield’s a good team.”
On Saturday, Troup was
ahead 8-1 going into the
fifth inning, but Albany
International rallied, and
it was tied heading into
the bottom of the sixth.
Matthew Freeman led
off the walk, which was
followed up by walks to
Hudson Graham and
Matthews.
Helton came to the
plate and delivered his
second RBI single of the
night, giving Troup the
walk-off win.
Prather said that it was
his team’s “never say die”
attitude that helped it to
pull out the victory.
Blackburn and John
Todd Bohn each had three
hits, and Helton, John
Crawford and Charles
Crawford each had RBI
hits.
ATLANTA (AP) –Brian
McCann’s week of basesloaded fun began with a
big hit at the All-Star
game and ended with a
grand slam that helped
the Atlanta Braves recover their home swagger.
McCann matched his
career high with five
RBIs, helping the Braves
end a rare two-game
home losing streak by
beating the Milwaukee
Brewers 11-6 on Sunday.
The Braves, who won the
series opener before losing
two straight to Milwaukee,
improved baseball's best
home record to 32-12.
In Tuesday’s All-Star
game, McCann’s basesloaded double drove in
three runs. He was named
the MVP of the National
League's 3-1 win.
McCann’s sixth career
grand slam gave Atlanta a
7-1 lead over the Brewers
in the third.
“Anytime you get the
bases loaded, you want to
get a big hit with less than
two outs,” McCann said.
There were no outs
when he hit the homer off
Manny Parra on an 0-2
pitch.
McCann said he was
thinking, “Better not miss
this one. I’m lucky I didn’t
miss it.”
Parra, a left-hander,
said he made a mistake
with a fat pitch to the lefthanded hitting McCann.
“The pitch to McCann
was right down the middle,” Parra said. “I wanted
to go up and in.”
Matt Diaz drove in
three runs with three hits,
including a homer, as the
Braves took a split in the
four-game series. Omar
Infante drove in two runs
with four hits.
Two Atlanta batters
were hit by pitches but
both teams remained
calm one day after Milwaukee’s Prince Fielder
was hit by a pitch, causing
unrest in the Brewers'
clubhouse.
Rickie Weeks had two
homers and Fielder hit his
second homer in as many
days for Milwaukee.
By splitting the four
games with Milwaukee,
the Braves have lost only
one of their last 20 series
(15-1-4) since May 10.
They are 41-20 in that
span.
Lowe (10-8) became the
first Braves pitcher with
10 wins.
LaGrange Daily News
200
Announcements
Notices
BUSINESS
POLICY
Notices
LAGRANGE
DAILY
NEWS
Does not vouch
for the legitimacy of pets,
job or moneymaking opportunities advertised
in the newspaper. We suggest
you carefully
evaluate such
offers and not
send money to
these advertisers unless you
are certain you
know with whom
you are dealing
and you know all
terms and conditions of the offer.
The LaGrange Daily
News reserves the
right to classify all advertisements,
to
delete objectionable
words or phases or to
edit or refuse any advertisements. Every
classified advertisement must specify a
bona fide offer in
good faith. Advertiser
will hold The LaGrange Daily News
harmless against all
claims resulting from
publication of his advertisement. All ads
must be accompanied with name, ad300
dress and phone
number of person
placing ad.
PUBLIC
AUCTION
Miscellaneous personal property will be
sold to satisfy rent
August 12, 2010, 10
a.m. Location: Commerce Mini Storage,
901 Hogansville
Road, LaGrange,
GA. 30241
Contents will be
shown prior to bidding. All sales are
cash only. We have
the right to set a minimum and refuse any
bid.
Shirley Tucker –
Unit #241; Furniture,
Misc. Items
Gail Gray – Unit
#502; Furniture
Regina Moss - Unit
#704; Furniture,
Appliances
Traci Jones – Unit
#813; Misc. Items
Monday, July 19, 2010 -
Services
Home
Improvements
GUARANTEED
HANDY MAN
Carpentry, Painting,
Sheet Rock Repair,
Plumbing.
706-443-6195
Home
Improvements
ADAMS HOME
REPAIR
painting, carpentry
roofs, plumbing,
gutters and
pressure washing
706-302-7544
Other Services
DIRECTV
Other Services
STARGILL'S
PRESSURE
WASHING
706-402-4945
Best Offer Ever!
Over 120 Top Channels only $24.99/mo.
for one year. Call Now
1-888-688-5943
Dish Network
SOUTHERN STYLE
PRESSURE
WASHING
www.southernstyle
pressurewash.com
706-523-0268
Animals
Pets
YORKIE POO
Nine weeks old, Can
be CKC registered.
Has had first shots
DIVERSIFIED
and worming. Raised
TREES, INC.
indoors, Family
ISA Certified Arborist
friendly. Contact
Licensed/Insured
Stacy 678-431-3334
706-663-0300
VONAGE
Unlimited local
For the best TV
and long distance
experience, upcalling for only
grade from cable to $24.99 per month.
Directv today!
Get reliable phone
Packages start at service from Vonage.
$29.99
Call Today!
1-866-541-0834
1-877-673-3136
DISH
NETWORK
600
11
Security
ADT
Free Home
Security
System
$850 value with
purchase of alarm
monitoringservices
from ADT Security
Services.
1-888-274-3888
400
Financial
Financial
CREDIT CARD
RELIEF
Buried in Credit
Card Debit?
Call Credit Card Relief for your free
consultation.
1-877-264-8031
FAST IRS
RELIEF
Do you owe over
$10,000 to the IRS?
Settle Out Over Due
Taxes for Less
1-888-692-5739
900
Merchandise
LAGRANGE
DAILY
NEWS
Has newspaper
end rolls for
sale. (Work great
for packing)
End Rolls
$4.00
Equipment /
Supplies
42" CRAFTSMAN
Riding Lawn Mower
with Grass Catcher,
20" Push Mower with
Grass Catcher,
Weedeater with four
attachments, Hedge
trimmer, All $1000
706-594-0191
SEARS
CRAFTSMAN
Limited edition riding
mower, Must see
$650 706-523-2894
Furniture
BROYHILL
Dining Room China
Cabinet, Table, Six
chairs, extra leaves,
$3000 706-523-2894
316106
12 - Monday, July 19, 2010
Sport Utility
NASCAR TICKETS
2007 TOYOTA 4Two truck, Two NaRUNNER SR5
tionwide, Two
Black, 53,000 miles,
NASCAR Cup tickets
Great condition
for Bristol Fall night $19,500 or best offer
race 706-637-9858
770-851-1953
Trucks
1985 FORD F150
SHORT BOX
PICKUP
302 C.I.D. dual
tanks, 23K miles on
new engine.
$2,000 or best offer.
706-845-9015
FOUR BEDROOMS
TWO BATH
with double car
garage in Stoney
Creek
neighborhood, close
to Wal-Mart. Rent
$1100 706.523.0096
HOMES FOR RENT
$200-$950
MALLORY REALTY
706-884-3336
www.malloryrealty.net
THREE BEDROOM
TWO BATH
With double garage,
Built 2005 in Hummingbird Estates,
Hogansville. $750,
$500 deposit
706-333-8336
Houses for Rent
Rentals
Help Wanted General
THREE BEDROOM
MOVE AND SAVE
Nice Two bedroom
ONE BATH
FORKLIFT
706-523-0693
Central air and heat,
SERVICE
Big covered wrap
TECHNICIAN
6000
around porch,
Employment Experience with both
217 Jefferson Street
Electric and LP Gas
$560/month
Forklifts. Four years
Clerical
TWO BEDROOM
experience with
ONE BATH
Forklift Dealer prePART TIME/
Central air and heat
FULL TIME
ferred. Good pay
903 Todd Street
OFFICE HELP
with vacation and
NEEDED
$525/month
holiday pay.
Applicants must have Submit resume to:
706-957-7130
a minimum of two
Blind Box #1
years office experiPO Box 929
THREE BEDROOM
ence with good
LaGrange, GA 30241
TWO BATH
Near Mountville
Elementary,
$700/month, $500
deposit
706-845-3765
computer and communication skills.
High school diploma
LOVETT'S
1999 CHEVROLET
required. Send
RECYCLING
VENTURE VAN
resumes to:
314 Cooley Road
Boats /
$3000
203 Westside Court WANTED: Yard Man
Accessories
706-845-7574
LaGrange, GA 30240 Qualifications: Must
1986 BOSTON
NO phone calls, please.
have valid drivers
3000
WHALER SPORT
Real Estate Sales
license.
NEW
FOUR
15' 3", 60hp Mercury,
TWO BEDROOM
Drivers &
Experience: MUST
BEDROOM
Good condition,
Private two bedroom,
Delivery
know how to use
For Sale By
In town, Near med$3500
one
bath
near
Pine
Cutting
Torch, Willing
ical centr, Call for deOwner
706-884-9559
DRIVER CDL to learn the operation
Mountain.
tails, $1850/ month
706-882-8972
CLASS
of Scrap Yard.
LEASE PURCHASE
Call 706-594-8215
706-884-8642
A Three years refrig- Only qualified appliLovely Three Bedcants need to apply.
erated experince.
room, Two Bath
2005 SYLVAN 20FT
Manufactured
RENT TO OWN
Clean MVR, and
Ranch, Less than
SUNCHASER FISH
4000
Housing
MARINE MEwork record.
LaGrange
five miles from KIA,
PONTOON BOAT
CHANIC
706-672-0332
$975
139 Mitchell Avenue
60hp Mercury 4Experienced marine
770-656-4788
Two bedroom, $225
stroke EFI Bigfoot
DRIVERS WANTED
Rentals
mechanic needed,
motor, Black SmokFranklin
Flatbed and Special- Must have own tools,
Houses For Sale
ercraft single axle
256 Fir Road
THREE BEDROOM
ized Lowboy Two
acceptable refertrailer with three
Three bedroom,
VERY NICE
1.5 BATH
ences, valid drivers
years experience,
steps, Lowrance X47
Two bath $775
THREE BEDROOM
New Franklin Road
fish finder, Brand
Class A CDL, OTR license and your own
Hogansville
Two bath, Two car
transportation, apply
Area, $370/month,
new Minn-Kota 54"
two to four weeks,
207 West Main
garage, 17 Savanat Highland Marina
$200
deposit
trolling motor,
Average pay per
Street
Resort, 1000
nah Place Drive,
$11,800 Less than
One Bedroom, $200 Call 706-302-2918 or
week $900
Seminole Road
Near KIA $124,000
100 hours
706-302-0334
706-302-6713
352-942-7821
706-402-3844
706-675-6702
706-302-8179
LEASE PURCHASE
Campers / RVs & Four bedroom, Two
bath, $650/month, 3Trailers
5% down, HogansKZ 05 SPORTSMEN ville 678-315-1014
18ft, Six cylinder can
tow, Loaded, Low
Real Estate
3500
mileage, Excellent
Rentals
condition $9000
706-882-4583
Apartments /
Motorcycles
Townhouses
Recreational
Vehicles
05 HARLEY D
SOFTAIL FXST
Been lowered, 12K
mi, $10,600
706-302-0904
1997 YAMAHA
750 VIRAGO
New tires, windshield, saddle bags,
very clean $2450
770-408-8542
706-883-7958
2007 YAMAHA 1100
Custom, $7100 or
best offer, Lots of
extras
706-594-2623
2005 SUZUKI
VL1500cc C90
Lots of extras.
Excellent condition
$6,000.
706-882-2609 or
706-616-2658
Other
GOLF CART
FOR SALE
Good Condition
$1800
706-594-0115
2000
Automotive
Autos
1994 BUICK
PARK AVENUE
AC, Great gas
mileage, Excellent
Condition $2550
706-402-8102
Sport Utility
Vans
304A HILL STREET
Two bedroom, One
bath, Central Heat
and Air, Stove and
Refrigerator, Washer
and Dryer hookup,
$450/ month, Deposit
Dependant,
706-883-6306
8am-5pm,
Monday-Friday
Help Wanted General
Medical
OFFICE STAFF
POSITIONS
SOFTWARE
Needed for Home
SALES/
Instead Senior Care.
TRAINING
Earn up to $100 per
RNʼs $22/hour and
CONSULTANT
day, Undercover
Staff Administration,
LaGrange,
GA
shoppers needed to
Client Care and
judge retail and din- Two years sales exRecruiter $10-$12/
perience
required,
ing establishments,
software or hardware hour. Benefits, paid
No experience revacaction, flexible
sales preferred.
quired, Call
work schedule.
$24,000
salary
plus
877-289-8554
Please fax your recommission. Multisume to 706-883state travel
1114 or go to:
required. Send reQUALITY
sume and references homeinstead.com/
CONTROL
LaGrangeGA
via email/fax to:
FULL TIME
[email protected]
Tucker Communicafax: 706-298-0231
tions, Inc. is currently
accepting applications for a full-time
Medical
Quality Control technician for our LaLICENSED
grange office.
PRACTICAL
Applicants must be
NURSE or PARAdetailed oriented,
MEDIC
willing to work in inPart-time
opportunity
clement weather, as
well as be able to lift at local correctional
facility. Monday- Friup to seventy five
day, 30 hours per
pounds frequently.
Applicants must also week. Competitive
pay and benefits.
possess a late model
Apply online at
truck/van. Backwww.correcthealth.or
ground Check and
g or fax resume to
Drug Screen are re770-692-5969.
quired upon acceptance.If you meet the
minimum requirements and are interested in applying,
please e-mail your
resume to
[email protected]
tuckercomm.net or
fax your resume to
(706) 938-1071.
MYSTERY
SHOPPERS
313531
APARTMENTS
COMMUNICATIONS/ SOUND
ADVERTISE TODAY!
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Home Improvement
LAWN CARE
NOW
SERVING
SERVING
COWETA &TROUP
FAYETTECOUNTY
COUNTIES
WOOBuilding
DWA RYour
D COFuture
NSTToday
RUCTION
• Morgan & Son •
125 LAFAYETTE
COURT
One bedroom, One
bath $350/month
706-884-6900
AffordableApartments
OfLaGrange.com
706-845-0706
Sec 8 accepted.
THE GARDENS
APARTMENTS
Two bedroom, Two
bath. $99 Move In
Special
706-883-8728
TWO BEDROOM
1.5 BATH
$525 monthly,
$500 deposit.
866-600-0527
THREE BEDROOM
TWO BATH
In three year old
triplex on Wynnwood
Drive. $635, $500
deposit
706-333-8336
Commercial
2006 HONDA PILOT 10,000/16,000 SQ
FT
DXL Leather, DVD,
BUILDING FOR
Warranty 88k miles,
LEASE OR SALE
$16,500
Offices, loading
706-402-3656
dock, 706-845-6578.
,17+(
&/$66,),('6
ERVICES
HHANDYMAN
ANDYMAN SSERVICES
We Do
Roofing
Licensed
& Insured
Room Additions • Basements
Window/Door Replacement & Repair
NO JOB TOO SMALL
Specializing in Custom Screened Porches
Garages / Golf Cart Garages
678-462-0699
678-462-0699
770-463-2900
770-463-2900
Locally
LocallyOwned
Owned
PAINTING
STORAGE
278721
1000
Help Wanted General
30 Years
Experience
Custom Home Builders
and Complete
Home Improvement,
Restorations and Repairs
706-637-9376
Licensed Georgia and Alabama
POOL
VETERINARY
274468
YAMAHA
CLAVINOVA
CPV309, Paid
$18,800 February
2009, Used only 24
hours. Will sell for
$10,000. Call 706884-1077
if interested
Houses for Rent
Lawn Care and
Maintenance
Pressure Washing ~ Landscaping
Debris Removal ~ Grass Cutting
Shrub Trimming
Barn & Wooden Fence Painting
Free Estimates ~ Licensed & Insured
313545
Miscellaneous
LaGrange Daily News
Bo Morgan
Owner/Operator
Ph: 706-837-4374
Cell: 706-523-2345
ROOFING
VIDEOS

Similar documents

Hogansville • LaGrange • West Point

Hogansville • LaGrange • West Point Florence Hand Home and Big Brothers Big Sisters. Guests may attend activities for two months without obligation. After that time, dues are $20 per year. For more information email [email protected]

More information

Local

Local Saving Senoia with movies, rebuilding downtown area. Page 1C

More information