April 2009 - ABC Central Florida

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April 2009 - ABC Central Florida
APRIL 2009
Central Florida Chapter
SURVIVING
AN ECONOMIC
DOWNTURN
Welbro Celebrates
30 Year Anniversary
.
We’re Proud to Build
the “American” Way!
• Metal Cladding
• Architectural Systems
• Structures - Aluminum & Steel
• Grilles, Screens, Stairs & Rails
• Canopies, Awnings & Sunshades
Serving the Southeast U.S.
• Engineering - Custom Design
• Fabrication - Installation
• FL License #CGC 1514045
• Bonded & Insured
ARCHITECTURAL SYSTEMS
L Plaza on Brickell • Miami, FL • Retail Kiosks
an Ohio Gratings company
American Metalco • 200 Hope Street • Longwood, FL 32750 • Phone: 407.260.8484 • Fax: 407.767.5376
www.americanmetalco.com • E-mail: [email protected]
Increase
Your Exposure
Platinum Value Club
Gold Value Club
• A C Development Group, Inc. • Able Body Labor • Alliance Solutions Group, LLC
• Baker Concrete Construction, Inc. • Balfour Beatty Construction, LLC • Bergelectric Corporation
• Coastal Mechanical Services, LLC • Commercial Equipment Rentals
• Doster Construction Company, Inc. • Enterprise Fleet Management • Florida Business Interiors
• Hardin Construction Company, LLC • Hartford South, LLC • Hensel Phelps Construction Company
• Just Concrete & Masonry, Inc. • Kelly Electric, LLC • KHS&S Contractors • Kirwin Norris, P.A.
• Labor Ready Southeast • Maxim Crane Works, LP • McGraw Hill Construction - Dodge
• Miller Plastering & Stucco • Mivan, Inc. • ModSpace • Morton Electric, Inc. • Mullinax Ford
• Palmer Electric Company • PCL Construction Services, Inc. • PPI Construction Management
• Progressive Plumbing, Inc. • Quinco Electrical, Inc.• R.L. Haines Construction
• Michael C Sasso, P.A. • Skanska USA Building • Sutton Leasing, Inc.
• Tatro Construction Company, LLC • United Forming, Inc.
• Wharton Smith, Inc. • Workers Temporary Staffing
Silver Value Club
• Aagaard-Juergensen, LLC • B&B Interior Systems • BE&K Building Group
• Carter Electric Co., Inc. • Comprehensive Energy Services • D & A Building Services, Inc.
• D&D Smith Constructors, LLC • Energy Air, Inc. • S.I. Goldman Company, Inc.
• Heintzelman's Truck Center • International Flooring, Inc. • Mobile Modular
• Modern Plumbing Industries, Inc. • Normax Mechanical, Inc. • TLC Concrete Construction, Inc.
.
Bronze Value Club
• Brown & Brown of Florida, Inc. • The Cat Rental Store/A Division of Ring Power
• East Coast Fire Protection • Ellis Mechanical Corporation • JCB Construction, Inc.
• John N. Puder, Inc. • Lake Glass & Mirror, Inc. • New Traditions National Bank
• Osburn, Henning & Co., CPA • Pyramid Masonry Contractors, Inc. • RSC Equipment Rental
• Southern Fire Protection of Orlando • Tharp Plumbing Systems • Walt Disney Imagineering Florida
with Value Club
For more information, please contact Becki Lewis at 407.628.2070 or email [email protected]
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
President & CEO
Mark P. Wylie
[email protected]
407.398.1272
Vice President & COO
Nancy Wray
[email protected]
407.398.1276
Director of Communications
BCF Editor & Designer
Pamela Hughes
[email protected]
407.398.1268
Features
10
Meet Your New Board Members
12
Legislative Update: Follow These Eight Issues
14
Components of a Health & Safety Plan
17
Welbro Building Corporation Celebrates
30 Year Anniversary
18
Top 10 Benefits of Leasing Company Vehicles
20
Insurance: COBRA Provisions
21
President Obama Remarks to AFL-CIO
22
How To Target Your Best Prospects
24
Surviving In An Economic Downturn
26
Job Survival During an Economic Downturn
27
Departments
3
2009 Value Club Members
6
President’s Perspective
8
Calendar of Events
9
Education Calendar
30
People
34
44
Member Mailbox
New Members
Photo Gallery
39
Night Golf
McGraw Hill Construction Outlook
40
Texas Hold'em Tournament
28
Education & Safety Committee Update
46
32
Job Costing
42
ABC Membership Anniversaries
Lunchtime BBQ
Building Central Florida (BCF) is published monthly by the Central Florida Chapter of Associated Builders
and Contractors. All material becomes the property of ABC unless prior arrangements are made. We welcome
submissions of articles and press releases from our members; however, we reserve the right to publish based on
relevance, and space availability. Please direct all inquiries to [email protected]
4
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
Director of Education
Lori Blake
[email protected]
407.398.1264
Director of Finance & Administration
Denise Charlesworth
[email protected]
407.398.1270
Marketing Director
Becki Lewis
[email protected]
407.398.1266
Membership Director
Cheryl Bovio
[email protected]
407.398.1278
Membership & Events Assistant
Brandy Whitmire
[email protected]
407.398.1282
Accounting Assistant
Debbie Crosby
[email protected]
407.398.1280
Executive Assistant
Charlotte Moegel
[email protected]
407.398.1274
Administrative Assistant
Tina Razzano
[email protected]
407.398.1262
ABC Central Florida Chapter
651 Danville Drive, Suite 200
Orlando, FL 32825-6393
Tel: 407.628.2070 | Fax: 407.629.0144
www.abccentralflorida.com
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www.abccentralflorida.com APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
5
PRESIDENT'S PERSPECTIVE
It's time to understand the proposed law and to prepare your employee policies
It was good to read the Orlando Sentinel
editorial on February 21 which had the
headline “We think: Union elections without secret ballots are bad for workers and
management.” A similar editorial was
published in the Sun-Sentinel on March 1.
This was not the first editorial comment
the Sentinel has published opposing the
so-called Employee Free Choice Act – aka
“Employee Free Choice Act” or “Card
Check” – and it likely will not be the last.
To hear the reasons to oppose Card Check, the editorial board met with
representatives of the Chamber of Commerce, the Florida Restaurant and
Lodging Association and ABC earlier in February. Central Florida board
chairman John Martin and I spoke for this association, and we had a wide
ranging discussion about the implications of Card Check for employees
and for employers.
These editorial opinions are welcomed additions to the voices of
concern about EFCA. They join the Tampa Tribune in opposing
this drastic re-write of the National Labor Relations Act. It is only
by hearing an outcry from all directions in Florida – hospitality,
healthcare, agriculture, manufacturing and construction and our
community voices like the Sentinel and Tribune – will Senator Bill
Nelson consider doing anything but cheering the labor unions
on.
As this issue percolates in Congress, conservative Democrats in the House do not want to get out in front again
and have it stalled in the Senate. So the rumor has it
that the Senate will have to pass Card Check first, and
then send it to the House. Many southern Democrats are
under intense pressure from businesses in their states to
oppose it this time, when it is clear that President Obama
will sign it.
If you are on www.linkedin.com and want to keep up with the
latest news on EFCA from around the country and across all business lines, please join our “Employee NO Choice Act” group.
Over 40 people from every kind of business are linked to this
site and more are coming every day. There are a number of
resources available through the chapter website, as well.
There are two elements of ABC’s Card Check program if you have not
participated.
The first is to understand the elements of the proposal and to encourage
you to contact your congressman or congress woman to help educate
them about why one of their constituents and (an employer of their constituents) may be very much opposed to the EFCA. The National ABC
website www.abc.org has a link to send a message via email or fax to
Congress, of which you are encouraged to take advantage.
The second is to understand the elements of the proposed law and to
prepare your employee policies so that you will be able to continue to
operate as a merit shop employer should it pass.
Message Sent. Message Received.
The best and most fundamental policy is to make sure you communicate
with your employees, from the interview process and through their first day
on the job and throughout their work experience with your firm.
Let them know from the beginning that while you comply with all federal
and state laws as they govern employers, your business operates as a
merit employer, and its success and ability to employ, train and promote
its workforce is dependent on continued merit workforce.
ABC has recently updated and published its popular Pocket Guide to
Dealing with Union Organizing, something you can use to talk about
unions with your managers and human relations staff. It is free to members and you may order any quantity you need.
The Guide gives responses to commonly asked questions about union
card signing. It also answers questions like What Should Employers Do in
the face of EFCA or to a direct union organizing campaign.
It addresses union salts (union organizers who may apply for
work or actually be in your workforce).
The Guide also discusses your rights and responsibilities on a
construction site and on your own business property. There
is no time like the present to make sure every jobsite is properly posted with approved Florida “No Trespassing” signs,
which elevate trespassing and theft on those sites to third degree felonies. (Visit the http://www.abccentralflorida.com/
jobsite_signs.shtm or call the ABC office for details.)
If you are a sub and your general contractor will not
post the site, consider placing a no trespassing sign
on your jobsite trailer if you have one.
Make sure that during your project’s progress meetings, jobsite security is one of the regular discussion
points. If strangers are approaching your workers,
the superintendent needs to know it and all subs need
to be aware. This is not only for union organizing, as unwelcomed visitors might be stealing equipment, selling drugs or
looking for an opportunity to fall and sue.
Another tool available to ABC members is to proudly display
the ABC logo, which sends a clear message to union organizers and salts that you didn’t just fall off the turnip truck. ABC logo stickers
are available in a variety of sizes, from hardhat to vehicles, and there is
no cost to Central Florida members if you order them through the chapter
office. Displaying the ABC logo also gives you and your managers an
opportunity to continue to remind your employees that your business is a
merit shop employer.
As an ABC member, you also can take advantage of a free initial consultation with a chapter labor attorney.
Mark P. Wylie
President
6
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
www.abccentralflorida.com APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
7
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Events
AT T E N D O U R E V E N TS A N D
M A XI M I Z E YO U R M E M B E RS H I P
April
8
Meet the Generals Luncheon (specialty contractors only)
11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. at ABC’s office
Sponsored by: McGraw Hill Construction - Dodge
10
Excellence in Construction Awards Workshop
8:30 - 10:00 a.m. at ABC’s office
13
Chapter Board of Directors Mtg.
3:00 p.m. at ABC’s office
15 - 17 National Education Conference
Flamingo Las Vegas
3555 Las Vegas Blvd South, Las Vegas, NV
16
Membership Reception, 5:30 - 7:00 p.m.
Slingapour’s, 25 Wall Street Plaza, Orlando, FL 32801
Sponsors: Hensel Phelps Construction Co. & Bergelectric Corporation
18
Poker Run, 8:00 a.m.
Begins at Notice to Owner
401 Center Pointe Circle, Suite 1521, Altamonte Springs, FL
22
Business Breakfast - OIA
7:30 -9:00 a.m. at ABC’s office
Sponsored by the Bronze Value Club
29
Lunchtime Barbecue, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Bahia Shrine, 2300 Pembrook Drive, Orlando, FL
Sponsors: Alliance Solutions Group, LLC & Williams Company
May
1
Excellence in Construction Awards Workshop
9:30 - 11:00 a.m. at ABC’s office
6
TEAM (Education) Awards Luncheon
11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m at Maison & Jardin, Altamonte Springs
11
For Reservations, please email
[email protected] or call 407-628-2070.
13
8
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 www.abccentralflorida.com
Chapter Board of Directors Mtg.
3:00 p.m. at ABC’s office
Meet the Generals Luncheon (specialty contractors only)
11:30 - 1:00 p.m. at ABC’s office
Sponsors: Miller Plastering & Stucco, Inc. & ModSpace
14
CEO Reception (by invitation only), 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by Silver Value Club
19
Business Breakfast - Lake County Update
7:30 - 9:00 a.m. at ABC’s office
Sponsored by Bronze Value Club
21
Membership Reception, 5:30 - 7:00 p.m.
Slingapour’s, 25 Wall Street Plaza, Orlando, FL 32801
Sponsors: PCL Construction Services, Inc. & Kelly Electric, LLC
20
ABC of Florida Board of Directors Meeting
11:00 a.m. - 3 p.m. at ABC’s office
27
Lunchtime Barbecue, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Bahia Shrine, 2300 Pembrook Drive, Orlando, FL
Sponsors Labor Ready Southeast & Baker Concrete Construction, Inc.
EDUCATION CALENDAR
Education
T H E F O L LO W I N G C L A S S E S A R E AVA I L A B L E
I N A P R I L & M AY
4/1
Planning and Decision Making
8:00 a.m.
4/1
Be a Better Manager
1:00 p.m.
4/3
Avoid Construction Disputes and Claims
8:00 a.m.
4/9
LEED v2.2 versus v3.0
8:00 a.m.
4/9
LEED v3.0 NC Test Prep and Technical Review (4/9 and 4/10)
1:00 p.m.
4/13
LEED v3.0 Study Groups begin
8:00 a.m.
4/14
MS Office 2007 - Excel Intermediate
8:30 a.m.
4/14
Estimating Site Construction (3 Tuesdays thru 4/28)
5:30 p.m.
4/15
CPR
8:00 a.m.
4/15
First Aid
1:00 p.m.
4/16
Basic Surveying/Field Engineering (Tues. & Thurs. thru 5/7)
4:30 p.m.
4/17
Business Management - Winning Edge
8:00 a.m.
4/23
MS Office 2007 - PowerPoint Intermediate
8:00 a.m.
4/24
Lien Law
9:00 a.m.
4/27
OSHA 10-hour (Tuesday and Thursday)
8:00 a.m.
4/27
LEED Field Documentation
8:00 a.m.
4/28
OSHA 7105, Evacuation and Emergency Planning
8:00 a.m.
4/29
OSHA 7600, Disaster Site Worker (today and tomorrow)
8:00 a.m.
5/5
MS Office 2007 - New Features
8:30 a.m.
5/5
CPR
5:00 p.m.
5/5
Estimating Concrete (3 Tuesdays thru 5/19)
5:30 p.m.
5/6
Basic Blueprint Reading (6 Wednesdays thru 6/10)
5:30 p.m.
5/7
First Aid
5:00 p.m.
5/8
Six-Required Hours Part 1 - Workplace Safety, Work Comp, Bus
Prac, & Adv. Bldg Code
8:00 a.m.
5/8
Six-Required Hours Part 2 - Laws & Rules and Wind Mitigation
1:00 p.m.
5/12
OSHA 10-hour (today and Thursday)
4:00 p.m.
5/13
MS Office 2007 - Word Basic
8:30 a.m.
5/14
Excavation and Trenching
4:30 p.m.
5/15
Daily Management of a Construction Project
8:00 a.m.
5/19
Rough Terrain Forklift Training (today and Wednesday)
5:00 p.m.
5/21
MS Office 2007 - Excel Basic
8:30 a.m.
5/26
Estimating Masonry (2 Tuesdays thru 6/2)
5:30 p.m.
We can also teach classes at
your site! Please call Lori Blake
at 407-398-1264 or email
[email protected]
Education Sponsor:
Education Committee: 4/14 & 5/12
Safety Committee: 4/24 & 5/22
VISIT OUR WEBSITE
TO VIEW CLASSES
AND EVENTS
W W W. A B C C E N T R A L F LO R I DA . C O M
www.abccentralflorida.com APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
9
MEET YOUR NEW BOARD MEMBERS
David Reaves
Turner Construction Company
Mimi Scanlon
R.L. Haines Construction, LLC
Cary Shippert
Skanska USA Building, Inc.
Vice President / Operations Manager
Director of Marketing
Project Executive
& Business Development
How long have you been working in
the construction industry? 29 Years
How long have you been working in
How long have you been working in
the construction industry? I have been in
the construction industry? Three years
the industry over 20 years.
construction industry? Working as an in-
How did you get started working in
How did you get started working in
tern for Turner on a hospital project for Duke
the construction industry? After graduat-
the construction industry? My family
University while finishing my Civil Engineering
ing from UF with a degree in Public Relations, I
owned a construction business where I grew up
Degree.
started working at a PR firm in Winter Park. A lo-
in Missouri. I began working at the business
cal GC was one of my clients and I loved work-
part-time after school.
How did you get started working in the
What is your proudest accomplish-
ing with the company. Shortly after, I landed at
ment?
R.L. Haines Construction and have been here
What is your proudest accomplish-
ever since.
ment? I am fortunate that I have a number of
My family. A loving wife of 26 years
and 3 bright & beautiful children (fortunately
professional accomplishments, but am proudest
they took after their mother…)
Why did you join ABC? Or become ac-
of the successes that the teams on my projects
Why did you join ABC? Or become active?
tive? I really wanted to learn more about the
have had in their professional growth, develop-
For the networking and industry leadership, as
construction industry and there's no better place
ment of strong client relationships and delivery
well as to stay on top of the issues currently im-
to do so than through ABC. From the wide-range
of successful projects.
pacting the construction industry.
of events and education classes to business de-
What would surprise people about
velopment opportunities, ABC truly offers some-
Why did you join ABC? Or become
thing for everyone in the construction industry.
active? I believe ABC is a great organization
you? Although I am a native born Floridian, I
for our community and industry. It provides a
What would surprise people about
great mechanism to promote the ideas that are
you? I am a die-hard Gator fan. While I was
important to our business and meet others in
What would you like to say about your
at UF, I was a proud member of the "Pride of
our industry.
company? In both good times and bad, Turn-
the Sunshine Marching Band" which only inten-
er is a great place to be in our industry. It is all
sified my love for the Gators.
grew up overseas (Hong Kong).
What would you like to say about your
company? R.L. Haines is a great company
- there's not a day that I don't look forward to
coming to work and learning something new.
10
What would surprise people about
you? I am training for a marathon that my
about the opportunities….
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
daughter and I plan to run in this coming fall.
www.abccentralflorida.com APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
11
Eight Legislative Issues Have Been Identified As Priorities
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
The 60-day Regular Session began on
Tuesday, March 3, 2009 with its usual
ceremonial flourishes. Opening Day
festivities were somewhat subdued given
the economic situation. The Legislature
got right to business with a full schedule of
committee hearings and workshops. The
concentration for the next four weeks will
be committee work. Each bill that is filed
is referred to two or more committees. The
bills must be heard in committee and pass
all committees of reference prior to going
to the floor for a final vote. The exact
same bill must pass both chambers before
being sent to the Governor for action.
At this point, ABC has tagged 85 bills
that impact construction. All tagged bills
are not reported upon each week. Eight
issues have been identified by the ABC
Board as priorities. Another twelve issues
are being closely monitored. Each issue
has two or more bills attached to it. The
bills in this report are hyper-linked so you
can go directly to the bill language. If you
hear about a particular bill or issue not
mentioned Legislative Updates, feel free
to contact Rick Watson or Peter Dyga for
information.
The ABC Lobbying Team is pleased to
welcome Stephen Lewis, lobbyist for the
ABC North Florida Chapter. Stephen is
a graduate of FSU where he is pursuing
a Master’s in Political Science. His
connection to ABC runs deep. His mother,
Becki Lewis, has worked for ABC Central
Florida for many years. Stephen will
be concentrating on the North Florida
legislators, in particular.
The first bill passed this session, SB
1112, was a Glitch bill to correct bonus
depreciation problems created by last
year’s corporate income tax piggyback
bill. ABC was part of a Coalition to
promote its passage. The Governor is
expected to sign it.
Growth management bills (SB 360/HB
1019) and impact fee bills (HB 227/
SB 580) passed their first committees of
reference. A House workshop began a
review of 51 sales tax exemptions. Three
exemptions on fill dirt used by owners and
the sales tax exemption for asphalt used
in public construction were discussed. See
the bills below for more details.
ABC Priority Bills and Issues
Thursday, March 12, 2009 is Apprenticeship Day. Governor Crist is expected to
12
issue a Proclamation and the House and
Senate have Resolutions recognizing the
apprenticeship community (HB 9011 and
SB 2106). ABC is the largest provider of
apprenticeship training in the state. Many
sponsors of apprenticeship programs will
be in Tallahassee to raise visibility of the
importance of skilled craft training.
The ABC Board of Directors
has identified eight major
issues to promote:
;
Building Crane Safety Bill
(HB 923/SB 1654):
These bills adopt statewide crane safety
regulations of OSHA and pre-empts local
ordinances. The bills have received their
committee references and are expected to
be heard soon. Rick Watson met with the
Senate Chair of the Regulated Industries
Committee, Senator Dennis Jones
(R-Seminole) with other supporters of the
bill to request the bill be agendaed.
;
Prohibit Anti-Geographic
Price Preferences
(HB 611/SB 616):
In every economic downturn, local
governments pass ordinances which give
a price preference to “local” contractors.
These ordinances decrease the bidders’
pool and increase prices. The prohibition
on such ordinances appears in these local
procurement bills. HB 611 is expected to
be heard next week. Peter Dyga met with
representatives of local government to
discuss their concerns with the legislation.
As expected, local government is
opposed to the bills.
;
Workers Compensation:
(HB 903/SB 2072):
The Florida Supreme Court ruled
that the attorneys fee provision of the
2003 Workers Compensation bill
unconstitutional. The bills address the
issues raised by the opinion and restore
the fee schedule. Two other workers
compensation bills were filed this week.
) ABC is opposed to HB 1489 and SB
2280 because of increased attorney
involvement promoted in the bills.
;Support Binding and Non
Binding Opinions for Fire Code
Disputes
(HB 693/SB 1606):
The Building Code has binding and non
binding opinions which have decreased
the time to resolve code interpretations.
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
These procedures will be extended to the
fire code. No action this week.
;Support Transparency in
Government Expenditures
(HB 971/SB 1972):
These bills require state and local
government to post their expenditures
in a check register format so the public
has a clearer idea how tax revenues are
spent. SB 594 was workshopped this
week and was well received. The bill
requires a searchable online data base
for the state budget.
;
Protect Apprenticeship
Funding:
Cuts to the education budget are
expected. Since apprenticeship is a
proven and successful partnership
between schools and the construction
industry, ABC will do everything it can
to protect that funding. Rick Watson met
with Lucy Hadi, Assistant Chancellor
for Workforce at the Department of
Education and her staff on Thursday with
a representative of organized labor to
coordinate our efforts to resist cuts to
apprenticeship funding.
;Support Secret Ballot
Constitutional Amendment
(HJR 1013/SJR 1908):
Card Check is a federal issue which
ABC opposes. These bills protect the
right of the secret ballot in elections to
unionize. ABC and the FL Chamber will
meet with the sponsors next week to
coordinate efforts on the bills.
;Support Changes in DMS
Continuing Construction Contracts
(HB 1459/SB 2666):
An audit at the Department of
Management Services revealed that the
department did not have the statutory
authority to enter into continuing contracts
for public construction for repair,
maintenance and small projects. The
bills clarify that continuing contracts are
allowed and the smaller jobs do not have
to be bid on an individual basis.
Other Construction Related
Bills of Interest
:
Immigration (HB 915):
Immigration as a hot-button state issue
has faded. This bill requires contractors
on public work to use the E-Verify system.
At this time, the bill has no senate
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
companion. The sponsor is not expected to
push it. Several other immigration bills (HB
163/SB 352, HB 567/SB 1532, HB 915/SB
1848, SB 1890) have been filed. None of
these bills have the E-Verify language and they
will be monitored.
:Electrical Journeymen on
Commercial Work (HB 519/SB 256):
These bills eliminate the square footage
requirement for journeyman electricians. ABC
opposes the measure because it will lead
to quotas on the jobsite. Rick Watson met
with Lucy Hadi, Assistance Chancellor for
Workforce Development at the Department of
Education to discuss alternatives to encourage
expansion of apprenticeship training. The
Department is expected to oppose the bills.
;Streamlining Growth Management
Laws (HB 1019/SB 360, SB 1306, SB
1252, SB 2026):
A number of bills have been filed dealing with
modifications to growth management laws.
The thrust of the bills is to streamline local
ordinances and permitting. Both HB 1019
and SB 360 passed their first committees of
reference.
;Modification to Impact Fees
low and register (you may also updated your
;Sun Rail (HB 7009/SB 1212):
466, SB 696): MONITOR
Every year bills dealing with construction lien
and surety bond issues are filed. These bills
will be monitored. HB 299 may be heard next
week. Rick Watson met with proponents of
the bills and other groups who have problems
with different aspects of the bills. A new draft
will be reviewed next week. ABC‘s concerns
are expected to be addressed.
;:Construction Licensure Issues
(HB 425/SB 2598, SB 674, SB 686, SB
1413, and SB 1422): MONITOR
Every year, bills dealing with construction
licensure issues are filed. These bills will be
monitored. Rick Watson met with the senate
staff on SB 2598 with other members of the
Construction Coalition to address changes
to the bill. A meeting will be scheduled on
March 13th with the Department of Business
& Professional Regulation to continue the
dialogue.
;Secondary Metal Recyclers (HB
339/SB 478):
These bills pre-empt local regulations on
secondary metal recyclers and make the state
law a uniform application. The house bill
passed its first committee of reference and the
senate bill is scheduled for hearing in its first
committee of reference.
them. This is ABC’s grassroots web-based
;Economic Stimulus Package 2.0
:Arbitration Bills
;:Lien & Bond Bills (HB 299/SB
VOICE” alerts when you receive
sytem which enables you and the industry to
(HB 709/SB 2064):
These bills change the “opt-in” provision to an
“opt-out” provision.
(HB 1135 and SB 2192):
These bills impose arbitration in construction
disputes. ABC will work to have construction
exempted from the bills.
Please respond to ABC’s “Voter-
(HB 227/SB 580):
The bills increase the burden of proof on local
government in establishing impact fees. Both
bills passed their first committees of reference
this week.
(ESP 2.0):
Bills have not been filed yet, but ABC is a
member of a business coalition supporting
additional funds for public construction to
stimulate the Florida Economy.
;Notice of Defect & Right to Cure
GRASSROOTS
ACTION CENTER
These bills provide for the light rail system in
the Orlando area. The senate bill passed
its first committee of reference. Mark Wylie
came up to Tallahassee for the hearing. ABC
and the business community in Orlando is
supporting the measure.
:A Sales Tax on Construction
Services (HB 1163/SB 2576):
This bill establishes a review process for
all sales tax exemptions. ABC is a member
of a coalition of business groups opposing
sales taxes on services. In 1987, construction
services were briefly taxed and then the
bill was repealed because of widespread
opposition. A workshop was held in the
House Finance & Tax Council this week to
review 51 sales tax exemptions. Three dealt
with construction (the sales tax exemption on
fill dirt and rock used by an owner and the
sales tax exemption on asphalt used in public
construction.) The Legislature is scrambling
to identify additional sources of revenue
because of declining tax revenues. These
construction-related sales tax exemptions have
minimal impact and are not expected to be
eliminated. The thrust of ABC’s efforts on this
issue is to prevent passage of any sales tax
on construction services. Materials used in
construction are already taxed. Labor and
other construction services are not taxed.
contact your elected officials with just a few
clicks of your mouse. If you are not receiving these alerts please click on the link becontact information with this link).
To register to Receive ABC/Construction
Related Legislative Action Alerts go to http://
www.votervoice.net/groups/abcfl/register
Another way you can help the industry is
by sharing alerts when you get them. Send
them to family, friends and co-workers who
can help generate grassroots e-mail to their
elected officials.
E-mail
Your
Elected
Officials:
Active ABC VoterVOICE alerts. If you have not
already responded to these urgent calls to contact your elected officials, please do so now.
Meet With Your Elected Officials
Become a citizen lobbyist for a day and join
the industry’s largest Washington “fly-in”.
Washington Legislative Conference
June 23 - 25, 2009
http://www.abc.org/Hot_Links/Meetings_
and_Events/Legislative_Conference.aspx
WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
13
SAFETY
COMPONENTS OF A
HEALTH & SAFETY PLAN
By Dr. Isabel Perry, “The Safety Doctor”
Management wants a health and safety plan
that will work for the benefit of all. Employees
want to work in a safe environment and know
that their employer cares about their health and
safety. This must be accomplished in several ongoing steps. To make any health and safety plan
work, everyone must contribute to it and take it
seriously. So let’s get started. If you already have
a safety plan in place, these steps will be a good
benchmark to use in evaluating the effectiveness
of that plan.
STEP 2: ANALYSIS The “team” should look
at the company’s track record, assess every area
of the business and come back with recommendations. A review of past injuries, illnesses and
accidents will provide a starting point for the
analysis. If each department is represented, the
individual team members can enlist their co-workers to identify potential or established problems.
This expands the sphere of influence. It may be
helpful to call in a safety professional to identify
hazards that may not be immediately obvious to
employees.
STEP 3: EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT
•
Develop a plan for correcting problems so
that accidents will not happen in the future.
•
If appropriate, conduct education and training programs for employees.
•
Hold periodic meetings with employees to
review and reiterate the need for safety.
•
Keep accurate records of what has occurred
and what has been done to correct problems.
•
Let the employees know on a routine basis
how successful the program has been in promoting a safe environment.
14
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009
INTEGRITY INNOVATION OPPORTUNITY
STEP 1: LEADERSHIP COMMITMENT Management must commit to the concept of a safety
plan. This can be done by signing a written statement of commitment to a safe and healthy work
environment for all. The responsibility for developing a plan, implementing it, and monitoring its
progress should be assigned to one individual.
This individual should have the ability to bring
together a taskforce committee or team to help
develop the plan. If the “team” is made up of a
cross-section of people from various departments,
the rest of the employees will more readily accept
whatever decisions are made.
Engage a partner
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Start Building Your Future
Earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Construction Management
Courses include:
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Construction Law
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Small classes with
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Built to Last.
SAFETY
•
Look for opportunities to promote competition among departments for the best safety
record, or give awards and recognition for
innovative ideas that help create a healthier
or safer environment.
STEP 4: RECORD KEEPING Record keeping
is a critical component of every health and safety
program. The injury and illness records must be
updated regularly, using the OSHA 300 form. In
addition, the organization must keep records on
training, self-inspections, safety meetings and status reports on corrective actions. A “responsible
person” should be identified to keep each type
of record.
STEP 5: INSPECTIONS AND AUDITS An ongoing audit and inspection program is necessary
to remove hazards before they cause accidents.
This segment of the health and safety program
should include a focus person to ensure the audits
are being conducted, provide audit tools to employees and determine how corrective action will
be completed and documented.
STEP 6: ACCIDENT REPORTS Any time there
is an accident, even a minor one, an investigation
should occur immediately to find out what happened and why. Determining the “root cause”
may be useful in correcting similar situations in
the workplace and should be factored into future
safety programs and education. The organization
needs to identify what types of accidents will be
investigated, by whom, and the process for corrective actions. This should be available in written
format.
STEP 7: PROGRAM REVIEW Regular inspections and reviews are needed to make certain
that the company is on track with its health and
safety program. Revise the program as necessary. Keeping everyone involved in promoting a
safe and healthy work environment will promote
a better working environment in other ways, including higher employee morale, increased productivity, and improved communication between
management and employees.
Since 1984, KHS&S has built our business by
achieving excellence in everything we do – from
traditional wall and ceiling construction to themed
construction, to healthcare construction. Financial
stability and an unparalleled responsiveness to
customer needs have made KHS&S a solid favorite
for large-scale private and public construction
projects. For a complete overview of services,
visit our Web site at www.khss.com.
Dr. Isabel Perry is an internationally-known safety expert,
motivational speaker, author, and safety educator. Based in
Orlando, Florida, she can be reached at 407-291-1209 or
via e-mail at [email protected]
407.425.5550 | www.khss.com
Interiors | Exteriors | Themed Construction | Water Feature & Rockwork Construction | Healthcare Construction
Anaheim | Atlantic City | Dallas | Las Vegas | Orlando | Reno | San Diego | San Francisco Bay | Seattle | Tampa
APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
15
If Your Business Has Just 15 Vehicles, That’s Still A Fleet.
And managing that fleet is taking time away from your business. At Enterprise Fleet Management, we specialize in
fleets like yours so you can spend your time doing what you do best. We’ll assign a dedicated account team that will
design a program that’s right for you. A program that takes advantage of services like vehicle disposal, loss control
coordination and maintenance plans. Put your work week back to work.
David Withee
EXJUIFF!FSBDDPNt
Enterprise and the ‘e’ logo are registered trademarks of Enterprise Rent-A-Car Company. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. ©2009 Enterprise Rent-A-Car Company. 907911 01/09 MJ
www.dosterconstruction.com
Specializing in the construction of Education, Healthcare, Industrial and Multi-family facilities throughout the Southeast
Building Lasting Relationships
ATL ANTA | B IR M INGHA M | NA SHV ILLE | ORL A NDO
16
Doster Construction Company - 8529 South Park Circle, Ste. 130 - Orlando, Florida 32819 - P: 407.248.9961 - F: 407.248.9971
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 www.abccentralflorida.com
WELBRO BUILDING CORPORATION
2009: Hilton Orlando Convention Center Hotel
RECENT ABC AWARDS
2007 ABC Excellence in Construction Award:
Recipient of an EAGLE Award and Project of the Year
for the construction of Rosen Shingle Creek Resort
and Convention Center and an Eagle for the historical renovation of the Marriott Courtyard Pennsylvania
Hotel, located in St. Petersburg, FL
2005 ABC Excellence in Construction Award:
Recipient of an EAGLE Award and “Project of the
Year” for the construction of Omni Orlando Resort
ChampionsGate and two MERIT Awards for Valencia
Community College Informational Technology School
and Marriot World Center Crystal Ballroom
2004 ABC Excellence in Construction Award:
Recipient of two EAGLE Awards for the construction
of Caribe Royale Convention Center Expansion and
UCF Rosen College of Hospitality Management
2003 ABC Excellence in Construction Award:
Recipient of three EAGLE Awards for the construction
of Caribe Royale Reception Building Renovation,
Crowne Plaza Orlando at Universal, and Orlando
Marriott – Lake Mary Hotel
2006: Rosen Shingle Creek Resort
1998: RDV Sportsplex
WELBRO Building Corporation
Celebrating 30 Years of “Service Excellence”
What started back in 1979 as a small construction company, is today one of the largest privatelyheld commercial general contractors in Central Florida. WELBRO takes pride in the fact that in those
earlier years it brought a new philosophy to the construction industry -- one of partnership and doing
away with adversarial relationships. Theirs is a proud history, with a firm foundation based on the
values established by WELBRO founders Gary Brown and Butch VonWeller. WELBRO has realized
the vision of Gary and Butch, receiving many accolades for the company’s performance in the commercial construction industry.
Thirty years later, now under the leadership of Steve Davis, CEO; Bruce Holmes, President/COO;
and a team of company executives WELBRO is committed to carrying its proud tradition into the
future with a continuing emphasis on the WELBRO values and with utmost care and concern for its
clients and associates.
According to Steve Davis, CEO, “…throughout 2009 WELBRO Building Corporation will celebrate
its accomplishments and continue its quality service based on the core values that have made the
company successful.” Says Davis, “…these values have played an important role in the history of
the company, with tangible proof of superior client service, that in an industry plagued with litigation, and with over one billion dollars of construction in place, WELBRO has never litigated with a
client.”
Another testament to WELBRO’s success is management’s commitment to its workforce. A company
based on family values WELBRO attributes its success to the dedication and hard work of its 300
associates. WELBRO will thank their workforce and clients in 2009 and look forward to another 30
years of success in the community.
A company founded on the principles of community involvement and family traditions, WELBRO will
also continue its support of local community events in 2009 focused on children and family issues,
education and responsible growth of Central Florida.
WELBRO Building Corporation has been building continuously in the Florida commercial construction market for over
29 years and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top contractors by Engineering News Record (ENR). WELBRO
is a dominant force in the hotel/hospitality and education markets. Other major project types include office buildings,
retail/commercial and special use facilities.
2003: University of Central Florida
Rosen College of Hospitality Management
2004: Omni Orlando Resort
At Championsgate
Steve Davis
CEO
WELBRO Building Corporation
T: 407/475-0800
2301 Maitland Center Parkway, Suite 250
Maitland, Florida 32751
www.welbro.com
WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
APRIL 2009
Bruce Holmes
President/COO
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
17
REASONS TO LEASE
The Top 10 Benefits
of Leasing Company Vehicles
A question we hear a lot in our industry is
“what are the benefits of leasing my vehicles
through a fleet leasing company like Sutton
Leasing?”
Following are the Top 10 Benefits of Leasing
Company Vehicles:
1.
Improve cash flow
Leasing requires less money up-front and
offers lower monthly payments through use
of residual values.
2.
Lower total cost
When you consider the Time Value
of Money benefit from lower monthly
payments, leasing generally saves money
overall.
3.
Off balance sheet accounting
You can reduce the amount of debt on
your balance sheet and improve your
company’s financial picture by leasing,
thus increasing the value of your business
4.
Reduce tax liability
Both income tax and sales tax liability
can be minimized by leasing vehicles.
Many leased vehicles are exempt from IRS
depreciation limitations. Also, most states
allow use-tax to be paid over time on
monthly payments versus paying sales tax
on the entire sale price at time of purchase
5.
Increase bonding capacity
Leasing can strengthen financial ratios and
increase bonding capacity allowing you to
compete for more and larger jobs.
6.
Separate line of credit at
competitive rates
Leasing companies offer a separate line
18
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009
REASONS TO LEASE
Building Florida’s Future
of credit for you to fund fleet vehicles,
from every angle:uniquely qualified
eliminating the need to take money out of
retained earnings or draw from existing
East Ridge Middle School, Lake County
credit lines.
7.
Access to any make/
model at lowest prices
Proactive acquisition strategies
to encourage factory ordering,
and unbiased vehicle select or
recommendations geared toward lowest
cost of ownership, set some leasing
companies apart as true consultants in an
overly-aggressive sales-driven automotive
industry.
8.
Consolidated monthly billing
All vehicle payments are itemized on a
single consolidated monthly statement
www.ppicm.com
for convenience and ease of processing
Orlando • Gainesville • Palm Coast
payment.
9.
Avoid unnecessary debt on
personal credit reports
Company vehicle loans through most
leasing companies are not reported to the
credit bureaus for guarantying officers
10. Fleet management programs
available to reduce operating
expenses
Fuel, maintenance, and disposal
programs are available to control and
reduce fleet expenses.
If you’re not leasing your vehicles through a
fleet leasing company, you should consider
doing so today!
Submitted by:
Mark Francis, Sutton Leasing, Inc.
T: 239-292-7584
[email protected]
www.suttonleasing.com
WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
19
INSURANCE
COBRA Provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
Congress has passed the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act (“the Act”), and the Act
has been signed by President Obama. This
communication describes the provisions in the
Act that affect COBRA continuation coverage
and similar state continuation coverage.
Applicability
and
Effective
Date
The COBRA changes affect both the federal
COBRA provisions and the Public Health Service Act program that provides similar extension benefits for public programs. In addition,
however, the subsidy provisions apply to state
continuation coverage that is comparable to
federal COBRA. That would include so-called
“mini-COBRA” state laws that cover groups
below the 20 employee threshold for COBRA.
To be comparable, the state continuation law
must allow the individual to continue substantially similar coverage as was provided under
the group health plan at a monthly cost that is
based on a specified percentage of the group
health plan’s cost of providing such coverage.
Reference to “COBRA” throughout this memo
will also refer to the state programs that meet
those requirements.
The Act is effective February 17, 2009, the day
that President Obama signed the bill. All of the
COBRA provisions that have a time frame will
date from that day. As for calendar monthly
billed programs, the effective date is March 1,
2009.
New Subsidy for COBRA Beneficiaries
The Act provides for a new subsidy for certain
COBRA beneficiaries. The subsidy is 65% of
the COBRA continuation coverage premiums
for eligible individuals for up to 9 months. The
COBRA beneficiary will pay only 35% of the
overall COBRA premium for that period. The
period expires on the earlier of (i) nine months,
(ii) the date the individual becomes eligible for
major medical group coverage or Medicare or
(iii) the end of the maximum required period of
continuation under COBRA. Further, the beneficiary must notify the employer in writing if they
become eligible for coverage under a major
medical group health plan or Medicare and is
subject to significant penalties (110% of the subsidy amount) for failing to do so.
An individual who does not receive a subsidy
that he/she believes appropriate may appeal
the plan’s determination to the Department of
Labor for private plans or to the Department
of Health and Human Services for public plans
covered under the Public Health Services Act.
20
The relevant agency must rule on the appeal
within 15 business days. Individuals whose appeal is denied may sue under ERISA.
Eligibility for the Subsidy - Timing
The subsidy is available to individuals (and their
dependents) who were involuntarily terminated
from their employment and became eligible
for COBRA beginning September 1, 2008
through December 31, 2009.
Persons who
elected prior to the enactment of the Act (but
on or after September 1, 2008) will be eligible
to receive the subsidy prospectively from the
date of enactment through the maximum ninemonth period. Otherwise eligible persons who
did not elect COBRA between September 1,
2008 and the date of enactment will have the
opportunity to elect COBRA on a prospective
basis with the maximum duration of the coverage dating from the date that they could have
first elected COBRA. Employers or plans will
have to provide notice to these groups of individuals. In addition, a group health plan or
insurer must refund the individuals any COBRA
premiums that subsidy-eligible persons paid on
or after the date of enactment in excess of 35%
of the premium. This may be in the form of a
reimbursement payment or credit against future
premium payments due.
Eligibility for the Subsidy - Income Test
The subsidy is adjusted based on income.
Joint filers with $250,000 or more of modified adjusted gross income and all other filers
with $125,000 or more of modified adjusted
gross income are not eligible for the full subsidy. The subsidy is phased out completely for
persons with modified adjusted gross incomes
of $290,000 joint or $145,000 for other filers. The subsidy is not considered income as
long as the beneficiary meets the income tests.
Excess amounts of subsidy over the amount the
person is entitled to by income will be added
to the person’s tax on the person’s federal tax
return. The employer will not have to be concerned about the taxable effect on COBRA
beneficiaries although a COBRA beneficiary
may request that the employer not provide any
subsidy.
Mechanics of the Premium Subsidy
The Act requires that the relevant entity that
is collecting the 35% premium simply not collect the remaining 65% and, instead, obtain
reimbursement from the federal government. In
cases of a multiemployer plan, a group health
plan subject to federal COBRA and/or a selffunded employer, the plan or the employer that
is collecting the premium will recoup the subsidy amounts through commensurate reductions
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
in payroll taxes. For insured plans not subject
to federal COBRA, where the insurer is collecting the premium, the insurance company will
be entitled to the reimbursement through a corresponding credit to its own payroll taxes. In
cases where the payroll taxes are not sufficient
to cover the subsidy, the additional amount will
be provided as a credit to the taxpayer as if it
was an overpayment of payroll taxes. There
are filings that payers receiving the subsidy
must make with the Secretary of the Treasury.
Electing a Different COBRA Option
An employer may allow a COBRA-subsidy eligible individual to change his or her health insurance coverage option when making a COBRA
election. The new plan option must be made
within 90 days of receipt of the COBRA election notice, must have the same or lower premiums and must be available to non-COBRA
active employees under the plan.
Notice Requirements and Election Period
Under the Act employers must provide modified
election notices or provide separate supplemental notices to all persons who became entitled
to elect COBRA continuation coverage during
the period beginning on September 1, 2008
and ending on December 31, 2009.
The new forms would notify the individual
about the subsidy and, if applicable, the right
to change to different benefits options. The
Department of Labor, Treasury and Health and
Human Services are supposed to work together
to provide a model notice within 30 days of
enactment.
Notices are required to be sent to subsidy-eligible persons who became qualified beneficiaries
before the date of enactment within 60 days of
enactment. (The Act does not affect the timing of notices sent to individuals who become
qualified beneficiaries on or after the date of
enactment.) The election period for those beneficiaries who became eligible before the date
of enactment will begin on the date of enactment and end 60 days after the date the plan
administrator provides the required notice.
Failure to provide the notices would be a
COBRA violation and subject to the standard
COBRA penalties of up to $110 a day under
ERISA. Additionally, there could be adverse
tax consequences under the Internal Revenue
Code, which can impose excise taxes of $100
per day per notice on the plan administrator.
If you have questions, contact your UnitedHealthcare representative.
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 3, 2009
Remarks of President Barack Obama – As Prepared for Delivery
Video to AFL-CIO Executive Council
Miami, FL
March 3, 2009
I’m sorry that I’m unable to join you this week, but it was a pleasure to see many of you at the White House recently, and I’m looking forward
to having you all back often. I want to start by thanking President Sweeney, Secretary-Treasurer Trumka, and Vice President Holt Baker for
their leadership. And I want to thank the Executive Council and all of you for your efforts as well as your advocacy these last several weeks.
We have already started to change America on behalf of working people.
With your help, we passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan – the most sweeping economic recovery package in our history.
I’ve always said that the gauge of our economic progress is clear: are we creating good jobs? Are we creating the kinds of jobs on which you
can raise a family, own a home, afford college, save for retirement? That’s why this plan is so important. It will create or save three and a half
million jobs over the next two years – and it will do so by putting Americans to work doing the work that America needs done.
We’ll modernize our health care system, rebuild crumbling roads, bridges, levees and transit systems, double our capacity to generate
renewable energy, and build the classrooms that will help our children learn today – and compete tomorrow. And this plan includes the
most progressive middle-class tax cuts in history; provides greater unemployment benefits for millions who have lost jobs; relieves overburdened cities and states struggling with budget shortfalls; and respects the work that Americans do right here at home while honoring our
international obligations.
I’ve signed legislation helping to guarantee equal pay for equal work and expanding the Children’s Health Insurance Program to millions
more children. We’ve reversed the ban on project labor agreements and we’ve overturned the previous administration’s Executive Orders
which were designed not only to undermine critical government work – but to undermine organized labor.
I’m also pleased to have nominated Hilda Solis, a daughter of union members and a lifelong champion for working families, to be my
Secretary of Labor – and that Vice President Joe Biden has agreed to lead my administration’s Task Force on Middle Class Working Families. This Task Force will work hand in hand with my cabinet and White House agencies – as well as with all of you – to focus on growing
and sustaining the middle class.
I want to repeat something that those of you who joined us for the Task Force announcement heard me say: I do not view the labor movement as part of the problem. To me, and to my administration, labor unions are a big part of the solution. We need to level the playing field
for workers and the unions that represent their interests – because we cannot have a strong middle class without a strong labor movement.
The truth is, the road ahead will not be easy. The economic crisis we face is vast and the challenges we confront are many; you know this
because your members have already had to make sacrifices. But I have every confidence that if we are willing to do the difficult work that
must be done, we will emerge from these trials stronger and more prosperous than we were before. And as we confront this crisis and work
to provide health care to every American, rebuild our nation’s infrastructure, move toward a clean energy economy, and pass the Employee
Free Choice Act, I want you to know that you will always have a seat at the table.
Thank you for everything you do.
MARKETING
How to target your best prospects
You can’t stop marketing your business, even
when dollars are tough to come by.
In fact, businesses just starting out or those slowly recovering from the economic downturn must
devote at least some of their precious resources
to prospecting for new customers. Competition
for customers is as keen as it will ever get right
now. And the cost of reaching these prospects
remains relatively low.
“This is not a time to keep a low profile,” says
Alexis Gutzman, author, columnist and managing editor of reports for MarketingSherpa.com,
a resource site for marketers. “Resources are inexpensive right now. This is a time for building
your customer base. This is a time for establishing relationships.”
Direct mail is effective
One of the leading ways larger companies
achieve this is by purchasing mailing lists of
qualified customers from customer data companies. With that in mind, Microsoft Small Business has teamed with infoUSA to provide users with lists of qualified sales leads — both
business-to-business and business-to-consumer
— to small and midsized businesses. InfoUSA,
founded in 1972, is a leading provider of business and consumer data today.
The Internet has helped level the playing field
in this arena, making it possible to affordably
search through databases of 14 million U.S.
businesses and 250 million consumers, such as
those offered by infoUSA. The infoUSA data is
compiled, verified and consistently updated by
a team of about 500 people at Omaha, Neb.based infoUSA’s data center. Because of the
high accuracy rate of the data, you avoid wasting precious marketing dollars on outdated or
incorrect information — or on lists filled with
unqualified leads.
“We’ve grown up serving the small-business
market,” says Monica Messer, infoUSA’s chief
operations officer and the president of the
company’s database and technology group.
“We’ve made it easy for them to do their own
research and to customize their mailing lists at
affordable prices. For a small business, the accuracy of this data is so important.”
Here’s what you get
What kind of information can you get from
these mailing lists?
If you’re looking for other businesses, you can
get a list via a Microsoft Excel file that includes
22
each prospect’s business name, contact name,
line of business and current address, city, state
and ZIP code. This list can be easily downloaded onto mailing labels for direct-mail campaigns.
For an additional cost, you get much more:
phone number, fax number, Web site address,
names of the owner, CEO and top managers,
as well as number of employees, years in business, sales volume and even number of PCs and
square-footage of the company’s building.
Similarly, for consumer leads, for a basic minimum, you get a qualified prospect’s name, address and type of residence. For an additional
cost, you get a phone number plus such information as marital status, age, size of household, household income, homeowner or renter,
average home value, whether the household includes children, whether it includes pets, whether it has Internet users, hobbies and interests (if
available).
All of the data is compiled from publicly available records, and then verified by a telephone
call. The information for business leads comes
from telephone books, business and government
directories, Web sites and public company filings, among other sources, while the consumer
information emanates mostly from phone books
and online and off-line surveys, according to
Rakesh Gupta, president of infoUSA.com, the
company’s Web operations.
Messer says that hundreds of employees in infoUSA’s data center compile the public information and then take the time to verify and update
the data by calling many of people listed. The
enhanced information that is voluntarily provided by the potential business or consumer lead
becomes part of infoUSA’s core database. Businesses and consumers have a right to say no to
providing enhanced information, Messer says,
adding, “We have only a 4% refusal rate.”
Note: E-mail addresses are not provided to users by infoUSA, in an effort to protect against
widespread unsolicited e-mails, Gupta says.
But infoUSA will send out e-mail promotions on
your behalf. More on this below.
An example of the cost
The infoUSA database enables you to target
your business mailing lists by industry, profession, business type, location (state, county,
metro area, ZIP code or area code), credit rating and other factors. Your consumer list can
be devised by location, age, household income
and estimated home value.
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
Costs of the lists you purchase vary generally
by the size of the list, and whether you seek
the basic mailing list or the list plus a complete
database for each lead.
For example, I did a search for all midsized
automotive dealers in Los Angeles County —
those with 20 to 100 employees. The list totaled
616. Cost of purchasing the basic mailing list
for the auto dealers was just over $400, and
the mailing list with a complete database for all
616 leads was slightly more than $500.
In searching consumer leads, I targeted homeowners aged 30-49 in southern Orlando,
Fla. (area code 321), with at least $140,000
in household income and homes valued at
$200,000 and above. I came up with 608
leads. The basic list with printed mailing labels
was less than $100 by regular mail and less
than $130 for electronic delivery. (There are additional options available as well.)
Here’s how to use the leads
So, how should you use this information? Directmail campaigns to a targeted audience work
best when combined with telemarketing efforts,
marketing experts say. “We advocate targeted
direct marketing,” says Messer. “What we love
to see our customers do is a direct mailing, followed up by a telephone call. Once a month,
businesses also should send their customers and
prospects an e-mail promotion.”
This is a formula that has worked well for infoUSA customers for several years now, she says.
InfoUSA has more than 4 million customers
today, of which approximately 80% are small
businesses. (Besides providing sales leads, it
also publishes the Polk City Directories, credit
reports and numerous other directories and
lists.)
But direct mail remains the linchpin of campaigns — most infoUSA customers still utilize
direct mail for more than 50% of marketing,
Messer says. “The industry is still predominantly direct mail. You’ve got to keep doing what
works for you.”
E-mail marketing is growing rapidly, however,
at the expense of direct mail, according to research-firm studies. But e-mail marketing also is
not without its pitfalls, not the least of which is
the harm caused by disreputable marketers (and
the ensuing crackdown on them by the Federal
Trade Commission and state governments).
InfoUSA offers a separate e-mail marketing service, in which it sends out the mailings itself. It
Continued top of next page...
does not provide the e-mail addresses to customers. “It’s been our policy not to release that
data,” Messer says. “We control the usage of
it. We monitor it very closely,” and customers
are limited to a certain number of mailings a
month. “As a traditional, well-regarded and respected company, we don’t want to be known
as a spam provider.”
However, smart use of e-mail marketing can
greatly enhance campaigns, she adds. “It’s a
great tool, for example, to test different prices
or promotions. You can send out a mailing to a
percentage of your customer base and gauge
the feedback.”
Marketing expert Gutzman agrees. She urges
marketers not to buy e-mail marketing lists, because of the high likelihood they contain people who don’t want to be on the list. A better
way to go, she says, is to advertise in the e-mail
newsletters that reach the people you want to
reach.
At any rate, Messer says, “Small businesses
can’t stop marketing. You’ve got to keep finding new customers.” The Web has made sales
leads easier than ever to get, and worth every
penny you spend on them.
Monte Enbysk is a lead editor for the Microsoft.com
network and writes occasionally about technology for
small businesses.
www.henselphelps.com
Seƫng the standard for
construcƟon excellence
in Central Florida and
throughout the Southeast.
Southeast District Office
6557 Hazel ne Na onal Drive
Suite One
Orlando, FL 32822
(407) 856-2400
ye
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Crawler
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ne
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SURVIVING IN THIS ECONOMY
Surviving in an Economic Downturn
The belief that small businesses fare poorly in economic slowdowns is
a common misconception that is not generally true. Solidly run small
businesses actually hold their own during downturns. While we all like
to believe our businesses fit the definition of “solidly run,” let’s take a
look at what are some commonly cited best practices for all businesses
to be following during a time of economic downturn.
Revisit Your Business Plan
The number one recommendation, across the board, is to reexamine
your business plan. Your business plan should be the working base
for your company. Have you strayed from it in any way? Does it need
revision in light of new information? Should you be considering whole
new directions that are not included in it? Sit down and read it from
the perspective of someone about to invest in your business - and make
any revisions that seem appropriate. You may even identify additional
information you need to know in order to make decisions about the
future of the company.
Seek Supporters and Advisors
If ever there is a time to network, this is it. Many companies set up
advisory boards that include a wide spectrum of professional expertise
that they can draw on for advice. Such board members often are
attorneys, certified public accountants, civic club leaders, owners or
managers of businesses similar to yours or whom you do business with,
and retired executives. The latest jargon for these types of boards is
“Power Circles.” An apt name because the members should be power
connections for you - knowledgeable about the environment in which
you do business and able to connect you with the information you
need to make good decisions. The purpose of the board is to offer you
objectivity. They should be people you can be truthful with and who will
keep your disclosures confidential. Most groups like this discuss specific
business problems you have, using the meeting to brainstorm possible
solutions.
If you don’t belong to civic and professional organizations, do it.
Here are groups of people facing similar challenges to you. Their joint
expertise and resources can be a powerful support mechanism when
times are tough.
Make Customer Satisfaction Your Priority
Your customers are your lifeblood in any economic climate. In a
downturn they are what keep you in business. Treat them very well.
Spend time listening to your clients to hear what they like and do not
like about the services you offer. Change those that you can. Take time
to be innovative in meeting your customer needs. Perhaps taking the
time to computerize customer information would allow you to more
easily access their particular preferences and respond quickly to
their needs. Perhaps taking time to call special clients to discuss how
you could serve them better would be productive. Maybe an extra
telephone line would speed the service time. Do whatever you need to
do to keep your current customers loyal and to position yourself to win
new customers.
Expand Relationships with Existing Clients/ Sign More Long-term Deals
Given that your customers are satisfied, they should want to do more
24
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
business with you. Find out if there are ways you can expand what you
do for them, perhaps by offering more products or services or fulfilling
other needs that they have. Long-term deals add to your security. So,
if you have happy customers, offer a discount to those who are willing
to sign a long-term contract or who are willing to pay cash up front
for a contracted set of services. Cash up front is particularly attractive
because it makes you look good on paper and can allow you to lock in
favorable financing from financial institutions.
Advertise/Sell
In a downturn one of the first places many businesses cut expenses is
in advertising - a real mistake. As part of the philosophy of expanding
your base and recruiting more customers, you need to advertise and
sell more than ever. People are looking for better ways to do business. If
you have established strong customer satisfaction, this is the time to get
the message out.
Seek New Business Opportunities (Diversify)
A downturn sounds like a terrible time to diversify, doesn’t it? But there
are opportunities out there to be taken. And given that you have done
your homework in establishing yourself on a solid financial base,
this is an opportune time to broaden your base. Diversification gives
you more stability because a down market in one product may be
compensated for by another product. The tricky part is, of course,
finding complementary products that face differing market challenges.
You don’t want to stretch your expertise by producing totally different
products, yet you do want to target different types of markets so that
softness in one may not be mirrored in the other. A simple example of
a way to seek new opportunities is to establishi an internet business for
a retail store. You have provided a new way to service your regular
customers and expanded the audience you reach.
Form Alliances
Alliances with your vendors or with closely aligned types of products is
always a good way to strengthen your customer base. With the right
alliance you are reaching a broader spectrum of possible customers
and you have more to offer each potential customer.
Diversify Your Customer Base
It may be possible that you have been selling to a limited subgroup
within the community and you can expand the appeal of your product
to a wider audience. For instance, you may be primarily selling to a
specific age, ethnic, or gender group and with different advertising or
a slight modification in the product, you can reach a broader spectrum
of the population. Simple things like instructions in another language or
wording advertising slightly differently can have a major impact in who
your business attracts.
Find Ways to Save Time and Money
Collections are a great place to start in tightening your belt. Not only
do you need to be providing incentives to your customers to pay ontime
or even early, but you need an efficient collection system that gives you
advance warning of problems as they develop. Similarly, you need to
be paying your bills on time and taking advantage of every possible
discount that you can.
SURVIVING IN THIS ECONOMY
Look at fixed and variable costs. What among the variable costs can
you cut back on or put off for later? What among the fixed costs can
you find a better deal on or negotiate more favorable terms for? And,
pay attention to your banking relationships.
Keep in touch with your banker, apprising them of any company
developments. If you face a tight situation, having your banker
knowledgeable about the positives of you and your business will make
them much more amenable to helping you through difficult times.
Consider lowering your prices. You need to maintain your profitability,
but you also need to retain your customers who are also most likely
hurting. If you can find more efficient methods that allow you to cut
costs, not only will you retain your customers, but you also may attract
others.
Watch for Signs and Act on Them
Look for changes in psychology and behavior in your clientele. They
may be spending less or putting projects on hold. They may not be
paying their bills as quickly. If you are in touch with your customers,
you will be aware of differences in buying habits. Contact them before
they contact you about what the problems are. Can you help them in
some way? You can gain a longtime relationship with a customer by
approaching them proactively with the view of being there to help them
through their own hard times.
Mobilize Your People to Save Jobs
Economic downturns are scary times for employees. Many firms cut
personnel and add to the workload of the remaining employees.
Involve them in cost cutting. Let them know they are important to you
and that you are committed to keeping them. If they know that they are
perceived as an active part of the solution, they can identify sources of
savings that never occurred to you.
Find rewards that are not costly yet acknowledge their efforts. As hokey
as it sounds, one successful businessman placed post-it notes on the
restroom mirrors every evening noting positives that had been reported
about various individuals during that day. It became a delightful, early
morning ritual for the employees to discover each morning what the
CEO had noted from the day before.
Whether or not the econoomy is in a recession, any of these methods
can strengthen your organization - and your bottom line. This is what
makes a “solidly run” business. It means returning to the roots of your
business and making certain that every one is healthy. All of these
principles are worth revisiting at least annually, in good or bad times.
Source: http://www.smallbusinessnotes.com
WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
25
SURVIVING IN THIS ECONOMY
Job Survival During An Economic Downturn
Dramatic changes are taking place in the workforce. People who embrace
This trend requires new attitudes in our education system and work place.
new technology are discovering new opportunity while those who fight it
The assembly line replaced skilled craftsmen of the twentieth century, to-
are not fully aware of the fundamental changes taking place in our soci-
day, the computer is removing dependency on many academic skills.
ety. During an economic slowdown, the fighters of change will be the first
The new front-line worker is a technician with analytical skills who is in a
to go out the door or companies that fight change will be the first to shut
continuous learning mode. This is achieved with challenges and a habit
down. In the following article, I will compare opposing attitudes, fighting
of solving them through self-education.
change versus embracing change.
•
Fighting Change - People who fight changing technology want to
expand the learning environment. The learning phase is failure. With ev-
maintain their comfort zone with familiar surroundings. (Status quo)
ery failure, they learn what does not work, then analyze and develop
As pressure for change grows, they depend on others to protect their
new ideas of what might work. They also learn to accept failure and
comfort zone through politicians, unions or other bureaucratic organi-
bounce back from it. With persistence, they find what works. One of the
zations. During their youth, they learned a professional skill and plan
by-products is learning how to finish what they start.
to ride it till retirement, like their parents did. In the meantime, they do
repetitive tasks (hourly, daily, weekly or monthly) waiting for their turn
to be promoted. As fighters resist change, their efficiency falls further
behind and in time their professional skill has no value to anyone.
•
Off the job, self-educated people engage in self-motivated projects, which
In the typical personnel office, job applicants are asked how many years
they spent in school. In worker responsibility organizations, employers
want to know what motivates applicants and their ability to manage challenges. Class grades have no value if there is no vision or motivation
Embracing Change - People who embrace changing technology
behind them. Today’s education system does not prepare students for
thrive on challenges. They are independent thinkers who seek new
workplace responsibilities, yet, this is the future.
opportunity, which is found in change. They are leaders of efficiency
and they are the leaders of blunders. Trial and error produces blunders and this is the only way to find what works. The casual observer
does not recognize increased efficiency of these people, they remember their blunders. The person who depends on proven methods can’t
understand how blunder’s get promoted ahead of those who maintain the status quo.
During an economic slowdown, businesses are forced to cut overhead
cost. During the twentieth century, front-line people were first out the door.
During the recession of 1992 and 2003, middle management, people
who fought change, were first out the door. Today, technology is available
to replace the middleman. During the 1990s, companies have been slow
to take action because of the morale factor in a tight labor market. In an
open labor market there is no hesitation. The person who survives, maybe
Technology is eliminating mid-level leadership. Decision making and re-
advances, will be an independent analytical thinker who seeks challenges
sponsibility is moving to the front-line by people who carry computers
and willing to support change that will get the job done efficiently.
and communication equipment on their belt while providing the physical
service. This trend not only cuts overhead cost, it speeds up service, corrects problems while still minor and allows speedy recognition and implementation of efficient procedures. Competing organizations with layers of
bureaucratic management can’t compete.
26
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
CONSTRUCTION OUTLOOK
McGraw-Hill Construction Outlook
On February 24, ABC and McGraw-Hill held it
first Construction Outlook for 2009 at the Central
Florida Chapter ABC office. Over 110 ABC
members attended the Business Breakfast that
began at 7:30 with a half hour of networking.
The program began at 8:00 a.m. with Jennifer
Coskren, Senior Economist, McGraw-Hill
Construction Analytics doing the presentation.
Outlook 2009 offers a detailed regional
forecast of the industry’s economic, environment
and market trend. Everyone attending the event
got a copy of the presentation, and an email
version to share with their staff.
For more information, contact Angela Martin
Walter, McGraw-Hill Construction Dodge at [email protected]
Sponsors: McGraw Hill Construction - Dodge
and Quinco Electrical, Inc.
Pictured above: Dawn Martin, Angela Martin Walter,
Dan Downey, Linda DeSpaignet, Jennifer Coskren
APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
27
E D U C AT I O N & S A F E T Y U P D AT E
Dear ABC Member,
Change is a part of life for individuals and organizations; how people and companies react to
change is the key to continued success or eventual failure. The question is: Is your corporate
culture set up to capitalize on change, or has it
been designed to be a victim of change? Let’s
first look at the concept of change.
There are two types of change:
•
•
External Change: Change that is imposed
by outside circumstances
Internal Change: Change that is initiated
from within
Examples of external change include economic
change, change in the market, change in technology, and even change in regulations - things
out of your control. Internal change includes
things you can control.
You and your employees are challenged every
day with responsibilities you didn’t have yesterday! As you push the productivity envelope and
expect more and different skills from everyone,
it’s important to be certain everyone has the
skills to achieve expectations. Develop these
skills through training. Simultaneously,
you’ll remind your employees of your company’s
culture and that you care about them.
"MMGPSNTPG1PXFSBOE-JHIUJOH*OTUBMMBUJPOT
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2008 EAGLE AWARD WINNER
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4&-&$5-*450'063130+&$54
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ABC offers you effective and economical means
to train your employees:
Planning and Decision Making – April 1,
8 a.m. – Learn key points to improve your company’s performance through proper planning,
decision making, and problem solving.
(407) 934-8084
WWW.ERMCOOFFLORIDA.COM
Be a Better Manager – April 1, 1 p.m., Learn to manage employees by developing your
own leadership skills and management techniques.
Avoid Construction Disputes and Claims
– April 3, 8 a.m. – Begins with type and elements of contracts through development of and
damages from claims, dispute resolution and
conducting claims meetings through negotiations
LEED – multiple offerings:
1. Differences
between
LEED
v2.2
and v3 - April 9, 8 a.m. – Understand
the differences between v2.2 and the
2009 version. There were 64 credits and
now there are 100; the new credentialing
program; etc.
Continued on page 29
28
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009
10450''*$&#09t%01&:%3*7&t-",&#6&/"7*45"'-
E D U C AT I O N & S A F E T Y U P DAT E
Knowledge and Experience: Our Building Blocks
Building a construction business takes more than bricks and mortar; it
requires strategic planning, a solid foundation, and service partners with
industry experience. For over 20 years, Foley has dedicated resources to
serve the construction industry. Our Construction Practice attorneys offer
comprehensive legal services ranging from contract administration to
construction and design defense, labor and employment matters to big
claim litigation, environmental compliance, dispute resolution, and
insurance issues. We concentrate on reducing your risks so you can
focus on growing your business — ahead of schedule.
For more information about our Construction Practice,
please contact John P. Horan at 407.244.3265 or [email protected]
Foley.com
JACKSONVILLE • ORLANDO • TALLAHASSEE • TAMPA
BOSTON • BRUSSELS • CHICAGO • DETROIT • LOS ANGELES • MADISON • MILWAUKEE • NEW YORK • SACRAMENTO
SAN DIEGO • SAN DIEGO/DEL MAR • SAN FRANCISCO • SILICON VALLEY • TALLAHASSEE • TOKYO • WASHINGTON, D.C.
The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.
©2009 Foley & Lardner LLP
2. LEED Test Prep and Technical
Review - April 9, 1 p.m. to April 10, 8
a.m. –Learn about LEED v3 and prepare
to become accredited. This class includes
five facilitated study groups. Come and
achieve LEED with us!
3. LEED Field Documentation – Understand
what’s expected of you and make this
new element of construction easy and
seamless!
Microsoft Office 2007:
• April 14, 8:30 a.m. – Excel Intermediate
• April 23, 8:30 a.m. – PowerPoint Intermediate
Estimating Site Construction – April 14,
21, and 28, 5:30 p.m. – A great series covering all CSI codes! This is the first in the
series
CPR and First Aid – April 15: CPR - 8 a.m.
to noon, and First Aid – 1 to 5 p.m. – Daytime
classes!
Basic Surveying/Field Engineering –
April 16, 4:30 p.m. - Avoid costly mistakes!
Learn the basics to be certain your survey
points are accurate. Limited to only 12 people.
Business Management – Winning
Edge – April 17, 8 a.m. – Come and learn
about the things that make a difference in
your business: workers’ compensation, safety, crisis management, TQM, partnering, time
management, and training.
Lien Law – April 24, 9 a.m. – A great class
to learn all about this essential subject!
OSHA 10-hour - April 27 and 29, 4 p.m.
– Keep your employees safe and comply with
OSHA!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Four Florida locations offer over 2000 vehicles in our inventory! (Fleet dept. in Apopka)
Customers can use Ford’s ABC program for HUGE discounts!
We will take multiple trade-ins on one unit!
We can handle all your vehicle needs, Fleet & Personal!
Mullinax offers an UNLIMITED MILEAGE commercial lease with no lease end fees!
We can quote via [email protected]
Our new “Quick Lane” service offers fast early morning and late night maintenance!
While other dealers are reducing their commercial inventory, we are expanding ours!
We offer used commercial vehicles at a great price!
No hassle buying! NO GIMMICKS! No dealer fees!
We give our best deal the first time!
Commercial Account Manager: Sean Wilson
Call: (407) 565-2102 (direct) or (407) 509-3302 (mobile)
E-mail: [email protected]
1551 East Semoran Blvd. l Apopka, FL 32703
For class details and to register, www.abccentralflorida.com/seminars.shtm. If you have
questions or need more information, please
contact Lori Blake, Director of Education and
Training: (407) 398-1264 or [email protected]
Sincerely,
Your Chapter Education
& Safety Committees
Excellent training
is as simple as ABC!
APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
29
Proud Winner of Three 2008 Eagle Awards
PEOPLE
Palmer Electric Company is pleased to announce its vice president
of commercial production,
Robert K. Vaughn, has
been elected treasurer of
Academy of Construction
Technologies (ACT); and Vaughn
commercial project manager, Dan DeMorse,
has been elected to the association’s board of
directors as a member-at-large.
Bella Collina Clubhouse, Montverde;
Exterior Finishes - Commercial $1 - $5 million, Interior Finishes - Commercial Under $1 million and
Seimens Spaceship Earth, Lake Buena Vista; Entertainment Facilities, Under $1 million
ACT, founded in 1992, is a
partnership of the Central
Florida construction industry contractors and trade
associations
representing
both union and non-union
DeMorse
entities. ACT works closely
with
Orange,
Osceola,
and Seminole county school districts to promote
construction as a career and provides students
with the opportunity to develop lifelong skills.
Charles R. Lewis III has
earned his LEED AP designation as an Accredited
Professional in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program from the United States
Green Building Council.
Lewis
Lewis, the director of operations for Orlandobased Construct Two Group, has 15 years
of experience in the construction industry. He
has a master of science in Industrial Engineering
Technology from Eastern Michigan University,
and a bachelor of science in Construction Engineering Technology from Florida A & M University. Lewis is a Certified Professional Constructor
by the American Institute of Constructors, and is
certified by the American Society for Healthcare
Engineers.
30
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009
In-House Capabilities Include:
• Scenic & Flat Painting
• Rockwork & Themed Plaster
• Rough & Finished Carpentry
• Drywall & Metal Studs
• Show Set Installations
• Fiber Cement Siding & FRP
General Contractor • Orlando
Tel 407.812.6616 • Fax 407.812.1521 • www.mivan.com
Part of the Mivan Group, offering construction services worldwide.
PEOPLE
R.C.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Stevens
Con-
struction
Co.
recently
announced
that
James
Caldwell has joined its
firm as Project Engineer
for the Coca-Cola North
America plant expansion
Caldwell
in
Auburndale,
Florida.
Caldwell, a graduate of
the University of North Florida with a degree
in Building Construction Management, has four
With our unique blend of construction and project
management experience, A C Development Group, Inc.
c.
is able to provide comprehensive general contracting
services on any project type. The advantage to the
client is single-source responsibility of project
construction, project management and value
engineering.
years of construction experience.
D & A Building Services
has
hired
Mike Gravenmier as
general manager of its
A C Development Group, Inc. prides itself in
understanding the client’s needs and delivering a
professionally designed and constructed product in a
timely manner at a fair price.
waterproofing and restoration division. Gravenmier
407.365.9553
View all of our under construction and
801 Eyrie Drive, Suite 200
Oviedo, Florida 32765
Inc.,
completed projects on the web at:
http://acdevelopmentgroup.com
has 28-years experience
in all aspects of the water-
Gravenmier
proofing industry. He was previously the owner
of Advanced Grouting & Epoxy Techniques in
Debary, Fla.
Cuhaci & Peterson Architects, LLC, recently launched its annual “Jeans for Charity”
drive to benefit Habitat for Humanity in Orange
County; Give Kids the World; Susan G. Komen
for the Cure; and the Russell Home for Atypical
Children.
The firm hopes to raise as much as $500.00 for
the individual charities quarterly during the drive
which will run until Dec. 31.
Employees who choose to wear jeans MondayThursday, pay $2.00 per day. The first drive
will be for the month of March to benefit Habitat
for Humanity; June’s drive will benefit Give the
Kids the World; September’s drive will benefit
Susan G. Komen for the Cure and December’s
drive will benefit the Russell Home for Atypical
Children.
For information about how to donate or participate, call Tina Kennedy at 407-661-9100.
APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
31
JOB COSTING
“Job
Costing”
the Two Most Misunderstood Words in the Construction Industry
If you ask contractors if they job cost, a majority will respond positively.
But do they really? There are two methods of job costing, which I call
“passive” and “active”. “Active” job costing is much more effective in
improving the bottom line than “passive”.
I am constantly surprised by the number of contractors which don’t practice
“active” job costing. Just what is job costing? Is it accumulating the costs of a
project and then comparing these costs to the contract price at the end of the
job to see how much money the job made? Is job costing driven by the accounting department? Absolutely not, to both questions! It is more…much more.
Let’s get the role of the accounting department out of the way first. The
accounting department can provide those costs that have been accumulated to date. The accounting department operates
only in a support role by collecting information and
generating the reports that are needed in
order to do cost projections. The
accounting department can
only tell you what
happened
in the past. The accountant is the historian of the company. History can’t
be changed (unless you’re a politician). This is the “passive” method in a
nutshell. “Passive” job costing, as a form of project management, would
be similar to driving a car forward by looking through the rearview mirror.
You wouldn’t see the obstacles or potholes until you have already hit them.
“Passive” job costing helps fuel a reactionary environment of constant fires
which always need immediate attention.
They are not the right people to forecast the costs to complete, which are needed
in order to develop the work-in-process and generate the financial statements.
Job costing is an “active” on-going process that involves each key employee that is associated with the performance of the contract, which includes
the key field people and the Project Manager. Job costing is a project
management tool— not an accounting tool.
There are four steps to “active” job costing:
•
Accumulating the costs to date.
•
Projecting the costs to complete, which is a
forward-thinking process.
•
Using the information to change (improve) the outcome.
•
End of job autopsy.
If you were to survey contractors, you would find that a
higher percentage do
step #1, less do #2,
Doug Phelps, President of
Management Consultants for
Contractors, has over 30 years
experience in the construction
industry and has been a consultant
to many small to mid-size contractors
for the past 11 years.
For more info, visit www.
TheJustRewardsPlan.com
or call 215.882.2963.
32
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009
JOB COSTING
and even less do #3. And #3 is most critical and is the step that will have
the most impact of improving your company’s bottom line.
As a project management tool, effective job costing is more concerned
with the time and costs remaining to complete the job so that corrective
action can be taken if needed. I have often heard that once a job is going
south, it is really hard to turn it around. There could be several reasons
why, but the major reason is that the practice of “passive” job costing
doesn’t recognize that there is trouble on a job until it is too late to do
anything about it.
The job costing process begins as soon as the job is “turned over” to
project management. Components of “active” job costing include the
following:
Benefits of “active” job costing include:
•
Knowing the estimated time and estimated costs of a construction project at the beginning of a project enables the project
manager and job foreman to pre-plan the project and establish
intermediate milestone dates to protect the estimated gross margin (gross profit) of that job.
•
Job costing reinforces project planning as it is a forward- thinking process.
•
It gives the job foreman and his crew team benchmarks from
which they can measure their own performance. It provides a
method for them to keep their own score— a strong motivational
tool!
•
An estimate based on direct and indirect costs to complete the
work.
•
Employees are better able to connect their performance—what
they do each and every day—to beating the estimated costs.
•
An accounting system that is capable of capturing and charging
costs to the appropriate cost codes.
•
•
The job estimate should be broken out into intermediate phases
that reflect the “construction plan” to perform the work. This step
is critical. It’s impossible to manage a job where the costs are
lumped together.
Sharing job performance and job cost expectations is a critical ingredient to being able to hold the project manager, job
foreman, and construction team accountable for their job performance.
•
The job costing process reinforces the planning process as the
thinking is always forward.
•
Actual productivity is tracked and estimated productivity rates
can be verified and/or revised for the future bids.
•
An estimated final cost that is based on how the job is performing will enable your accounting department to generate more
accurate monthly reports—financials that you can trust!
•
The total costs for each intermediate phase are separated by
labor (including manhours), materials, equipment, and subcontractors’ costs.
•
A daily field report that is completed by the foreman/ superintendent that allocates the manhours worked to each phase.
•
A weekly manhour report that requires the foreman/ superintendent to keep track of the job-to-date manhours and project the
manhours to complete each phase, and thus the total job.
•
Project management reviews the weekly manhour reports to
identify phases that may require some sort of corrective action.
•
A job cost summary report that is periodically generated (at least
monthly) that accumulates all the phase costs to date.
•
A documented monthly review process to project the costs to
complete each phase of the project.
•
A “close-out meeting” to review the final time and costs as compared to the estimated time and costs, along with explanations
for variances in case estimated productivity rates need to be
changed in future bids.
The job foreman and lead personnel should be actively involved in the
job costing process. After all, don’t they have the most daily influence
on how much it will cost to complete the job? They need to be aware
of the costs accumulated to date and, with the help of the Project Manager, be able to forecast the time and costs to complete the job as it
progresses. If they don’t have the skills to do this right away, train them.
Active job costing is a critical control process. This process will enable you to know which jobs, and which employees, are generating your profits.
If you aren’t practicing “active” job costing
now, implementing it will improve your bottom line. It is an all important, fundamental business practice for any economic time.
WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
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Cuhaci & Peterson Architects
…construction has begun on the $4 million
Northpark Baptist Church on Prospect Avenue in
Baldwin Park in Orlando. Cuhaci & Peterson
Architects, LLC, designed the church, which includes a worship center and educational facility.
H.J. High Construction Company is the general
contractor.
…completed the design and construction documents for 21 ALDI Supermarkets that opened in
the Central Florida area by the end of 2008.
Each facility offers 16,900 square feet of space.
…has expanded the availability of its scope of
professional services to now offer landscape architecture, LEED design and certifications, permit
facilitation and expediting, Building Information
Modeling (BIM) and digital interactive leasing
packages. “We have been providing these services for years. Now we are offering clients the
opportunity to utilize them independently from
our full-scale architecture/engineering work,”
said Lonnie Peterson, chairman of Cuhaci & Peterson Architects.
Tilt-Con Corporation
…completed the new 53,893-square-foot Osceola County Joint Communication Emergency
Operations Center at 2588 Partin Settlement
Road in Kissimmee, FL. The project consisted of
a 2-story building, chiller yard and command
vehicle shelter. Designed by Architects Design
Group, Inc., Winter Park, FL, Tilt-Con’s scope of
work included foundations, slab-on-grade and
tilt-up concrete wall panels.
…completed the School District of Osceola County’s new 2-story, 113,903-square-foot Elementary
School “L” at 5000 Koa Street, Kissimmee, FL,
under its contract with W.G. Mills, Kissimmee.
…completed Westminster Christian School’s new
2-story, 22,250-square-foot cafetorium in Palmetto Bay, in Miami-Dade County, FL, under its contract with Burke Construction Group, Doral, FL.
Comprehensive Energy Services, Inc.
(CES) announced the launch of its new line
of Energy Solutions Services aimed at helping
building owners and managers lower operating
costs, particularly in the area of energy. With
its recent acquisition of the BuildingAdvice and
Vykon/Tridium building automation system technologies, CES has enhanced its detailed energy
assessments of buildings, as well as estimated
financial impact of proposed improvements.
34
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009
MEMBER MAILBOX
Tri-City Electrical Contractors, Inc.
CONNECTING WITH OUR CLIENTS
SINCE 1976
…completed nearly $1 million of work at Key Isle
Apartments, a new multimillion-dollar, 165-unit
rental community in Ocoee, FL, under its contract
with SSW & Bush Construction, Orlando.
…completed $4 million of work at Marriott Vacation Club International’s 14-story, 90,000-squarefoot, 72-unit Crystal Shores timeshare resort in
Marco Island, in Collier County, FL, under its
contract with Hardin Construction, Tampa.
…completed $747,000 of work at the new 6-story, 50-unit, 90,560-square-foot Fairview Grande
Condominiums overlooking Lake Fairview in
Orlando, FL, under its contract with Fairview
Grande Development, Orlando, FL.
(407)859-8801
www.kellyelectricllc.com
…is under way on $1.2 million of work at the
new 276-unit Stovall at River City Apartments
in Jacksonville, FL, under its contract with A.G.
Spanos Companies, Tampa. Completion is slated for May 2009.
…completed approximately $325,000 of work
at the new 5,800-square-foot Lake Nona Central
Energy Plant in Orlando, FL, under its contract
with S.I. Goldman, Longwood, FL.
…completed $750,000 of work at the luxurious
new Ocean Club Condominiums in Jupiter, FL,
under its contract with Paone Builders, Jupiter.
The 6-story, 12-unit oceanfront development features residences exceeding 4,000 square feet.
…completed $545,000 of tenant build-out work
at Hensel Phelps Construction’s new
LEED-certified, 18,884-square-foot Orlando office located at 6280 Hazeltine National Drive,
Orlando, FL.
BRPH Construction Services recently completed construction of Fire Station #22 in Winter
Garden, Fla. The $1.9 million, full-service station
has sleeping quarters for eleven firefighters, a
fully equipped kitchen, community room, fitness
room, offices, gear storage, and three pullthrough bays large enough to hold six vehicles.
The 11,000 SF public safety facility is situated
in a residential area of Winter Garden, in close
proximity to a neighborhood park and community center, and has a residential look to blend
with the neighboring community. The station was
designed by C.T. Hsu.
APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
35
MEMBER MAILBOX
Johnson-Laux Construction is building the
city of Oviedo’s new state-of-the-art, LEED Goldcertified, Public Works Administration Building, a
superior-class, environmentally-friendly, $1.9 million, 5,346-square-foot facility nearing completion at 1655 Evans Street in Oviedo, in Seminole
County, FL. Notably, under its contract with the
Oviedo City Council, the contractor has to-date
recycled 98.6 percent of its construction debris
in coordination with Waste Management’s LEED
recycling program. Designed by VOA Associates, Orlando, under the direction of John Page,
AIA, Project Architect, the building will offer numerous features certified by the United States
Green Building Council, including: a Rain Harvesting System which will utilize rainwater from
the building’s roof for operation of toilets and
other uses; waterless urinals; pervious concrete
paving; maximum use of natural daylighting;
and use of raised access flooring and systems
furniture for flexible reconfiguration requiring no
additional construction. Slated for completion
in April 2009, the sustainable “green” building
project including 2.9 acres of related sitework
is being managed by Anthony Laux, Vice President, and Carolyn Mercurio, Project Manager.
PPI Construction Management
…was selected to provide construction management services for the expansion of the University
of Florida’s Southwest Recreation Center expansion project. The project consists of a 37,000
GSF addition and renovation of 6,600 GSF to
the center which houses student workout and
wellness activities, as well as, intramural sports
programs.
The construction/renovation of the facilities is
necessary to fulfill a growing demand for intramural sports, personal training, and other recreation sports uses. The proposed project will
alleviate the immediate problem and establish a
framework for future growth and ultimate buildout of the complete recreation sports center complex. The estimated construction budget is approximately $11M.
…was selected to provide construction management services for the Harn Museum - Asian Art
wing. The Harn Museum will be adding 16,000
– 18,000 GSF to the existing building. This space
is very much needed to house the Asian art collection, which is fast growing, and will include
art exhibition, offices, art storage, an Asian garden and support services for this wing. The new
wing will also create the opportunity to establish
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It all adds up to one very special
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An independently owned Volvo Construction Equipment Rents, Inc.franchise
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BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009
Lakemont Elementary School
Winter Park, Florida
MEMBER MAILBOX
a second entry to the Harn Museum and give it a
front door visible from the new campus entry. In
addition to the new wing, an attached two-level
parking garage will be built to span over the existing loading dock and designed to appear as
an integral part of the building. The estimated
construction budget is approximately $15M.
Construction Management
General Contracting
All the Right Tools for Building Success!
Design-Build
Green Building Services
…was selected to provide construction management services for the new women’s Lacrosse facility at the University of Florida. The project consists
of the new construction of Lacrosse facility which
includes 12,000 GSF of locker room, conference
room, restrooms and concessions space. As well
as, Lacrosse practice and competition fields and
a Soccer practice field. The estimated construction budget is approximately $14M.
Terry’s Electric, Inc.
…completed an electrical contract for the new
multimillion-dollar, 8-story, 259,100-square-foot
Vacation Village at Parkway Resort, Buildings 18
and 19, in Kissimmee, FL. Winter Park Construction, Winter Park, FL, served as general contractor for the 224-unit project.
St. Cloud Water Treatment Plant #4
St. Cloud, Florida
How Many Times Have
You Felt Like This?
Bid due by
10:00 AM
Time Wasted
Due to lack of updated
plans, specs or addenda
Loss
of Revenue
and liability due to incorrect bid
Let McGraw-Hill Construction show you how
Project Document Manager (PDM) can manage
your bids, documents and save your bottom line.
For more information call or email
Angela Martin Walter at
813-787-0783
[email protected]
Dodge
..is handling electrical work for the new
22,000-square-foot Gulfside Regional Hospice
located at 5748 Dean Dairy Road in Zephyrhills,
FL, under its contract with W.G. Mills, Inc., Sarasota. Completion is slated for September 2009.
…completed an electrical contract for Macy’s
department store’s new 3,100-square-foot Figs
Restaurant located in The Gardens Mall at 3101
PGA Boulevard, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Triad
Construction Co., Atlanta, served as general
contractor for the project.
S. I. Goldman Company, Inc./Comfort
Systems USA
…has begun work on the VA Hospital addition
in Gainesville, FL. Awarded in 2008 from Archer Western/DeMaria of Chicago, this 5-story
addition to the current Veterans Affairs Medical
Center is slated to be complete in late spring of
2011.
…was awarded two renovation projects by
Reedy Creek Energy Services at Disney’s North
Service Area Central Energy Plant. The RCES
Co-Gen Gas Line Bypass project was completed
in March 2009 and the High Temperature Heating Hot Water project will be performed over a
single night outage and will be completed later
this month.
www.construction.com
APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
37
MEMBER MAILBOX
Palmer Electric Co. has completed its tenant improvement contract with Turner Construction Co. for the electrical wiring and fire alarm
system for Dynetech Corp.’s 40,000-squarefoot corporate headquarters in its namesake,
the 32-story Dynetech Centre in Orlando, Fla.
Baker Barrios Architects of Orlando provided
architectural design for the tenant improvements. Palmer Electric also provided electrical
contracting for the 600,000-square-foot building completed last year by developer, Lincoln
Property Co.
D & A Building Services Inc.’s landscape
division, was awarded a $49,200 contract by
the city of Sanford for full-service landscape
maintenance at Sanford Memorial Cemetery.
The one-year contract has an option for two
additional one-year renewals. Services for this
contract will be performed by the landscape
maintenance staff at the company’s Longwood,
Fla., headquarters. D & A’s scope of services
includes mowing, edging, weed control, litter
and floral removal at the 10-acre cemetery located on 27th Street in Sanford, Fla.
38
Window Interiors recently completed installation of custom window treatments for Florida
Hospital’s new 12 story tower in downtown Orlando. Window Interiors provided design and
installation of custom solar shades for the lobby,
laboratories, corridors, icon tower conference
rooms and all five floors of patient rooms. The
patient rooms are equipped with motorized solar shades and the icon tower conference rooms
are equipped with solar shades and black-out
shades operated by an advanced AV system on
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
timers to highlight the building’s exterior lighting
effects. The system features LED lights that reflect off the black-out shades, illuminating the12
story icon tower at night. The escalator lobby
is equipped with 448” long solar shades controlled by a photo-cell activated sensor system.
Window Interiors teamed with long-standing
client, Brasfield & Gorrie General Contractors
to perform its largest contract in its 20 year history, totaling 1.1 million.
NIGHT GOLF
On Thursday, February 26, ABC held its 9th
annual Night Golf Tournament at the Winter
Park Municipal Golf Course. The tournament
was sold out with 72 players. Golfers started the
evening with a BBQ dinner provided by Labor
Ready Southeast and beverages provided by
Able Body Labor.
The format was a shotgun start and the golfers
played nine holes in the dark. They were
provided with glow in the dark golf balls,
lightsticks, and all the beverages they could
consume. A great time was had by all.
Sponsors: Able Body Labor – Beverage Sponsor; Labor Ready Southeast – BBQ sponsor
T E X A S H O L D ' E M TO U R N A M E N T
ABC held its 3rd annual Texas Hold’em
Tournament on Wednesday, February 25th at the
Maitland Civic Center with 70 players competing
for over $1,500 in prizes for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd
place.
The three hour tournament, sponsored by R.L.
Haines Construction, followed a one hour
reception with plenty of food and open bar
sponsored by Workers Temporary Staffing.
After players lost out at one of the seven poker
tables, they had the option to compete in the
“Loser’s Lounge” at one of the Black Jack tables.
1st Place: Barry Blakely; Cherry, Bekaert & Holland
2nd Place: Michelle Buck; Bergelectric
3rd Place: Brian McLoone; Workers Temporary Staffing
®
WOR K E R S
TEMPORARY STAFFING, INC.
Sponsors: R.L. Haines – Tournament sponsor;
Workers Temporary Staffing – Gold Value Club
Reception Sponsor; Mobile Modular – Table sponsor;
Hensel Phelps Construction Co. – Wine Sponsor
40
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ABC MEMBERSHIP ANNIVERSARIES
Members for 35 Years - Joined 1974
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Gerdau Ameristeel Corporation
McCree General Contractors & Architects
Members for 30 Years - Joined 1979
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Economy Electric Company
Members for 25 Years - Joined 1984
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Brasfield & Gorrie, LLC
Crane Rental Corporation
Wharton-Smith, Inc.
Members for 20 Years - Joined 1989
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Fern Insulators, Inc.
Finfrock Construction, Inc.
Kirwin Norris, P.A.
407-299-8246
Mateer & Harbert, P.A.
Members for 15 Years - Joined 1994
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D & D Smith Constructors, LLC
Dew Glass, Inc.
Ferguson Enterprises
Rexel Consolidated Electrical Supplies
Terry’s Electric, Inc.
TLC Concrete Construction, Inc.
Walt Disney Imagineering Florida
Workers Temporary Staffing
Members for 10 Years - Joined 1999
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Able Body Labor
APG Electric, Inc.
CDC News
Certified Slings and Supply
Clancy & Theys Construction Co.
CNA Surety
Dixie Metal Products, Inc.
Don King’s Concrete, Inc.
Edwards Construction Services, Inc.
Enterprise Fleet Management
Harper Limbach LLC
Hartford South, LLC
Hopkins Contract Hardware, Inc.
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Stormwater Management
NPDES Consulting
Erosion Control
Environmental Consulting
SWPPP Management
Green Build Credit
Site Compliance
Permit Preparation
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Site Inspections
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Silt Fence Installation
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Etc.
ABC MEMBERSHIP ANNIVERSARIES
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Millennium Electric
ModSpace
Spectra Contract Flooring
T & T Construction of Central Florida
Members for 5 Years - Joined 2004
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Advanced Millwork, Inc.
Aerotek
Automated Building Control Systems
Black Box Network Services
The Blue Book of Building & Construction
Chesser and Company, P.A.
Comfort House, Inc.
Control Electric Services, Inc.
James A. Cummings, Inc.
Daisy Fresh Commercial Cleaning, Inc.
Doster Construction Company, Inc.
Dyer, Riddle, Mills & Precourt, Inc. (DRMP)
Electric Services, Inc.
E-Tec, Inc.
Falcon Termite & Pest Control
Flamingo Construction Works, Inc.
Ford of Clermont
Hayes & Caraballo, P.L.
Hilti, Inc.
KENPAT USA LLC
Lovett-Silverman Construction Consultants, Inc.
R.F. Lusa & Sons Sheetmetal
PECE of Mind Disposal Environmental, Inc.
ProFast Supply
Protective Barrier Services, Inc.
Michael C. Sasso, P.A.
Scherer Construction & Engineering
SIKON Construction Corporation
Southeastern Surfaces & Equipment
Tailored Foam of Florida, Inc.
Tilt Con Corporation
Winter Park Construction
APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
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NEW MEMBERS
Ace Staffing Unlimited, Inc.
Arleen M. Hill
16214 CR 448
Mount Dora, FL 32757
T: (352) 385-0174
F: (352) 385-0164
E: [email protected]
W: www.acestaffingunlimited.com
Supplier; Staff Leasing
Altamonte Glass & Mirror
Bruce Fitzgerald
2591 Clark Street, Suite 208
Apopka, FL 32703
T: (407) 770-1400
F: (407) 770-1402
E: [email protected]
W: www.altamontegm.com
$3,000,000-$6,000,000
Hardware, Metal Windows, Special Windows,
Entrances, Storefronts, Glazing and Curtain
Wall Systems, Toilet and Bath Accessories
CORT
Beau Bullard
1920 State Road 436
Winter Park, FL 32792
T: (407) 678-2677
F: (407) 678-3014
E: [email protected]
W: www.cort.com
Supplier; Furniture, Furniture Systems, and
Furniture Accessories
Cvercko and Valantasis, PLLC
Marcus G. Valantasis Esquire
390 N. Orange Avenue, Suite 2300
Orlando, FL 32801
T: (407) 956-1052
F: (407) 956-1005
E: [email protected]
Associate, Attorney
44
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Full Service Roofing Contractor
New Construction/Renovation
Built-Up/Single Ply Roof Systems
Inspections, Maintenance, and Repairs
Consulting Services
Leed/AP Roof System Compliance
Solar/Photo-voltaic Supply and Installation
Elastomeric Coatings
The Right Tools for Your Job Site
NEW MEMBERS
Dunkman Paint
& Wallcovering, LLC
Paul Dunkman
1370 Pine Way, Suite A
Sanford, FL 32773
T: (407) 323-9935
F: (407) 323-9938
E: [email protected]
ModSpace has the mobile office, storage and site services
you need for your next construction project.
• Site trailers – single, double or larger
• Multi-unit complexes
• Steps, ramps and decks
• Designer sales offices
• Portable storage containers
• Furniture packages
W: www.dunkmanpaint.com
$1,000,000-$3,000,000
Painting and Wall Coverings
HydraDry, Inc.
Robert Messer
3615 N. Apopka Vineland Road
Call for a FREE quote: 407-859-7925
Orlando, FL 32818
T: (407) 290-0567
F: (407) 293-8641
E: [email protected]
W: www.hydradry.com
800-523-7918 • www.ModSpace.com
$500,000-$1,000,000
Emergency Flood / Water Extraction & Drying
Infrared Thermographic Leak Detection
Certified Mold Remediation
Tri-Green Energy, LLC
Mike Cornelius
430 West Drive
Altamonte Springs, FL 32714
T: (407) 788-3500
F: (407) 788-4392
E: [email protected]
Supplier; Energy Management, Electrical
Materials Suppliers
Weston Coatings Group, Inc.
Kenneth W. Presley
1901 Mason Avenue, Suite 106
Daytona Beach, FL 32117
T: (386) 274-3278
F: (386) 274-3279
E: [email protected]
$1,000,000-$3,000,000
Painting and Wall Coverings, Wall coverings
APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
45
TRI-CITY ELECTRICAL LUNCHTIME BBQ
46
BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA APRIL 2009 WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM
TRI-CITY ELECTRICAL LUNCHTIME BBQ
On Friday, February 27, the Tri-City Electric crew
started cooking at 4:00 a.m. in the morning at
the Bahia Shrine to feed over 350 hungry ABC
members at their 3rd annual BBQ.
This event has become one of the most popular
BBQ’s of the year because of the chicken and
ribs that Tri-City serves up, along with other
delicious favorites. ABC would like to thank Mike
Cornelius and his crew for sponsoring this event
every year. We look forward to next year!
WWW.ABCCENTRALFLORIDA.COM APRIL 2009 BUILDING CENTRAL FLORIDA
47
651 Danville Drive, Suite 200
Orlando, FL 32825-6393
PRSRT STD
US POSTAGE
PAID
ORLANDO, FL
PERMIT NO. 150

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