Corbin Bleu visits UD campus, theatre students

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Corbin Bleu visits UD campus, theatre students
TUESDAY, FEB. 10, 2015
VOL. 62 NO. 17
NEWS // New CFO transitions to
working at UD, pg. 6.
A&E // ‘Fifty Shade’s of
Grey’ mania comes to Dayton for Valentine’s
weekend, pg. 8.
OPINIONS // Valentine’s Day is not
just for romantic couples, pg. 12.
SPORTS // Buzzer-beater stuns
Flyer in overtime, pg. 16.
FLYER NEWS
History professors
Bobbi Sutherland
and Miguel Gomez
waltzing at World
War I Social Friday.
Corbin Bleu visits UD campus, theatre students Gov. Kasich
speaks at UD,
commends
business
program
ERIN CALLAHAN
Chief A&E Writer
Let the speculation end here:
Corbin Bleu was indeed on campus
Feb. 2.
He visited the University of Dayton
to talk to a group of students, mostly
music and theater majors, about his
experience in the world of performing
and offered valuable advice for those
pursuing their passion in the field.
In case anyone somehow missed all
of your middle school years between
2006 and 2008, Bleu starred in the
“High School Musical” movie trilogy
on Disney Channel. More recently,
Bleu reached the final round of Dancing with the Stars in 2013. He has been
in Dayton for the past five weeks performing in “Family Shots” with The
Human Race Theatre Company.
On New Year’s Eve, he crossed
paths with Linda Hartley, professor and music education [program
coordinator] while at a party with
their mutual friends. As a mother of
a 20-year-old daughter and an owner
of three “High School Musical” DVDs,
Hartley was thrilled to meet him. She
knew of a few others that may be excited to meet him too, so she invited
him to UD.
He happily agreed.
Much of our generation grew up
with him during his Disney days, but
Bleu has since made a name for himself with a career on Broadway and
the release of two albums. Hartley
said his down-to-earth personality
and the drive for his career could be
very inspiring for the audience.
More than 70 students attended
the question and answer session with
Bleu at Fitz Hall. Bleu provided them
with insight on the industry from his
23 years of experience in modeling,
singing, dancing and acting for stage
and film.
The best, and first, advice Bleu said
he ever received came from his father,
actor David Reivers, who told him the
No. 1 rule for an actor: to listen. Listen to fellow actors on stage, listen to
the director, listen to everything that
comes at you – not just in the acting
world, but also in life.
Students were given the opportu-
MIKE BRILL
Staff Writer
Actor Corbin Bleu speaks to UD theatre and music students. Jed Gerlach/Staff Photographer
nity to learn just by listening to the
themes that resonated in Bleu’s responses throughout the session: to
stand out in an audition, make a good
first impression and make unique
choices when reading the material;
when struck with performance anxiety, know it’s not a hindrance – trust
in your work; to transition between
singing, dancing and acting for different platforms, bring something
new and different to the table each
time and take on as much as you can.
“[In life] we should be trying to
take in everything and take on everything we can do, and it’s the same
way you should be in your projects,”
he said. “I know what I’m great at,
but I’m always trying to build up everything else at the same time. It’s a
juggling act.”
Among the multiple projects
Bleu has been juggling in the recent
months, he told the audience of one
cause he’s especially passionate about
– the movement against bullying.
Bleu said he was bullied in middle
school and early high school, though
he had a strong support system of
family and friends he could lean on.
However, he knows others may not be
as fortunate.
“A lot of kids don’t have [a] support group or someone to even vent
to about it,” he said. “And nowadays,
because of social media, there are so
many kids out there that get bullied
and you don’t even know who the bully is, because everybody hides behind
a computer screen.”
He has joined the movement with
the “I Was Bullied” campaign to create a support system for other victims,
and is also working on a film called
“The Day I Died,” which he described
as a very realistic and raw take on bullying in high schools. He said he hopes
to show victims of bullying they are
not alone.
Bleu’s words were well received by
the audience. More than half the students lined up for the chance to meet
him personally and ask questions after the session. One student, first-year
theater and psychology double major
Alexandra Damiani, was particularly
moved by Bleu’s advice.
She has dreams of being on Broadway, she said, and she came all the
way from Puerto Rico to start her life
here and work her way to success.
After having an especially stressful
week, Damiani said Bleu gave her the
motivation she needed.
“He was able to speak about his career with such [allure] even though
he [had] struggles in the industry and
things pushed him to his edge,” she
said. “He inspired me to keep moving
forward toward my dreams.”
Ohio Governor John Kasich and
Ohio Tax Commissioner Joseph Testa
spoke to a group of entrepreneurship
students Tuesday about the Kasich
administration’s proposed tax plan.
University President Dan Curran,
Interim Provost Paul Benson and
School of Business Administration
Dean Paul Bobrowski welcomed Gov.
Kasich to Miriam Hall. Kasich greeted
the entrepreneurship students as he
entered, asking Blend Express employees and audience members about
their career aspirations and hometowns.
Kasich began by speaking to the
entrepreneurship students about his
time attending the Ohio State University. Access to top OSU administrators
was difficult when he was a student,
as Kasich found when he was repeatedly ignored by the OSU president’s
secretary in his request to schedule
a private meeting with the president.
Kasich was persistent, however, and
the secretary relented and granted
him a short meeting with the president.
Kasich spoke to the president about
his difficulty deciding his major his
first year. The president described
his position to the 18-year-old Kasich,
and mentioned that he was flying to
Washington, D.C., the following week
to visit then President Richard Nixon
in the Oval Office.
Kasich asked to join him on this
trip, a request that was denied. Kasich, however, convinced the university president to deliver a letter to
Nixon on his behalf. Kasich received
a letter two weeks later, inviting him
to the Oval Office to meet with Nixon.
See KASICH, pg. 4
FOLLOW @FLYERNEWS ON TWITTER FOR MORE UPDATES ON CAMPUS, LOCAL, NATIONAL AND WORLD NEWS
VocAdFlyerNewsNov2013_Layout 1 10/29/13 4:26 PM Page 1
2
NEWS
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
3
NEWS
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
CAMPUS
MOM SAYS WE’RE SPECIAL
It’s not whether you win or lose. In a
NCAA poll, UD’s men’s basketball team
fans were ranked the fifth most passionate in the nation. The only universities
ranked higher were Syracuse University,
the University of Kentucky, the University
of Arizona and Duke University (No. 1).
Source: Dayton Business Journal
Welcome home
to a life of community, service and prayer
Students showed off their dance moves during CAB’s Culture and Cocktails event at the Mandalay Friday night.
Chris Santucci/Photo Editor
LOCAL
NATION
We invite you to consider
life as a Marianist brother,
priest or sister.
Contact
Bro. Tom Wendorf — [email protected]
or Sr. Nicole Trahan — [email protected]
www.marianist.com
BYE BYE, BRIAN
QDOBA GETS SAUCY
UNC COACH DIES
Brian Williams announced Saturday that
he will take leave from his position as anchor of “NBC Nightly News.” He said the
decision was made because of scrutiny
he’s drawn to the network. Williams has
not yet decided upon plans to return, and
“Dateline” anchor Lester Holt will take his
place. Source: NY Times
Free burritos in exchange for a kiss?
This Valentine’s Day, Qdoba will offer a
buy one, get one free burrito deal – the
catch? You have to kiss someone in line.
Sounds like the perfect place to take
a Valentine’s date … or pick one up.
Source: The Daily Meal
Retired University of North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith died Saturday
in his Chapel Hill home. Smith was 84
years old. He was the winningest coach
in men’s history when he retired, and
won an Olympic gold medal in 1976.
Source: AP
JENNER INVOLVED IN CAR CRASH
BRING IN THE SNOW MISER
FOR A LINEUP
MASS GAY BEACH WEDDING
Bruce Jenner of sporting and reality TV
fame was involved in a deadly car accident this weekend in Malibu, California. Jenner was driving an Escalade and
towing an all-terrain vehicle when he hit
a Lexus and sent it spinning into oncoming traffic, where the Lexus was hit by a
Hummer. Jenner may face vehicular manslaughter charges. Source: CNN
WARM HEART OF AFRICA
The Center for International Programs
and the Office of Multicultural Affairs will
sponsor a Friends of Africa Reception in
KU Torch Lounge, Thursday from 3:30 to
5 p.m. You can meet students, faculty
and staff connected to or interested in
African language and culture. Source:
udayton.edu
Last Sunday, a woman in Racine, Wisconsin, called police to report that her
car had been stolen in the middle of a
snow storm. After half an hour, she called
back to report that she had found her
car, buried under snow by a passing
plough. Source: The Journal Times
Lance Bass, of N’Sync fame, presided
over a mass gay beach wedding Thursday morning in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
The event was called “Love is Love” and
included over 100 couples, gay and
straight, as a celebration of marriage
equality. Florida is the most recent state
to legalize marriage equality, making a
total of 36 states. Source: Refinery29
SHERIFF OFFICE FACES
CHARGES OF RACISM
RIOT LIKE AN EGYPTIAN
A riot broke out outside a major soccer
game in Egypt Sunday night, causing a
stampede that killed at least 25 people.
Officials are unsure what caused the riot,
but said fans tried to force their way in
without tickets. This comes only three
years after a similar soccer match riot
that killed 74 people. Source: AP
NON ME ENCANTA
McDonald’s Mexico began a new ad
campaign last week, which encouraged
Mexicans to buy McBurritos instead of
tamales, with some pictures bearing the
caption “Tamales are a thing from the
past.” The campaign was canceled after
a strong negative reaction from Mexican
tamale fans. Source: ABC
NOT THE OSCARS, SO WHO CARES?
The British Academy of Film and Television Awards took place Sunday at London’s Royal Opera House. “The Theory of
Everything,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
and “Boyhood” were the biggest winners
of the night, each taking home multiple
awards. “Boyhood” was awarded film of
the year. Source: E! Online
KIM JONG BOOM
RED LIGHTS IN ROME
City officials in the Italian capital are
considering adding designated red light
districts in an effort to minimize exploitation of prostitution. Additionally, the city
would provide psychological and health
care to prostitutes in designated areas,
while clients of prostitutes in non designated areas would be subject to fines of
about $550. Source: NBC
North Korea test fired five short-range
missiles into the sea Sunday morning,
according to South Korean officials. The
officials also said this was North Korea’s
second test firing this year. One of the
missiles was a new anti-cruise ship missile, because Kim Jong-un apparently
hates fun. Source: AP.
Solution to Issue 16 sudoku
MARCH FOR BLACK HISTORY
Students will meet in front of KU Friday from at 3 p.m. to march for Black
History Month and share the stories of
black people throughout the U.S. and the
world. The march is sponsored by Black
Action Through Unity (BATU) and the
Office of Multicultural Affairs. For more
information, contact 937-229-3634.
Source: udayton.edu
THE WALKING FORECLOSURES
On Friday, the Montgomery County sheriff’s office held a news conference to
address the allegations that members
of the office sent each other racist texts.
During the time between November
2011 and January 2013, two members
of the force were suspended for the allegations. The Dayton Unit NAACP president said the members should be fired if
the texts are verified. Source: WHIO
As of January, Ohio was ranked fourth
of the U.S. states with the most zombie
foreclosures, which is when the owner
of a foreclosed house is evicted but
discovers he or she has legally owned
the house and is responsible to pay for
property taxes and fees – years down
the line. Although zombie foreclosures
dropped about 35 percent a year ago,
they continue to be a problem in the U.S..
Source: Dayton Daily News
BK BANDIT ‘HAS IT HIS WAY’
Dayton police officers are trying to find
the suspect who robbed the Brown
Street Burger King Friday. Although the
suspect never showed a gun, he apparently had his hand in his pocket as if he
had one. The suspect ran in the direction
of Hot Head Burrito. There were no injuries. Source: Dayton Daily News
TEEN ARRESTED FOR JAYWALKING
A Dayton police officer arrested a teenager for jaywalking on Salem Avenue
Thursday. The arresting officer said the
teen told him she needed to catch her
bus. She asked for a ride, and when she
would not buckle her seatbelt and had to
be cuffed, she was charged with obstruction and jaywalking. Source: WHIO
SUDOKU
WORLD
I DIG YOUR GROOVY TUNES
Have you ever wanted to experience
commentary on social issues in English
and French from a rapper/beatboxer/
singer-songwriter and an Afrobeat/
reggae sensation? The time has finally
come. Musicians Driscoll and Kouyate
will perform in the Boll Theatre in KU,
Thursday at 8 p.m. Students can purchase tickets for $8, and UD faculty, staff
and alumni can attend for $12.
DIFFICULTY // EASY
VocAdFlyerNewsNov2013_Layout 1 10/29/13 4:26 PM Page 1
2
NEWS
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
3
NEWS
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
CAMPUS
MOM SAYS WE’RE SPECIAL
It’s not whether you win or lose. In a
NCAA poll, UD’s men’s basketball team
fans were ranked the fifth most passionate in the nation. The only universities
ranked higher were Syracuse University,
the University of Kentucky, the University
of Arizona and Duke University (No. 1).
Source: Dayton Business Journal
Welcome home
to a life of community, service and prayer
Students showed off their dance moves during CAB’s Culture and Cocktails event at the Mandalay Friday night.
Chris Santucci/Photo Editor
LOCAL
NATION
We invite you to consider
life as a Marianist brother,
priest or sister.
Contact
Bro. Tom Wendorf — [email protected]
or Sr. Nicole Trahan — [email protected]
www.marianist.com
BYE BYE, BRIAN
QDOBA GETS SAUCY
UNC COACH DIES
Brian Williams announced Saturday that
he will take leave from his position as anchor of “NBC Nightly News.” He said the
decision was made because of scrutiny
he’s drawn to the network. Williams has
not yet decided upon plans to return, and
“Dateline” anchor Lester Holt will take his
place. Source: NY Times
Free burritos in exchange for a kiss?
This Valentine’s Day, Qdoba will offer a
buy one, get one free burrito deal – the
catch? You have to kiss someone in line.
Sounds like the perfect place to take
a Valentine’s date … or pick one up.
Source: The Daily Meal
Retired University of North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith died Saturday
in his Chapel Hill home. Smith was 84
years old. He was the winningest coach
in men’s history when he retired, and
won an Olympic gold medal in 1976.
Source: AP
JENNER INVOLVED IN CAR CRASH
BRING IN THE SNOW MISER
FOR A LINEUP
MASS GAY BEACH WEDDING
Bruce Jenner of sporting and reality TV
fame was involved in a deadly car accident this weekend in Malibu, California. Jenner was driving an Escalade and
towing an all-terrain vehicle when he hit
a Lexus and sent it spinning into oncoming traffic, where the Lexus was hit by a
Hummer. Jenner may face vehicular manslaughter charges. Source: CNN
WARM HEART OF AFRICA
The Center for International Programs
and the Office of Multicultural Affairs will
sponsor a Friends of Africa Reception in
KU Torch Lounge, Thursday from 3:30 to
5 p.m. You can meet students, faculty
and staff connected to or interested in
African language and culture. Source:
udayton.edu
Last Sunday, a woman in Racine, Wisconsin, called police to report that her
car had been stolen in the middle of a
snow storm. After half an hour, she called
back to report that she had found her
car, buried under snow by a passing
plough. Source: The Journal Times
Lance Bass, of N’Sync fame, presided
over a mass gay beach wedding Thursday morning in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
The event was called “Love is Love” and
included over 100 couples, gay and
straight, as a celebration of marriage
equality. Florida is the most recent state
to legalize marriage equality, making a
total of 36 states. Source: Refinery29
SHERIFF OFFICE FACES
CHARGES OF RACISM
RIOT LIKE AN EGYPTIAN
A riot broke out outside a major soccer
game in Egypt Sunday night, causing a
stampede that killed at least 25 people.
Officials are unsure what caused the riot,
but said fans tried to force their way in
without tickets. This comes only three
years after a similar soccer match riot
that killed 74 people. Source: AP
NON ME ENCANTA
McDonald’s Mexico began a new ad
campaign last week, which encouraged
Mexicans to buy McBurritos instead of
tamales, with some pictures bearing the
caption “Tamales are a thing from the
past.” The campaign was canceled after
a strong negative reaction from Mexican
tamale fans. Source: ABC
NOT THE OSCARS, SO WHO CARES?
The British Academy of Film and Television Awards took place Sunday at London’s Royal Opera House. “The Theory of
Everything,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
and “Boyhood” were the biggest winners
of the night, each taking home multiple
awards. “Boyhood” was awarded film of
the year. Source: E! Online
KIM JONG BOOM
RED LIGHTS IN ROME
City officials in the Italian capital are
considering adding designated red light
districts in an effort to minimize exploitation of prostitution. Additionally, the city
would provide psychological and health
care to prostitutes in designated areas,
while clients of prostitutes in non designated areas would be subject to fines of
about $550. Source: NBC
North Korea test fired five short-range
missiles into the sea Sunday morning,
according to South Korean officials. The
officials also said this was North Korea’s
second test firing this year. One of the
missiles was a new anti-cruise ship missile, because Kim Jong-un apparently
hates fun. Source: AP.
Solution to Issue 16 sudoku
MARCH FOR BLACK HISTORY
Students will meet in front of KU Friday from at 3 p.m. to march for Black
History Month and share the stories of
black people throughout the U.S. and the
world. The march is sponsored by Black
Action Through Unity (BATU) and the
Office of Multicultural Affairs. For more
information, contact 937-229-3634.
Source: udayton.edu
THE WALKING FORECLOSURES
On Friday, the Montgomery County sheriff’s office held a news conference to
address the allegations that members
of the office sent each other racist texts.
During the time between November
2011 and January 2013, two members
of the force were suspended for the allegations. The Dayton Unit NAACP president said the members should be fired if
the texts are verified. Source: WHIO
As of January, Ohio was ranked fourth
of the U.S. states with the most zombie
foreclosures, which is when the owner
of a foreclosed house is evicted but
discovers he or she has legally owned
the house and is responsible to pay for
property taxes and fees – years down
the line. Although zombie foreclosures
dropped about 35 percent a year ago,
they continue to be a problem in the U.S..
Source: Dayton Daily News
BK BANDIT ‘HAS IT HIS WAY’
Dayton police officers are trying to find
the suspect who robbed the Brown
Street Burger King Friday. Although the
suspect never showed a gun, he apparently had his hand in his pocket as if he
had one. The suspect ran in the direction
of Hot Head Burrito. There were no injuries. Source: Dayton Daily News
TEEN ARRESTED FOR JAYWALKING
A Dayton police officer arrested a teenager for jaywalking on Salem Avenue
Thursday. The arresting officer said the
teen told him she needed to catch her
bus. She asked for a ride, and when she
would not buckle her seatbelt and had to
be cuffed, she was charged with obstruction and jaywalking. Source: WHIO
SUDOKU
WORLD
I DIG YOUR GROOVY TUNES
Have you ever wanted to experience
commentary on social issues in English
and French from a rapper/beatboxer/
singer-songwriter and an Afrobeat/
reggae sensation? The time has finally
come. Musicians Driscoll and Kouyate
will perform in the Boll Theatre in KU,
Thursday at 8 p.m. Students can purchase tickets for $8, and UD faculty, staff
and alumni can attend for $12.
DIFFICULTY // EASY
NEWS
4
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
UD alumnus supports social impact through philanthropic app
EMMA CREEKBAUM
Staff Writer
The social enterprise that helps
people pay it forward, Stand4, is
launching their new live app by
April, according to founder, Andy
Hill.
The idea for Stand4 originated
in August 2013. In January 2014 it
began to take shape into what it is
today.
The idea of Stand4 is for young
people to realize that they can
make an impact in the world whenever they choose without donating
a dime.
“The company enables individuals to create a social impact and to
make their mark on the world,”
Hill said.
The company works by presenting a Stand4 app user with easy
challenges such as taking a picture
with a friend or drinking a cup of
coffee. If a picture is taken and
sent through the app, the user is
allowed to choose the impact they
want to make. For example, a user
can choose to give a child a fresh
cup of water or provide one day of
shelter for an animal. An update
on the impact being made is sent
to the user through the app.
“We believe there should be
more transparency in charity than
there is today,” Hill said.
Charities may lack the technology available, he said, which is
why Stand4 brings updates to users to provide clarity.
The company’s first test run
was at the University of Dayton
during March Madness of 2014.
UD students were able to sign up
through Stand4’s website and start
making a change in the world. For
every person who clicked on the
Stand4 link, a meal would be provided to a local Dayton community
member in need of food.
“UD gave us a proven concept
here that we knew we were on
to something,” Hill said. “It was
cool that the Flyer faithful really
helped us do that. After the platform that UD gave Stand4, an app
was generated for the company
through First Round Capital in
September 2014.”
The public will be able to download the beta March 1. The Stand4
app will be live for iOS and Android users to download by April 1.
Stand4 is also accepting interns to work for their company.
UD alumni, Sean Johnson and Ian
Sauer, worked with Stand4 this
past summer. Johnson is a UD se-
niors, Jake Robinson-Liberman
and Davis Arnold, interned for
the company in Delray Beach,
Florida, where Stand4 is based.
Arnold was the director of
marketing and user acquisition
for Stand4.
“It’s incredibly rewarding
to step back and see how far
something has come that was
once just an idea,” Arnold said.
“What’s even more exciting is
now seeing the endless potential Stand4 has in front
of it.”
Everyone can take a
“stand” and multiple
“stands” with a tap
of a button when the
Stand4 is a fully functioning app by April
this year.
For more information about Stand4 and
the Stand4 app contact
Andy Hill at [email protected]
com or visit stand4.com.
ADVERTISEMENT
5
NEWS
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
Kasich
(cont. from pg. 1)
Gov. Kaisch spoke to UD students
Tuesday.
“I was in Congress 18 years, and
those five minutes in the Oval Office
have been the peak of the time I have
spent there,” Kasich said. The governor attributes his inspiration to beginning a career in government to this
moment in the Oval Office.
Kasich switched topics to his plan
to create tax breaks for some small
business owners. The tax changes are
a part of Kasich’s 2016-2017 fiscal year
budget, which the administration has
titled “Blueprint for a New Ohio.”
The plan would exempt owners of
businesses with less than $2 million in
annual gross receipts from the state’s
personal income taxes. It would also
decrease every Ohioan’s income tax
by 23 percent.
This tax cut would be paid for by
an across-the-board sales tax increase
from 5.7 percent to 6.25 percent, a $1
increase in the sales tax on packs of
cigarettes, a tax increase on oil and gas
drillers and new sales taxes on currently untaxed industries. The proposal
would create a net $500 million tax cut.
The goal of Kasich’s tax plan is to
incentivize Ohioans to open small businesses.
“Small business is the glue that ties
our communities together,” Kasich
said. He emphasized the tax plan would
help small businesses create jobs, saying Ohio has gained over 600,000 jobs
under his tax policies.
“The income tax is the biggest job
killer,” Testa said. He noted the individual income tax makes up 35 percent
of the state’s annual revenue, which he
believes is a sign state government has
become too reliant on income taxes,
the proceeds of which may vary yearto-year as Ohioans’ earnings change.
The Kasich administration’s proposal
would help shift the state from an income tax system to a consumptionbased system.
Kasich and Testa hope these small
business tax cuts encourage students
to stay in Ohio after graduation. They
emphasized the importance of having
Ohio students use their skills as businesspeople or workers to help benefit
the state.
“What would it take for you to stay?”
Kasich asked students. Many students
responded by saying they wanted to
return home to be near their families,
while others said they would be looking for a business-friendly environment after graduation. The governor
said he is working to create such an
environment.
The event also highlighted the
School of Business Administration’s
Entrepreneurship program, ranked
13th nationally by The Princeton Review, and two of its students, Annie
Kyne and Jessica Kerr.
Kyne and Kerr are both involved
with the Flyer Angels program, which
allows students to make private equity
investments in Ohio-based technology
ventures. They are also business plan
competition elevator pitch winners.
“We are both really excited about
Gov. Kasich’s entrepreneurship initiatives,” Kerr said.
Kasich had one final compliment
for the school’s entrepreneurship program before he left.
“You’ve got to be nuts not to participate in this program,” Kasich said.
Help us help the kids!
From February 9 through February 20, for every new account opened at
Day Air Credit Union, we’ll donate $5.00 to Children’s Miracle Network through
UD’s Dance Marathon. This event helps raise money for children who are
battling life-threatening illnesses.
Already have an account with us? Donate $1.00 and we’ll place your name on a
Miracle Worker cutout that we’ll hang within the branch to recognize your support!
Let’s make some miracles happen! Students,
faculty and staff are invited to participate!
Stop by our campus branch in Marianist Hall (Next to the post office).
For more information, call 229-2126, or email us at: [email protected]
TOP STORIES RIGHT TO YOUR INBOX.
Subscribe to Flyer News weekly
email updates at
www.flyernews.com/subscribe.
Andy Hill is the founder of the app Stand4. Photos courtesy of Stand4.
NEWS
4
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
UD alumnus supports social impact through philanthropic app
EMMA CREEKBAUM
Staff Writer
The social enterprise that helps
people pay it forward, Stand4, is
launching their new live app by
April, according to founder, Andy
Hill.
The idea for Stand4 originated
in August 2013. In January 2014 it
began to take shape into what it is
today.
The idea of Stand4 is for young
people to realize that they can
make an impact in the world whenever they choose without donating
a dime.
“The company enables individuals to create a social impact and to
make their mark on the world,”
Hill said.
The company works by presenting a Stand4 app user with easy
challenges such as taking a picture
with a friend or drinking a cup of
coffee. If a picture is taken and
sent through the app, the user is
allowed to choose the impact they
want to make. For example, a user
can choose to give a child a fresh
cup of water or provide one day of
shelter for an animal. An update
on the impact being made is sent
to the user through the app.
“We believe there should be
more transparency in charity than
there is today,” Hill said.
Charities may lack the technology available, he said, which is
why Stand4 brings updates to users to provide clarity.
The company’s first test run
was at the University of Dayton
during March Madness of 2014.
UD students were able to sign up
through Stand4’s website and start
making a change in the world. For
every person who clicked on the
Stand4 link, a meal would be provided to a local Dayton community
member in need of food.
“UD gave us a proven concept
here that we knew we were on
to something,” Hill said. “It was
cool that the Flyer faithful really
helped us do that. After the platform that UD gave Stand4, an app
was generated for the company
through First Round Capital in
September 2014.”
The public will be able to download the beta March 1. The Stand4
app will be live for iOS and Android users to download by April 1.
Stand4 is also accepting interns to work for their company.
UD alumni, Sean Johnson and Ian
Sauer, worked with Stand4 this
past summer. Johnson is a UD se-
niors, Jake Robinson-Liberman
and Davis Arnold, interned for
the company in Delray Beach,
Florida, where Stand4 is based.
Arnold was the director of
marketing and user acquisition
for Stand4.
“It’s incredibly rewarding
to step back and see how far
something has come that was
once just an idea,” Arnold said.
“What’s even more exciting is
now seeing the endless potential Stand4 has in front
of it.”
Everyone can take a
“stand” and multiple
“stands” with a tap
of a button when the
Stand4 is a fully functioning app by April
this year.
For more information about Stand4 and
the Stand4 app contact
Andy Hill at [email protected]
com or visit stand4.com.
ADVERTISEMENT
5
NEWS
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
Kasich
(cont. from pg. 1)
Gov. Kaisch spoke to UD students
Tuesday.
“I was in Congress 18 years, and
those five minutes in the Oval Office
have been the peak of the time I have
spent there,” Kasich said. The governor attributes his inspiration to beginning a career in government to this
moment in the Oval Office.
Kasich switched topics to his plan
to create tax breaks for some small
business owners. The tax changes are
a part of Kasich’s 2016-2017 fiscal year
budget, which the administration has
titled “Blueprint for a New Ohio.”
The plan would exempt owners of
businesses with less than $2 million in
annual gross receipts from the state’s
personal income taxes. It would also
decrease every Ohioan’s income tax
by 23 percent.
This tax cut would be paid for by
an across-the-board sales tax increase
from 5.7 percent to 6.25 percent, a $1
increase in the sales tax on packs of
cigarettes, a tax increase on oil and gas
drillers and new sales taxes on currently untaxed industries. The proposal
would create a net $500 million tax cut.
The goal of Kasich’s tax plan is to
incentivize Ohioans to open small businesses.
“Small business is the glue that ties
our communities together,” Kasich
said. He emphasized the tax plan would
help small businesses create jobs, saying Ohio has gained over 600,000 jobs
under his tax policies.
“The income tax is the biggest job
killer,” Testa said. He noted the individual income tax makes up 35 percent
of the state’s annual revenue, which he
believes is a sign state government has
become too reliant on income taxes,
the proceeds of which may vary yearto-year as Ohioans’ earnings change.
The Kasich administration’s proposal
would help shift the state from an income tax system to a consumptionbased system.
Kasich and Testa hope these small
business tax cuts encourage students
to stay in Ohio after graduation. They
emphasized the importance of having
Ohio students use their skills as businesspeople or workers to help benefit
the state.
“What would it take for you to stay?”
Kasich asked students. Many students
responded by saying they wanted to
return home to be near their families,
while others said they would be looking for a business-friendly environment after graduation. The governor
said he is working to create such an
environment.
The event also highlighted the
School of Business Administration’s
Entrepreneurship program, ranked
13th nationally by The Princeton Review, and two of its students, Annie
Kyne and Jessica Kerr.
Kyne and Kerr are both involved
with the Flyer Angels program, which
allows students to make private equity
investments in Ohio-based technology
ventures. They are also business plan
competition elevator pitch winners.
“We are both really excited about
Gov. Kasich’s entrepreneurship initiatives,” Kerr said.
Kasich had one final compliment
for the school’s entrepreneurship program before he left.
“You’ve got to be nuts not to participate in this program,” Kasich said.
Help us help the kids!
From February 9 through February 20, for every new account opened at
Day Air Credit Union, we’ll donate $5.00 to Children’s Miracle Network through
UD’s Dance Marathon. This event helps raise money for children who are
battling life-threatening illnesses.
Already have an account with us? Donate $1.00 and we’ll place your name on a
Miracle Worker cutout that we’ll hang within the branch to recognize your support!
Let’s make some miracles happen! Students,
faculty and staff are invited to participate!
Stop by our campus branch in Marianist Hall (Next to the post office).
For more information, call 229-2126, or email us at: [email protected]
TOP STORIES RIGHT TO YOUR INBOX.
Subscribe to Flyer News weekly
email updates at
www.flyernews.com/subscribe.
Andy Hill is the founder of the app Stand4. Photos courtesy of Stand4.
NEWS
6
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
New chief financial officer adapts to working, living in Dayton
DEVYN GIANETTI
Staff Writer
New University of Dayton chief
financial officer Andrew Horner
began his position Jan. 12 after
formerly working as Vice President
for Research and Finance Operations at Boston University.
Horner said Boston and Dayton
parallel and contrast in many ways.
“Boston and Dayton are very different markets and there are different relationships and complexities
and I’m still learning a lot about
what the pressures and concerns
are here at the University of Dayton. BU was an urban setting with
a main street in Boston running
right through the campus; there really was no traditional campus like
there is here,” Horner said.
“The cliche word is ‘community,’
but I got that during my interviewing process and was one of the
things that ultimately sold me,”
Horner said. “I thought, ‘I’ve got
to take this job,’ because it was so
welcoming.”
While Horner comes from Boston, Dayton is a familiar place to
him. He married his wife Sarah at
St. Francis in Centerville, Ohio, after she grew up in the Dayton area.
Horner’s main job responsibilities entail all nonacademic areas of
the university, which include facilities management, dining services,
human resources and financial
matters.
“How can we make sure that
we are using our resources as efficiently as possible?” Horner said
about his main focus within all of
these responsibilities. “We need to
stretch every single dollar that we
can to contribute to the mission of
the university and to make sure
that we have the strongest possible
academics and follow through on
our Catholic identity and Marianist values.”
Dealing with financial matters is
one of Horner’s main responsibilities, and he said how UD spends its
money will be important.
“How we use funds here at the
university is the same way I would
think ‘How would I open my own
wallet and spend money on my
kids?’” Horner said. “I treat the
university’s dollars in the same
way that I would treat my own dollars, and I think that’s something
we should all do, no matter what
job we’re in.”
Horner is not exactly sure he
knows about all the changes that
need to be changed. He believes
there are always opportunities to
do more.
“We need to know where we can
do better service and be efficient
with our research,” Horner said.
Any changes will be for the benefit
of the UD community.”
Horner believes student input is
also important and he values student opinions.
“[Student input] could be considered the most important constituency,” Horner said. “My door is
always open, so I’m always happy
to meet with anyone who wants to
talk to me. I’m open to ideas on how
best to engage with the students.”
Horner had positive words to say
about President Daniel Curran.
“As I went through the search I
didn’t really know that President
Curran was stepping down. You always want to know who your boss
is going to be. UD is not one person, and President Curran has ob-
CLASSIFIEDS
HOUSING
Leo’s Quality Student Housing
the Original! Behind Panera
Bread. Secure your housing
for next year fully furnished,
with leather living room sets,
Maytag washer/dryer. Some
homes with marble bathrooms,
off street parking, first class.
Check out our website leosrentals.com or call (937)-456-7743
or cell (937)- 371-1046. Availability 3 to 10 students:
48 and 50 Woodland, 65, 63, 57,
49, 25, 29, 38, 40, 56, 50 Jasper
St. 119 Fairground, 42, 46 and
58 Frank. To make your stay
comfortable and a very enjoyable school year.
Apartments available in the ghetto. 2 bedroom for 3 students, off
street parking, laundry facilities.
Know where you are going to live
next year. Call 937-681-4982
Near UD apartments for 1-5 students. 5 bedroom duplex house
approved for six students. All
viously done a tremendous amount
for this institution in his 12 years
here.”
As a graduate of Notre Dame
University, Horner has advice for
students based on what UD has to
offer.
“When you’re an undergrad it
seems like the real world is so far
away, and then it hits you more
than you expect when you graduate,” Horner said. “Take as many
credit hours as you can. There are
so many great professors here and
so many interesting classes. Really
challenge yourself and get the value for your education that you and
your family are paying a lot for.”
While being CFO of UD takes up
a lot of his day, he always makes
sure he has time for family.
“I have two little girls. Adeline is
almost four and Elise is 20 months,
and so they keep me really, really
busy on the weekends. I like spending as much time with them as possible and my wife, Sarah,” Horner
said. “I love skiing and now I’m in
southwestern Ohio and I’m going to
have to figure out how I’m going to
get my ‘ski-itch’ out. I’m a sports
fan, and being the only guy in the
household can be a challenge and
I’m hoping my girls are going to become sports fans and can turn my
wife into a sports fan.”
Horner has been a part of the
UDcommunity for less than a
month, but this isn’t stopping him
from jumping right into work.
“I need to make sure I’m as supportive as possible, providing the
best administrative services I possibly can to the students, faculty
and staff of the institution,” Horner said. “These are my early days
here and I just couldn’t be more
excited to be in this role.”
STUDENT HOUSING AVAILABLE. 3-4 Bedrooms. Many
amenities, all appliances. Including washer and dryer,
central air conditioning &
off-street parking. Call Mike
at 937-478-1935 or email at [email protected]
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
Library exhibit spotlights courageous rescuers
CAITLIN SCHNEIDER
Staff Writer
“Picturing Moral Courage: The
Rescuers” is a featured exhibition
that opened Feb. 2 in Roesch Library. The event is sponsored by
the University of Dayton’s Human
Rights Center.
The exhibit includes 21 portraits
and personal accounts from survivors of genocide and mass atrocities who risked their lives to rescue
people from enemy groups. These
ordinary people recount their heroic stories from the Holocaust and
the genocides in Rwanda, BosniaHerzegovina and Cambodia.
“The Rescuers” was created by
PROOF: Media for Social Justice,
a nonprofit organization that creates visual documentary projects
for genocide prevention and peacebuilding. PROOF’s goal is to empower future generations to work
for social change.
Leora Kahn, the founder and
executive director of PROOF, was
a featured speaker at The Social
Practice of Human Rights, an academic conference that was held at
UD in 2013.
According to UD political science
professor Joel Pruce, Kahn spoke
eloquently on PROOF’s work in the
area of visual storytelling. She later
“Picturing Moral Courage: The Rescuers,” on display in Roesch Library through Feb. 27, tells the stories of courageous
people who risked their lives to save others from genocide. Joe Buffo/ Staff Photographer.
approached the Human Rights Center about hosting one of her exhibits
on campus.
“[‘The Rescuers’] stood out to
me for, among other reasons, its
ability to fit well with the Rights.
Rites.Writes. theme of ‘Faith and
Reason,’” Pruce said.
The exhibit is designed to raise
awareness for the need to stand up
to the injustices in the world. People
are invited to read these stories and
reflect on their own choices within
society. According to Kahn, everyone has the ability to be a rescuer.
The four photographers in the
exhibit each covered a different
genocide. Riccardo Gangale focused
on Rwanda, Sonia Folkman on the
Holocaust, Nicolas Axelrod on Cam-
bodia and Paul Lowe on Bosnia.
“The pictures are arresting because they capture these individuals in mundane, everyday places:
living rooms, back yards, etcetera,”
Pruce said. “The contrast of how
regular these people are with how
courageous their actions were is
compelling.”
The project began in Rwanda
where Kahn interviewed 30 rescuers. Photos and stories from the
Holocaust and from Cambodia and
Bosnia came after. These ordinary
people told her their stories about
how they risked their own lives to
save others during the Rwandan
genocide. According to Kahn, most
of these people had never shared
their stories before and felt empowered after they did.
“When you are looking at genocide, you don’t often hear about rescuer stories,” Kahn said. “I really
think you learn more from studying
the good things that people can do.”
“The Rescuers” has been showcased around the world in cultural
heritage sites, museums and on college campuses.
“I hope students will learn about
these crises and reflect on questions like: ‘How would I act, if ever
faced with life and death choices?’”
Pruce said. “Ordinary individuals
can make decisions every day that
affect others – but in a way that goes
beyond mere charity.”
“You too can, inch by inch, little
by little, do acts that are social justice acts,” Kahn said.
The exhibit will be held in the
first floor gallery of Roesch Library
through Feb. 27. It is free and open
to the public during regular library
hours.
Unlikely duo blends musical styles at ArtsLIVE
MALLORY ROSHKOWSKI
Staff Writer
Andrew Horner was hired as CFO in January. Photo courtesy of Larry Burgess.
Flyer News reserves the right to reject, alter or omit advertisements. Advertisements must conform to the policies
of Flyer News. For a review of these policies, please contact the Flyer News business office at 847.530.7578; Email:
[email protected]; Website: flyernews.com/advertising.
houses are completely furnished,
dishwasher, washer/dryer. Very
reasonable rates. Call Bob 937938-0919.
7
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
RESERVE YOUR
CLASSIFIED
SPACE TODAY
Contact Advertising Manager,
Will DiFrancesca at
[email protected]
A rapper/beatboxer/singer-song
writer from New York and a West
African musician known for playing the kora will perform together
at the University of Dayton Thursday night. Joe Driscoll and Sekou
Kouyate’s performance is part of
the ArtsLIVE program, supported
by the college of arts and sciences
and partially sponsored by Dayton
City Paper.
ArtsLIVE works to bring artists
to campus that enable audiences to
better understand the joys and challenges of being a human.
Driscoll and Kouyate first came
together at a music festival in Marseille, France, in 2010. With Driscoll
speaking only English and Kouyate
solely speaking French, music became their main form of communication. According to their website,
their initial collaboration in France
lead to the formation of their band,
the recording of their album “Faya”
and more than 120 tour dates across
Europe.
“The result of their collaboration
speaks volumes – and has reached
audiences across continents,” Eileen
Carr, ArtsLIVE coordinator, said.
Cee-Lo Green has labeled Driscoll
as “the gangsta with the iron lung”
due to his unique combination of
hip-hop and folk music. Kouyate
has been frequently called the Jimi
Hendrix of the kora, a 21-string lutebridge-harp used in West Africa.
With talent this extensive, Thursday
night’s performance will be unique
and powerful.
“We’re excited to be able to present these musicians who show us
some of the magic that can happen
when you open yourself up to new
experiences and new worlds,” Carr
said.
On Driscoll and Kouyate’s website, their sound is described as, “a
blend of hip-hop, spoken word, funk,
and soulful, accessible rock with Afrobeat, reggae and irrepressible African grooves.” They have combined
several different elements from their
backgrounds that bring personal ties
into their distinctive sound.
Driscoll and Kouyate are playing at UD as part of a U.S. tour that
started in Boston and will continue
through New York City, Toronto,
Montreal and Chicago.
As part of promotions for the
event, UD’s chapter of the Public
Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) will be hosting table
hours outside of KU on Monday and
Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
PRSSA will pass out flyers with promotional code for a “two-for-one”
ticket deal and a link to a free download of one of Driscoll and Kouyate’s
songs. During the table hours, PRSSA plans to share a playlist of songs
from the new album “Faya” so students can get a taste of what the concert will feature.
Tickets for Joe Driscoll and Sekou
Kouyate’s performance Thursday at 8
p.m. in Boll Theatre are available for
purchase online at go.udayton.edu/
artslive or at the KU Box office by
calling 937-229-2545. Tickets are $12
for UD students, $12 for faculty, staff,
alumni and seniors and $8 for youth.
Sekou Kouyate and Joe Driscoll became an unlikely pair, despite not even
speaking the same language when they met. Photo courtesy of Alex Munro.
NEWS
6
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
New chief financial officer adapts to working, living in Dayton
DEVYN GIANETTI
Staff Writer
New University of Dayton chief
financial officer Andrew Horner
began his position Jan. 12 after
formerly working as Vice President
for Research and Finance Operations at Boston University.
Horner said Boston and Dayton
parallel and contrast in many ways.
“Boston and Dayton are very different markets and there are different relationships and complexities
and I’m still learning a lot about
what the pressures and concerns
are here at the University of Dayton. BU was an urban setting with
a main street in Boston running
right through the campus; there really was no traditional campus like
there is here,” Horner said.
“The cliche word is ‘community,’
but I got that during my interviewing process and was one of the
things that ultimately sold me,”
Horner said. “I thought, ‘I’ve got
to take this job,’ because it was so
welcoming.”
While Horner comes from Boston, Dayton is a familiar place to
him. He married his wife Sarah at
St. Francis in Centerville, Ohio, after she grew up in the Dayton area.
Horner’s main job responsibilities entail all nonacademic areas of
the university, which include facilities management, dining services,
human resources and financial
matters.
“How can we make sure that
we are using our resources as efficiently as possible?” Horner said
about his main focus within all of
these responsibilities. “We need to
stretch every single dollar that we
can to contribute to the mission of
the university and to make sure
that we have the strongest possible
academics and follow through on
our Catholic identity and Marianist values.”
Dealing with financial matters is
one of Horner’s main responsibilities, and he said how UD spends its
money will be important.
“How we use funds here at the
university is the same way I would
think ‘How would I open my own
wallet and spend money on my
kids?’” Horner said. “I treat the
university’s dollars in the same
way that I would treat my own dollars, and I think that’s something
we should all do, no matter what
job we’re in.”
Horner is not exactly sure he
knows about all the changes that
need to be changed. He believes
there are always opportunities to
do more.
“We need to know where we can
do better service and be efficient
with our research,” Horner said.
Any changes will be for the benefit
of the UD community.”
Horner believes student input is
also important and he values student opinions.
“[Student input] could be considered the most important constituency,” Horner said. “My door is
always open, so I’m always happy
to meet with anyone who wants to
talk to me. I’m open to ideas on how
best to engage with the students.”
Horner had positive words to say
about President Daniel Curran.
“As I went through the search I
didn’t really know that President
Curran was stepping down. You always want to know who your boss
is going to be. UD is not one person, and President Curran has ob-
CLASSIFIEDS
HOUSING
Leo’s Quality Student Housing
the Original! Behind Panera
Bread. Secure your housing
for next year fully furnished,
with leather living room sets,
Maytag washer/dryer. Some
homes with marble bathrooms,
off street parking, first class.
Check out our website leosrentals.com or call (937)-456-7743
or cell (937)- 371-1046. Availability 3 to 10 students:
48 and 50 Woodland, 65, 63, 57,
49, 25, 29, 38, 40, 56, 50 Jasper
St. 119 Fairground, 42, 46 and
58 Frank. To make your stay
comfortable and a very enjoyable school year.
Apartments available in the ghetto. 2 bedroom for 3 students, off
street parking, laundry facilities.
Know where you are going to live
next year. Call 937-681-4982
Near UD apartments for 1-5 students. 5 bedroom duplex house
approved for six students. All
viously done a tremendous amount
for this institution in his 12 years
here.”
As a graduate of Notre Dame
University, Horner has advice for
students based on what UD has to
offer.
“When you’re an undergrad it
seems like the real world is so far
away, and then it hits you more
than you expect when you graduate,” Horner said. “Take as many
credit hours as you can. There are
so many great professors here and
so many interesting classes. Really
challenge yourself and get the value for your education that you and
your family are paying a lot for.”
While being CFO of UD takes up
a lot of his day, he always makes
sure he has time for family.
“I have two little girls. Adeline is
almost four and Elise is 20 months,
and so they keep me really, really
busy on the weekends. I like spending as much time with them as possible and my wife, Sarah,” Horner
said. “I love skiing and now I’m in
southwestern Ohio and I’m going to
have to figure out how I’m going to
get my ‘ski-itch’ out. I’m a sports
fan, and being the only guy in the
household can be a challenge and
I’m hoping my girls are going to become sports fans and can turn my
wife into a sports fan.”
Horner has been a part of the
UDcommunity for less than a
month, but this isn’t stopping him
from jumping right into work.
“I need to make sure I’m as supportive as possible, providing the
best administrative services I possibly can to the students, faculty
and staff of the institution,” Horner said. “These are my early days
here and I just couldn’t be more
excited to be in this role.”
STUDENT HOUSING AVAILABLE. 3-4 Bedrooms. Many
amenities, all appliances. Including washer and dryer,
central air conditioning &
off-street parking. Call Mike
at 937-478-1935 or email at [email protected]
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
Library exhibit spotlights courageous rescuers
CAITLIN SCHNEIDER
Staff Writer
“Picturing Moral Courage: The
Rescuers” is a featured exhibition
that opened Feb. 2 in Roesch Library. The event is sponsored by
the University of Dayton’s Human
Rights Center.
The exhibit includes 21 portraits
and personal accounts from survivors of genocide and mass atrocities who risked their lives to rescue
people from enemy groups. These
ordinary people recount their heroic stories from the Holocaust and
the genocides in Rwanda, BosniaHerzegovina and Cambodia.
“The Rescuers” was created by
PROOF: Media for Social Justice,
a nonprofit organization that creates visual documentary projects
for genocide prevention and peacebuilding. PROOF’s goal is to empower future generations to work
for social change.
Leora Kahn, the founder and
executive director of PROOF, was
a featured speaker at The Social
Practice of Human Rights, an academic conference that was held at
UD in 2013.
According to UD political science
professor Joel Pruce, Kahn spoke
eloquently on PROOF’s work in the
area of visual storytelling. She later
“Picturing Moral Courage: The Rescuers,” on display in Roesch Library through Feb. 27, tells the stories of courageous
people who risked their lives to save others from genocide. Joe Buffo/ Staff Photographer.
approached the Human Rights Center about hosting one of her exhibits
on campus.
“[‘The Rescuers’] stood out to
me for, among other reasons, its
ability to fit well with the Rights.
Rites.Writes. theme of ‘Faith and
Reason,’” Pruce said.
The exhibit is designed to raise
awareness for the need to stand up
to the injustices in the world. People
are invited to read these stories and
reflect on their own choices within
society. According to Kahn, everyone has the ability to be a rescuer.
The four photographers in the
exhibit each covered a different
genocide. Riccardo Gangale focused
on Rwanda, Sonia Folkman on the
Holocaust, Nicolas Axelrod on Cam-
bodia and Paul Lowe on Bosnia.
“The pictures are arresting because they capture these individuals in mundane, everyday places:
living rooms, back yards, etcetera,”
Pruce said. “The contrast of how
regular these people are with how
courageous their actions were is
compelling.”
The project began in Rwanda
where Kahn interviewed 30 rescuers. Photos and stories from the
Holocaust and from Cambodia and
Bosnia came after. These ordinary
people told her their stories about
how they risked their own lives to
save others during the Rwandan
genocide. According to Kahn, most
of these people had never shared
their stories before and felt empowered after they did.
“When you are looking at genocide, you don’t often hear about rescuer stories,” Kahn said. “I really
think you learn more from studying
the good things that people can do.”
“The Rescuers” has been showcased around the world in cultural
heritage sites, museums and on college campuses.
“I hope students will learn about
these crises and reflect on questions like: ‘How would I act, if ever
faced with life and death choices?’”
Pruce said. “Ordinary individuals
can make decisions every day that
affect others – but in a way that goes
beyond mere charity.”
“You too can, inch by inch, little
by little, do acts that are social justice acts,” Kahn said.
The exhibit will be held in the
first floor gallery of Roesch Library
through Feb. 27. It is free and open
to the public during regular library
hours.
Unlikely duo blends musical styles at ArtsLIVE
MALLORY ROSHKOWSKI
Staff Writer
Andrew Horner was hired as CFO in January. Photo courtesy of Larry Burgess.
Flyer News reserves the right to reject, alter or omit advertisements. Advertisements must conform to the policies
of Flyer News. For a review of these policies, please contact the Flyer News business office at 847.530.7578; Email:
[email protected]; Website: flyernews.com/advertising.
houses are completely furnished,
dishwasher, washer/dryer. Very
reasonable rates. Call Bob 937938-0919.
7
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
RESERVE YOUR
CLASSIFIED
SPACE TODAY
Contact Advertising Manager,
Will DiFrancesca at
[email protected]
A rapper/beatboxer/singer-song
writer from New York and a West
African musician known for playing the kora will perform together
at the University of Dayton Thursday night. Joe Driscoll and Sekou
Kouyate’s performance is part of
the ArtsLIVE program, supported
by the college of arts and sciences
and partially sponsored by Dayton
City Paper.
ArtsLIVE works to bring artists
to campus that enable audiences to
better understand the joys and challenges of being a human.
Driscoll and Kouyate first came
together at a music festival in Marseille, France, in 2010. With Driscoll
speaking only English and Kouyate
solely speaking French, music became their main form of communication. According to their website,
their initial collaboration in France
lead to the formation of their band,
the recording of their album “Faya”
and more than 120 tour dates across
Europe.
“The result of their collaboration
speaks volumes – and has reached
audiences across continents,” Eileen
Carr, ArtsLIVE coordinator, said.
Cee-Lo Green has labeled Driscoll
as “the gangsta with the iron lung”
due to his unique combination of
hip-hop and folk music. Kouyate
has been frequently called the Jimi
Hendrix of the kora, a 21-string lutebridge-harp used in West Africa.
With talent this extensive, Thursday
night’s performance will be unique
and powerful.
“We’re excited to be able to present these musicians who show us
some of the magic that can happen
when you open yourself up to new
experiences and new worlds,” Carr
said.
On Driscoll and Kouyate’s website, their sound is described as, “a
blend of hip-hop, spoken word, funk,
and soulful, accessible rock with Afrobeat, reggae and irrepressible African grooves.” They have combined
several different elements from their
backgrounds that bring personal ties
into their distinctive sound.
Driscoll and Kouyate are playing at UD as part of a U.S. tour that
started in Boston and will continue
through New York City, Toronto,
Montreal and Chicago.
As part of promotions for the
event, UD’s chapter of the Public
Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) will be hosting table
hours outside of KU on Monday and
Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
PRSSA will pass out flyers with promotional code for a “two-for-one”
ticket deal and a link to a free download of one of Driscoll and Kouyate’s
songs. During the table hours, PRSSA plans to share a playlist of songs
from the new album “Faya” so students can get a taste of what the concert will feature.
Tickets for Joe Driscoll and Sekou
Kouyate’s performance Thursday at 8
p.m. in Boll Theatre are available for
purchase online at go.udayton.edu/
artslive or at the KU Box office by
calling 937-229-2545. Tickets are $12
for UD students, $12 for faculty, staff,
alumni and seniors and $8 for youth.
Sekou Kouyate and Joe Driscoll became an unlikely pair, despite not even
speaking the same language when they met. Photo courtesy of Alex Munro.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
8
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
COLUMN
‘50 shades’ mania hits
Dayton Valentine’s weekend
MARY KATE DORR
Asst. A&E Editor
Valentine’s Day is a holiday that
receives extreme reactions year after
year. There are the bitter “I’m dying
alone with 15 cats” singles, the couples who already have their weddings
planned and post kissing photos on social media and then there’s the rest of
us who carry on with life as usual, be
it with or without a significant other.
This Feb. 14, however, will be met
with anticipation by women and
men who have devoured E.L. James’
“Fifty Shades of Grey” trilogy as the
first film hits theaters. Since, apparently, making a novel based on an
X-rated dominant relationship into a
movie doesn’t cross the line quite far
enough, there now exists a musical
parody version as well. “50 Shades!
The Musical Parody” has left New
York City and will show at Dayton’s
Victoria Theater Feb. 17.
The musical parody centers
around three girlfriends reading “Fifty Shades of Grey” as part of their
book club, and the obsession they develop with the relationship between
college student Anastasia Steele and
unrealistically young and attractive
corporate CEO Christian Grey. The
affair between Steele and Grey comes
to life in front of the book club as they
consume the novel.
When I say the affair comes to life,
it REALLY comes to life – with lots of
leather. And whips and chains and
masks and many other non-G-rated
attributes.
For those unfamiliar with the
novel, Steele and Grey meet as she
is interviewing him for her student
newspaper and embark on a twisted,
disturbing relationship in which
emotionally stunted Grey controls all
aspects of Steele’s life. This includes
working out with a personal trainer
multiple times a week. For that reason alone, I refute the “Fifty Shades
of Grey” obsession. Please give me
the name of one woman who fantasizes about a man forcing her to go to
the gym regularly. She doesn’t exist.
And if she does, she’s lying. Sorry to
disappoint.
This satire brings to life this weird
and completely unrealistic affair
through song, because some people
PROFILE
just don’t know when to stop. Titles include “Could This Be the One,” “How
Much Can I Take,” and, of course, “50
Shades!” In case you were wondering,
every single one of them is listed as
explicit on iTunes. I would include
some of the lyrics to pique your interest even more, but sometimes my
grandmother reads my articles so I’d
really rather not.
The (censored) reviews promise
a hilarious, exhilarating and sassy
show. Personally, I read one chapter
of the novel and am still slightly traumatized so I might pass, but you know,
people must love it for a reason.
Ladies, in my opinion, this is a
great alternative to dragging your
boyfriend to the movie on Valentine’s
Day because candlelit dinners are so
overrated when you can watch a relationship much more dysfunctional
than yours come to life via show
tunes.
Tickets at the Victoria Theater
range from $42-$47 and it is recommended for ages 18 and up. For more
information regarding the show or
tickets, please visit www.ticketcenterstage.com.
KATY HOEPER
Staff Writer
Lobby 4 (In C for Two Virgins)”
1.“Chateau
FATHER JOHN MISTY
Don't Mind”
2.“ITWERPS
Latin”
3.“Boys
PANDA BEAR
‘n’ Roll Is Cold”
4.“Rock
MATTHEW E. WHITE
Me”
5.“Melt
HANNI EL KHATIB
Our Friends”
6.“Bury
SLEATER-KINNEY
Blah Blah”
7.“Blah
GIRLPOOL
Love You Too”
8.“IDARLINGS
9.“Competition”
THE DODOS
in the Dark”
10.“Nights
CALIFORNIA X
Ladder 11 to host Cleveland-based band Friday
CARI ZAHN
Staff Writer
Attention music fans looking for
something to do Valentine’s Day
weekend: Eclectic Cleveland rock
band, Yosemight, will perform at Jimmie’s Ladder 11 Friday.
The band plays many types of
music ranging from funk to jazz,
progressive rock to Americana and
everything in between. Yosemight
hasn’t branded their tunes with just
one genre, but their strong improvisational element keeps their music
interesting and alive.
“We all carry our own flavors to
the mix,” said Luke Bergan, Yosemight guitarist.
Bergan launched the band in 2012
with bassist Nick Shaver. Drummer
Tony Kazel joined the duo in 2014, and
they have since added a piano, trumpet and trombone to their sound.
Each member of the band plays a
vital role in their sound as a whole,
Bergan said. They are able to combine each band members’ style in
order to create a sound all their own.
This is not Yosemight’s first time
playing in Dayton, and they are excit-
Yosemight combines musical styles to accomodate each member and create a unique sound.
Photo courtesy of Tom Wickstrom.
ed to be back with support from their
community of friends here, along
with seeing some new faces at this
show. The band promises at least a
few surprises for each show, whether
it has to do with their songs or their
flashy production. They strive to put
on a unique performance every time
they play. Audiences at a Yosemight
show can expect a visually stimulat-
ing performance complete with lights
and lasers, but the real surprises lie
within their music.
“We continually throw in new
tunes, have guest sit-ins or play some-
thing different to brand each show its
own special evening,” Bergan said.
Aside from their upcoming Dayton performance, Yosemight has
a lot in store for the future of their
band. Their album can be accessed
and downloaded for free at yosemight.com, and they have merchandise
available ranging anywhere from Tshirts to winter hats.
They are slated for several upcoming shows along with performances
at summer music festivals such as
The Ville, May Daze, Tribal Connection, Family Roots and more. Yosemight hopes to release a music video in
the near future.
A raging horn section and a
show full of unique songs that cross
the borders of several genres is what
students have to look forward to
when deciding to attend this show.
Yosemight is offering a discounted
cover charge for students.
Yosemight will perform at Jimmie’s
Ladder 11, 936 Brown St., Friday.
Doors open at 9:30 p.m., and the band
will perform at 9:45. There will be a $7
cover charge, but students get in for $5
with a student ID. For more information, please visit yosemight.com.
9
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
FN: So how did you ladies meet?
Mary Kate Carroll: Olivia, Anna,
Carolyn and myself all lived on the
same floor in Marycrest.
Claire Quinn: And Lizzy and I lived
on the same floor in Founders.
Olivia Hirt: Before school started,
Maggie and I met on a retreat.
Lizzy Riddle: For me, during the
first weekend of freshman year,
Mary Kate and I met in the student
neighborhood, and she said, “Are
you a freshman?” And I said, “Yes.”
And she said, “I’m a freshman too.”
And at the end of the night she told
me—
MC: “Text me tomorrow and remind me that I love you.”
LR: So the next day, I texted her
saying, “I’m Lizzy Riddle, and we
are friends.”
MC: Oh, the story of me meeting
Claire is embarrassing. When I
first met her, I said –
CQ: “Hey are you Claire Quinn? I
stalked you on Facebook.”
MC: In my defense, I knew someone
from home who knew her and told
me to room with her.
FN: Care to share your most embarrassing moment at UD?
OH: The second week of freshman
year, Anna sharted her pants, and
she texted me from the bathroom
to bring her a fresh pair of underwear. I barely even knew her.
MC: Well, mine was probably when
I woke up to the police banging on
my bedroom door. Not our house
door. Bedroom door.
OH: Apparently, our back door was
open the whole night.
Maggie Quinn: Which was awesome to find out, since I was sleeping on the couch that night.
LR: Tell her why you were sleeping
there.
MQ: I don’t want to.
Anna Combs: Maggie wet the bed.
CQ: Carol and Maggie stole traffic
cones.
Carolyn Wahlen: It’s true. We almost got arrested. We got yelled at,
and they told us to go home right
then, so I turned to Maggie and go,
“Bye Maggie,” and she went, “Bye
Carol,” and then we ran off in opposite directions.
LR: I think my shining moment was
The Women of
20 & 22 Woodland
when the police came to return my
phone and credit card and I was
wearing a party police sweatshirt.
Sobbing at the door.
MC: As you can tell, we and the UD
police go way back.
CW: Claire Quinn’s is when she
bonged six beers at a day drink.
CQ: That wasn’t embarrassing, it
was impressive.
FN: What’s on your UD bucket
list?
CW: See “Lemme Smang It” by
Yung Humma, ft. Flynt Flossy, in
concert.
CQ: A Tim’s VIP card.
MC: Have a bar crawl from Applebee’s to Chili’s to TGI Fridays and
end at Tim’s.
LR: I want UD to win the NCAA so
we can riot again. Long live March
Madness 2K14.
CW: Host a day drink.
LR: Yes. A Saturday afternoon,
Amish-themed, day drink. I’ve already bought my denim dress.
MQ: Butt tattoos.
AC: Matching butt tattoos.
OH: Matching Space Jam butt tattoos.
MQ: It’s so tasteful.
OH: We tried once, but [the tattoo
parlor] was closed.
LR: Not me. I am very against it.
AC: But it’s Michael Jordan and
Bugs Bunny!
LR: That’s ink on your skin forever!
AC: It’s just a butt!
LR: Think about how beautiful and
wonderful that butt was when it
came out of your mother’s womb!
AC: But everyone will know I was
cool when I’m a grandma.
MC: Who will you be mooning as
a grandma? I’m with Lizzy on this
one. I think it is on her and my
bucket lists to simply be spectators
while they get these tattoos.
FN: Give everyone in your house
a superlative.
MQ: Mary Kate is Most Likely to
Lay in Everyone’s Bed.
AC: Lizzy is Most Likely to Plan Everyone’s Weddings.
CW: Or Break Out in Song. Most
Likely to Never Eat Spam: Claire.
Most Likely to Force Her to Eat
Spam: me.
AC: Most Likely to Lose all of her
Belongings: Maggie Quinn.
MC: Olivia is Most Likely to Sleep
Carolyn Wahlen, Anna Combs, Claire Quinn, Mary Kate Carroll, Maggie Quinn, Lizzy Riddle and Olivia Hirt want matching
butt tattoos. Photo courtesy of the ladies of 20 & 22 Woodland.
All Day if You Let Her.
MQ: She has time management
skills like none other, in her defense.
MC: Claire is Most Likely to be
Seen Eating Hummus.
MQ: Anna is Most Likely to Make
us Pancakes.
AC: Carolyn is Most Likely to Severely Piss Someone Off by Trying
to be Nice and Funny.
LR: Or Most Likely to be at the
Wrong Place at the Wrong Time.
CW: It’s true. Every single wrong
place. At every single wrong time.
FN: If you were visiting for your
10-year reunion, what would everyone be up to?
OH: Bargo’s Crazy Hour.
LR: We probably won’t have left.
AC: Liv is going to be a doctor and
a mother of 10.
MQ: She will have delivered Liv’s
eight children by then.
LR: Maggie will still not know
where her phone is.
CW: Claire will be a huge meat addict.
LR: Working at the No. 1 meat packing company.
CW: Anna will be married with the
cutest family ever.
CQ: Teaching somewhere.
AC: I bet MK will still be dartying
every Saturday.
CQ: Lizzy will be a very successful
businesswoman.
CW: And I will not.
AC: Carol would be in Guatemala
or Peru.
CQ: Yeah, doing some nonprofit
work.
MC: With a hot Latino-lover-husband.
CW: Mag will be a softball coach at
the local high school.
MQ: I’ve been told I have softball
hands.
FN: What Disney character does
each roommate most closely resemble?
CW: I say Anna is Belle.
AC: Liv is Sleeping Beauty.
OH: Do I really sleep that much?
AC: Yes! You slept for 13 hours yesterday!
MQ: She is awake for six hours less
than me, but she is more productive
in that span than I am all day.
LR: Maggie is Dory from “Finding
Nemo,” and I’ll tell you why.
MQ: Everyone is a princess but me!
LR: Because Dory has the kindest
intentions, but always forgets her
stuff.
MC: Lizzy would be the girl from
“Enchanted.”
LR: Giselle.
AC: I see Claire as Snow White.
LR: Yeah, because of the cleaning
thing.
CW: And also all the boys.
OH: Carolyn, you are Mulan.
CW: Okay, but only because of Li
Shang.
MQ: Mary Kate is Jasmine mixed
with…
LR: The naked mole rat.
MQ: (singing) What is that? That
freaky thing?
FN: Describe each other in one
word.
CW: Liv is wise.
OH: Guys, it’s like I’m an 80-yearold man! I sleep all day, and I’m
wise!
MQ: Anna is playful.
CW: Claire is kind through and
through.
LR: MK…
MQ: Goof.
MQ: Elizabeth…
MKC: Spunky.
LR: Joyful for Maggie. Wait, scratch
that. Batsh-t crazy.
CQ: Carolyn is compassionate.
FN: If you knew you could stay
at a certain age forever, what
would it be, and why?
LR: Twenty-one. If I could just live
in this house forever with these
people and share this joy forever,
I think that would be a pretty good
life.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
8
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
COLUMN
‘50 shades’ mania hits
Dayton Valentine’s weekend
MARY KATE DORR
Asst. A&E Editor
Valentine’s Day is a holiday that
receives extreme reactions year after
year. There are the bitter “I’m dying
alone with 15 cats” singles, the couples who already have their weddings
planned and post kissing photos on social media and then there’s the rest of
us who carry on with life as usual, be
it with or without a significant other.
This Feb. 14, however, will be met
with anticipation by women and
men who have devoured E.L. James’
“Fifty Shades of Grey” trilogy as the
first film hits theaters. Since, apparently, making a novel based on an
X-rated dominant relationship into a
movie doesn’t cross the line quite far
enough, there now exists a musical
parody version as well. “50 Shades!
The Musical Parody” has left New
York City and will show at Dayton’s
Victoria Theater Feb. 17.
The musical parody centers
around three girlfriends reading “Fifty Shades of Grey” as part of their
book club, and the obsession they develop with the relationship between
college student Anastasia Steele and
unrealistically young and attractive
corporate CEO Christian Grey. The
affair between Steele and Grey comes
to life in front of the book club as they
consume the novel.
When I say the affair comes to life,
it REALLY comes to life – with lots of
leather. And whips and chains and
masks and many other non-G-rated
attributes.
For those unfamiliar with the
novel, Steele and Grey meet as she
is interviewing him for her student
newspaper and embark on a twisted,
disturbing relationship in which
emotionally stunted Grey controls all
aspects of Steele’s life. This includes
working out with a personal trainer
multiple times a week. For that reason alone, I refute the “Fifty Shades
of Grey” obsession. Please give me
the name of one woman who fantasizes about a man forcing her to go to
the gym regularly. She doesn’t exist.
And if she does, she’s lying. Sorry to
disappoint.
This satire brings to life this weird
and completely unrealistic affair
through song, because some people
PROFILE
just don’t know when to stop. Titles include “Could This Be the One,” “How
Much Can I Take,” and, of course, “50
Shades!” In case you were wondering,
every single one of them is listed as
explicit on iTunes. I would include
some of the lyrics to pique your interest even more, but sometimes my
grandmother reads my articles so I’d
really rather not.
The (censored) reviews promise
a hilarious, exhilarating and sassy
show. Personally, I read one chapter
of the novel and am still slightly traumatized so I might pass, but you know,
people must love it for a reason.
Ladies, in my opinion, this is a
great alternative to dragging your
boyfriend to the movie on Valentine’s
Day because candlelit dinners are so
overrated when you can watch a relationship much more dysfunctional
than yours come to life via show
tunes.
Tickets at the Victoria Theater
range from $42-$47 and it is recommended for ages 18 and up. For more
information regarding the show or
tickets, please visit www.ticketcenterstage.com.
KATY HOEPER
Staff Writer
Lobby 4 (In C for Two Virgins)”
1.“Chateau
FATHER JOHN MISTY
Don't Mind”
2.“ITWERPS
Latin”
3.“Boys
PANDA BEAR
‘n’ Roll Is Cold”
4.“Rock
MATTHEW E. WHITE
Me”
5.“Melt
HANNI EL KHATIB
Our Friends”
6.“Bury
SLEATER-KINNEY
Blah Blah”
7.“Blah
GIRLPOOL
Love You Too”
8.“IDARLINGS
9.“Competition”
THE DODOS
in the Dark”
10.“Nights
CALIFORNIA X
Ladder 11 to host Cleveland-based band Friday
CARI ZAHN
Staff Writer
Attention music fans looking for
something to do Valentine’s Day
weekend: Eclectic Cleveland rock
band, Yosemight, will perform at Jimmie’s Ladder 11 Friday.
The band plays many types of
music ranging from funk to jazz,
progressive rock to Americana and
everything in between. Yosemight
hasn’t branded their tunes with just
one genre, but their strong improvisational element keeps their music
interesting and alive.
“We all carry our own flavors to
the mix,” said Luke Bergan, Yosemight guitarist.
Bergan launched the band in 2012
with bassist Nick Shaver. Drummer
Tony Kazel joined the duo in 2014, and
they have since added a piano, trumpet and trombone to their sound.
Each member of the band plays a
vital role in their sound as a whole,
Bergan said. They are able to combine each band members’ style in
order to create a sound all their own.
This is not Yosemight’s first time
playing in Dayton, and they are excit-
Yosemight combines musical styles to accomodate each member and create a unique sound.
Photo courtesy of Tom Wickstrom.
ed to be back with support from their
community of friends here, along
with seeing some new faces at this
show. The band promises at least a
few surprises for each show, whether
it has to do with their songs or their
flashy production. They strive to put
on a unique performance every time
they play. Audiences at a Yosemight
show can expect a visually stimulat-
ing performance complete with lights
and lasers, but the real surprises lie
within their music.
“We continually throw in new
tunes, have guest sit-ins or play some-
thing different to brand each show its
own special evening,” Bergan said.
Aside from their upcoming Dayton performance, Yosemight has
a lot in store for the future of their
band. Their album can be accessed
and downloaded for free at yosemight.com, and they have merchandise
available ranging anywhere from Tshirts to winter hats.
They are slated for several upcoming shows along with performances
at summer music festivals such as
The Ville, May Daze, Tribal Connection, Family Roots and more. Yosemight hopes to release a music video in
the near future.
A raging horn section and a
show full of unique songs that cross
the borders of several genres is what
students have to look forward to
when deciding to attend this show.
Yosemight is offering a discounted
cover charge for students.
Yosemight will perform at Jimmie’s
Ladder 11, 936 Brown St., Friday.
Doors open at 9:30 p.m., and the band
will perform at 9:45. There will be a $7
cover charge, but students get in for $5
with a student ID. For more information, please visit yosemight.com.
9
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
FN: So how did you ladies meet?
Mary Kate Carroll: Olivia, Anna,
Carolyn and myself all lived on the
same floor in Marycrest.
Claire Quinn: And Lizzy and I lived
on the same floor in Founders.
Olivia Hirt: Before school started,
Maggie and I met on a retreat.
Lizzy Riddle: For me, during the
first weekend of freshman year,
Mary Kate and I met in the student
neighborhood, and she said, “Are
you a freshman?” And I said, “Yes.”
And she said, “I’m a freshman too.”
And at the end of the night she told
me—
MC: “Text me tomorrow and remind me that I love you.”
LR: So the next day, I texted her
saying, “I’m Lizzy Riddle, and we
are friends.”
MC: Oh, the story of me meeting
Claire is embarrassing. When I
first met her, I said –
CQ: “Hey are you Claire Quinn? I
stalked you on Facebook.”
MC: In my defense, I knew someone
from home who knew her and told
me to room with her.
FN: Care to share your most embarrassing moment at UD?
OH: The second week of freshman
year, Anna sharted her pants, and
she texted me from the bathroom
to bring her a fresh pair of underwear. I barely even knew her.
MC: Well, mine was probably when
I woke up to the police banging on
my bedroom door. Not our house
door. Bedroom door.
OH: Apparently, our back door was
open the whole night.
Maggie Quinn: Which was awesome to find out, since I was sleeping on the couch that night.
LR: Tell her why you were sleeping
there.
MQ: I don’t want to.
Anna Combs: Maggie wet the bed.
CQ: Carol and Maggie stole traffic
cones.
Carolyn Wahlen: It’s true. We almost got arrested. We got yelled at,
and they told us to go home right
then, so I turned to Maggie and go,
“Bye Maggie,” and she went, “Bye
Carol,” and then we ran off in opposite directions.
LR: I think my shining moment was
The Women of
20 & 22 Woodland
when the police came to return my
phone and credit card and I was
wearing a party police sweatshirt.
Sobbing at the door.
MC: As you can tell, we and the UD
police go way back.
CW: Claire Quinn’s is when she
bonged six beers at a day drink.
CQ: That wasn’t embarrassing, it
was impressive.
FN: What’s on your UD bucket
list?
CW: See “Lemme Smang It” by
Yung Humma, ft. Flynt Flossy, in
concert.
CQ: A Tim’s VIP card.
MC: Have a bar crawl from Applebee’s to Chili’s to TGI Fridays and
end at Tim’s.
LR: I want UD to win the NCAA so
we can riot again. Long live March
Madness 2K14.
CW: Host a day drink.
LR: Yes. A Saturday afternoon,
Amish-themed, day drink. I’ve already bought my denim dress.
MQ: Butt tattoos.
AC: Matching butt tattoos.
OH: Matching Space Jam butt tattoos.
MQ: It’s so tasteful.
OH: We tried once, but [the tattoo
parlor] was closed.
LR: Not me. I am very against it.
AC: But it’s Michael Jordan and
Bugs Bunny!
LR: That’s ink on your skin forever!
AC: It’s just a butt!
LR: Think about how beautiful and
wonderful that butt was when it
came out of your mother’s womb!
AC: But everyone will know I was
cool when I’m a grandma.
MC: Who will you be mooning as
a grandma? I’m with Lizzy on this
one. I think it is on her and my
bucket lists to simply be spectators
while they get these tattoos.
FN: Give everyone in your house
a superlative.
MQ: Mary Kate is Most Likely to
Lay in Everyone’s Bed.
AC: Lizzy is Most Likely to Plan Everyone’s Weddings.
CW: Or Break Out in Song. Most
Likely to Never Eat Spam: Claire.
Most Likely to Force Her to Eat
Spam: me.
AC: Most Likely to Lose all of her
Belongings: Maggie Quinn.
MC: Olivia is Most Likely to Sleep
Carolyn Wahlen, Anna Combs, Claire Quinn, Mary Kate Carroll, Maggie Quinn, Lizzy Riddle and Olivia Hirt want matching
butt tattoos. Photo courtesy of the ladies of 20 & 22 Woodland.
All Day if You Let Her.
MQ: She has time management
skills like none other, in her defense.
MC: Claire is Most Likely to be
Seen Eating Hummus.
MQ: Anna is Most Likely to Make
us Pancakes.
AC: Carolyn is Most Likely to Severely Piss Someone Off by Trying
to be Nice and Funny.
LR: Or Most Likely to be at the
Wrong Place at the Wrong Time.
CW: It’s true. Every single wrong
place. At every single wrong time.
FN: If you were visiting for your
10-year reunion, what would everyone be up to?
OH: Bargo’s Crazy Hour.
LR: We probably won’t have left.
AC: Liv is going to be a doctor and
a mother of 10.
MQ: She will have delivered Liv’s
eight children by then.
LR: Maggie will still not know
where her phone is.
CW: Claire will be a huge meat addict.
LR: Working at the No. 1 meat packing company.
CW: Anna will be married with the
cutest family ever.
CQ: Teaching somewhere.
AC: I bet MK will still be dartying
every Saturday.
CQ: Lizzy will be a very successful
businesswoman.
CW: And I will not.
AC: Carol would be in Guatemala
or Peru.
CQ: Yeah, doing some nonprofit
work.
MC: With a hot Latino-lover-husband.
CW: Mag will be a softball coach at
the local high school.
MQ: I’ve been told I have softball
hands.
FN: What Disney character does
each roommate most closely resemble?
CW: I say Anna is Belle.
AC: Liv is Sleeping Beauty.
OH: Do I really sleep that much?
AC: Yes! You slept for 13 hours yesterday!
MQ: She is awake for six hours less
than me, but she is more productive
in that span than I am all day.
LR: Maggie is Dory from “Finding
Nemo,” and I’ll tell you why.
MQ: Everyone is a princess but me!
LR: Because Dory has the kindest
intentions, but always forgets her
stuff.
MC: Lizzy would be the girl from
“Enchanted.”
LR: Giselle.
AC: I see Claire as Snow White.
LR: Yeah, because of the cleaning
thing.
CW: And also all the boys.
OH: Carolyn, you are Mulan.
CW: Okay, but only because of Li
Shang.
MQ: Mary Kate is Jasmine mixed
with…
LR: The naked mole rat.
MQ: (singing) What is that? That
freaky thing?
FN: Describe each other in one
word.
CW: Liv is wise.
OH: Guys, it’s like I’m an 80-yearold man! I sleep all day, and I’m
wise!
MQ: Anna is playful.
CW: Claire is kind through and
through.
LR: MK…
MQ: Goof.
MQ: Elizabeth…
MKC: Spunky.
LR: Joyful for Maggie. Wait, scratch
that. Batsh-t crazy.
CQ: Carolyn is compassionate.
FN: If you knew you could stay
at a certain age forever, what
would it be, and why?
LR: Twenty-one. If I could just live
in this house forever with these
people and share this joy forever,
I think that would be a pretty good
life.
OPINIONS
10
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: Only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate: Only love can do that.”
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Paper towel dispenser change relieves frustration
LOVE THE DAYTON COMMUNITY
BREAK OUT FROM THE UD BUBBLE
This weekend will mark the annual culmination of what has been
two months of marketing, pink balloons and chocolates. Honestly, we’re
glad that there is no such genre as Valentine’s music, or else every other
song on the radio would have been inundated with sappy, drippy tunes
beginning Dec. 26.
But, when all of the clearance chocolate is gone, UD’s annual donation drive will still be chugging along, encouraging us and our alumni
to donate our time, money and effort to the community. We know how
much UD promotes community. In fact, they use it so much that it almost
seems as though many students have been able to tune it out whenever
they hear it in conversation.
It can be easy to define our community as just what’s in and around
our campus, what’s usually referred to as the “UD bubble,” but there is
so much more that we aren’t considering.
There are museums, food fairs, arts festivals and local music performances that are all important parts of our larger community. To neglect
these is to neglect a large part of what makes UD special.
The marketers in charge of I Love UD month have been trying to
expand the common definition of community to include our city, but
it’s hard to tell whether or not the strategy has taken any hold with the
students.
Many of us never make it past Brown Street as our definition of “off
campus.” Of course, for those of us who don’t have cars, it can be nearly
impossible to go beyond what borders our beloved university. If you have
the means of transportation, definitely take advantage of the entire city.
Grab dinner with a group of friends in the Oregon District or go ice skating at RiverScape MetroPark.
While it’s good to know the fastest route to Chipotle and Arrow, they
aren’t all the city has to offer. We should try to remember that UD, as
big of a role as it plays in our lives, is only a small part of something
much bigger.
ANDREW KOERNER
Columnist, Senior
I’m sure I speak for a lot of people
when I say I love this university, I love
the people and I love the opportunities
that have presented themselves to me.
Generally speaking, everything from
my classes to the jobs I’ve held and
communities I’ve been a part of have
made me the person I am today, a person I am very happy to have become. I
am blessed to have found a home in the
University of Dayton.
One of my favorite things to do is
simply walking through the neighborhood with friends. Even when I’m by
myself I’m able to feel a spirit of community flow throughout each and every square inch of campus. I believe
part of this is because I’ve been here
for over four and a half years and have
memories associated with almost everything I look at: KU fountain brings
me back to my days working in Stuart,
when I would run through it at midnight with my co-workers; the pine
forest takes me back to heart to heart
talks in the grotto; even a recycling
bin near Baujan Field holds the epic
memory of a 30-foot fade-away shot I
made on the way to a soccer game.
There truly aren’t many things
that spark up bad memories in me,
but there has always been one thing
that stirred a fire in my heart and an
aneurism in my brain. They were all
over campus and they were the absolute bane of my existence. Every time
I came in contact with one I became a
worse version of myself and felt my
personal well-being slip away. I am
talking, of course, about KimberlyClark Professional paper towel dispensers.
As an engineering major, I find it
hard to believe a simple lever could be
executed so poorly. There was never a
time after washing my hands that I had
to pull that lever down less than a hundred times. And after all of that work
there was still only the equivalent of a
mere one and a half paper towels.
Periodically, in the Rec Plex especially, the paper towels would be off
the mechanism and unable to be dispensed by the lever. This is probably
because people were in a hurry and
pulled too quickly. When I think about
it, students and faculty are probably in
a hurry 80 percent of the day, so that
would explain why so many of these
dispensers rarely had usable paper
towels. The worst part about this was
that there would often be a full roll
waiting for you less than two inches
away! It’s just sitting there, mocking
you while your soaking wet hands
wait for their savior, only to find the
savior never appears. I often settled
and used my pants as towels, which
infuriated me.
Well, my soaking hands now have
their savior in the form of a new
campus-wide paper towel dispenser:
Tork. I noticed the change for the first
time in the men’s room of KU. I vividly remember letting out an audible
cheer and a rather emphatic fist pump
when it caught my eye. To me, that first
paper towel pulled from the dispenser
was like feeling a freshly mown lawn
after the first week of spring: pure
bliss. I had similar reactions when I noticed the new dispensers in Kettering
Labs, Marianist Hall and the Rec Plex.
This made me realize even more
how blessed my time has been at UD;
when I reflect, the thing that has bothered me the most wasn’t a bad professor or feeling bored in my free time or
having an undesirable place of living:
It was a paper towel dispenser. There
may be a scientific reasoning for this
since our brains release a certain
chemical during times of crisis to calm
us down rather than during things
that don’t really matter (example: road
rage) but regardless I think we have it
pretty good here. I’m in no hurry to get
to the day where my daily commute
consists of anything other than walking by all of these memories.
Online at flyernews.com
Columnist calls for change, confronts racism on campus
—Martin Luther King Jr., 1929–1968
fneditorial
11
OPINIONS
KWYNN TOWNSEND RILEY
Columnist, Junior
Dear White people,
Greetings my lighter-hued counterparts. It is I, your token African-American expert on all things
“ratchet,” connoisseur of Beyonce
and chicken, your favorite homegirl
during diversity workshops. I don’t
know where to start. Should it be
the Yik Yaks during the die-in, or
the fact that students believe we
live in a post-racist society and are
colorblind?
Remember, during the protests
on campus last semester, how many
of the offensive Yik Yak posts were
threats toward students of color?
We must remember that there is
still a lot to change on this campus.
A week of protests brought some
awareness, but did not spur true
change.
That true change is coming
though, I promise. We’ve just got to
work on it together.
However, as Black History
Month arrives, I wanted to give you
examples of the micro-aggressions,
“triggers,” I have experienced on
campus. Perhaps you know someone who does this, perhaps you
don’t. The fact is that these situations exist. Students said these
things to my face. Unfortunately,
since I am not white, or your
“friendly neighbor,” you may dislike me after you read this letter.
Racism is on this campus.
Racism occurs when AfricanAmerican students are referred
to as “ratchet.” It appears when
students on this campus recognize
Nelson Mandela as a man who supported abortion more than his time
as the first black president of South
Africa. Racism occurs when you
ask an African-American student
to teach you how to twerk, about
Cartoonist A. Hussain, Sophomore, Pre-Medicine
If you could ask President Curran any question, what would it be?
Submit your opinions
editorial to Flyer News.
Contact Louis De Gruy,
Opinions Editor, at
[email protected]
“Did he secretly enjoy the
riots last March?”
“Will he crowd surf again if we
go to the Elite Eight?”
ALEX KRAMER
Senior
Chemical Engineering
KAITLIN REGAN
Senior
Pre-Physical Therapy
MOLLY MCGONIGLE
Sophomore
Entrepreneurship
“What is his proudest
accomplishment at UD?”
C.J. ROMANELLI
Senior
Pre-Medecine
“When’s he going to fix the Wi-Fi?”
ROBERTO DE LA ROSA-FINCH
First Year
Chemistry
their hair, or call us sassy.
Ladies and gentlemen, I am no
longer accepting ignorance. The
“Oh, I didn’t know calling your
hair crazy was a trigger for you.”
For decades, African-American
women have been ostracized for
our different hair texture. We have
been marginalized and stereotyped
for the versatility of our hair.
This stuff makes me sick.
When black students get together, it seems like we are seen
as more radical than the St. Patrick’s Day revelers of 2013. When
we have parties on campus, ours
get shut down permanently. For
example, my friends’ party this
past week was moderate. There
were some people on the porch and
music. The party was shut down.
‘Gifts for someone special’
Editor’s Note: “Ask Dr. Dan” will be hosted Tuesday, Feb. 10 in Sears Recital Hall
“Can I chest bump him
at graduation?”
“We must remember that there is still a lot
to change on this campus.”
ourpolicy
The party at the house next to us
was also confronted. The house had
more people, louder music and was
able to continue their party with a
warning. There have been a slew of
incidents that occur daily regarding the marginalization of AfricanAmerican students.
When we have a protest, so many
students walk by and do not participate.
White privilege exists. Racism
exists.
This is the first year that I see
bulletin boards about Black History
Month from RA’s. This is the first
time that housing is enforcing bulletin boards about black history be
made. It is so refreshing to receive
support. I am so grateful when I see
the pictures, flyers and tables with-
in Kennedy Union referencing the
month as well.
I am frustrated still, very much
so, that most of you still don’t get
it. I do not want your pity. I want
meetings. I want change. I need
President Curran to say before I
graduate that black lives matter.
I want an apology from the Office of Advancement for prioritizing alumni funds over black history. Placing a fundraiser during
the month of black history limits
students once again from gaining
the knowledge needed to eliminate
the covert racism that occurs.
I want an apology. An apology
and action.
We have come a long way, but we
still have a long way to go.
Focus on sustainability, UD
Have you ever walked through the
student neighborhood on a Monday
morning on your way to class without seeing an empty beer can? The
only reason the yards are cleaned up
at UD-owned houses is because of
the citation and fine if cans are not
picked up by the next morning. But,
what about the cans on the street,
sidewalk and landlord-owned houses? Many of these areas are cleaned
by maintenance staff to make the
student neighborhood look presentable to alumni, visitors and students.
With the endowment UD received for
sustainability, why haven’t we looked
for a way to recycle these cans? Most
of the time I see huge trash bags filled
with hundreds of cans in garbage bins
that are already overflowing.
With a university that is so committed to being a leader in sustainability,
we have no excuse not to do something
about one of the easiest and most valuable items to recycle. According to
itseasytorecycle.org, “Recycling just
one aluminum can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning
for almost four hours or run your television for three hours.”
There are ways to help recycle, put
money back in student’s pockets and
exemplify one of UD’s main pillars:
to serve the community. In my hometown there is a “reverse vending machine” in which you put your empty
aluminum cans and receive money
or choose to donate it to a local food
pantry.
After contacting local stores and
gas stations that sell beer to UD students, places like Arrow Wine and
Liquors, The Deli, Shell and Sunoco,
I found that they receive a combined
order of 1,300 cases of beer a week during the academic year. This doesn’t
even include UDF and Wal-Mart, who
I was unable to reach for comment.
This means UD students dispose of
a minimum of 31,200 cans per week,
which could be recycled and turned
in for cash. What kid wouldn’t love to
turn their empty beer cans into more
beer money? Let’s make a difference
in the world, exemplify UD’s sustainability effort, and, most importantly,
give students an easy way to give back
to the community.
WILL RANDERSON
SOPHOMORE
BUSINESS
Flyer News is the student-run newspaper of the University of Dayton. It works to serve the campus community and offers a forum for opinion. The university makes no representations
or warranties regarding products or services advertised in Flyer News. Flyer News reserves the right to edit or reject all copy. Flyer News does not necessarily uphold or advocate
the opinions in the columns, letters or cartoons appearing in the opinion pages. Send 50- to 600-word letters to the editor at [email protected] Submissions must include name,
major, year and phone number.
OPINIONS
10
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: Only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate: Only love can do that.”
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Paper towel dispenser change relieves frustration
LOVE THE DAYTON COMMUNITY
BREAK OUT FROM THE UD BUBBLE
This weekend will mark the annual culmination of what has been
two months of marketing, pink balloons and chocolates. Honestly, we’re
glad that there is no such genre as Valentine’s music, or else every other
song on the radio would have been inundated with sappy, drippy tunes
beginning Dec. 26.
But, when all of the clearance chocolate is gone, UD’s annual donation drive will still be chugging along, encouraging us and our alumni
to donate our time, money and effort to the community. We know how
much UD promotes community. In fact, they use it so much that it almost
seems as though many students have been able to tune it out whenever
they hear it in conversation.
It can be easy to define our community as just what’s in and around
our campus, what’s usually referred to as the “UD bubble,” but there is
so much more that we aren’t considering.
There are museums, food fairs, arts festivals and local music performances that are all important parts of our larger community. To neglect
these is to neglect a large part of what makes UD special.
The marketers in charge of I Love UD month have been trying to
expand the common definition of community to include our city, but
it’s hard to tell whether or not the strategy has taken any hold with the
students.
Many of us never make it past Brown Street as our definition of “off
campus.” Of course, for those of us who don’t have cars, it can be nearly
impossible to go beyond what borders our beloved university. If you have
the means of transportation, definitely take advantage of the entire city.
Grab dinner with a group of friends in the Oregon District or go ice skating at RiverScape MetroPark.
While it’s good to know the fastest route to Chipotle and Arrow, they
aren’t all the city has to offer. We should try to remember that UD, as
big of a role as it plays in our lives, is only a small part of something
much bigger.
ANDREW KOERNER
Columnist, Senior
I’m sure I speak for a lot of people
when I say I love this university, I love
the people and I love the opportunities
that have presented themselves to me.
Generally speaking, everything from
my classes to the jobs I’ve held and
communities I’ve been a part of have
made me the person I am today, a person I am very happy to have become. I
am blessed to have found a home in the
University of Dayton.
One of my favorite things to do is
simply walking through the neighborhood with friends. Even when I’m by
myself I’m able to feel a spirit of community flow throughout each and every square inch of campus. I believe
part of this is because I’ve been here
for over four and a half years and have
memories associated with almost everything I look at: KU fountain brings
me back to my days working in Stuart,
when I would run through it at midnight with my co-workers; the pine
forest takes me back to heart to heart
talks in the grotto; even a recycling
bin near Baujan Field holds the epic
memory of a 30-foot fade-away shot I
made on the way to a soccer game.
There truly aren’t many things
that spark up bad memories in me,
but there has always been one thing
that stirred a fire in my heart and an
aneurism in my brain. They were all
over campus and they were the absolute bane of my existence. Every time
I came in contact with one I became a
worse version of myself and felt my
personal well-being slip away. I am
talking, of course, about KimberlyClark Professional paper towel dispensers.
As an engineering major, I find it
hard to believe a simple lever could be
executed so poorly. There was never a
time after washing my hands that I had
to pull that lever down less than a hundred times. And after all of that work
there was still only the equivalent of a
mere one and a half paper towels.
Periodically, in the Rec Plex especially, the paper towels would be off
the mechanism and unable to be dispensed by the lever. This is probably
because people were in a hurry and
pulled too quickly. When I think about
it, students and faculty are probably in
a hurry 80 percent of the day, so that
would explain why so many of these
dispensers rarely had usable paper
towels. The worst part about this was
that there would often be a full roll
waiting for you less than two inches
away! It’s just sitting there, mocking
you while your soaking wet hands
wait for their savior, only to find the
savior never appears. I often settled
and used my pants as towels, which
infuriated me.
Well, my soaking hands now have
their savior in the form of a new
campus-wide paper towel dispenser:
Tork. I noticed the change for the first
time in the men’s room of KU. I vividly remember letting out an audible
cheer and a rather emphatic fist pump
when it caught my eye. To me, that first
paper towel pulled from the dispenser
was like feeling a freshly mown lawn
after the first week of spring: pure
bliss. I had similar reactions when I noticed the new dispensers in Kettering
Labs, Marianist Hall and the Rec Plex.
This made me realize even more
how blessed my time has been at UD;
when I reflect, the thing that has bothered me the most wasn’t a bad professor or feeling bored in my free time or
having an undesirable place of living:
It was a paper towel dispenser. There
may be a scientific reasoning for this
since our brains release a certain
chemical during times of crisis to calm
us down rather than during things
that don’t really matter (example: road
rage) but regardless I think we have it
pretty good here. I’m in no hurry to get
to the day where my daily commute
consists of anything other than walking by all of these memories.
Online at flyernews.com
Columnist calls for change, confronts racism on campus
—Martin Luther King Jr., 1929–1968
fneditorial
11
OPINIONS
KWYNN TOWNSEND RILEY
Columnist, Junior
Dear White people,
Greetings my lighter-hued counterparts. It is I, your token African-American expert on all things
“ratchet,” connoisseur of Beyonce
and chicken, your favorite homegirl
during diversity workshops. I don’t
know where to start. Should it be
the Yik Yaks during the die-in, or
the fact that students believe we
live in a post-racist society and are
colorblind?
Remember, during the protests
on campus last semester, how many
of the offensive Yik Yak posts were
threats toward students of color?
We must remember that there is
still a lot to change on this campus.
A week of protests brought some
awareness, but did not spur true
change.
That true change is coming
though, I promise. We’ve just got to
work on it together.
However, as Black History
Month arrives, I wanted to give you
examples of the micro-aggressions,
“triggers,” I have experienced on
campus. Perhaps you know someone who does this, perhaps you
don’t. The fact is that these situations exist. Students said these
things to my face. Unfortunately,
since I am not white, or your
“friendly neighbor,” you may dislike me after you read this letter.
Racism is on this campus.
Racism occurs when AfricanAmerican students are referred
to as “ratchet.” It appears when
students on this campus recognize
Nelson Mandela as a man who supported abortion more than his time
as the first black president of South
Africa. Racism occurs when you
ask an African-American student
to teach you how to twerk, about
Cartoonist A. Hussain, Sophomore, Pre-Medicine
If you could ask President Curran any question, what would it be?
Submit your opinions
editorial to Flyer News.
Contact Louis De Gruy,
Opinions Editor, at
[email protected]
“Did he secretly enjoy the
riots last March?”
“Will he crowd surf again if we
go to the Elite Eight?”
ALEX KRAMER
Senior
Chemical Engineering
KAITLIN REGAN
Senior
Pre-Physical Therapy
MOLLY MCGONIGLE
Sophomore
Entrepreneurship
“What is his proudest
accomplishment at UD?”
C.J. ROMANELLI
Senior
Pre-Medecine
“When’s he going to fix the Wi-Fi?”
ROBERTO DE LA ROSA-FINCH
First Year
Chemistry
their hair, or call us sassy.
Ladies and gentlemen, I am no
longer accepting ignorance. The
“Oh, I didn’t know calling your
hair crazy was a trigger for you.”
For decades, African-American
women have been ostracized for
our different hair texture. We have
been marginalized and stereotyped
for the versatility of our hair.
This stuff makes me sick.
When black students get together, it seems like we are seen
as more radical than the St. Patrick’s Day revelers of 2013. When
we have parties on campus, ours
get shut down permanently. For
example, my friends’ party this
past week was moderate. There
were some people on the porch and
music. The party was shut down.
‘Gifts for someone special’
Editor’s Note: “Ask Dr. Dan” will be hosted Tuesday, Feb. 10 in Sears Recital Hall
“Can I chest bump him
at graduation?”
“We must remember that there is still a lot
to change on this campus.”
ourpolicy
The party at the house next to us
was also confronted. The house had
more people, louder music and was
able to continue their party with a
warning. There have been a slew of
incidents that occur daily regarding the marginalization of AfricanAmerican students.
When we have a protest, so many
students walk by and do not participate.
White privilege exists. Racism
exists.
This is the first year that I see
bulletin boards about Black History
Month from RA’s. This is the first
time that housing is enforcing bulletin boards about black history be
made. It is so refreshing to receive
support. I am so grateful when I see
the pictures, flyers and tables with-
in Kennedy Union referencing the
month as well.
I am frustrated still, very much
so, that most of you still don’t get
it. I do not want your pity. I want
meetings. I want change. I need
President Curran to say before I
graduate that black lives matter.
I want an apology from the Office of Advancement for prioritizing alumni funds over black history. Placing a fundraiser during
the month of black history limits
students once again from gaining
the knowledge needed to eliminate
the covert racism that occurs.
I want an apology. An apology
and action.
We have come a long way, but we
still have a long way to go.
Focus on sustainability, UD
Have you ever walked through the
student neighborhood on a Monday
morning on your way to class without seeing an empty beer can? The
only reason the yards are cleaned up
at UD-owned houses is because of
the citation and fine if cans are not
picked up by the next morning. But,
what about the cans on the street,
sidewalk and landlord-owned houses? Many of these areas are cleaned
by maintenance staff to make the
student neighborhood look presentable to alumni, visitors and students.
With the endowment UD received for
sustainability, why haven’t we looked
for a way to recycle these cans? Most
of the time I see huge trash bags filled
with hundreds of cans in garbage bins
that are already overflowing.
With a university that is so committed to being a leader in sustainability,
we have no excuse not to do something
about one of the easiest and most valuable items to recycle. According to
itseasytorecycle.org, “Recycling just
one aluminum can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning
for almost four hours or run your television for three hours.”
There are ways to help recycle, put
money back in student’s pockets and
exemplify one of UD’s main pillars:
to serve the community. In my hometown there is a “reverse vending machine” in which you put your empty
aluminum cans and receive money
or choose to donate it to a local food
pantry.
After contacting local stores and
gas stations that sell beer to UD students, places like Arrow Wine and
Liquors, The Deli, Shell and Sunoco,
I found that they receive a combined
order of 1,300 cases of beer a week during the academic year. This doesn’t
even include UDF and Wal-Mart, who
I was unable to reach for comment.
This means UD students dispose of
a minimum of 31,200 cans per week,
which could be recycled and turned
in for cash. What kid wouldn’t love to
turn their empty beer cans into more
beer money? Let’s make a difference
in the world, exemplify UD’s sustainability effort, and, most importantly,
give students an easy way to give back
to the community.
WILL RANDERSON
SOPHOMORE
BUSINESS
Flyer News is the student-run newspaper of the University of Dayton. It works to serve the campus community and offers a forum for opinion. The university makes no representations
or warranties regarding products or services advertised in Flyer News. Flyer News reserves the right to edit or reject all copy. Flyer News does not necessarily uphold or advocate
the opinions in the columns, letters or cartoons appearing in the opinion pages. Send 50- to 600-word letters to the editor at [email protected] Submissions must include name,
major, year and phone number.
OPINIONS
12
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Some NFL teams are factories of sadness for fans
wore thin when I saw a play that I
could have never have imagined in
my life: Pete Morelli, head referee in
the Lions vs. Cowboys game, didn’t
just put away the flag. He put away
my Super Bowl dreams with it. It
seems that the Lions have enough
talent to raise their fans’ hopes only
to let them down in the end.
This isn’t just an issue for Lions
fans. It’s an issue for many other
teams’ fans.
These teams usually bring excitement with the start of the season.
We’ve all been there, anxiously
awaiting the preseason with our
newly obtained draft picks that
showed promise and a wiser team
that is ready to give it their all. Fans
go nuts because their terrible team
looked amazing in the preseason. I
don’t care how many games the Lions, Browns, Rams, etcetera win in
the preseason, these teams often get
smacked with reality once the regular season starts. This, of course,
will lead to denial and eventually
acceptance once again that your
team is dreadful. It’s this excitement
at the beginning of the season that
hooks skeptical fans.
Occasionally, your team will
perform well enough to get a playoff spot. This is the Holy Grail for
crappy teams. This playoff spot
gives hope to fans, and allows them
to think that they can now play with
the big boys. Any frustrated Bengals
fan will tell you that they do pretty
well in the regular season only to
choke in every playoff game.
Watching an NFL game is supposed to be an escape from your
problems, not the bearer of new
ones. I try to see it as comic relief.
Every week, I sit for a good laugh
with family and friends. We tune in
to see how our team will mess up
this time. Surprisingly, I love listening to other fans complain about
how abysmal their team is and how
they could improve. Fans who never
Valentine’s Day: Just for romance?
Valentine’s Day is approaching and it’s time to start making
those special plans for a night of
celebration. It’s the day of sharing
romance, passion and appreciation
for those you hold dear in your
heart. This holiday is very important to me because I view it as a
way to share the joy and love you
feel with either a group of people
or one special significant other.
I don’t believe it’s a day that
only couples can celebrate together. Regardless of a person’s
romantic status, Valentine’s Day
should be about celebrating loving and friendly relationships that
have positively affected your life.
I remember the days when I was
in elementary school and my parents would buy me a pack of my
favorite cartoon character’s Valentine cards to pass out to my close
friends. I was always so excited to
write a personal message inside
followed by a messy signature, in
hopes of making my friends feel
special. It wasn’t about romance or
secret crushes. I viewed it as showing gratitude for always being in
my corner. Even now, as an adult
in college, I feel that nice gestures
such as giving out cheesy cards or
delicious chocolates are simple
and easy enough to show gratitude
to the people I care about.
Many people take great consid-
eration in planning a celebratory
night with either their romantic
partner or close friends. For example, in my relationship, we love
to go out to eat at a new restaurant
every year and exchange gifts of either flowers or beautifully written
Hallmark cards. However, when I
was single, me and my best friend
Ashley would rent movies and
buy each other our favorite candy
to stuff our faces with while we
stayed up all night talking. These
gestures make the environment
pleasant and enjoyable when celebrating the company of someone
special in your life.
As college students, we have
to cope with stresses like studying for exams while still managing a decent social life. It can be
very hard to try to balance both
romantic and social relationships
with people when studies have to
be completed or jobs call you into
work. However, Valentine’s Day is
a perfect day to prepare nightly
festivities and take a break from
the stresses of school. I think it’s
important for all students to enjoy
this holiday without fretting that
it’s only for people in relationships. It’s the day for sharing love
with people you hold close to your
heart.
Junior Clare Egan said, “I think
Valentine’s Day can be extended to
13
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
TENNIS
Letter to the editor:
One thing I noticed while watching the Super Bowl was that my
friends and I were all wearing jerseys for teams that were not even
playing in the game. Though we did
this unintentionally, we all had the
same reason: to support our teams. I
had to ask, “Why are we supporting
our teams today?” All we were doing
was acknowledging the fact that our
teams simply were not good enough
to make it to the Super Bowl.
This begs the question: “Why are
fans loyal to teams that are downright terrible?”
I am a proud and devoted fan of
the Detroit Lions. Believe me, the
struggle could not be more real.
This roller coaster of emotions has
shown me seasons of promise, and
those in which my team could not
even win one game. This past season
I would consider one of promise, because the Lions made it to the playoffs: A feat that I thought was a sign
of the apocalypse. My excitement
SPORTS
friends as well as couples because
it’s a day to share the love you have
for special people in your life.”
I agree with Egan, because there
is no limitation to how love can be
spread to others on Valentine’s
Day. Valentine’s Day gifts can be
given to parents, best friends and
even colleagues from your job that
you may have built relationships
with. There are all kinds of activities students can do to celebrate
with others. Going to fancy restaurants with fine cuisine, going
to Valentine’s Day bashes with
close friends or simply spending
the night in like I did with my own
best friend are all valid ways to
celebrate the holiday. There are
so many different relationships,
romantic and friendly, that must
not go unappreciated. I encourage
all UD students who celebrate this
holiday to appreciate and enjoy the
loving relationships that you have
built with such special people.
see success find enjoyment in other
areas.
Fans of all the doomed teams of
the league are hopeless romantics.
We cling to the hope that we can
get better players or coaching staff.
They always say, “Next year is our
year.” This state of mind allows
fans to leave a game disgruntled
only to come back next Sunday for
their weekly beating. When looking at these fans, it’s plain to see
that it’s not about how hard you hit,
it’s about how hard you get hit and
still come out to watch the following week.
These fans truly know the meaning of hard work because nothing
is handed to them. For fans of good
teams, all I have to say is it isn’t hard
to stay loyal when you win a Super
Bowl every couple years. Walk a
mile in our shoes. Stay loyal to your
hometown team rather than riding
the bandwagon. The bandwagon is
the coward’s way out.
SCOTT PETERSON
JUNIOR
COMMUNICATION
fnstaff 2014–2015
JONATHAN KOSTOFF
Staff Writer
Love. Deuce. Set. Match.
These are a few terms that many
are unfamiliar with, but once you see
the University of Dayton men’s and
women’s tennis teams in action, you’ll
learn quickly.
Both teams are off to a solid start
in the early portion of the nonconference schedule, coming off a victory
over Wright State University 4-3. Led
by coach Ryan Meyer, each is sitting
at the .500 mark with the men’s team
overall record at 3-3 and the women’s
team at 2-2.
After the Wright State matches,
coach Meyer thought that both squads
had a good day.
“I am extremely proud of both
teams,” Meyer said. “They showed a
ton of heart and got the job done.”
Coach Meyer, in his third season as
the head coach of both programs, has
brought plenty of experience to the
university. He was a four-year player
at Franklin College in Franklin, Indiana. He has been in coaching roles
for seven years with stops at Thomas
More College, University of Cincin-
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CC Hutten
Will DiFrancesca
(CONTACT: [email protected])
(CONTACT: [email protected])
MANAGING EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
Matthew Worsham
Allie Gauthier
NEWS EDITOR
ART DIRECTOR
Roger Hoke
Meghan Ostermueller
1.
GEO. WASHINGTON 21-2
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
CIRCULATION MANAGER
2.
FORDHAM
Mary Macrae
Meghan Ostermueller
3.
A&E EDITOR
ASST. ART DIRECTOR
Katie Christoff
Amanda Smith
ASST. A&E EDITOR
WEB EDITOR
Mary Kate Dorr
Melissa Shaffer
OPINIONS EDITOR
PHOTO EDITOR
Louis De Gruy
Chris Santucci
ASST. OPINIONS EDITOR
CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER
SPORTS EDITOR
Keith Raad
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
Steven Miller
Ian Moran
SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER
Amanda Dee
BUSINESS MANAGER
Molly Kunkel
First year Carsten Fisher won straight sets (6-1, 6-2) in his singles matches against Wright State, then won the Atlantic
10 Rookie of the Week honors. Chris Santucci/Photo Editor
nati and Franklin College.
Currently leading the way for
the men’s team is first year Carsten
Fisher, who was named Atlantic 10
Conference Rookie of the Week after
his dominating performance against
Wright State. Fisher won both his singles and doubles matches. Fisher was
teamed with first year Zach Berry for
the doubles match and helped lead the
team to overall victory.
Fisher and Berry have already won
a combined 24 sets, dropping only seven in the process. Fisher is a pre-physical therapy major from Hilton Head,
South Carolina. Berry is a hometown
face who attended Springboro High
School. He is a chemical engineering
major.
Berry was the reigning Rookie of
the Week for the week prior when the
team won their match versus Eastern
Kentucky, but dropped the following
match to Lipscomb University. Berry went 3-1 in matches during that
stretch.
The women’s team has been paced
by the rock solid play of their threepronged attack that includes first
singles player and first year Marlys
Bridgham, third singles player Carly
Peck and fifth singles player Mandy Marchant. All three have won
their last two singles matches and
Bridgham has won all four of her
singles matches this season.
Peck is a junior with plenty of experience in the program. She was tied
for the most wins last season with
seven wins.
Marchant was a three star recruit
coming out of Kenston High School in
the Cleveland area last year. Now in
her second year, she also tied for the
most wins last year. Marchant credited the chemistry of the team as one
of the main reasons she chose to play
here.
Both teams long for strength in
the upcoming week when they take
on Northern Kentucky on the road.
The team normally plays their home
matches on Graul Tennis Complex located on L Street here on campus, but
with the lingering cold weather, they
have moved their matches to Five Seasons Sports Club.
Both teams begin conference play
against St Joseph’s University March
UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON SPORTS STANDINGS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Steven Goodman
EBONY MUNDAY
JUNIOR
COMMUNICATION
After everything is all said and
done, I commend the fans of these
losing teams. They love teams
whose only expertise seems to be in
mediocrity. They show true resilience because their loyalty is a oneway street. We support our teams
and get no reward out of doing it,
but we do get minor victories, comic
relief, and a dream. They defy logic
knowing that there is no better feeling than to see their team finally
reign victorious. Even after the infamous picking up of the flag, I am
still dedicated to my Lions. I will
have time to sulk in my sadness, but
next fall I will be eager to see every
play. So here’s to you Detroit Lions,
I will see you next year.
Team effort gives tennis team a hot start
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
MEN’S BASKETBALL
MEN’S NEXT 5 GAMES
WOMEN’S NEXT 5 GAMES
PL TEAM
CONF.
PL TEAM
FEB. 11 VS. RICHMOND
10-0
1.
17-7
9-2
DAYTON
17-5
4.
DUQUESNE
5.
7P.M.
OVR
CONF.
FEB. 10 @ SAINT LOUIS
9:30P.M.
VCU
18-5
8-2
FEB. 14 @ ST. BONNIE
12:30P.M.
2.
RHODE ISLAND
16-5
8-2
FEB. 19 VS. SAINT JOSEPH’S
6P.M.
FEB. 18 LA SALLE
7P.M.
8-2
3.
DAYTON
17-5
7-3
FEB. 21 @ DUQUESNE
2P.M.
FEB. 15 VS. ST. JOSEPH’S
2P.M.
15-8
7-3
4.
GEO. WASHINGTON 17-6
7-3
FEB. 21 @ GEO. MASON
FEB. 26 VS. UMASS
7P.M.
RICHMOND
15-8
7-3
5.
UMASS
13-9
6-3
6.
RHODE ISLAND
13-9
5-5
6.
RICHMOND
15-6
6-4
7.
VCU
14-10
5-6
7.
ST. BONNIE
13-8
6-4
8.
SAINT JOSEPH’S
8-14
4-6
8.
LA SALLE
13-9
5-4
9.
SAINT LOUIS
11-12
4-6
9.
RICHMOND
12-11 5-5
10. GEO. MASON
12-11
4-6
10. SAINT JOSEPH’S
10-12
4-6
11. LA SALLE
12-11
3-7
11. SAINT LOUIS
10-13
2-8
12. ST. BONNIE
13-11
3-8
12. DUQUESNE
7-14
2-8
13. UMASS
8-14
2-8
13. GEO. MASON
7-15
2-8
14. DAVIDSON
5-19
1-10
14. FORDHAM
6-15
1-9
OVR
12:30P.M.
FEB. 15 VS. SAINT JOSEPH’S
AS OF 2 /8 /2015 AT 6P.M.
12P.M.
OPINIONS
12
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Some NFL teams are factories of sadness for fans
wore thin when I saw a play that I
could have never have imagined in
my life: Pete Morelli, head referee in
the Lions vs. Cowboys game, didn’t
just put away the flag. He put away
my Super Bowl dreams with it. It
seems that the Lions have enough
talent to raise their fans’ hopes only
to let them down in the end.
This isn’t just an issue for Lions
fans. It’s an issue for many other
teams’ fans.
These teams usually bring excitement with the start of the season.
We’ve all been there, anxiously
awaiting the preseason with our
newly obtained draft picks that
showed promise and a wiser team
that is ready to give it their all. Fans
go nuts because their terrible team
looked amazing in the preseason. I
don’t care how many games the Lions, Browns, Rams, etcetera win in
the preseason, these teams often get
smacked with reality once the regular season starts. This, of course,
will lead to denial and eventually
acceptance once again that your
team is dreadful. It’s this excitement
at the beginning of the season that
hooks skeptical fans.
Occasionally, your team will
perform well enough to get a playoff spot. This is the Holy Grail for
crappy teams. This playoff spot
gives hope to fans, and allows them
to think that they can now play with
the big boys. Any frustrated Bengals
fan will tell you that they do pretty
well in the regular season only to
choke in every playoff game.
Watching an NFL game is supposed to be an escape from your
problems, not the bearer of new
ones. I try to see it as comic relief.
Every week, I sit for a good laugh
with family and friends. We tune in
to see how our team will mess up
this time. Surprisingly, I love listening to other fans complain about
how abysmal their team is and how
they could improve. Fans who never
Valentine’s Day: Just for romance?
Valentine’s Day is approaching and it’s time to start making
those special plans for a night of
celebration. It’s the day of sharing
romance, passion and appreciation
for those you hold dear in your
heart. This holiday is very important to me because I view it as a
way to share the joy and love you
feel with either a group of people
or one special significant other.
I don’t believe it’s a day that
only couples can celebrate together. Regardless of a person’s
romantic status, Valentine’s Day
should be about celebrating loving and friendly relationships that
have positively affected your life.
I remember the days when I was
in elementary school and my parents would buy me a pack of my
favorite cartoon character’s Valentine cards to pass out to my close
friends. I was always so excited to
write a personal message inside
followed by a messy signature, in
hopes of making my friends feel
special. It wasn’t about romance or
secret crushes. I viewed it as showing gratitude for always being in
my corner. Even now, as an adult
in college, I feel that nice gestures
such as giving out cheesy cards or
delicious chocolates are simple
and easy enough to show gratitude
to the people I care about.
Many people take great consid-
eration in planning a celebratory
night with either their romantic
partner or close friends. For example, in my relationship, we love
to go out to eat at a new restaurant
every year and exchange gifts of either flowers or beautifully written
Hallmark cards. However, when I
was single, me and my best friend
Ashley would rent movies and
buy each other our favorite candy
to stuff our faces with while we
stayed up all night talking. These
gestures make the environment
pleasant and enjoyable when celebrating the company of someone
special in your life.
As college students, we have
to cope with stresses like studying for exams while still managing a decent social life. It can be
very hard to try to balance both
romantic and social relationships
with people when studies have to
be completed or jobs call you into
work. However, Valentine’s Day is
a perfect day to prepare nightly
festivities and take a break from
the stresses of school. I think it’s
important for all students to enjoy
this holiday without fretting that
it’s only for people in relationships. It’s the day for sharing love
with people you hold close to your
heart.
Junior Clare Egan said, “I think
Valentine’s Day can be extended to
13
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
TENNIS
Letter to the editor:
One thing I noticed while watching the Super Bowl was that my
friends and I were all wearing jerseys for teams that were not even
playing in the game. Though we did
this unintentionally, we all had the
same reason: to support our teams. I
had to ask, “Why are we supporting
our teams today?” All we were doing
was acknowledging the fact that our
teams simply were not good enough
to make it to the Super Bowl.
This begs the question: “Why are
fans loyal to teams that are downright terrible?”
I am a proud and devoted fan of
the Detroit Lions. Believe me, the
struggle could not be more real.
This roller coaster of emotions has
shown me seasons of promise, and
those in which my team could not
even win one game. This past season
I would consider one of promise, because the Lions made it to the playoffs: A feat that I thought was a sign
of the apocalypse. My excitement
SPORTS
friends as well as couples because
it’s a day to share the love you have
for special people in your life.”
I agree with Egan, because there
is no limitation to how love can be
spread to others on Valentine’s
Day. Valentine’s Day gifts can be
given to parents, best friends and
even colleagues from your job that
you may have built relationships
with. There are all kinds of activities students can do to celebrate
with others. Going to fancy restaurants with fine cuisine, going
to Valentine’s Day bashes with
close friends or simply spending
the night in like I did with my own
best friend are all valid ways to
celebrate the holiday. There are
so many different relationships,
romantic and friendly, that must
not go unappreciated. I encourage
all UD students who celebrate this
holiday to appreciate and enjoy the
loving relationships that you have
built with such special people.
see success find enjoyment in other
areas.
Fans of all the doomed teams of
the league are hopeless romantics.
We cling to the hope that we can
get better players or coaching staff.
They always say, “Next year is our
year.” This state of mind allows
fans to leave a game disgruntled
only to come back next Sunday for
their weekly beating. When looking at these fans, it’s plain to see
that it’s not about how hard you hit,
it’s about how hard you get hit and
still come out to watch the following week.
These fans truly know the meaning of hard work because nothing
is handed to them. For fans of good
teams, all I have to say is it isn’t hard
to stay loyal when you win a Super
Bowl every couple years. Walk a
mile in our shoes. Stay loyal to your
hometown team rather than riding
the bandwagon. The bandwagon is
the coward’s way out.
SCOTT PETERSON
JUNIOR
COMMUNICATION
fnstaff 2014–2015
JONATHAN KOSTOFF
Staff Writer
Love. Deuce. Set. Match.
These are a few terms that many
are unfamiliar with, but once you see
the University of Dayton men’s and
women’s tennis teams in action, you’ll
learn quickly.
Both teams are off to a solid start
in the early portion of the nonconference schedule, coming off a victory
over Wright State University 4-3. Led
by coach Ryan Meyer, each is sitting
at the .500 mark with the men’s team
overall record at 3-3 and the women’s
team at 2-2.
After the Wright State matches,
coach Meyer thought that both squads
had a good day.
“I am extremely proud of both
teams,” Meyer said. “They showed a
ton of heart and got the job done.”
Coach Meyer, in his third season as
the head coach of both programs, has
brought plenty of experience to the
university. He was a four-year player
at Franklin College in Franklin, Indiana. He has been in coaching roles
for seven years with stops at Thomas
More College, University of Cincin-
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CC Hutten
Will DiFrancesca
(CONTACT: [email protected])
(CONTACT: [email protected])
MANAGING EDITOR
COPY EDITOR
Matthew Worsham
Allie Gauthier
NEWS EDITOR
ART DIRECTOR
Roger Hoke
Meghan Ostermueller
1.
GEO. WASHINGTON 21-2
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
CIRCULATION MANAGER
2.
FORDHAM
Mary Macrae
Meghan Ostermueller
3.
A&E EDITOR
ASST. ART DIRECTOR
Katie Christoff
Amanda Smith
ASST. A&E EDITOR
WEB EDITOR
Mary Kate Dorr
Melissa Shaffer
OPINIONS EDITOR
PHOTO EDITOR
Louis De Gruy
Chris Santucci
ASST. OPINIONS EDITOR
CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER
SPORTS EDITOR
Keith Raad
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR
Steven Miller
Ian Moran
SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER
Amanda Dee
BUSINESS MANAGER
Molly Kunkel
First year Carsten Fisher won straight sets (6-1, 6-2) in his singles matches against Wright State, then won the Atlantic
10 Rookie of the Week honors. Chris Santucci/Photo Editor
nati and Franklin College.
Currently leading the way for
the men’s team is first year Carsten
Fisher, who was named Atlantic 10
Conference Rookie of the Week after
his dominating performance against
Wright State. Fisher won both his singles and doubles matches. Fisher was
teamed with first year Zach Berry for
the doubles match and helped lead the
team to overall victory.
Fisher and Berry have already won
a combined 24 sets, dropping only seven in the process. Fisher is a pre-physical therapy major from Hilton Head,
South Carolina. Berry is a hometown
face who attended Springboro High
School. He is a chemical engineering
major.
Berry was the reigning Rookie of
the Week for the week prior when the
team won their match versus Eastern
Kentucky, but dropped the following
match to Lipscomb University. Berry went 3-1 in matches during that
stretch.
The women’s team has been paced
by the rock solid play of their threepronged attack that includes first
singles player and first year Marlys
Bridgham, third singles player Carly
Peck and fifth singles player Mandy Marchant. All three have won
their last two singles matches and
Bridgham has won all four of her
singles matches this season.
Peck is a junior with plenty of experience in the program. She was tied
for the most wins last season with
seven wins.
Marchant was a three star recruit
coming out of Kenston High School in
the Cleveland area last year. Now in
her second year, she also tied for the
most wins last year. Marchant credited the chemistry of the team as one
of the main reasons she chose to play
here.
Both teams long for strength in
the upcoming week when they take
on Northern Kentucky on the road.
The team normally plays their home
matches on Graul Tennis Complex located on L Street here on campus, but
with the lingering cold weather, they
have moved their matches to Five Seasons Sports Club.
Both teams begin conference play
against St Joseph’s University March
UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON SPORTS STANDINGS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Steven Goodman
EBONY MUNDAY
JUNIOR
COMMUNICATION
After everything is all said and
done, I commend the fans of these
losing teams. They love teams
whose only expertise seems to be in
mediocrity. They show true resilience because their loyalty is a oneway street. We support our teams
and get no reward out of doing it,
but we do get minor victories, comic
relief, and a dream. They defy logic
knowing that there is no better feeling than to see their team finally
reign victorious. Even after the infamous picking up of the flag, I am
still dedicated to my Lions. I will
have time to sulk in my sadness, but
next fall I will be eager to see every
play. So here’s to you Detroit Lions,
I will see you next year.
Team effort gives tennis team a hot start
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
MEN’S BASKETBALL
MEN’S NEXT 5 GAMES
WOMEN’S NEXT 5 GAMES
PL TEAM
CONF.
PL TEAM
FEB. 11 VS. RICHMOND
10-0
1.
17-7
9-2
DAYTON
17-5
4.
DUQUESNE
5.
7P.M.
OVR
CONF.
FEB. 10 @ SAINT LOUIS
9:30P.M.
VCU
18-5
8-2
FEB. 14 @ ST. BONNIE
12:30P.M.
2.
RHODE ISLAND
16-5
8-2
FEB. 19 VS. SAINT JOSEPH’S
6P.M.
FEB. 18 LA SALLE
7P.M.
8-2
3.
DAYTON
17-5
7-3
FEB. 21 @ DUQUESNE
2P.M.
FEB. 15 VS. ST. JOSEPH’S
2P.M.
15-8
7-3
4.
GEO. WASHINGTON 17-6
7-3
FEB. 21 @ GEO. MASON
FEB. 26 VS. UMASS
7P.M.
RICHMOND
15-8
7-3
5.
UMASS
13-9
6-3
6.
RHODE ISLAND
13-9
5-5
6.
RICHMOND
15-6
6-4
7.
VCU
14-10
5-6
7.
ST. BONNIE
13-8
6-4
8.
SAINT JOSEPH’S
8-14
4-6
8.
LA SALLE
13-9
5-4
9.
SAINT LOUIS
11-12
4-6
9.
RICHMOND
12-11 5-5
10. GEO. MASON
12-11
4-6
10. SAINT JOSEPH’S
10-12
4-6
11. LA SALLE
12-11
3-7
11. SAINT LOUIS
10-13
2-8
12. ST. BONNIE
13-11
3-8
12. DUQUESNE
7-14
2-8
13. UMASS
8-14
2-8
13. GEO. MASON
7-15
2-8
14. DAVIDSON
5-19
1-10
14. FORDHAM
6-15
1-9
OVR
12:30P.M.
FEB. 15 VS. SAINT JOSEPH’S
AS OF 2 /8 /2015 AT 6P.M.
12P.M.
SPORTS
14
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
BASEBALL
Flyers return starters, strengthen rotation
STEVE MILLER
Asst. Sports Editor
The warm days of spring beckon
from horizon as the Dayton baseball
team is looks forward to kick -starting
the 2015 season.
Stacked with much of the same
lineup and an improved pitching
staff, spirits are high in the clubhouse
with the rejuvinated team looking to
improve on last season’s rebuilding
effort.
Head coach Tony Vittorio is entering his 16th season managing the
Flyers, and is excited about the talent
the University of Daton will boast this
year.
“We’ve returned almost every position player from a very dynamic team
last year,” Vittorio said, “So there’s a
lot of experience from both an offensive and defensive standpoint.”
Senior first baseman A.J. Ryan
heads that corps along with outfielder
Alex Harris, also in his final season
at UD. Both recorded batting averages over .330 last season, and won
Atlantic 10 Conference Second Team
honors.
Rounding out the right side of the
infield with Ryan is fellow senior and
second baseman Sergio Plasencia. He
started all 46 games last year for the
Flyers and finished the season with a
.962 fielding percentage.
At shortstop will be senior Greg
Rhude, who has “pro potential from
a defensive standpoint,” according to
Vittorio, although the team would like
to see more offensive production this
year from Rhude, who batted .204 in
53 games.
of 2014’s top starters. Noah Buettgen
is a redshirt senior and a workhorse
on the mound, winning UD’s Most
Valuable Pitcher the past two seasons.
He started 15 games for the Flyers last
season and tallied six wins with a 4.37
earned run average (ERA). In addi-
third starter. He posted a 1.70 ERA
last year as a sophomore.
To add depth to a depleted bullpen,
the coaching staff turned to several
more junior college transfers, and
are happy with the fresh faces. Cal
Rohrman, a six-foot-five junior from
“...the Flyers will have to work through the
doldrums of the cold early spring games
to begin that journey back to the top.”
The third baseman job is the only
infield position not yet set in stone.
Cale Dineen, a sophomore transfer
from Garden City Community College, will battle it out with sophomore
Nick Gobert early on in the season to
determine the position before conference play begins. In addition to playing infield in 2014, Gobert also pitched
38.2 innings and recorded three wins
on the mound.
The Flyers hope that Gobert’s
pitching services will not be as crucial this season, as the pitching staff
should be much improved.
Dayton is thrilled to bring back two
tion, he led the A-10 with 115.1 innings
pitched and six complete games.
Junior right-hander Charlie Dant
will be Dayton’s second starting pitcher. He also started 15 games for the
Flyers last season and led the team
with a 3.69 ERA. He was named the
A-10 Pitcher of the Week twice in 2014,
and threw a complete game shutout
against La Salle University.
Buettgen and Dant provide the
most experience on the hill for Dayton.
Bradley Horn, a junior transfer
from Murray State Community College in Oklahoma, should fit in as a
Madison College in Wisconsin, will
be an additional starter and will also
fill a long-relief role. At the back end
of the bullpen, Ben Polansky, junior
from Los Medanos Community College in California, will work in a setup role for closer Sam Brunner.
“We have a legit closer in him,” Vittorio said of Brunner, a junior from
Dodge City Community College in
Kansas.
Vittorio and his coaching staff are
pleased with the additional arms in
the bullpen, and have filled what they
felt was a major void in last season’s
depth chart.
For Ryan, and the other senior
members of this team, the time is
now to succeed in the A-10. Last season, the Flyers went 14-13 in the conference, including two quality wins
against eventual champion Fordham
University.
However, Dayton does not want
to settle for an average conference
record again. In Ryan’s first season,
the team won the A-10 tournament
and advanced to the regional round
of the NCAA tournament.
“I have quite an experience to
share with the younger guys and
show them what it takes to get to that
level,” Ryan said.
For now, though, the Flyers will
have to work through the doldrums of
the cold early spring games to begin
that journey back to the top.
“I think Noah [Buettgen] has done
a great job, Sergio [Plasencia] and
Charlie [Dant] as well,” Ryan said, “To
get us where we want to be at the end
of the year.”
The Flyers season begins Friday
at the Spartanburg Classic in Spartanburg, South Carolina for three
games. UD will first play at home
Feb. 24 against Bowling Green State
University.
As Dayton’s pieces are in place, the
boys of summer are looking forward
to hitting the diamond in the coming
weeks, and regaining the strength
they know this program should have.
TRACK AND FIELD
A-10 Tournament marks final stretch before spring
MEGHAN MCNICHOL
Staff Writer
After about a month of competing
in multiple indoor tournaments, the
University of Dayton track and field
team is gearing up to participate in
the Atlantic 10 Conference Indoor
Championship Feb. 21.
The team kicked off its season
Jan. 9 at the Ohio State University’s
Buckeye Classic, bringing home a
second place medal. Since then, the
team has been working hard and
continuing to improve.
“This year one of our main focal points has been consistent performances across the board,” head
coach Jason Francis said. “Everyone has just been striving to have
more consistent performances week
in and week out.”
Results from the last couple of
meets have met the consistency cri-
teria. Jordan Hofman, junior sprinter, has kept her times close, running
between 7.91 and 7.98 seconds in the
three 60 meter events she has participated in.
Paige Yeager, junior distance runner, has stayed consistent as well. In
the 600 meter event her time ranges
between one minute and 42 seconds
and one minute and 43 seconds at
each tournament.
Consistency is also something the
jumpers pride themselves on. Senior high jumper, Rebecca Maj has
competed in four tournaments and
jumped 1.65 meters at two and 1.60
meters at the others.
This season the team added a
large first year class to the mix. In
combination with the large senior
class, Francis is expecting big things
out of his athletes this season, both
indoor and outdoor.
Out of the three first years who
have led their event in the A-10 di-
vision this season, two of them are
Flyers.
Erin Reese, a first year from Mt.
Prospect, Illinois, still holds onto the
first place spot in the division for
shot put. She has shown a tremendous amount of consistency, with all
of her throws reaching between 13.2
and 13.8 meters.
With an immense amount of new
talent, the Flyers are preparing for
the A-10 Championship with their
heads held high. “Our expectation
going into any conference meet is to
win and to bring home some hardware,” Francis said. “We will settle
for second if that’s how the cards
play out for us but we’re definitely
going into the championship with
the mindset to try to bring home
another A-10 conference championship to the program and the university.”
In addition to the new talent, the
Flyers are also returning many ath-
letes who have brought home medals for them in the past.
Senior sprinter Maya Pederson
broke three school records last season, and is anticipating major success again this year.
“I think that everyone on the
team has the ability for greatness,
especially in the A10,” Pederson
said. “I think we’ll really be able to
shine and show our talent. And although we are a really diverse team,
I think that when we come together
we can do some amazing things,”
Pederson said.
After the A-10 indoor championship tournament, some athletes
will have the chance to participate
in NCAA tournaments, and then the
transition to the spring season will
begin.
“I can see the hard work and determination carrying over but as
far as the specific events in some
aspects they won’t carry over, but
I think it’s just the different experience helps with indoor,” Pederson
said.
While the team’s success during
the indoor season might not foreshadow what the spring season will
bring, the constant indoor training
will produce positive things for the
Flyers.
Coach Francis expects the team
to continue to grow and get stronger as it transitions into the spring
season.
“With our sport it’s just a buildup throughout the year,” Francis
said. “So our indoor season just
kind of builds right into the outdoor
season with our peek performances
always coming at the end of our outdoor season.”
With one week until the A-10
championship, the Flyers are aiming
to finish strong this indoor season,
and glide into a successful spring
season come the end of March.
15
SPORTS
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
Colonials out-tough Dayton’s revenge in D.C.
KEITH RAAD
Sports Editor
Jonquel Jones and the entire
George Washington University
women’s basketball team took a
page out of Buzz Lightyear’s quote
book.
Sunday’s rematch against GW
was Dayton’s chance for revenge
after losing 69-66 at home to open
up Atlantic 10 Conference play Jan.
4. But when the dust settled, the
famous space toy’s words echoed
off of the walls of the Charles E.
Smith Center.
“Revenge is not an idea that we
have on my planet.”
All game, it was GW’s world.
Jones, the junior forward transfer from Clemson University, and
Naismith Award finalist, dropped
her 14th double-double of the season with an 18-point, 18-rebound
effort. Though she took 19 shots,
her supporting cast stole most of
the show. The Colonials dished
out 20 assists on 26 made baskets,
a number the team has bested just
five times this season.
Point guards Chakecia Miller,
Lauren Chase, and Brianna Cummings combined for 12 assists.
While Jones was happy with her
points, sophomore forward Caira
Washington popped in 11 points
and snagged 10 rebounds.
On the boards, George Washington outrebounded Dayton by margin of 21, the highest surrendered
by head coach Jim Jabir’s club all
season.
“We’ve got to develop some level of toughness and fight,” Jabir
said. “What happened today was
that they had some bigs and they
have some kids who play really
hard all the time and we’re very
selective.”
While GW’s of fense flowed
through the immense number
of assists on field goals, Dayton
staggered to only assist on eight
of their 19 buckets, also the lowest number of assists this season.
The 56-point effort, inthe 67-56
loss, was Dayton’s lowest accumulation all year.
“Right now I’m just very disappointed, hurt,” Jabir said. “I think
they’re a great team, I really do,
but I think we hurt ourselves more
than they hurt us. You can’t win
championships when you do that.”
When the Colonials edged out
the Flyers in early January, it
snapped Dayton’s 31-game home
winning streak, the longest active
streak at the time.
8-2 in conference play thus far, women’s basketball has dropped both games against A-10 leader George Washington. Each loss to the Colonials ended an
eight-game winning streak. Ian Moran/Chief Photographer
In that game, the Flyers turned
the ball over 23 times, and were
out-scored 36-30 in the paint. The
feeling in the locker room was one
of discontent and disappointment.
Players were not playing with the
same intensity, expressed personally by senior forward Ally Malott.
“I wasn’t too happy with myself
after the GW game,” Malott said
following a win over Davidson College Jan. 7. “I know that my team
needs me to be aggressive.”
Against the Colonials in January, Malott, who averages 16 points
per game, scored 13 while shooting
just 1-of-4 from three-point range.
GW limited Malott to a 25 percent
clip from the field and only 12
points in the second go-around.
“We lacked consistency and it
kills us at times,” Jabir said. “We
need to rely on certain people to do
certain things and we didn’t have
that today.”
After losing the inside battle in
game one to a GW team that was
0-of-4 from long-range in January,
Dayton aimed to take away the
paint on Sunday. The Flyers edged
GW in paint points 32-30, but the
Colonials used the three-point line
as the great equalizer.
George Washington shot 5-of11 from deep in the first half, and
the lead was enough in the second
20 minutes, to stave off a Dayton
comeback.
Down by 10 at the break, Dayton
put their worst half behind them,
and showed fight in the second.
“In the first half we weren’t as
tough as we were in the second
ADVERTISEMENT
half,” Jabir said. “You’re in a double-digit deficit to come out of the
half and we do it to ourselves.”
The Flyers got to the free throw
line in the second half adding 12 of
a possible 16 freebies, but managed
only seven baskets from the field.
George Washington, however, added 11 field goals.
“It was both ends,” Jabir said.
“Consistency [lacked] on both
ends.”
With a 17-5, 8-2 record in conference play, Dayton matches up with
the University of Richmond 7 p.m.
Wednesday and St. Joseph’s University noon on Sunday.
SPORTS
14
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
BASEBALL
Flyers return starters, strengthen rotation
STEVE MILLER
Asst. Sports Editor
The warm days of spring beckon
from horizon as the Dayton baseball
team is looks forward to kick -starting
the 2015 season.
Stacked with much of the same
lineup and an improved pitching
staff, spirits are high in the clubhouse
with the rejuvinated team looking to
improve on last season’s rebuilding
effort.
Head coach Tony Vittorio is entering his 16th season managing the
Flyers, and is excited about the talent
the University of Daton will boast this
year.
“We’ve returned almost every position player from a very dynamic team
last year,” Vittorio said, “So there’s a
lot of experience from both an offensive and defensive standpoint.”
Senior first baseman A.J. Ryan
heads that corps along with outfielder
Alex Harris, also in his final season
at UD. Both recorded batting averages over .330 last season, and won
Atlantic 10 Conference Second Team
honors.
Rounding out the right side of the
infield with Ryan is fellow senior and
second baseman Sergio Plasencia. He
started all 46 games last year for the
Flyers and finished the season with a
.962 fielding percentage.
At shortstop will be senior Greg
Rhude, who has “pro potential from
a defensive standpoint,” according to
Vittorio, although the team would like
to see more offensive production this
year from Rhude, who batted .204 in
53 games.
of 2014’s top starters. Noah Buettgen
is a redshirt senior and a workhorse
on the mound, winning UD’s Most
Valuable Pitcher the past two seasons.
He started 15 games for the Flyers last
season and tallied six wins with a 4.37
earned run average (ERA). In addi-
third starter. He posted a 1.70 ERA
last year as a sophomore.
To add depth to a depleted bullpen,
the coaching staff turned to several
more junior college transfers, and
are happy with the fresh faces. Cal
Rohrman, a six-foot-five junior from
“...the Flyers will have to work through the
doldrums of the cold early spring games
to begin that journey back to the top.”
The third baseman job is the only
infield position not yet set in stone.
Cale Dineen, a sophomore transfer
from Garden City Community College, will battle it out with sophomore
Nick Gobert early on in the season to
determine the position before conference play begins. In addition to playing infield in 2014, Gobert also pitched
38.2 innings and recorded three wins
on the mound.
The Flyers hope that Gobert’s
pitching services will not be as crucial this season, as the pitching staff
should be much improved.
Dayton is thrilled to bring back two
tion, he led the A-10 with 115.1 innings
pitched and six complete games.
Junior right-hander Charlie Dant
will be Dayton’s second starting pitcher. He also started 15 games for the
Flyers last season and led the team
with a 3.69 ERA. He was named the
A-10 Pitcher of the Week twice in 2014,
and threw a complete game shutout
against La Salle University.
Buettgen and Dant provide the
most experience on the hill for Dayton.
Bradley Horn, a junior transfer
from Murray State Community College in Oklahoma, should fit in as a
Madison College in Wisconsin, will
be an additional starter and will also
fill a long-relief role. At the back end
of the bullpen, Ben Polansky, junior
from Los Medanos Community College in California, will work in a setup role for closer Sam Brunner.
“We have a legit closer in him,” Vittorio said of Brunner, a junior from
Dodge City Community College in
Kansas.
Vittorio and his coaching staff are
pleased with the additional arms in
the bullpen, and have filled what they
felt was a major void in last season’s
depth chart.
For Ryan, and the other senior
members of this team, the time is
now to succeed in the A-10. Last season, the Flyers went 14-13 in the conference, including two quality wins
against eventual champion Fordham
University.
However, Dayton does not want
to settle for an average conference
record again. In Ryan’s first season,
the team won the A-10 tournament
and advanced to the regional round
of the NCAA tournament.
“I have quite an experience to
share with the younger guys and
show them what it takes to get to that
level,” Ryan said.
For now, though, the Flyers will
have to work through the doldrums of
the cold early spring games to begin
that journey back to the top.
“I think Noah [Buettgen] has done
a great job, Sergio [Plasencia] and
Charlie [Dant] as well,” Ryan said, “To
get us where we want to be at the end
of the year.”
The Flyers season begins Friday
at the Spartanburg Classic in Spartanburg, South Carolina for three
games. UD will first play at home
Feb. 24 against Bowling Green State
University.
As Dayton’s pieces are in place, the
boys of summer are looking forward
to hitting the diamond in the coming
weeks, and regaining the strength
they know this program should have.
TRACK AND FIELD
A-10 Tournament marks final stretch before spring
MEGHAN MCNICHOL
Staff Writer
After about a month of competing
in multiple indoor tournaments, the
University of Dayton track and field
team is gearing up to participate in
the Atlantic 10 Conference Indoor
Championship Feb. 21.
The team kicked off its season
Jan. 9 at the Ohio State University’s
Buckeye Classic, bringing home a
second place medal. Since then, the
team has been working hard and
continuing to improve.
“This year one of our main focal points has been consistent performances across the board,” head
coach Jason Francis said. “Everyone has just been striving to have
more consistent performances week
in and week out.”
Results from the last couple of
meets have met the consistency cri-
teria. Jordan Hofman, junior sprinter, has kept her times close, running
between 7.91 and 7.98 seconds in the
three 60 meter events she has participated in.
Paige Yeager, junior distance runner, has stayed consistent as well. In
the 600 meter event her time ranges
between one minute and 42 seconds
and one minute and 43 seconds at
each tournament.
Consistency is also something the
jumpers pride themselves on. Senior high jumper, Rebecca Maj has
competed in four tournaments and
jumped 1.65 meters at two and 1.60
meters at the others.
This season the team added a
large first year class to the mix. In
combination with the large senior
class, Francis is expecting big things
out of his athletes this season, both
indoor and outdoor.
Out of the three first years who
have led their event in the A-10 di-
vision this season, two of them are
Flyers.
Erin Reese, a first year from Mt.
Prospect, Illinois, still holds onto the
first place spot in the division for
shot put. She has shown a tremendous amount of consistency, with all
of her throws reaching between 13.2
and 13.8 meters.
With an immense amount of new
talent, the Flyers are preparing for
the A-10 Championship with their
heads held high. “Our expectation
going into any conference meet is to
win and to bring home some hardware,” Francis said. “We will settle
for second if that’s how the cards
play out for us but we’re definitely
going into the championship with
the mindset to try to bring home
another A-10 conference championship to the program and the university.”
In addition to the new talent, the
Flyers are also returning many ath-
letes who have brought home medals for them in the past.
Senior sprinter Maya Pederson
broke three school records last season, and is anticipating major success again this year.
“I think that everyone on the
team has the ability for greatness,
especially in the A10,” Pederson
said. “I think we’ll really be able to
shine and show our talent. And although we are a really diverse team,
I think that when we come together
we can do some amazing things,”
Pederson said.
After the A-10 indoor championship tournament, some athletes
will have the chance to participate
in NCAA tournaments, and then the
transition to the spring season will
begin.
“I can see the hard work and determination carrying over but as
far as the specific events in some
aspects they won’t carry over, but
I think it’s just the different experience helps with indoor,” Pederson
said.
While the team’s success during
the indoor season might not foreshadow what the spring season will
bring, the constant indoor training
will produce positive things for the
Flyers.
Coach Francis expects the team
to continue to grow and get stronger as it transitions into the spring
season.
“With our sport it’s just a buildup throughout the year,” Francis
said. “So our indoor season just
kind of builds right into the outdoor
season with our peek performances
always coming at the end of our outdoor season.”
With one week until the A-10
championship, the Flyers are aiming
to finish strong this indoor season,
and glide into a successful spring
season come the end of March.
15
SPORTS
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
Online at flyernews.com
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
Colonials out-tough Dayton’s revenge in D.C.
KEITH RAAD
Sports Editor
Jonquel Jones and the entire
George Washington University
women’s basketball team took a
page out of Buzz Lightyear’s quote
book.
Sunday’s rematch against GW
was Dayton’s chance for revenge
after losing 69-66 at home to open
up Atlantic 10 Conference play Jan.
4. But when the dust settled, the
famous space toy’s words echoed
off of the walls of the Charles E.
Smith Center.
“Revenge is not an idea that we
have on my planet.”
All game, it was GW’s world.
Jones, the junior forward transfer from Clemson University, and
Naismith Award finalist, dropped
her 14th double-double of the season with an 18-point, 18-rebound
effort. Though she took 19 shots,
her supporting cast stole most of
the show. The Colonials dished
out 20 assists on 26 made baskets,
a number the team has bested just
five times this season.
Point guards Chakecia Miller,
Lauren Chase, and Brianna Cummings combined for 12 assists.
While Jones was happy with her
points, sophomore forward Caira
Washington popped in 11 points
and snagged 10 rebounds.
On the boards, George Washington outrebounded Dayton by margin of 21, the highest surrendered
by head coach Jim Jabir’s club all
season.
“We’ve got to develop some level of toughness and fight,” Jabir
said. “What happened today was
that they had some bigs and they
have some kids who play really
hard all the time and we’re very
selective.”
While GW’s of fense flowed
through the immense number
of assists on field goals, Dayton
staggered to only assist on eight
of their 19 buckets, also the lowest number of assists this season.
The 56-point effort, inthe 67-56
loss, was Dayton’s lowest accumulation all year.
“Right now I’m just very disappointed, hurt,” Jabir said. “I think
they’re a great team, I really do,
but I think we hurt ourselves more
than they hurt us. You can’t win
championships when you do that.”
When the Colonials edged out
the Flyers in early January, it
snapped Dayton’s 31-game home
winning streak, the longest active
streak at the time.
8-2 in conference play thus far, women’s basketball has dropped both games against A-10 leader George Washington. Each loss to the Colonials ended an
eight-game winning streak. Ian Moran/Chief Photographer
In that game, the Flyers turned
the ball over 23 times, and were
out-scored 36-30 in the paint. The
feeling in the locker room was one
of discontent and disappointment.
Players were not playing with the
same intensity, expressed personally by senior forward Ally Malott.
“I wasn’t too happy with myself
after the GW game,” Malott said
following a win over Davidson College Jan. 7. “I know that my team
needs me to be aggressive.”
Against the Colonials in January, Malott, who averages 16 points
per game, scored 13 while shooting
just 1-of-4 from three-point range.
GW limited Malott to a 25 percent
clip from the field and only 12
points in the second go-around.
“We lacked consistency and it
kills us at times,” Jabir said. “We
need to rely on certain people to do
certain things and we didn’t have
that today.”
After losing the inside battle in
game one to a GW team that was
0-of-4 from long-range in January,
Dayton aimed to take away the
paint on Sunday. The Flyers edged
GW in paint points 32-30, but the
Colonials used the three-point line
as the great equalizer.
George Washington shot 5-of11 from deep in the first half, and
the lead was enough in the second
20 minutes, to stave off a Dayton
comeback.
Down by 10 at the break, Dayton
put their worst half behind them,
and showed fight in the second.
“In the first half we weren’t as
tough as we were in the second
ADVERTISEMENT
half,” Jabir said. “You’re in a double-digit deficit to come out of the
half and we do it to ourselves.”
The Flyers got to the free throw
line in the second half adding 12 of
a possible 16 freebies, but managed
only seven baskets from the field.
George Washington, however, added 11 field goals.
“It was both ends,” Jabir said.
“Consistency [lacked] on both
ends.”
With a 17-5, 8-2 record in conference play, Dayton matches up with
the University of Richmond 7 p.m.
Wednesday and St. Joseph’s University noon on Sunday.
16
SPORTS
Online at flyernews.com
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015
MEN’S BASKETBALL
George Washington sinks Dayton at buzzer
KEITH RAAD
Sports Editor
It was the opposite of the Andrea Doria.
Joe McDonald’s tip in at the
buzzer Saturday ripped away Dayton’s starving hopes for a conference road win.
Ahead by one point with 6.6 seconds on the scoreboard in overtime, the Flyers needed to defend
a George Washington shot, and it
would all be over. On the inbound,
it seemed guard Kethan Savage
staggered at the top of the key. As
seconds slipped away from the Colonials, Savage made his move and
drove on junior forward Dyshawn
Pierre. Pierre back-peddled, leapt
and blocked Savage’s shot.
Sprinting in instantaneously
from the corner was Colonials
guard McDonald, who grabbed the
blocked shot, heaved it toward the
basket, and watched as his lastsecond layup struck gold. George
Washington won, 65-64.
As George Costanza reported
about the famed ship, Andrea
Doria, “it eased into the water like
an old man into a nice warm bath,”
McDonald’s shot did the opposite.
It completely sunk a Dayton comeback quickly and painfully.
“When you lose the way we did
tonight, it sort of sticks a stake in
your heart,” Flyers head coach Archie Miller said.
Miller’s words punctuated the
final outcome, especially when the
Flyers defended the last play to a T.
“I thought [GW] broke down a
little bit, and [Savage] is coming
right down the chute,” Miller said.
“Dyshawn made a great play on the
ball.”
From the sidelines, Miller was
pleased with the defense on the
drive. From Pierre’s perspective
in the paint, he cared more about
the moments following the block.
“When I blocked the shot I was
just hoping that someone would
grab the ball,” Pierre said. “I
thought maybe the ball was going
to go out of bounds or something.
I was trying to figure out how
much time was on the clock and
really hoping that the time would
expire.”
Time did expire, and for the fifth
time this season, Dayton lost. The
Flyers fell to 17-5, 7-3 in the Atlantic 10 Conference, and continued
their struggles on the road, falling
to 3-4 overall in that category.
Dayton fought during crucial
times of the game. Sophomore
point guard Kyle Davis popped the
biggest 3-pointer of the night to
give Dayton the 64-63 lead before
McDonald’s game winning tip-in.
Davis hit three big threes, acting
as a catalyst for breaking Dayton
from its offensive woes. With UD
down 48-40 with 6:37 left, Davis hit
his first 3-pointer. He added another two minutes later, again pulling
Dayton within two possessions.
“He really stepped up for us tonight,” Pierre said. “We all know
he’s a driver and a shooter, but he
shot the ball really well for us tonight.”
Miller mimicked Pierre’s insight.
“Kyle was good,” Miller said.
“We were bound to have some
guys step up and make some open
[shots]… Kyle, to his credit, got
some open shots and drilled it.”
Davis was the shining light amid
a slow Flyers offense. Dayton assisted on seven of its 20 baskets,
the lowest number of assists in a
game this season.
Redshirt senior guard Jordan Sibert lead the team with 17
points, but missed all four of his
3-point attempts. Sophomore forward Kendall Pollard, who fouled
out with 3:05 left in the game with
the score in favor of GW 54-50,
scored 14 points and nabbed six
rebounds. The Flyers shot just 29
percent from long-range, tying the
lowest number of hit threes from
that distance, five, since the team’s
first road loss at Arkansas.
Miller made the message quite
clear that despite the outcome at
Charles E. Smith Center, Dayton
would have to prepare for the next
day, and their next eight conference games. The Saint Louis University Billikens are next in line
for the small ball seven.
“For us, we’ve got to move on,”
Miller said. “We’re on to Saint Louis. Whether we won this game, lost
this game, lost by 20, it doesn’t really matter. The next day, the next
approach, is what’s on my mind
right now. We competed. We played
very, very hard in a tough environment. We battled foul trouble
for the first time all season and I
thought guys really stepped up and
played.”
Dayton goes to SLU for a 9:30
p.m. EST tip-off on CBS Sports
Network Tuesday.
Freshman Darrell Davis has hit 27 three-point shots on the season at a .500 clip, the highest percentage on the team.
He is averaging 5.5 points per game in his first season with the Flyers Zoey Xia/Photographer
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