Year Abroad handbook 2014-2015

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Year Abroad handbook 2014-2015
University of Dublin
Trinity College
The Centre
for
European Studies
Year Abroad Handbook 2014-2015
CONTENTS
Page
1. The academic status and the opportunities of the year abroad
4
1.1
Planning Ahead
4-9
1.2
The year abroad - academic
10
1.3
The year abroad - personal
11
1.4
Assessment
12
1.5
Work load
12 - 13
1.6
Integrated courses of study
13
1.7
Language instruction
14
1.8
Dissertation
14
2. The European Studies exchange programme
15
2.1
The European Studies exchange programme
16
2.2
Financial implications
16
2.3
Advance arrangements and required documentation
17 -18
2.4
On arrival
19
2.5
Keeping in touch with TCD
19
3. Protocol
Steps to be taken if you suffer ill health while abroad
20 - 21
4. Guidelines for dissertations
22 - 29
5. Exchanges
30
5.1 France
30
Bordeaux
Grenoble
Paris
Strasbourg
5.2 Germany and Austria
60
Freiburg
Hamburg
Tübingen
Vienna
2
Page
5.3 Italy
77
Pavia
Siena
Florence
5.4 Poland
89
Krakow
5.5 Russia
93
Moscow - Gorky Institute
5.6 Spain
107
Sevilla
Salamanca
Alcalá
Oviedo
Zaragoza
3
_____________________________________________________
1. The academic status and opportunities of the year abroad
____________________________________________________
1.1 Planning Ahead:
Read the Student Reports, get in touch with former Erasmus students and look at the
websites for your host university. Erasmus information is usually contained within the
International Office section. There may be Trinity Students at your host university at
the moment – you can ask at the International Office about this. The International
Office also has additional reports completed by former Erasmus Students.
Travel to your host university:
Plan ahead and shop around for the best fares (see advice from former Erasmus
students). Be sure you have the term/semester and holiday dates of the host university
before you commit yourself to an exact return date if you are coming home for
Christmas. If you are planning to come home for Christmas, you should try to book
your return ticket as soon as you arrive as Christmas flights can get booked out very
early and become quite expensive.
Remember that you will be quite limited in terms of the luggage you can bring, as
excess baggage can be very expensive. Check the websites of the different airlines for
their baggage allowances. If your journey involves different modes of transport e.g.
plane, train, bus, be sure that you can comfortably and safely carry your luggage. You
should leave packed luggage ready at home for collection if you have friends or family
coming out to visit. If you are going out for the full academic year, you will have to
bring clothes appropriate to all seasons. It is possible to ship packages overseas. This
usually takes about six weeks and you should talk to your local Post Office about costs.
4
Passport:
Every student needs a valid passport for travel to all EU countries except the UK. Even
if spending a study period in the UK, it is a good idea to bring your passport as you
may want to travel to another country from there. You should be aware that some
airlines now require
photo-ID for flights from Ireland to the UK. You will also need a passport or driver's
licence as identification to avail of the public health service. In most countries your
passport serves as your international identification.
If you need a passport, please apply for a passport well in advance, especially if
travelling out at the start of the academic year. The Passport Office is very busy during
the summer months. The minimum period you should allow is two weeks. The fee for a
standard 10 year, 32-page passport is €80. You will need to bring two passport sized
photographs with your old passport and a completed application form. If you have
never had a passport, you will need the original long copy of your birth certificate as
well as the completed application form, two photographs and the fee of €80. If you are
travelling outside of the EU it is possible that you will need a visa, so please check this
in advance.
The Passport Office is located very close to Trinity at the Setanta Centre, Molesworth
St, Dublin 2. Alternatively you can get an application form from your local Post Office.
Further information about passport applications can be found at the Passport Office or
Citizens Information.
Medical insurance forms:
If you are an Irish resident you are entitled to get healthcare through the public system
in countries of the European Union (EU), European Economic Area (EEA), and
Switzerland if you become ill or injured while on a temporary stay there .
5
Until recently, you needed an E form, such as the E111 or the E128, to get such
treatment. Now, these paper forms have been replaced by the European Health
Insurance Card (EHIC). The card is valid for up to two years.
Full information and an application form for the EHIC can be found on the EHIC
website. Citizens Information has Travel abroad information which also covers the
EHIC. If you already have a EHIC card, it may be renewed on line.
It is also recommended that you extend your own or your parents/guardians personal
health insurance which may be with the VHI , Quinn Direct, Vivas Health, or other
insurance company.
Managing your money and financial planning:
As a student you will no doubt already be aware of the need to budget. It is even more
important to plan ahead when you are spending time abroad. If you are an EU national
you will be eligible to apply for an Erasmus Mobility Grant, but remember that the first
installment of this grant will not be sent to you until after you arrive in your host
country. Your grant application is included in the (pink) Erasmus Mobility Application
that you submitted to the International Office in February (see 'How to Apply'). The
grant is intended as a mobility grant which helps cover travel to the country and the
difference in the cost of living between that country and Ireland. It is not intended to be
a maintenance grant. Students who normally live at home while at Trinity will
obviously have to consider carefully the financial implications of a stay abroad.
Students who rent in Dublin often find that student accommodation abroad is cheaper
than here.
Costs between one country and another country vary considerably and some students
live more frugally than others. An average figure for the cost of a nine month stay
abroad would be approximately €6000 (not including travel there and back). Students
do however have very differing needs and expectations. It is very important that you
consider the financial implications of an Erasmus stay abroad and that you talk it over
with your parents/guardians, or plan in advance to support yourself. Seek advice from
6
your Bank about managing your funds while abroad, and to ensure that your Bank card
has been coded in such a way that it may be used in ATMs abroad (for example, the
'Cirrus' or 'Plus' symbols on your card, indicate that you can withdraw cash abroad).
This means that if money is being sent out from home, it can be lodged directly to your
account and will allow you to withdraw cash from your account while you are abroad.
Managing your money in your host country:
Try to work out a sensible budget per month and bear in mind that the first month will
bring a certain amount of extra costs e.g. deposit on accommodation, travel pass, some
extra household items, phone calls, text books, other deposits etc.
Check with former Erasmus students about their experiences in setting up a bank
account in your host country. In some countries the bureaucracy involved may make it
more hassle than it is worth! However, in France for example, it is necessary to open a
French bank account in order to receive the CAF (PDF 65 kB) (government rent grant
for students).
It is a good idea to bring some cash (in the local currency where applicable) for the
initial period. Don't keep your cash all in the one place – it is safer to split it! You may
chose to bring some travellers cheques too.
See list of non-Euro countries.
Erasmus Mobility Grant:
The Erasmus Mobility Grant is issued by European Commission through the National
Agency in Ireland and the universities have no control over the amount allocated. The
amount of the grant varies from year to year and from country to country. In some of
the other EU countries the government subsidises study abroad schemes, so students
from those countries are likely to receive larger grants than the usual Erasmus grant.
The average grant for a full academic year abroad will be approximately €1000 to
€1500. The larger part (approx. 80%) will be sent by cheque to your home address once
7
we receive the Confirmation of Arrival form (PDF 59 kB) from you and the Erasmus
Financial Agreement (PDF 40 kB) – these forms will be sent to you in an information
pack before departure. There is a smaller 'top-up' grant cheque in mid-March for full
year students.
If for any reason you withdraw from the Erasmus Programme earlier than planned, and
after you have been issued with the first Erasmus Grant, you must contact the
International Office to organise a reimbursement of the Erasmus grant, or part of it.
What is the Learning Agreement?
The Learning Agreement (DOC 204 kB) is an important document which sets out your
study programme at your host university. With the guidance of your Trinity Erasmus
Coordinator you must fill in the courses which you wish to study at your host university
and the ECTS weighting for each course. It must then be signed by the Coordinator at
your host university, by you, and returned for final approval and signature by your
Trinity Coordinator. Your Trinity Department should hold a copy of the Learning
Agreement for their records, and forward a copy to the Trinity International Office for
signature by the Institutional Coordinator.
It is a requirement of the European Commission that all students participating in the
Erasmus Programme must complete this Agreement to gain credit for the work studied
abroad. The Learning Agreement (DOC 204kB) will be included in an information
pack sent to you before departure. The Agreement also ensures that there will be no
misunderstandings regarding course choices at the host university when you return to
Trinity.
What is ECTS?
The European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) is a student-centred
system based on student workload. ECTS makes study programmes easy to read and
compare for all students. The System facilitates the recognition of periods of study
abroad.
8
Erasmus Intensive Language Courses (EILC)
The EILC scheme, supported by the European Commission, offers specialised courses
in the less widely used and less widely taught European Union languages and the
languages of other countries participating in Erasmus. The EILCs give Erasmus
students the opportunity to study the language of the host country for 3–8 weeks, in the
host country.
EILCs take place in the following countries for the eligible languages in brackets:
Belgium (Dutch), Bulgaria (Bulgarian), Cyprus (Greek), Czech Republic (Czech),
Denmark (Danish), Estonia (Estonian), Finland (Finnish and Swedish), Greece (Greek),
Hungary (Hungarian), Iceland (Icelandic), Italy (Italian), Latvia (Latvian), Lithuania
(Lithuanian), Malta (Maltese), the Netherlands (Dutch), Norway (Norwegian), Poland
(Polish), Portugal (Portuguese), Romania (Romanian), Slovakia (Slovak), Slovenia
(Slovenian), Spain (for the languages Basque, Catalan , Galician and Valencian),
Sweden (Swedish) and Turkey (Turkish).
Participating students do not have to pay any kind of tuition fee. Students who
participate in one of the special EILCs receive a small supplementary grant. Please note
that other language courses which are not the special EILCs are not eligible for this
supplementary grant. Students who participate in an EILC must submit a copy of the
certificate received at the end of the course to the International Office in order to
receive the supplementary grant. For further information and an application form please
contact the International Office: [email protected] Please also see the EILC website.
It is important to note that the application form for an EILC must be submitted
electronically through the International Office at Trinity. It can not be sent
directly to the organising Institute
Registration at Trinity College/Fees:
While abroad you are still a registered student of Trinity College and you must pay the
usual Trinity fees. If you are eligible for the Fee Remission scheme, you will pay the
Trinity registration fee as usual and you can get information regarding the fee from the
Student Fees Office. The International Office will notify the Student Records Office
that you are away and the Student Records Office will send you the necessary forms for
9
postal registration. This means that if you are home at Christmas or at another time
during the year you may pick up your Trinity ID card. Erasmus students do not pay fees
at their host university. Please note that if a non-EU national is spending a year abroad
with one of the Erasmus partner universities, full tuition fees must be paid to Trinity
College and there may be some fee implications at the host university.
1.2 The year abroad - academic: Spending the Junior Sophister year studying at a
university in the country of the student's major language is an integral part of the
European Studies degree programme. Students must register in Trinity for the year
they spend abroad, and pay the Trinity registration fee. Registration should be done
prior to departure if possible, but can be done by post (contact the Student Records
office: [email protected]) or on the student’s return at Christmas. If you are in receipt of a
County Council grant, please ensure that you complete all necessary procedures before
you leave.
Students choose a course of study (number and level of courses, forms of assessment
etc.) within the parameters agreed by the Trinity exchange co-ordinator and the
exchange co-ordinator in the host university. Precise course details must be sent to the
TCD co-ordinator on the learning agreement form to be provided by the ISA office. The
courses must be mainly ES-type subjects. But students also have considerable freedom
to follow individual interests and to specialise in the intellectual disciplines which have
been of most appeal in the first two years of the course (History of Ideas, History,
Political Science, Economics and Sociology). In addition, students are obliged to follow
a language course at an appropriate level in their major language, focussing on grammar
and writing skills. The marks for this course do not count towards the overall result of
the JS year, but will be recorded on the transcript.
Most partner universities also offer formal language instruction in the minor languages.
Students are strongly encouraged to follow such a course if available.
Please note that in Senior Sophister year, the Minor Language is worth 10 ECTS, so
while students will not necessarily get credits towards their year abroad results for
language courses, it is strongly recommended they take courses in their minor
language where available.
10
Serious difficulties should be reported immediately to the Trinity co-ordinator or to the
Centre for European Studies office (+353 1 896 1808). If the office is unmanned, please
leave a message on the answering machine. Faxes may be sent to European Studies at +
353 1 896 2603. Please find below a protocol in case of illness.
1.3 The year abroad – personal: The year spent abroad is challenging in terms of
personal development, but it is also a unique chance for personal growth. Students
should be aware that they are going into university systems where the student receives
much less individual attention than is the case in Trinity. Living conditions are not
luxurious. Home is a long way away. Academic instruction and all day-to-day business
is carried out through the target language. These realities are part of the experience.
Provided students realise that the point of the exercise is to experience a different
system and an unfamiliar situation, and provided they show a measure of resilience and
maturity, there is no reason to suppose that they will not have the academically positive
and personally enjoyable experience which seems almost without exception to have
been the case so far.
1.4 Assessment: European Studies students are required to pass the course of studies
which they take at the host university in order to rise with their year. The marks earned
during this year are converted into the Trinity marking system and entered on their
academic record. They do not, however, contribute towards Moderatorship, the marks
for this being derived solely from the Senior Sophister year. If they fail the year,
students must avail of whatever supplemental examination arrangements exist at
the exchange university. If they are unsuccessful, they may be permitted to repeat
the Junior Sophister year in Trinity. Students who fail any element of their year’s
programme of study have to contact their co-ordinator immediately.
1) Please note that you are responsible for obtaining all essay marks and examination
results. These must be on original certificates of the exchange university, and in
the local grading system, as used for that country's own students. Results are
converted in Trinity College for ratification by the European Studies Board of
Examiners. Students are reminded that it is their sole responsibility to inform
11
themselves of all procedures relating to enrolment and examinations (registering
and obtaining information on formats and lengths of assessments, dates of
examinations and supplementals).
2) Comparison between European grading systems
Insufficient /Failure
Sufficient
Satisfactory
D
5, 6
4-,4,4+,3-
3, 3+ 2-
F
7,
8, 9
I
17 and less
E
4
Good
Excellent
2, 2+,1-2
1- 1
10-12
13-15
16
18-22
23-26
27-29
4-5
5-6
7-9
Suspenso
Aprobado
Notable
P
2
3/3+
4
4+
R
2
4
5
Irl
Fail
3
Third
30- 30 lode
10
Matricula de Honor
lower 2nd
Sobresaliente
5
upper 2nd
I
The above is included as a guideline for your information to assess your performance.
(NB in France, some universities may consider 8-9 as a pass, others not. The host
University regulations in this respect will be applied).
3) Translation of marks
The CES Board of Examiners meets in September. Students are responsible for
ensuring that all necessary documentation has been submitted to the Centre for
European Studies by 1st September. Marks which are not submitted by the first
week in September may not be graded in the TCD transcript, but returned as
pass/fail.
1.5 Work load: ES students are expected to take courses amounting to ¾ of a local
student's full load. Some European universities operate a system of European Credit
12
Transfers (ECTS), where a local student's course requirements in any given year
would total 60 ECTs. If they are in such a university, students should bear in mind that
they are required to return marks for the equivalent of 42-60 ECTs. However, as the
allocation of ECTs points is not consistent across institutions and/or countries,
students’ workload is principally determined by the required number and type of
courses to be taken. If in doubt, students should make contact with their local and
home co-ordinators. When completing the form outlining their course choices,
students should complete the section relating to the level of the course, the number of
contact hours per week and ECTs of each course.
Students are not permitted to choose courses taught through English. Such courses
can never form part of the formal assessment for the year. Students should bear in
mind that their obligatory language classes (Major and Minor) should not be
included in the core 42-60 ECTs.
Students attending academic institutions in Poland and the Russian Federation are,
however, not only required to continue their formal study of their major language, but it
also does count as part of their annual assessment. Should these students wish to pursue
their study of their minor language, they may do so in addition to the programme
negotiated between TCD and the host institution.
1.6 Integrated courses of study: Some of the CES European exchange partners offer
students the possibility, instead of selecting courses on an à la carte basis from those
available in the relevant disciplines, of following a pre-established programme in which
there would be limited, or no, choice. This would apply to study in the Russian
Federation, but may also apply in EU universities. A number of French IEPs, for
instance, offer the possibility of doing a Certificat d'études politiques (CEP). The CES
would encourage students to enrol for such programmes on two grounds: (1) it ensures
the coherence of their course of study; (2) students obtain an internationally recognised
certificate which, if they intend to obtain work in the country of their major language or
indeed Europe, would stand them in good stead. The TCD assessment requirements for
students enrolled on such a programme would be the same as for other ES students: any
additional courses they might be doing in order to qualify for the certification would not
be factored into the result recorded on their TCD transcript. Students should discuss this
option with their host and home co-ordinators should the possibility arise. The home co13
ordinator and the Director of the CES must approve course choices. It is the
responsibility of the student, not the host co-ordinator, to obtain such approval.
1.7 Language instruction: Language instruction in students' major language is
available in all exchanges.
Although daily exposure to the language may seem
sufficient, it is necessary that students continue to receive formal instruction in
grammar, written expression etc. Students are obliged to avail of such a suitable
language instruction course in their major language.
Students should remember that they are also examined in their minor language in
Senior Sophister year (10ECTS). While students will not necessarily get credits
towards their year abroad results for language courses, it is strongly recommended
they take courses in their minor language where available, and maintain their
reading ability in this language during the year.
Important note: with the exception of Polish and Russian, all language instruction is
additional to the substantive work in history, history of ideas, political science,
economics or sociology which constitutes the assessed programme of study. Language
learning is not accepted in lieu of other examinable components of the year's work. All
language classes should be considered as additional to the compulsory 42-60 ECTs.
1.8 Dissertation: One academic possibility opened up by spending the Junior Sophister
year abroad is that of preparing a final year dissertation using materials (archives,
libraries, or fieldwork) sourced during the year abroad. The writing of the dissertation
is done in the Senior Sophister year, but the essential research may be carried out during
the third year. European Studies students are urged to think about this possibility, and
ensure they follow the Guidelines for Dissertations in European Studies (encl.). Above
all they should establish contact with a potential supervisor in Trinity College. If
students are not aware of who might supervise their dissertation, they should contact the
Centre for European Studies to seek advice.
14
__________________________________________
2. The European Studies exchange programmes
__________________________________________
2.1 The European Studies exchange programme: In order to allow European Studies
students to spend their Junior Sophister year at a university abroad, we have organized
the largest Trinity-originated SOCRATES co-operation which involves exchanges with
the following universities:
France:
Bordeaux:
Institut d'Etudes Politiques, 3 places
Grenoble:
Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Grenoble, 3 places
Paris:
(i) Université de Paris 7 (Département d'Histoire), 3 places
(ii) Institut d’Etudes Politiques, 2 places
Strasbourg: (i) Université March Bloch, (USH) Strasbourg II (Faculté des Sciences
Historiques), 3 places
(ii) Université Robert Schuman, Strasbourg III (Institut d' Etudes
Politiques), 2 place
Germany:
Freiburg:
Albert-Ludwigs-Universität (Historisches Seminar), 3 places
Hamburg:
Universität Hamburg (Historisches Seminar), 2 places
Tübingen:
Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (Historisches Seminar), 1
place[s]
Italy:
Pavia:
Università degli Studi di Pavia, (Dipartimento di Studi Politici e
Sociali), 6 places
Siena:
Università degli Studi di Siena, (Dipartimento de Storia; Facoltà di
Scienze Politiche), 2 places
Firenze:
Università degli Studi di Firenze, (Dipartimento de Storia; Facoltà
di Scienze Politiche), 3 places (places in the first instance are
offered to students from the Department of History)
15
Poland:
Krakow:
Jagiellonian University, Institute of European Studies,
Jodlowa 134; Krakow; Malopolska; 30-252; Poland
Spain:
Sevilla:
Universidad
de
Sevilla,
(Departamento
de
Historia
Contemporanea), 5 places
Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca, (Fac. Geografía e Historia), 5 places
Alcalá
Universidad de Alcalá de Henares 3 places
Oviedo
Universidad de Oviedo, Department of Filología Hispánica
Zaragoza
Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Historia Moderna y
Contemporánea, 2 places
In addition, but outside the SOCRATES network, the CES has established links with the
following academic institution in the Russian Federation
Moscow:
The
Gorky
Literary Institute
2.2 Financial implications: It is not possible to make general predictions as to the
financial cost of the year abroad, since the position varies so much between the different
countries and cities involved. The following points, however, should provide some
guidance for individual calculations.
1)
Fees are payable in Trinity, not the exchange university.
2)
The Socrates grant is issued from the Commission in Brussels and we have no
control over the amount. The amount of the grant varies from year to year and
from country to country. In some countries the government subsidises study
abroad schemes, so students from those countries are likely to receive larger
grants than the usual Socrates one. An average grant for a full academic year
16
abroad will be approximately €700 to €1200. The larger part (approx. 80%) will
be sent to your home address once we receive from you the completed letter of
confirmation of arrival and Socrates contract (these forms will be sent to you
before departure). There is a small top-up cheque in mid-March for full year
students. If a student withdraws early from the Programme they should call
in to the Office of International Student Affairs to organise a
reimbursement of their Socrates grant.
3)
The main additional expenses in comparison with a year spent in Dublin are:
(i) two return fares to the city concerned (assuming a visit home at Christmas)
(ii) accommodation (if this is not rented in Dublin). In most cases, university
accommodation is available; in others, students are dependent on the private
market. Indications of accommodation costs are given in section 5 below.
4)
In most of the cities concerned, living costs are now considerably cheaper than
in Dublin, and in a number of the cities concerned opportunities for part-time or
vacation work may be more plentiful than in Dublin.
General. Opening one’s own bank account in the host country is worth considering.
Electronic transfers of money in the Eurozone under €12,500 incur no charges to
personal customers, and Cirrus cards used in Cirrus cash dispensers are cost free.
Travellers cheques are trouble free. Use of (non-Cirrus) cash cards may incur a 3½%
charge per transaction abroad. Personal credit cards are now issued to students; it is also
possible to be added on to a parent’s credit card with an individual PIN number; cash
advances do not incur interest charges if the account is in credit. SOCRATES grant
cheques will be released to a family member authorised by you and advised in
writing to the Office of International Student Affairs.
2.3 Advance arrangements and required documentation: In all cases, the Trinity
co-ordinator formally notifies the exchange university of the number and names of the
Trinity students arriving the following academic year. This sets in motion the
registration process, but it is up to students to ensure that they have the necessary
documentation from Trinity and from the university and other authorities in the city to
which they are going in order to be able to register on arrival. The nature of this
17
documentation varies considerably between universities and is listed under individual
exchanges in section 3 below. Students must ensure that they have the following
documentation before they leave Ireland:
• If you are an Irish resident you are entitled to get healthcare through the public
system in countries of the European Union (EU), European Economic Area (EEA),
and Switzerland if you become ill or injured while on a temporary stay there .
• In order to access the local healthcare system you need a European Health
Insurance Card (EHIC). The card is valid for up to two years.
Full information about the EHIC is available at:
http://www.oasis.gov.ie/moving_country/moving_abroad/health_issues.html or at
www.ehic.ie
It may be necessary to acquire private health insurance as a top up: Mutuelle is offered
in France at approximately €122. Students going to Russia are required to take out
private health insurance.
You should also make sure that you have with you:
•
A letter translated into the host language and signed by parent/guardian to
accompany EHIC, confirming their permission to have any re-imbursement
paid directly into the quoted student bank account.
•
Large numbers of passport-size photos
•
Passport (for students going to Russia this must be valid for 6 months
AFTER the expected date of return)
•
Original full format birth certificate
Where students opt for university accommodation (where available), the Trinity coordinator facilitates booking this and letting the exchange university know the names of
the student(s) concerned. But it is still the responsibility of the students concerned to
ensure that they have the necessary documentation before going to claim their rooms. In
relation both to registration and accommodation, therefore, students must liaise closely
18
with their Trinity co-ordinator during the months in which the exchange is being
organised.
2.4 On arrival: It is essential that students contact their co-ordinator on arrival and
again at reasonably regular intervals (once a month). Problems are best solved by
informing your local co-ordinator promptly.
2.5 Keeping in touch with TCD: Students must register in Trinity for the year they
spend abroad. This can be done by post (contact the Student Records office) or on the
student’s return at Christmas.
When students are away, they are guided in the organisation of their programme by the
local co-ordinator in the exchange university. But it is essential that they keep in close
touch with their Trinity exchange co-ordinator and with the European Studies office for
two reasons. Firstly, we must have an up-to-date address so that, in the case of any
emergency, students can be contacted instantly. Secondly, unless the programme agreed
locally is ratified by the Trinity co-ordinator and by the Director of European Studies, it
may be invalid. Credit for the year is thus at stake. Additionally, students who are
preparing a dissertation while away need to be in close touch with their Trinity
supervisor.
To this end, students are requested to do two things:
(i) to let the European Studies office know their address and e-mail address (if different
from their tcd.ie e-mail address) and if possible also their local mobile phone number as
soon as possible after arriving. Notice of any subsequent change of address must also be
sent to Trinity.
(ii) to fill in the Learning Agreement form indicating the course of study agreed and
to send this off to your TCD co-ordinator with a copy to the CES office, by 1 November
at the latest. Any subsequent changes of programme or later decisions on second
semester courses must likewise be submitted to the Trinity co-ordinator for approval.
If students return home at Christmas, they are encouraged to call in to the European
Studies office to keep us posted on how the year is progressing.
19
Serious difficulties should be reported immediately to the Trinity co-ordinator or to the
Centre
for
European
Studies
office
(+353
1
896
1808),
or
e-mail
[email protected] Faxes may be sent to European Studies at + 353 1 896 2603.
____________________________________________________________
3. Protocol - Steps to be taken if you suffer ill health while abroad
_____________________________________________________________
If you are an Irish resident you are entitled to get healthcare through the public system
in countries of the European Union (EU), European Economic Area (EEA), and
Switzerland if you become ill or injured while on a temporary stay there. In order to
access local health services you will need a European Health Insurance Card (see
page 6 above)
You may also wish to extend your personal insurance with the VHI
(www.vhihealthcare.com ) or Quinn Healthcare (www.quinn-healthcare.com), or other
insurance company.
Familiarising yourself with the practices of the health system in a given country will
minimise the stress associated with ill health. On arrival at your destination, as part of
your general familiarisation with the structures and practices of the institution, find out
•
where the student health centre (or equivalent) is
•
what steps you have to take (if any) to register with them
•
how you go about filling a prescription (what documents are required, what forms
you might have to complete, how you go about being refunded by your insurance
company)
•
how to contact your co-ordinator/the International Student Officer/other relevant
parties, in case of emergencies
Keep all necessary documents in a safe and retrievable place
20
If by some mischance you should suffer ill health while on your Socrates exchange
year, please make sure that you (or one of your classmates) take the following steps:
•
Seek appropriate medical assistance
•
Ask the doctor to write down what is wrong with you and what treatment is
required
•
Don't forget to take your insurance documents and means of identification with you
when seeking medical assistance. It would possibly not be a bad idea to take a small
dictionary in case your language skills break down; better still, bring someone with
you.
•
Tell a friend!!! If you need to be hospitalised, bear in mind that many continental
hospitals provide only medical care. You may need someone to bring you changes
of clothes and even possibly food.
•
If you are confined to bed at home, someone will need to be able to shop, cook etc
on your behalf.
•
Contact your parents, your local Socrates co-ordinator and your TCD co-ordinator
(and if appropriate your College Tutor) as soon as possible (or ask a friend to do
so).
•
Ensure that the above have some way of maintaining contact with you (a person
through whom contact can be made, a telephone number, an address).
If the effects of your ill health are long-term, please bear in mind that College does not
penalise students for their state of health. Just as allowances are made for students
studying in Trinity who suffer health problems, so the same allowances apply to TCD
students studying abroad as a compulsory part of their degree programme. The most
important thing is to keep us informed. Please be assured that any information you give
your tutor, your year abroad co-ordinator, or the Director the CES is treated in the
strictest of confidenc
21
__________________________
4. Guidelines for Dissertations
___________________________
Introduction
Senior Sophister students may submit a moderatorship dissertation in place of one of
their List B courses. These guidelines are intended to anticipate some of your questions,
and set out what we expect of a dissertation.
What is a dissertation?
It is an extended essay based on independent research, involving critical study. It
allows you to apply the techniques learnt in your undergraduate career to sustained
investigation of a topic of your own choosing, free from the constraints imposed by
your normal class schedule. The dissertation must be your own work, in that you must
do your own research, construct your own argument, and write it yourself. This does
not imply that you should work in isolation, ignoring interpretations offered by fellowstudents, published scholarship, or your supervisor. Instead, take every opportunity to
exchange ideas with others.
Am I expected to make an original contribution to scholarship?
No - although it is quite possible that you will. In many cases, presumably, your
conclusions will coincide with those of other scholars who have tackled similar
evidence. We do expect you to show your capacity for independent and critical
analysis. This involves formulating clear hypotheses, applying these systematically to a
body of relevant evidence, and justifying your conclusions by reference to that
evidence.
What are the formal requirements for a dissertation?
The length of the text should be 7,000 - 10,000 words, supported by a table of contents,
classified bibliography, and systematic references to sources in the form of footnotes or
endnotes. The dissertation (and all preceding drafts and project outlines) must be
typewritten or word-processed on one side of the page only, with generous margins on
22
the left and the right, and double-spacing. Please submit two identical copies of the
dissertation, securely bound. Further guidance on lay-out and conventions is attached.
How should I choose my topic?
Your dissertation must be within the range of the courses offered in European Studies,
i.e. the history, politics, society, or culture of Continental Europe. You must discuss
your prospective topic with one of the supervisors listed below. A copy of the proposed
project must be submitted to the supervisor and to the Director of European Studies,
who will jointly decide on approval to proceed. The methodology used should be that
of the department in which the supervisor is based.
What supervision will be offered?
Students may not undertake a dissertation project without supervision by a member of
staff in Trinity College. You may ask academic staff in the partner university abroad if
they are willing to offer advice; however, they are not obliged to offer supervision to
Trinity students. Students should feel free to contact their supervisors if any specific
difficulties arise. Since this is a piece of independent research, no detailed critique will
be offered of the final draft of the entire dissertation. However, you will be given
detailed comments on a draft chapter of about 2,500 words. It will be your
responsibility to apply these criticisms and suggestions to the remainder of your
dissertation.
How will the dissertation be assessed?
It will be examined by three people: your supervisor, another member of staff, and an
external examiner. This should ensure that dissertations are assessed consistently,
whatever your chosen field.
SCHEDULE
Optional: Senior Freshman students already considering the possibility of writing a
dissertation should meet potential supervisors in the course of Trinity Term.
Essential: Junior Sophisters should submit their proposed topic to their supervisors by
the end of February of their year abroad, together with a note on the feasibility of the
23
project. A research proposal, minimum 2 pages, maximum 5 pages, including an
outline of the dissertation, a provisional bibliography, and a note on sources, must be
submitted by the beginning of Trinity Term (i.e. first week of April).
Senior Sophisters: Final confirmation of the acceptability of research proposal is made
by the Director of European Studies in consultation with the supervisor in the first
week of MT. Students should meet their supervisor three times during Michaelmas
Term. A draft chapter, which need not be the first chapter, must be submitted by the
beginning of Hilary Term.
The completed dissertation must be submitted to the European Studies Office by the
first day of Trinity Term.
You might find it useful to put these deadlines in your diary.
PRESENTATION
(1) Divide your dissertation into an introduction and three or four chapters.
(2) Before embarking on research, work out a strategy for taking notes accurately,
methodically, and retrievably. Remember that your dissertation will require far more
notes than a term essay. Double check the accuracy of transcription as you go, clearly
distinguishing between quotations and summaries, and marking the precise page of
every entry. The use of keyword headings will facilitate filing and retrieval.
(3) Quotations from secondary sources, whether direct or indirect, should be brief and
wholly relevant (use [...] to indicate omitted passages). To avoid the suspicion of
plagiarism you must not only use your own words, but also refrain from paraphrasing
extended passages from any single work. In the case of primary sources which are not
readily available, longer extracts may be included in support of a detailed textual
commentary. You may wish to reproduce entire documents or extended extracts in an
appendix, with appropriate references in the text. All quotations must follow the
original precisely, in wording, spelling and capitalisation.
24
(4) Provide a bibliography listing all the sources used, and separating primary from
secondary sources. For books give title, author's full name, place and date of
publication. For articles, add the title and issue of the journal, together with page
numbers.
(5) Precise page references must be given for all direct quotations, and also for closely
paraphrased passages. When a passage is re-quoted from a secondary text, that text
must be cited in addition to the original source. References may be given in notes at the
foot of the page, or at the end of the essay. Please do not follow the common but
distracting practice of interpolating references in the text. Footnote citations may use
abbreviated titles, but must indicate the precise location of every primary source cited
(such as folio number within MSS, or page number). In short, give enough information
to allow the reader to trace the passage cited.
(6) Choose your own conventions for the text, notes and bibliography, but aim to be
simple, consistent and unambiguous. For practical guidance in choosing conventions,
you might consult a manual such as Hart's Rules for Compositors and Readers at the
Oxford University Press. Alternatively, follow the style adopted in any major
monograph in your field.
(7) Rewrite your first version before submitting the draft chapter or final dissertation.
This should help you not only to achieve greater accuracy and fluency, but also to
delete passages superfluous to the questions raised in your outline. Try reading your
first draft aloud or show it to another student, in order to detect faulty argument or
expression. Avoid padding and repetition, and check doubtful spellings before
submission. Paragraphs should occupy less than a page and be devoted to a single
major theme.
(8) Dissertations must be submitted in typescript or print-out, double-spaced,
preferably without any hand-written amendments. Use one side only of each A4 sheet,
number the pages, and provide generous margins on the left and the right. Start each
chapter, and the bibliography and appendices, on a new page. Both copies must be
25
securely bound, including a table of contents, and a cover sheet giving the title, your
name, your supervisor's name, and the date of submission.
EUROPEAN STUDIES STAFF
The staff who teach on the European Studies programme are:
B. Apor, Diploma, University of Debrecen, Ph.D., EUI (Florence). History of Central and
Eastern Europe in the 19-20th centuries.
P. Arnds, M.A. (LMU Munich), Ph.D (U of Toronto), German Literature and
Culture,Comparative Literature, Cultural Theory, Interdisciplinarity
E.J. Arnold, M.A., D.E.A. (Grenoble, I.E.P.), Doctorat en Sciences Politiques (Grenoble,
I.E.P.), C.A.P.E.S. (Aix-Marseille). 20th-century French intellectual, political and social
history; history of ideas in late 19th and 20th-century Europe.
J. Barkhoff, M.A., Dr.Phil.(Hamburg) German literature and culture of the 18th and 20th
centuries.x m
Susana Bayó Belenguer: M.A., Ph.D. 20th century Spanish history, literature, and
cinema. Spain and Europe.
R. Bertoni, Dott. Let. (Pisa) Post-war Italian literature.
R Chari, B.A. (SASK), M.A. (SASKS), Ph.D. (QU). Economic Policy Making,
Privatisation and deregulation in Western Europe, Spanish Politics, Canadian Politics and
American Politics
J. Clarke, M.A. (NUI). , Ph.D (Florence) 18th and 19th century French political and
cultural history, French Revolutionary political culture.
26
C.B. Cosgrove, B.A. (Belfast), M.A., Ph.D. (Essex). Literary theory, modernist and
postmodernist fiction; Modern Spanish American novels; Spanish intellectual life;
Translation theory and practice
J.F. Doherty, B.A., D.Phil. (Oxon) Modern Russian literature and culture.
D. Faas, M.A. University of Stuttgart (English and Geography), MPhil University of
Cambridge (Educational Research), Ph.D. University of Cambridge (Sociology of
Education). Comparative Sociology; Globalisation; Identity Politics and Social Change;
Migration; Race and Ethnic Studies; European Minority Cultures and Identities
M. Gallagher, M.Sc. Ph.D (Strath.), Irish politics, Political parties, Comparative political
institutions, Electoral systems, Backgrounds, attitudes and activism of party members.
Katerina García: M.A. (Charles University, Prague), Ph.D. (Charles University, Prague)
The Spain of the Three Cultures -- the interaction of Christians, Muslims and Jews in the
fields of art, literature and thought in Medieval Iberia. The history, literature and art of the
Jews prior to their expulsion in 1492.
J. Hanrahan, BCL (NUI), Ph.D. (Edinburgh); Literary, political and cultural history of
the Enlightenment, particularly Voltaire and political culture of Ancien Régime France.
J. Hayden,B.A. (N.U.I.), Ph.D. Democratization and transition in Eastern Europe;
Judicial activism: The role of institutions in transition to democracy.
J. Horne, B.A. (Oxon.), D. Phil. (Sussex) Social, cultural and political history of 20thcentury France; comparative history of the First World War.
A.R. Kramer, B.A., M.A. (Newcastle), Dr.Phil. (Hamburg) Political, economic and social
history of 20th-century Germany.
27
C. Leahy, B.A., M.A. Ph.D (NUI), Modernism, Postmodernism, Literary Theory,
Contemporary Women Writers.
R. Lindstädt, Ph.D., Washington University, Political Economy; Political Institutions;
Legislative, Bureaucratic and Judicial Politics; Formal Theory; Political Methodology
G. McElroy, M.Sc. (LSE), M.A. (Rochester), Ph.D. Political Parties, Political
Institutions, European Integration, Research Methods.
C. Houle, B.A. (Belf.,), M.A. (Roch.), Ph.D. (Roch.), Democratization and Democratic
Consolidation, Developing Countries, Comparative Political Economy, African Politics,
Inequality and Redistribution, Ethnic Conflicts, and International Political Economy.
M. McGowan, BA, MA (Newcastle), Dr. phil. (Hamburg), modern German and European
cultural history, German theatre and drama, literature and migration, German ideas
of 'Europa'.
G. Murdock, Ph.D., Reformed Religion in Early Modern Europe
J.D. Murray, B.A., Ph.D. Russian lexicology.
C. Ó Cuilleanáin, M.A. (Dublin, NUI), Ph.D. (Cantab.). Translation Studies, Dante and
Boccaccio Studies, Creative Writing
Ciara O’Hagan: B.A. (Belfast), M.A., PGCE, Ph.D. (Belfast) Enlightenment Spain and,
more especially, the representation of America in eighteenth-century Peninsular literature.
T. Pegram, M.A.(Oxon) D.Phil (Oxon). Comparative politics and human rights with work
touching upon several inter-related areas.
W. Phelan, Ph.D. (Harv.), European Community Law, European Political Development,
European Union International Organisation, International Relations Theory, International
Political Economy.
28
C. Ruthner, MAG.Phil., (Vienna), Dr.Phil (Vienna), German/Austrian literature and
cultural history, Central European Studies, literary and cultural theory, otherness as a
cultural phenomenon.
D. Scott, M.A. Ph.D., Text and image, Semiotics, Literature and cultural studies, Travel
writing
S. Smyth, M.A., H. Dip.Ed, Ph.D. 19th-century Russian literature.
E. Tannam, B.A., M.A. (Essex) Ph.D. (Lond.) EU Politics, Integration Theory/IR Theory,
EU and conflict management, Northern Ireland/Anglo-Irish Politics
Note: The 'survival' section under each exchange in part 5 has been updated by Junior Sophister
students abroad at the moment, and by Senior Sophister students in the light of their own
experience, and using the questionnaires completed during their year abroad. Thanks to all those
involved.
29
_______________________
5. Exchanges
_______________________
Please note that the overall co-ordination for these exchanges remains with the
Director. If you have urgent business and cannot contact the TCD co-ordinator,
contact
the
CES
office:
tel
896
1808
or
fax
896
2603,
e-mail:
[email protected]
5.1 FRANCE
General academic requirements
You should arrive in France at the end of the first week in September at the latest. This
gives you the opportunity to settle in for a week before the start of the stages
d’Intégration offered by the university and the inscription pédagogique (enrolment for
classes). If you need accommodation, you should start looking before the end of August
when supply is plentiful. Make an appointment to see your local Erasmus co-ordinator
as soon as possible to discuss course choices.
Courses are generally year-long although some institutions have semesterised courses.
ES students take courses amounting to approximately two- thirds to three-quarters of a
local student's full load: they are required to return marks for the equivalent of 45-60
ECTs. The courses should be mainly ES-type subjects, and should include at least one
year-long or two semester-long seminar(s) ('conférence de méthode' - at the IEPs - or
'travaux dirigés' at other institutions).
NB : You will not be given permission to take courses given in English during your
year abroad. You are also encouraged to take a course in your minor language.
However, any ECTs obtained for these courses will not be counted towards the final
mark.
Work load: Students should choose and (promptly on arrival) enrol for at least the
following number of ‘semesterised’ courses over the whole year. Weightings differ from
one university to the next, so aim for at least 50 ECTs :
·
two 'conférences de méthode' or 'travaux dirigés'
30
·
four lecture courses known as 'cours fondamentaux'
·
two more courses, either 'cours spécialisés' or 'ateliers'.
Please note that French language courses cannot count towards your total number of
ECTs (except in the case of Certificats d’Etudes Politiques or other approved
programmes, where these language classes are part of an curriculum approved by the
host institution). As soon as possible after enrolment, you should send details of the
courses you have chosen to your home coordinator for approval on the International
Office learning agreement form. These course details must include (i) the official
course code used by the institution, (ii) the total number of ECTs, (iii) the total
number of contact hours, and (iv) the correct title IN FRENCH. Failure to provide
precise information will lead to delays in your course of study being accepted by the
CES, and will make any changes we require difficult.
Unless you receive specific written permission to take a course from the Trinity coordinator, the ECTs obtained will not count towards the final mark.
Level: In university history departments, the level of course should be the third, or
Licence, year, though some second-year courses may be included. In the Instituts
d'Etudes Politiques (IEPs), courses may be chosen equally from the second and third
years.
Assessment varies, being sometimes by written assignment, sometimes by end of
semester or year exams. It is your responsibility to inform yourself of assessment
requirements and procedures on arriving at your host university.
Of the equivalent of 45-60 ECTs which are required, marks for the best 45, or
equivalent, are used to calculate the overall mark for the year abroad. Remember that
you should leave yourself a margin for error, as you may fail your year if you bring
back less than 45 ECTs.
Certificat d'Etudes Politiques or the Diplôme du Programme International (IEPG):
At some IEPs it is possible to obtain a Certificat d'Etudes Politiques à titre étranger or
to follow an undergraduate programme which provides international students with a
broad grounding in social sciences, emphasizing comparative studies in an
international context. Areas of focus include: contemporary history, economics and
31
business, international relations, law, European studies, political science and
sociology. These programmes entail slightly more courses and some French or other
language classes. The CES would positively encourage students wishing to avail of this
opportunity.
5.01 Special requirements in France: Do not expect the French administration to be
as user-friendly as in Ireland. Secretarial staff in France are often off-hand and
indifferent to your sufferings. The only way to get around them is to smile, and be calm,
courteous, and patient.
You can get a USIT student card at USIT offices once you register as a student.
5.02 Accommodation in France: If you are unable to avail of University
accommodation in France and must rent on the private market, be aware that you must
provide the letting agency proof of income to pay the rent. Experience to date shows
that a letter from your parents’ Bank Manager indicating their undertaking to transfer
the equivalent of a year’s rent will be acceptable. You may also be required to pay up to
three months rent in advance. Travel very early in September to have a better choice of
accommodation. Some letting agencies require more detailed proof of parents’ income.
5.03 Rent subsidy in France: Rent Subsidy for Students: CAF
What is CAF?
There is a rent subsidy scheme in France, run by the CAF (Caisse d’Allocations
Familiales; www.caf.fr), for which you may be eligible. It is best to apply as soon as
possible because the bureaucracy can take some time, however, the subsidy can be
backdated once it is approved. It would appear that the amount of the subsidy depends
upon the location and size of your accommodation, as well as other factors, but it is
usually worth about 20-30% of your monthly rent.
Please see below for advice on applying to CAF for the rent subsidy. Students have
advised that the best way to apply is online.
You will need:
To apply for the rent subsidy you will need to know your address in France
32
(including postcode), and you will need a French bank account. You may also need an
identity card from your host university and a form signed by your landlord.
Students have suggested that you bring to France several photocopies of your passport
and plenty of passport photos, as you will often be asked for these when negotiating
French bureaucracy.
Bank account advice ;
Students have recommended that you open a French bank account immediately you
arrive because sometimes landlords do not wish to lease to you unless you have one.
Also, it may be useful to have bank statements or a letter from your home bank saying
that you have enough money to support yourself or that a parent/guardian has
guaranteed to do so. Be prepared to have to schedule an appointment with a bank in
order open a bank account, especially in the cities where there are many foreign
students. To open a bank account you may need to show your passport, student
identification, and proof of residence (eg a rent agreement or a letter of offer from your
host university).
You will not need:
EU students do not need a Carte de séjour, but non-EU students do.
Students have advised that you do not need a French translation of your birth
certificate.
HOW TO APPLY FOR THE CAF RENT SUBSIDY:
The following is the website of the CAF (Caisse d’Allocations Familiales) which
allocates all the rent subsidy money: http://www.caf.fr/
You can apply for the CAF rent subsidy online.
How to apply online:
When you are on the CAF website homepage, click on ‘Etudiants’ in the menu on the
left hand side of the screen, then ‘Faire unde demande’. Scroll to the bottom of this
page and click on ‘Poursuivre’ to access the form. You need an address in France
(including a postcode) in order to do so. The website also includes information and
33
documents you need to complete the form, so be sure to have these in front of you
before you begin to fill in the form. Once you have submitted the form, you will be
given a reference number and asked to print the form and send the accompany
information above to the CAF office as directed.
CAF offices in Paris
The following is the link to the contact details of all the CAF offices in Paris:
http://www.paris.caf.fr/
5.04
Health Insurance: You should obtain the European Health Insurance Card
which gives you an entitlement to medical treatment in France (details available on
http://oasis.gov.ie/moving_country/moving_abroad/e111.html : you should read
this information before leaving)
5.05 Registration: the following documents are needed:
·
Two copies of Fiche d'état civil (perhaps!)
·
Passport and photocopy of passport
·
The European Health Insurance Card, or health insurance purchased in France
·
About 20 passport photographs
·
Letter of introduction from TCD
Web links to host institutions available on European Studies
http://www.tcd.ie/European_Studies/exchange.htm,
1) Bordeaux: Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Bordeaux. 3 places
Address: 11 Allée Ausone, Domaine Universitaire
33607 PESSAC Cedex - FRANCE
http://www.sciencespobordeaux.fr/accueil/
TCD Co-ordinator: Dr E Arnold
[email protected]
Tel: +353 1 896 1836 Fax: +353 1 671 7118
34
Bordeaux coordinator: Gabrielle STOCKMAN
[email protected]
Tel: +33 (0)556 844 144
Essential: For more details on academic year 2014-2015 and documents to download,
consult
http://institut.sciencespobordeaux.fr/ and
http://www.sciencespobordeaux.fr/fr/formation/relations_internationales/incoming/etudi
ants_sous_convention.html
No details are available regarding the 2014-2015 University Calendar. The calendar for
this year will give you an idea of the term dates for next year
Cf
http://www.sciencespobordeaux.fr/modules/resources/download/default/Fichiers/Admis
sions/Inscriptions/Calendrier_univ_2013-2014.pdf
Academic year: On arrival, go to see the local coordinator or International Office for
information about registration and courses.
Courses: Students may take any of the courses on offer in the first, third or fourth
years. Courses currently on offer include: culture générale; sociologie politique ; théorie
politique; vie politique française et contemporaine; régionalisme et intégration;
géographie humaine ; histoire sociale ; migrations internationales ; histoire des relations
internationales; histoire de l’idée européenne ; nationalités & minorités dans les
systèmes politiques occidentaux ; various ‘cours d’ouverture’ given by visiting
professors. There is also a well-established course on political science methodology.
There is an optional course, 'certificat d'etudes politiques' (24 ects), which is well worth
doing. It is a very general look at French society, politics and french language. Upon
passing the course, you will receive a certificate stating that you have studied at
Sciences Po. With your other courses, you will not have any tutorial sized classes so
this certificate course will be your only opportunity to have tutorial classes during the
week. The course is only for erasmus students and is a great way to get to know all the
erasmus in your college.
35
Accommodation: If possible, try to find accommodation in Bordeaux. There is college
accommodation available but rooms are quite small and basic. Some students are
sharing two shared kitchens between 30 people with only two hobs and a sink. College
accommodation is really close to Sciences Po but during the evening and at the
weekends there is nothing to do in the area (no shops, restaurants etc.) so you have to
travel into Bordeaux (20 mins on tram) to find restaurants, bars etc. If you do want to go
for college accommodation, make sure to check out the website for each housing village
as room sizes vary. Be prepared to deal with unfriendly secretaries at CROUS (in
charge of residences) and have all the documents required at hand on your first day.
Try websites such as www.colocation.fr. Students might require a “garant” who
guarantees that students pay their rent on time.
Survival
Eating: Auchan (Tesco-type), Marché Plus, Champion and Monoprix for buying food.
Chez Marcel has a good varied menu. Restaurants Universitaires are very cheap; some
are better than others: Forum at Bordeaux 4 has sandwiches and salads; Veracruz at
Village 3 is good; RU2, behind the IEP, is not great. (There's a student travel agency
there, OTV, which is better than USIT in town); RU central at the Victoire is convenient
in town, the food, however, is just about edible. Lots of good and some inexpensive
restaurants around the Place du Parlement and Place Camille Julian in the Quartier St.
Pierre.
Work: Quite hard to find. Try CROUS or CIJA (Cours Pasteur). If you arrive early try
the Connemara (Irish Pub, near Centre Commercial Meriadeck)
Social life: Bordeaux has a great social scene. The area around the Victoire is very
lively, especially at the weekend. Erasmix is a very active and fun association at the IEP
run by French and Erasmus students: get involved-it’s a great way to meet French
students. It organizes soirées, weekends away etc. A wide choice of sports and activities
are available at the IE, from swing dancing to rugby. CREPS 50 m. swimming pool is
free. The Grand Theâtre has good student reductions for the ballet and opera. L’Utopia,
one of the many cinemas is very cheap for students.
The wine society (societe d'oenologie) has a fee of €35for the year, and is strongly
recommended. There are weekly wine tastings in the lectures theatres and several events
36
in venues in the city centre.
Safety: Bordeaux is generally a safe city, but it makes sense to be careful. At night,
avoid the area around the train station and the Quartier St Michel. Always lock up
securely, even when leaving your room for a short time. Consider insurance for valuable
items.
Travel: The bus and tram system in Bordeaux makes it very easy to travel around. I
recommend buying the annual tbc card (€202) which means you will pay about €17 a
month on travel. The tbc bicycle system is also very good value. In terms of travelling
throughout France, I would recommend buying the care jeune (€50) which will give you
disounts of up to 60% on all regional/tgv trains
2) Grenoble: Institut d'Etudes Politique de Grenoble. 3 places
Address: B.P. 45, 38402 St-Martin-d'Hères. http://www-sciences-po.upmf-grenoble.fr
TCD co-ordinator: Dr. E Arnold +353 1 896 1836
e-mail: [email protected] Fax: +353 1 671 7118
Grenoble co-ordinator: Nicole Van Der Louw, [email protected]
Telephone: +33 476 82 60 93, Fax : +33 476 82 83 63
Academic year: Check the website for precise dates. No details are available
regarding the 2014-2015 University Calendar. The calendar for this year will give you
an idea of the term dates for next year
Cf
http://www.sciencespo-grenoble.fr/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Calendrier-1er-
cycle-ann%C3%A9e-2013-2014_au_07_06.pdfUseful website: http://www.sciencespogrenoble.fr/
Courses: The most up to date information is on-line at the Grenoble website;
Cours
spécialisés
http://www.sciencespo-grenoble.fr/wp-
content/uploads/2013/09/Listes-CS_2013-2014.pdf and
Listes
des
Séminaires
http://www.sciencespo-grenoble.fr/wp-
content/uploads/2013/09/Listes-s%C3%A9minaires_2013-20.pdf
37
Students may take any of the courses on offer in the second or third years, but must take
at least 2 conférences de méthode and 2 cours fondamentaux. All courses are
semesterised, and they change each year. There are three types of course on offer:
conférences de méthode (6 ECTS), cours fondamentaux (6 ECTS), cours specialisées (4
ECTS),. Among the courses on offer in 2011-2012 are: histoire des mentalités (not the
same as History of Ideas from 1st year Trinity, much harder and way more abstract);
questions d’Orient (this is a brilliant course but tough to follow, even the French
students think the lecturer speaks very fast, it is worth it though) questions d’Occident;
la France 1920-1980; femmes et citoyenneté; les politiques d’immigration et
d’intégration; les groupes d’internet et l’Union européenne. Seminars in the French
language are on offer to SOCRATES students. In the Maison des Langues on the same
campus, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish language classes are available. Forms for
language courses should be obtained and stamped by the IEP. Be prepared for 8 am
lectures that run for 3 hours.
Students can also follow the Le Certificat d'études politiques (for more information :
http://www.sciencespo-grenoble.fr/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/CEP-2013-enfrancais.pdf ).
Saturdays are potential lecture days, and can be used for examinations on mornings
and/or afternoons. Students should therefore wait until examination dates are published
(15 days after classes start) before planning holidays.
Accommodation: Rooms in a university residence are not generally available in
Grenoble. The local coordinator finds accommodation in the centre of town for the
duration of the intensive language course, provided the necessary sum of money
(approximately €92) is deposited by August. Accommodation is difficult to find; make
contact with ES students currently there, or go out during the summer to secure
accommodation. It is recommended that you arrive at the end of August to find
somewhere to stay and Centre Ville is highly recommended by previous Erasmus
students. If you wish to live independently, enrol at CROUS, 5 rue d'Arsonval, from
home and register early. Avoid private fee-charging accommodation agencies.
Recommended accommodation area on the B line, (avoiding A line) between quartier
Ile Verte and La Gare. Avoid Villeneuve and Natherbe. Make sure all documents are in
order early, especially for things like CAF, otherwise things can drag on for ages. Buy a
38
good Blay Foldex map of Grenoble! Look for somewhere within walking distance of
town. Buses stop at 20.30, trams before midnight. Taxis are expensive. Buy a monthly
train/bus ticket especially for the first month (approx €26) available at all Tabacs.
Survival
(i) Eating. Student RUs are quite good. Across the river are good Italian restaurants,
inexpensive restaurants all over the town especially in the Quartier Arabe, pizza
parlours on Rive Gauche and a choice of McDonalds! Tacos de Lyon is a wonderful
Taco restaurant.
(ii) Work can be found with difficulty, pub-work, child-minding or giving grinds have
proved most rewarding: London Pub near place Notre Dame specifically looks for
foreign staff to attract Erasmus students. see ‘Le 38’ newspaper. Teaching English 1015 euro per hour.
(iii) Social life in the many bars in the centre of town is swinging - La Bibliothèque,
Trois Canards, Couche Tard, Notre Dame, London Pub highly recommended.
Nightclubs very expensive and not recommended, late bars are safer. Go to IntEGre
events, they organise fantastic trips and cultural nights throughout the year, also a lot of
introductory tours at the start which are great for meeting people and getting your
bearings. Visit Annecy and Vizille, really beautiful places. Take the multi-activities
course that Sciences Po offer, it's fantastic value and great fun. If you prefer skiing and
snowboarding to Escalade and Mountain biking, take it in Term 2, but both courses are
an absolute steal at 50€ per term.
Excellent sports clubs and facilities: astro-turf hockey pitch outside the university;
University Ski Club (GUC) (ski gear for purchase in Decathlon) - membership and
insurance costs approx €39. The Office for Foreign Students is very helpful and the
staff organise loads of activities during the first week and this is a great way of
integrating with the other students. Students in the IEP are really hard working and
pretty serious so it is a bit hard to talk to them but get involved in stuff and it gets
easier. The tram is the best way to get around, but it stops at midnight and it can be a bit
rough, the buses at 8pm and taxis are very expensive. SPIN (Science-Po International)
is an association to integrate foreign students and well worth joining. Giving FREE
English lessons, 'classes orales', (to max 4 French students for 30 minutes per week) is
reported to be an excellent way to meet the elusive French. Join the ‘Ecole de Glisse’.
39
Use the mountains!
(iv) Study. The library is very small but quite good, less crowded than Trinity. Very few
books, but lecture notes suffice.
(v) Safety. Don’t walk alone at night. Avoid Village Olympique and Villeneuve.
Grenoble can be as safe or unsafe as most cities.
Be careful and vigilant.
3) Paris: (i) Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris. 2 places
Address: 21 rue Saint-Guillaume, 75337 Paris
Metro stations – Line 4 either Saint-Sulphice or St Germain-des-Près
Line 10 / 12 Rue de Sevres (Line goes to Sorbonne and Jussieu)
Buses – stop Rue St Guillaume No.63; stop Rue des Saints-Pères or Rue de Rennes Bus
No.95
RER – Musée d’Orsay, St Michel or Luxembourg- all about 10-15 mins walk from
Sciences-Po
http://www.sciences-po.fr/
TCD Co-ordinator: Dr. Edward Arnold. Tel: +353 1 896 1836
e-mail: [email protected] Fax: +353 1 671 7118
Paris IEP Co-ordinator: Mlle Cécile Marin
International Affairs Manager - UK and Ireland
[email protected]
Tél: +33 (0)1 45 49 51 20
IEP Co-ordinator: Ms Cécile Blondel
Direction des Affaires Internationales et des Echanges.
For the welcome programme and student life is Paris, see
http://www.sciencespo.fr/en/content/38/living-france
Academic year: No details are available regarding the 2014-2015 University Calendar.
40
The calendar for this year will give you an idea of the term dates for next year
http://formation.sciences-po.fr/contenu/calendriers-scolarit%C3%A9
For details on enrolment and the stage d’integration, consult :
http://www.sciencespo.fr/welcome/fr/content/premieres-demarches and
http://college.sciences-po.fr/siteparis/node/130
Programme International de Sciences Politiques et Sociales: At the IEP (Paris)
motivated students can follow the Certificat d'Etudes en Sciences Sociales et
Humanités. http://college.sciences-po.fr/siteparis/curricula ‘Programme International de
Sciences Politiques et Sociales’, for which a diploma is awarded after successfully
completing the year. This programme proposes an ‘Introduction to European Societies’
through the pluri-disciplinary approach of the social sciences. Students are familiarised
with a comparative approach to international problems.
The academic year is divided into two semesters. For each semester, you choose two
cours magistraux (which include a 2 hour conférence de méthode) for each and one
enseignment d’ouverture. There is then the option of doing another language or taking
on another enseignment d’ouverture. The enseignments d’ouverture, and the
conférences de méthod are two-hour sessions, whereas the cours magistraux last
between an hour to two hours. French is compulsory. The summer preceding SciencesPo, you will have to do an online language test and send it electronically to the
languages section of the IEPP. Your French will be graded from level 1 to level 5, with
level 5 being the highest level of competency. For levels 1 and 2 you will have 4 hours
of French classes a week, and for levels 3 to 5, you will have two hours a week. You
will also have to do an online test for any other language you want to study. The Stage
d’Intégration in September is important, as you get to meet people and find out things
about Sciences-Po, have extra French classes and learn more about Paris.
Precise details of courses available (http://college.sciences-po.fr/siteparis/frenchlecture-courses) and course requirements can be found on the sciences po website
(http://college.sciences-po.fr/siteparis/curricula)
In Sciences-Po there is a system of contrôle continu (constant assessment) which means
that the marks that you obtain throughout the semester contribute to your overall mark.
This can vary from class to class but can be as much 2/3 of the final mark. The contrôle
41
continu may require you to prepare exposés, fiches de lecture, plans détaillés (detailed
essay plans), or dissertations (essays). Much emphasis is placed on a rigorous
organisation of ideas and very specific presentation conventions. Students may have the
opportunity to do a two-month placement organised by the IEP, between mid-June and
the end of September. For the JS assessment, only the number of courses described
under general academic requirements are taken into account, but the diploma is as such
a valuable additional qualification. German, Italian, Russian and Spanish language
classes are also available. If after the two semesters you have obtained over 53 credits
you will receive a Certificate and are eligible to apply for the Sciences-Po Masters
course.
Accommodation might be arranged in the Irish College in Paris, but is not guaranteed
by the local co-ordinator.
Requests must be submitted by the beginning of April.
Rents in Paris are very expensive and expect to pay Dublin prices or maybe even more.
Rents range from €550-€700 per month and per person for a comfortable, good sized
flat. However, some of the students who share can get a flat for around €990 between
them. If you fancy living in the city centre St Germain-des-Près is very good, but
expensive, but then you are in the city centre and have few travel costs. Belleville is
cheaper for accommodation but you have travel costs -it has a great atmosphere and
really good Chinese restaurants. Avoid around the stations especially Gare de Nord and
Gare de l’Est. Around Champs-Elysées and the Eiffel Tower accommodation is really
expensive. Avoid the suburbs if you can, RER is not really attractive late at night.
Before you start getting worried, Paris is a really safe city, which given its size is quite
an achievement. Don’t worry about the police presence especially the riot police as it’s
the norm and nothing to fear. There is the French government’s CAF (caisse
d’allocations familiales) With the CAF you will receive each month a rent allowance,
which can only be paid into a French bank account. The amount of the CAF varies but
for €500 rent per month expect around €90. More details are available at
www.paris.caf.fr/
Survival: It is worth investing in the RATP carte imaginaire for about €29 per month
for the whole city on metro, bus, night buses, RER (central zones weekdays, and for
whole of Ile de France at the week-ends i.e. the airports, Versailles and Disneyland).
42
Carte 12-15 from the SNCF is also well worth buying. First Sunday of the month the
national museums are free in Paris, but on the first Wednesday of each month at midday
they test the air raid sirens in the whole city – so don’t panic.
Stage de I’Intégration which takes place in September is well worth attending as you get
to meet people and find out things about Science-Po and Paris that would otherwise take
you ages to find out (http://www.international.sciences-po.fr/en/welcome-program).
Keep in contact with and visit the other JS students; last year the students visited
Andorra, Cologne, Normandy, Spain and Moscow.
(ii) Université de Paris VII (Département d'Histoire). 3 places
Address: Université de Paris-Diderot VII, Département d'Histoire UFR GHSS
Case 7001 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (Metro station, Jussieu). http://www.jussieu.fr/
TCD Co-ordinator: Dr. Edward Arnold. Tel: +353 1 896 1836
e-mail: [email protected] Fax: +353 1 671 7118
Paris VII Co-ordinator: Mme Manuela MARTINI, Responsable des relations
internationales
e-mail: [email protected]/ [email protected]
UFR Géographie Histoire Sciences de la Société
Bâtiment Olympe de Gouges
case courrier 7001
17, rue Jean-Antoine de Baïff
75205 Paris Cedex 13
Tél. 0033 1 57277177
Academic year: For details on dates, consult the calendrier universitaire for this year
that will give an idea of dates for 2014-2015:
http://www.univ-paris-diderot.fr/sc/site.php?bc=formations&np=3_CALUNIV
For enrolment, consult the following page:
http://www.univ-parisdiderot.fr/sc/site.php?bc=international&np=EtudiantsechangeEuropeProcedures&g=m
43
Registration is in three steps:
(i)
Bureau d’Europe for attestation
(ii)
Bureau de Scolarité (Pyramide) for student card
(iii)
Academic registration soon after in 34/44 tower and the following documents
are needed:
·
Letter of introduction from TCD
·
Passport and four photographs
The university no longer uses the Jussieu campus – the new campus is on the 13th
arrondissement near the Bibliothèque François Mitterrand (metro Bibliothèque François
Mitterrand). Students should be aware that if they take any 2nd year courses they will
more than likely take place here and any 3rd year courses will take place at the Javelot
site (metro les Olympiades). Although you can walk between campuses students should
not schedule any classes back to back in the different buildings. Students should also be
aware that they will have to register with the history departments on both campuses;
with Sabine Zyzemski ([email protected]) for second year
courses and with Gilles Pidard ([email protected]) for third year ones.
Courses: students take courses almost exclusively from the Licence (third, or BA
equivalent) year. Courses are semesterised. Students take four courses in the first
semester and four in the second. This should equate to at least 2/3 of a local student's
workload, that is to say 42-60 ECTs. The courses are essentially in French and
European history (eg. Religion et société au moyen age et à l'époque moderne - 13 et 18
siècles; Voyages, cultures et commerces; Mouvements sociaux au 19e siècle; La France
des années trente à nos jours; Famille et politique au 20e siècle; Révolution française).
But one of the strengths of history at Paris VII is colonial and 'third world' history.
Since this is important in its own right and often provides a revealing angle on
European history, students are encouraged to explore these courses provided that not
more than one is taken per semester. They include: Histoire moderne et contemporaine
en Amérique latine: la mise en place de colonies de l'Amérique latine, 1492-1790;
Histoire moderne et contemporaine en Amérique latine: l'entrée en modernité
d'Amérique latine, 1780-1980; Mutations africaines; Fondamentalisme et modernité
44
dans le monde musulman etc.. Here are some courses taken by students in previous
years; L'Ancien Régime et les Débuts de Révolution'; ' Introduction a l'Afrique
Contemporaine: Histoire, Société et Culture' and 'Initiation a l'Histoire Urbaine
Contemporaine' (which is an excellent course on the history of the city of Paris itself).
See also :
http://www.univ-parisdiderot.fr/formation/DocFormation4P/Licence_Histoire_2012_2013.pdf
Courses in French are available through the French Department. Students must organise
themselves into a group and request a course, stressing in particular the need for work in
writing French.
Accommodation: the exchange has no guaranteed accommodation in Paris. Two rooms
(or one shared room) have in the past been secured in University residences in the Cité
Universitaire (Bld Jourdan in the 14e arrondissement, a short métro ride away from
Paris VII and the Latin quarter). Since these rooms are highly sought-after, students
who wish to take this option must be prepared to spend the entire year in the residence.
Otherwise they reduce our chances of being awarded a room in following years.
Another option is a ‘foyer’ – rent reasonable, great way to meet people, speak French
and live in a safe, accessible area.
The office of CROUS (Centre Régional des Oeuvres Universitaires et Scolaires), 38 ave
Georges Bernanos, 75005 (métro Port-Royal) helps find accommodation for students
(the queues are long) Try also PAP, Fusac magazines, and the noticeboard in the
American Church, Quai d’Orsay.
When searching for accommodation, the Irish Cultural Centre comes highly
recommended. Whether you stay there for the entire year or just for a month or two
whilst searching, it is an excellent way of making friends (the students at Paris VII
really are not interested in socialising and meeting other Erasmus students). The
location is absolutely fantastic and at €600/567 without deducting the €90 or so for the
rent subsidy it is a fairly average rent for central Paris and you do get a room and
ensuite to yourself (otherwise unheard of!). Also, I found that Fusac was the best source
45
of accommodation listing - it is also online and gets updated very regularly. As regards
the Cité Unversitaire, students had a lot of negative things to say about it - inadequate
facilities, dirty, too far out etc. Students moved out sooner or later. It can be difficult to
find somewhere in Paris, especially if you are unfamiliar with the city or are trying to do
it from Ireland. The best way to go about getting accommodation is to move into the
Irish College, make some friends and then be able to search for somewhere else with
French speakers whilst still having the IC as a safety net.
Survival
(i) Arrival. Do your best to arrive early in the day, with someone else if possible.
(ii) Information. (i) FUSAC (available in the American Church/Chicago Pizza Pie
Factory/Chicago Meatpackers) is a fortnightly magazine which gives information on
accommodation, second-hand furniture, jobs, places to go, conversation exchanges, etc.
(ii) American Church, 65 Quai D'Orsay (Métro Invalides).
(iii) Eating. CROUS restaurants (in most universities, vouchers required) - very cheap
but food is stodgy - dodgy. Restaurants 'Self' and ‘Tapas’ recommended, as are
Japanese and Chinese, really good meal for €6. Try St Michel area (rue St Séverin) and
look out for restaurants, especially Greek, with priced plat du jour (€6 - 9).
(iv) Shopping. ED supermarket is very cheap; good for tinned and long life foods.
Leader Price is cheapest supermarket with reasonable quality; Franprix and Monoprix
are better in range and freshness of food but is a bit more expensive. Look out for
Champion also.
(v) Social life. There are no societies in the universities so it is that bit more difficult to
meet people. However the university sports clubs offer a good alternative, e.g. tennis.
Good facilities in the Cité Universitaire.
Bars, nightclubs: try Hideout Bar (near Irish College), Tigh Johnny’s (Metro Les
Halles); La Locomotive (Métro Blanche); Le Moose 6th arrondissement (2 beers for €5
Monday nights), Corcorans ‘Oirish’ pub (Rue St Andres des Arts); Montmartre,
Quigley’s Point near Les Halles / Rue de Jour and The Fifth Rue Mouffetard. The
Bastille area is lively but dodgy, Rue Dr Denis can be dodgy but loads of great bars and
pubs, especially Anglophone, Bastille – more French . Cité Universitaire houses
organise soirées.
46
Cinema is a big pastime in France, and there are numerous cinemas around the Odéon
area and other parts of the city. Paris is a very vibrant city so there will always be
something to cater for your taste and interests – roller-skating along the seine on a
Sunday or skating in front of the Hôtel de Ville/second level of the Eiffel tower are just
two examples. Cf. www.parisgaels.com
Other places to visit:
-
Jardin des Plantes
-
Musée du Moyen Age
-
Musée du Quai Branly
-
Les Invalides
-
Institut du Monde Arabe
-
La Grande Mosquée de Paris (one of the best couscous in Paris in fabulous
surroundings)
-
Bois de Vincennes
-
Bois de Boulogne
-
Grand / Petit Palais
-
Hôtel de Ville
-
Buttes Chaumont
Further afield but absolutely worth a visit – Monet’s Gardens at Giverny, Chateau de
Fontainebleu, Versailles.
(vi) Safety. Always be alert. Foreigners stand out. Be particularly aware in student
residences and on the métro and try not to travel alone after 11 pm, or to go to the end
of the line.
(vii) Study. The library facilities at Sciences Po are excellent, but within Paris VII are
not satisfactory and the system is confusing, but borrowing is permitted. Best libraries
are the Bibliothèque de la Sorbonne, Bibliothèque National de France, and the
Bibliothèque Ste Geneviève. Separate registration required for each. Other study spaces
are the libraries in the Cité Universitaire and in the Pompidou Centre (a public library
but very good).
47
The majority of the big Parisian bookshops are found on the Boulevard St Michel, about
10 mins from Sciences-Po, Sorbonne and Jussieu.
♦ Gibert et Jeune (near the Seine)– huge bookshop spread over several buildings
♦ Gibert et Joseph (on corner of the Rue d’École de Medicine) Excellent bookshop,
and offers the possibility of selling back your books www.gibertjoseph.fr
♦ Boulinier (22 Bv St Michel) and also Silly Melody are very good second hand
bookshops, which sell the indispensable “Que sais-je” series for between €1 - €2
♦ FNAC – Rue de Rennes, Les Halles and across the city, has books, dvds, cds, and
electronics. They offer a 10% discount on books, but beware ‘Que sais-je’ (albeit
second hand) is €1 at Boulevard St Michel. In the FNAC they are €7,95 each!!
www.fnac.fr
♦ English bookshop WH Smith is located Rue de Rivoli
(viii) Miscellaneous. Paris can be expensive, especially until you get to know your way
around! Get your bearings early - use a map. Look out for monthly or other special
offers for travel passes – Carte orange and Carte imaginaire.
(ix) ‘Pauper's Paris' is a good guide to Paris, but concentrates mainly on sights and
restaurants. Buy the guide Fáilte à Paris (if possible before you go). Available from
Eason Hanna's Bookshop, Nassau Street, Finnegan's Wake (rue des Boulangers,
opposite métro station at Jussieu) and from the Collège des Irlandais, 75005 Paris, about
half a mile from Jussieu. It is very helpful on the practical side of moving to, and living
in, Paris.
(x) Where to live in the city
St Germain-des-Pres - this is a haunt of students, the well-heeled, and would-be
intellectuals, but somewhat expensive, given its location in the city centre, close to
Sciences-Po, the Louvre and the Latin Quarter;
Belleville - bit cheaper but further out; great atmosphere and Chinese restaurants. Bit
less safe than St Germain
5th arrondissement - Latin Quarter - this is a traditional student area, about 15
minutes from Sciences-Po, close to the Sorbonne and Jussieu
48
Montparnasse - about 10 minutes away from the centre, near a big shopping centre
Irish College – good; a central and safe location (in the 5th arrondissement), but a bit
expensive;
Montmartre – a very bohemian district which is full of tourists. At night the
closeness of Pigalle may make it uncomfortable for some female students.
Useful addresses: Irish Embassy, 2 rue Rude, (off Ch. de Gaulle Etoile). tel: 1
45.00.05.55
Irish College: rue des Irlandais, 75005 Paris.
Aer Lingus, tel: 1 47.42.12.50
Usit voyages, (1) 6 rue Vaugirard, 75006 Paris (2) 12 rue Vivienne, 75002 Paris, tel: 1
42.16.15.88 - closed Saturdays.
'Finnegan's Wake, 6 rue des Boulangers, 75006 Paris (just opposite Jussieu).For Cité
residents, addresses of Paris Préfectures and Caisses are available from the Maison
Internationale.
4) Strasbourg:
For practical information on student life in Strasbourg, consult :
http://www.unistra.fr/index.php?id=vie-pratique
(i) Université de Strasbourg UFR des Sciences Historiques. 3 places
Address: Palais Universitaire, 67084 Strasbourg.
http://www.unistra.fr/index.php?id=18722
TCD co-ordinator: Dr. Edward Arnold. Tel: +353 1 896 1836, Fax: +353 1 671 7118, email: [email protected]
USH co-ordinator: Catherine VANDERHEYDE (Institut d'Histoire Moderne, Faculté
des Sciences Historiques)
Tél : (0033) 3 68 85 61 99
e-mail : [email protected] or [email protected]
49
(ii) Institut d'Etudes Politiques, Université de Strasbourg. 2 places
47 avenue de la Forêt Noire, 67082 Strasbourg.
Tel : 03 68 85 84 00 - Fax : 03 68 85 86 15 - [email protected]
http://www-iep.u-strasbg.fr
TCD co-ordinator: Dr. Edward Arnold. Tel: +353 1 896 1836, Fax: +353 1 671 7118, email: [email protected]
IEP co-ordinators:
Fabienne GOETZ-RICOU - Secrétariat des Relations Internationales, Bureau 422
[email protected]
Tél : 00 33 (0)3 68 85 81 06
Fax : 00 33 (0)3 68 85 85 78
Michelle BENOIT - Bureau 422
[email protected]
Tél : 00 33 (0)3 68 85 81 05
Fax : 00 33 (0)3 68 85 85 78
Going to UFR des Sciences Historiques and going to the IEP seem two very different
things. The USH is more like UCD/ TCD as far as size is concerned. IEP is a political
institute, a "grande école" with only about 600 students in total, 150 of them Erasmus.
The Trinity exchange is with both institutions in that students can take courses in one or
both universities depending on whether their interests lean more to history or to politics.
However, officially there are distinct quotas for the two exchanges, and it therefore
makes sense for those with interests primarily in political science and contemporary
sociology to go to the IEP and for those with primarily historical interests to go the
History Faculty.
For details on academic year dates, consult the calendrier universitaire for this year
that will give an idea of dates for 2013-2014:
50
•
UFR des sciences historiques:
consult http://www.unistra.fr/fileadmin/upload/unistra/etudes/2013-
2014__annee_universitaire_/Calendrier_2013-2014.pdf
•
IEP Strasbourg:
consult http://www-iep.u-strasbg.fr/SCOLARITE/calendrier_diplome.html
Registration USH: Go to Mme Szuszmann ([email protected]) at the
SOCRATES Students' Office, U.S.H.S. (22 rue René Descartes 67084 Strasbourg,
Bâtiment 5, 3ème étage, tel. +33 3 88 41 74 13) with photos, social security forms,
student card, passport, letter from Trinity - basically all official documents. Have
photocopies
of
all
your
documents!
Check
opening
hours
in
advance
(http://www.unistra.fr/index.php?id=2108)
IEP: Registration for the IEP is at the administrative office of the latter, 47 ave de la
Forêt
Noire.
http://www.iep-
strasbourg.fr/fileadmin/upload/IEP/INTERNATIONAL/Etudier_a_l_IEP/2013_14_De
marche_Erasmus_Etudes_entrants-FR.pdf
Why Strasbourg?
Strasbourg is a charming city in general. The people are very friendly and willing to
speak French, which is something language students appreciate very muchy. First port
of call should be the following page: http://www.unistra.fr/index.php?id=vie-pratique
Strasbourg is an enchanting medieval city with a distinctive Franco-German culture.
It’s incredibly easy to get around and feel at home in and it’s ideally suited for
travelling, especially to Paris, Nancy, Reims, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, the
Netherlands and Luxembourg. It’s a really student-friendly city and hosts a lot of
Erasmus students, with a programme of cheap entertainment in September called
“Strasbourg aime ses étudiants”. The cost of living isn’t high, it’s a very safe city and
there are buckets of things to see and do. There’s also the possibility of getting a stage
(internship) with an MEP at the European Parliament which is a great opportunity for
anyone in European Studies.
Arrival:
51
If your parents aren’t willing to drive you, your suitcases and the kitchen sink there (it’s
a LONG drive), this can be a little tricky.
The nearest useful airport is Karlsruhe-Baden. Ryanair fly Dublin-Stansted and CorkStansted, with a connecting flight to Karlsruhe. There is a direct bus connection from
the airport to Strasbourg, and train connections from both Karlsruhe and Baden-Baden.
It’s very affordable if booked in advance (between €50 and €100) but could be arduous
with your entire luggage in tow.
Ryanair also fly Dublin-Frankfurt Hahn. There is a bus from the airport to Heidelberg,
where you can take a train to Strasbourg via Offenburg. Alternatively, there is a bus
from FrankfurtHahn to Metz (in Lorraine), which is only an hour by train from
Strasbourg. This is similarly about €100 altogether.
Finally, Aer Lingus and Ryanair both fly to Paris (CDG and Paris-Beauvais
respectively) where you can take the TGV to Strasbourg. This is probably the simplest
route but can be expensive. It’s worth noting that the Aer Lingus baggage allowance is
larger than that of Ryanair and that you can take the TGV directly to Strasbourg from
Terminal 2 of CDG (landing in Terminal 1). Book well in advance for the best value.
Strasbourg-Entzheim airport seemingly flies nowhere useful and is expensive to boot.
Accommodation
Rooms are available in student accommodation for Erasmus students, at great prices
with rent ranging from 146 euro to 230 euro per month depending on whether you have
a bathroom or not. Rooms are available at Cité Universitaire Paul Appell, 8 Rue de
Palerme (10 mins walk from the history faculty and 15 from the IEP), Cité de la
Robertsau, 14, rte de la Wantzenau (further out near the European Institutions, about 15
mins by tram) and Residence de la Somme (2 minutes from the IEP on foot and 10
from the history faculty). However be warned the accommodation in the student rooms
is very basic with shared kitchens supplied only with hobs and no oven or microwave
and shared bathrooms and showers if you don’t get a room with its own bathroom. If
you are lucky studio apartments are also available at Cité Alfred Weiss, 4 rue du Vieil
Armand (10 mins away from the university by tram), and Residence Les Flamboyants,
8 rue Jean-Henri Schnitzler with their own bathrooms and hobs. However the rent is
more expensive around 400 euros per month. Contact the Erasmus coordinators Student
52
accommodation is a good way to meet people but as they tend to group the
international students together it is sometimes difficult to talk French. Therefore
sometimes private accommodation is better, rent can be more expensive ranging from
around 300 to 470 euro a month, however if you find French flat mates, you will be
more likely to speak French something that is hard to do in student accommodation as
well the facilities are better. Look on websites like www.leboncoin.fr,
www.colocation.fr and www.appartager.com. Agents fees could cost up to €400 each.
Please note if you book student accommodation you must stay in it for the year; it is
very difficult to move once you arrive.
Transport:
Strasbourg is really easy to navigate. From the Esplanade, it takes twenty minutes to
walk to the city centre. You can also buy a badgéo for €25 a month which grants you
unlimited tram and bus use. However, it’s cheaper again to buy a bicycle. The
monitrices d’Erasmus will advise you where to look and there will be signs and notices
everywhere if there is a secondhand bike sale as the students from last year will
undoubtedly be selling theirs on, usually between €30 and €80. Look for notices that
say “vélo d’occasion”. You will also have the option of selling yours back at the end of
the year. If you want to rent a bicycle, there’s a company called Vélhop who are quite
cheap. There are cycle lanes on every footpath and zebra crossing, so it’s extremely
safe. If you can’t cycle, don’t worry, it really is easy to walk.
Food:
Food is relatively cheap. There is a Simply on Rue de Londres which is very
convenient, Norma in the city centre (Rue des Frères), Le Mutant on place de
l’Esplanade and a Lidl on Place de l’Étoile. Big names like Auchan and E. Leclerc are
on the outskirts of the city; you can take the tram. Most supermarkets close early, at
seven or eight. However, it’s noticeably cheaper to go to Kehl, a German town just
across the border and try the Edeka Kohler there. You can take bus no. 21 from the
Jean Jaurès tram stop (line C) or the Aristide Briand tram stop (line D). The journey
takes about half an hour. It’s also possible to walk or cycle easily. Strasbourg has many
gorgeous cafés and restaurants, but when you are broke try the Restos Universitaires,
53
where it is only €3 for a three course meal of decent quality (you charge it to your
student card, which you can top up at both and at the Agora). As a rule, Esplanade is
better quality than Gallia and has a better vegetarian selection. Alsatian food is as a rule
delicious and quite wintry (bay leaf stews, cured hams, dried sausages, Riesling torte
and quiches), but there is a love of choucroute that some might call excessive. The
Christmas market products are fantastic; gingerbread and coconut biscuits, Kristollen (a
sort of brioche with currants), hot chestnuts, caramel and nougat. Strasbourg is the
recognised Christmas capital of Europe. There are lots of good university restaurants
where you can get a good three course meal for €3.90.
Communicating with home:
Caveat emptor as far as internet and mobile deals are concerned; do your research.
Students found that Virgin Mobile do the cheapest deals; with SFR and Orange credit
goes very quickly. It costs almost a euro to send a text on the same network. Orange
internet is a rip-off; €50 for 2 GB of monthly usage, while Virgin offers unlimited
internet and 300 texts for €30. Beware of signing any contracts if at all possible, as
even if you are entitled to break them, you will have to pay the amount you would have
spent regardless for a minimum period fee. Invest in a webcam and set up a Skype
account to keep in touch with home. When you first arrive, you can use the free wifi in
any McDonalds or Subway, and also in the Rive d’Étoile (large shopping centre). There
is an internet café with printing facilities on Rue de Rome which is very convenient. As
for ‘snail mail’, the Post Office is very inefficient; it can take a few weeks for letters to
arrive. Keep a copy of whatever documents (e.g. learning agreement) you send to
Ireland and send your grant application as soon as possible. Michelle Benoit will sign it
for you if you visit her office.
Services:
Recycling facilities are available on most streets and recycling is encouraged. There are
three or four laundries around the Esplanade area; the driers are very expensive so it
might be worthwhile to invest in a clothes rack instead. There is a very good
hairdresser on Rue de Rome where you can have a cut and dye for €30 without looking
like something the cat dragged in.
54
Shops:
There are a few recognisable shops; Benetton, Zara, H&M, Ikea, Habitat, The Body
Shop, Lush, Palais de Thé and a really great high street (Etam, Pimkie, Jennyfer,
Comptoir des Cotonniers, Kooples, Princesse Tam Tam, Printemps, Galeries
Lafayettes). In Les Halles (shopping centre) there is a large Dixons-style electronics
shop named Darty. There are also fantastic vintage shops and boutiques in the city
centre, particularly for jewellery. Strasbourg has a lot of very quaint antique shops and
horlogeries, as well as artisanal boulangeries and caves de vin.
Social Life:
Going out in France is a very different experience to going out in Ireland; you’ll
develop an ear for 1970s pop and misogynistic French rap in no time. There are a few
good clubs; Java and Underground in the city centre are great. LondonMezzanine,
BarFusion and Living Room host a lot of Erasmus and student nights, which can be
really fun. Le Rafiot is a club ON A BOAT, not to be missed. Jimmy’s Pub and
L’Artichaut are great for a casual drink, both with live music on certain days. For gigs,
La Laiterie is the best venue and features a lot of international (recognisable) bands.
With the carte culture given by the university, you can also attend any festival for only
€5.50. Strasbourg has a number of festivals, including the Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Horror
Film Festival (don’t miss the Zombie Walk), the Jazz Festival and the Contemporary
Music Festival. For the same price, you can also attend the opera, the ballet, and the
orchestra in the Theatre Nationale, as well as any play in the numerous smaller theatres.
The carte culture also gives you free access to the Planetarium and to any of
Strasbourg’s museums. The Contemporary and Modern Art Museum and the
Zoological Museum are well worth a visit.
Girls, be warned that in the evening suitors may be unusually persistent and not a little
tacky/sleazy. Strasbourg is very safe, but be careful if walking home alone and avoid it
if possible.
Stages:
55
Stages in the EU Parliament are like gold dust and if you want one, you need to start
writing to MEPS now. At the IEP they are very sympathetic to people doing stages and
will excuse them from lectures. It is a great opportunity to gain practical experience of
how the EU works. However, you cannot miss a conference de méthode so you will
have to arrange your timetable so that you can fit everything in.
Registration:
Come prepared to spend hours in queues and visiting the same office 3 or 4 times.
Photocopy all your documents, like student cards, insurance, passport and make sure
you have lots of passport photos you will need them. Never send any documents home
without photocopying them first. Do not let the French administration get you down,
just be patient but assertive, it will all work out eventually.
For more details on what the French Administration expects of you:
http://www.unistra.fr/index.php?id=14804
Université de Strasbourg UFR des Sciences Historiques:
The history faculty is situated in the historic Palais Universitaire near to the Gallia
cafeteria, just off Rue de la Victoire. The major advantage of the history faculty is that
it is overwhelmingly French with only a handful of Erasmus/international students in
contrast to the IEP where some classes are composed almost entirely of foreign
students. Courses currently being taken include la propagande, histoire sociale de
l’URSS, le Saint-Empire, histoire des sociétés européennes 1848-1945 , justice &
société sous l’ancien regime, histoire romain, histoire de l’Alsace, la France dans les
conflits du 20e siècle. La propgande is quite an interesting course documenting the
history of propaganda from the age of antiquity to the age of dictators, whilst selecting
a course on Alsatian history will give you a better perspective on the region of Alsace.
However be prepared to work hard in the history faculty and to expect very long
lectures which can range from 2-3 hours with corresponding tutorials which usually
follow them directly ranging from 3-4 hours. Days can be long starting at 8am and
finishing around 6.30pm on some days. The system of presentations and document
56
analysis in seminars differ from in Trinity and will take a bit of time to get used to, but
once you have mastered this and got used to the long days it will become second
nature. It might also be prudent to take courses in the IEP to supplement those in the
history faculty because as a European studies student following straight history can
have its limitations when you are used to studying other areas like politics. Making up
credits as well might be a factor and the IEP also offers a range of history courses
which complement those being pursued in the history faculty. However taking courses
both institutions has its administrative headaches. It will require a special registration
and a quite a few trips between the two international offices which deal with each
institution. It might be best to consider doing this before departing so it can be clarified
with the two institutions to limit any problems you might encounter upon arrival. Once
all the obstacles have been overcome it is quite an easy transition studying in both
faculties and highly recommended.
Link to course handbook of the history faculty: http://histoire.unistra.fr/ Accommodation
If you are fortunate enough to get a room in Cité Universitaire la Somme, 13 Rue de la
Somme, it has the great advantage of being a 2 minute walk to the IEP and a 10 minute
walk to the history faculty.
Miscellaneous Practical Information.
Upon arrival internet access might be an issue. McDonalds and Subway at Esplanade
offer free wifi and are very useful in those first few weeks of no internet. Don’t rush
into buying a French mobile phone, shop around for deals- Virgin seems to offer the
best deals, somewhat similar to what is on offer in Ireland whilst Orange seems to have
caused a lot of problems for students here.
Institut d’Études Politiques:
Language Course: Students recommend taking the (free) language course in
September. It is very basic in terms of revision but is an excellent way to meet the other
Erasmus students. You will learn how to abbreviate French to make note taking easier
and receive really useful tips on colloquialising your French. There are two monitrices
57
d’Erasmus overseeing the language course who are 4th year students at the IEP. They
answer all your questions, explain how to fill out the registration form and what
documents are necessary, when and where you have to register, the ECTS values for
each course and also plan nights out and day trips. They also organise a kind of ‘handme-down’ service, where last year’s students leave the things they didn’t bring home.
This is a lot smaller, friendlier and more manageable than the main university. Michelle
Benoit is the coordinator and she is very friendly. Courses from the second and fourth
years are the most suitable
cf http://www.iepstrasbourg.fr/fileadmin/upload/IEP/ETUDIER_A_L_IEP/ok_web_2EME_CYCLE__gu
ide_1314.pdf );
those in first year seem very broad and directionless (http://www.iepstrasbourg.fr/fileadmin/upload/IEP/ETUDIER_A_L_IEP/Le_Diplome/guide_1314.pdf
). Each lecture and seminar is two hours in length; days can start at 8 a.m. and continue
until 8 p.m. so it can be quite exhausting. If you follow the CEPE you will have to take
a minimum of 60 ECTS, but will receive a diploma at the end of the year. Fourth year
courses are more interesting but much more challenging. A conférence de méthode can
involve a presentation, group research, MCQs and a book report. However, if you
follow the CEPE you are free to have any combination of cours (lectures) and
conférences de méthodes you like, from any year. You are not obliged to take the
corresponding CM to your lecture. Classes begin the last week of September and
usually finish for Christmas around the 18th or 19th of December (see http://www.iepstrasbourg.fr/fileadmin/upload/IEP/Actualites/MAJ_1810_calendrier_IEP_201314_maj_18_octobre_2013_CA.pdf ).
Courses include histoire de l’idée européenne, problèmes internationaux actuels,
l’Europe et les crises internationales, ONG, histoire des relations internationales,
histoire de l’idée politique moderne, problèmes sociaux et politiques, l’UE et droits de
l’homme. If you take the CEPE, you must also take actualités francaises and la France
contemporaine for 5ECTS (current affairs). There is a course called Méthodologie de la
dissertation française worth 10ECTS which focuses on presentation skills, insanely
helpful. Courses that you take for one term will be examined after Christmas at the very
58
beginning of January and summer exams are in May and June. The annual timetable is
available online. Christmas and Easter holidays are only a fortnight long each but there
are reading weeks in October and February. There is also a week in February called
Semaine Européenne which is worth 10ECTS, which is along the lines of EYP
(European Youth Parliament).
The downsides of the IEP are the long hours, intensive workload, and the large number
of internationals – it’s difficult to meet French students! Library facilities are not great,
very small. Opening hours are very short; from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and closed for lunch.
However, you can also use the libraries on the main campus, and for a small fee can
join the Bilbiothèque Nationale, which is enormous and in a beautiful building. You
can join any of the libraries at the Agora in September. There are word processors,
printing and photocopying facilities in the IEP, and an abundance of cheap internet
cafés if necessary.
Student counselling and the Student Disability Centre are in the Agora on the main
university campus. There is also a medical centre and a sports centre located there.
59
5.2 GERMANY & AUSTRIA
TCD co-ordinator: Dr Clemens Ruthner
Tel +353 896 1935 e-mail: [email protected]
General academic requirements
In the first term (Wintersemester), students take three ‘content’ modules of different
kinds and with different assessment weightings, as follows: 1 lecture (Vorlesung) of 2
contact hours, 1 Proseminar (2 hours tutorial, or 4 hours if it includes 2 hours group
work), and 1 further Proseminar or 1 Übung (2 hours).
In the second term (Sommersemester), students take a further three modules; 1
Vorlesung, 1 Übung and 1 Hauptseminar. It should be pointed out that a Hauptseminar
is highly specialised, quite demanding and should be taken very seriously.
All modules may be chosen in German Studies, History, Sociology, Political Science,
International Relations, Anthropology etc.; however, their topics should be ES-style or
at least ES-compatible topics.
On top of these ‘content’ modules, students are advised to take 2 language classes in
DaF/German as a Foreign Language (preferably in essay writing etc.) and 1-2 classes in
their Minor language throughout the academic year. These 3-4 language modules are
mandatory for all non-native speakers; however, they don’t count on the final mark for
the year abroad.
Assessment - lectures: Students are required to be assessed on their lecture modules at
the end of the semester by oral or written examination, as stipulated by their host
university. They have to make arrangements for this at the beginning of the academic
year with the lecturer concerned (as some German university don’t do exams for
lectures).
Seminars and Übungen. Assessment is by submitted written papers that are graded
(schriftliche Hausarbeit); please note that expectation might be different from seminar
essays at Trinty in terms of length, research, etc.
Language classes. Assessment may include written tests, presentations, oral exams etc
Year abroad assessment: Work at the exchange university in Germany is weighted by
60
TCD as follows: a Vorlesung counts for 1 ‘unit’; an Übung for 2 ‘units’; a Proseminar
for 3 ‘units’; a Hauptseminar for 4 ‘units’. Out of 12 to 14 ‘units’ thus established, the
average result for the nine best units is converted into the final mark of the year abroad.
*
You need to record the ECTS credits for each course on your learning agreement, but at
present, European Studies weights courses at German universities according to the
‘units’ mentioned above. Students attending German Universities are asked to ensure
that all their Scheine (transcripts) have been returned to their Trinity Erasmus coordinator by 10 September 2013. If a student fails to produce the required Scheine for 6
‘content’ module plus 3-4 language classes, s/he will be returned incomplete by the ES
Board of Examiners in September. Thus, to ensure that Scheine are issued in time, all
work should be submitted by 15 August. Students in any case need to consult with the
lecturer before the end of Sommersemester that they will be available to deliver their
marks in time for Scheine to be issued by 10 September.
PS. Please note that 3 October, Tag der Deutschen Einheit, is a public holiday in
Germany where everything is closed; for other Bank Holidays in Germany and Austria
(where there are plenty!), please consult the Academic calendar of your host university.
1) Freiburg:
Albert-Ludwigs Universität (Historisches Seminar). 2-3 places
Address: KG IV, Rempartstr. 15, 79085 Freiburg, Germany
Local co-ordinator: Dr Christian KÜHNER
Historisches Seminar, Rempartstr.15, 79085 Freiburg i.Br., Germany.
Office Hours for Erasmus students: Thu 11:00-12:00 in room 4441
Phone: +49 761 203-3420
Email: [email protected]
Websites: http://www.uni-freiburg.de (university)
http://www.geschichte.uni-freiburg.de (history dept.)
For listing of the the different modules offered by the departments /faculties, having
*
) NB. The regulations re: the calculation of your JS final mark might change over the year, because they
are under re-negotiation collegewide; in the future the best 45 ECTS of your stay abroad might be
counted instead. 61
accessed the university website, click on the button Vorlesungsverzeichnis / Course
Catalogue on the right. There are module listings available on most departmental
websites as well.
Students registering for modules should do so as soon as listings become available
during the holidays (check online), as there is considerable demand for courses in the
history and politics faculties and numbers may be limited to 30 places per course.
International Office:
Service Center Studium (SCS)
Sedanstr. 6, second floor /2. OG, room 02024:
Opening hours Mon Tue Thu 9:00 - 11:30
Tue & Thu 14:00 - 16:00 Info for incoming Erasmus students is available at:
http://www.studium.uni-freiburg.de/studienbewerbung/austausch/erasmus_international
It is necessary to re-register for the summer semester at German universities!
Another very helpful institution, especially for students, is the Studentenwerk (Student
Service & Welfare Organization) that is in charge of e.g. the student residences, the
cafeterias, financial-, social- and psychological advice and support etc.
Address: Schreiberstr.12-16 office hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 – 17:00
79098 Freiburg
phone: 0761 2101-200 fax: 0761 2101-303
website: http://www.studentenwerk.uni-freiburg.de
Registration: Some important things to do before registration:
1.
Open a bank account, put money in and visit the Studentenwerk to sign
contracts etc. for your room.
2.
Pay a Sozialgebühr of approx €65. You can pay this at the Universitätskasse in
the Rektorat. This entitles you to get a semester-ticket for only a further €65 and it also
means that your bike (when parked at the Wohnheim) and contents of your room are
automatically insured (once everything is properly locked up).
3.
Bring your EHIC card to the student section of the AOK on Fahnenbergplatz 6,
directly in front of the Rektorat building to get your Versicherungsbescheinigung,
which you need to register at the University.
4.
You will have to go to the Bürgeramt on Basler Strasse no. 2 and obtain an
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Anmelde-Bestätigung. Once you have that, on the same floor you go and get your
Bescheiningung. Make sure you have all documents, address, passport etc. No proof of
financial sustainability is necessary. Opening times are 07.30 till 12.00 but they open
till 16.00 on Thursdays.
Language classes have been taken over by SprachLehrInstitut. Registration is done
online on a first come first serve basis. Apply online as soon as you can as places are
very limited and waiting lists are long: http://portal.uni-freiburg.de/sli/sprachen/
Unfortunately the two main language courses ‘Sprechen und Hören’ and ‘Lesen und
Schreiben’ are offered at quite a very basic level. Better courses are the Landeskunde,
Wissenschaftssprache Deutsch or Schriftliche und mündliche Präsentation im Studium,
although you have to pay for the last two. It is mandatory that students take an
appropriate language course focussing on grammar and writing. Full details are given
during the introductory programme.
It is possible to come to Freiburg to do a summer course to prepare for the year abroad
and get to know the place. It also means you have to do less running around in October
as you can get the accommodation etc sorted out while you are here: http://portal.unifreiburg.de/sli/internationale_sprachkurse/
Accommodation: Ask for Händelstrasse dorm (Wohnheim) on your form. Really nice
location with views of the mountains. Location 7 mins from city centre by tram/ 15
mins by bike. Apartments of between 5 and 8 people, mostly Germans. Very easy to
integrate. The Wohnheim also has own bar (very cheap). Plenty of shops and amenities
in the area, served by 2 trams, own train stop etc.
Foreign students who wish to live in a student residence are to inquire with the
Studentenwerk’s housing office during the following office hours: Mon – Fri: 9. 30–12
and Thu: 14 – 16. For more info on Studentenwerk Freiburg, see above.
In order to optimise the chance of being provided with student housing, students need to
indicate their interest in being given a room in a student residence directly on the
Socrates application form which you should have ready by the end of May. The
application deadline for the winter semester is around 14 July. Although not guaranteed,
sufficient places can usually be arranged in advance. Visit the Studentenwerk site as
63
detailed above.
Hint from last year’s students – go for StuSie and the WG
accommodation option which has sharing kitchen and bathroom – enables more
interaction and speaking German. You need to have a bank account before signing the
contract. Rent approximately €220 per month. Information on private accommodation
can be obtained from the Studentenwerk but this is extremely limited. Try to arrive
early in the day.
Getting there: There are many ways to get to Freiburg, but the cheapest and most
direct way is with AerLingus to Frankfurt and get the train which goes directly from
Frankfurt airport to Freiburg. Ryanair now flies directly to Karlsruhe from Dublin. The
direct train connection between Karlsruhe and Freiburg is a lot shorter than the one from
Frankfurt. Germanwings now flies directly to Stuttgart, but the train journey from there
to Freiburg is more complicated than from Frankfurt.
Survival
(i) Arrival. It is imperative to arrive in good time before lunch, since most offices
which you have to visit on your first day are only open in the morning, and for a very
short time at that. This is clearly stated in your information pack.
(ii) Information. Two bi-weekly, free newspapers, Zypresse and Joker, available at
newsagents and supermarkets, etc.
(iii) Eating. The student residences have self-catering facilities. For eating out, the
Mensa (student canteen) is cheap, quite good especially for vegetarians, cost: 5 meals
for approx €7.50. Recommended: Pizzeria Bella Italia, great food, a few doors down
from Studentenwerk on Schreiberstr (€5.50-€3.5), Brennessel, Escholzstrasse,
Schlappen, Laubfrosch, Firenze.
Good Italian and Chinese restaurants also.
Cost
approx €2-10.
(iv) Social life. O’Kelly’s is reported to be the best Irish pub; O'Dwyer's pub - Irish,
pricey, good crowd. Schlappen, Warsteiner Pub, Dammfrosch, and Pilsstube are good
alternative student pubs. StuSie bar is cheapest, good atmosphere, but beer not great!
Good clubs and discos around the centre either free (LP, Sound, Pur, Circus), free with
student card (Agar), or €3-5. Taxis reasonable, especially women's rank, but most
places within walking distance.
(v) Travel. Buy a Semesterticket as soon as you register: approx €65 valid for buses
64
trams and regional trains valid for 6 months. Schönewochende ticket. approx €17 per
day for up to 5 people anywhere in Germany on the regional trains. You can get a
second-hand bike from the police for €10-€20. If you plan to see a bit more of Germany
the Bahncard 50 (€100 for students)is a really good investment as it gives you 50%
discount and full flexibility on the trains. Mundphone Karte is cheaper for calling home.
www.billiger-telefonieren.de gives Vorwahl numbers which allow you to phone home
much more cheaply, e.g. 2.5 cent per minute to Ireland landlines, and 15.5 cent to Irish
mobiles. It’s a good idea get skype on your computer (www.skype.com) which lets you
call landlines all over the world for 2 cent per min.
Studium Generale is a prospectus containing additional courses of interest. The groups
are very small. The content ranges from academic specialisation in areas not normally
taught in the university to sporting activities and excursions with the necessary
preliminary sessions to prepare the trips. It is well worth consulting in good time, since
this is an excellent way of meeting German students.
Akademisches Auslandsamt Heinrich-von Stephanstrasse has programmes of interest to
foreign students. All these programmes make sure that there is a good mix of German
and foreign students participating in them.
They specialise in trips to Basel, to
museums and plays/concerts; trips to Berlin and Prague with similar range
opportunities. They are very heavily subsidised by the university and are therefore
extremely good value.
Full sports complex at the Sundgauallee residence, also lake for bathing in summertime.
In the Siedlung there is a range of leisure activities available, music rooms and
instruments (available for borrowing or hire), art, aerobics, good parties etc. throughout
the year. Sportsclubs in the university; booklet available - enrol early. It is worth
joining the Akademischer Film Klub. Skiing at Feldberg.
(v) Safety. Keep your door locked at all times. Beware of pickpockets. It is safer not
to go around the residences alone at night.
(vi) Study. Libraries - the main Universitätsbibliothek and several smaller libraries, such
as the Historisches Seminar. Comprehensive range of books, plenty of study space.
May need to reserve books in advance on the computer service; you can also get
extensions on this service - for popular courses. Bring a good dictionary from Ireland.
(vii) Work. There is always employment for students in pubs (approx 5 euro per hour +
tips) by word of mouth. Advertisements in both bi-weekly papers (see [ii] above). Also
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Studentenarbeitsamt has jobs on a first come first served basis. Be early - 7-8 am. Make
direct approaches to pubs, hotels - O'Dwyers, The Pickwick, Lago, etc. Min. wage
approx 6 euro per hour. If you think it is necessary to find a job, do so early on as it is a
good way of integrating and improving your German. Make sure to get a
Lohnsteuerkarte from the local Bürgeramt.
(viii) Miscellaneous. Students have reported that it is difficult to integrate if staying at
Europa Haus. Contact the Studentenwerk before mid-August if you’d prefer not to be
placed there.
2) Hamburg:
Universität Hamburg (Fachbereich Geschichtswissenschaft) 2-3 places
Address: Von-Melle Park 6, 9. Stock
20146 Hamburg, Germany
Website: www.uni-hamburg.de
The History Department is located in the Philturm, the highest building on the main
campus.
Local Erasmus co-ordinator: Ms. Julia TWESTEN
ERASMUS-Büro Geisteswissenschaften
c/o Institut für Germanistik II
Von-Melle-Park 6, 13th floor, room 1364
20146 Hamburg, Germany
Phone: +49 40-42838-3648 Fax: +4940-42838-3553
E-Mail: [email protected]
Tel : ++49 40 42838-4841 Fax: ++49 40 42838-2371
Online info for incoming ERASMUS students:
http://www.geschichte.uni-hamburg.de/informationenfuerincomings.html
Academic year: the year is divided into two semesters. The Wintersemester runs from
mid October to early February; the Sommersemester from early April to mid-July.
There is a short break at Christmas.
Arrival: Arrive in plenty of time before the start of lectures, as the process of getting
all the requirements for registration can take a long time and many offices have very
66
limited opening hours. It is a good idea to arrive two weeks before the start of the
semester and to start organising yourself as soon as possible. The contracts with most
of the student residences start on the 1st October so that should give you plenty of time.
Registration: SOCRATES students going to Hamburg enjoy the benefit of simplified
registration. Students must apply (by post) by 15 July for the following Wintersemester,
and are also be required to re-register for the following Sommersemester by 15 January.
The University of Hamburg does not require fees to be paid. However, on registration
all students have to pay a semester contribution of approx €153, which includes a free
pass for the public transport network valid for six months.
The first thing students should do is register at the local Bezirksamt,
Einwohneramt-Meldeabteilung (‘Golden Pages’ lists all the regional offices - look up
your local one). Bring your passport and the registration form which will be given to
you at your student residence, ask for Lohnsteuerkarte also. Students should then go to
the AOK Studentenservice, to organise health insurance (very close to campus:
Grindelallee 100, 22589 Hamburg - opening hours: Mon-Wed: 8.30-15.00, Thurs: 8.3018.00 and Fri: 8.30-13.00). Bring an Anmeldeschein. As soon as possible after arrival
go to the Studentensekretariat für Ausländer, Edmund-Siemers-Allee I (Hauptgebäude,
Zimmer 236), 20146 Hamburg, office hours - Mon, Tues, Wed 9-12 (tel:
4123.3310/4472). It is necessary to bring:
(i) Proof of SOCRATES grant (letter from European Studies or receipt for
SOCRATES grant if you have received this).
(ii) Confirmation of health/medical insurance (From the AOK office or
European Health Insurance Card)
(iii) Valid passport
(iv) A letter of proof of permission to attend the university of Hamburg (a letter
from the local Erasmus coordinator). The registration fee is approx €180 and it maybe
a little less for the second semester. Registering for the second semester is much easier
as you get a bank giro when you register the first time and once you pay that before the
start of semester you are automatically registered again.
It is necessary to re-register for the summer semester at German universities!
67
Banking: Set up a bank account because you need it to pay rent and other things.
Deutsche Bank is better than Hamburger Sparkasse as the latter are not student friendly.
Courses / modules: see the listings on http://www.stine.uni-hamburg.de/
Click on the button Vorlesungsverzeichnis
Language Courses Outside the Host University: It is a good idea to attend some
language courses before semester starts to get into the German mode. Some of the
courses are quite pricey but previous students recommend courses given by a language
school called Colon on the Colonnaden which is in the city centre. The school also runs
a course entitled ‘German as a Foreign Languag’ but these are only after lectures begin.
Languages:
Major Language: Courses are available in the Arbeitsbereich Deutsch als Fremdsprache
in the Institut für Germanistik I, which is on the 3rd floor in the same building as the
History Department.
Minor Language: Minor Language: Courses in all minor languages are available at the
Zentrales Fremdspracheninstitut (ZFI) Von-Melle-Park 5. Registration is in room 3030.
Some of the students do their minor language courses with the Fachsprachenzentrum
which is in Von Melle Park 5. Here students do a test in the first week to get the paper
that allows you to take a course which start in the second week. These courses are
subject-centred: eg there are courses for medicine, law and business students etc. The
obvious courses for European Studies students are in political or cultural courses, or else
just ones in general communication.
The class is normally 2 hours a week and
depending on the lecturer these courses can be relatively straight-forward or actually
very difficult – though students do have room for manoeuvre in the first few weeks if
you wish to change course.
Other courses: A new online system for course registration called Studien-Infonetz
(StiNE) is in operation. www.info.stine.uni-hamburg.de
To access this site fully you need the user ID and password provided at registration.
Your local coordinator will be happy to help if you have any difficulties with registering
68
for courses. Lecturers are normally quite understanding with Erasmus students, but it is
best to get any registration problems sorted before lectures begin.
Libraries: the History Department has its own, well-equipped library which, together
with the Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek should meet the needs of most
undergraduates. Students wishing to do research for a Moderatorship dissertation may
also use one of the many specialist libraries and archives in Hamburg, such as the
Commerzbibliothek, the Hamburger Weltwirtschafts-Archiv, or the Bibliothek für
Sozialgeschichte und Arbeiterbewegung Forschungsstelle für die Geschichte des
Nationalsozialismus in Hamburg. Consult the guidebook Führer durch die Hamburger
Bibliotheken.
Accommodation: application can be made via the Hamburg co-ordinator for a place in
the Hall of Residence: Studentenwerk Hamburg, von-Melle-Park 2, Hamburg 20146.
Tel: 040/4122-260. Price: approximately €220 per month. Anyone wishing to holiday
in Hamburg prior to taking up residence can avail of accommodation at the above
address: approximately €195. In a Wohngemeinschaft it is common to pay
approximately €240 per month (inclusive)
Some students took accommodation in the Europahaus residence and really
found it very good, it is a residence with separate apartments where each apartment is
made up of two German students, one foreign student who is studying on a long-term
basis and three Erasmus students. The quality of the accomodation is said to be better
than in some of the other residences and the atmosphere is much more conducive to
getting to know people. And despite the fact that it is mainly foreign students, the
emphasis is very much on speaking German and the German students are usually very
helpful with any problems. It costs about €235 a month including bills, internet access,
etc. and the deadline for applying last year was at the end of March – the students had
the forms sent out to them and did not have to do anything about it themselves.
Survival
(i) Eating. The Mensa on campus is the handiest place (breakfast, lunch & tea, but
breakfast is expensive). Price range: approx €1 - 4. Aldi Markt cheapest supermarket.
Try street markets (Wochenmarkt) for fresh produce. There are a lot of restaurants 69
Greek, Italian, and Turkish are the cheapest. Café Neumann, Abaton, Arkadash and
Limerick are good and close to campus. Seafood restaurants at Landungsbrücken.
(ii) Social life. No bar in college! Fewer societies than in Trinity but good University
Players (drama). Sport Spaß offers a great selection of aerobic, karate classes etc., at
very reasonable prices. Sports societies are a great way to meet people. Be sure to
register early. The Stadtpark is great for a jog. The Reeperbahn is good for nightclubs
eg: Mojos, Mary Lu's, San Brasiliano, Bar Zentrale. The Sternschanze is good for pubs.
Try also the Irish pubs: The Shamrock, Feldstr. and two more at Hans-Albers Platz in
St. Pauli. Buy Die Szene or Ok-Pur to find out what's on. Opera tickets are cheap if
you buy them on the night. There are also free choral concerts on Sunday nights.
(iii) Safety. Hamburg is as safe or dangerous as any large city. Be careful, especially
around 'Hauptbahnhof' where the drug dealers trade. Don't go alone along Reeperbahn
or in U-Bahn carriage at night. Don't forget that there are some really good and
interesting clubs and events off the beaten track ie not on the Reeperbahn! Check the
internet and look out for flyers and event guides in bars.
There are some really good sports courses offered by Hochschulsport, with every sport
you could think of. The programme for the courses is on the internet, you can join at
any time though the popular courses get booked up quickly. Prices are really reasonable.
Canoeing! If you live in Europahaus or another residence which has its own canoes,
definitely wait for a nice day and take a trip around the canals and onto the Alster lake,
well worth it!
(iv) Work. Student/part-time work may be found at the Messe in Hamburg and also (but
not so useful)
at the Arbeitsamt
Hamburg, Vermittlungsstelle für Studenten,
Grindelallee 91, Mon-Thu 7.30-12.00.
Also, keep your eyes on windows of
cafes/restaurants/bars for jobs. Karstadt or the Post (at Stellingen) are good for work
around Christmas. Apply directly to Messegelände, Hostess Agencies (for commercial
work at Trade Fairs etc.) and watch newspapers (Hamburger Abendblatt on Saturdays).
Work is also available at the many language schools teaching English - rate of approx
€10 per hour.
(v) Miscellaneous. Cycling an option - it is relatively safe and secondhand bikes can be
bought cheaply through newspapers.
Bahncard 50 (unlimited) for half-price train
tickets valid for one year €100. Schönewochende ticket. approx €17 per day for up to 5
people anywhere in Germany on the regional trains. Use Mitfahrzentrale for cheap long
70
distance travel. Rainbow Tours offer very cheap trips to Paris, Amsterdam.
3) Tübingen:
Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
(Historisches Seminar). 1-3 places
Address: Wilhelmstraße 36, 72076 Tübingen.
Website: http://www.uni-tuebingen.de
Local co-ordinator: Dr Stefan ZAUNER,
Dekanat Geschichtswissenschaftliche Fakultät,
Sigwartstrasse 17 (beside bus stop), 72076 Tübingen
Tel: 0049 7071 2976854 Fax: 0049 7071 252897
e-mail: [email protected]
Important info for incoming ERASMUS students:
http://www.uni-tuebingen.de/en/facilities/verwaltung-dezernate/division-iiiinternational-affairs/section-1/studying-in-tuebingen-erasmus-exchange.html
Academic year: Term starts in the second week of October, preceded by an induction
week, which the university expects Socrates students to attend and during which course
allocations are finalised. Semesters are the same as for Freiburg. No end of year exams.
Registration: Please follow very carefully the directions provided in the information
pack sent to you by the university during the summer. Every effort will be made to
ensure it reaches you before September. The registration procedure is lengthy and
confusing, so give yourself lots of time. Ask Dr Zauner to translate the application
forms. Start with a visit to the bank to open your account (best bank Kreissparkasse –
widespread ATMs etc.)
It is necessary to re-register for the summer semester at German universities!
Courses / modules: http://campus.verwaltung.uni-tuebingen.de/index.html
71
Click on Öffentliches Vorlesungsverzeichnis
Languages: The Abteilung International Sprachprogramme (Wilhelmstrasse 9) offers a
wide range of DaF courses. Registration is from 29 September, Monday and Friday
10.30-12.00. There are also intensive language courses available prior to the start of the
semester. The one for the Wintersemester runs from approx. 20 September to 8 October.
Accommodation: Application is during spring, forms available on the web. The
accommodation provided is for the whole of your stay. Monthly rental: (standard)
approx €180-220. Initial choice as applied for is confirmed by notification from
Studentenwerk by early September.
Survival
(i) Arrival.
Try to arrive as early as possible in the day and go directly to the
Studentenwerk in Wohnheimverwaltung in Waldhäuser-Ost. Check opening hours of
Wohnheimverwaltung as unless it’s during opening hours you cannot get your keys.
Break out and take a taxi for the first time (€6) Address: Fichtenweg 5, Studentendorf
Waldhäuser Ost, 72076 Tübingen (buses 2,3 & 4 from station, or taxi rank at station
also). See Frau Wolf, tel: 07071/62322.
(ii) Eating. University Mensas open for lunch and dinner (not recommended). Price
range: € 2 - 3, approximately for a meal. Restaurants: Al Dente; Andalucia; El Chico;
Da Pino; Stern (student specials; great breakfasts - best); Al Boccaccio.
(iii) Shopping. Best variety – Marktkauf or Handelshof in Südstadt or Edeka or
Tengelmann on Mohlstrasse are clean, good fresh veggies. Market in Altstadt best for
fresh food. Reutlingen (next town – 30 mins on train) is best place for non-household
shopping.
(iv) Social life. Bar in College. 3 bars in student village, bars in the Altstadt. Other
activities run by the Studentenwerk in the student village, e.g. aerobics, music lessons,
etc. Theater-groups (eg Anglo-Irish) run by the language departments in the Brecht
Bau, Wilhelmstrasse (see noticeboards). Hades; Marktschenke; Jazz Keller. Look out
for Tangente Nacht karaoke (Mondays), Clubhaus or Morgenstelle (Thursdays).
Weekends are quiet.
(v) Safety. Be alert. But Tübingen is relatively safe. Student bus pass costs approx
72
€23 (providing unlimited travel for the entire semester - recommended). Buses run until
12.30 am and 3.30 on the weekend. If you have a bus-pass and you phone a special taxi
number at least half an hour in advance you get a lift home for €2 (€3 if you have no
bus-pass).
(vi) Study. The seminar libraries are the best places to go.
(vii) Work. Go to the Arbeitsvermittung on Wilhelmstraße. See the "Schwäbisches
Tagblatt" (local newspaper) on Wednesdays. Neckarmüller (beergarden) are always
looking for staff, good employers.
(viii) Miscellaneous. It is well worth while purchasing a Bahncard 50, costing €100, as
you are entitled to 50% reduction on all rail travel with it. There is a bus from Tübingen
to Strasbourg with cheap rates. A very high percentage of Tübingen's population are
students.
There are many foreign students and a very large number of those are
English-speaking, i.e., American and British. Make an effort to integrate with the
Germans! Look for a tandem partner, notices in Brechtbau and in Mensa. The city of
Stuttgart is half an hour away by car, one hour by train and one and a half hours away
by bus.
4) Vienna:
Universität Wien (Institut für Germanistik) 2-3 places
Address: Universität Wien, Hauptgebäude
Universitätsring 1
1010 Vienna, Austria
Website: www.univie.ac.at
Local Erasmus co-ordinator: Prof Arno DUSINI
German Department / Institut für Germanistik
Universitätsring1, 3rd floor, room ZG1O2.82
Office hours for ERASMUS students:
Thu 11-12
Telefon: +43 1 4277 42111 Fax: +43 1 4277 42150
E-Mail: arno[email protected]
International Office
Main building, Universitätsring 1, 1010 Vienna
Opening hours: Mon & Wed: 10-12.30, Tue & Thu: 14-16
73
Ms Alexandra POSPISIL Tel.: +43 1-4277-18205
Mr Roman SCHETT
Tel.: +43 1-4277-18202
General e-mail address: [email protected]
Fax: +43 1-4277-18229
Online info for incoming ERASMUS students:
http://international.univie.ac.at/en/incoming-students/erasmus/
(contains all necessary info about Registration etc.)
Academic year: the year is divided into two semesters. The Wintersemester runs from
mid October to end of January; the Sommersemester from early March to end of June.
There is a two-week break at Christmas.
Arrival: Arrive in plenty of time before the start of lectures, as the process of getting
all the requirements for registration can take a long time and many offices have very
limited opening hours. It is a good idea to arrive two weeks before the start of the
semester and to start organising yourself as soon as possible. The contracts with most
of the student residences start on the 1st October so that should give you plenty of time.
Registration: see above
Other important/urgent things to do after your arrival:
http://international.univie.ac.at/en/incoming-students/erasmus/faqs/during-yourerasmus-stay/
Accomodation
If you need university housing, contact the ÖAD
http://www.oead.at/welcome_to_austria/legal_practical_issues/accommodation/EN/
Österreichischer Akademischer Austauschdienst
Housing Service / WohnraumverwaltungsGmBH
Ebendorfer Str. 7, 1010 Viena
Tel. +43.1.53408-800
E-Mail: [email protected]
74
Seek advice from your TCD coordinator which dorms in Vienna to choose…
Life in Vienna / Austria (info)
http://www.oead.at/welcome_to_austria/legal_practical_issues/life_in_austria/EN/
Courses / modules: see the listings on http://www.unvie.ac.at
Click on the button Vorlesungsverzeichnis (right-hand side)
Language Courses:
Most language departments and the Dept. for Translation / Interpreting offer language
classes, plus there is the University Language Center offering German classes:
http://deutschkurse.univie.ac.at/dk
Libraries:
all
departments
have
well-equipped
Fachbibliotheken.
Otherwise
recommended are the Universitätsbibliothek (in the main building of the uni; a sticker
on your Studentenausweis allows you to use it) or the Nationalbibliothek
(Heldenplatz/Hofburg, Wien 1, ca 25€ for a year’s reader’s pass).
Survival
Like Dublin, Vienna is divided into (23, concentric) districts; so it’s easy for you to read
addresses like “Wien 1”.
(i) Culture: really good listings of all cultural events in Vienna are provided by the
Programmzeitschrift FALTER
(ii) Jobs, social life etc. – check out the website of the Austrian Students Unions:
http://www.oeh.ac.at
(iii) Eating. The student restaurant (Mensa) in the NIG (Neues Institutsgebäude) is the
cheapest place, maybe not the best… However, there are many nice pubs and little
restaurants at the university Campus AKH (Alsterstraße) where most language
departments (except German) and some history facilities (eg. East European History)
are located.
Check out the famous Vienna coffee houses where you can have an espresso and spend
hours reading, talking to friends etc.; in the warm season the very Viennese wine
75
taverns called Heuriger
Famous pub (Beisl) hoods in Vienna are e.g. the Bermuda Triangle (1st district), the
Gürtel venues, the places in the 7th district.
(iv) Travel. The Austrian Railways ÖBB offer cheap tickets to the neighboring
metropoles in Central Europe (Prague, Budapest, Bratislava, Munich, sometimes even
Venice / Trieste)
(v) Safety. Vienna has the reputation to be very “green” and pretty safe for a European
capital. Still, you need to watch out for pick-pockets in the U-Bahn or in shopping
streets. You should stay away from the rough areas beyond the Gürtel boulevard,
particularly the Red Light District.
For all other practical advice, don’t hesitate to ask your TCD co-ordinator Dr
Ruthner who happens to be Viennese by origin…
76
5.3
ITALY
Students MUST choose places in Pavia and Siena first, and only
if there are no places in either of these universities can they apply
for Florence.
1. Pavia: Università degli Studi di Pavia
(Dipartimento di Studi Politici e Sociali). 6 places
Address: Strada Nuova, 65, 27100 Pavia.
Website - http://www.unipv.it/
TCD co-ordinator:
Dr Roberto Bertoni
Tel +353 1 896 2062; +353 87 3261480; [email protected]
Pavia co-ordinator: Professor Marina Tesoro, address as above.
Tel. (382) 504 429. Home number (emergencies only): (382) 21996. Fax 382 20158 email: [email protected]
Arrrival: Students strongly recommend getting a taxi to the Centro Assistenza straight
away after getting off the train, where your accommodation will be sorted. Apparently,
one cannot get a taxi from anywhere else in Pavia. The Centro Assistenza is a good 15
minute walk from the train station and the last thing you want is lugging your suitcases
around in the heat.
The language course in September is a great way to settle in before all the Italian
students arrive and also for making friends.
Academic year: most courses in Scienze Politiche are semesterised, with classes from
the beginning of October to late January with a break at Christmas (c.20 December - 8
January), the second semester is from mid-February to end May (with a break for the
first two weeks of April). Students will be operating essentially under this semester
system, in which three sessions of exams are held commencing first week in January
going through to mid-Feb and a further three sessions in June-July. Some 2nd, 3rd and
4th year semester-intensive courses (66 hours) are available. Each of these is equivalent
to a full one-year course. This does not affect your starting date, however, since the
university runs an intensive course in Italian for foreigners from mid-September which
you are advised to attend, especially if this is your first visit to Italy. You should thus
77
plan on arriving in Pavia mid-September. Students are required to take a combination of
year-long and semester-long courses for a total number of at least 45 ECTs (see further
details on this below).
Registration: all students must register in the ASL (Viale Indipendenza 3, Pavia)
during their first week. Bring passport and European Health Insurance Card (EHIC).
SOCRATES students register separately at the SOCRATES office, Sezione Mobilita
Studentesca counter (via S. Agostino 8, 27100 Pavia; Tel. (382) 504 2851; Fax (382)
25133; hours: Mon-Fri 9:30-12:00). It is advisable to let this office know your date of
arrival 15 days in advance. Required documentation:
Evidence of enrolment for JS year in Trinity (letter from European Studies), translated
into Italian.
(for students obliged to spend time abroad in EU)
4 Passport-sized photographs
European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)
At this phase of registration you will be given your ID card and incoming form.
Permesso di soggiorno: this document is usually essential to complete registration, but
following directions given at the induction meeting. Students have reported long queues
from early in the morning at the Questura (local police station) where you must register
to obtain a Permesso di soggiorno but it is recommended that within a week of arrival
students should register there. Required documentation:
·
Incoming form
·
EHIC (or private health insurance translated into Italian)
·
Passport and a photocopy of passport
·
Passport-sized photographs
·
Rent contract for your room (you get this from the Centro Assistenza Studenti,
Caso Mazzini)
The Permesso will be issued within one month, but the provisional Permesso issued
immediately you take to the Socrates office to finalise registration.
Courses: This exchange being with a Faculty of Political Science, its strengths are the
range of courses available in contemporary Italian (and European) history and politics,
78
in sociology and also in economics, together with the possibility of taking some
elements of law. There is little available in the way of history pre-1800. However, as a
result of negotiations with the Department of History in the Facoltà di Lettere e
Filosofia additional options are now available in early modern as well as modern
history.
Trinity students take at least six courses overall, at least three in each semester. In each
semester at least one of these courses must be worth 9 ECTS points (if these are still
available), two more can be either 6 or 9 ECTS. Or else choose at least four courses
worth 6 ECTS. Take the remaining courses worth 3 ECTS. Overall, this should equate
to ¾ of a local student's workload, that is to say at least 45 ECTs, excluding courses in
the major and minor languages – but one course on Italian literature can also count
towards credits. These courses are a mixture of second and third year courses. Provided
the bulk of them are to do with Italy and Europe, the choice is à la carte subject to
guidance and advice by Prof. Tesoro and local pre-requisite stipulations. The occasional
course on third world politics, developmental economics, etc., is of course acceptable.
Final course choices are not valid until approved by the Trinity coordinator. The range
of courses available includes: Storia e istituzioni dell’Europa orientale; Storia dei
movimenti e partiti politici; Sociologia urbane e rurale; Filosofia Politica;
Organizzazione
politica
Europea;
Storia
del
pensiero
politico
moderno
e
contemporaneo; Filosofia della politica; Teoria dello Sviluppo Politico; Storia dei
trattati e politica internazionale; Storia delle Dottrine Politiche; Sistema politico italiano
dal 1945; etc. Study the Guida dello studente and attend as many lectures as possible in
the first week to help inform your final choice.
Assessment is by oral exams at the end of the semester or year. Students are strongly
advised to take the Italian for foreigners course organized by the university in early-mid
October. Students last year particularly enjoyed the following courses: 'Sociologia
dell'educazione' and 'Storia dell'africa'
Accommodation: Although it cannot be guaranteed, there is a chance of obtaining
rooms in a university residence (Collegio). These have to be reserved in advance
through the Trinity co-ordinator. Rent: about €200 per month, €355 if all meals are
included.
Accommodation on the private market is available but more expensive
79
(unless a shared flat) – the average is approx €3000 and requires arriving early.
Riccardo Cambiaghi and Elena provide an exemplary service both in terms of
orientation and in ensuring that everyone is accommodated. Senior Sophister students
are very willing to discuss their accommodation experiences with Senior Freshman
students about to embark on their year in Pavia.
NB. Centro Assistenza Studenti on Corso Mazzini assists students in finding short-term
accommodation.
Survival (i) Arrival. SGEA buses (info in airports or from Autostazione Pavia) bring
you straight from airports to Pavia. More convenient than train (frequent service, about
45 minutes travel time) from Milan. A coach service connects Milan (piazza Cadorna)
with Pavia (Via Trieste, 2) in 50 minutes.
Students should go directly to the residence if they have been allocated a room
there. It is a good idea to send prior warning of the date of arrival and to arrive in the
morning time if at all possible. They should then register (see above). Students should
then go to the Istituto per il Diritto allo Studio Universitario [ISU], or Student Affairs
Office, on the corner of Corso Cavour and Strada Nuova, where they can obtain
information about a variety of student services and get a canteen card.
(ii) Information. Either before arriving or on arrival, obtain the Guida per lo studente
straniero
from the Ufficio Affari Internazionale (Corso Strada Nuova, 65, 27100
Pavia).
(iii) Shopping. 'Esselunga' is the main supermarket in Pavia located beside train station.
There is a food market every day at Piazza Petrarca, and a food, clothes, shoes etc.
market on Wednesday and Saturday (all day). Self-service laundrette: left of Corso
Cairoli – beside the Castello
(iv) Eating. ISU, main mensa on corner of Strada Nuova – 3 floors. Cost of a full meal
is max €3. Some, but not all, of the residences have self-catering facilities. Pavia also
has plenty of fairly cheap pizzerie: Da Gulio; Café Dublino; Amalfiana; Marechiaro.
(v) Social life. Italian students are friendly and helpful. It is not difficult to make
contact. Pavia has over 200 cafes and bars! San Tomaso and Safara are definitely the
main bars for nights out while Bar Minerva (owned by an Irish guy) and Mana do the
best apperitivo! Many people just meed in Piazza del duomo at night. V2 in Piazza
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Vittoria is good for coffee. For the best hot chocolate and ice cream ever go to the
latteria on via Manzoni. Join the international society. The SOCRATES office organizes
quite a lot of social events, but integration with Italian students is recommended.
(vi) Study. The library at the 'Facoltà di Scienze Politiche' is very small and noisy.
More space available at the 'Biblioteca Centrale' in the university, or in the library at the
Piazza Petrarca. Computer rooms in both the university and the Residenza Golgi, free
access.
(vii) Miscellaneous. Previously, some students have found it necessary to take up parttime work: teaching English (Elena has a list of people looking for English teachers)
and working in a bar. There is an efficient bus service, but a bicycle (it’s a must!) is far
more economical in Pavia. Secondhand bicycles can be bought, from about €30. Buses
run up to midnight. You
can buy a green card for about €21 which give you a 20% discount every time you use
the train.
2. Siena: Università degli Studi di Siena
(Facolta di Scienze Politiche). 2 places
Address: P.za S. Francesco, I-53100 Siena, Italy.
web site: http://www.unisi.it
TCD co-ordinator:
Dr Roberto Bertoni
Tel +353 1 896 2062; +353 87 3261480; [email protected]
Pavia co-ordinator:
Professor Paul Corner, address as above.
Tel. +39 0577 235299. [email protected]
SOCRATES office: Mrs Angelita Campriani,
via S. Vigilio, 6, 1, 53100 Siena; Tel. (0577) 298 158;
Fax (0577) 298 392; e-mail [email protected]
hours: Mon-Sat 11.00-13:00.
http://www.unisi.it/ammin/uri/mondo/22SHORT.htm#Language:
web address of ‘The Short Guide’ published for visiting students
81
by the University of Siena International Office.
This comprehensive document provides all the information you are likely to need in
preparation for your year in Siena.
Academic year: all the faculties are semesterised, but a few courses may still be
annualised. The semester system is as follows: 1 October - 31 January & 1 March - 31
May. There are two mid-year holiday periods at Christmas and Easter. Students are
required to take a combination of year-long and semester-long courses for a total
number of at least 45 ECTs. Students normally choose 4 year-long courses (8 ECTs
each) and two semester-long courses (6 ECTs each). This should equate to ¾ of a local
student's workload (see further details on this below). If changes have been made in this
arrangement, please contact your co-oridnator immediately from Siena.
Registration: On arrival students should go directly, with passport and 2 photos, to the
International Office at via S. Vigilio, 6, 1, 53100 Siena; Tel. (0577) 298 158; Fax (0577)
298 392; hours: Mon-Sat 11.00-13:00 for information on the University,
accommodation, canteens, insurance cover and application forms. SOCRATES students
should then register separately, again with passport and 2 photos, at the Settore
Autonomo Programma ERASMUS (Nancy Witman - Segreterie Studenti) office (via
Sallustio Bandini, 25, 1; Tel. (0577) 298 324; Fax (0577) 298 307; hours: Mon-Fri.
10.30-13:30). The 'libretto' is a student exam record which is obligatory, it is issued to
the Erasmus student upon the production of a Learning Agreement, signed by the
Erasmus Co-ordinator of Siena University and also requires a passport photo. This
'libretto' can also be used as proof of being a student and thus can be used for discounts
throughout Italy, for example students of Unisi can get free access to l'Uffizi Gallery at
Florence.
The third visit is the co-ordinator. It is advisable to let the International office know
your date of arrival 15 days in advance. Required documentation:
Evidence of enrolment for JS year in Trinity (letter from European Studies
translated into Italian).
European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)
7 Passport-sized photographs
Letter of validation from Trinity
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Passport + photocopy
Courses: This exchange being with a Faculty of Political Science, its strengths are the
range of courses available in contemporary Italian (and European) history and politics,
in sociology and also in economics, together with the possibility of taking some
elements of law. There is little available in the way of history pre-1800. However, as a
result of negotiations with the Department of History in the Facoltà di Lettere e
Filosofia additional options are now available in early modern as well as modern
history. The University of Siena (Unisi) website is notoriously difficult to navigate as
the Italian university system is currently undergoing major structural changes from a
system of Faculties to one of Departments.
Trinity students take six courses overall, three in each semester. Four of these courses
must be weighted 9 ECTS points, the remaining two can be weighted 6 ECTS. This
should equate to ¾ of a local student's workload, that is to say at least 45 ECTS,
excluding courses in the major and minor languages – but one course on Italian
literature can also count towards credits. These courses are a mixture of second and
third year courses. Provided the bulk of them are to do with Italy and Europe, the choice
is à la carte subject to guidance and advice by Prof. Corner and local pre-requisite
stipulations. However, final course choices are not valid until approved by the Trinity
coordinator. The occasional course on third-world politics, developmental economics,
etc., is of course acceptable. The range of courses available includes: Filosofia politica;
Storia contemporanea or storia moderna; Storia delle istituzioni politiche or storia delle
dottrine politiche; Storia delle relazioni internazionali. A complete list of courses is
available from Dr Bertoni and on the Siena web site: http://www.unisi.it. Courses in the
Facoltà di Lettere commence somewhat later than Scienze Politiche
Assessment is by oral exams at the end of the semester or year.
While the academic year is split into two semesters, individual courses are not all
semesterized. For example, many courses last for only one month and can be worth the
same 6 credits as another course which lasts from October - January. When choosing
courses this becomes very important, especially as Erasmus students will experience
many timetable clashes due to the à la carte nature of the course selection process.
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Students, when choosing subjects, should pay attention to the dates of courses to ensure
that the two semesters come with an equally balanced workload.
The majority of courses are worth either 6 ECTs or 9 ECTS. The exams are mostly oral
and take place in January/February and again in June. Most courses are in the large
lecture format of 2 hours each, with a few courses in small classes of ~20 students. It is
recommended that students go to as many lectures as possible in the first few weeks in
many different courses as it takes a process of trial and error to identify the suitable
courses. For example, some magistrale course Professor's will not accept Erasmus
students and some courses may turn out to be much different than the provided course
description as the content of lectures is completely up to the Professor.
There is not an equivalent of Trinity 'tutorials'. Unisi is a very well known University
for History of Art and it is recommended students take one of these courses or a
Medieval history course for some academic insight into the history of Siena and the
surrounding Tuscany.
Italian language course: Students are obliged to take an Italian for foreigners course of
an appropriate level organized by the Università per Stranieri, Via Pantaneto, 45. Fees
incurred will be reimbursed by the CES on production of the appropriate receipt.
Students are also strongly encouraged to take the one-month Italian for foreigners
course organized by the Universita per Stranieri. in mid-September. In order to
participate in the course, students must pay approx €75.00 for administrative costs and
buy a special stamp called “marca da bollo” of €12.00 from tobacco shops, although
former ES students say it is not necessary to buy a ‘marca di bollo’. two photos, your
passport and your “mensa” (or university restaurant) card.
For instruction in the minor language, enquire at the University language centre.
Accommodation: There is very little university accommodation available in Siena and
it is allotted to visiting students by a strictly administered system. University Halls are
available to students, however many find them not suitable for a full year. Rent is
similar to an apartment in Siena's old centre at ~€350 a month. Students should arrive
in Siena in early September, before the majority of Italian students arrive in the city, for
a more enjoyable house-hunting experience as it can get very difficult to find
apartments with single rooms later in the season. Previous ES students would not
84
recommend living outside the city especially not as far as 6km! Siena is a small city
with very poor public transport. For a true Senese experience students should search for
apartments 'dentro le mura' or 'poco fuori le mura'. Unisi has a very helpful page for
private accommodation adverts: http://www.unisi.it/ateneo/adempimenti/urp-e-europedirect/bacheca-alloggi/alloggi-siena Also helpful are websites such as easystanza.it and
uniaffitti.it
The International Relations Office assists all visiting students to find accommodation
both in Erasmus houses and on the private market. It is essential to gather information
early and even book lodging via this office prior to your arrival. Useful websites for
finding accommodation include www.uniaffitti.it, www.subito.it and
www.easystanza.it. Students can also use Siena Erasmus pages on Facebook to search
for potential flatmates. It is a good idea to find accommodation dentro le mura (inside
the walls) or poco fuori le mura, as the surrounding countryside is served by a
relatively unreliable bus system, which can make going in and out of town a hassle.
Rent in Siena is usually can be from around €350 to €400 a month depending on
location and whether or not bills are included.
Survival
Arrival: The most convenient airports to Siena are Pisa and Florence. Siena is
approximately 2 hours by train from Pisa, one hour by bus or train from Florence and
three hours by train from Rome. Students should go directly to the International Office
at Via San Vigilio for information on the University, accommodation, canteens,
insurance cover. It is a good idea to send prior warning of the date of arrival and to
arrive in the morning if at all possible. They should then register at the University (see
above). You must bring with you three photos, your study booklet, a photocopy of your
passport, Form E111 and a declaration from your landlord. You obtain your Italian
health form at the USL (Unita Sanitaria Locale) Ufficio Asistenze Stranieri, Via Pian
d’Olive 11, Siena, on production of your Form E111. All students need to obtain a
'codice fiscale' from the Agenzia delle Entrate in Palazzo Piccolomino near the
University Rectory. This is necessary for all contracts, and also for buying some things
online, for example concert tickets. Passport required.
85
Canteens: There are three University canteens. Foreign students enrolled at the
University of Siena may use the canteens at a reduced price if they possess the meal
card issued by the International Relations Office. A three course meal can be obtained
for €4 with the canteen (‘mensa’) card issued to students upon registration, queues can
be long.
Study: Nancy Witman will provide the letter required to register at and obtain books
from the library (take copies of this letter as you may need it also for the Questura.
Libraries are open till 11 pm.
Language facilities: book early for the September course which incurs a modest charge
of approx €51, arranged by Angelita Campriani, [email protected]
(v) Social life: Ask for the Guida a’ Servizi. To use residence computers you must get
the form here, issued following a computer skills test. Student concessions for theatre
and cinema may be available. For registration and use of the sports facilities, students
must go to the doctors, a list of doctors is provided by the Ufficio Assistenza Estero e
Stranieri in Via Pian d'Ovile, in order to obtain a health cert. Sports facilities include
astro-turf pitches, rugby pitches and an indoor multi-purpose gymnasium just outside
the old walls.
Nightlife: There is very little university life compared to the likes of the Trinity Arts
Block. All social life surrounds the Piazza del Campo in the centre of town where
hundreds of students hang out on most nights.
Siena has two very active groups which cater to Erasmus students; ESN and AEGEE
both of which can be found on Facebook. These groups organise events every week
such as Tuscan tours and trips to the discos outside the city which are called
"DocleVita" and "Vanilla".
The 'Cuban Bar' is now called 'Bella Vista' and is a regular for Erasmus and local
students.
The live music scene is fantastic in Siena, which is home to one of the most famous Jazz
and Classical music schools in Italy. Hidden gems like 'unTubo' and 'Cacio e Pere'
provide an outstanding quality of live bands throughout the year.
Students should read up on Siena's 'Palio' culture before arriving. Siena is split into 17
different neighbourhoods or 'contrade' which participate in an inner city horse race in
July and in August called the Palio. The rivalries and pageantry of this race continue
86
throughout the year and create an entirely unique lifestyle and community that you
would never see anywhere else in the world.
Siena itself is small, taking a half hour to walk from one end to the other. This creates a
very tightknit and friendly Erasmus group as well as making it very easy to make
friends with locals alike.
Information: Either before arriving or on arrival, obtain the Guida per lo studente
straniero from the Ufficio Affari Internazionale (Via San Vigilio )
Useful address: GES (Gruppo ERASMUS Siena) Piazza S. Francesco 8, 53100 Siena.
Tel & Fax: +39 577 263556 Open Mon-Sat 12.15 - 13.15
3. Florence (places are offered initially to students of School of History) Università
degli Studi di Firenze (Facoltà di Scienze Politice). Dipartimento di Studi Sullo Stato,
50121 Firenze, Via Laura 48. Tel. 0039 055 275 7073, Fax 234 5486
TCD Coordinator: Dr. Joseph Clarke, Tel. 003531 896 2378,
e-mail: [email protected]
Florence coordinator: Dr. Jennifer Greenleaves.
Tel. 0039 055 275 7073,
e-mail: [email protected]
Socrates Office: Piazza San Marco 4, 50121 Firenze,
Tel. 0039 055 275 7671,
Fax 275 7681, Internet: http://www.unifi.it
Academic year: whilst officially, the academic year starts on 1 November, semester
courses now start mid September. There are three modules in each semester, of approx.
4 weeks duration. Following each module there is a week off, in which
written examinations in that module can be taken. Alternatively, students can opt to do
‘final’ oral exams after all three modules in the semester. Each module is worth 3
credits.
Language courses: The Centro Linguistico di Ateneo (Via degli Alfani 58, Tel. 055289 407) organizes free Italian language courses throughout the year. It would be
advisable to take the course starting on or about 7 September, with a placement test
four days prior to this date.
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Accommodation: Accommodation in Florence can be a difficult problem. There are no
College residences. You are advised to arrive several weeks before term starts. The
most satisfactory way to acquire accommodation is to consult the university
noticeboards, where there are always many advertisements, usually students looking for
flatmates. This system has proved less costly than renting through an agency. Rent
approx €317 per month in accommodation acquired through a real estate agency.
Libraries: The university library is in theory good, especially for modern Italian
history, but somewhat disorganized. The Biblioteca Nazionale is an excellent copyright
library, but cumbersome to use. There are several other specialist libraries in Florence.
Undergraduates may also use the library of the European University Institute in Fiesole,
which is good not only for the history of the European Union, but also for early modern
history.
Registration: Firstly, you have to register in the ISO - International Students Office
(Via Laura). This is where you confirm or change your courses. You must also register
in the Socrates office for Scienze Politiche (via Cavour 82, 3rd Floor). This is where
you get your student card. Follow the steps in the handbook supplied by the
International Students Office (Via Laura, Scienze Politiche). Students must apply for
their permesso di soggiorno and codice fiscale. Documentation required must be signed
in the registration office in piazza San Marco.
Living in Florence: although the centre is packed with tourists from early summer
until late autumn, from October on it is almost tourist free and Florence becomes a
wonderful place to live. Dr Greenleaves is extremely helpful, assisting TCD students
with course choices and guiding them through the complications of the system.
Further information, also on the required number and type of courses, and the Socrates
handbooks from Florence, available from Dr. Joseph Clarke, Dept. of Modern History.
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5.4
POLAND
Jagiellonian University, Krakow
website: http://www.uj.edu.pl/
TCD co-ordinator: Dr Ewa Stańczyk
Tel +353 1 896 1291
email: [email protected]
TCD address: Arts Block, rm. 4114
Krakow co-ordinator:
Dr. Stanisław Górka
Erasmus Coordinator at the Institute of European Studies (Departmental Coordinator)
Jagiellonian University
ul. Jodlowa 13, 30-252 Krakow, Poland
e-mail: [email protected]
phone: +48 12 664 74 18
mobile: +48 600 48 64 20
fax: +48 12 429 70 52
url: http://www.europeistyka.uj.edu.pl
The Institute of European Studies is situated in the Przegorzaly Castle. You can get there on the
409 bus which leaves from outside Hotel Cracovia, Al. 3 Maja.
Learning agreement
Over the year students are required to complete courses amounting to 45 ECTs.
Semester 1
20 European Credits
7
12-14
credits for Polish language classes
credits for courses in history, political science, sociology or cultural
history/studies (at least half of which should be through the medium of
Polish)
Semester 2
7
14-16
25 European Credits
credits for Polish language classes
credits for courses in history, political science, sociology or cultural
history/studies (at least half of which should be through the medium of
Polish)
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Students are required to communicate their course choices to the Department of
Russian and Slavonic Studies ([email protected]) and to the Center for European Studies
([email protected]) by the end of the second week of the semester.
Registration
On arrival in Krakow students should see Ms Maria Baranska at the Foreign Students’
Office. There you will be issued with a student ID and a marks/grade book (indeks).
They will also be given instructions about registering with the local authorities.
The office address is: Foreign Students Office (Biuro Obslugi Studentow
Zagranicznych), ul. Golebia 24, 3-007 Krakow, tel 0048 12 663 1546/7,
fax 0048 12 663 1545, email [email protected] The office is situated
downstairs in Collegium Maius.
Ms Maria Baranska is in charge of the office. Her email is: [email protected]
Choice of courses may be discussed with the Erasmus co-ordinator, Stanisław Górka (see address
at top of page).
Polish Language Test
Trinity requires students to take the Polish language test at B2 level at the end of the
academic year. The results obtained in this test counts as the student’s language
assessment: students should submit a copy of their certificates to the Centre for
European Studies (TCD). In all other courses students are required to submit marks
obtained for courses to the Centre for European Studies (TCD) by the beginning of
September.
Polish Language Classes
Polish language classes are held on ul. Grodzka 24 in the Centre of Polish Studies. Second
(minor) language classes can be found in the Centrum Jezykow
Obcych on ul. Krupnicza.
90
Students are strongly encouraged to follow an appropriate course in their minor
language, although this is not a formal requirement of the year and the grades obtained
by students in their minor language will not count as part of their annual assessment. It
is also possible to audit language classes in the Philology Department of the university,
French, Spanish, Italian are all in Collegium Paderevianum on Al. Mickiewicza 9.
All you need to do is get the lecturer's permission first.
Erasmus Students’ Network
There is an organisation called the Erasmus Students' Network whose office is next
door to the Foreign Students Office (see above for address). They organise events for
Erasmus/Socrates students and have a mentor system whereby you are assigned a
Polish student to help you with any problems you might have, for example finding a
flat. Their website is: www.esn.student.uj.edu.pl.
Accommodation
You can apply for accomodation in student dorms through the Foreign Students
Office (Biuro Obslugi Studentow Zagranicznych) by writing directly to Ms Maria
Baranska: ([email protected]) or [email protected]
The deadline for applying is early May 2009. The advantages are the cost (rent is
c 70€ a month), the location and the fact that there are lots of Polish students there.
The conditions are adequate: you share a room and there are common bathroom
and kitchen facilities.
Finding a flat is difficult (a bit like Dublin). Check out agencies on the net before
you arrive.There are signs on the streets and also word of mouth, especially from
other Erasmus students. Expect to pay anywhere between 120-250€ a month,
including bills.
Cost of Living:
In general most things (except clothes, though you can get all your winter gear
here quite easily and reasonably, though better quality clothes, shoes and boots may be more
91
expensive than in Ireland’s discount outlets) are significantly cheaper than in Ireland. Transport,
groceries and restaurants are very reasonable.
Sample Price List (2010)
Item
Cost
rent
500-900 zl
monthly bus/tram ticket
60 zl
beer
6-8 zl
loaf of bread
3 zl
milk, 1L
2.50 zl
decent meal in a canteen or bar
15-20 zl
cinema
15-20 zl
theatre
20-50 zl
Culture and Going Out:
Krakow is full of theatres, museums, music, exhibitions, etc. There is a lively Jazz
scene, lots of cinema that show foreign films (not dubbed), and lots of cafes
pubs and clubs, especially in Kazimierz (Jewish quarter).
The cost of a decent meal is about 15 to 20 zloty now. At the beginning of May there is
a so called 'long weekend' which could end up being a week free of college, depending
on how the days fall. The 1st and 3rd are Bank Holidays. There is also a week of semi
holidays around this time called Juwenalia, which is a week-long student festival.
Krakow is situated very near the southern borders of Poland and within easy reach of
the Tatra, Bieszczady and Carpathian mountains so in Summer you can hike and in
winter you can ski. It is also ideally located to visit other countries: the Czech Republic,
Slovakia, or Ukraine. With a student ID you get a substantial discount on all internal
train and bus tickets in Poland.
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5.5 RUSSIA
Gorky Literary Institute
Address: Moscow, 123104, Tverskoi Boulvard, 25 (Москва, 123104, Тверской
бульвар, 25)
TCD Co-ordinator: Dr Sarah Smyth, Tel 896 1819, Fax 896 2655, email: [email protected]
Contact person in the International Department (Международный отдел): Tatiana
Yevgenievna Nikolskaya
Tel: +(7) 495 694 0812
Mail: [email protected]
Hostel number: +7 495 618 33 90
Website: http://www.litinstitut.ru/
Agreed programme
The following is for guidance only and may be subject to change.
Students are required to attend 20 academic hours of classes per week: 8 hours of
language and 12 hours of non-language courses. Apart from the compulsory language
components, students may select three year-long (or six semester-long) courses from
those listed below. In the non-language components, TCD students attend a lecture
with their Russian peers (2 hours) and a seminar conducted by the lecturer of a given
course on their own (2 hours).
Количество учебных часов в неделю составляет 20 часов (8 часов русского языка
и 12 часов общественно-политических дисциплин):
1. Русский язык
6 часов (обязательно)
2. Русский язык через газету
3. 3 спецкурса
2 часа (обязательно)
1 лекция (вместе со студентами института) = 2 часа
+ 1 семинар по теме лекций = 2 часа
Спецкурсы (по выбору)
1. Oтечественная история
2. История философии
3. История культуры
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4. Политология
5. История политических учений
6. Новая и новейшая история
7. История религии
8. Социология
9. История средних веков
10. Эстетика
Examination and assessment
At the end of the first semester students are examined in all subjects. The assessment in
language is the ONLY element to count as part of the annual assessment. At the end of
the second semester students are examined/assessed in all courses.
Студенты обязаны сдавать экзамены по всем предметам в конце как и первого
так и второго семестров. Зато экзамены/зачеты по общественно-политическим
дисциплинам в первом семестре, хотя и отмечены в сертификате, считаются
пробными.
Students are required to sit the State Examinations in Russian at the end of the
academic year at a level considered appropriate by their language instructor.
Студенты обязаны в конце учебного года сдавать государственные тесты по
русскому языку.
Students are required to write a long essay (3000 words) during the second semester.
The topic of this essay should normally be related to one of their lecture courses and
should be agreed with their supervisor before Christmas/the end of the first semester.
Студенты обязаны писать куросвую работу в течение второго семестра по теме,
связанной с одним из спецкурсов по общественно-политическим дисциплинам и
согласованной с научным руководителем до конца первого семестра.
The Institute is able to facilitate access to archives and libraries. Students are also
permitted to participate in PE and sporting activities organised by the Institute. The
GLI organises a cultural programme, the cost of which is included in the overall fee
paid by TCD. Excursions include a Moscow guided tour, a visit to the Kremlin, visits
94
to museums and may include trips to towns outside Moscow, such as St Petersburg,
Suzdal, Vladimir, …
Культурная программа включает в себя самые основные и популярные
экскурсии: обзорная поездка по г. Москве, посещение территории Кремля,
посещение музеев по просьбе учащихся. Могут организоваться также
экскурсионные поездки в другие города: С.-Петербург, Владимир, Суздаль и др.
Academic Contacts:
Dean of Russian as a Foreign Language Faculty (РКИ): Надежда М. Годенко
Dean of Humanities Faculty (Общественных наук): Людмила Михайловна Царева
General Information from current and former students :
Do register at the Irish embassy. It’s a good safety precaution just in case anything
happens to you, and they also have free wine/food receptions several times a year
with various interesting guests.
Weather and What to Wear:
•
It is cold! Temperature and humidity: November/December in Moscow
averages between -5°C and -15°C, but there can be cold snaps. There are
around 7 hours of sunshine a day and humidity is quite low, so winter can
actually be very pleasant in Russia.
•
In St. Petersburg and other places near the coast/ a river humidity can be much
higher and winds can be much stronger, making it feel much colder.
•
Dressing for winter in Russia: The most important thing to remember, as any
Russian will tell you, is to look after your extremities, i.e. feet, hands, heads. So
good shoes, gloves and hats are essential.
•
Rules for clothing: There is no need to buy special gear, but it is important that
the items you bring with you do the following;
•
Hats must cover your ears
95
•
Shoes must be water proof and have a sole at least 1 to 1.5 inches thick, and
should ideally be ½ a size too big (or at least roomy). This will allow the air
inside the boot to warm up and will keep your feet protected.
•
Hence, socks should not be too thick
•
The same principal applies to gloves: mittens are much warmer, as they create a
warm air-pocket
•
Scarves are necessary, because if the temperature drops to less than -15°C it is
much more comfortable to breathe through it, as your lungs are not used to such
cold air.
•
Layering: You will find that although outside it is very cold, inside can be
extremely warm; Russians like to heat their houses/ restaurants/ metro.
•
Not only will layers keep you warmer outside, it means that you will not be
stifling inside.
•
It is advisable to bring leggings or tights to wear under trousers.
•
What to buy and where to buy it: Although it is not necessary to buy your cold
gear in Russia, if you find that you arrive and that you have forgotten something
or that what you have is not warm enough, anything you might need can be
found at the street markets that are dotted around the place.
•
The market is the perfect place to buy hand-made pure wool socks and mittens,
and sometimes hats too.
•
They are also often sold by elderly women in metro stations.
•
General cautions: Packed snow can be very slippery and they do not always
totally clear the footpaths, so walk with caution.
•
Take care when passing under buildings/ bridges/ window ledges, as icestalactites can form and grow to quite a size and may then drop unexpectedly.
•
You will also need a few sturdy pairs of waterproof shoes with grip. The ground
is very slippery from November-February, and very slushy from February-May,
when the snow is melting. Hiking boots are good.
Accommodation:
Standards of Accommodation (urban vs. rural)
96
•
Regardless of accommodation it is necessary to register on arrival. It is by far
the easiest option to let hotel/guest house do this for you for a fee of 500 roubles
(€13). You will need to give passport to receptionist for a few hours.
•
It is commonplace that the tap-water is not drinkable
•
In Moscow:
•
Hotels: These are generally very expensive. A 3-star usually ranges €80150/room/night, depending how close to centre. The standard of
accommodation is pretty average.
•
Guest House/ Hostel: This is either an established tourist hostel or could be in a
‘student residence’. Tourist hostel especially in centre can be reasonable- €1025/night. Basic, but facilities usually good. A student residence is usually
€10/night but entails shared facilities and is likely of bad quality.
•
In Provincial Areas:
•
Hotels: These are generally very reasonably priced and accommodation most
likely pretty standard.
•
Hostels/ guest house: Tourist Hostel or ‘Halls of Residence’ (as above)
•
The obshezhitie is by far the cheapest accommodation you will find, but if you
do want to move out it’s possible. You can look on Russian websites, or on
English sites like Expat.ru for rooms or whole appartments to rent. It’s ok to
live with other expats/English speakers, just make sure you keep up contact
with Russian speakers as well! If you can find some Russian speaking flatmates,
even better.
Work:
•
Work is abundant in Moscow. There is a huge demand for native speaker
English teachers, and you can work every day of the week if you want to. You
will most likely earn more in Russia than you could working at home –
97
anything from 25 to 65 euro for an hour’s teaching. Qualifications help, but are
by no means necessary.
Food:
•
Food is unfortunately very expensive. The best place to shop by far is Ashan, a
big discount supermarket chain with stores around Moscow. The prices are low
and the choice is extensive. For eating out, there are several nice restaurants
very close to the Gorky institute:
- Pelman, a dumpling restaurant, Hacha-Puri, a Georgian restaurant that does
good lunchtime deals, Moo-Moo, a buffet style café, and Café Pushkin, famous
for traditional Russian food ( though only if you are feeling incredibly
wealthy!).
•
Eating: Russian food can be an acquired taste. The main types of food eaten are
meat, dumplings, pancakes, hearty soups and substantial salads. Dishes tend to
be quite heavy in comparison to their European counterparts, but in winter it is
exactly what is needed!
•
Particularly popular are “pelmeni” (пельмени): a kind of ravioli/ boiled
dumplings filled with meat or potatoes, and often served with sour cream called
“smetana” (сметана)
•
Russian salads tend to be made up of chopped meat, potatoes and other
vegetables mixed together with a type mayonnaise. Cabbage and carrot salads
are also very popular.
•
A common snack is piroshky (пирошки): these are kinds of mini pies filled
with cabbage and egg, meat, cheese, cherry or poppy seeds. They are often sold
hot in the metro, and cost around 25 RUB.
•
Soups are often the best choice on the menu. Russian soups tend to contain meat
and are very substantial. Favourites are: borsch (борщ), a beetroot and paprika
soup, schi (щи), a cabbage soup that often contains bacon, and solyanka
(сольянка), a mixed meat soup.
•
Russians love sweets, and there is always a large selection of desserts on offer.
98
Russian People and Culture:
•
People may appear rude at first. In general they tend to be much more direct
than Irish people, and it may initially surprise you. However, you soon get used
to it, and eventually you might even start to pick up some of the habits.
•
If you are in a situation where a Russian knows you’re a foreigner, you will
probably be met with a lot of polite curiosity. If the Russian doesn’t realise you
are foreign or can’t hear you very well (in the metro, for example), they may
assume you are also Russian, but are speaking badly, and might get frustrated
with you. Don’t take this as a sign that your Russian is poor or unintelligible.
It’s just that Russian speaking foreigners are quite unusual! Russians have a
reputation for being very cold and unfriendly, but this is only true until you get
to know them. Once you do they are extremely warm and hospitable.
•
However, do not expect a smile from people serving you in restaurants or in
metro stations. Customer service as a concept does not really exist.
•
Culture clashes: People in Russia tend to be a quite xenophobic, particularly
towards people from the Caucuses or indeed any people that look Caucasian,
i.e. anyone Asiatic in appearance. This can make for some awkward
conversation.
•
The gender divide in Russia is also quite strong. For example, when greeting
somebody (when you meet them for the first time, but also if you already know
each other) it is customary for the men to shake hands. However, they will
rarely shake a woman’s hand.
•
Visiting people: Russians love to invite people to their homes. If going on an
informal visit, there are some general things that are good to bear in mind.
•
As in most countries, you should not show up empty-handed. Preferred housegifts are alcohol or sweets.
•
Russians have an extremely sweet tooth, so any biscuits, chocolates, cakes or
even just jam go down very well.
•
There is a lot of bad vodka available in Russia, so a nice bottle (anything over
500 rubles, around €12.50) is a nice offering.
•
When entering someone’s house, you always take off your boots/outdoor shoes
(this is probably due to the snow etc in winter, but the rule applies at all times of
the year).
99
•
Inside Russians wear what they call “tapotchki”, or slippers. They can be like
plastic sandals or like traditional slippers. They will often have spare pairs to
offer you, but sometimes you are expected to bring your own.
•
Similarly if a Russian is coming to visit you, it is advisable to have a spare pair
to offer them.
Infrastructure (travelling around):
In Moscow- Walking and Metro are by far the most efficient means of transport.
Although sometimes you may need to negotiate trolleybus, tram or
“marshrutka” (public mini-bus taxi) – not the most accessible for the foreigner,
therefore best avoided. Traffic is renowned as worst in world. If getting taxi to
airport have it pick you up several hours in advance. The cheapest way to travel
is to get a student metro ticket. The application process is incredibly arduous,
but the discount is so huge that it is worthwhile. The International office in the
Institute will help you with the application form.
•
Metro: Extremely efficient but very busy. At peak times the metro
comes every 2 minutes, and the interval between metro rarely exceed 10
minutes. The Metro runs from 7am to 12.30am. Tickets may be bought
individually at the ‘kassa’ or the cashier. A single ticket costs 28 rouble,
probably best bought in bulk. If you have little confidence in your ability
to count in Russian, then easiest is to gesture using fingers (10 fingers
equals 10 journeys- 280 rouble.) Note that 2 or more metro line may
interconnect in an underground ‘perekhod’ (indicated by stick man
running up a stairs)
•
Trolleybus/ Tram/ Marshrutka (minibus-taxi): These can be pretty
inaccessible for foreigners who don’t speak the language (writing down
the name of stop helps). These generally are very slow. 25 or 28 rouble.
•
Taxi: There are some private companies but telephone numbers will
only be found in guidebooks or on the internet. Most common in
Moscow are ‘unofficial’ taxis- ordinary Joe Soap who wants to make a
couple of rouble on the side. These are not as sinister as they sound are
very widely used but there is some ‘danger element’, so best used in
100
groups only. It is necessary to negotiate price before entering. Usually
no more than 300-500 rouble. Don’t expect seatbelt!
•
To airport best mode of transport is the AeroExpress which leaves from
metro stations Pavletskaya (Domodedovo Airport) or Savyolovskaya
(Sheremetovo)
•
Roads in Moscow are very good, of not slightly treacherous in winter
(with nightmarish traffic). Best means of transport is Metro- by far!
•
Outskirts of Moscow: To travel out of Moscow you can get a train from
various train stations which are reachable by Metro.
•
Train Stations can be very stressful. As in most countries they can be
shady and you are likely to be hassled by ‘taxi drivers’ etc. Since the
terrorist bombing of Domodedovo last January there are now security
checks on entry. Best to have exact time and date of travel, and type of
carriage in mind before approaching cashier (Kassa). Although ticket
salespeople can ‘help’ you if you are uncertain/flexible, they are not
known to be very patient. There is usually a discreet Information Desk
somewhere if you need to enquire about tickets. Passport need to be
shown when purchasing ticket, and will be checked by conductor.
•
Travelling by train: There are several types of ticket. The cheapest is
‘seat only’ but this is only for daytime travel. For overnight travel there
is a choice between “kupe” (compartment) which provide you a bed in a
closed compartment with three other passengers and platzkart tickets
(economy class) which provide you a bed in an open carriage with about
twenty-five other passengers.
•
Roads out of Moscow get notably worse the further away from the
centre but they are not too bad. These are generally motorways. In
Provincial Areas roads generally tend to be bad, uneven with potholes.
•
Travel within provincial areas: It is unlikely there will be a metro so
trolleybuses and “marshrutka” will have to be used.
101
•
Trolleybuses: 28 rouble. These can be difficult for the foreigner to use.
If no knowledge of Russian write place name on a sheet of paper and
show to driver. Stops are sometimes called over intercom, but not
usually.
•
Marshrutka (public mini-bus taxi): 25-28 rouble which you hand to the
driver on entry. You must tell the driver to stop when approaching your
stop. Very inaccessible for foreigners.
•
Taxis: In provincial areas there are surprisingly more official taxis than
unofficial taxis. Official taxis can usually be found at train station, or
can be hailed from street. ‘Unofficial’ taxis (private cars) are hailed
from street but are probably best avoided, or use in groups. Always
negotiate price before entering (official and non official) – usually
between 200-400 roubles. It is never necessary to pay more than 1000
roubles.
Standards of Accommodation (urban vs. rural)
•
Regardless of accommodation it is necessary to register on arrival. It is by far
the easiest option to let hotel/guest house do this for you for a fee of 500 roubles
(€13). You will need to give passport to receptionist for a few hours.
•
It is commonplace that the tap-water is not drinkable
•
In Moscow:
•
Hotels: These are generally very expensive. A 3-star usually ranges €80150/room/night, depending how close to centre. The standard of
accommodation is pretty average.
•
Guest House/ Hostel: This is either an established tourist hostel or could be in a
‘student residence’. Tourist hostel especially in centre can be reasonable- €1025/night. Basic, but facilities usually good. A student residence is usually
€10/night but entails shared facilities and is likely of bad quality.
•
In Provincial Areas:
•
Hotels: These are generally very reasonably priced and accommodation most
likely pretty standard.
•
Hostels/ guest house: Tourist Hostel or ‘Halls of Residence’ (as above)
102
Local customs/ norms/ greetings
•
In Moscow people are less forthcoming. ‘Small talk’ with strangers is unusual
although people can often be curious if hear English being spoken and may start
conversation.
•
Very little English is spoken except for some restaurants
•
In Provinces virtually no English is spoken, not even in restaurants (although
some places may have an English menu)
•
People are generally friendlier than in Moscow and are especially curious if
they find out you are foreign. Once or twice encountered racist remarks but
people are usually accepting.
•
Some Russians are very superstitious and it is generally expected that you
observe customs (There are too many superstitions to enumerate but you will be
told as you go along!)
•
It is generally seen as rude to refuse something (especially in the way of food
and drink) although sometimes you need to draw the line. A Russian
host/hostess will keep on treating you until you say no!
•
There is a huge culture of alcohol in Russia. It is officially banned to drink beer
on the streets, however this is never observed. In provinces especially it is
standard to see men drinking on streets, in buses, on the way to work and at any
time of day. Beer (sometimes vodka) can be bought at any kiosk or shop.
•
It is not uncommon to drink vodka with meals or with guests. Drinking is a
ceremonious procedure and there are hundreds of drinking customs. Few
examples: drinking is always accompanied with toasts. If someone pours a
drink for himself it is tradition to pour drink for drinking partner too (never
drink alone!) There are often calls to drink ‘to my leaving’ when someone is
leaving.
103
For example, useful words the same as English
words:
Language
Кафе
Cafe
Кофе
Coffee
Банкto the Latin Bank
The Cyrillic alphabet is not too dissimilar
alphabet, and can be learned
Ресторан
Restaurant
quite quickly. Learning the alphabet makes
life much easier,
as there are many English
words that have been absorbed into Russian
Метро and beingMetro
able to pronounce them will
make orientating yourself and finding aАвтобус
bank/ cafe/ internet
Bus access much easier.
•
Такси
Taxi
Интернет
Internet
Сэндвич
Sandwich
Some useful words/ phrases:
o Hello
Привет (preeviet)
o My name is...
Меня зовут... (meenya zovut...)
o I am...
Я... (Ya...)
o Nice to meet you
Очень приятно (otchen priyatno)
o Please
Пожалуйста (pozhaloosta)
o Thank you
Спасибо (spasiba)
o Excuse me/ Sorry
Извените (izvenitye)
o Where is...?
Где...? (gdye...)
o How much is this?
Сколько стоит? (Skolko stoeet?)
o ATM
Банкомат (Bankomat)
o Pharmacy
Аптека
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(Aptieka)
o Currency exchange
Овмен валюты (obmien valyuti)
Money (the information on currency conversion is from 2011-2012 and there may
be some discrepancies):
•
The currency is the Russian rouble (рубль), currently valued at roughly €0.02c,
or €1 = 41.95 RUB. Therefore 10 RUB= €0.25, roughly. There are 100 kopeks
in a rouble.
o There are 1 kopek, 2 kopek, 5 kopek, 10 kopek coins, but they are worth
so little that shops sometimes do not accept them as legal tender.
o There used to be a 10 rouble note, but that is being phased out and a coin
brought in. You may find yourself with both the notes and the coins.
o With 1000 and 5000 rouble notes (€25 and €125, respectively) make
sure to check the hologram as there are quite a few fake notes in
circulation.
•
Not everywhere accepts laser cards/ credit cards, even in many restaurants and
bars, so it is necessary to have cash at all times. There are ATMs everywhere.
o Some places do not accept large notes (1000 and 5000 rouble notes) on
the bases that they cannot/ do not want to give you change. It is easier to
break them in large supermarkets or banks.
o When buying items in shops it is not uncommon for the person at the till
to demand exact change.
o You can exchange euro in all banks.
§
Raiffeisen Bank (Райффайзен Банк) is particularly foreignerfriendly and they usually have English-speaking clerks available.
There are many all over Moscow and St. Petersburg.
•
Moscow is more expensive than the rest of the country, and within Moscow
there is a large range of prices depending on what type of establishment it is.
o Sample prices:
105
§
Metro ticket: 27 RUB (€0.60)
§
Litre of milk: 30 RUB (€0.75)
§
Loaf of bread: 30 RUB (€0.75)
§
Pint of beer in a bar or club: 80 – 150 RUB (€2.00 - €3.75)
§
“Business lunch” (set menu lunch) in an average cafe: 150 – 300
RUB (€3.75 - €7.50)
Academic Standards:
•
Don’t expect the same kind of academic standard in the Institute that you are
used to from Trinity. The Russian education system is very different, and is
more similar to our school system than to university. You’ll need to write one
extended essay for the year, on a topic of your choosing, and the rest of your
exams will be specially organised for you and anyone else on Erasmus with
you. You do NOT need to sit the equivalent of Trinity exams in Russian, so
don’t panic!
Minor Language:
•
If you are interested in keeping up your second language while away, ask the
foreign languages department in the Gorky Institute if they can accommodate
you. They have a sporadic timetable of French, German and Italian classes, and
if at all possible they will be more than happy to welcome you into their classes.
Websites:
For general travel information (good for almost everything- trains, visas,
customs...):
www.waytorussia.net
Russian politics, economics, society:
www.russiaprofile.org
Travel trips and blogs:
106
www.lonelyplanet.com 5.6 SPAIN
Please note that Spanish language, minor language, and other language courses do
not count towards your total number of ECTS credits. You should always email
your study program to your TCD coordinator in the Department of Hispanic
Studies for approval before registering for courses (see the General Introduction
in the ES Year Abroad Handbook). Remember that you must enroll in a Spanish
Language course (a year-long course or two semester courses) and that it is
COMPULSORY: it does not count for ECTS credits but you must bring back a
certificate of attendance and a grade mark.
SEVILLA: Universidad de Sevilla (Departamento de Historia Contemporánea)
Address: C/. Dña. María de Padilla, s/n., 41004 Sevilla.
Website: http://www.us.es
TCD Coordinator: Dr Susana Bayó Belenguer (Department of Hispanic Studies)
Tel 896 3496; e-mail: [email protected]
Sevilla Coordinator: Dr Julio Ponce Alberca
Departamento de Historia Contemporánea,
Facultad de Geografia e Historia Tel: 00 34 95 455 14 10
Fax: 00 34 95 455 13 51; e-mail: [email protected]
107
Other contact persons are:
History: Secretaría de Historia Contemporánea: [email protected]
Sociology: Dr Lina Gavira, Departamento de Sociologia y Trabajo Social,
Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación, Avda. Ciudad Jardín 20-22; Tel: 00 3495 455 17
51 (or 00 34 95 448 60 30 or 00 34 95 455 17 64).
Economics (Vice-Dean of the Faculty) Professor Luis Palma Martos,
Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Avda. Ramón y Cajal s/n.
Tel: 00 34 9 463 51 50.
Oficina de Relaciones Internacionales: Ms M. Victoria Camarillo Naranjo;
[email protected]; Tel: 00 34 954 55 10 51; c/ San Fernando, 4 C.P. 41004
Academic year: In 2014-2015 we expect the terms to run from approximately the
beginning of the third week of September to early third week of December and from 13
January to 31 May. Exams will be held a) between mid-January and mid-February; b)
from May to June. Please note that exams are not as rigidly timetabled as at TCD
(Students MUST consult each lecturer about the dates).
108
Travel: Fly directly to Sevilla with Aer Lingus or Ryanair; alternatively, fly to Madrid
with Iberia and then travel by AVE train to Sevilla, or via London to Seville with
Iberia; you can also fly via London or Liverpool with Ryanair.
Accommodation: Finding accommodation in Sevilla has become problematic, as
student numbers have considerably increased in the past few years.
Arrange your accommodation in August or by early September at the very latest.
And never leave your arrival in Spain until close to the start of the teaching term.
SADUS (situated near the University in the Pabellón de Uruguay; www.sadus.us)
provides you with a list of apartments to suit your chosen location, price range and any
other requirements you may have. Alternatively, for a fee and with a guarantee,
(generally around €50 Euro) there are numerous private agencies (such as Roomates in
c/Nardo, 8-10; www.roomates-sevilla.com) that can find an apartment for you.
Cambalache newspaper is a good source of information – it is published on Monday,
Wednesday and Friday but remember to buy it from any newsstand early in the
morning as flats are rented out very quickly. You can also find an apartment from the
numerous signs both in and around the various university faculties. Monthly rents vary
from €180 to €400. Always inquire if rent includes costs for water, electricity, etc.
(usually running costs are included in the rent but always ask). It is cheaper in the long
run to pay extra for a well-equipped apartment that provides a washing machine
(laundrettes are expensive), air-conditioning (a must) and, if possible, central heating.
109
Registration:
1. Sevilla has introduced an online pre-registration system – all students must fill in
the online form as soon as possible in early summer. If you encounter any
difficulties, contact the TCD Socrates coordinator immediately. Remember that unless
you fill in the online form you will have endless delays in registering when you arrive
in Sevilla. You should print the form and get it signed by the ISA Office in TCD
before posting it to Sevilla ISA Office. You should receive a package from the host
University with information about welcoming meetings – you should attend all
introductory meetings since they will provide you with useful information – Sevilla
functions very differently from TCD and students will find the system rather slow at
the beginning.
You will be required to send a provisional Learning Agreement – your choices at this
stage are not set in stone and on arrival you may have to adapt them to allow for
timetable clashes or administrative changes. And, as Sevilla offers students three weeks
to audit courses, you can amend your Learning Agreement at any stage during these
three weeks and you can do the same at the beginning of the second term.
2. The best thing to do on arrival is to go and see the Sevilla Socrates coordinator, Dr
Julio Ponce (History Department). He will explain the registration steps and show you
110
where to go next. Alternatively, the International Student Office will explain the
registration steps and take from you all the documentation you need to give them: a
photocopy of your passport, 2 passport photos, the letter from Trinity confirming
your Erasmus status and a photocopy of your European Health Card (E-128/E111).
3. Class listings and timetables are available from the Copistería, and maps from the
Consejería. You must buy FICHAS (ID cards for each class) from the Copistería;
complete personal information details, and attach photo, then give one to the professor
of each class you take.
4. Go back to see Dr Julio Ponce -- he must sign your registration forms for other
subjects and he will explain the local regulations of subject choices and time-tabling
systems, etc. Once you have decided on a program you must e-mail your TCD
coordinator for final approval of choices. You must then register your course of
study with the Oficina de Geografia e Historia in Sevilla. You will be provided with an
official list of your classes, which you take to the bank to be stamped on payment of a
small registration fee and return to the History Department in Sevilla.
5. Then you must get the Learning Agreement signed by your coordinator and the
coordinator of any other department/faculty in which you are taking classes and post it
to your Socrates coordinator in TCD. Remember to give the ‘ficha’ with your
photograph and personal details to each one of your lecturers.
111
6. Once registration is complete you will receive your permanent student card in your
department office.
Courses: Although you can select courses from any Faculty it is advisable to keep
close to your degree program (Geography, History, Politics, Sociology, etc.). This
exchange is with the Department of Contemporary History in the Faculty of Geography
and History, and with the Department of Sociology and the Faculty of Economics and
Business Studies. Students have to take 4 one year long courses or the equivalent of 8
semester-long courses at third or fourth year level (this equates approximately to 45-60
ECTS credits). If you wish to take a course at second year level you must get approval
from the TCD Socrates coordinator.
The curriculum may vary from year to year: History: History of Contemporary Spain
(compulsory for all ES students), History of the United States, Spanish Political
Parties and Ideologies; Modern Spanish Political Institutions; Modern Political
Thought; Social Movements; History of Contemporary Culture; Spanish Society in the
Ancien Régime. Sociology: Public Opinion; Sociology of Gender and Age Groups;
Business and Labour before the New Century. Economics: The Economics of Urban
Society; Transport and Construction; Economic History of Contemporary Andalucía;
Regional and Urban Economy. Filología: El relato hispanoamericano, Tendencias
actuales de la poesía hispanoamericana, Historia del cine, etc.
112
Language courses are available at the Instituto de Idiomas (Palos de la Frontera, s/n,
41004 SEVILLA, Tel: 455 1156 or 455 11 55). Placement on courses is following
assessment. Courses in minor languages are also available and free. Apply as early as
possible as places fill up very quickly. Alternatively, the Department of English
Language and Literature of the University (same address as History) offers advanced
Spanish-English translation courses – but you must take the course for the entire year.
To register for Spanish and other language courses, fill in the form for the Instituto de
Idiomas (take the 34/35 bus from in front of the University to Avda. Reina Mercedes)
and get it signed by your Socrates coordinator; enclose a photocopy of your passport,
your Sevilla student-card and one passport photograph. This must be done before the
deadlines at the beginning of each semester. At the beginning of each semester there is
a Spanish language exam to test your level and to assign classes. Remember that you
must enroll in a Spanish Language course (a year-long course or two semester courses)
and that it is COMPULSORY: it does not count for ECTS credits but you must bring
back a certificate of attendance and a grade mark.
Arrival: The Extensión Universitaria provides addresses of long-term and short-term
accommodation (avoid Hostal Nuevo Suizo) to students on arrival but reports suggest
that reading advertisements around the university buildings is a much more effective
way of finding accommodation. All students urge sharing with Spanish students as the
very best way to live. You can expect to pay approximately €150-350 per month.
You’ll find two student cafés opposite the main entrance to the university, and there are
numerous good-value restaurants in Seville. Integration into the Spanish way of life is
possible, especially if you share accommodation with Spanish students. Recommended
113
neighbourhoods: Los Remedios; Centro; Triana; Santa Cruz (avoid Macarena district).
The student residence ‘Rector Ramon Carande’ seems to be a well-kept secret! Seek
information on it from the Extension Universitaria.
Eating: Most faculties have canteens which serve a full meal for about €5-9.
Supermarkets are cheap. Sevilla also has numerous restaurants serving a fairly
inexpensive ‘Menu del Día’ for generally €7-10. Calle San Eloy has numerous cheap
restaurants: La Cigala de Oro is recommended for fish. Eslava Tapas Bar is more
pricey but worth a visit. La Carbonera with traditional music and dancing is popular
with students.
Study: The library system is different from the one at TCD and there are fewer books.
Each department has its own departmental library with different opening hours. Free
wireless internet in the main library. There is a good public library beside the Pabellón
de Uruguay with computers and internet access. Students are advised to be in contact
with Dr Ponce prior to arrival for a provisional list of the wide range of courses.
Work: With unemployment running quite high in Spain the chances of finding parttime work are minimal.
Social Life: Socializing in Sevilla should not be a problem. Night-clubs are not popular
amongst Spanish students; most people loiter around the numerous plazas before
moving on to the hundreds of bars, including Feria, O’Neill’s and Flaherty’s Irish pubs
(pricey by comparison with tapas bars) in Sevilla. Plaza de Alfafa is a very popular
spot, as is Calle Betis. There are many nightclubs, including Boss and Elephunk. The
Erasmus Students network organizes a night out every Wednesday. Cinema is cheap
and popular, with the Avenida cinema showing films in the original version and there is
114
a good English language cinema near Plaza de Armas. Inter-faculty sporting
competitions are a big feature of university life in Sevilla, and a great way of meeting
people. The main sports centre is in Los Bermejales, bus 34. The swimming pool
facilities are good and membership is available.
Miscellaneous: Cycling can be hazardous enough. Good city bus service and 10journey ticket for €7.50 -- it is available from pavement kiosks and automated
machines. Taxis are cheap.
Climate in Sevilla: Daytime winter temperatures are pleasant, but it becomes quite
cold at night, and central heating is not standard. A duvet is a must and a hot water
bottle, and an umbrella is highly recommended.
Traveling: The opportunities for travel are obvious, with Lisbon, Madrid, Barcelona,
Granada, and even Gibraltar or Morocco only around the corner! Other places to visit
are Cádiz, Ronda and Córdoba. Trains and buses are quite efficient and not too
expensive. Ask for information about ‘blue’ days travel when fares are cheaper.
SALAMANCA
Please note that Spanish language, minor language, and other language courses do
not count towards your total number of ECTS credits. You should always send
your study program to your TCD coordinator for approval before registering for
courses (see ES Year Abroad Handbook general introduction). Remember that
you must enroll in a Spanish Language course (a year-long course or two semester
courses) and that it is COMPULSORY: it does not count for ECTS credits but
you must bring back a certificate of attendance and a grade mark.
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Universidad de Salamanca (Departamento de Geografía e Historia)
Address: C/ Cervantes s/n, 37008 Salamanca. Tel. 00 34 923 394448; Website:
http://www.usal.es
TCD Co-ordinator: Dr Susana Bayó Belenguer (Department of Hispanic Studies);
Tel. 00 353 1 896 3496; e-mail: [email protected]
Salamanca Co-ordinator: Ms Izascun Álvarez Cuartero (e-mail: [email protected])
Facultad de Geografía e Historia (C/ Cervantes s/n)
Other contacts:
International Student Affairs
(Servicio de Relaciones Internacionales); address: C/ Cardenal Plá y Daniel, 21
Registration
Salamanca has introduced an online pre-registration system – all students must fill in
the online form as soon as possible in the summer. If you encounter any difficulties,
contact the TCD Socrates coordinator immediately. Remember that unless you fill in
the online form you will have endless delays in registering when you arrive in
Salamanca. You should print the form and get it signed by the ISA Office in TCD
before posting it to Salamanca ISA Office. You should receive a package from the host
University with information about welcoming meetings – you should attend all
introductory meetings since they will provide you with useful information.
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You will be required to send a provisional Learning Agreement – your choices at this
stage are not set in stone and on arrival you may have to adapt them to allow for
timetable clashes or administrative changes. And, as Sevilla offers students three weeks
to audit courses, you can amend your Learning Agreement at any stage during these
three weeks and you can do the same at the beginning of the second term.
Academic year
Traditionally a term structure but in practice semesterized. In 2014–2015 we expect the
terms to run from early September to Christmas and from late January/ early February
to the end of May. Final dates are not yet available as there major changes this year.
(Details will later be posted on the website http://fgh.usal.es). Exams are held a) in
January/February, and b) from May to June. Please note that exams are not as rigidly
timetabled as at TCD (Students MUST consult each lecturer about the dates).
It's worth noting that the exams for the second semester can run the whole month of
June into the first week of July and so students shouldn't assume they only need
accommodation until June. As is mentioned however the exams aren't rigidly
timetabled and if you explain to a lecturer that you must leave Seville by a certain date
it may be possible to arrange an alternative exam (Some lecturers scheduled exam dates
specifically for foreign students who needed to return home).
The library system is different from the one at TCD. However, Salamanca has one of
the best University libraries in Spain. The University libraries are open from 09.0021.00; there is an excellent public library in ‘La Casa de las Conchas’ with computers
and web access: Biblioteca Santa María de los Ángeles, C/ Libreros s/n, 37008
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Salamanca. Salamanca has also the Archives of the Spanish Civil War – this is
wonderful resource for any student interested in doing a dissertation on the topic.
Accommodation
Salamanca is a small city, but it has ample accommodation for students in residences,
with families, in shared flats, etc. It is therefore easy to find somewhere to live in a
matter of days. However, you should ensure that you look for your accommodation in
early September or if possible in August. SOU (Oficina de Orientación al
Universitario); Address: c/. Traviesa, 3-7, 1ª planta, C.P. 37008 Salamanca. Tel. 00 34
923 394648; Fax: 00 34 923 294717; e-mail: [email protected] Web: http://websou.usal.es)
provides you with a list of apartments to suit your chosen location, price range and any
other requirements you may have. Alternatively, for a fee and with a guarantee, there
are numerous private agencies that can find an apartment for you. You can also find an
apartment from the numerous signs both in and around the various university faculties
and through the local newspapers.
Roommates Sevilla are a good accommodation agency and pleasant and professional to
deal with, though you will find you pay higher rents than if you do not go through an
agency. Their website address is roommatesevilla.com and last year their office moved
around the corner to Plaza de los Curtidores No.3. easypiso.com is a website similar to
craigslist and many students seemed to have found their accommodation through them.
Reiterating that air conditioning is essential.
Try to live in the centre/Santa Cruz area. Everything will be reachable by foot from
there. Avoid Nervión, it's a bit far from the university/ most places of interest etc.
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The International Relations Office does not arrange accommodation; the students
themselves must arrange this according to their preferences. The Office does, however,
provide some information and recommendations.
Before arriving:
Flights: Only Ryanair fly directly to Seville (2x per week) and the flights do not run
between the end of October and the middle of March. Ryanair and Aer Lingus fly to
Málaga (3 hours away approx. by train and much cheaper to travel to and from than
Madrid) all year round.
Arrange your accommodation in August or by early September at the very latest.
And never leave your arrival in Spain until close to the start of the teaching term.
Students who wish to reserve accommodation before their arrival can arrange this by
visiting the web site of the Servicio de Orientación al Universitario (Student Guidance
Service): http://websou.usal.es/vivienda/index.htm Students who wish to stay at a
university residence hall can consult the following website: http://www.usal.es/residen/
or contact the addresses and telephone numbers given below. The period for booking
places ends in the first week of July every year. If temporary accommodation is
required for the first few nights, the International Relations Office will provide, on
request, a list of hotels, boarding houses, hostels, etc. If you prefer to stay at the city
Youth Hostel, its address is as follows: ‘Alberge Juvenil Salamanca’, c/ Escoto, 13-15;
37008 Salamanca. Tel. 00 34 923 269141; e-mail: [email protected] Web:
http://mmteam.disbumad.es/empresas/hiperocio.
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Registration
1.
The best thing to do on arrival is to go see the Salamanca Socrates coordinator,
Ms Izascun Álvarez Cuartero (History of Art). She will explain the registration steps
and will help you with matters related to your enrolment and choice of courses.
Alternatively, the International Student Office will explain the registration steps and
take from you all the documentation you need to give them: a photocopy of your
passport, 2 passport photos, the letter from Trinity confirming your Erasmus
status and a photocopy of your European Health Card (E-128/E-111).
2.
You must attend a Socrates information meeting: the first one will take place in
mid-September at the Faculty of Sciences. (Salón de Actos), Plaza de los Caídos s/n.
There, you need to complete an “Attendance Form”, and will be given practical
information on the steps to follow in order to attend the University of Salamanca. You
must then go to the International Relations Office (opens from Monday to Friday
09.00-14.00).
3.
Then go to the Administration Office of the Socrates Centre in the History
Department to hand in your papers and fill in the enrolment forms that you will be
given together with the syllabus. Once you have enrolled you will be given the
counterfoil. There they will also be able to give you any other forms you may need.
You must report any change of address or telephone number during your stay at
Salamanca University at the Administration Office.
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4.
With the counterfoil of the enrolment form you must go to the International
Relations Office for them to issue you with a University of Salamanca Student Card.
5.
Once you have finalized your choices you must get the Learning Agreement
signed by your Salamanca coordinator and the coordinator of any other department in
which you are taking classes and then post it to your Socrates coordinator in TCD.
6.
If you are going to stay in Spain continuously for longer than 90 days (more
than three months), the law obliges you to have a Residency Card from the Police
Station (C/ Ronda Sancti Spiritus, 8-10, 37001 Salamanca. Tel. 00 34 923 127726).
Besides filling in the appropriate form you must also take the following documents:
·
Counterfoil of the enrolment from the University of Salamanca and a photocopy
of the same.
·
Valid ID (passport) and TWO photocopies of the same.
·
Medical Insurance (E-128 / E-111)
·
3 passport-size photographs
·
A document that proves your economic solvency (a certificate from your bank,
a copy of the bank account into which the grant will be paid, etc.)
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Courses
Although the exchange is with the Department of Contemporary History in the Faculty
of Geography and History, students are free to attend a certain number of courses in
other Faculties. Students have to take four yearlong courses or the equivalent of 8
semester-long courses at third or fourth year level – if there is a course you wish to do
at second year level get approval from the TCD Socrates coordinator. Your study
program should equate to approximately 45-60 ECTS credits.
Although the curriculum varies from year to year, courses in offer include: History:
Historia contemporánea de España (1808-1939) (compulsory for ES); Historia de
España de 1939 a nuestros días; Historia social y económica de América Latina;
Participación Americana en la Guerra Civil Española; Sociedad y movimientos sociales
en la España Moderna; Población, familia y sociedad en la España Moderna; Sociedad
y conflicto en España de la 2nd República al 1er Franquismo; Formación histórica de la
Europa comunitaria; Historia del cine español.
Sociology: Sociología urbana; Sociología de la opinión pública; Economía política;
Estructura social de España; Sociología política; Sociología de las Relaciones
Internacionales.
Language courses:
The University of Salamanca offers an intensive course in Spanish for two hours a day
for three weeks to all Socrates students and you should attend this course. Places are
limited to approximately 150 per course and each student can only take one course.
Once the students have enrolled, a placement test is administered in order to organize
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the different groups according to level. These courses are free and the student need only
pay approximately €50 for books and learning materials. At the end of the course each
student who has attended at least 90% of the classes will receive a certificate. Students
must register for these courses when filling in the “Arrival Card”, either at the
Information Meeting or at the Salamanca International Relations Office. Pre-inscription
will only become effective when you have enrolled in the course in the International
Courses Office: Universidad de Salamanca; c/ Patio de Escuelas Menores s/n; 37008
Salamanca; Tel: 00 34 92 3294418; e-mail: [email protected]; special enrolment
conditions are offered for students who wish to take more hours than those already
established. However, you must also enroll in a translation course from English into
Spanish and Spanish into English (taught in the Facultad de Traducción) and get the
certificate of attendance and grade mark at the end of the academic year. Although this
course is COMPULSORY it does not count for ECTSs.
The registration process for classes, while not too complicated, can be maddening, and
you may need to return to the same office numerous times, remain patient! Ask for
directions with a receptionist if you need to go see Julio Ponce as his office is difficult
to find.
In theory you can take courses from any faculty however: the University of Seville has
a number of campuses around the city and it may be difficult to go between faculties
that are far from each other AND you may only take a maximum of 3 courses from
outside the faculty of geography and history during the entire year, and your minor
language course will be one of them. It is likely you will mostly study history. Historia
de la America Moderna is very interesting and Art History courses are worth looking at
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too. Lecturers are generally very friendly and will be more helpful if you introduce
yourself to them early on.
Survival
Salamanca University has five canteens which serve a full meal for about €7-10. There
are also numerous restaurants, bars, cafes and pubs serving fairly inexpensive menus.
It is said that the cities in Spain with better night life are Santiago, Salamanca and
Granada. Usually students go out just at weekends. Salamanca is full of good places so
it is really a problem to advise you about this. If you like rock, punk, and the latest in
modern music you will enjoy the following places: ‘La Iguana’, ‘Paniagua’, ‘El
Contrastes’, ‘El Potenkim’.
Winters tend to be long, with minimum temperatures averaging around 6°C (42.8°F),
while the summers are marked by average highs that rarely climb above 24°C (71°F). It
is recommended that you take warm clothing and an umbrella.
There are ample opportunities to travel to Madrid, Avila, Segovia, Valladolid, Zamora,
Burgos, León by bus and train.
Seville actually has great cycling infrastructure and bikes are a good way to get around.
Membership of the Sevici city bikes scheme costs €30 for the year and you can borrow
bikes from the many stations around the city, journeys of less than 30 minutes are free.
(website en.sevici.es) Secondhand bikes are also easy to find, however, always lock
your bike securely as theft happens.
Make use of the many long weekends created by bank holidays and holy days and
travel! Flights to and from Marrakech in Morroco are very cheap with Ryanair.
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Shopping: Almost all shops except for small convenience stores are closed on
Sundays, there are some pharmacies that remain open on Sundays, you can check in
their windows for a sign which will tell you. Many supermarkets/grocers etc. observe
the siesta and close between 2 and 5 during the day. University offices follow similar
limited opening hours.
Stamps can be bought in estancos (tobacconists) which have maroon and yellow signs.
ALCALÁ DE HENARES
Please note that Spanish, minor language, and other language courses do not
count towards your total number of ECTS. You should always send your study
program to your TCD coordinator for approval before registering for courses (see
ES Year Abroad Handbook general introduction). Remember that you must
enroll in a Spanish Language course (a year-long course or two semester courses)
and that it is COMPULSORY: it does not count for ECTS credits but you must
bring back a certificate of attendance and a grade mark.
Universidad de Alcalá de Henares:
Address: Plaza de San Diego s/n, 28801 Madrid
Tel. 00 34918854000; Website: http://www.uah.es
TCD Co-ordinator: Dr Susana Bayó Belenguer (Department of Hispanic Studies)
Tel. 00 353 1 896 3496; e-mail: [email protected]
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Alcalá Erasmus Co-ordinator: Dr Luisa Juárez; Facultad de Filología y Letras (C/
Cervantes s/n); Tel. 00 34 918854432; Email: [email protected]
Other contacts:
History Department:
Dr Rita Ríos de la Llave
Tel.: 00 34 918854469. Email: [email protected]
International Student Affairs (Servicio de Relaciones Internacionales).
Address: C/ Colegio de San Ildefonso, Plaza de San Diego s/n, 28801
Erasmus Students’ Contact Office:
Ms Beatriz Avila; Mr César Hallström
Tel.: 0034 918854088; Fax: 00 34 918854130
Email: [email protected]; [email protected]
Registration
All students must fill in the online form as soon as possible in the summer as the
university applies strict deadlines. If you encounter any difficulties, contact the TCD
Socrates coordinator immediately. Remember that unless you fill in the online form
you will have endless delays in registering when you arrive in Alcalá. You should
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print the form and get it signed by the ISA Office in TCD before sending it to
Alcalá ISA Office.
You will be required to send a provisional Learning Agreement – your choices at this
stage are not set in stone and on arrival you may have to adapt them to allow for
timetable clashes or administrative changes. And, as Sevilla offers students three weeks
to audit courses, you can amend your Learning Agreement at any stage during these
three weeks and you can do the same at the beginning of the second term.
Arrange your accommodation in August or by early September at the very latest.
And never leave your arrival in Spain until close to the start of the teaching term.
Academic year
Traditionally a term structure but in practice semesterized. In 2014-2015 we expect the
teaching terms to run from early/mid-September to the end of January and from midFebruary to the end of June (Christmas break 22 Dec-8 Jan). Exams are held a) in
January/February; b) from May to June. Please note that exams are not as rigidly
timetabled as at TCD (Students MUST consult each lecturer about the dates).
You must first go to the International Relations Office in order to arrange the
registration process. Students must present the following documentation:
1. A letter from your Home University stating the period of the scholarship, duly
signed and stamped by the coordinator of the Home University.
2. European health insurance or any private insurance, a copy of valid passport or
identity card (for EU students), and three passport photographs.
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Once the registration is completed students are issued with the Student Card for the
University of Alcalá, which allows access to all the different services offered by the
University (sports, access to computers, library, etc.).
Academic enrolment: when you have finished the registration, you must go to the
Erasmus Office
at your Faculty. There you will receive a brochure with all the subjects and timetable
information
The student will be advised on the enrolment process. In some case the student can
schedule an appointment with his/her coordinator to solve any question about the
courses he/she is going to study at the University of Álcalá. The Academic enrolment
will be carried out at the Faculty Erasmus Office.
Orientation Week: The International Office organizes an orientation in early
September. It includes a guided tour of Alcalá, a free excursion to another town close to
Madrid, a ‘Spanish Buffet, which will be attended by our Vice-Rector. Some
introductory talks will also be held.
Library: The library system is different from the one at TCD. However, Alcalá has
one of the best University libraries in Spain. The University libraries are open from
09.00-21.00. Alcalá has also the Archives of the Franco era (Archivo General de la
Administración, 1939-1975) – this is a wonderful resource for any student
interested in doing a dissertation on the topic.
Accommodation: Alcalá is a small city, but it has ample accommodation for students
in residences, in shared flats, etc. It is therefore easy to find somewhere to live in a
matter of days. However, you should ensure that you look for your accommodation as
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early as possible: never leave your arrival until close to the start of the teaching
term – you should aim to arrive at the end of August or early September. Useful
addresses: CRUSA (University Residences); address: Carretera de Madrid-Barcelona
km 33.600, C.P. 28805 Alcalá. Information Tel. 00 34 91 8809895; e-mail: in[email protected]; Web: http://www.cru-sa.es); Hall of Residence “Gran Cisneros”; address: Av.
de los Jesuitas, 34, C.P. 28805 Alcalá; Tel: 00 34 60 5979960; e-mail:
[email protected]; Web address: http://ceges.cardenalcisneros.com;
Residencia Universitaria (RESA); addres: Campo Universitario de Alcalá, Parcela
R.1, C.P. 28805 Alcalá. Tel: 00 34 90 2444447; e-mail: [email protected]; Web address:
http://www.resa.es.
The International Office will also provide you with a list of apartments to suit your
chosen location, price range and any other requirements you may have (prices for
shared apartments range from 200 to 300 Euro per month).
Academic Courses
The exchange is with the Faculty of Letters but students are free to attend courses in all
the faculties. Students have to take four yearlong courses or the equivalent of 8
semester-long courses at third or fourth year level – if there is a course you wish to do
at second year level get approval from the TCD Socrates coordinator. Your study
program should equate to approximately 45-60 ECTS credits.
Although the curriculum varies from year to year, courses in offer include: Historia
contemporánea de España (compulsory for ES); Historia del mundo actual; Historia de
América; Historia de la ciencia y cultura contemporánea, Historia de la iglesia en la
Edad Moderna, Historia de Iberoamerica.
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Language courses
The University of Alcalá offers a Spanish language intensive course (40 hours – from
3rd to 17th September). All Socrates students should attend this course. Places are
limited so it is very important that you complete the ‘Language Application Form’ and
return it to the International Office by 1st May 2013. You must also enroll in a
translation course from English into Spanish or in an advanced grammar course and
you need to bring back the certificate of attendance and the grade mark obtained.
Although this course is COMPULSORY it does not count for ECTs.
General Information
The origins of Alcalá go back to the foundation of the Roman town Complutum. Over
the four centuries of its existence, Complutum attained a splendour and importance
which it would retain throughout the period of the Visigoths and Moors. The Christian
Reconquest brought with it another rebuilding on what was to be the city's definitive
site in the environs of what is today the Magistral Cathedral. Nevertheless, it wasn't
until the end of the fifteenth century that the city would enter another period of
splendour. In 1499, the city experienced a renewed period of splendour when Cardinal
Cisneros founded the University.
Another event that marked Alcalá's history was the birth of Miguel de Cervantes, writer
of El Quijote. Other illustrious figures in the fields of culture or politics were Juan
Ruiz, Arcipreste de Hita, Catherine of Aragón, Ferdinand I of Bohemia, the architect
Pedro Gumiel, and Manuel Azaña, the first Prime Minister of the Second Republic
(1931-1933).
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Today, after the reopening of the University in 1977, the industrial expansion of the last
few decades, and UNESCO's recognition of Alcalá as a World Heritage Site, the city is
enjoying a period of growth in terms of its economy, tourism and culture.
Access to Alcalá City Campus
From Madrid by train: Commuter trains for Alcalá leave from Chamartin, Nuevos
Ministerios, Recoletos and Atocha stations (lines C1, C2 and C7). Train timetables can
be accessed on the RENFE website (there is a train to Madrid every 20 minutes).
By bus: the company Continental Auto runs buses to Alcalá from the Avenida de
América Interchange. Bus number 223 reaches the Calle Brihuega bus station.
Getting around the city
The different Faculties are in the centre of Alcalá, very close to the railway station and
the intercity bus station, so it is easy to get around on foot.
Climate: Alcalá de Henares has a dry continental climate with cold winters and hot
summers (temperatures can rise above 40ºC).
Survival: Alcalá University has several canteens which serve a full meal for about €710. There are also numerous restaurants, bars, cafes and pubs serving fairly inexpensive
menus (a standard restaurant set-menu 9 Euro; a glass of spirits or liquor in a night-club
costs 5 Euro).
Travel: There are ample opportunities to travel to the historic cities of Madrid, Avila,
Segovia, Valladolid, Salamanca, Zamora, Burgos, and León by bus and train.
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OVIEDO
Please note that Spanish language, minor language, and other language courses do
not count towards your total number of ECTS credits. You should always send
your study program to your TCD coordinator for approval before registering for
courses (see general introduction in the ES Year Abroad Handbook). Remember
that you must enroll in a Spanish Language course (a year-long course or two
semester courses) and that it is COMPULSORY: it does not count for ECTS
credits but you must bring back a certificate of attendance and a grade mark.
Universidad de Oviedo:
Oviedo Co-ordinator: Dr Álvaro Arias Cabal; email: [email protected]; Department
of Filología Hispánica, email: [email protected]; addres: Campus del Milán
Edificio Departamental, 2ª planta c/ Teniente Alfonso Martínez s/n; C.P. 33011
Oviedo; Phone: 00 34 985 10 46 24 / 00 34 985 10 46 25.
TCD Co-ordinator: Dr Susana Bayó Belenguer (Department of Hispanic Studies);
Tel. 00 353 1 896 3496; e-mail: [email protected]
Registration
Oviedo has introduced an online pre-registration system – all students must fill in the
online form as soon as possible in the summer and no later than the first fortnight
of July. If you encounter any difficulties, contact the TCD Socrates coordinator
immediately. Remember that unless you fill in the online form you will have endless
delays in registering when you arrive in Oviedo and you may not be accepted. You
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should print the form and get it signed by the International Office in TCD before
posting it to Oviedo International Office. You should receive a package from the host
University with information about orienteering meetings – you should attend all
introductory meetings since they will provide you with useful information.
Arrange your accommodation in August or by early September at the very latest.
And never leave your arrival in Spain until close to the start of the teaching term.
On arrival you must submit the following documentation to the Office of International
Relations: a) Passport (original and copy) b) Letter of presentation; c) Copy of
Registration Form; d) three passport photograph; e) European Health Insurance Card
with cover in Spain (original and copy).
Accommodation: it is relatively easy to find accommodation in Oviedo. The
International Office provides students with a list of places to rent. The Colleges and the
Halls of Residence of the University of Oviedo also offer suitable accommodation for
students. The residences are located in the Campus of Los Catalanes, in a privileged
environment with green areas near the Parque de Invierno and close to the university
sports facilities. In addition, this setting combines the impressive views to the
mountainous area of the Aramo (it is five minutes walking from the Cathedral and the
old quarter of the city). Currently, the University of Oviedo has one Student College
and two Student Halls of Residence. The Student Colleges and the Student Halls of
Residence organize and develop several activities (workshops on photography,
psychology, engraving; conferences, theatre plays, media shows, sports and traditional
celebrations).
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Contact details: José Alejo Rueda Martínez (Director); Phone: 00 34 985 10 95 11; email: [email protected] and Julio Pardo Pérez (administrative officer);
Phone: 00 34 985 10 95 11; e-mail: [email protected]
Oviedo has the ‘A-DUO’ programme – it attempts to make arrival at the University of
Oviedo as easy as possible. An international student is assigned to a Spanish student
from the same campus in order to help with the integration into the city and university
life. To enrol in the programme students must simply fill in a short form that can be
accessed on www.uniovi.es/RI/aduo to receive an email with the instructions and the
name of their helper.
Academic year
Traditionally a term structure but in practice semesterized. In 2014-2015 we expect the
academic teaching terms to run from early September to Christmas and from late
January/ early February to the end of May. Final dates are not yet available but you
should plan to travel in late August. Exams are held a) in January/February, and b)
from May to June. Please note that exams are not as rigidly timetabled as at TCD
(students MUST consult each lecturer about the dates).
Academic Courses
Although the exchange is with the Faculty of Philosophy and Letters, students are free
to attend courses in nearly all the faculties. Students have to take four yearlong courses
or the equivalent of 8 semester-long courses at third or fourth year level -- if there is a
course you wish to do at second year level get approval from the TCD Socrates
coordinator. Your study program should equate to approximately 45-60 ECTS credits.
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Although the curriculum can vary from year to year, courses in offer include: Historia
Contemporánea de España hasta 1939 (compulsory for ES); La España actual desde
1939; España y el Mundo Actual; Historia Moderna y Contemporánea de Iberoamerica;
Historial Contemporánea de Asturias; Historia de Ideas y Movimientos Sociales en el
Mundo Contemporáneo; Frontera y Sociedades en la España Medieval; Geografía de
España; Historia Social y Económica de España; Geografía Económica; Economía
Española; Teoría y estética del cine; Historia de la ciudad; Introducción a la literatura
Latinoamericana.
Language courses
The University of Oviedo offers a Spanish language courses (Campus de Humanidades
“El Milán”. La Casa de las Lenguas. C/ Teniente Alfonso Martínez s/n C.P.: 33011
Oviedo (Asturias). E-mail: [email protected]; web page:
http://lacasadelaslenguas.uniovi.es/); Tel: 00 34 98 5109664 / 00 34 98 5109666. They
have a year-long advance course in translation from English into Spanish and from
Spanish into English. The university offers special rates to Erasmus students but you
need to enroll a fortnight before the course starts (approx. 160 Euro per course) – you
can instead select two semester advance language courses in Filología Hispánica.
Remember that although the language course is COMPULSORY and it does not
count for ECTS you must bring back a grade.
General Information
Travel: Asturias Airport is located in Santiago del Monte, in the municipal district of
Castrillón, 45 km. from Oviedo and 40 km. from Gijón. There are regular flights from
Madrid, Barcelona, Tenerife, Palma de Mallorca, Málaga and Alicante. There are also
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flights to London and Paris. Regular flights are connected with a coach service to the
cities of Oviedo and Gijón.
By train: There are train stations in Oviedo, Gijón, Avilés and other Asturian rural
towns. More information on routes, services, fares, etc. available on the RENFE and
FEVE websites or see telephones listed below. Bus and taxi services available from
each station.
By coach or bus: There are several coach operators which link Asturias with other
Spanish and foreign cities. City buses and taxi services available from bus stations.
History: 400 years have passed since Fernando de Valdés Salas decided to create the
University of Oviedo in1574, being the official opening date as an academic institution
in 1608. Although the University suffered a great tragedy when the 1934 October
Revolution destroyed the Historical Building with its entire cultural and scientific
heritage, Oviedo University has retained its academic prestige in many fields.
Getting around the city: The different Faculties are in the centre of Oviedo and it is
easy to get around on foot.
Culture: The historical background of Asturias has given way to an intense cultural
tradition which is revealed by multiple manifestations: from the Asturian language and
mythology to the folklore and gastronomy (Asturias is famous for its cider – you can
visit the Cider Museum in Nava, a village near Oviedo). “The Asturian language” also
known as Bable is the traditional language spoken in Asturias: Its grammar, dictionary,
and spelling rules have been elaborated by the Academy of Asturian Language.
Asturian Art, also known as Pre-romanesque Asturian, declared World Heritage by the
UNESCO, is clearly outstanding. The Paleolithic Cave Art of the north of Spain which
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includes five exceptional Asturias Caves has also been awarded a World Heritage site.
The magnificent art collection treasured at the Bellas Artes of Asturias Museum also
deserves special mention, as it displays both the works of the most prominent Asturian
artists and of the greatest Spanish painters (El Greco, Goya, Sorolla, Picasso, Dalí).
Climate: the winter Oviedo temperature in January ranges between 4.2 and 11.7
degrees celcius on average. In the spring temperatures show average values of between
6.3 and 14.9 degrees celcius. In July the summer temperatures average 22 degrees
celcius. By the autumn temperatures fall to between 10.0 and 18.1 degrees
Travel: Galicia, Cantabria, Castilla y León can be reached very easily from Oviedo.
The region of Asturias has a total of 345 km of coastline with a great variety of
impressive beaches, coves, and cliffs. Asturias, renowned for its beautiful coastline and
its spectacular mountain ranges, has been described as a Natural Paradise.
ZARAGOZA
Please note that Spanish language, minor language, and other language courses do
not count towards your total number of ECTS. You should always send your
study program to your TCD coordinator for approval before registering for
courses (see general introduction in the ES Year Abroad Handbook). Remember
that you must enroll in a Spanish Language course (a year-long course or two
semester courses) and that it is COMPULSORY: it does not count for ECTS
credits but you must bring back a certificate of attendance and a grade mark.
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Universidad de Zaragoza: c/ Pedro Cerbuna, 12, 50009 Zaragoza; Ph: 00 34 976 76
1001; web: http://www.unizar.es
Departamento de Historia Moderna y Contemporánea (Facultad de Filosofía y
Letras): c/ Pedro Cerbuna, 12, 50009 Zaragoza; Phone: 00 34 976 76 1000 ext. 2139.
TCD Co-ordinator: Dr Susana Bayó Belenguer (Department of Hispanic Studies);
Tel. 00 353 1 896 3496; e-mail: [email protected]
Zaragoza Co-ordinator: Dr Angela Cenarro (Departament of Modern and
Contemporary History); Ph: 00 34 976 76 1000 ext. 3839; email: [email protected]
International Office: Edificio Interfacultades, 2nda planta; c/ Pedro Cerbuna, 12, C.P.
50009 Zaragoza; Phone: 00 34 97 6762052; email: [email protected]
Erasmus website: http://wzar.unizar.es/servicios/inter/infoestud.html
Travel
There are direct flights to Zaragoza through Stansted, or to Madrid or Barcelona (same
distance) and then take bus (cheap, four hour journey)/train (expensive, one and a half
hour journey)
Registration
Zaragoza has not yet introduced an online pre-registration system but this may change
for the academic year 2013-2014 – as soon as the information is received it will be
forwarded to you. You will have to register on arrival. If you encounter any difficulties,
contact the TCD Socrates coordinator immediately. You should receive a package from
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the host University with information about orienteering meetings, academic calendar –
you should attend all introductory meetings since they will provide you with useful
information.
There is no requirement to send a provisional Learning Agreement – your choices at
this stage are not set in stone and on arrival you may have to adapt them to allow for
timetable clashes or administrative changes. And, as Sevilla offers students three weeks
to audit courses, you can amend your Learning Agreement at any stage during these
three weeks and you can do the same at the beginning of the second term. Students can
choose any course from Facultad de Filosofia y Letras, optativas included. Particularly
popular modules with last year’s students were, Introducción al marketing, Historia
Contemporanea de Espana Siglo XX.
Arrange your accommodation in August or by early September at the very latest.
And never leave your arrival in Spain until close to the start of the teaching term.
Academic year
Traditionally a term structure but in practice semesterized. In 2014-2015 we expect the
teaching terms to run from mid-September to the end of January and from midFebruary to the end of June (Christmas break 22/23 Dec-7/8 Jan). Exams are held a) in
January/February; b) from May to June. Please note that exams are not as rigidly
timetabled as at TCD (Students MUST consult each lecturer about the dates).
You must first go to the International Relations Office in order to arrange the
registration process. Students must present the following documentation:
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1. A letter from your Home University stating the period of the scholarship, which
must be signed and stamped by the coordinator of the Home University.
2. European health insurance or any private insurance and copy of valid passport
or identity card (for EU students).
3. You must also submit the following documentation to the Office of
International Relations: a) three passport photographs; b) European Health
Insurance Card with cover in Spain (original and copy).
Once the registration is completed students are issued with the Student Card, which
allows access to all the different services offered by the university (sports, access to
computers, library, etc.).
Accommodation: it is relatively easy to find accommodation in Zaragoza. The
International Office provides students with a list of places to rent: CIUR Servicio de
Alojamiento: c/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, Edificio de Información; Ph: 00 34 976762318;
email: [email protected]; webpage:
http://ebro3.unizar.es:8080/alojamiento/buscar.html). There are Halls of Residence near
the university – CMU Cerbuna is de largest with full board and individual rooms; it
costs around 540 Euro per month; apartments cost between 500 and 700/per month.
The Student Halls of Residence organize several activities (theatre, music, conferences,
cinema, etc.).
Academic Courses
Students have to take four yearlong courses or the equivalent of 8 semester-long
courses at third or fourth year level – if there is a course you wish to attend at second
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year level you need to get approval from the TCD Socrates coordinator. Your study
program should equate to approximately 45-60 ECTS credits.
Although the curriculum can vary from year to year, courses in offer include: La
España Actual: Franquismo y Transición (compulsory for ES); Historia de América;
Historia de América II; Historia de Aragón; Economía para Historiadores; Historia
Contemporánea de España; Historia de los medios de comunicación; Historia de los
movimientos sociales en los siglos XIX y XX; Historia Social Moderna; La
construcción del estado contemporáneo en España; Introducción a la literatura
española; Cine español contemporáneo, etc. Zaragoza is undergoing major changes to
comply with the Bologna Agreement and therefore some courses may be replaced or
withdrawn from the programme.
Language courses
The University of Zaragoza offers Spanish language courses. You must follow an
advanced course in Spanish Language or in Translation into Spanish and remember that
the language course is COMPULSORY: it does not count for ECTS credits but you
must bring back a certificate of attendance and a grade mark.
History: the university traces its origins to the 16th century. Zaragoza, at the geographic
centre of the hexagon formed by Madrid, Valencia, Barcelona, Toulouse, Bordeaux and
Bilbao, is a key city in southeast Europe. Zaragoza is a unique place: Iberian, Roman,
Moslem, and Christian cultures have each contributed their part to making it the
beautiful and surprising city of today. Throughout its 500 years of history, those who
have passed through its doors include important figures such as Botanist and Economist
Ignacio de Asso, Doctor Santiago Ramón y Cajal (Nobel prize-winner in 1906), and
Cuban liberator José Martí. Similarly, the University has awarded its highest honour,
the Honorary Doctorate, to Luis Buñuel, Ramón J. Sender, Rigoberta Menchú, José
Antonio Labordeta or Richard Schrock.
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Getting around the city: The various Faculties are in the centre of Zaragoza and it is
easyto get around on foot or by bus.
Climate: continental Mediterranean with dry weather in the summer and winter and
rain in the spring. Temperatures can be high in the summer reaching up to 40°C but in
winter temperatures are much lower, varying between 0 and 10°C.
Transport: The AVE (High Speed railway) and long distance railway lines connect
Zaragoza with Madrid, Barcelona, and other cities in Spain and the South of France.
Entertainment: Huge Erasmus community, Erasmus organisation organises weekly
events, trips away, conversation groups etc.
©University of Dublin 2014
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