04.10.14 Section A - Southside Sentinel

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04.10.14 Section A - Southside Sentinel
SSentinel.com
Serving Middlesex County and adjacent areas of the Middle Peninsula and Northern Neck since 1896
Urbanna, Virginia 23175 • April 10, 2014
Vol. 120, No. 2
Two Sections • 75¢
Current Tax on
a $200,000 Property
Rates per $100 of Assessed Value
County
Tax
Rate
Year last
Reassessment
took Effect
Tax
Amount
Middlesex
48¢
$960
2011
Mathews
47¢
$940
2012
Lancaster
50¢
$1000
2012
King & Queen
54¢
$1080
2011
Gloucester
65¢
$1300
2010
King William
79¢
$1580
2010
Essex
84¢
$1680
2012
Public hearing on proposed
5-cent tax increase is tonight
by Larry Chowning
The Middlesex County Board of Supervisors will hold a
public hearing Thursday, April 10, at 7 p.m. on the second
floor of the Historic Courthouse in Saluda on a proposed
FY15 budget that totals $21,294,176—$14,414,565 of
which is for county schools.
A 5-cent increase in the county’s real estate tax is
included in the proposal. The current tax rate per $100 of
value is 48 cents; the proposed rate is 53 cents. Each penny
on the real estate tax rate generates about $215,000.
If approved, the 5-cent increase would generate
$1,075,000, and would represent about a 10% tax increase
on real estate. The county’s total FY15 budget is up
$1,524,039—an 8% jump over FY14.
The largest jump in local funding in the proposed budget
is for education. In FY14, $7.5 million in county funds was
budgeted; in FY15 the proposed funding for education is $8.2
million—an increase of $741,000 in county funds. Funding
this increase alone will necessitate a 3-cent real estate tax hike.
The second largest increase is for Middlesex’s share of
funding the Middle Peninsula Regional Security Center
in Saluda. In FY14, $744,000 was budgeted. In FY15,
$929,000 is proposed—a jump of $185,000.
Middlesex now has the highest number of inmates incarcerated in the jail, which means the county must pay a
larger share of the overall cost of operating the facility.
The third largest increase in the budget proposal is for
law enforcement, up $134,000 over the $1.4 million budgeted in FY14.
Dr. Rev. Chauncey Mann Jr. (right) was honored as the recipient
of the “Pride of Middlesex” award by the Middlesex Rotary Club
Saturday night. State Delegate Keith Hodges presented Dr. Mann
with a framed copy of a Virginia Assembly resolution honoring him
for his service to Middlesex County, starting in 1975 as pastor of
Grafton Baptist Church.
(Photo by Larry Chowning)
Community honors
Rev. C.E. Mann for his
service to Middlesex
by Larry Chowning
Dr. Rev. Chauncey E. Mann
Jr. was honored Saturday by the
Middlesex Rotary Club as the recipient of the “Pride of Middlesex”
award at the 16th annual banquet
held at the Deltaville Maritime
Museum.
Dr. Mann, now retired, came
to Middlesex in 1975 to become
pastor of Grafton Baptist Church
in Hartfield. He brought with him
his good nature, his charm and a
charismatic outlook on life that
instantly lifted him into a leadership role during a critical time for
race relations in the county.
The year 1975 was just five
years after Middlesex was forced
by federal law to totally integrate
public schools. Mann’s presence in
the county helped bridge the gap
between whites and blacks, and
helped encourage and bring racial
stability to Middlesex. This was
pointed out by speakers at Saturday’s ceremony.
One of the highlights on Saturday was when Dr. Mann was
informed that the Virginia Gen-
eral Assembly had honored him
in March by passing House Joint
Resolution No. 43—a resolution
thanking Dr. Mann for his service
to the state and Middlesex County.
Delegate Keith Hodges of Urbanna,
sponsor of the bill, presented the
framed resolution to Dr. Mann at
the ceremony.
The resolution stated that Dr.
Mann was “a moving force in the
life of the community and spent
much time focusing on ways to
improve Middlesex County for all
of its residents, and recognizing
that change often comes in small
ways and happens in many places.
Chauncey Mann was active in many
areas of civic life, including serving
as chairman (and a member) of the
Middlesex County Electoral Board
. . . for 25 years.”
The resolution went on to state
that Dr. Mann was a longtime
member of the Middlesex Ministerial Association; a founding
member and past president of the
Middlesex Rotary Club; and a
member and officer for many years
(See Dr. Mann, page A3)
Proposal would require
2.0 GPA of MHS athletes
by Larry Chowning
Members of the volunteer rescue squad say their jobs are very rewarding. Above, members of the Middlesex
*V\U[`=VS\U[LLY9LZJ\L:X\HKVM+LS[H]PSSLWVZL^P[O[OL3PML,]HJÅ`PUNHTI\SHUJL
(Photo by Tom Chillemi)
Make a difference: Join a rescue squad
by Tom Chillemi
“When I go home from a rescue call I have
the best feeling. You feel really good about
yourself when you help people.”
—MCVRS EMT Kristee Norwood
of the Middlesex County Volunteer
Rescue Squad (MCVRS), based in
Deltaville. “Both rescue squads run
24/7 and we need people to drive
ambulances and/or learn to be Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs).”
Volunteers do not need to wait at
the squad building for calls, Cerullo
explained. “They can respond from
56525 10561
6
In side
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Would you know what to do if
someone was choking? What if a child
who had been swimming was found
unconscious? What would you do?
Without training, you probably would
call 911 and wait while critical minutes passed by.
There’s a better way. You can learn
how to deal with these emergencies
and much more by joining the teams
that are ready to respond to medical
emergencies—the volunteer rescue
squads of Middlesex County.
Rescue squad members are desperately needed in both county rescue
squads, said Bob Cerullo, a member
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home or business because we have
two radios. They do not need training;
we will train them.”
Volunteers can serve as little as 24
hours in a month or as many hours as
they choose, he said. “It is very flexible. Some folks go on call for just half
(See Rescue, page A10)
The Middlesex County School Board
took a first vote Monday to approve
a change in student-athlete academic
standards that would require a 2.0
semester grade point average (GPA) to
participate in sports at Middlesex High
School.
The board voted 3-0 to take a second
vote on the proposal. A second and
final vote on the matter may be considered at the board’s May meeting.
Currently, Middlesex schools require
Virginia High School League (VHSL)
standards for sports participation
where a student has to be enrolled in
five classes, and has to have passed five
classes during the previous semester.
If the new proposal is approved,
beginning the first semester of the
2015-16 school year, all high school
student-athletes will be required to
have a 2.0 minimum GPA. Students
will be monitored, counseled, and
given the opportunity to participate in
tutoring programs throughout the year,
it was indicated.
A study of last year’s student GPAs at
MHS showed 13 freshmen, 10 sophomores, six juniors and seven seniors
had a GPA below 2.0 for a total of 36
among the 350 students enrolled at
MHS.
Board chairman Garland Harrow
said, “If we go to this we will be the
only school division in our district with
these standards. I’m concerned we are
creating an unequal field for our student-athletes and sport teams.
“For some students this may be the
only opportunity they have in their
lives to participate in team sports, and
I’d hate to be involved in taking this
away from our students,” Harrow said.
Board member Claudia Soucek said,
“I’m concerned that when a student
fails algebra, should he be out on the
field practicing until six o’clock or at
home studying. We are trying to instill
the importance of education in our students.”
Waiver
Under the proposal, student-athletes
will have the option of taking a onetime waiver request from the minimum
GPA requirement for a semester during
their high school years. Approving or
denying the waiver will be determined
by the high school principal, with consideration of VHSL eligibility requirements and other considerations deemed
(See Athletes, page A10)
Clean-Up
Saturday
Medal
Winner
Math
Whiz
PAGE A3
PAGE B1
PAGE B3
A2 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va. • April 10, 2014
opinion
letters to editor
Stop another
Middlesex
tax increase
To the Editor:
The Middlesex County Board
of Supervisors are at it again.
Wayne Jessie and Beth Hurd are
almost always in favor of bigger
government and higher taxes.
Jack Miller and Pete Mansfield
pretty much the same, and the
newest board member, Bob
LeBoeuf, has apparently been
elected into their tax-and-spend
club.
These supervisors, who
should be representing the citizens and doing what the majority of all the county citizens
want, instead are in lockstep
with the county administration
and are simply rubber stamping
the administrations tax, tax, tax
and bigger government.
The administration wants to
have more things, more programs, and the “Gang of 5”
does not resist. What they do
is raise our taxes, and raise our
taxes, and give lip service to us.
It is time for change. In the
next election, vote these people
out and require and elect men
and women who are fiscal conservatives to the board, unless
these current board members
decide to do what the taxpayers
want and what you and I want—
no tax increase.
Please come and bring a
neighbor or a friend to the
second floor meeting room in
the Historic Courthouse building in Saluda on Thursday,
April 10, at 7 p.m. and tell these
tax lovers that we oppose any
tax increase—no new taxes.
Go online to the Board
of Supervisors link (www.
co.middlesex.va.us/index_
BOS.html ), email, or telephone them every day, from
now on until they agree to stop
any plans for a tax increase.
Our supervisors phone numbers
are: Elizabeth Hurd, Pinetop,
804-776-7491; Wayne Jessie,
Jamaica, 804-758-4244; Peter
Mansfield, Saluda, 758-5335;
Jack Miller, Harmony Village,
758-5652; Robert LeBoeuf,
Hartfield, 776-8908.
Jerry Dunford
Remlik
Editor’s note: It was erroneously reported in last week’s
Southside Sentinel that Supervisor LeBoeuf was in favor of
advertising a proposed FY15
Middlesex County budget with
a 4-cent real estate tax increase.
See “Correction” on this page.
Tax hike and
county cleanup
To the Editor:
I am truly, truly opposed to tax
hikes in Middlesex. My reason,
correct me if I am so wrong, is
that when we voted for a meals
tax that the revenue generated
would take pressure off the real
estate taxes. Now, the county is
proposing a 4-cent real estate
tax hike one week and then a
5-cent tax hike the next week.
Also, people are talking about
cleaning the roads of garbage.
Why don’t they clean the county
of all these burned houses that
are falling down and look like
a total mess and are a disgrace
to Middlesex throughout the
county and the Urbanna area in
particular on Urbanna Road. It
looks disastrous.
Is this what we are paying
higher taxes for? To live in a
town or county looking like
this? No other counties look
like ours with the junk cars, etc.
Urbanna Oyster Festival visitors
and out-of-town visitors come
here and see a total mess. Board
members, we need to do something about things of this sort.
People in jail need to pick up
garbage by our roadsides and
help earn their keep.
Revenue is taken out of our
county and spent in other counties that have more and bigger
stores. That’s the reason there
is no revenue and no jobs in
Middlesex. Stores create jobs
and revenue. On both sides of
the highway (Route 17 Bypass)
from Food Lion to Hardee’s
there should be a strip mall. We
don’t want anything to come
here, so we get what we get.
Nothing from nothing leaves
nothing.
Quit sitting on the board just
taking up a seat. Get up and
start something positive in the
county.
Betty Armstrong
Saluda
Land Use, Part 2
To the Editor:
Per last week’s front page
article, it appears we have 533
“special people” in Middlesex.
Before this devolves into the
usual conservative battle cry—
”to save the less fortunate, we
must give tax breaks to the
wealthy”—could we see how
this acreage is classified per
entity? Speaking as a retired
project engineer, facts are
needed to understand and solve
problems, not ideology. The
modern world has corrupted
the ancient Greek’s study of
ideas into something much
darker. Ideology is now the primary tool of the elites; used to
manipulate their servile minions, much like a drunk uses a
lamp post for support, not illumination.
Wouldn’t it be nice to see
a distribution curve plotting
parcel size and subsidy category:
(1) Business—(a) parcels
owned by corporations; (b)
those managed on a daily basis
under the direct supervision
of the owners; (c) those under
daily professional management
with absentee owners; (d) pulp
(much of our pulp is shipped to
China for processing into diapers); and (e) lumber.
(2) Lifestyle—(a) large
estates leasing farmland; (b)
private land held in nature conservatories (really lazy farmers); (c) horse farms (land
yachts).
(3) Social—(a) small parcels actually being subsistence
farmed by their struggling
owners.
I think most of us would
agree that category 3 is the only
folks that we should be truly
extending a helping hand. Why
not work out something along
the lines of deferred taxes that
are recovered when the property is sold? Categories 1 and
2 are nothing more than corporate welfare and Tammany
Hall-style crony capitalism,
and provide no benefit to the
vast majority of Middlesex
residents.
While I do strongly believe
that the county needs to put a
stop to the many vainglorious
public monuments and the mismanagement of their construction phases that we have all
seen of late, I do believe that
we should stop impoverishing
our public workers and step up
to support a strong public education system. No one likes to
see their taxes rise, but only the
wealthy with their connections
can shift their burden to those
who can least afford it. It’s time
we put a stop to this.
Bob Golembicki
Wake
Urbanna
budget work
session Friday
The Urbanna Town Council
is scheduled to discuss amendments to the current budget
(2013-14) at its work session
on Friday, April 11, at 3:30 p.m.
on the second floor of the town
hall. The public is invited.
Council member Joe Heyman
and town staff have been working on the current budget for
several months, to get it into a
more easily understood format.
The budget amendments will
be made to better reflect actual
spending in certain categories
for this current fiscal year. One
item is town pool expenses,
which are higher than the budgeted amount, said Heyman.
In coming months council
will begin work on the budget
for the upcoming fiscal year,
2014-15 (FY15), which begins
July 1.
Council’s regular monthly
meeting is scheduled for
Monday, April 21, at 7 p.m. and
a public hearing will be held on
the proposed budget amendment.
Special ed
advisors to
meet April 23
The Middlesex County
Special Education Advisory
Committee will meet Wednesday, April 23, at 3:30 p.m. in
the conference room of the
Cook’s Corner Office Complex. The public is invited to
attend.
Correction
It was erroneously reported
in last week’s Southside Sentinel that Hartfield District
supervisor Bob LeBoeuf was
in favor of advertising a proposed FY15 Middlesex County
budget with a 4-cent real estate
tax increase.
“I did not suggest in any way
that I would be in favor of a
4-cent increase,” LeBoeuf said
in an email to the Sentinel this
week.
LeBoeuf and Saluda District supervisor Pete Mansfield
voted against advertising a
budget with a 5-cent tax hike.
No vote was taken on advertising a budget with a 4-cent tax
increase.
The public hearing on the
proposed budget and 5-cent tax
increase is at 7 p.m. Thursday,
April 10, at the Historic Courthouse in Saluda.
One Woman’s
Opinion will
return next week
Because of the large number
of Letters to the Editor in
this week’s Sentinel, Mary
Wakefield Buxton’s column,
“One Woman’s Opinion” has
been held until next week’s
issue.
letters
Policing for profit?
To the Editor:
In February, a battalion of
local, state and federal cops,
including Homeland Security, raided the Slipknots store
in Topping looking for Bath
Salts. According to the Daily
Press, six bank accounts, two
houses and three vehicles were
seized in the Tuesday raid.
The U.S. Attorney was not
talking to the Daily Press about
the results of the hearing. Slipknots opened days later. What
drew such a huge show of
lethal force to Topping to look
for Bath Salts?
Was it the threat of danger? It
may be the “equitable sharing”
policy when feds are invited to
adopt a local drug raid. Local
law enforcement gets up to
80% of the proceeds from auctions of seized property, often
without a conviction. The war
on drugs has turned some cops
and prosecutors into bounty
hunters, policing for profit
instead of justice.
The Wall Street Journal
reported the federal government scored $1 billion in forfeiture from marijuana cases
alone over the past decade.
The Institute for Justice
ranks Virginia 49th out of 50
states in protecting citizens’
constitutional rights in drug
cases. Prosecutorial discretion
is the rule in Virginia. Prosecutors in Virginia fight tooth
and nail for the cash, cars,
and houses of suspects in drug
cases, convicted or not.
Prosecutorial
discretion
from the Department of Justice
down has passed some psychological point where justice
now finds some people are not
appropriate for jail. There is a
systemic divide between the
justice for white collar offenders and the rest of us.
Prosecutorial discretion is
no substitute for legal reform,
which the Institute for Justice
is working hard to accomplish.
For more information, read
“Policing For Profit” at www.
ij.org.
Mead Usry
Topping
Davenport to
address NAACP
Middlesex County Commissioner of the Revenue Priscilla
J. Davenport will be the guest
speaker at the NAACP General
Membership Meeting on Tuesday, April, 22, at 7 p.m. at the
Cooks Corner Office Complex
on Route 33, two miles east of
Saluda.
Commissioner Davenport’s
office is responsible for maintaining real estate ownership
information; overseeing the
tax relief program; assessing
all personal property tax, and
overseeing state income tax
filing process for Middlesex.
The meeting is open to
everyone and is a chance to
learn more about the Commissioner of the Revenue’s office.
letters to the editor
Letters to the Editor may
not exceed 400 words. There
is a limit of two letters per
person, per month. Email letters to [email protected]
What comes next
from our board of
supervisors?
To the Editor:
In an article in last week’s
Southside Sentinel it was
reported that Middlesex County
Administrator Matt Walker said
the school system held public
hearings and meetings on its
budget and the need for a 3-cent
tax hike, and hardly anyone
attended. This, he said, demonstrated little opposition for a
higher tax rate.
To suggest lack of citizen
attendance at a budget hearing
must mean citizens support a
“tax hike” is a stretch of logic
beyond belief!
Lets look at some facts: A
partial review of the 2011 reassessment data from the county
data base available online for six
“defined” communities reveals
the following incredible information:
Loss of property value—
Mariners Woods $6,633,000,
Wilton Creek Road $6,094,100,
River Run (waterfront only)
$2,003,800, Fairfield Road
(waterfront only) $643,700,
Stove
Point
$12,297,100,
Kilmer’s Point $3,182,800—
total loss of value in the six communities: $30,854,500.
The
greatest
individual
property owner’s loss in the
six
communities—Mariners
Woods $384,800, Wilton Creek
Road $495,000, River Run
$390,700, Fairfield $234,300,
Stove Point $523,000, Kilmer’s
Point $206,000. Total properties
reviewed 276; and of those 181
were waterfront.
These figures are representative of the enormous loss of
value to many property owners
in the county. Now let’s look at
some of the actions taken by the
county Board of Supervisors.
Since 2008 it has increased the
tax rate by 5 cents; it committed
the taxpayers to a $5 million athletic complex; it implemented a
county-wide food tax [that goes
into effect July 1, 2014]; it spent
$100,000-plus in adding two
positions to the administrative
staff; and now it is proposing a
5-cent tax increase again.
Apparently,
supervisors
Wayne Jessie and Elizabeth
Hurd have never seen a tax
increase they didn’t like, and
supervisor Jack Miller is a major
disappointment to those of us
who believe in fiscal restraint.
Instead of supervisor Pete Mansfield suggesting the school
board “could have asked for a
4-cent increase,” he should have
asked to see a zero-based budget
and the list the superintendent
referred to earlier as identified
needs he did not include in his
budget. Supervisor LeBoeuf
raised numerous pertinent questions and, compared to the other
“tax-and-spend” supervisors, at
least he appears to be taking a
logical approach to establishing
priorities.
To Mr. Walker I say if only a
few people show up for the next
budget meeting, please feel free,
using the “Walker Logic,” to suggest a property tax increase of 10
cents or more since the taxpayers apparently support any tax
increase as evidenced by their
absence!
If taxpayers in the county want
a real shock, contact a local real
estate agent to find out what
their home is worth in the current market. Taxpayers are facing
numerous significant increases
in their cost of living including
gas, groceries, health insurance,
etc. Many seniors are living on
minimum fixed incomes with
little hope of any significant costof-living increases. I can’t wait
to see what comes next from our
Board of Supervisors!
Joe Grebb
Hartfield
Trivia:
Scientists say there is no
such thing as “negative-calorie” foods -- snacks that burn
more fat and calories than they
contribute. But here are some
that come pretty close: celery,
grapefruit, lemon, lime, apple,
lettuce, broccoli, and cabbage.
Duck Dynasty,
Blue Bloods,
Father Boddie
To the Editor:
When the late Reverend Fr.
John Boddie was ministering to
the Church of the Visitation in
Topping, a frequent topic of his
homily was eating. That’s right,
eating—with your family. In
fact he often made comparisons
of the family dinner to the congregation gathered around the
communion table.
Fr. Boddie instinctively knew,
as did our parents, there was
something more important than
just eating to mealtimes with
your family.
Today, many of us can’t seem
to find time to gather the family
for a nice sit-down meal. The
family meal, an American tradition so beautifully illustrated in
Norman Rockwell’s Thanksgiving dinner scene “Freedom from
Want,” may be slowly fading.
Blame it on the constraints and
stresses to the nuclear family,
the economy, unemployment,
geopolitical tensions, even
“global warming.” Why, past
generations only had the Great
Depression, World War I and
World War II to whine about.
Even if today’s families are able
to dine together, the ubiquitous
smart phone seems to get in the
way.
What our parents and Fr.
Boddie knew about the benefits
to the body, soul, and psyche
of families who share meals
together has now been bolstered
by research and an increasing body of work that shows a
link between the simple family
meal, bonding and positive
child development. One such
study was a survey by CASA
Columbia (Center for Addiction
and Substance Abuse at Columbia University) that showed
children who share frequent
mealtimes with their parents
have a decreased risk of drinking, smoking, and substance
abuse. CASA is a science-based
organization whose mission is
to develop effective solutions to
addiction and substance abuse.
Whether it’s by design or not,
two television shows also are
helping to raise awareness of
the importance of family meals.
After a hectic week of solving
crimes, chasing scoundrels,
and even family squabbles, the
Reagan family in “Blue Bloods”
ends their week with prayers at
Sunday dinner. No matter what
you think of the oft-maligned
patriarch of “Duck Dynasty,”
their antics and misadventures,
their days similarly always end
with the extended family gathered in prayer at the dinner
table.
There’s more to family dinners than just eating. No further research is required, in my
opinion. It is a time to relax, see
each other face to face, engage
in conversation, tell stories, get
connected and recharge.
It is also a time for everyone
to learn. The simple meal is
just that—simple—but a very
potent tool in raising children
and keeping the family together.
Just food for thought as
Easter, a season of renewal,
approaches.
Let’s eat.
Fernando Atienza
Hardyville
Be frugal
in the future
To the Editor:
I can’t say that a 5-cent
increase in my real estate
taxes is going to break me, or
take food out of my children’s
mouths, but it is troubling that
over six years the county’s taxes
will have gone up more than
51%—from 35 cents per $100
to the proposed 53 cents.
And the federal government
says there is virtually no inflation. They must not count taxes.
I’m sure the Board of Supervisors realize that the individual
taxpayer has no one below him
on the economic food chain to
which he can pass the increase.
Businesses can at least raise
prices.
Retirees in Middlesex are a
large part of the tax base and
we who have been frugal all
our lives, expecting to live on
the interest of our savings, are
being whipsawed by the federal
government’s keeping interest
rates at almost zero.
Let’s hope the county can be
frugal in the future and avoid
doing those “nice” things we’d
like to have, but which many of
us less well-off than I am, can’t
afford.
Gordon White
Deltaville
More rescue
EMTs needed
To the Editor:
I recently learned that the
Central Middlesex Volunteer
Rescue Squad of Urbanna
does not have an EMT on duty
some of the time. If you call
for rescue, they might have to
come from Deltaville, but very
often Deltaville does not have
an EMT on duty either. When
this happens, rescue has to
come from Gloucester, which
takes 45 minutes or more. I
wonder how many county residents realize this.
There are a number of possible solutions for this situation.
The Middlesex rescue squads
provide training to anyone
interested in helping fill the
void. Also, there are EMTs in
the county who no longer volunteer. If they could just volunteer one shift a month they
would be doing a great service
for the community.
During the last election, we
were told that the new county
meals tax would be used for
emergency services. Middlesex
voters approved this tax. It
should now be possible to hire
EMTs for more shifts. Some are
already paid and more could be
if what we were told during the
election is correct.
Just imagine if it were
you or a loved one who was
bleeding or had a stroke or
heart attack. Forty-five minutes could be the difference
between life and death. Residents and visitors in the county
deserve better than this.
Please call your county
supervisors and encourage
them to fix this problem.
Judy Davenport
Urbanna
Editor’s note: The recently
adopted Middlesex County
Meals Tax goes into effect July
1, 2014.
More Letters to the Editor on page A3
Published in the Interest of the Territory
Lying South of the Rappahannock River
RAPPAHANNOCK PRESS, INC., Publisher
Frederick A. Gaskins, President and Publisher
Elizabeth Lee C. Gaskins, Secretary/Treasurer
John Thomas Hardin, Editor
Staff: Larry S. Chowning and Tom Chillemi, General Assignment Reporters; Julie H. Burwood,
Art Director; Joe Gaskins, Graphic Designer; Wendy Payne, Advertising Manager; Libby Allen,
9\n]jlakaf_J]hj]k]flYlan]3H]__q:Ym_`Yf$;aj[mdYlagfYf\;dYkkaÚ]\EYfY_]j3;gffa]?&OYdlgf$
Compositor; and Geanie Longest, Customer Accounts Manager.
The Southside Sentinel (USPS 504-080) is published each Thursday except Christmas week.
Periodicals postage paid at Urbanna, Va. 23175. Subscriptions: $25 per year in Middle Peninsula
Counties and $32 per year elsewhere.
Phone, Fax and Email: Phone: (804) 758-2328; Fax: (804) 758-5896; Editorial:
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Postmaster: Send address changes to Southside Sentinel, P.O. Box 549, Urbanna, Va. 23175
Pluck, Perseverance and Progress
April 10, 2014 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va.• A3
letter to editor
The church’s folly
To the Editor:
I pray all Christians read
my brother’s article “Passover
or Easter” and studied and
researched its Biblical truths
and historical facts. If the articles content seems contrary to
what you have heard or been
taught, there is a logical and
Biblical explanation. It goes
back to the beginning when disobedience first reared its ugly
head in the form of Satan and
through his deceptions and disobedience has permeated every
generation past, present and
future.
Why Christians wear blinders, like a horse, and continue
to disregard Passover in favor of
Easter proves Satan continues to
control the reins. Passover is not
just an Old Testament remembrance celebration by God’s
chosen people, the Hebrews.
Contrary to popular belief, Eve
is not the mother of all living
(mankind) but because her only
descendants were the Hebrew
people, her importance lies in
the fact that she is the mother
of all living (those having salvation through Christ) because
Jesus was Hebrew. That is why
God instructed the Hebrews to
remember and observe the Passover through all generations and
forever. God knew the future as
he provided for his people in the
Visit
SSentinel.com
for more news
Dr. Mann . . .
(Continued from page A1)
past. Their Passover observance
would become the greatest gift
and observance of the New Testament Christians’ faith.
The shedding of the firstlings’ (sheep or goat) blood
to save the Hebrew firstborn
would become the shedding of
Christ’s (Passover lamb) blood
to save mankind from sin and
death. Perhaps your pastor or
teacher failed to tell you the
significance of the goat’s blood.
It represents God’s future adoption of the Gentiles (people
other than Hebrew) called goats
in the New Testament. Again,
God knew the future while he
provided for his chosen people
in the past. It’s no coincidence
Jesus’ blood was shed on the
very same calendar day the
Hebrews shed the firstlings’
blood for their door frames.
God states many times “be not
deceived.”
Christians who disregard
Passover (celebration of Jesus’
death mandated by God) in favor
of Easter (celebration invented
by man to remember Christ’s
resurrection whose name and
associated rituals in fact find
their origin in paganism) have
been deceived. The Bible states
that as a dog returns to its vomit,
so a fool continues his folly. The
early church observed Passover
as God instructed, but disobedience soon reared its ugly head
and Satan put the blinders on
the church, which adopted
pagan ways and has returned
to its vomit (disobedience) ever
since. I can only pray the church
clean up its vomit and never
return to devour it!
Wendell Palmer
Saluda
Rock-n-Roll Easter Event
Saturday, April 19, 10 – 11:30 a.m.
Lower United Methodist Church
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The Steamboat Restaurant
Easter Brunch Menu
Sunday, April 20 • 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Blue Crab Bisque
Cream of Spring Chicken with Leeks and Orzo
Herb Roasted Leg of Spring Lamb with Mint and Dried Sour Cherries
Asian Red Miso Glazed Atlantic Salmon with Ginger Wasabi Butter
Carved Slow Roasted Prime Rib with Horsey Sauce and Au Jus
Shrimp and Andouille Sausage with Stone Ground Virginia Grits
Oven Roasted Fresh Vegetable Medley
Steamed Fresh Asparagus
Fried Apples
Rosemary/Dijon Roasted Baby Red Skin Potatoes
Herb Multi Grain Pilaf
Seafood Pasta Salad
Fresh Fruit Ambrosia Salad
Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad
Deluxe Omelet Station
French Toast Casserole
Apple Bacon, House Made Sausage and Cherry Smoked Ham
Freshly Baked Muffins, Biscuits and Pastries
Gourmet Dessert Selection
$26.95 per person
$12.95 for Children 10 and Under
Reservations required
Call (804) 776-6589 Ext. 2
of the local NAACP.
He helped form after-school
programs for students, and was
active in literacy, business and
many other local organizations.
The resolution further stated
“that the clerk of the House of
Delegates prepare a copy of
this resolution . . . as an expression of the General Assembly’s
respect and admiration for his
many years of service to the
people of Middlesex County
and the Commonwealth.”
Several people from Grafton
Baptist Church spoke at the
ceremony. Alvin Wake was the
first deacon Dr. Mann ordained
in the church. “I was there
when the old board was there
and we went through a lot of
ups and downs, but Chauncey
was dedicated to Grafton
Church and he is a wonderful
man. We miss you Rev. Mann,
but you left a legacy for all of
us to follow and aspire to,” said
Wake.
Several Rotarians praised
Dr. Mann for his dedication to the club. Rotary Club
president-elect Bob Tassone
said Dr. Mann was reluctant
at first to join the club because
of its weekly and early morning meetings, but his decision
to join was a “blessing” to the
club and to the community.
In the early 1950s, Dr. Mann
had been a high school football
star and also played football in
the military. He went to Allegheny College in Pennsylvania
where he was one of five African-Americans enrolled. When
he finished college, he moved
back home to Hampton and
someone he knew there recommended he apply as pastor
at Grafton Baptist Church at
Hartfield.
Dr. Mann’s leadership abilities quickly brought attention
that he was going to be andynamic leader in the community.
With the encouragement of
Tom Hamilton, the Middlesex
County School Superintendent at the time, Dr. Mann and
others at Grafton started an
after-school child development
program for mentoring and
providing academic programs
to help young blacks in school.
He was one of the first African-Americans to be the featured speaker at a Middlesex
High School graduation.
Dr. Mann also was on the
Syd Thrift Sports Complex
Committee when the county
board of supervisors approved
the funds to build the complex
at Middlesex High School. At
that time, he stated the new
sports complex was not only a
victory for the committee, but
“was a victory for Middlesex
County.”
Over the years, many motorists coming into Middlesex
from Lancaster via the Norris
Bridge over the Rappahannock
River have pulled over to
watch baptisms conducted by
Dr. Mann in the river—a line
of children with white robes
and swim caps, hand-in-hand
going out into the water. In
a 2012 interview with the
Southside Sentinel, Dr. Mann
said, “Baptizing in the river . .
. we can’t go back but we can
look back. I liked the reenactment and the water. There is
something Godly about a natural climate that creates a spiritual climate.”
In true Chauncey Mann spirit
on Saturday night, he thanked
the Rotary for his awards and
entertained the packed pavilion
at the Maritime Museum with
a couple of his favorite reflections that he elegantly recited.
And some listeners most likely
went home to dig for a dictionary to figure out the meaning
of a few of those words that
flowed from his lips.
A number of speakers
alluded to his vast knowledge
of the English language. The
audience laughed when Rev.
Paul Pleasants said, “Some of
those words can’t be found in
any modern unabridged dictionary or thesaurus.”
keep middlesex beautiful
Virtual art gallery of Middlesex
student art posted on Facebook
The Keep Middlesex Beautiful
Committee
(KMB)
announces the grand opening of
a Virtual Gallery of Middlesex
County Student Anti-Litter
Poster Art. The gallery opens
on Saturday, April 12, as part of
the spring Clean-Up Middlesex
County Day.
The art show includes over
100 anti-litter poster designs by
artists from Middlesex Elementary School, St. Clare Walker
Middle School and Middlesex
High School.
Students from all three schools
were invited in September to
design posters with an anti-litter
theme. The student art project was funded through a grant
from Keep Virginia Beautiful
with the intent to enlist the help
of students through art to help
fight litter in Middlesex. Some
of the artwork was displayed last
fall when KMB organized the
first county-wide clean up day
in November. Posters bearing
various anti-litter slogans were
placed in businesses and other
public spaces throughout the
county to promote the November event. Individual works also
have been published with antilitter messages in the Southside
Sentinel. But, much of the work
has not yet been shown.
In describing the committee’s decision to go virtual with
the art rather than again placing
posters around the county, KMB
member Kathy Swinehart said,
“We wanted to find a way to use
all of the art. Facebook gives
us the opportunity to share the
work of all of our young artists.”
KMB member Celane Roden
added, “There is great design,
wonderful whimsy and a lot of
creativity in this collection. We
hope it will be widely viewed.”
Carol King, KMB Facebook
manager, added one more hope
to this list. “We know folks
will love this artwork. We have
arranged the gallery in albums
according to the school to make
it easy for friends and family to
find their own student’s art. And
we certainly hope that viewers will support the students by
taking the time to ‘like’ the individual pieces in the gallery as
they visit.”
The “grand opening” of the
virtual gallery is set for the same
day as the first Spring Clean
Middlesex Day to honor the
anti-litter awareness themes of
Members of the Middlesex County Anti-Litter Committee
are ready for this Saturday’s county-wide cleanup. From left
are Carol King, Bill Shuman, Kathy Swinehart and Phil Mullins. Other members of the committee are Celane Roden,
Vivian Dwyer and Gene Ruark.
Clean-Up Middlesex
County Day is Saturday
The public is invited to join any of the groups listed
below to clean up county roadsides, or to create their own
team and clean areas that are not on the list. Orange trash
bags will be available for participants at Old Virginia Street
and Lord Mott Road in Urbanna from 9 a.m.-noon.
To date, the clean-up crews and sites are:
• Middlesex Kiwanis Club, Borinqueneers Motorcycle Club
of Virginia Beach and Northern Virginia, and Church of
the Visitation, Town Bridge Road.
• Middlesex Rotary Club, Dirt Bridge Road.
• Urbanna Harbor Homeowners Association, Urbanna
Road.
• Healy’s Mill and Deer Chase neighbors, Stormont Road.
• Deltaville Community Association, Deltaville area.
• Kilmer’s Point/Cedar Point Homeowners Association,
Remlik Drive and Old Virginia Street.
• Zion Branch Road neighbors, Zion Branch area.
• Water View residents meet at the Water View Firehouse.
• Friends of Wilton Cove, Wilton Cove area.
• Shortcut Adopt-A-Highway, Stampers Bay Road.
the art. The committee hopes the
public will do two things on that
day: (1) help clean the county;
and (2) treat themselves to a visit
to this virtual gallery.
Logistical information about
the Clean Middlesex Day this
Saturday also can be found on
the Keep Middlesex Beautiful
Facebook page, in the KMB ad
on page A10 and in the article
above. Email [email protected] for more
details.
‘Spice’ charges bring guilty pleas
The manager of the
A&N Tobacco Store in
Tappahannock and his son
both pled guilty recently
in Essex Circuit Court for
their roles in distribution of
“Spice,” a synthetic drug that
mimics the effects of marijuana.
Mohamed Alashmali pled
guilty to a charge of distributing a synthetic “cannabinoid”
and was sentenced to five
years in prison. All time was
suspended on conditions that
include forfeiture of $20,000,
which was the store’s proceeds from selling Spice.
In return for Alashmali’s
guilty plea, three charges of
Spice distribution charges
and one count of money laundering were not prosecuted.
His son, Waleed N.M.
Alashmali, pled guilty to a
misdemeanor count of being
an accessory after the fact
relating to the sale of synthetic cannabinoid. In return
for the guilty plea, a felony
charge of distribution of
synthetic marijuana was
not prosecuted against the
19-year-old.
In unrelated cases, seven
other area individuals are
facing charges in federal
court in Richmond related
Bentley’s Bar
& Grille
Serving lunch Monday - Saturday
and dinner Monday - Sunday
Happy Hour 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. daily
Closed Wednesday
572 Rappahannock Drive, White Stone, VA 22578
‹^^^ILU[SL`ZNYPSSLJVT
to synthetic marijuana conspiracy.
Federal, state and local law
enforcement agencies executed search warrants on February 25 at Slipknots Trading
& Tobacco in Topping in
connection to charges of
conspiracy to distribute and
possess with intent to distribute smokeable synthetic cannabinoids (SSC) with intent
for human consumption, and
drug paraphernalia. (See February 27, and March 6 stories
at SSentinel.com).
Police assert that over the
course of an 18-month investigation, law enforcement
personnel made numerous
controlled purchases of SSC
from the Slipknots stores in
Topping and Tappahannock.
The authorities allege that
Slipknots Trading & Tobacco
sold over $3 million of SSC
products during an 18-month
time period.
More information can be
found on the website of the
U.S. Attorney’s Office for the
Eastern District of Virginia
at www.justice.gov/usao/vae.
Related court documents and
information may be found
on the website of the District
Court for the Eastern District of Virginia at www.vaed.
uscourts.gov or at https://pcl.
uscourts.gov.
A4 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va. • April 10, 2014
Reservations being accepted for RWC ‘Voyages’ program
On Tuesday, April 22,
Rappahannock WestminsterCanterbury (RWC) will host
its popular “Voyages” program, a one-day seminar created to address some of the
medical, legal, administrative, and spiritual dimensions
of aging. The event will take
place on the RWC campus
at 132 Lancaster Drive,
Irvington, and run from 8:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. A continental
breakfast and lunch are provided as part of the program.
Voyages is offered at no
cost, but attendance is limited to 50 participants, so
those interested in attending
are asked to call 438-4000 by
April 10 to reserve a place.
Although
originally
designed for RWC residents
and those who have expressed
interest in moving to the continuing care facility, Voyages
is also open to the public.
RWC Resident Life Coordinator Maria Ferrand, one
of the organizers for Voyages
2014, says, “We decided once
again to schedule our program
close to the date of National
Healthcare Decisions Day, to
further highlight the importance for all adults of having
the information and opportunity to communicate and
document their healthcare
decisions.”
unity
Commalendar
C
During the morning session of the Voyages program,
attendees will learn about
medical and legal issues
all seniors should consider,
including advanced directives that provide instructions
for medical care, especially
at end-of-life. Attendees will
also learn about the State of
Virginia’s Advance Health
Care
Directive
Registry
(www.VirginiaRegistry.org),
a resource that allows Virginians to store documents they
want to make available to
family members and health
care providers if they are
unable to convey their wishes
concerning medical care.
• NAACP Area 14 Meeting hosted by the Essex
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will lead a discussion about
the spiritual dimensions of
aging and offer advice about
handling spiritual crises. Participants also will be given the
opportunity to walk RWC’s
Labyrinth as part of the presentation on spiritual wellbeing.
Ferrand will provide tips
for organizing paperwork and
identifying documents which
seniors should have readily
available for themselves and
their loved ones. After lunch
the group will be treated to a
presentation by Tom Gale of
Currie Funeral Home, whose
upbeat style and rich anecdotes have made him a hit at
prior seminars.
Everyone who attends Voyages will receive a notebook
filled with helpful information and resources. Additionally, RWC staff plan to follow
up with attendees to check on
their progress in following
through on actions they might
have promised to take.
Memory Lane Cruise-In is Sunday
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Friday, April 11
Monday, April 14
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Tuesday, April 15
Botox, Fillers and Consultations
at Salon by the Bay
April 16
Space is limited. Call today!
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82 Campbell Road • Topping • 776-0061
trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon
Treating You Like Family
Saturday, April 12
• County-wide Clean-up Day-«œ˜ÃœÀi`LÞii«
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Thursday, April 17
Email your event to [email protected] by Friday for consideration. For an expanded version of our
community calendar, please visit www.SSentinel.com.
Weekly Events
Thursdays
• Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver Support
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Tuesdays
• Rotary Club Ç\Îä>°“°iÛiÀÞ/ÕiÃ`>ÞvœÀLÀi>Žv>ÃÌ
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• Quilting Class £ä>°“°ÌœÓ«°“°iÛiÀÞ/ÕiÃ`>Þ
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• RGH Diabetes Support Group x «°“° ̅i wÀÃÌ
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• Cub Scout Pack 307 È «°“° iÛiÀÞ /ÕiÃ`>Þ >Ì
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Saturdays
Sundays
Wednesdays
Mondays
Gloucester Family Practice
• Story Hour™\Îä>°“°iÛiÀÞ7i`˜iÃ`>ÞLi}ˆ˜˜ˆ˜}
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• Veterans Café™>°“°q£Ó«°“°iÛiÀޜ˜`>Þ>
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• Dementia Support Group £ä\Îä >°“° ̅i wÀÃÌ
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• Boy Scout Troop 370È«°“°iÛiÀޜ˜`>Þ>Ì̅i
Ƃ“iÀˆV>˜i}ˆœ˜>]->Õ`>°Î{LJÇÎÓÎ
• Kiwanis Club of MiddlesexÈ«°“°iÛiÀޜ˜`>Þ
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• Bingo Ç«°“°iÛiÀޜ˜`>Þ>̈``iÃiÝ
œÕ˜ÌÞ Email your event to [email protected] by
6œÕ˜ÌiiÀ,iÃVÕi-µÕ>`]iÌ>ۈi°
Friday for consideration. Please keep your event
• Al-Anon/Adult Children of Alcoholics“iiÌÃ>Ìn information current.
Ebtehal Abdelaal, M.D.
Being a Primary Care Physician gives
me the opportunity to care for entire
families—parents, kids, grandparents. I’m
committed to helping my patients stay
Watch Dr. Abdelaal
explain her passion for
Family Medicine.
healthy and active for a lifetime, and I treat
every patient with the same kindness and
respect that I would give to my own family.
Seeing the relief and gratitude on my
patients’ faces tells me that I’m making a
positive difference in their lives.
Scan the QR code
Gloucester Family Practice
7560 Hospital Drive
Building B, Suite 101
Gloucester, VA 23061
To select Dr. Abdelaal as your physician, call (804) 693-4300
or visit us at www.riversideonline.com/abdelaal
Appointments Available Now. Medicare Patients Welcome.
April 10, 2014 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va.• A5
at the library
by Ralph Oppenheim
Executive Director
The current issue of Virginia Libraries magazine has a cover article on the Library of Virginia’s Cookbook Collection written by Tom
Ray, the Library’s Collection Management
Coordinator. It’s a very interesting
article. Prominently placed on the
cover as well, as within the article itself, is a copy of Culinary
Tales Middlesex County Public
Library presents a Collection
of Delicious Recipes from the
Bay, Rivah & Beyond. Mr. Ray
writes: “. . . I will occasionally buy
a new cookbook if the production is
unique or simply well done. The most recent
example of that was Culinary Tales, produced
by the Cookbook Committee of the Middlesex
Public Library. The artwork, design, recipes and
stories make this compilation a regional delight.
I splurged, paying $22 for the book, but what a
treat!”
And congratulations to Sherry Inabinet and
her committee for producing this gem. The
cookbook is available at both branches of the
library as well as River Birch Nursery, Nauti
Nell’s, Something Different, Coffman’s on the
Coast and a couple of other shops.
There was an interesting research report from
an English charity named Booktrust that came
out March 12. Actually, the report didn’t use
the word “interesting.” It used the term “worrying” to describe the results of the survey that
indicated that poor adults are much less likely
to read books than the more well-off. England
is divided into two nations, according to this
report: those who read weekly or daily and
those who prefer TV and DVDS. The study
found that the richer a person’s background, the
more likely he is to read. More than one in four
adults from the poorest socio-economic backgrounds said they never read books, compared
with just 13% of those from the richest
socio-economic backgrounds.
Why is this important? The
study concludes that “on average, people who read regularly
are more satisfied with life,
happier and more likely to feel
their life is worthwhile.”
Viv Bird, the CEO of Booktrust, said, “There will never be a
one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to
social mobility, but reading plays an important
role.”
The next fabulous program we’re going to
have at the library will take place Saturday,
April 26, at 1 p.m. Dolly Niemiec Konwinski
will be coming to the Deltaville Branch to talk
about her new book, “Summertime Dreams:
Yes! Girls Can Play Baseball!” Written with
Douglas Williams, Dolly’s book describes her
career as a barnstorming player in the AllAmerican Professional Girls Baseball League
that was depicted in the film “A League of Their
Own.” We’ll be showing that film Tuesday, April
22, at 6:30 p.m. so you can get in the baseball
mood for Saturday’s program. Just for the
record, Dolly batted right-handed, threw righthanded and batted .170 in 1950.
Both branches of the library will be closed
Thursday, April 17, for staff training.
Genealogy Society meeting
to feature ‘show and tell’
The Middle Peninsula
African-American
Genealogical and Historical Society of Virginia (MPAAGHS)
will hold its monthly meeting on Saturday, April 12,
at 11 a.m. at the Essex
County Public Library, 117
North Church Lane (Rt. 17),
Tappahannock.
Those attending are asked
to bring an item for “show
and tell.” It might be an
object, a document, or a
photo/copy that is relevant to
90th birthday
family research.
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place prize will be given in
asked to share a discovery
that they find most unusual,
most surprising, of which
they are most proud, or is
most “research-shattering,”
etc.
All persons who are interested in African-American
genealogy and history are
invited to attend.
Experienced
researchers and novices alike are
welcome. For further information about this meeting
or about MPAAGHS, visit
mpaagenealogicalsociety.org
or call 758-5163.
Extension service to hold
Tomato Growing Contest
each age group and judging
category.
There is an entry fee of $5
per contestant. Entry forms
are due by April 15. Judging
will be held on July 26. For
rules and entry forms, call the
extension office at 758-4120
or email [email protected] or
[email protected]
‘Quilt-In’ set for April 11-12
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‘Pound cake’
‘Where’s Momma?’ author
to address Alzheimer’s group expert to speak
Eltham area resident and
author, Marion Delagrange,
will speak about her family’s
Alzheimer’s experience at the
Alzheimer’s Association caregiver support group on Tuesday, April 15, at 10:30 a.m. at
the West Point YMCA, 3135
King William Hwy., West
Point.
Book group to discuss
‘No One You Know’
The Middlesex County
Woman’s Club Book Group
will meet on Tuesday, April 15,
at 10 a.m. at the Woman’s Club
building at 210 Virginia Street
in Urbanna.
This month’s book is “No
One You Know” by Michelle
Richmond.
All her life Ellie Enderlin had been known as Lila’s
sister—until the day Lila, a
top math student at Stanford,
was murdered and the shape of
their family changed forever.
Twenty years later, Ellie is
a professional coffee buyer
who has never put down roots.
When, on a chance meeting,
she comes into possession of
the notebook her sister carried everywhere, Ellie returns
home to finally discover the
Are Your Affairs In Order?
New State and Federal Laws can help you to Preserve and Transfer Wealth
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Please join us for a FREE
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• The four essential tools for an effective estate plan
• The differences between wills and trusts
• How using our “Legacy Trust” can insulate businesses, farms & other family assets from
death taxes, debts, disability and divorce for future generations
• How to avoid the expense and delay associated with court supervised probate
• The risks associated with long-term care and Medicaid “Spend Down” rules
• The benefits of Virginia’s new Powers of Attorney Act
Delagrange’s book “Where’s
Momma?” tells the story of
caring for her mother, Mabel
Yoder, and how love, compassion, humor and faith helped
her through this difficult journey.
For more information, call
804-695-9382 or email [email protected]
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
6:30 p.m.
TrustBuilders Law Group
Urbanna Office - Conference Room
110 Grace Avenue
Urbanna, VA 23175
Wednesday, April 16, 2014
11:00 a.m.
Lunch provided
The Inn at Montross
21 Polk Street
Montross, VA 22520
Join Certified Elder Law Attorney*, Chip
Buxton, for this timely discussion of current
estate planning opportunities. Mr. Buxton is a
member of the National Academy of Elder Law
Attorneys and has been drafting wills, trusts
and family estate plans for over 35 years.
truth about her sister’s death .
. . a search that will lead her
to Lila’s secret lover, to the
motives and fate of a man who
profited from their families
grief, and ultimately to the
deepest secrets even sisters
keep from each other.
This is a riveting family
drama, about loss, love and the
way hope redefines our lives.
Light refreshments will be
served. For additional information, contact Vera at 758-2721.
CSB board to
meet April 15
The
Middle
Peninsula
Northern Neck Community
Services Board (CSB) will
hold a board meeting at 2:30
p.m. on Tuesday, April 15, in
the Chesapeake Bank training
room at 35 School Street in
Kilmarnock.
Trivia:
According to the latest “Q
Score” survey, here are America’s Most Liked Anchors:
1. Scott Pelley (CBS)
2. Anderson Cooper (CNN)
3. Lara Logan (CBS)
4. Brian Williams (NBC)
5. Chris Cuomo (CNN)
6. Kate Bolduan (CNN)
7. Diane Sawyer (ABC)
8. Ann Curry (NBC)
9. Morley Safer (CBS)
10.
Rachel
Maddow
(MSNBC)
* * * *
On April 7, 1933, after 13
years of prohibition, beer is
sold once again in 19 of the
48 states and the District of
Columbia.
at Woman’s Club
The Middlesex County
Woman’s Club will meet
Monday, April 14, at 1 p.m. at
the club building at 210 Virginia Street in Urbanna.
Sherry Inabinet will present
a program on “The History of
Pound Cakes.” Most of you will
remember her as the Middlesex
County Library Director, who
is now retired.
Sherry is also known for the
delicious “baked goods” she
and her daughter make and sell
at many county functions.
Light refreshments will be
provided. The public is invited
to attend. For additional information, contact Mickie McCallum at 758-1357.
Relay For Life
yard/bake sale
set for April 19
The Middlesex Relay For
Life team “Tastefully Simple
For A Cure” will host a yard
and bake sale in order to raise
money and spread cancer
awareness. The event will be
held in Urbanna from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. in the parking lot of Bon
Secours in Urbanna on Saturday, April 19.
In addition to the event, local
vendors will be there to promote and sell their products.
Some team members also will
raffle off a number of prizes.
Also participating at the
event will be the Youth Developmental Football Campers in
an effort to raise funds for the
group to attend football camp
this summer. All are invited to
attend and support in the fight
against cancer. For more information, contact Wilma Williams at 804-832-5437.
Writers group
meets April 17
The Rappatomac Writers Critique Group will meet
Thursday, April 17, from 1-3
p.m. at Roma Ristorante Italiano-Tappahannock on Routes
17/360 in Tappahannock. All
are invited to come early for
lunch at noon.
AN STANDA
C
I
R
E
RD
M
A INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
Speaker
Joseph T. “Chip” Buxton III
Attorney at Law
This educational class is free, however, reservations are required. To make your reservation or for more information,
call Andrea Wohlever at 804-758-8290, 800-966-2889, or register online at www.trustbuilders.com.
“The only thing you take with you when you are gone is what you leave behind.” ~ John Allston
*Certified by the National Elder Law Foundation (Arizona); *Accredited by the National Association of Estate Planners and Councils (Ohio).
SPONSORED BY TRUSTBUILDERS LAW GROUP
BUXTON & BUXTON, PC, A PROFESSIONAL LAW CORPORATION
YORKTOWN • WILLIAMSBURG • URBANNA, VA
ALL LINES OF
INSURANCE
ESTABLISHED
IN 1959
435-1677
KILMARNOCK
A6 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va. • April 10, 2014
Bake and buy for books Registration under way for Urbanna Farmers’
The Friends of the Deltaville changes to make book sales RGH ‘Look Good’ program Market seeks vendors
Library will hold its annual and storage more accessible
bake sale on the day before
Easter, Saturday, April 19,
from 8:30 a.m.-noon at Philippi
Christian Church in Deltaville,
rain or shine.
Not only is it the time to
buy great treats, but this is
an opportunity to support the
library by baking something
for the sale. Contributions in
the form of pies, cakes, cookies, buns, breads and other
wonderful foodstuffs will be
accepted on the afternoon of
Friday, April 18, at the church.
The Friends of the Library
is going to be undertaking
some major improvements
for the library in the coming
year, including some structural
and attractive. The proceeds
from the bake sale will help to
make these upgrades possible.
Everyone is encouraged to support the library by both baking
and buying.
For more information, call
Brenda Coffman at 776-8032.
Rappahannock General Hospital and the American Cancer
Society have teamed up to
host the “Look Good . . . Feel
Better” program for females
currently in active treatment for cancer. The session
includes a free kit with makeup
Girl Scouts Day Camp set
Girl Scouts of the Commonwealth
of
Virginia
(GSCV) will hold Day Camp
at Camp Kittamaqund in
Northumberland County for
its 50th year. The Day Camp
will run Monday-Friday, June
16-20, from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
each day for girls entering
grades 1-12.
For more information about
GSCV camp opportunities,
visit
www.comgirlscouts.
org/camp or contact Wendy
Mataya at 804-462-0322 or
[email protected]
and skincare products valued at
$250. Jennifer Bishop of Merle
Norman in Kilmarnock is the
trained volunteer facilitator of
the session.
The next session will be held
Thursday, June 19, at 4:30 p.m.
in the RGH Cancer Center at
the hospital in Kilmarnock.
Pre-registration is required.
Call 435-8593 to sign up or for
more information.
Urbanna Farmers’ Market
will begin its 2014 season on
Saturday, May 10. The market
is held at Taber Park in “downtown” Urbanna from 9 a.m.-1
p.m. on the second Saturday of
each month through September. There is free parking and a
playground for children.
The Town of Urbanna and
the Urbanna Business Asso-
ciation sponsor the market.
This year there will be music,
raffles, baked goods, handcrafted items, plants and flowers, fresh produce, jewelry
and so much more. Those
interested in participating as
a vendor in the market should
visit www.urbanna.com for
rules, regulations and an
application.
CSB to offer ‘Nurturing America’s Military Families’ classes
The Middle Peninsula-Northern Neck Community Services Board Prevention Services
Division will hold the seven-week educational
series of the “Nurturing America’s Military
Families Program.” The classes will be held
at Susanna Wesley United Methodist Church,
3900 George Washington Memorial Highway,
Ordinary, on Tuesday, April 22, through Tuesday, June 3. Classes will be from 6-8 p.m. To
register, call 642-5402.
National Volunteer Week is April 6th - 12th, 2014
The Northern Neck Free Health Clinic wishes to thank our
dedicated volunteers who donated their time during
April 1, 2013 - April 1, 2014
Name
Started in
Anderson, Nancy
2005
Antonio, David MD
1993
Arencibia, Sharon
2013
Arnold, Bill
2013
Atienza, Fernando, MD
2003
Barentz, Steen
2013
Barentz, Trudy
2013
Battelle, Dorie
2011
Baylor, Richard MD
1993
Bellas, Pat
2011
Berry, Mary
2005
Bessler, Joseph MD
1994
Birchett, Mary Ann
2010
Birdsong, Jane
2013
Bledsoe, Joyce
2009
%OXP(GGLH
Bonnet, Jennifer
2012
Borostovik, Loretta
2010
Bott, John
2007
Bott, Kate, RN
2007
Boyenga, Jenni
2014
Branson, Grover
2014
Britton, Brian
20144
Broderick, Kathleen, RN
2001
Brooke, Susan
1999/2008
1999/
09
Brooks, Deborah
2009
Brown, Judith
2011
Brownley, Brenda
2009
Brunson, Nancy
2013
Bryant, Bonnie
2002
%XQG\-R
Burner, Peggy
2002
Burton, Willis
2003/2010
Cali, Elizabeth
2005
Cali, John
2010
Campbell, Betty
2002
Canale, Susan
2010
&DQQ-HUU\
&DULHQV-DQLFH
Carpenter, Richard MD
1996
D
Castle, William MD
20088
Chamberlain, Rae
2013
Chilton, Nancy, RPh
2007
200
Chilton, Nancy D.
2014
Clayton, Kelvonna
2012
Clements, Joan
1999
&REE+HOHQ
Cole, Barbara
2014
Conrad, Liz
2009
Cordes, Dave
2013
&RUGHV-DQHW
Cotter, Doug
2010
11
1
Creeth, Kitty
2011
Crockett, Jo
2012
Cupples, Barbara
2008
20
200
006
06
Curran, Mary
2006
Cutler, Jessica
20122
Cutler, Ronnie
2013
2006
Daffeh, June, MD
Davenport, Dazeh
2013
Davenport, Tia
2007
007
Davis, Ella
1998
Davis, Martha
2008
Davison, Edith
20022
Decker, Glenda
2012
DeCoste, Linda RN
2010
Ph
Dedmond, Britney RPh
2008
S
Dedmond, Chris, DDS
2008
Dees, Peggy, RN
2009
DePaolo, Ann, M.Ed., CCC-A, 2006
Deschamps, John MD
1993
Dimitrova, Svelta
2013
'RUPDQ5REHUWD
Dozier, Curtis
2012
'XEOLQ5XE\
Dungan, Bernard
2004
Edmonds, Susan
2009
(GPXQGV0DULO\Q
10
Edwards, Nancy
2010
(OOLV0DU\
Elmore, Sara, RN
2012
Eng, William DPM
2002
Estell, Jinny RN
1996
Estes, Shayne
2013
Eury, Jim
2011
Fillingane, Hugh
2013
Fillingane, Shelby
2007
Fitzgerald, Pat
2013
Fleischman, William
2009
Fletcher, Janice
2012
Foley, Leah
2014
Forcum, Rosemarie, RPh
1994
Fortney, Charles
2005
Fortney, Jennifer
2005
Gainey, Rebekah
2011
Gao, Christine
2014
*DULVV-XG\
George, Kledus, RN
2009
Gifford, Roy
2003
Gill, Kristen, RDH
2005/2013
*LOOLRQV-RDQ
*LOOLRQV:DOW
Glessner, Steve MD
1993
Goose, Emily
2013
Graham, G. Scott
2013
Graham, William B. Jr.
2005
*UD\ELOO(OL]DEHWK
Position
Name
Outreach Clinic
Referral Physician
Special Projects
Data Entry/Clinic
Staff Pediatrician
Pharmacy
Pharmacy
Meal Program
Bd. of Directors/Foundation
Special Projects
Pharmacy
Staff Physician
Outreach Clinic
Board of Directors
Outreach/Special Projects
2I¿FHYROXQWHHU
Pharmacy
Rappahannock Garden Club
Pharmacy
Nursing/Patient Education
Rappahannock Garden Club
Pharmacy/Data Entry
Pharmacy
Nursing
Clinic Volunteer
Ra
Rappahannock
Garden Club
Middlesex
Outreach
Mi
Middlesex
Outreach
Midd
P
Special Projects/Outreach
Foundation
Board
Foun
2I¿F
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Outreach
Clinic
Data Entry
Pharmacy
Data Entry
Outreach Clinic
Clinic Volunteer
lunteer
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Referral Physician
eferral Physician
Referral
Special Projects
Pharmacy
Pharmacy
Student
Pharmacy
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
ch/Special Projects
Outreach/Special
Outreach Clinic/Special
Special Projects
Dental Clinic
2I¿FH5HIHUUDOV
Pharmacy
Pharma
Spec Projects
Special
Bo
Boa
Board
of Directors
Special Projects
Nursing/Pharmacy
Nursing
Student
Staff Physician
Student
Pharmacy
Pharmacy
Ph
Pharmacyy
Outreach
rea Clinic
Rappahannock Garden Club
Nursing/Patient
ursing/Patient Education
Pharmacy
Dentist
Nursing
Referral Service
ation
io
Staff Physician/Foundation
Student
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
Data Entry
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Outreach Clinic
ppahannock Garden Club
C
Rappahannock
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ppahannock Garden Club
C
Rappahannock
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Nursing
Referral Physician
Nursing
Outreach Clinic
Patient Education
Special Projects
Outreach/Special Projects
Outreach Clinic
Pharmacy
Special Projects
Student
Pharmacy
Outreach Clinic
Outreach Clinic
Pharmacy
Student
2I¿FH3KDUPDF\
Nursing/Referrals
Facilities
Dental Clinic
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Staff Physician
Student
Board of Directors
Finance/Foundation
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
Graybill, Roy
Green, Frances
Green, Marjorie
*ULI¿WK)OR\G2'
Gurley, Pam, RN
Hakos, Barbara
Hamilton, James MD
Harris, Ann, MT
Harris, Jim
Harris, Ruth, RN, ANP
Harris, Sandra
Harvey, Jan, RN
+DUZHOO0DUFLD
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Head, Gwen
Headley, Cynthia
Hecht, Ann
Heinz, Jean
Henkel, Carolyn
Henley, Page
Herron,, Jane
+HVV-H
+HVV-HDQ
+HVV-HDQ
Higgins, Daniel
Higgs, Pat
Hobbs, Joyce
Hoferkamp, Jan
Houck, Ginger
Hudson, Nicole
Hull, Moria
Insko, Don
-DPHV%RQLWD
-DPHV%RQLWD
Jayne, Rachel
Jennings, Jack
Jennings, Julann, LPN
Joel, Nancy
Johansen, JJeanne
Johnston, Andy
Johnston, Betty
-RKQVWRQ5RVD
-RKQVWRQ5RVD
Jones, Lois
Jones, Peggy
Jones, Tracey
Jordan, Eve
Kean, Barry
Kennedy, Michael
Kilcarr, Paul
Kimberly, Claire
Kingsbury, E. Ann, MD
Kingsbury, Milton
Kinsel, Vicki M
MD
Kiple,
p , Deanna,, RPh
Kittrell, Nancy
Nan
Klein, Walt
Knight,
ht,
t, Frances
France
Kressin,
ssin Kaitlin
Kroll, Joan
Jo
Laughton, Hazel
Lawler,
wler, Patt
Lawson,
on, Penny
Lee, Anita
An
Leming, Joyce
Levin,
L i Debra,
D b RN
Lewis,, Cynthia
y
Little, Hank
Little
Love, Edist J., DC
D
Lowe, Beverly, RD
Lowe, Frances
Lowe
Luxton
Luxton, Fred
Fred, RPh
Mackey,
ack Cora
Mahapatra, Shreyas
Makin, Barbara
Makin, Jim
Malloy,
alloy, Susa
Susan
Maresh,
resh Allison
Allison, RN
Maresh, Charles, MD
Marr, Emily
Marsh,
arsh, Andrea
Andre
Martin, Shirley, RN
R
Matasuda,
tasuda, Kana
Kanako
May,John
ay,John
McConahey
M
McConahey,
C
h William
Willi MD
0F'HUPRWW)DLWK
McKay,
ay, Mary Ann
McGinness,
inness,
ness, Bettie
McGinness,
inness,
ess, Wallace
McGrath,
rath,
th, Kevin MD
McMannus,
Mannus, Patti
McNeill, Maggie
Melton, John III, MD
Merkel, Catherine
Mill, Betty, ANP
Miller, Jennifer, RD
Mintz, Inanje
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Moran, Gerry
Morris, Peggy
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Neal, Nick
Nelson, Abby
Nelson, Alex
Nelson, Gayle
Nelson, Gordon
Nelson, Kate
Nelson, Shelia
Nelson, Taylor
Started in
Position
2010
Pharmacy
2012
Dental Clinic
2010
Pharmacy
5HIHUUDO3K\VLFLDQ
2012
Nursing
2002
Pharmacy
1993
Staff Physician
2003
Nursing
2012
Rappahannock Garden Club
2009
Nurse Practitioner
2010
Rappahannock Garden Club
2013
Nursing
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
2005
Pharmacy
2014
Nursing
2014
Rappahannock Garden Club
2008
Data Entry/Referrals
2009
Middlesex Outreach
2011
Clinic Volunteer
2012/2014
Special Projects/Outreach
2I¿FH5HIHUUDOV
20
2013
Student
20
ach
ch
h Clinic
Cli
C
2013
Outreach
20
utreach Clinic
utreac
Clini
C
2013
Outreach
20
M
2012
Middlesex
20
Ph
cy
2012
Pharmacy
20
Pharma
Pharm
harmac
harma
macy
mac
2012
Pharmacy
20
Proj
Pr
ojects
oj
2013
Special Projects
2007
Information Systems
20
Syys
S
ystems
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WH
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20
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nt
2013
Student
1996
Pharmacy
19
19
1993
Nursing
20
Sp
2013
Special
Projects
2013
Public
Relations
20
Pu
20
Pharm
2008
Pharmacy
20
macy
2009
Pharmacy
2I¿FH6SHFLDO3URMHFWV
2I
20
2013
Pharmacy
20
O
Clinic/Spe
2009
Outreach
Clinic/Special
Projects
2011
Pharmacy
20
c
2
20
nteer
2006
Clinic Volunteer
2
20
ors
2006
Board of Directors
2008
Outreach
Clinic
20
O
20
Pha
Pharmacy
2009
20
Stude
ude
2014
Student
1997
Staff Physician
19
ysician
20
d
2009
Medical Records
19
1993
Referral Physician
2009
Pharmacyy
Projec
20133
Special Projects
1994
94
Finance
2005
Outreach Clinicc
200
005
00
05
20
014
0
2014
Student
2005
2
Pharmacy
2009
Clinic Volunteer
Volunteer
1993
993
Special Projectss
2009
Middlesex
M
Outreach
Outreaa
ach
2012
Pharmacy
2006
2
Outreach
Outre h Clinic
Clin
Clini
2012
Nursing
N i
2009
Middlesex Outreach
2006
Clinic Volunteer
eer
2011
201
Chiropractor
Chirop
2011
Dietician
201
Dieti
Middl
O t
h
2009
Middlesex
Outreach
1999
Pharmacy
2012
Pharmacy
2014
Student
tudent
2008
Pharmacy/Referrals
Pharmacy/Referra
2008
Pharmacy
harmacy
2012
201
Pharmacy
rmacy
2010
20
Nursing
Nurs
2010
Staff Physician/Medical Director
2014
Student
2009
009
Nursing
Nurs
2006
006
Nursing
2014
014
Student
Stud
2013
013
Board of Directors
2006
Staff
St ff Physician
Ph i i
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
2011
20
Rappahannock Garden Club
Clu
2002
200
Outreach Clinic
Cli
2002
20
Board
rd of Directors/Outreach Clinic
C
1995
995
Staff
aff Physician
Physi
2010
20
Clinic volunteer
2013
Nursing
2009
Referral Physician
2001
Pharmacy
2002
Nurse Practitioner
2011
Dietician
2014
Student
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
2004/2013
Outreach
2010
Pharmacy
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
5HIHUUDO3K\VLFLDQ
2I¿FH9ROXQWHHU
2012
Student
2009
Special Projects
2009
Special Projects
2009
Special Projects
2006
Pharmacy
2009
Special Projects
2006
Pharmacy
1993
Student
2
Name
Started in
Position
Nguyen, Ellen
2014
Student
Nickerson, Dawn
2003
Pharmacy
Nonnacker, Nick
2013
Special Projects
Oliveri, Susan
2006
Outreach Clinic
Olsen, Marilyn
2009
Middlesex Outreach
2¶/HDU\9HURQLFD
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O’Shaughnessy, John
1996
Board of Directors/Finance
Osborne, Lorraine
2013
Middlesex Outreach
Owens, Cheryl
2008
Pharmacy
Palsgrove, Mary
2004
Outreach Clinic
Parry, Vini
2012
Outreach Clinic
Peach, Lanice
2009
Middlesex Outreach
Perks, Robin
2010
Rappahannock Garden Club
Perry, Rebecca
2002
Pharmacy
Pirok, Darryl, DDS
2001
Dentist
Power, Tove
2010
Meals Program Chair
Powers, Heather, LPN
2012
Nursing
Prince, James OD
1999
Referral Physician
Pulling, Barbara
2012
Rappahannock Garden Club
Rappahannock Garden Club 1996
Landscaping
Raymond, Diane, RN
2013
Nursing
2005
Pharmacy
Reath,
Reath
Re
ea
ath, Nancy
Redlin
R
Redlin,
edlin Marge
2011
Rappahannock Garden Club
Carolyn
1996
Clinic Volunteer
Reed, Caroly
19
199
Referral Physician
Reeves, Alexander,
xand MD
2011
11
Revere, Charles
es
2009
20
Board of Directors
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Rice Cheryl
Rice,
R
heryl
2005
2
Richardson, Bet
R
Bett
B
Betty
2002
20
Outreach
Outrea
eac Clinic/Special Projects
Clinic
Volunteer
Richardson,, Gar
Gary
ary
2009
20
C
Richardson,
Nursing
Richardson
dson,, Lynne, RN
R
2009
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Robbins,
s, Ann
Ann, FNP
P
2009
2
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Outreach/Special
Projects
Robey, Jan
2009
200
009
Outreach
ch/
Rogers, Walte
Walter
er
e
2008
008
08
D
Da
Data Entry
Robinson, Sham
Shamika
amika
ami
20133
20
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N
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Rosenfe
Rosenfeld,
senfeld,
enfeld
feld,
eld Karen
K
201
2012
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Rotert,
ert, M
Maryy Kay,
y, R
RN
2003
200
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Rowe, Sha
Sharon
Shar
2012
2
20
0
Rappa
Rappahannock
ppa
Garden Club
Nancy
Data Entry
Royall, Nanc
R
ancy
2012
2
1
Rumsey, Dexter
Rum
xter C. III, E
Esq.
2005
20
05
Foundation Board
Sanford,
ford, Ev
fo
Evalyn
2007
Outreach Clinic
Sathi,
Student
h Sruyeera
yeera
eera
2014
201
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Schaschek,
as
Bonnie
2
20
2011
Rappahannock Garden Club
Schear,
2011
Rappahannock Garden Club
hea Carol
Scheu
Scheu, Donald
2005
Data Entry
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Schwendeman,
em
man, Pa
Pat
P RN
2009
Outr
O
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Anthony
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Sica, Antho
hony
ho
2003
P
Sica,, Rene
Ren
2002
Clin
Clinic Volunteer
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Smith,
mith, Bren
Brenda
2010
Patie
e Education
Smith,
th, Nathalie
Natha
2012
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Rappahannock
pa n
pahan
Garden Club
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th
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2005
D
Spencer,
p
Lois, RN
2010
Outreach Clinic/Special Projects
Nursing
Spengler,r, Carol, RN
2013
N
Physician/Board of Directors
Sperry, Tom, MD
2004
4
Staff Physicia
MD
Staff
Stallings, William, M
2
2008
Staf Physician
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Stephens, Tamara
Tamara, FNP
2006
Nurse Practitioner
2004
Staff Physician
Stout,, Kay MD
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Swain, M
Miche
Michelle, RN
2007
Outreach Clinic
Nursing
Symons,
mons, A
Alexx
2012
Taliaferro, Be
Taliaferr
Betty RPh
2006
Pharmacy
Taliaferro, Joh
Jo
John
2007
Church Committee
Beverly RPh
2006
Pharmacy
Thomas,
s, Bev
Thomas, Selma
Se
2009
Middle
Middl
Middlesex Outreach
Thomason,
homason, Marcia
2013
01
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mpson Bobbie
201
2013
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ggle, Gracie
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201
2011
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Tinder, Maia
Student
Tinder
2014
014
Tingle, Rocky MD
1993
Staff Physician
Towne, Carol, RN
1999/2013
Nursing
Towne, Harry
2003
Pharmacy
Townsend, Mildred
2009
Middlesex Outreach
Turnage, June, RN
2000
Nursing
Ulses, Anne RN
2011
Nursing
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Vanlandingham, Diane, FNP 2004
Nurse Practitioner
VCU Dental Students
2004
Dental Clinic
VCU Dental Hygiene Students 2004
Dental Clinic
Vickery, Kendall
2003/2009
Clinic Volunteer
Vogel, Matthew MD
1993
Board of Directors/Staff Physician
Wachter, Jerry
2010
Special Projects
Waller, Peggy
2009
Special Projects
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Walker, Courtney
2008
Special Projects
Ward, Bud
2009
Rappahannock Garden Club
Ward, Cathie
2009
Rappahannock Garden Club
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Warner, Anne
2009
Rappahannock Garden Club
West, Shante
2014
Special Projects
Whay, Joyce, RN
2010
Nursing
White, James
2010
Middlesex Outreach
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Wright-Bowden, Rebecca, PNP 2007
Nurse Practitioner
Zakaib, Edward, MD
2003
Staff Physician
years
y
ears
Bridging the Gap in Health Care
Northern Neck
FREE HEALTH CLINIC
1993-2013
More help is needed.
Please call 804-435-0575 to volunteer.
Paid for by the NNFHC Board of Directors.
April 10, 2014 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va.• A7
arts & leisure
Bay School to host
Emerging Artists Show
Local art on display
at Lancaster Library
Ten local artists are currently
exhibiting at the Lancaster
Library
in
Kilmarnock
through April 30. Paintings
are from Kathleen Noffsinger’s Deltaville Watercolor
Class. Kathleen is a master
watercolorist who teaches
at the Rappahannock Art
League in Kilmarnock, The
Bay School Community Arts
Center in Mathews as well as
her “Noffsinger University”
classes in Deltaville.
In a recent interview,
Noffsinger said, “I am
excited to share the work of
the very talented artists who
take my weekly watercolor
class in Deltaville. The class
was started in 1998 as ‘individual studies’ and focuses
on each artist choosing their
own style of painting and
subject matter. I work individually with the artists starting at their current levels of
expertise, whether they are
beginners or advanced art-
ists. Many of my students
have won awards for their
paintings so you will see
paintings by both beginner
and award-winning artists in
this current show.”
Exhibitors include Linda
Goldstein, Rebecca Grow, Barbara Kershner, Karen AltschulKingsley, Susie Collamore,
Cathy Cottrell, Carolyn Davis,
Carolyn Hawley, Ken Baker and
Martha Anne King.
“Art is food for the eyes and
soul, so come to look at the
abundant talent next time you
visit the wonderful resources
available at the library,” said a
library spokesperson.
Additional works by the
artists can be seen at the
Rappahannock Art League and
at The Bay School Community
Arts Center.
For
more
information
regarding purchases or art
classes, contact Noffsinger at
804-832-1387 or at www.kath- Visitors to the Deltaville Maritime Museum from 9 a.m.-2
leennoffsinger.com.
p.m. on Saturday, April 26, will have an opportunity to look
at a variety of classic and antique vehicles.
Signup continues for
Kekoka Yoga Retreat
Members of the public are
invited to immerse themselves
in yoga and nature at the 5th
Annual Kekoka Yoga Retreat
May 16-18 on the waterfront
shores of YMCA/APYC Camp
Kekoka in Kilmarnock.
The cost of the weekend is
$125 and includes lodging,
four healthy meals, all levels
of yoga, meditation, workshops and lectures, arts and
crafts, music, water activities
and much more. Space is limited to 60 and fills up quickly.
All proceeds benefit scholarships for YMCA campers. For
reservations and information,
visit www.ymcacampkekoka.
org or call Cassie at 435-3616.
Dobe Run
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8am to 5pm
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‘Memory Lane of Classic Cars’
to be at maritime park opener
by Bill Powell
Events Director
Maritime Museum
Fans of classic and antique
automobiles will have plenty to
“Oooh,” “Ahh,” and talk about
when the Memory Lane Car
Club brings over 40 of these
diverse, classic, beautifully
restored and maintained rolling works of art for “show and
tell” to the Deltaville Maritime
Museum’s Working Waterman’s Weekend (WWW) festivities on Saturday, April 26.
The Saturday events of
Working Waterman’s Weekend,
April 24-27, at the Maritime
Park begin at 8 a.m. with Billz
Bistro’s opening for breakfast and coffee. The car show,
antique boat show and farmers’
market run from 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
and the Pierwalk tours, cruises,
and shuttle to the schooner
“Virginia” run from 10 a.m.-2
p.m. Groovin’ in the Park concert with the “Ray Pittman
Project” is from 6-8 p.m.
Watch the Sentinel for more
details on the many upcoming
events and attractions at the
Maritime Park.
The organizing group for
this year’s car show is the
Memory Lane Car Club, based
in Kilmarnock. Memory Lane,
formed in 2011, is a club with
the express purpose of encouraging the owners of antique,
classic and even exotic motor
vehicles to get together, enjoy
operating, working on, exhibiting and, big surprise, actually
driving their cars.
“It’s all about enjoyment,”
quotes the Memory Lane
website. Check it out at www.
sites.google.com/site/oldcars2012 or call Jack at 804435-6171.
Spokesman Jack Ashburn
said, “We do this for fun and
to help organizations like the
museum with their fundraising. The museum is there for
the community and we want to
be there for them, both in their
time of need and in the future.”
Deltaville Maritime Museum
and Holly Point Nature Park
is a non-profit organization at
287 Jackson Creek Road and
on Mill Creek. Turn right off
Route 33 across from the Shell
Station to get there.
To find out everything
you need to know about the
museum and park, purchase
event tickets, donate, volunteer, or become a member
visit www.deltavillemuseum.
com, email [email protected]
verizon.net or call 776-7200.
The museum mailing address
is P.O. Box 466, Deltaville, VA
23043.
RFA distributes grants
The Rappahannock Foundation for the Arts recently
distributed grants to several
organizations that support its
performing arts events.
Recipients included Mary
Ball Washington Museum &
Library’s Lancaster Court Day
Festival; Kilmarnock Museum’s
Talent Extravaganza; Grace
Episcopal Church’s Grace-ful
Summer Sounds; Friends of
Belle Isle State Park’s Music
by the River; Lancaster County
Public School’s Juniata College
Real . Local . Radio
Concert Choir presentation;
and Lancaster Middle School
Drama Club’s production of
“Peter Pan.”
Information on grant application guidelines may be
found at www.rappahannockfoundation.org or by calling
438-5555.
Local shops often
stock a high percentage
of locally sourced goods
that do not require longdistance transportation,
helping to reduce our
carbon footprint.
The Bay School Community
Arts Center in Mathews will
hold its 2nd Annual Emerging Artists Show in the center’s
Art Speaks Gallery from April
12-25, with an opening reception Saturday, April 12, from
4-7 p.m.
This exhibition of adult student work will feature artwork
representative of the breadth of
fine art and craft media taught
at and through the Bay School.
It will provide a venue for local
student artists to showcase their
work, illustrating what they
learned as a result of a class or
classes.
Last year 50 artists exhibited
in the show and more than 20
artistic media were represented,
including painting, pottery,
basket weaving, rug hooking,
and many more. Several artists exhibited in more than one
media.
This show is open to all artists, whether novice, hobbyist or professional, who have
taken a class at the school
within the last 18 months
(August 1, 2012 through
March 28, 2014). Artists must
be at least 16 years old. There is
no fee or jury process to enter
this show. More information
can be found on the website
at www.bayschool-arts.com/
eventsandexhibits.html.
The Bay School is at 279
Main Street in Mathews. The
Bay School is a non-profit arts
organization partially funded
by the Virginia Commission
for the Arts and the National
Endowment for the Arts. For
more information about the Bay
School and the Emerging Artists Show, call 804-725-1278 or
visit www.bayschool-arts.com.
Novelist to lead writing
workshop in Tappahannock
Tappahannock Art Guild’s
“Second Sunday Afternoon”
program on Sunday, April 13,
at 2 p.m. will feature nationallyacclaimed novelist Sarah Collins
Honenberger leading a workshop
on how to develop writing skills.
During the afternoon, beginners and experienced writers
alike will explore the wonders
of the writing world with one
of Amazon’s top 100 literary
fiction authors. The workshop
will feature warm-up exercises,
long-range planning, and information about what to pack in
your backpack so that you’re
ready to begin when the writing
urge strikes.
The free workshop at the
Tappahannock Art Gallery at 200
Prince Street is open to all ages
and does not require registration.
Honenberger lives and writes
in Tappahannock. Her novel
“Catcher, Caught” is a PEN/
Faulkner Foundation selection
for its Writers in the Schools
program. Her first three novels,
including Waltzing Cowboys
(2009) and White Lies (2006),
were nominees for the Library
of Virginia’s Fiction award. Her
fourth novel, Minding Henry
Lewis, has just been released.
She has taught creative writing
to all ages and is recognized by
the Virginia Writers Club for her
support of other writers.
DJ Dance
is Friday at
Freeshade
There will be a DJ Dance
from 7:30-10 p.m. this Friday,
April 11, at Freeshade Community Center in Syringa.
Light refreshments will be
served. Admission is $5 and all
proceeds benefit the Stepping
Stones square dance club.
A SLOWING ECONOMY HAS RESULTED IN THE DISUNION OF PARTNERS OF
ONE OF THE LARGEST ORIENTAL RUG CORPORATIONS IN THE DC
METROPOLITAN AREA. A MAGNIFICENT COLLECTION OF PERSIAN AND
ORIENTAL RUGS HAS BEEN CONSIGNED TO OUR COMPANY FOR
LIQUIDATION PRECEDING.
65% TO 75% OFF
ENTIRE INVENTORY
PERSIAN AND
ORIENTAL RUGS
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882 WAVERLY AVE OFF RT 3 KILMARNOCK
WE HAVE BEEN COMMISSIONED TO LIQUIDATE A LARGE INVENTORY OF ORIENTAL RUGS COMPLIMENTED WITH OUR GOODS OF
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A8 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va. • April 10, 2014
Who was Bessie Coleman?
Deltaville Seafood Festival
Author Reeve Lindbergh tells vendor deadline is April 15
us in ‘Nobody Owns the Sky’ The first-ever Deltaville Sea- items—things not previously
A book review by
Dr. Jane Park Cutler
For the CMVRS
The Ladies Auxiliary of the Central Middlesex Volunteer
Rescue Squad of Urbanna presented a check for $2,000
to the squad on Monday. The funds were raised through
“A Night To Remember” music show featuring “The
Holmes Brothers” and other local musicians and singers. Above, from left, are squad treasurer Ben Langford,
squad president Christian Foster, auxiliary president
Lois Jean Brooks, and auxiliary treasurer Sandy Barbee.
Brooks thanked everyone who attended and supported
the show. The auxiliary will hold another fundraiser for
the squad, a drive-through spaghetti dinner, on Saturday,
April 26, from 5-7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased from
any auxiliary member.
(Photo by Larry Chowning)
Northern Neck Chantey Singers
‘Chantey Singers’ to
perform free concert
The Urbanna Oyster Festival
Marine Science Legacy Program will offer a free public
concert featuring the “Northern Neck Chantey Singers” at
7 p.m. Wednesday, April 23,
at St. Clare Walker Middle
School on Route 33 in Locust
Hill.
This group of local men
worked on fishing boats when
nets teaming with menhaden
were pulled aboard by hand. To
coordinate their movements,
they often sang. AfricanAmerican work songs stem
from a West African tradition of call and response. The
lyrics were often improvised to
express what was happening in
their lives.
The Northern Neck Chantey
Singers is keeping alive this
great tradition with booming
voices and clever lyrics. The
group has been featured on
National Public Radio and has
headlined the Urbanna Oyster
Festival Education Day and
waterfront stage.
“It would be well worth your
time to join us for this special
concert that will help us peer
into the past of one of our most
important fisheries,” said Kim
Olsen of the Urbanna Oyster
Festival
Marine
Science
Legacy Program.
This concert is made possible by a Chesapeake Bay
Restoration Fund license plate
grant.
If you have visited the
National Air & Space Museum,
you have probably seen the
Spirit of St. Louis hanging
from the rafters. Many documentaries chronicle Charles
Lindbergh’s
death-defying
flight in that little aircraft from
New York to Paris in 1927,
the first solo flight across the
Atlantic Ocean. But, have you
heard about an equally courageous woman, Bessie Coleman, who also defied odds, and
refused to be denied her dream
to pilot an airplane?
Born in 1892 in Texas, the
daughter of a Choctaw/Cherokee/African-American father
and an African-American
mother, Bessie knew well racial
and gender inequality. Finding
flight schools closed to her in
the USA, she found sponsors
who sent her to France where
she became the first AfricanAmerican woman to earn an
aviation pilot’s license, even
before Amelia Earhart and
Anne Morrow Lindbergh! For
five years she entertained many
audiences as a popular stunt
pilot, sadly dying during one
performance in 1926. While
many tributes have been paid
to her, including a U.S. postage stamp honoring her, Bessie
never received the acclaim
bestowed on Charles Lindbergh.
That’s where Reeve Lindbergh comes into the picture. At
a Lindbergh celebration, Reeve
viewed Flyers in Search of A
Dream (1986) [www.youtube.
com/watch?v=iDD7rqiqsFk]
and was struck by the inequity
dealt to pioneer black aviators.
She “fell in love” with Bessie
Coleman and began to research
her life story. As Reeve puts it,
“Bessie was an incredibly brave
person who was hardly noticed,
while my parents got so much
publicity that it was difficult
for them to live their normal
lives. I saw a crazy imbalance
and wanted to set things right.”
“Nobody Owns the Sky”
by Reeve Lindbergh
Thus, Reeve penned “Nobody
Owns the Sky”—a delightful children’s book that fully
engages adult readers too.
Bessie Coleman once said,
“The sky is the only place
there is no prejudice. Up there,
everyone is equal, everyone
is free.” Reeve’s tribute to
“Brave Bessie” in the form
of a book that we all can hold
in our hearts says as much to
me about Reeve Lindbergh as
it does about Bessie Coleman.
Here we have two courageous
women who used their own
dreams and talents to inspire
us all.
The public is invited to a
reception for Reeve Lindbergh
hosted by the Deltaville Maritime Museum on Thursday,
April 24, from 5-7:30 p.m. at
the new museum building, 287
Jackson Creek Road, Deltaville.
Tickets at $50 include the
reception with food and drinks,
meeting Reeve, hearing her
speak about the Lindbergh
Foundation, answering questions from the audience, and
an autographed book. Call the
museum at 804-776-7200 for
tickets or stop by Nauti Nell’s,
Carter’s Consignment or Pat’s
Gallery in Deltaville or Interior
Innovations in White Stone for
tickets. Only about 20 unsold
tickets remain for this wonderful evening, so get yours now!
food Festival will be held Saturday, May 24, including displays
and vendors located in the
Deltaville Community Village
and at the Deltaville Maritime
Museum.
The Deltaville Community
Association (DCA) is seeking quality, distinctive and
hand-made arts and crafts
vendors to participate in this
event. Since this is a first-time
event, organizers are seeking a
unique group of vendors. “We
are very pleased with our initial response—particularly for
a first-time event. Our last day
to accept applications is April
15 so get those applications
in. For this event, the goal is to
limit duplicated offerings, and
display unique arts and crafts
Volunteers needed for
museum Easter egg hunt
The Deltaville Maritime
Museum in Deltaville is in
need of volunteers for its
annual Easter egg hunt that
will be held from noon-3 p.m.
on Saturday, April 19.
Help is needed with hiding
eggs and manning tables. This
is a fun event for all volunteers, from teens and up. There
are donation boxes for candy,
novelties and/or money at EVB
Bluegrass
coming to
Urbanna
The “Waterview Bluegrass
& Classic Country Band”
and others will play Saturday,
April 12, from 7-10 p.m at
the Urbanna Firehouse. Covered dish snacks are shared
at intermission. Admission is
free, but any donation benefits
the Middlesex Volunteer Fire
Department (MVFD) Auxiliary.
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Places to go and things
to do in the Northern Neck
and Middle Peninsula
Mathews Market Days Committee is accepting applications to participate in the 40th
Annual Mathews Market Days
Poster Contest. Applications
and complete rules are available online at www.mathewsmarketdays.com, by emailing
[email protected]
com, or from the Mathews Virginia Cooperative Extension
Office at 10494 Buckley Hall
Road (next to Bank of America). A completed application
and $15 entry fee are due no
later than May 1 by 5 p.m. The
artwork entry is due July 1 by
5 p.m.
“Small Town Charm” is this
year’s theme since Mathews
County was voted 5th best
small town in the USA. Entries
should reflect the bounty of
life in Mathews—its rich heritage, abundance of nature, or
spirit of community. The winning artist will receive $500
plus 10 posters. The contest is
open to all ages and levels of
expertise; you need not live in
Mathews County to enter, and
there is no limit to the number
of entries submitted by an
individual.
The winning entry will be
announced at the unveiling
reception on August 17 at the
Bay School Community Arts
Center at 1 p.m. Posters also
will be on sale and the winning artist will be present to
sign/number the collectible
print.
The 40th annual festival
will be held Friday and Saturday, September 5-6.
For more information, call
Janette Parkin at 725-7196 or
email [email protected]
gmail.com.
in Urbanna, Deltaville and
Hartfield and at the museum.
Please contact Marie Wilding
at 776-9836 for more information or to volunteer.
donk’s
THEATER
ROUTE 198 at HUDGINS
IN MATHEWS, VA
Phone (804) 725-7760
VIRGINIA’S Lil Ole Opry presents:
Second 2014
Talent Showcase
Saturday • April 12, 2014 • 8 p.m.
PLUS
All the Opry Regulars
Shades of Country
Uncle Jimmy Wickham
Adults: $12 • Children under 12: $5
TICKETS:
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7KH0DWKHZV&RXQW\9LVLWRU&HQWHU0DWKHZV
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For Information and Reservations 725-7760
Website: www.donkstheater.com
Fall/Holiday 2013 • FREE
Places to go and things
to do in the Northern Neck
and Middle Peninsula
CT_cT\QTa" !#6B55
Places to go and things
to do in the Northern Neck
and Middle Peninsula
Inside:
Mathews Market Days
plans annual poster contest
seen in local festivals. Vendor
applicants are being asked to
submit a photo of their wares
along with their application,”
said Carolyn Norton Schmalenberger, chair of the Event Committee.
The fee for a 10’x10’ space
is $60, and booths are expected
to be open from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. All proceeds will go to
the DCA, the organization
responsible for maintaining
the recreational areas and the
Deltaville Community Center.
Please contact Kris Scherer at
804-776-7117 or [email protected]
com; or Gail Butler at 804-3576465 or ti[email protected]
Visit
www.facebook.com/
Deltavilleseafoodfestival
for
more information on the event.
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DWT=T]WPST]6XbWTah*8TaT±bW^fXc±bS^]T Beach walks &
8XccX]VcWT[X]ZbPc_dQ[XRBXePWV^[UR^dabTb weekend getaways
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little: Yard sale
steals & deals
Inside:
Inside:
• Follow the path: Take the African American Heritage Trails Tour
• Hunting Hideaways: Spend a weekend hunting and fishing on the Neck
• Parades, music and more at the Montross Fall Festival
From the Potomac Rivah to the York Rivah — A FREE
Guide to the Northern Neck and Middle Peninsula
Advertise in the first Rivah of 2014!
On newsstands May 1
SUPER SAVINGS by advertising in more than one issue!
Advertising Deadline: April 16
Designed to suit your needs
(804) 758-8887
Serving
Middle Peninsula
and
Northern Neck
20% off
Courtesy In-Home Consultations
Draperies
Cornices
Valances
Shades
Blinds
Shutters
Upholstery
Free Installation
Call the Southside Sentinel at 758-2328 or
the Rappahannock Record at 435-1701
soon for more information!
Don’t forget to ask about our Rivah Website Special!
April 10, 2014 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va.• A9
Antique boats to be at
maritime park opener
by Bill Powell
Events Director
Maritime Museum
Relay rider
Willie Holt of Urbanna held on tight as he rode Bubba at
last Saturday’s Middlesex Relay for Life Carnival behind
the Urbanna Firehouse. Leading Bubba is Rachel Boles of
Hearts Corner Farm in Wake.
(Photo by Tom Hardin)
Donk’s Theater to host
Talent Showcase Saturday
On Saturday, April 12,
Donk’s Theater, Virginia’s Li’l
Ole Opry in Mathews, will
host its second Talent Showcase of 2014. The Talent Showcase is open to local talent of
all ages. The contest spotlights
talent hopefuls in the country
music arena who wish to perform with a live band.
Contestants may accompany themselves with an
instrument or they may use
the “Shades of Country”
band for their presentation.
Because of space and time
limitations, the competition
does not include bands. Each
person wishing to be a contestant must pick two wellknown country songs. A list
of possible songs that the
band knows is posted on the
Let’s Go
Cruisin!
Osprey are back
Departures from
Urbanna and
Irvington
Contact Captain Phil
(804) 366-1778
urbannacruises.com
website donkstheater.com.
After meeting with the band,
one of those songs will be
selected to present to the audience.
Unlike the old talent
searches, there will be no
judges. The audience will pick
their favorite performers. This
format will continue for each
Talent Showcase of 2014 and
all the votes will be tallied for
each contestant and the favorites will be invited back for
the talent finals in November.
This means contestants may
compete at every Talent Showcase if they wish to accumulate
audience votes.
Contestants must report to
Donk’s Theater between 6 and
7 p.m. on the night of the show.
The price of admission is the
registration fee. After registering, each contestant will have
a few minutes with the musicians to make sure the song is
presented in the right key and
with the right arrangement.
Saturday’s show also will
feature The Opry Regulars
performing favorite country
songs.
Admission is $12 for adults;
$5 for children. Show time is 8
p.m. Doors open to the public
at 7:30 p.m. For tickets and
information, call 725-7760.
Hey, if you love the class,
lines and style of the old classic
runabouts, launches and cruisers, the Tidewater Chapter of
the Antique and Classic Boat
Society will display at least
10 trailerable craft and two
large cruisers on the pier at the
Deltaville Maritime Museum’s
season opener, Working Waterman’s Weekend, on Saturday,
April 26.
Most of us remember during
our early trips to the “Rivah”
when these classic, stylish craft
ruled the Rappahannock. The
names Chris Craft, Feathercraft, Whirlwind, Glastron and
Glasspar bring back memories
of white, rushing bow waves
and fast-moving boats in the
days when water skiing was
“king.” I remember when I saw
my first Glasspar G3. Sleek,
molded, sitting low in the
water at rest and skimming the
waves like a waterbug at speed.
The feel of a 50’s Thunderbird
Fashions on display
The Susanna Wesley Circle of Urbanna United Methodist
Church hosted a fashion show and tea on April 5. Above,
from left, Meghan Hall models a dress from Lowe Tide,
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Edwards displays a blouse and skirt from R.S. Bristow Store.
Northern Neck Wine Old recipes sought
Fest set for April 19 for museum cookbook
Savor the flavor of the
wines of the Chesapeake
Bay Wine Trail on Saturday,
April 19. The Northern Neck
Wine Fest will take place
from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on the
grounds of historic Rice’s
Hotel/Hughlett’s Tavern in
Heathsville.
Tickets will be sold at the
gate for $12, which includes
a free etched wine glass for
tastings. Food and other
wine-related vendors will be
on hand. The Tavern Restaurant and Gift Shop also will
be open.
The public is invited to
come early and enjoy the
season-opening Heathsville
Farmers’ Market from 9
a.m.-1 p.m. Shoppers will
find farm-fresh produce,
bread and baked goods, seafood, health food, flowers and
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brought to sea.
Check out this watershed
Glasspar as well as Chris Crafts,
Feathercrafts and Whirlwinds
next to the new museum building from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. during
the first Deltaville Farmers’
Market at the museum’s official season events opener. On
the Pierwalk, along with the
“F.D. Crockett,” “Explorer”
and creek cruises, the Classic Boat Society will display a
1938 37-foot Elco and a 1966
Chris Craft 33.
John Rothert, boat restorer
and spokesman for the society,
will bring his one-off Argentine runabout to display.
Don’t forget to get your tickets for the April 24 Lindbergh
reception, and April 26 shrimp
and barbecue dinner and dance
and Groovin’ in the Park concert. Give the museum office a
call at 776-7200.
Deltaville Maritime Museum
and Holly Point Nature Park
is a non-profit organization at
287 Jackson Creek Road and
on Mill Creek. Turn right off
Route 33 across from the Shell
Station to get there.
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nursery plants, and unique
locally-made handcrafts.
Circa 1795, historic Rice’s
Hotel/Hughlett’s Tavern is
also home to four active
artisan guilds, which will be
on-site that day, demonstrating and selling their wares.
Follow the smoke to see the
blacksmiths working in the
Tavern’s forge. The woodworkers have both a modern
and a colonial workshop in
the “Carriage House,” which
also houses a collection of
antique carriages. The Tavern
Spinners and Weavers gather
in their studio on the second
floor of the Tavern. The quilters will have a special quilt
show in the adjacent “Transportation Museum Building.”
Rice’s
Hotel/Hughlett’s
Tavern is at 73 Monument
Place,
just
off
Route 360 behind the old
Northumberland Courthouse
in Heathsville. For more
information, visit www.
RHHTFoundation.org, e-mail
[email protected], or
call 804-580-3377.
Do you have recipes from
your mother, grandmother,
family member or friend such
as Carolyn Sanders’ Mother’s
Chocolate Orange Cookies, Barbara Baxter’s Grandmother’s Fried Pies, Anne
McClintock’s Grandmother’s
Irish Potato Pie or Nancy Newlin’s Grandmother’s Holiday
Dates? If you do, the Steamboat Era Museum in Irvington
would like to hear from you!
The museum is in the process of compiling a “Steamboat Era Cookbook.” To be
considered for the book, reci-
pes must have been served
between 1813-1937. Entrees,
salads, desserts, cocktails and
other food items are welcome.
Include any related anecdotes about the originator of
the recipe—when, to whom,
and how it was served. The
recipe book will be sold in the
museum gift shop. All proceeds will support museum
programs.
Send recipes, including contact information, by June 30 to
Sallie Dashiell at [email protected] or P.O.
Box 8, Weems, VA 22576.
Visit
SSentinel.com
for more photos!
YMCA chicks
Knenah Colbert and other preschool friends cuddle with the
5-day-old chicks that were recently incubated and hatched
at the Middlesex Family YMCA Preschool. “Teacher Judy
Emmanuel and Kristina Glenn have done a wonderful job
taking the children through the process and using every
teachable moment possible during the 21-day incubation
period,” said Y program director Becca Panis. “All the chicks
have found great homes with friends from the YMCA. Special thanks to the Rae family for donating the eggs.”
Trivia:
Girl Scout cookies were born
a century ago when girls began
baking them at home and
selling them to finance troop
The weather is here . . .
don’t you wish your porch was beautiful ?
activities. The only time the
tradition was interrupted was
during World War II. Because
of sugar, flour, and butter
shortages, troops switched to
selling calendars.
Galloping into Spring
Fundraiser
Sunday, April 13 • 12 – 4 p.m.
Join us for an exciting day of Demonstration
Riding, Paint the Ponies, Pony Rides,
Food & Prizes!
All proceeds are going to support
our local equestrian athletes.
CUSTOM INTERIORS
42 N. Main St., Kilmarnock, VA
‹ ‹^^^^MIVV[OJVT
Call 804-577-3831 for more information
Heart’s Corner Farm • 1341 Wake Rd., Wake
A10 • Southside Sentinel • Urbanna, Va. • April 10, 2014
Rescue squad volunteers needed . . .
a day at a time.”
Rewarding work
Being part of an important
organization makes her feel
good, said Kristee Norwood, an
EMT with the MCVRS. “It’s
very rewarding to know you
have helped someone or made
someone feel more secure.
When I go home from a rescue
call I have the best feeling. You
feel really good about yourself
when you help people.”
Norwood wanted to work in
the medical field, but family
responsibilities came first.
Then, she got her chance and
joined the rescue squad in
2011.
Getting experience
Those who think they want
a career in the medical field
can get upclose experience to
see if medical work is for them
by joining a rescue squad, said
Norwood.
As a junior rescue squad
member, Beth Guill was
inspired to pursue a college
degree as a paramedic, noted
Norwood.
Even an outsider can see
the camaraderie among rescue
volunteers who share such an
important mission. “We’re like
a big family,” said Norwood.
“We help each other and care
about each other.”
Drivers wanted
Ambulance drivers are an
essential part of the rescue
squad team.
Scott Woolard has been
a driver with the MCVRS
for about 18 months. “I love
being part of the rescue squad
family,” he said.
Woolard joined after the
rescue squad helped him in an
emergency. “I wanted to give
back. When I rode along on
rescue squad calls, I could see
how much they were helping
and I could see there was a need
for more volunteers.
“I could see they were a team
when they came to help me,
and I was attracted to the family
and camaraderie that is in the
rescue squad,” said Woolard.
Drivers are trained during a
two-day course, he said. “It’s
a comprehensive course, and
they train you very well.”
Drivers’ training includes
(Continued from page A1)
Finding purpose in life
In his book “On Purpose,” Dr. Victor Strecher states there
is scientific evidence that having a sense of purpose in your
life is good for your long-term health. “People with a strong
purpose have been shown to live longer, to be less likely to
get heart attacks, and less likely to get a stroke,” stated Dr.
Strecher in a Wall Street Journal interview. “When you see
the data about the elderly who have little or no purpose in
life, and how quickly they get sick and die, you realize how
important it is for elderly persons to repurpose their lives
toward something bigger than themselves.”
driving fire trucks and learning to handle the pressure and
responsibility of transporting the injured in a $220,000
ambulance. Those who complete the course are certified
to drive vehicles up to 60,000
pounds. “Anybody can learn
to do it,” said Woolard. People
who are at least 19 years old
can be drivers.
Woolard said his son Noah,
16, wants to work in the medical field and has applied to be a
junior rescue squad member so
he can ride along and see if it’s
something he definitely wants
to do.
Free training
To be an EMT-Basic, students take a class that can vary
from two weeks of full days at
a school such as Rappahannock
Community College, or two
nights a week for about six
months for a total of about 140
class hours, said Cerullo. Once
the applicant passes the class,
he or she must be certified by
passing a State EMT test.
“The training to be an EMT
Athletes . . .
looks great on a resume,” noted
Cerullo.
Also, a $25 vehicle tax credit
is given to rescue squad members by Middlesex County.
“We are a team.”
Dan Brooks said it is stimulating to be a member of the
Central Middlesex Volunteer Rescue Squad, based in
Urbanna.
Brooks has been a member
for 11 years and has no thought
of quitting. “I plan on running
calls until I can’t run them any
more,” he said.
It doesn’t matter what time of
day or night the calls come—
he’s ready. “There have been
times when I was tired but
when the tone comes, I don’t
mind getting out of bed. You do
this because you want to help
the community,” said Brooks,
“and there is a satisfaction that
comes from helping others.”
He said ambulance drivers
are an important part of the
rescue squad. “We are a team
. . . and that’s what makes it
all click.”
(Continued from page A1)
appropriate. The decision of
the high school principal will
be final.
Soucek said she has concerns over the waiver option.
“I don’t see how we are holding up the academic standards
of the school with this waiver,”
she said.
Harrow noted again that
Middlesex is the only school
division in the district considering such change and the proposal needs to be “considered
with caution.”
School board members Jim
Goforth and Elliott Reed were
not at Monday’s board meeting.
Board member Dr. Richard
Shores voiced concern that a
full school board should be
present to vote on such a significant change in school policy.
A second vote of approval
is required for the 2.0 GPA
standard to become part of
Middlesex County School
Board policy.
Six reasons
to join a
rescue squad
by Bob Cerullo
1. One of the tenants of my
faith came from the lips of
Jesus Christ. “Whatever you
do for the least of my brethren,
you do for me.” The parable of
the Good Samaritan teaches
the importance Jesus places
on helping those in need.
2. I joined the squad because
I was looking for a career
path. I found it working and
learning at the rescue squad. It
gave me a direction, which has
become my life’s work.
3. When I first read in the
paper the rescue squad needed
drivers and people to become
EMTs, I said to myself, “I
have been very successful in
life and now is a good time to
give back to my community
and to help my neighbors.”
4. I always wanted to ride in
an ambulance with the siren
blowing and the lights flashing on my way to help someone who is injured in a car
wreck, a fire or from a fall. I
like helping people and I like
the excitement of answering
calls.
5. When I moved to
Deltaville I did not know
anyone. I thought getting into
the rescue squad would help
me to get to know my neighbors. I was not disappointed. I
have met some very wonderful
people who are on the rescue
squad, many have become my
friends. Knowing them makes
being a member of the rescue
squad fun and something I
really enjoy.
6. I thought I was getting
too old to learn to be an EMT
and drive an ambulance. The
people at the rescue squad
encouraged me to take the
challenge. I am now a certified ambulance driver and a
certified Emergency Medical Technician. I shocked my
kids but I proved to myself and
to them this old dog still has
some hunts in him.
‘Middlesex Pet Friends for
Life’ approves new logo
This week the newly-created board of directors for
Middlesex Pet Friends for
Life approved a new logo for
the newly-incorporated group.
County computer specialist
Kevin Gentry along with assistant county administrator
Marcia Jones and Cate Ogden
helped the group develop the
logo.
Members of the board of
directors are Cate Ogden,
president; Marcia Jones, treasurer; and Ruth Williams,
manager of the shelter, secretary. Other members of the
board are Father Paul Andersen
of Hartfield, Mary Wakefield
Buxton of Urbanna, and Thyra
Harris of Deltaville.
Richmond attorney Genevieve Dybing, who has a
vacation home in Topping, has
provided pro bono legal assistance from the firm of McCandlish Holton.
Completing and mailing off
the arduous application forms
to the IRS applying for a 501c3
tax exempt status is the group’s
next goal. In the meantime,
donations to help homeless
dogs at the Middlesex Animal
Facility at Cooks Corner can
still be made in care of Marcia
Jones, assistant county administrator, Box 428, Saluda, VA
23149, and are still tax-deductible. The dog park fund is now
at $3,314.09 and will require
another $7,500 in funding to
purchase fencing on land the
county has set aside to establish a dog park.
“Organizations, clubs and
other groups are urged to
consider helping establish
the county’s first dog park, a
much-needed facility,” said
board member Mary Wakefield
Buxton.
Those who specifically
wish to donate to the dog park
should write “for dog park” on
donations, or money will be
used for emergency medical
care funding for our homeless
dogs.
Recent donations to help
provide emergency services
to homeless dogs have come
from the following: Elizabeth
M. Lester, $100; Margaret
and Raymond Benson, $25;
Judith W. Mullins, $25; Mary
Ann Larssen, $100; Kenneth
and Margaret Williams, $50
in memory of Ed Letchworth;
Middlesex County Woman’s
Club Inc., $100; Cornerstone Gov. Affairs/Jodi Major,
$250; Bruce and Fredrik Forsberg, $50; Page and Rebekah
Melton, $20 in memory of Ed
Letchworth; Evelyn Turner,
$25 in memory of Ed Letchworth; Bill and Blair Curdts,
$25 in memory of Maxine
(pet); Chessa Lowery with
gifts, $164.09; and Helen E.
and T.R. Shelly III, $100 in
memory of Ed Letchworth.
The shelter desperately
needs more dog walkers in
order to provide daily exercise
for the county’s homeless dogs.
If you can give a few hours a
week to help the dogs, please
call Jody Perkins at 695-1187
or email [email protected]
Those who would like to
provide a foster or permanent
home for a homeless dog, contact Ruth Williams at the shelter at [email protected]
For those interested in adopting a kitten or cat, contact Cate
Ogden at [email protected]
“Those who stoop to help
a homeless pet are the tallest
people on earth!” said Buxton.
Visit
SSentinel.com
for more news
County-Wide Clean-Up Day
Saturday, April 12th
Join your friends and neighbors to clean-up the litter from our roads.
Thanks to those who’ve already volunteered and to those who follow their lead!
› Kiwanis Club, Borinqueneers Motorcycle Club (VA Beach and Northern VA)
and Church of the Visitation - Town Bridge Road
› Rotary Club - Dirt Bridge Road
› Urbanna Harbor HOA - Urbanna Road
› Healy’s Mill and Deer Chase Neighbors - Stormont Road
› Deltaville Community Association - Deltaville Area
› Kilmer’s Point/Cedar Point HOA - Remlik Drive and Sections of Old Virginia
Street
› Friends of Wilton Cove - Wilton Cove area
› Zion Branch Road Neighbors - Zion Branch Area
› Water View Residents - Meet at the Volunteer Fire Department
› Shortcut Adopt A Highway - Stampers Bay Road
Don’t see your neighborhood listed?
Create your own team or join the efforts of the locations listed above
Get big orange trash bags at
Old Virginia St. and Lord Mott Rd., Urbanna, 9 a.m. to Noon
Let’s Keep Middlesex Beautiful!
For more information: [email protected]