Neighborhood Watch enjoys sweet success

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Neighborhood Watch enjoys sweet success
TUESDAY
September 5, 2006
Odom’s Carpet Cleaning
This Week’s Business Review, 2
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Vol. 76, No. 210
Neighborhood Watch enjoys sweet success
By Abby Morris-Frye
STAR STAFF
[email protected]
When it comes to keeping
an eye on things, the Neighborhood Watch Program in
Rolling Hills Estates has it
covered.
According to Elizabethton
Police Department Sgt. Danny Hilbert, who is in charge
of helping residents to establish Neighborhood Watch
Programs, there are currently five organized Neighborhood Watch Programs in the
city of Elizabethton.
“Without a doubt, public
housing is the most active,”
Hilbert said.
The Neighborhood Watch
group meets monthly in
Rolling Hills Estates on Pine
Ridge Circle and members of
the group also meet regularly with Hilbert, Elizabethton
Housing and Development
Authority Director Kelly
Geagley and with EPD Cpl.
Jennifer Mayberry and Ptl.
Christopher Bowers, who
are the two officers assigned
to the police substation in
Pine Ridge.
According to Hilbert,
members of Neighborhood
Watch Programs help the police department dramatically
in the prevention of crime.
“Neighborhood Watch is
about trying to prevent
crime before it happens,” he
said, adding that the individuals in the program serve
as “the eyes and ears of the
police department.”
Hilbert stated that the residents living in a particular
community are familiar with
what goes on around them
and they can immediately
spot suspicious activity or a
suspicious person and can
contact police with that information.
Geagley stated that when
he first came to work with
EHDA he wanted to start a
Neighborhood Watch program. He stated that in October of 1995 when he took the
job, he was asked how he
would work to deter crime
and drug activity and he
stated to the Board of Directors at that time that he
wanted to implement a program which would involve
the residents working with
law enforcement.
The EHDA worked with
the EPD and secured a grant
which paid for the installation of a police substation in
Pine Ridge, which opened in
October of 1998. Following
the opening of the substation, Geagley began work to
officially start the Neighborhood Watch program. In
March of 1999, the EHDA
proudly erected signs designating Rolling Hills as a
Neighborhood Watch area.
Geagley stated that he
Photo by Hannah Bader
From left: Elizabethton Police Department Cpl. Jennifer Mayberry, EHDA Director Kelly Geagly and EPD Sgt. Danny
Hilbert stand with Nathan Morefield, Christian Miller and Shelia Morefield who are members of the Neighborhood
Watch in Rolling Hills Estates.
classifies the Neighborhood
Watch program as “being a
good neighbor” and said
that not only do the residents watch out for crime,
they also watch out for each
other by checking on the
other residents, especially
elderly residents.
He further stated that res-
idents will usually go to the
Mayberry stated that she
substation to talk to an offi- has had residents come to
cer before they would con- her on numerous occasions
sider calling 911 to report
n See WATCH, 14
something.
Judicial selection panel says it’s not trying to scold governor
NASHVILLE (AP) — State Judicial Selection Commission members say their decision
to allow two rejected Supreme Court candidates to reapply was not done to scold the
governor, but simply to give him a variety of
applicants.
Gov. Phil Bredesen rejected the first slate
of applicants because it didn’t include any
minority candidates. But last month, the
commission passed a resolution allowing former Democratic Party chairmen J. Houston
Gordon and George T. “Buck” Lewis to reapply.
The commission’s move contradicted a
state attorney general’s opinion that the same
candidates cannot be on the second panel
presented to the governor.
The committee is scheduled to hold a public hearing today to review applicants and
recommend its next slate to the governor.
Seventeen people applied by the Aug. 29
deadline.
Bredesen rejected the first panel in July after the only minority candidate, Davidson
County Chancellor Richard Dinkins, withdrew for family reasons. Bredesen told the
commission he wants the panel to “include
qualified minority candidates.”
Under the Tennessee Plan for judicial selection adopted in 1994, the governor chooses
new justices from a three-person panel compiled by the commission. If he rejects the first
panel of nominees, the governor must select
one of the nominees in the second panel.
Some questioned whether allowing rejected candidates to reapply is constitutional;
others disagreed with the attorney general.
“It’s an opinion and they’re not bound by
the opinion,” said Rep. Rob Briley, who
asked for the attorney general opinion and
says he disagrees with its conclusion.
The Nashville Democrat said when the
plan was drawn up, “the legislative intent
was to present the governor with the most
qualified individuals from which he can select judges.”
That being the case, if the governor asked
for a new panel then people who applied previously should “be sent back to the governor,” Briley said.
n See PANEL, 14
7 coalition troops
killed in Iraq
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) — Police found the tortured, blindfolded bodies of 33 men scattered across the capital Monday and the
U.S.-led coalition reported combat deaths of seven servicemen, a
day after Iraqi leaders said the capture of a top terror suspect
would reduce violence.
Iraqi soldiers also clashed with gunmen near the holy city of
Karbala during an operation to secure the area ahead of a religious festival on Saturday, leaving 14 gunmen and one soldier
dead, the prime minister’s office said.
Kidnappers also dragged off a popular soccer star in Baghdad, while a security crackdown in the city expanded into the
upscale Mansour neighborhood.
An al-Qaida-affiliated group dismissed the Iraqi government’s claim that the organization’s second most important
leader had been arrested, suggesting the man was not a senior
figure and denying the terror group had suffered a significant
blow.
On Sunday, Iraq’s national security adviser announced the arrest of Hamed Jumaa Farid al-Saeedi, also known as Abu Humam or Abu Rana, and said that had left al-Qaida in Iraq suffering a “serious leadership crisis.”
But the Mujahedeen Shura Council, an umbrella organization
of Sunni Arab extremist groups that includes al-Qaida in Iraq, issued a statement Monday saying its “leadership was in the best
condition.”
The statement did not directly deny the arrest, or say what position al-Saeedi held, although it suggested he was not the No. 2
leader.
The security adviser, Mouwafak al-Rubaie, described al-Saee-
n See TROOPS, 14
Deaths
Billy J. Campbell
Betty L. Huff
Johnson City
Elizabethton
Kyle Chambers
Ora M. Thomas
Elizabethton
Elizabethton
Jesse R. Hamm
Frankie F. Wallace
Aiken. S.C.
Johnson City
Photo by Eveleigh Hatfield
Monday night a Ford truck pulled out from Gap Creek Road heading South on 19E in front of a Nissian Altima. One
person was taken to the Johnson City Medical Center for treatment of possible injuries. The accident occurred on a
wet road, which could have been a contributing factor in the accident. Details of the wreck had not been released
by investigating officers.
Dow
Jones
+83.00
11,464.15
√ Wall Street ended an
erratic week with a big
advance Friday.
Index
Stocks . . . . . . . .Page 11
Classified . . . . .Page 12
Editorial . . . . . .Page 4
Obituaries . . .Page 5
Sports . . . . . . . .Page 7
Weather . . . . . .Page 14
‘Crocodile Hunter’
Steve Irwin’s
death caught on videotape
√ Steve Irwin was videotaped
pulling a poisonous stingray
barb from his chest in his last
moments of life, officials said
today, as tributes poured in for
TV’s “Crocodile Hunter.” Page 3
Weather
Low tonight
54
78
High tomorrow
Page 2 - STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006
ELIZABETHTON STAR
BUSINESS REVIEW
423 - 542-4151 • 423 - 928-4151
542-KMCC or 542-5622
151 Lovers Lane • Elizabethton
Open Mon. & Sat. 8-1 pm • Tue. - Fri. 8-5 pm
— New Ownership —
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503 First Avenue • Hampton
725-9915
* Ask About Our
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Does your group need to raise money?
Call me for fundraising!
Redolence Candle Co.
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Tracy Kellerman 542-8845
WAYNE’S HOME
MAINTENANCE
Heating & Air • Plumbing & Electrical
547-0564
One Call Does It All
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP
HAMPTON REPAIR SHOP
Complete, Professional Automotive Care
106 Williams Street • Hampton, TN 37658
725-4925
Free Back to School Check Over
with Valvoline Oil Change
Sue Carol’s
Beauty Shop
Tu - Th 8 A.M. to 5 P.M.
Fri - 8 A.M. to 2 P.M.
Sat 9 A.M. to 2 P.M. - Every
Other Saturday
Walk-Ins Welcome
Color • Perms Ear Piercing
• Waxing • Cuts • Frosting
Christie Vines
Operator & Stylist
147 Copley Branch Rd.
Butler • 768-3219
Complete Family Hair Care
9 Years Experience
TO PLACE YOUR
BUSINESS REVIEW AD
CALL
DARLENE GUINN
542-4151 • 928-4151
FARMERS EXCHANGE
6451 Hwy. 19E • Corner of 19E & Bear Cage Rd.
Feed • Seed • Fertilizer • Hardware
Fence Supplies
Corral Panels & Gates & More!
725-2800 • Open Mon. - Sat. 8-5
WING CHUN KUNG FU
“The Kwoon”
Plank’s Mowing Service can make
your property beautiful for autumn
By Greg Miller
STAR STAFF
[email protected]
Plank’s Mowing Service is
gearing up for the colorful
autumn season and offers a
variety of services to make
your property more beautiful.
Autumn
beautification
services include leaf removal, aeration, and overseeding. For leaf removal,
owner Gary Plank can either
turn the leaves into mulch or
use his leaf blowing system.
The peak time for leaf removal is around Halloween,
Plank said. “It’s according to
whether it’s an early fall or a
late fall.
“It’s a good time for aeration and overseeding,” Plank
said. “It reduces compaction
of soil, which allows grass to
produce a stronger, healthier
root system. Stronger roots
will always be a benefit to
your lawn. Fertilizer can get
down to the root system
more readily. An aerated
lawn will absorb more water.
It reduces water runoff and
puddling. Aeration breaks
up the thatch layer. Annually
By Greg Miller
STAR STAFF
[email protected]
Sunny Bunz
Tanning Salon
KARATE
520 E. Elk Avenue • Elizabethton • 543-6088
A New Image Weight Loss Clinic, Inc.
“We are committed to your good health”
1933 W. Elk Ave. • Elizabethton
15 mg
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OPEN FOR LUNCH 10-2 Mon.-Fri.
Tobacco Snacks Collectibles
ADULT BEVERAGE CENTER • MIX OR MATCH
Jerry & Kathy Oliver - family owned & operated
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99
602 B E. Elk Avenue • 423-542-6488
542-8957 www.Lighthousetobacco.com
Odom uses a “basic
steam extraction system.
The addition of a Rotovac
Powerwand really enhances
the cleaning process. The
Rotovac replaces the traditional manual wand for extraction carpet cleaning.
Combining rotary agitation
with hot water extraction,
the Rotovac cleans better
and leaves the carpet drier.
”The Rotovac has two
stainless
steel
cleaning
heads, which counter-rotate
at 250 rpm. Each head has
three solution jets and three
vacuum ports. This produces 1,500 multi-directional cleaning passes per
minute. A person with a
manual wand can only
make about 60 two-directional cleaning passes per
minute.
“Cleaning with the Rotovac means that your carpets
get cleaned better and
faster. With its aggressive
cleaning action, the Rotovac
will restore heavily-soiled
carpets and matted traffic
areas with ease.”
Odom’s Carpet Cleaning
HUMPHREY ENTERPRISE
1003 W. Main Street • Abingdon, VA
276-676-3444
Saturday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
For more information, call
647-6806 or e-mail [email protected]
• 35 years experience
• State Certified • Licensed
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CLINE-HOLDER
ELECTRIC SUPPLY, INC.
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS
Milwaukee Tools
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THE
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783 Hwy. 91, Ste. 3 • 543-7225
We’re Your ONE STOP, SHOP & SHIP Store!
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Stacy’s Carpet Steam
Cleaning Co. Inc.
Stacy’s Carpet Outlet • Smokebusters
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of your home with one call
145 Wilson Avenue in Biltmore Area
543-5833 • 282-6565
Customer Appreciation Specials
Celebrating our Second Anniversary
We SHIP
137 Hudson Drive, Elizabethton
543-6630
Holder’s
WAYNE’S AUTO REPAIR
150 Grandview Circle • Elizabethton
Different Specials Each Month
206 Church Street • Hampton
FLOOR CARE
• SPECIALIZING IN CARPET CARE •
Other services available •Commercial •Residential
Bus. Mobile 677-5497 Home 543-4567
GRADY HOLDER, OWNER
725-2741
Appalachian Surgery and
Skin Lesion Excision Center
Adjacent to Sycamore Shoals Hospital
Open Mon.-Fri 8:00 - 5:00
owners Wayne Whitehead & Bucky Morton
423-543-8619
Specializing in all types office surgery
Skin Lesions • Cancers • Moles • Vasectomy
Most insurances accepted and non insured patients
BREAKFAST • OPEN DAILY FOR SOUTHERN STYLE BREAKFAST • OPEN
CARPET CLEANING
$20 per room (traffic areas)
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We also clean furniture & vehicles
Quality, Affordable Service
JEFF ODOM
647-6806
Hair Fashions & More
Specializing in haircuts, hair color,
foiling, perming, waxing, nails,
pedicures, manicures, Aloette
Cosmetics, Premier Jewelry & Home Decor
501 Broad Street #1 • Beside Wendy’s
543-5881
Proudly serving you since 1948
Southern Style Breakfast daily
408 E. Elk Avenue
Elizabethton
542-6735
Open Mon-Wed 7-7
Thur-Sat 7-8
Sunday 11a-2p
Choose from homemade biscuits & gravy, eggs any style,
pancakes, french toast, grits, country ham and more.
Great Lunch Specials incl. Southern Fried
Chicken, Southern Style Cube Steak & Gravy, Meatloaf,
Turkey & Dressing, Lots More (Including Dessert)
Sunday - Great after Church Specials
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includes Dessert!
D A I LY F O R S O U T H E R N S T Y L E
Sales and Service
* * All Your Needs * *
in May, is located at 113
Cross Street, in the Lynn Valley community. Hours of operation are Monday through
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IN STOCK
LADIES
Business hours are Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-7
p.m. For more information,
call 725-3704 or 676-7413 or
e-mail
[email protected]
To place your ad and have
your business featured
CALL DARLENE GUINN 297-9068
423-542-8277 or 423-213-8781
(423) 547-9434 • (423) 542-2707
Rainbow Vacuum Cleaner
will also clean furniture and
vehicles.
Odom’s Carpet Cleaning,
which opened the first week
BED & BREAKFAST
beside Craig’s Barber Shop
547-0031
Washington County.
“I have all professional
grade mowing and trimming
equipment ranging from ExMark to Stihl, etc.,” Plank
said.
Jeffrey Odom, the owner of Odom’s Carpet Cleaning, realizes that one secret to the success of any business is loyal customer support. For more information, call 647-6806 or email
[email protected]
Nightly • Weekly • Corporate
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C & C Mobile Home
Moving Service
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have grown tremendously
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Plank offers services to
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FLOORING
Hwy. 91 in Stoney Creek
Carpet…from $5.00 sq. yd.
Vinyl… from $4.00 sq. yd.
Photo by Erica Yoon
Gary Plank, the owner of Plank’s Mowing Service, does residential, commercial and industrial jobs. Free estimates are available. For more information, call 725-3704 or 676-7413 or
email [email protected]
Odom: Loyal customer support
is key factor in success of business
Larry Thomas, Instructor
Jeffrey Odom, the owner
of Odom’s Carpet Cleaning,
Classes for 10 y rs old to adult
1431 West G St • 423-342-7726 realizes that one secret to
the success of any business
is loyal customer support.
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Odom expressed appreciation for his customers, who
have helped make the busiCertified Technicians
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Pam & Troy Sloan Elizabethton, TN 37643
them telling their family
Owners
Phone: 423.542.3176
and friends about my business, and I look forward to
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“I want all of my customers to be 100 percent satisfied with my work,” Plank
said. “If a customer is happy
with my services, then that
helps me in my business.
Customers will recommend
my services to their family
and friends, and this is one of
the best advertisements a
business could have.”
After Plank has done a
good job for a customer, he
feels that he has “provided
my services at a professional
level and that all the hard
work has paid off.”
Plank believes area residents should use his services
because “it saves residents
time where one works a fulltime job and has a hectic
schedule. Also, if residents
want a professional-looking
lawn and landscape.
“I feel like I have wonderful relations with our community. My services extend
throughout the Tri-Cities and
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STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006 - Page 3
Crocodile Hunter’s death caught on videotape
MILITARY
Acosta
graduates
Army basic
PV1 Sonny J. Acosta, the
son of Mike and Debbie
Hubbard,
Elizabethton,
graduated from Army basic
combat training on July 13 in
Ft. Sill, Okla.
Acosta is currently stationed in Germany.
Acosta’s grandparents are
James and Barbara Holmes,
Jonesborough, and Tom and
Carolyn Hubbard, Knoxville.
PV1 Sonny J. Acosta
Church
graduates
boot camp
Steven M. Church graduated from Great Lakes Military Recruit Boot Camp on
Aug. 18.
Church is currently in the
sub school in Groton, Conn.,
training in sub technology.
Church is the son of Brian
and Terry Church, 1298 Poga
Road, Butler.
CAIRNS, Australia (AP)
— Steve Irwin was videotaped pulling a poisonous
stingray barb from his chest
in his last moments of life,
officials said today, as tributes poured in for TV’s
“Crocodile Hunter.”
Police said there was
nothing suspicious about Irwin’s death and no evidence he provoked the animal. Irwin, 44, was stabbed
through the heart on Monday while snorkeling with a
stingray during filming of a
new TV program on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.
John Stainton, Irwin’s
manager who was among
the crew on the reef, said
the fatal blow was caught
on videotape, and described
viewing the footage as having the “terrible” experience
of watching a friend die.
“It shows that Steve came
over the top of the ray and
the tail came up, and spiked
him here (in the chest), and
he pulled it out and the next
minute he’s gone,” Stainton
told reporters in Cairns,
where Irwin’s body was
taken for an autopsy.
Queensland state police
were holding the tape as evidence for a coroner’s inquiry — a standard procedure in high-profile deaths
or those caused by other
than natural causes.
Experts have said the
stingray may have felt
trapped between the cameraman and the TV star. Irwin, the popular host of
“Crocodile Hunter,” rose to
fame by getting dangerously close to crocodiles,
snakes and other beasts.
But Queensland Police
Superintendent
Michael
Keating said there was no
evidence Irwin threatened
or intimidated the stingray,
a normally placid species
that only deploys its poisonous tail spines as a defense.
Stainton said Irwin was
in his element in the Outback, but that he and Irwin
had talked about the sea
posing threats the star wasn’t used to.
“If ever he was going to
go, we always said it was
going to be the ocean,”
Stainton said. “On land he
was agile, quick-thinking,
quick-moving and the ocean
puts another element there
that you have no control
over.”
Parliament took a break
from the business of running the country to pay tribute to Irwin, whose body
was being flown home today from Cairns. No funeral
plans were announced but
state Premier Peter Beattie
said Irwin would be afforded a state funeral if his family agreed.
Irwin’s American wife
Terri, daughter Bindi and
their son Bob, almost 3, returned late Monday from a
trekking vacation in Tasmania to Australia Zoo, the
wildlife park where the
family lived at Beerwah in
Queensland’s southeast.
At the park, hundreds of
people filed past the entrance laying floral bouquets and handwritten condolence messages. Khaki
shirts — a trademark of Irwin — were laid out for
people to sign.
“Mate, you made the
world a better place,” read
one poster left at the gate.
“Steve, our hero, our legend, our wildlife warrior,”
read another. “I thought
you were immortal. How I
wish that was true,” said a
third.
The park opened today
because it was what Irwin
would have wanted, said
Gail Gipp, an animal health
employee.
Irwin was propelled to
global fame after his TV
shows, in which he regularly wrestled with crocodiles
and went face-to-face with
poisonous snakes and other
wild animals, were shown
around world on the Discovery Channel.
The network announced
plans for a marathon
screening of Irwin’s work
and a wildlife fund in his
name.
“Rarely has the world
embraced an animal enthusiast and conservationist as
they did Steve Irwin,” Discovery Networks International President Dawn McCall said in a statement.
Experts differed on the
number of human deaths
caused by stingrays — anywhere from 3 to 17 —
though they agreed that
they were extremely rare.
Steven M. Church
Nave graduates basic
Michael L. Nave graduated from U.S. Army basic
training at Fort Jackson, S.C.,
on Aug. 4.
While at Ft. Jackson, Nave
mastered man skills, which
included Nuclear Biological
Chemical training, team development classes, first aid,
marching,
map
reading
skills, rifle marksmanship,
hand-to-hand combat, development of .S. weapons skills
and individual tactical training.
Nave joined the Army Reserves on a delayed entry
program in January. While he
is completing his education
at Elizabethton High School,
where he is a senior, he will
serve one weekend a month
at his unit Gray Station. Nave
will return to Fort Jackson after graduation in May to
complete his Advanced Indi-
Michael L. Nave
vidual Training.
Nave is the son of Mike
and Annetta Nave. Nave’s
sister, Laura, is a freshman at
EHS. He is the grandson of
Albert and Virginia Nave
and Minnie Hughes and the
late Richard Hughes.
Christmas Connection
seeks arts and crafts
The Cultural Arts Division
of Kingsport’s Parks and
Recreation seeks arts and
crafts vendors for the 27th Annual Christmas Connection to
be held Friday through Sunday, Nov. 10-12, at the Civic
Auditorium in Kingsport.
Guidelines, application and
more information is available
from the Cultural Arts Division located in the Kingsport
Renaissance Center. Call (423)
392-8416 for more information
or go to www.kingsportparksandrecreation.org to download all forms.
The Christmas Connection
has a long-standing tradition
for providing regional arts and
crafts vendors with an opportunity to offer their products to
the community. We are looking for original arts, crafts, as
well as unique holiday and
gift items. All new vendors
must apply to the Cultural
Arts Division, although there
is no cost to apply. The selection committee will review
each application and issue invitations to selected vendors.
The Christmas Connection
will be held November 10, 11
and 12 at the Civic Auditorium. In addition to arts and
crafts vendors, entertainment
and refreshments will be available as well as hands-on arts
and crafts workshops.
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Page 4 - STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006
EDITORIAL & COMMENTARY
Are tobacco firms spiking
cigarettes with nicotine?
A study by the Massachusetts Department of Public
Health raises disturbing questions about the safety of cigarettes and the lengths to
which tobacco companies will
go in order to keep selling
them.
According to the study, reported by the Boston Globe
and The Washington Post,
most cigarettes in 2004 had almost 10 percent more nicotine
than in 1998, and the biggest
increases showed up in the
brands most popular with
young people and minorities.
Nicotine is both harmful
and addictive, and higher levels of nicotine could make it
harder for people to quit
smoking. This is bad news for
people’s health but good
news, of course, for the tobacco companies.
Those companies’ livelihood depends on keeping as
OPINION
many smokers hooked as
possible and recruiting new,
preferably young smokers to
replace the ones they kill.
Whatever posturing the tobacco companies may do
about discouraging young
people from smoking, these
death merchants know they
benefit every time a young
person experiments with cigarettes and then gets addicted
before he or she recognizes
the need to quit.
The tobacco companies are
not talking about the new
study, in part because they
lost another lawsuit about
two weeks ago and they are
reassessing what they can say
publicly. But the study results
speak loudly enough to suggest a government investigation. Congress should hold
hearings and consider legislation to regulate the companies
more closely.
As Matthew L. Myers,
president of the Campaign for
Tobacco-Free Kids, said, “The
reports are stunning. What’s
critical is the consistency of
the increase, which leads to
the conclusion that it has to
have been conscious and deliberate.”
—Decatur, Alabama Daily
CAL THOMAS
Lose the belly: It’s time to
rediscover fitness, lean foods The ‘Contract with Britain’
That jiggly inner tube of
surplus flesh around the waist,
with the help of ice cream,
gravy and fried chicken, is
morphing into a monster truck
tire.
America got a little wider
last year, with 31 states racking
up increases in obese adults,
according to the Trust for
America’s Health. Pennsylvania is in the thick of it, ranking
15th with nearly a quarter, 24.3
percent, of its adults qualifying as obese. It is padded on
two sides by even chunkier
states, West Virginia, sealing a
third-place finish with 27.6
percent and Ohio at 13th with
25.3 percent.
Nationwide, 15.5 percent of
adolescents are obese, three
times the figure for 1980, and
15.3 percent of children are
obese, twice the figure for
1980, according to American
Obesity Association.
It’s not a pretty picture, nor
is it a healthy one. Excessive
weight leads to numerous
health problems including diabetes, heart disease and high
blood pressure. It can cause
terrible pain as pounds press
on ill-equipped knees and
backbones. It costs billions of
dollars in otherwise avoidable
medical treatments each year.
Under federal mandate,
schools this year began cutting
kids’ calories, stepping up
measures to encourage exercise and warning pupils to
wise up on wellness.
The Pittsburgh Public
Schools yanked the snack
cakes, candy bars and sugary
soft drinks out of school vending machines. Some say candy
fundraisers for school sports
and birthday cupcakes for elementary classes will soon be
just memories of the high-calorie bad old days as well. At the
same time, teachers are pushing exercise, like the instructor
at Fishing Creek Elementary
School in Cumberland County, who is giving youngsters
five minutes to run around following math class.
The cure for flab can be
pleasurable, however. Each
person just has to find the tonic that’s right for them. It
might be chasing and tickling
a toddler, then munching together on fresh strawberries. It
could be walking through the
woods with friends and snacking on wild raspberries.
If it feels like work — like
eating boiled cabbage and jogging on bad knees — it’s probably not going to last long
enough to make a difference.
Find the low-calorie foods and
sweat-producing
activities
that feel good and will make
America healthy.
—Pittsburg, Pa. Post-Gazette
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Merchant-car club questions
continue in answered letter
Editor:
I would like to ask Mrs.
Lanthorn some questions.
First of all, have you ever
owned a business of any kind?
And, how long has it been that
you made a purchase in
downtown Elizabethton? If so,
you should know when a
merchant has to close his
doors for anything, it costs
them money.
I would hate to know that
the car club is responsible for
the beauty of the downtown.
If the merchants are forced to
close their doors every time
someone wants to do something, downtown will look
like Johnson City, and several
small towns where the buildings are empty.
I will give an example of
why the merchants are upset.
One Saturday when the car
club missed coming to town,
between 4:30 and 5 p.m., we
sold over $4,000 dollars of merchandise. The couple had been
downtown another Saturday
to make the purchase and
could not find a place to park.
They came one more time to
downtown and it happened
that they could find a parking
place. Does this sound like it
doesn’t cost the merchants?
That may not be much to you,
but to the merchants that are
making a living in downtown
it is. How many more customers have been downtown
late on Saturday and couldn’t
shop because of the cars?
You know, in this area most
people work five days a week,
and Saturday is the only day
they have to shop. Other than
Wal-Mart, Saturday morning is
used to relax and work around
the house before coming to
town. Everyone does not have
the pleasure to shop whenever
they feel like going to town.
I would like to know why
you think Mr. Norris is looking a gift horse in the mouth?
First of all, you need to go to
Mr. Webster and look up a gift
horse in the mouth. Mr. Norris
hasn’t asked for a gift or anything free, all he wants is the
streets to stay open so the merchants can keep their doors
open. This is something that
all the merchants pay for city
taxes, licenses to conduct business. I would like for you to
pay the merchants’ monthly
bills just for one month. It
sounds to me that you want
hotdogs at the merchants’ expense. How would you like
for someone to come to your
home and use the bathroom at
your backdoor? This has hap-
pened to some of the merchants. I believe that you need
to look at life instead of living
in a dream world where no
one has to work and make a
living. How many of the cities
you have been to close their
street every Saturday night so
you could bring your out-oftown guests to buy hotdogs
and see cars lined up on the
streets?
I would like to tell you
some places that your out-oftown guests might like to see
instead of cars and hotdogs.
You know, the top of Grandfather Mountain is one. Doe River Gorge, Watauga Lake,
Watauga Dam Overlook, the
top of Roan Mountain or the
Laurels. Why don’t you pack a
lunch and some lemonade and
take them to some of these attractions? These are more
beautiful than the same cars
every Saturday night. Something that they could remember for a long time.
I don’t think anything else
needs to be said about the subject of the car show. Something
needs to be done about it since
the merchants pay to do business downtown.
Deanie Norris
Elizabethton
BELFAST, N. IRELAND
— British Prime Minister
Tony Blair returns from a
late-summer vacation in Barbados with his
ruling Labor
Party approval
rating at a 19year low of 31
percent. Conservatives, under new leader
David
Cameron, enCal
joy
40 percent
Thomas
approval, according to the
latest Guardian/ICM Poll.
Seeking to take advantage
of Blair’s troubles and their
popularity surge, the Tories
last week borrowed a page
from what now seems like an
ancient Republican Party
playbook, publishing a type
of “contract with Britain.”
Titled “Built to Last: The
Aims and Values of the Conservative Party,” Cameron
lays out his party’s philosophy in the opening lines:
“Our Party seeks to cherish
freedom, advance opportunity and nurture responsibility.
By trusting people, we help
individuals grow stronger;
by sharing responsibility, we
help society grow stronger.
We believe that there is such
a thing as society, but it is not
the same thing as the state.”
This last sentence is a middle ground between Ronald
Reagan’s (and Margaret
Thatcher’s) “government is
the problem” world view
and President Bush’s “compassionate conservative” position. There are a few
“bones” for almost everyone:
“Top-down
government
seems to belong to another
age. Monolithic, unreformed
public services do not provide the personalized response people expect. High
taxes and poor education
make us steadily less competitive.”
There is also an appeal to
do more to fight HIV/AIDS
and endemic poverty in
Africa. The word “revolution” is repeated several
times as in a “revolution in
personal
responsibility.”
There is great concern
throughout the UK that lawlessness, declining test scores
in public schools (Conservatives propose school choice
vouchers for the poor) and
general cultural drift have
caused Britain to fall behind
where a majority thinks the
country ought to be. The party calls for “a revolution in
civic responsibility.”
While the Conservative
Party document does acknowledge the need for
“new efforts to integrate at
home,” there is nothing else
in its eight points that addresses the public’s growing
concern about unrestrained
immigration (more than 1
million non-European Union
foreigners have been allowed
to settle in Britain since Labor
came to power in 1997). A
significant number of those
are Muslims, who refuse to
embrace the cultural values
of Britain. According to a
Telegraph YouGov poll, a
majority of Britons (53 percent) now view Islam, not
just Muslim extremists, as a
threat to society. And 18 percent of those polled believe
“a large proportion of British
Muslims feel no sense of loyalty to this country and are
prepared to condone or even
carry out acts of terrorism,”
up from 10 percent from a
year ago.
The Conservative Party vision statement offers no
specifics about what it will
do about any of this should
voters elect David Cameron
prime minister. Perhaps that
is because it wants to avoid
being labeled “intolerant” or
“Islamophobic.”
Failing,
however, to address this real
concern among the British
public will not make the issue go away. Following last
summer’s London subway
and bus attacks, Tony Blair
promised to crack down on
“preachers of hate” and to
close any mosque or Muslim
school that advocated violence. He has been unable to
do so, thanks mainly to liberal judges and lawyers who
have manipulated Britain’s
legal system, allowing most
of the mosques and Muslim
schools to continue to preach
and teach their extremist
doctrines.
No party can lead without
addressing security and uncontrolled immigration. It isn’t about keeping people
from enjoying a better life. It
is about preserving life for
those already here and for
those who come in an orderly, legal and proportional
fashion. Immigrants must be
willing to transform themselves into complete British
citizens, embracing the history, language, culture and
laws of their adopted home.
Anyone not wishing to do so
should not come, or should
be deported for trying to undermine that which serves
the majority.
Still, the Conservative Party is on to something. America’s Republican Party would
do well to remember what it
has forgotten, which is that
power should not be used to
perpetuate one’s self in office, but to do good things.
Democrats, who appear to
have a chance at recapturing
a congressional majority,
should be required to offer a
detailed “contract” of their
own; one that would allow
them to liberate themselves
from the special interests and
class warfare of the past and
move into the 21st century
with new ideas to deal with
serious challenges at home
and abroad.
CAL THOMAS
One in every four Americans has appeared on television.
—————
Hummingbirds can weigh less than a penny.
—————
If you counted 24 hours a day, it would
take 31,688 years to reach one trillion.
—————
It’s illegal to drink beer out of a bucket
while you’re sitting on a curb in St. Louis.
—————
The first product to have a bar code was
Wrigleys gum.
—————
It is estimated that four million “junk”
telephone calls, phone solicitations by persons or programmed machine are made
every day in the United States.
www.starhq.com
Elizabethton STAR
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Elizabethton, Tennessee. Served by The Associated
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STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006 - Page 5
O
Kyle Chambers
Kyle Chambers, 94, 605
Pine Hill Road,
Elizabethton,
died Monday,
September 4,
2006, at Johnson
City Medical Center following a brief illness.
A native of Carter County, he was the son of the late
William H. and Florene
Vanhuss Chambers. In addition to his parents, he was
preceded in death by six
brothers and two sisters.
Mr. Chambers was a
homebuilder and had built
over 200 homes in the Elizabethton area. He also
worked as an appraiser for
Elizabethton Federal Bank,
where he served as Chairman of the Board of Directors. He was very active in
the community.
Mr. Chambers was a
member of First Baptist
Church of Elizabethton,
where he had served as
Treasurer, Trustee and Deacon. He was a great example of a Christian gentleman. He was a U.S. Army
veteran of World War II and
was a 60-member of the
American Legion Post No.
49, Elizabethton.
Survivors include his
loving wife of 56 years,
Mary S. Chambers, of the
home, and several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services for Mr.
Chambers will be conducted
at 7 p.m. Wednesday, September 6, at First Baptist
Church of Elizabethton with
Rev. Brent Seals and Rev. Bob
Polk officiating. The family
will receive friends on
Wednesday following the funeral service at the church or
at the residence, 605 Pine
Hill Road, Elizabethton, at
other times. Graveside services and interment will be
conducted at 10 a.m. Thursday, September 7, at Happy
Valley Memorial Park. Active pallbearers will be Billy
Shultz, Bill Shultz, Bruce
Noles, Max Churchill, Ted
Tipton and Richard Barker.
Everyone will meet at the funeral home at 9:15 a.m.
Thursday to go in procession
to the cemetery. In lieu of
flowers to those who desire
memorials may be made to
First Baptist Church of Elizabethton, Preschool Department, 212 East F Street, Elizabethton, TN 37643. Online
condolences may be sent to the
family through our Web site at
www.hathawaypercy.com.
Arrangements for the
Chambers family have been
entrusted to Hathaway-Percy Funeral Home.
Frankie Fair
Wallace
Mrs. Frankie Fair Wallace,
90, of Johnson City, died
Sunday, September 3, 2006,
at Johnson City Medical Center.
Mrs. Wallace was a native
of Carter County and a
daughter of the late Frank
and Fannie Mace Johnson. In
addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her
husbands, Jess Fair and John
Wallace, several sisters and
b
brothers, and a grandson,
Jackie Fair.
Mrs. Wallace worked as a
cashier for Piccadilly Cafeteria. She was a member of
First Free Will Baptist
Church of Elizabethton.
Survivors include two
sons and daughters-in-law,
Mack and Shirley Fair and
Richard and Lois Fair, all of
Johnson City; a sister, Evelyn
Gray of Roan Mountain; a
brother, J.C. Johnson of
Elkhart, Ind.; three grandsons, Jess Fair and his wife
Sharon of Johnson City, Ted
Fair and his wife Debra of
Unicoi and John Fair and his
wife Angie of Hampton; two
great-granddaughters, Jessica and Lacey Fair; a greatgrandson, Daniel Fair; and a
special niece, Linda Davidson.
A committal service for
Mrs. Wallace will be held at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday, September 6, at Happy Valley
Memorial Park with Rev.
David Tydings and Rev. Don
Merriman officiating. Pallbearers will be chosen from
family and friends. Honorary
pallbearers will be her caretakers from Appalachian Christian Village. Her family will receive friends from 10 to 11
a.m. Wednesday in the Sunset
Chapel of Tetrick Funeral Services. Following visitation
everyone will go in procession
to the cemetery. Condolences
and memories may be sent to
the family at www.TetrickFuneralHome.com.
Arrangements for the
Wallace family are in the care
of Tetrick Funeral & Cremation Services, Johnson City,
(423) 610-7171.
i
t
u
those who desire, Betty had
asked that memorial contributions be made in her honor in lieu of flowers to the St.
Jude Children’s Research
Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place,
Memphis, TN 38105-1905.
Betty had many very special
friends that were always
there when she needed them.
Betty wrote, “Thank you
Buddy and Ann Ward, Tonya
and Wanda Gifford, Edward
“Pooky” Ensor, Elic Grindstaff, the Patterson Family,
Ben and Sherry Johnson,
Charlie
Bowers,
Kathy
Hicks, and my many other
friends. Also, thanks to Dr.
Smith and Jill from JCMCH
and all the Hospice nurses.
Thank you to everyone at
ETSU Cancer Center of Johnson City.” Online condolence
messages may be sent to the
family at www.tetrickfuneralhome.com.
Tetrick Funeral Home,
Elizabethton, is serving the
Huff family. Obituary Line:
(423) 543-4917. Office: (423)
542-2232.
Jesse Ray Hamm
Betty Louise
Patterson Huff
Betty Louise Patterson
Huff, 48, 168 H. Heaton
Road, Elizabethton, departed
this life and began eternal
life and rest to be with her
daughter, son and mother.
She passed away on Sunday,
September 3, 2006, at her residence following a lengthy
illness.
Mrs. Huff was a native of
Carter County and a member
of Riverside Community
Church of Jesus in the Sandy
Bottom community of Elizabethton.
Mrs. Huff was preceded
in death by her daughter,
Polly Ann Patterson; her son,
Johnny Constant Patterson;
her mother, Laura Culbert;
and a step-father, Charles
Culbert.
Survivors include her
beloved husband and best
friend, Cecil W. Huff, of the
home; a step-father, Paul Tolley of Elizabethton; a brother,
David Paul Tolley of Elizabethton; three sisters, Wanda
Faye Clawson, Elizabeth
Smith and Loeva Booth, all
of Elizabethton; and three
brothers-in-law, James Clawson, Marvin Clawson and
Rick Smith, all of Elizabethton. Several nieces and
nephews also survive.
A memorial service for
Mrs. Huff will be conducted
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, September
5, at the Riverside Community Church of Jesus with Pastor Wesley Ward and Bro.
Benny Johnson officiating.
Music will be under the direction of Benny and Sherry
Johnson. The family will receive friends at the church
from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, prior to the service, or at the
home of her sister, Loeva
Booth, 249 Little Stoney
Road, Elizabethton, other
times. Mrs. Huff donated her
body to the James H. Quillen
College of Medicine in hopes
that from her sickness, someone else could be helped. For
AIKEN, S.C. — Jesse Ray
Hamm, 94, Crestwood Drive,
Aiken, died Saturday, September 2, 2006.
A native of Troutdale, Va.,
he had made Aiken his home
for the past 54 years. He was
the father of the late Elsie Lee
Canaperi and the son of the
late Pheoba Jane and Thomas
Franklin Hamm.
Mr. Hamm was a member
of Millbrook Baptist Church
and the Men’s Senior Adult
Sunday School Class.
Mr. Hamm was retired
from Owens Corning Fiber
Glass, where he worked in
the Utilities Department, and
was a self-taught artist.
Survivors include his wife
of 74 years, Eula Smith
Hamm; two sons and daughters-in-laws, Bob and Betty
Hamm of Aiken and Benny
and Shelby Hamm of North
Ridgeville, Ohio; a daughter
and son-in-law, Ruby and
Thurman
Lester
of
Brunswick,
Ohio;
eight
grandchildren,
Bobby
Hamm,
Calvan
Hamm,
Dwayne Hamm, Johnnie
Berry, Jackie Daniel, Terry
Dautrich, Gerri Carter and
Justine Holstein; 14 greatgrandchildren; one greatgreat-grandchild; a half sister, Louise Richardson of BelAir, Md.; a half brother, Garris Brown, Lenoir, N.C.; and
a sister-in-law, Laura Grey
Brown of Marion, Va.
Funeral services for Mr.
Hamm will be conducted at
11 a.m. Wednesday, September 6, from the Millbrook
Baptist Church Chapel with
Rev. Mike Chandler officiating. Interment will follow at
Sunset Memory Gardens.
Honorary pallbearers will be
members of the Men’s Senior
Adult Sunday School Class
of Millbrook Baptist Church.
Active
pallbearers
will
grandsons and great-grandsons. The family will receive
friends at Millbrook Baptist
Church Chapel from 6 to 8
p.m. Tuesday, September 5.
Memorials may be made to
the Shriner’s Children Hospital, 950 West Faris Road,
Greenville, SC 29605. Floral
delivery to funeral home by
3 p.m. Tuesday. Visit the on-
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Stephen D. Posey Funeral
Home of North Augusta,
(803) 278-1181), is in charge
of the arrangements.
Billy Jack
Campbell
Billy Jack Campbell, 66,
147 Miller Avenue, Johnson
City, passed away Monday,
September 4, 2006, at his residence after a long battle with
heart problems. Billy Jack received a heart transplant at
Vanderbilt Medical Center
Hospital, Nashville, on April
20, 2000.
A native of Jonesborough,
he had spent most of his life
in Johnson City (Pinecrest
area). He was the son of Rose
Vines Campbell of Jonesborough and the late Joe A.
Campbell. In addition to his
father, he was preceded in
death by a sister, JoAnn Wilson Brown, June 29, 2006.
Billy Jack was a graduate
of
Jonesborough
High
School, the class of 1959. He
retired from Durr-Fillauer
Medical Supply in 1993 and
was a member of Piney
Grove Free Will Baptist
Church, Johnson City.
Survivors include his
mother, Rose Vines Campbell of Jonesborough; his loving wife, Peggy Arnett
Campbell; two daughters,
Sonja Ellis and husband Gregory “Allen” of Jonesborough and Lora Booher and
husband Gary of Johnson
City; five grandsons, Billy,
Jonathon and Timmy Ellis,
all of Jonesborough, Joseph
and Jamey Booher, both of
Johnson City; one greatgrandson, Kurt Ellis of Jonesborough; two sisters, Nancy
Lovegrove and husband Bill
of Jonesborough and Mary
Bachman and husband Bob
of Jonesborough; several
nieces and nephews; and a
very special sister-in-law and
dear friend, Helen Crowe of
Johnson City.
Funeral services for Mr.
Campbell will be conducted
at 8 p.m. Wednesday, September 6, at the Piney Grove
Free Will Baptist Church,
corner of Lakeview Drive
and Charles Street, Johnson
City, with the Rev. Paul
Crowe officiating. Music will
be provided by The Boohers.
The family will receive
friends at the church from 5
to 8 p.m. Wednesday and
other times at the home. A
committal service will be
conducted at 11 a.m. Thursday, September 7, at Greenwood Eden Cemetery, Mill
Springs Road, Jonesborough. Family and friends are
asked to assemble at the
church at 10:30 a.m. Thursday to leave in procession.
Active pallbearers will be
grandsons, Billy, Jonathon
and Timmy Ellis and Joseph
and Jamey Booher, and
friend/neighbor,
Wayne
Richardson. Honorary pallbearers will be his special
friends at Piney Grove Free
Will Baptist Church. Online
condolences may be made
online at [email protected]
Woodall-Anderson
and
Dugger Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, 108 W.
Watauga Avenue, Johnson
i
e
s
City, (423) 928-2245, is serving the Campbell family.
Ora M. Thomas
Ora M. “Granny” Thomas,
94, 142 Edgewater Road,
Elizabethton, died Sunday,
September 3, 2006, at the residence of her daughter.
Mrs. Thomas was a native
of Carter County and the
daughter of the late Sam and
Mary Miller Perkins. In addition to her parents, she was
preceded in death by her
husband, Waytes Thomas, in
1954.
Mrs. Thomas was a member of Valley Forge Christian
Church and was a homemaker.
Survivors
include
a
daughter and son-in-law,
Henrietta and Mose Honeycutt of Elizabethton; a son
and daughter-in-law, Carroll
and Charlotte Thomas of
Johnson City; five grandchildren, Deborah Montgomery,
William Honeycutt, Kathy
Sams, Susie Johnson and
Kimberly Campbell; eight
Former addict who
shot his face off
to speak to students
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Hundreds of Mississippi high
school students will hear the grisly tale of a methamphetamine user whose addiction led him to blow his face off with
an assault rifle.
David Parnell of Martin, Tenn., who has traveled around
the country sharing his personal account of the consequences
of drugs, will speak at the City Auditorium in Vicksburg today.
He’ll make his presentation to students at Vicksburg High
School and Warren Central High School on Wednesday, and
visit Porter’s Chapel Academy and St. Aloysius High School,
both in Warren County, on Thursday.
His graphic presentation includes crime scene photographs of himself after he had attempted suicide in 2003. It also will feature before and after photographs of drug users
that show the havoc meth wreaks on the body and the
corpses of people killed in meth-lab explosions.
“It’s a pretty graphic presentation so what we decided to
do was have him come and offer it publicly prior to him going to the high schools,” said Warren County Public Schools
superintendent James Price. “If I’ve got 2,000 high school students and he has an impact on even one of them, it was worth
him coming.”
Price said parents will be sent permission slips on today
and they can decide if they want their children to attend.
Parnell said he began using meth when was 21 and living
in Texas. He later moved to Tennessee, where drugs were
harder to find so it was a few years before he resumed his
habit.
Methamphetamine, which can come in the form of a crystal-like powder or rock-like chunks, is an addictive stimulant
that can be smoked, snorted, injected or taken orally. Its street
names include “ice,” “crystal,” “speed” and “tina.”
Meth addiction eventually caused Parnell to bankrupt his
family and in February 2003, his wife, Amy, told him she was
going to take their six children and leave.
“I reached over her and grabbed the SKS assault rifle and
put it under my chin and I really thought that was just it,”
Parnell said in a telephone interview. “This dope had taken
everything away from me and I was convinced my wife and
kids would be better off without me.”
Though the bullet nearly destroyed Parnell’s face, shattering every bone except his left eye socket, he survived.
He underwent several reconstructive surgeries and less
than a year after the shooting, he began his crusade against
drug use. In 2005, he visited over 150 high schools and had
over 200 presentations.
“I have people call me all the time,” Parnell said. “At one
school, their entire 11th-grade class pledged not to use
drugs.”
In recent years, some states have experienced an increase
in the use of meth among teenagers, but Price said prescription drugs, including OxyContin, have become the problem
in his district.
Price, who oversees a
9,200-student district, said
each year a few students are
suspended or expelled over
drug possession or drug selling.
“It comes from the drug
cabinets of parents and
grandparents and aunts and
uncles,” Price said. “They
Pick 3 For Sept. 4, 2006
take them and that’s the gate9-6-5 (Evening)
way to something else.”
Parnell said the Warren
County district is the first in
Mississippi to invite him to
speak. The visit was sponsored by several groups inPick 4 For Sept. 4, 2006
cluding the Warren County
3-6-0-7 (Evening)
Medical Association, the local
drug court and the Make A
Promise Coalition.
HEALTH INSURANCE
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great-grandchildren;
three
nephews, James Hopson,
Ray Perkins and Frank Ellis;
and several great-nieces and
great-nephews.
Graveside services for
Mrs. Thomas will be conducted at 2:45 p.m. Wednesday, September 6, at Perkins
Cemetery with Mr. Clay Bailey officiating. Active pallbearers will be Ray Montgomery, William Honeycutt,
Michael Hopson, Nathan
Montgomery, James Hopson,
Ray Perkins, Frank Ellis,
Bobby Johnson, Jerry Sams
and Brad White. Honorary
pallbearers will be Jack Jenkins, Bobby Reece, Preston
Carrico, Gary Perkins, Rodney Perkins, Dexter Perkins
and Joe Perkins. The family
will receive friends at the funeral home from 1 to 2 p.m.
Wednesday, prior to the
graveside service. Online
condolences to the Thomas
family may be e-mailed to
[email protected]
Memorial Funeral Chapel
is in charge of the arrangements.
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Page 6 - STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006
DEAR ABBY
First ever Tri-Cities Dash for the
Cure scheduled Oct. 1 in Kingsport Judgment based
KINGSPORT — The TriCities affiliate of the Susan G.
Komen Foundation will
make history on October 1 by
hosting the very first TriCities Race for the Cure. The
first annual event is not just
for adults, children will have
a chance to lend a hand
against breast cancer during
Dash for the Cure.
“We are so excited to have
Dash for the Cure where children can “dash” for their
mothers,
grandmothers,
teachers, and friends who
have had breast cancer,” said
Tri-Cities Race for the Cure
Chair Natalie Whitlock.
The one mile run/walk
sponsored by the Regional
Eye Center will begin at 2
p.m. followed by Race for
the Cure, a 5k run/walk at 3
p.m. and lots of family entertainment, activities and food.
Children 14 and under can
participate in this non-com-
petitive 1 mile run/walk.
The Tri-Cities will join
more than 100 cities across
the country who host annual
races with a fun filled day of
survivorship, remembrance
and celebration.
Teams for the Dash must
have a Captain (age 14 or below) who will participate in
the race and an Adult Sponsor. You may register as a
team online at www.tricitieskomen.org .
Warm-up with Ronald
McDonald at 1:30 p.m. The
dash begins at 2 p.m. and a
magic show and refreshments will follow at 2:30
p.m.
Cost is $12 before Sept. 18
after that date the cost will be
$15 per child or $20 on the
day of the race.
Nationally, Race for the
Cure expects to have more
than 1.5 million participants
in 2006. Locally, the organiza-
tion is hoping for more than
2,500 participants from the 22
counties it serves in Tennessee, North Carolina and
Virginia.
“We hope everyone will
come out and enjoy the festivities of the day. Whether
you walk, run or just bring
your lawn chair and enjoy
some music while cheering
on the participants. It will be
a fun day for the entire family,” said Whitlock.
Local volunteers formed
the Tri-Cities Affiliate of the
Susan G. Komen Foundation
in October 2005 and are dedicated to putting an end to
breast cancer.
Seventy-five percent of the
net proceeds from the TriCities Race for the Cure will
remain in the Tri-Cities region to fund breast health
community outreach programs in the service area. The
remaining income supports
the Susan G. Komen Breast
Cancer Foundation Award
and Research Grant Program,
which funds groundbreaking
breast cancer research, meritorious awards and educational and scientific programs around the world. The
race is expected to be the TriCities
Affiliates
biggest
fundraiser of the year and
will be an official “Up and At
Em” health initiative event
for Johnson City.
The mission of the TriCities affiliate of the Susan G.
Komen Foundation is to
eradicate breast cancer as a
life-threatening disease by
advancing research, education, screening and treatment.
For further information or
to register for the race, visit
www.tricitieskomen.org. You
can also register on September 8 or 9 at the Eastman
Road Race Expo.
Crisp autumn day gives way for fun
during Smoky Mtns. Harvest Festival
SEVIERVILLE — Fall
brings more than rich golden
and red leaves to the Great
Smoky Mountains — it also
brings the annual Harvest
Fest celebration. Sevierville,
a gateway town to the Great
Smoky Mountains located
right next door to Pigeon
Forge and Gatlinburg, is
celebrating fall with six
weeks of events, harvest
decorations and fun things
to do during Smoky Moun-
Catch The Latest
Local News
in The STAR
For Less Than A
Cup of Coffee
tain Harvest Festival Sept.
15 - Oct. 31.
Many Harvest Festival
events celebrate the season
as well as mountain culture.
Events like Dumplin Valley
Bluegrass Festival (Sept. 1416) highlight traditional
mountain
music
while
Robert Tino’s Smoky Mountain Homecoming (Oct. 7-8)
focuses on the craftsman
heritage of the mountains.
Outdoorsmen can focus on
fly tying, fly fishing and
outdoor lectures and seminars throughout Harvest
Fest offered by Sevierville
outfitters Bass Pro and
Orvis. Other events such as
the high-flying Warbirds
Weekend
(Sept.
23-24),
Lynyrd Skynrd in concert
(Sept. 24), the Great Smoky
Mountains
Auto
Show
(Sept. 29-30) and the
Spurin’ “S” Rodeo (Oct. 1314) add fun to any visit.
Even storefronts get into
the spirit of Harvest Festival. Hundreds of businesses
throughout Sevierville, Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg
decorate with giant scarecrows, overflowing pumpkin displays and colorful
floral arrangements. These
imaginative displays provide
plenty of opportunities for
fun photos with family and
friends.
For even more fun, visit
the attractions in Sevierville and the surrounding area. From discovering
national treasures like the
Jimmy Doolittle Medal of
Honor at the Tennessee
Museum of Aviation to seeing authentic moonshine
vehicles and a multitude of
muscle cars at Floyd Gar-
rett’s Muscle Car Museum,
there is something unique
to see around every corner
in Sevierville. Nearby Dollywood is also a Harvest
Festival
must-see
with
thrill rides, mountain music, craftsmen and harvest
foods like pumpkin bread
and hot apple cider.
While visiting the Great
Smoky Mountains this fall,
be sure and stop at the Sevierville Visitor Center/
Great Smoky Mountains Visitor Center just 1.5 miles
from I-40 Exit 407. Get up-todate national park and visitor
information,
peruse
handcrafted
Appalachian
merchandise and pick up
valuable area coupons.
For more information, visit www.VisitSevierville.com
or call 1-888-SEVIERVILLE
(738-4378).
on looks proves
later to be wrong
DEAR ABBY: I recently
learned a lesson about not
judging a book by its cover. A
young
man
and his divorced mother
moved
into
our
quiet
neighborhood
of mostly retirees
and
young couples
who have not
yet
started
families. When we first laid
eyes on the young man, we
saw a guy with shoulderlength hair dressed all in
black -- complete with black
fingernail polish and black
eyeliner. Everyone thought
the worst: “Oh, no! A heathen devil-worshipper!” A
few months later, he presented himself in ragged jeans, a
flannel shirt, his head completely shaved. Again we
thought the worst: “He’s
turned into one of those neoNazi skinheads!”
I later learned from his
mother that her son is a sociology major at a university
about 200 miles from here.
(He had to evacuate during
Hurricane Katrina as a large
portion of the campus was
destroyed.) The black attire
we first saw was for a costume party he was attending
that evening. He grows his
hair long to donate to Locks
of Love, which uses it to
make wigs for cancer patients who have lost their
hair during chemo, hence the
shaved head.
He spends his summers
working with groups going
to underprivileged countries
to teach the children to read
and write. He also goes with
Doctors Without Borders to
help inoculate people who
have never had the basic
childhood
vaccinations
against rubella, tetanus, etc.
I feel completely ashamed
of myself for forming such an
opinion about this wonderful
young person simply from
his appearance at a distance.
I have since gotten to know
him during his weekend visits home to see his mother
and have discovered what an
intelligent, compassionate,
giving individual he is, and I
am honored to have him as a
neighbor.
Please warn your readers
not to make the same mistake I and the rest of my
neighbors made in judging a
worthwhile young man by
his appearance at first glance.
— ASHAMED IN BRANSON, MO.
DEAR ASHAMED: With
pleasure. Your letter is a
timely one because it applies
not only to individuals who
dress differently, but also to
people of different races and
religions. It illustrates that
hand in hand with ignorance
walks prejudice.
—————
DEAR ABBY: I’m a 14year-old girl with a problem.
I am starting high school as a
freshman. Last year I got into
more trouble at school than I
ever have been in my entire
life. I even got kicked out of a
program that’s supposed to
help students get into a good
college. My grades went
down, and I have been talking back not only to my
teachers but also to my mother. Mom thinks it’s because
my father is dead.
Can you tell me something that will help me stop
talking back? — TALKING
BACK IN VIRGINIA
DEAR TALKING BACK:
I have a couple of suggestions that might help. The
first is, because your father
passed away within the last
couple of years, your mother
may be right. If it’s true that
your problem is repressed
anger over your father’s
death, then counseling, or a
grief support group, might
help you to express feelings
in an acceptable way.
Another effective way to
express
your
emotions
would be to start a journal
and write in it every night.
A journal is a healthy place
to dump anger and frustration, as well as confide your
hopes, dreams and victories.
The more of your feelings
you get “out,” the fewer
your outbursts will be —
and that’s a promise.
—————
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write
Dear
Abby
at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
—————
For an excellent guide to
becoming a better conversationalist and a more attractive person, order “How to
Be Popular.” Send a business-size, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money
order for $6 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is
included.)
ASU, Lees-McRae
will present musical
On Wednesday, Sept. 6, at 7:30 p.m., at ASU’s Rosen Hall,
the 4th annual event, sponsored by the Friends of the Center
for Judaic, Holocaust, and Peace Studies at ASU, will be held.
This year’s program will consist of a musical tribute to
world peace presented by both the Music Department of Appalachian State University, under the direction of Dr. William
Harbinson and the Performing Arts Department at Lees-McCrae College in Banner Elk, under the direction of Dr. Janet
Barton Speer.
As a crowning touch, Dr. Speer will perform in a scene
from the Broadway play, Golda’s Balcony with Dr. Speer, herself, playing the late Prime Minister of Israel, Golda Meier.
Dr. Speer notes that LMC’s participation in this event is
partially underwritten by a generous grant from the Joseph
and Frieda Ross Foundation, Inc. This co-joining of talent
from ASU and LMC promises to be as successful and entertaining an evening as it has been in the past.
Tickets may be purchased in the lobby of Rosen Hall prior
to the 7:30 p.m. performance. Doors will open at 7 p.m. All
proceeds will benefit the Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and
Peace Studies. Faculty and students of ASU and LMC will be
admitted free of charge, with ID.
For further information, or to reserve tickets, please call
Ruth and Stan Etkin at 963-5167.
TUESDAY
September 5, 2006
Daytime Phone: (423) 542-4151
Fax: (423) 542-2004
E-Mail: [email protected]
INSIDE
Reporting Scores:
Sports Spectrum • 8
Scoreboard • 8
NASCAR • 9
To report a sports score call (423)
542-1545 after 9 p.m. SundayThursday and Saturday.
www.starhq.com
Braves rally past Twins
By Tim Chambers
STAR STAFF
[email protected]
Trying to win its fourth Appalachian League
championship since 2000, the Elizabethton
Twins came within five outs of doing so but
couldn’t shut down the bats of Danville when
they needed too.
Behind two towering home runs from Larry
Williams and Danny Brezeale in their final two
at bats, the Braves claimed their first Appy
League title with a come-from-behind 4-3 win
over the Twins at Joe O’Brien Field.
Elizabethton won game two of the series, 5-4
forcing the title tilt.
“These guys regrouped after that first loss
and never gave up after falling behind in the
second game,” said Braves manager and former
major league infielder Paul Runge. “We’ve been
on the other side of the fence watching Elizabethton win this thing.
“I’ve been in Danville for a number of years
and this is a great win for these kids and our
fans. It’s great to finally win a championship.”
The Twins continued their hot hitting, taking
a 2-0 lead in the second. Daniel Berg crushed a
mammoth home run over the center field wall
for a one-run lead.
Danny Santiesteban doubled with two outs
and later scored on a RBI single by Josh Land.
The Twins got four shutout innings from
starting pitcher, Jose Castillo until Danville
reached him for two in the fifth.
After a walk to Robert Fontaine, Ernesto
Mejia blasted a two run homer to right tying the
contest at 2-2.
Elizabethton responded in the bottom half
when Brian Dinkelman roped a laser over the
right field fence for a 3-2 Twins lead.
The Twins sent Sean Land to the mound in
the sixth hoping to hold the Danville bats in
check but that was not to be.
Williams drove a fast ball over Ashe Street to
tie the score at 3-3, after finishing second in the
Appy League batting title at .338 on the season.
Proving baseball to be a game of inches, Elizabethton just missed retaking the lead after Josh
Land roped a double off the right center field
fence in the bottom half of the inning.
Danville summonsed ace closer Kristopher
Medien to the hill who resume was one for the
record books.
Medien collected 10 saves on the season with
an ERA of 0.41.
He struck out 26 batters while issuing only
two walks. He faced four Twins batters and disposed of them all on strikeouts, including pinch
hitter Joshua Dean to end the sixth inning.
Brezeale’s tater in the seventh brought the
Danville to within three outs of its first Appy
League title. Medien made it reality by striking
out the side in the seventh.
n See TWINS, 9
Photo by Eveleigh Hatfield
Twins second baseman Brian Dinkelman turns a double play during Elizabethton’s loss to
Danville Sunday evening.
Photo by Larry N. Souders
Tennessee receiver Robert Meachem breaks a tackle en route to the end zone Saturday.
Cutcliffe a big reason for UT win
I received grief all week for
saying the Tennessee Volunteers
would defeat California.
Following
Saturday
evening’s game at Neyland Stadium, I was among those with a
smile on my
face.
Not because Tennessee had
won (okay,
maybe it was
— I can’t say
that and be
unbiased),
but because
the Volunteers had acWes
tually
upheld
Holtsclaw
one of my
predictions
for the first time in two years.
If you regularly follow our
writers’ picks in Friday’s paper,
you will remember that Tennessee games ruined any
chances I had of catching the
leader.
They finally came through in
their opening test this year.
Here’s
my
Volunteer
thoughts this week:
• What a difference David
Cutcliffe makes. The re-hire of
Cutcliffe as the Volunteer offensive coordinator was a great
move by coach Phillip Fulmer
in the offseason.
The coach nailed it on the
head following the game when
he stated that Cutcliffe “called a
great game” Saturday.
Can you remember the last
time a Tennessee team made so
many big plays against a topten squad in one game?
Didn’t think so. Cutcliffe
sprinkled “magic dust” on
quarterback Erik Ainge, who
went from looking like a Flag
quarterback to a Heisman contender, and made the conservative Volunteer football playbook
seem fun again.
Ainge, who threw just five
touchdown passes in all of last
season, threw four Saturday.
Wonder why?
Cutcliffe also knew from Internet tip sheets that Robert
Meachem would be up against
a banged-up freshman cornerback. Did the soft-speaking senior wideout remind anybody
else of Peerless Price?
I have a feeling that if Tennessee rolls through this season
like it did during Saturday’s
game, Cutcliffe won’t be around
much longer.
Memo to Fulmer: Send
Coach Cut a thank you card for
single-handedly getting you off
n See CUTCLIFFE, 9
Florida State kicks past ‘Canes
MIAMI (AP) — Gary
Cismesia took his final
warmup kick on the sideline,
rubbed his head, fastened his
helmet strap and jogged onto
the field. He looked cool and
calm, then did what so many
Florida State kickers over the
years could not.
He beat Miami.
Cismesia’s 33-yard field goal
with 8:06 left lifted the 11thranked Seminoles to a 13-10
win over the No. 12 Hurricanes
on Monday night.
Michael Ray Garvin intercepted Kyle Wright’s final pass
with 29 seconds left, sealing the
victory.
It was the second straight
win in the series for the Seminoles, who also eked out a
three-point win over their Sunshine State rival in last season’s
opener.
Drew Weatherford, who
was awful in the 2005 win, was
solid this time — throwing for
175 yards, 62 of them on a pair
of pivotal third-down conver-
sions that set up the Seminoles’
lone touchdown early in the
fourth quarter. And Florida
State’s hopes almost entirely
hinged on the passing game,
since Miami’s defensive front
held the Seminoles to 1 yard on
25 rushes.
Still, even a performance
like that wasn’t enough to carry
the Hurricanes, who managed
only 17 yards in the second half
and wasted a 10-3 halftime
lead.
“You don’t know how hard
it is to beat Miami,” Seminoles
coach Bobby Bowden said. “I
mean, I’ve been playing these
guys for 31 years. They’ve
probably got as good a defense
as there is in the country, unless
it’s us.”
Charlie Jones had a 4-yard
touchdown run for Miami,
which hadn’t lost to Florida
State in the Orange Bowl since
1998 — and has now lost three
of its last four games overall
dating back to last season. The
revamped Hurricane offense
struggled mightily; Wright was
18-of-27 passing, but gained
only 132 yards.
And the rushing game, like
Florida State’s, was nonexistent: Miami had 2 yards on 26
carries, the second-lowest total
in school history.
“What you saw tonight was
a typical Miami-Florida State
game. ... I want to make sure
our fans don’t give up on this
football team,” Miami coach
Larry Coker said. “This is going to be a very good football
team. It’s a long season.”
Joe Surratt had a 1-yard
touchdown plunge for Florida
State on the first play of the final quarter, and De’Cody Fagg
had three catches for 60 yards
for the Seminoles.
Darnell Jenkins and Lance
Leggett each had four catches
and combined for 93 yards for
the Hurricanes, but the duo
made only one catch in the second half.
n See FSU-MIAMI, 9
Photo by Larry N. Souders
California quarterback Nate Longshore gets brought down from behind by Jarod Mayo,
who was named Walter Camp Division 1-A National Defensive Player of the Week for his performance in the game.
Golf
Woods takes winning streak to 5
NORTON, Mass. (AP) — What began as a
rally quickly turned into a rout for Tiger
Woods, who matched the lowest final round
of his career Monday in the Deutsche Bank
Championship to win for the fifth straight
time on the PGA Tour.
With a splendid array of shots and key
putts, Woods crushed Vijay Singh’s spirit on
his way to an 8-under 63, turning a threeshot deficit into a two-shot victory for his
longest winning streak in a season.
The streak began in July with a victory in
the British Open, his first since his father
died in May. It continued on a sunny afternoon outside Boston with some of his best
golf of the year and allowed him to avenge a
loss to Singh at this tournament two years
ago.
Woods needed only three holes to erase
the deficit, including a 7-iron over a marsh
and into 10 feet for eagle at No. 2. He pulled
ahead with a 25-foot birdie putt at No. 5, and
he seized control with a 3-wood from 266
yards, a piercing shot into a gentle breeze
that banged into the slope fronting the green
and stopped 10 feet away for another eagle.
He played his first seven holes in 6 under
par, and Singh never got closer than two
shots the rest of the way.
Singh beat him two years ago to end
Woods’ five-year reign atop the world ranking. The 43-year-old Fijian closed with a 68,
not his best golf but ordinarily enough to
win with a three-shot lead in swirling
breezes.
But not against Woods, and certainly not
when the world’s No. 1 player is on this kind
of a roll.
“Tiger played unbelievable,” Singh said.
“He made two eagles and just took it away.”
Byron Nelson won 11 straight tournaments in 1945, a streak regarded as one of
the most untouchable in sports. Woods won
six straight at the end of 1999 and the start of
2000, and Ben Hogan won six in a row in
1948.
Woods now takes a week off before heading to England for the HSBC World Match
Play Championship, followed by the Ryder
Cup. His next PGA Tour start will be the
American Express Championship outside
London at the end of September.
Page 8 - STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006
Sports Spectrum
Football
Prep Poll
The Associated Press’ Top 10 teams in
each of Tennessee’s five Division I nonfinancial aid classifications and in the
combined Division II financial aid classification as selected by Tennessee APmember sport swriters and broadcasters. With first-place votes in parentheses, records through September 4, total
points based on 10 points for a firstplace vote through one point for a 10thplace vote:
Class 5A
Record Pts Prv
1.Dob. Ben. (3)
3-0 109
2
2.O. Ridge (4)
2-0 95
1
3.Franklin (2)
3-0 94
3
4.Smyrna
3-0 70
5
5.Ridgeway (1)
3-0 68
6
6.Ooltewah (2)
3-0 64
7
7.Riverdale
2-1 60
4
8. Ger.town (1)
2-0 55
10
9. Gallatin
2-0 44
9
10. Antioch
2-0
9
Others receiving 12 or more points:
Class 4A
Record Pts Prv
1. Maryville (12)
3-0 129
1
2. Knoxville Central
3-0 99
2
3. Hillsboro
2-0 85
3
(tie) Morristown West 3-0 85
4
5. Melrose (1)
2-1 80
5
6. Red Bank
3-0 79
6
7. Cleveland
2-0 34
8
8. Jackson C-M
1-1 31
7
9. Maplewood
2-0 23
10. Sullivan South
2-1 21
10
Others receiving 12 or more points: 11,
Tennessee 13.
Class 3A
Record Pts Prv
1. Knoxville Catholic (7) 3-0 115
1
2. Knoxville Fulton (3) 2-0 109
2
3. David Lipscomb
2-1 82
4
4. Covington (1)
2-0 81
5
5. Crockett County (2) 2-0 69
3
6. Dyersburg
3-0 64
6
7. Jackson South Side 2-0 48
9
8. Dyer County
3-0 17
(tie) Giles County
3-0 17
10. Fayette Ware
3-0 16
Others receiving 12 or more points: 11,
Mitchell 15. 12, Notre Dame 12. 12,
Knoxville Carter 12.
Class 2A
Record Pts Prv
1. Goodpasture (5)
3-0 121
1
2. Alcoa (8)
1-1 114
2
3. Tyner Academy
2-0 98
3
4. CPA
2-0 83
4
5. Huntingdon
1-1 67
5
6. Loudon
2-0 57
7
7. Lewis County
3-0 54
8
8. Camden
1-1 28
9
9. Milan
1-1 20
10. Booker T. Washington3-0 13
Others receiving 12 or more points:
Class A
Record Pts Prv
1. Friendship Chris.
(8) 3-0 123
1
2. South Pittsburg (2) 2-0 104
2
3. Jo Byrns (1)
3-0 93
4
4. Coalfield (1)
3-0 77
6
5. Fayette Academy
3-0 67
7
6. Jackson Christian
2-1 58
5
7. Hampton
1-1 36
10
8. Cosby
3-0 20
9. Union City
1-1 19
8
10. Watertown
2-0 18
Others receiving 12 or more points: 11,
Temple 15. 12, Unaka 13. 13, Forrest 12.
Division II
Record Pts Prv
1. Brentwood (7)
3-0 118
1
2. McCallie (3)
2-0 109
2
3. MUS (1)
2-1 96
3
4. Father Ryan (1)
2-0 87
9
5. ECS
3-0 69
6
6. MBA
2-1 64
4
7. Pope John Paul II (1) 2-1 52
10
8. CBHS
2-1 48
4
9. Baylor
2-1 23
7
10. Knoxville Webb
2-1 19
8
Others receiving 12 or more points: 11,
Davidson Academy 14.
———
All Associated Press members in Tennessee are eligible to participate in the
high school football poll. Those who voted
for this week’s poll are: Chattanooga
Times Free Press; The Daily Herald (Columbia); Cookeville Herald-Citizen; The
Jackson Sun; Johnson City Press;
Kingsport Times-News; The Knoxville
News Sentinel; The Commercial Appeal
(Memphis); The Daily News Journal; The
Tennessean (Nashville); The Newport
Plain Talk; The Mountain Press (Sevierville); Union City Daily Messenger.
Top 25 Fared
No. 1 Ohio State (1-0) beat Northern Illinois 35-12. Next: at No. 3 Texas, Saturday,
Sept. 9.
No. 2 Notre Dame (1-0) beat Georgia
Tech 14-10. Next: vs. No. 19 Penn State,
Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 3 Texas (1-0) beat North Texas 56-7.
Next: vs. No. 1 Ohio State, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 4 Auburn (1-0) beat Washington State
40-14. Next: at Mississippi State, Saturday,
Sept. 9.
No. 5 West Virginia (1-0) beat Marshall
42-10. Next: vs. Eastern Washington, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 6 Southern Cal (1-0) beat Arkansas
50-14. Next: vs. No. 20 Nebraska, Sept.
16.
No. 7 Florida (1-0) beat Southern Miss 347. Next: vs. UCF, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 8 LSU (1-0) beat Louisiana-Lafayette
45-3. Next: vs. Arizona, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 9 California (0-1) lost to No. 23 Tennessee 35-18. Next: vs. Minnesota, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 10 Oklahoma (1-0) beat UAB 24-17.
Next: vs. Washington, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 11 Florida State (1-0) beat No. 12 Miami 13-10. Next: vs. Troy, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 12 Miami (0-1) lost to No. 11 Florida
State 13-10. Next: vs. Florida A&M, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 13 Louisville (1-0) beat Kentucky 5928. Next: at Temple, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 14 Michigan (1-0) beat Vanderbilt 277. Next: vs. Central Michigan, Saturday,
Sept. 9.
No. 15 Georgia (1-0) beat Western Kentucky 48-12. Next: at South Carolina, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 16 Iowa (1-0) beat Montana 41-7.
Next: at Syracuse, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 17 Virginia Tech (1-0) beat Northeastern 38-0. Next: at North Carolina, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 18 Clemson (1-0) beat Florida Atlantic
54-6. Next: at Boston College, Saturday,
Sept. 9.
No. 19 Penn St. (1-0) beat Akron 34-16.
Next: at No. 2 Notre Dame, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 20 Nebraska (1-0) beat Louisiana
Tech 49-10. Next: vs. Nicholls State, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 21 Oregon (1-0) beat Stanford 48-10.
Next: at Fresno State, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 22 TCU (1-0) beat Baylor 17-7. Next:
vs. UC Davis, Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 23 Tennessee (1-0) beat No. 9 Califor-
nia 35-18. Next: vs. Air Force, Saturday,
Sept. 9.
No. 24 Arizona State (1-0) beat North Arizona 35-14, Thursday. Next: vs. Nevada,
Saturday, Sept. 9.
No. 25 Texas Tech (1-0) beat SMU 35-3.
Next: at UTEP, Saturday, Sept. 9.
Baseball
MLB Glance
American League
East Division
W
L
Pct
GB
New York
82
54
.603
—
Boston
74
64
.536
9.0
Toronto
72
66
.522 11.0
Baltimore
61
76
.445 21.5
Tampa Bay
55
83
.399 28.0
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Detroit
85
53
.616
—
Minnesota
79
57
.581
5.0
Chicago
79
58
.577
5.5
Cleveland
65
71
.478 19.0
Kansas City
51
88
.367 34.5
West Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Oakland
79
58
.577
—
Los Angeles
73
65
.529
6.5
Texas
71
68
.511
9.0
Seattle
64
73
.467 15.0
———
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees 10, Minnesota 1
Tampa Bay 7, Seattle 6
Texas 5, Cleveland 2
Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 3
Toronto 6, Boston 1
Oakland 10, Baltimore 1
L.A. Angels 2, Detroit 1
Monday’s Games
Detroit 6, Seattle 2
Toronto 4, Cleveland 3
Minnesota 2, Tampa Bay 1
Texas 8, Oakland 1
Boston 3, Chicago White Sox 2, 10 innings
N.Y. Yankees 12, Kansas City 5
L.A. Angels 1, Baltimore 0
Today’s Games
Seattle (Woods 4-2) at Detroit (Bonderman 11-7), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Vazquez 11-8) at
Boston (Gabbard 0-3), 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Sowers 6-3) at Toronto (Halladay 16-5), 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota (J.Santana 16-5) at Tampa Bay
(Seo 3-9), 7:15 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Mussina 13-5) at Kansas
City (De La Rosa 3-4), 8:10 p.m.
Texas (Eaton 4-4) at Oakland (Saarloos 76), 10:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Benson 10-10) at L.A. Angels
(Lackey 11-9), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Seattle (Meche 9-8) at Detroit (Rogers 156), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (Padilla 13-9) at Oakland (Blanton
14-10), 3:35 p.m.
Baltimore (D.Cabrera 7-9) at L.A. Angels
(E.Santana 13-7), 3:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Contreras 11-7) at
Boston (Snyder 4-3), 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Westbrook 12-8) at Toronto
(Lilly 11-12), 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota (Silva 8-13) at Tampa Bay
(Hammel 0-2), 7:15 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (R.Johnson 15-10) at
Kansas City (Hernandez 5-8), 8:10 p.m.
National League
East Division
W
L
Pct
GB
New York
84
52
.618
—
Philadelphia
70
68
.507 15.0
Florida
69
68
.504 15.5
Atlanta
66
71
.482 18.5
Washington
60
77
.438 24.5
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
St. Louis
73
63
.537
—
Cincinnati
68
70
.493
6.0
Houston
67
71
.486
7.0
Milwaukee
63
75
.457 11.0
Chicago
55
82
.401 18.5
Pittsburgh
55
83
.399 19.9
West Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Los Angeles
73
64
.533
—
San Diego
71
66
.518
2.0
San Francisco 69
69
.500
4.5
Arizona
64
73
.467
9.0
Colorado
63
74
.460 10.0
———
Sunday’s Games
Washington 5, Arizona 3
Philadelphia 8, Atlanta 7, 1st game
Atlanta 3, Philadelphia 1, 11 in., 2nd game
Florida 10, Milwaukee 3
Houston 2, N.Y. Mets 1
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 3
San Francisco 7, Chicago Cubs 4
San Diego 2, Cincinnati 1
Colorado 12, L.A. Dodgers 5
Monday’s Games
Florida 8, Arizona 5
Washington 4, St. Louis 1
Milwaukee 6, L.A. Dodgers 3
Pittsburgh 5, Chicago Cubs 4
Philadelphia 3, Houston 2, 10 innings
San Francisco 5, Cincinnati 4, 10 innings
Atlanta 5, N.Y. Mets 0
San Diego 7, Colorado 5
Today’s Games
Arizona (Vargas 10-9) at Florida (Willis 910), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Pettitte 13-13) at Philadelphia
(Wolf 3-0), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Suppan 10-7) at Washington
(Astacio 3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Smoltz 12-7) at N.Y. Mets
(Williams 4-3), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Morris 10-11) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 11-9), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Santos 5-9) at Chicago Cubs
(Mateo 1-2), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Hendrickson 5-14) at Milwaukee (Davis 9-9), 8:05 p.m.
Colorado (Francis 11-10) at San Diego
(Young 10-5), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
San Francisco (Lowry 7-8) at Cincinnati
(Undecided), 12:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Carpenter 13-6) at Washington
(Traber 3-3), 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Villarreal 9-1) at N.Y. Mets
(Glavine 12-6), 1:10 p.m.
Houston (Rodriguez 9-8) at Philadelphia
(Undecided), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (Ed.Gonzalez 1-2) at Florida
(Sanchez 6-2), 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Duke 8-13) at Chicago Cubs
(Hill 4-6), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Lowe 13-8) at Milwaukee
(Capuano 11-9), 8:05 p.m.
Colorado (Jennings 7-12) at San Diego
(Hensley 8-11), 10:05 p.m.
MLB Game Capsules
American League
Yankees ..............................................12
Royals ...................................................5
Jorge Posada started a 10-run, eighth-inning comeback with a two-run homer and
Robinson Cano capped it with a three-run
drive to lead the Yankees over Kansas City.
Bobby Abreu had four RBIs for the Yankees (82-54), who moved a season-high
28 games over .500 and maintained a
nine-game lead in the AL East over second-place Boston.
Twins .....................................................2
Devil Rays .............................................1
Rondell White hit a go-ahead, two-run
homer in the seventh off Tim Corcoran (47), his first in 61 at-bats at Tampa Bay, and
Minnesota regained the wild-card lead by
moving a half-game ahead of the White
Sox. The Twins have won 13 in a row
against Tampa Bay.
Boof Bonser (4-5), pitching for the first
time in his hometown, allowed one run and
five hits in 6 1-3 innings to get the win. He
departed after center fielder Torii Hunter
made a leaping catch at the wall on Kevin
Witt’s drive leading off the seventh.
Joe Nathan pitched the ninth for his 29th
save.
Red Sox .................................................3
White Sox ..............................................2
Sparked by the return of Manny Ramirez,
Trot Nixon and Jason Varitek, the Red Sox
tied the score in the ninth and won on Carlos Pena’s home run off Brandon McCarthy (3-6) leading off the 10th at Fenway Park.
Boston, which won for just the third time in
10 games, trailed 2-1 in the ninth when
Ramirez walked on four pitches leading off
against Bobby Jenks. He moved to second
on Nixon’s groundout to first, then scored
on Mike Lowell’s double into the left-field
corner. It was just the third blown save in
42 chances for Jenks.
Pena’s homer was his first since last Oct.
2. Mike Timlin (6-4) pitched a hitless inning
for Boston, which trails the Twins by six
games in the wild-card race.
Tigers.....................................................6
Mariners ................................................2
Omar Infante’s two-run double keyed a
four-run seventh and Nate Robertson (1211) allowed one run and eight hits in seven
innings for Detroit, which increased its AL
Central lead to five games.
Jarrod Washburn (8-13) lost for the second time in six starts, giving up six runs
and six hits in 6 2-3 innings. Detroit had
lost eight of 11, while the Mariners are 114 in their last 15 road games.
Angels ...................................................1
Orioles ...................................................0
Jered Weaver (10-2) scattered six hits over
seven innings, struck out five and walked
one to get the win at Anaheim.
Francisco Rodriguez got three outs for his
39th save, tying Chicago’s Bobby Jenks for
the major league lead. Los Angeles closed
within 6 1/2 games of Oakland, the AL
West leader.
Juan Rivera doubled in the fourth against
Rodrigo Lopez (9-15) and scored on a twoout single by Adam Kennedy.
Rangers .................................................8
Athletics ................................................1
Texas rookie Nelson Cruz hit an insidethe-park homer and a three-run shot on
the way to a career-high five RBIs.
Robinson Tejeda (4-3) took a shutout into
the seventh at Oakland, Ian Kinsler added
a solo homer and Eric Young hit a two-run
double in his first big league at-bat in more
than a month.
Frank Thomas singled in Oakland’s only
run — it was unearned — in the seventh,
and the Big Hurt tied Fred McGriff for 36th
on the RBIs list at 1,550.
Barry Zito (15-9) allowed seven runs, six
hits and six walks in 5 1-3 innings.
Blue Jays...............................................4
Indians...................................................3
Vernon Wells and Reed Johnson homered
at Toronto.
With the score 2-2, Cleveland’s C.C.
Sabathia (10-9) walked Aaron Hill starting
the sixth and then Wells hit a 0-2 pitch over
the right-field wall for his 31st homer.
Brandon League (1-2) pitched an inning,
and B.J Ryan got six outs for his 30th save.
National League
Nationals ...............................................4
Cardinals ...............................................1
Ramon Ortiz punctuated a dramatic holiday weekend for the Washington Nationals
with a near no-hitter.
Ortiz came within three outs of ending the
majors’ longest drought of no-hitters Monday as the Nationals beat St. Louis.
The Nationals have won five straight, all in
dramatic fashion. On Sunday, they became the first team win four in a row when
trailing by two runs in the seventh or later
since the 1923 New York Giants.
Padres ...................................................7
Rockies..................................................5
At San Diego, rookie Josh Barfield hit a
three-run homer off Colorado’s Brian
Fuentes (3-4) with one out in the ninth after walks to Mike Cameron and pinch-hitter
Mike Piazza.
Barfield finished with four RBIs. Rudy
Seanez (1-0) pitched one inning as the
Padres closed within two games of NL
West-leading Los Angeles and maintained
a 1 1/2-game margin over Philadelphia in
the wild-card race.
Giants ....................................................5
Reds.......................................................4
At Cincinnati, Barry Bonds hit a tying, tworun homer in the eighth and Shea Hillenbrand had a solo shot in the 10th off Reds
reliever David Weathers (4-4). With 730
homers, Bonds is 25 shy of Hank Aaron’s
career record.
Ken Griffey Jr. dug his right cleats into the
padded wall while vainly trying to catch
Bonds’ homer, which landed in the first row
in right-center field. Griffey left with a dislocated toe next to the big toe on his right
foot.
The Giants have won three in a row and 15
of 21, closing within 2 1/2 games of San
Diego, the NL wild-card leader. They
reached .500 (69-69) for the first time
since July 27.
Cincinnati has lost nine of 10 and trails the
Padres by 3 1/2 games.
Kevin Correia (1-0) retired four in a row,
and Mike Stanton pitched the 10th for his
sixth save.
Marlins...................................................8
Diamondbacks......................................5
At Miami, Joe Borchard’s three-run homer
capped a six-run sixth and the Marlins (6968) became the first team in major league
history to climb above .500 after being 20
games under. Florida, 11-31 on May 21, is
two games back of the Padres.
Enrique Gonzalez (3-7) took a one-hitter
into the sixth but dropped to 0-5 in his last
nine starts. Arizona has lost six in a row
despite leading in each of the past five
games.
Randy Messenger (2-7), recalled before
the game from Class-A Jupiter, pitched a
perfect sixth and Joe Borowski had a 1-2-3
ninth for his 33rd save.
Phillies...................................................3
Astros ....................................................2
At Philadelphia, Chase Utley homered off
Dave Borkowski (1-2) with two outs in the
10th as the Phillies stopped a 12-game
losing streak to Houston that dated to May
18, 2003.
Rick White (3-1) pitched a scoreless 10th,
retiring the final two batters to strand a runner on third.
Houston’s Roger Clemens left his 15th
start of the season with a strained right
groin after allowing only one hit in five innings but hopes to make his next scheduled turn this weekend. The Astros trail
San Diego by 4 1/2 games.
Braves ...................................................5
Mets .......................................................0
At New York, Chuck James (8-3) pitched
one-hit ball for eight neat innings, scored
twice and got his first hit of the season.
Helped by a string of strong defensive
plays, he allowed only a second-inning single off the left-field fence to New York’s
David Wright, who was thrown out at second by Matt Diaz.
Adam LaRoche and Edgar Renteria each
drove in two runs for the Braves, five
games back in the NL wild-card race.
Atlanta took advantage of a season-high
seven walks by Steve Trachsel (14-6) and
gave manager Bobby Cox his 2,158th win,
which moved him ahead of Hall of Famer
Bucky Harris for fifth place on the career
list. The Mets have one run and five hits in
their last two games.
Brewers .................................................6
Dodgers.................................................3
At Milwaukee, Greg Maddux (12-12) lost
his first decision since joining the Dodgers
as the Brewers ended a 10-game losing
streak.
Maddux, 3-1 since he was acquired from
the Cubs on July 31, gave up six runs and
10 hits in 5 1-3 innings.
Dave Bush (10-10) allowed three runs and
eight hits and struck out five in 7 1-3 innings for the victory.
Pirates ...................................................5
Cubs ......................................................4
At Chicago, Xavier Nady’s three-run double capped a four-run first off Carlos Zambrano (14-6), who left the shortest outing
of his career after 1 1-3 innings because of
lower back stiffness.
Pittsburgh’s Paul Maholm (7-10) gave up
four runs, three hits and three walks in five
innings.
Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX—Signed RHP Daniel
Bard. Recalled LHP Javier Lopez from
Pawtucket of the IL.
MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled OF Josh
Rabe from Rochester of the IL.
TAMPA BAY DEVIL RAYS—Recalled C
Shawn Riggans from Durham of the IL.
Purchased the contract of RHP Juan
Salas from Durham.
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES—Optioned Anthony
Lerew to Richmond of the IL.
CHICAGO CUBS—Activated RHP Carlos
Marmol from the 15-day DL. Recalled INF
Scott Moore from Iowa of the PCL.
CINCINNATI REDS—Recalled INF Ray
Olmedo from Louisville of the IL and RHP
Matt Belisle and LHP Chris Michalak from
Sarasota of the GCL. Purchased the contract of OF Dewayne Wise from Louisville.
Recalled RHP Elizardo Ramirez from
Louisville and placed him on the 60-day
DL.
COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled C J.D.
Closser and purchased the contract of
RHP Nate Field from Colorado Springs of
the PCL.
FLORIDA MARLINS—Recalled RHP Jose
Garcia from Carolina of the SL and RHP
Randy Messenger from Jupiter of the FSL.
PHILADELPHIA
PHILLIES—Recalled
LHP Matt Smith from Clearwater of the
FSL.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS—Signed OL Chris
Liwienski. Released SS Ernest Shazor.
BUFFALO BILLS—Signed QB C.J. Leak to
the practice squad.
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed C Ben
Wilkerson, S John Busing, TE Ronnie
Ghent, DE Eric Henderson, WR Glenn
Holt, G Nate Livings and FB Naufahu Tahi
to the practice squad.
DALLAS
COWBOYS—Claimed
DT
J’Vonne Parker off waivers from Cleveland. Released NT Thomas Johnson.
Signed TE Jerome Collins, QB Matt Baker,
WR Skyler Green, OL D’Anthony Batiste,
TE Tony Curtis, RB Keylon Kincade, DE
Stephen Bowen and DB Quincy Butler to
the practice squad.
GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed TE Zac
Alcorn, S Atari Bigby, CB Patrick Dendy,
WR Chris Francies, WR Calvin Russell, OT
Travis Leffew, FB Brandon Miree and DE
Dave Tollefson to the practice squad.
HOUSTON TEXANS—Signed RB Ron
Dayne. Signed S Kevin Curtis, QB Quinton
Porter, WR Richie Ross and G Mike Brisiel
to the practice squad.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Claimed LB
Rocky Boiman off waivers from Dallas and
DE Bo Schobel off waivers from Tennessee. Signed OL Matt Ulrich. Signed QB
Josh Betts, DT Vincent Burns, OL Daniel
Federkeil and TE Joey Hawkins to the
practice squad.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed QB
Casey Printers, CB Michael Bragg, C
Johnathan Ingram, TE Adam Johnson, LB
William Kershaw, DE Clint Mitchell, WR
Donovan Morgan and DT Stephen
Williams to the practice squad.
MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed RB Lee Suggs, TE Tim Massaquoi and LB Keith
Adams. Waived LB Mike Labinjo.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Signed G Steve
Edwards. Waived DE Jayme Mitchell.
Signed WR Jason Carter and RB Wendell
Mathis to the practice squad.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed WR
Bam Childress to the practice squad.
NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed DE Adrian
Awasom, CB Gerrick McPhearson, TE
Darcy Johnson, TE Charles Davis, WR Anthony Mix, RB James Sims, DL Marcus
Green and LB Tyson Smith to the practice
squad.
OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed TE Derek
Miller, WR Burl Toler, WR Will Buchanon,
LB Ricky Brown, OL Chris Morris and DL
Bryant McNeal to the practice squad.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Signed LB
Torrance Daniels, TE Tim Day, S Dustin
Fox, WR Michael Gasperson, C Jasper
Harvey, WR Bill Sampy, and FB Zach Tuiasosopo to the practice squad.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Signed QB
Brian St. Pierre to the practice squad. Released FB John Kuhn from the practice
squad.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed DT
Damane Duckett, WR Cory Rodgers and
LB Jeremy Mincey to the practice squad.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Signed DE
Charles Bennett, DT Anthony Bryant, RB
Lionel Gates, WR Chas Gessner, OL Scott
Jackson, FB Rick Razzano and OT Dennis
Roland to the practice squad.
Sportscast
Television
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m. — (TBS) Atlanta Braves at New
York Mets
TENNIS
11 a.m. — (USA) U.S. Open
Work cut out for EHS
For the second consecutive
season, Elizabethton is off to a
rocky 0-3 start after losses to
Dobyns-Bennett, Science Hill
and Tennessee High.
The Cyclones have an open
date this week before hosting
Sullivan North on September
15.
What many considered to be
a sure win is no longer. North
could possibly enter the contest
at 3-0 with a win on Friday
night over David Crockett. The
Golden Raiders have knocked
off Volunteer and Sullivan East
by identical scores of 21-7.
The Cyclones have been
outscored by its opponents 9119 in its three game skid. Those
three opponents have a combined record of 7-0 and have
outscored their opposition 21233.
After being one of the kingpins in Northeast Tennessee for
several seasons, Elizabethton
now wears the bulls-eye for
ever opponent on its schedule.
For many, beating the Cyclones is about as good as winning a playoff game. For others,
its about bragging rights.
After
North
comes
Greeneville who must play Sullivan South and Cocke County
before entertaining the Cyclones. Elizabethton must also
travel to “Death Valley” to play
South and Sullivan Central on
October 20.
Johnson County would love
nothing more than to knock off
the city slickers in week 10. The
Horns are capable after beating
a very good Hampton squad
17-14 in week zero.
Expect Tennessee High and
Sullivan South to make the
playoffs. The other two spots
will be up for grabs. The open
date couldn’t have come at a
better time for Elizabethton.
The North game looms big
for ‘Betsy. Can Elizabethton
find its offense next week? Can
the defense step up and shut
down the North offense?
Don’t expect “Raiders of the
Lost Ark” to show up in town.
It’s the Cyclones who must find
its ship and set sail toward a
playoff berth. A loss could
mean ‘Betsy missing out on the
post season, something that
Cyclone fans are not accustomed to.
Hampton
The Bulldogs will get a more
stern test against Unicoi this
week. The Blue Devils are
much improved since last season but will have its hands full
trying to stop Adam Townsend
and company.
Hampton hardly broke a
sweat while knocking off Jellico
last week, while Unicoi was
getting pounded by Johnson
County 49-21.
This same Blue Devil squad
disposed of Happy Valley 3518 after dropping a heartbreak-
Tim Chambers
ing 19-18 decision to South
Greene in week zero.
It was in 1983 that a Hampton Bulldog squad went into
Gentry Stadium as a huge underdog and knocked off the #5
team in the state.
Unicoi would love to return
the favor.
A win over Hampton would
be bigger than the hanging of
Mary the elephant back in 1916
in downtown Erwin. More
than 2500 people witnessed the
execution.
Expect about than many on
Friday night at J.C. Campbell
Stadium.
Unaka
The Rangers will have its
hands full on the road at Tennessee Temple on Friday. Unaka must find a way to slow
down Seth Skogan (6’4 224, Sr.)
who many have said is a can’t
miss D-1 prospect.
Skogan is averaging 26.3
yards per catch with 184 yards
in wins over Sequatchie County and Lookout Valley.
In last week’s win he caught
six passes for 151 yards, added
a 67-yard touchdown reception
and booted four extra points.
Josh Smith rushed for 125 yards
while Joey Skogan added 99.
Unaka has outscored its opponents 95-6 in three contest,
yielding only 39 yards of total
offense in Friday’s win over
Grace Christian.
Should the Rangers knocked
off Temple on Friday, they
might possibly crack the top 10
before Hampton comes calling
on the on September 15.
Sycamore
Drive-In
&
Sports Spectrum
Player of the week: Adam
Townsend, Hampton
Townsend scored everytime
he touched the football. In only
three rushing attempts he had
two 55-yard scores and a 24yard touchdown.
He also returned a punt for
68-yards and hauled in a 37yard touchdown pass from
Michael Lunsford.
Cheeseburger, fries and a Dr.
Enuff for the little “Superman.”
Without Mary the elephant
at nose-guard, expect the Devils to have a hard time stopping
Adam up the middle this week.
Roethlisberger out at
least 1 game after
having appendectomy
PITTSBURGH (AP) —
Ben Roethlisberger missed
no playing or practice time
despite nearly dying during
a June motorcycle accident.
A case of appendicitis will
keep him out of the Super
Bowl champion Pittsburgh
Steelers’ season opener.
Roethlisberger will sit out
the NFL’s showcase Thursday night game against Miami after having an appendectomy Sunday, not long
after reporting for practice
with stomach pains and
nausea.
“The surgery went well,”
coach Bill Cowher said. “He
is obviously going to be out
this week and we will go
week to week from there.”
The operation was the
third in less than a year for
the 24-year-old Roethlisberger, who is off to one of
the best career starts of any
quarterback in NFL history.
He was in the operating
room for seven hours following his scary motorcycle
accident on June 12, mostly
to repair facial damage, and
had arthroscopic knee surgery midway through last
season.
Charlie Batch, a former
Lions starter who was 2-0 as
a fill-in for Roethlisberger
last season, will start
against the Dolphins.
Roethlisberger’s
latest
medical setback followed an
uneventful training camp
that began with questions
about whether he was fully
recovered from the crash
and ended with him playing
better in the preseason than
he did a year ago.
It was not immediately
known if the motorcycle accident might have caused
any internal damage that
subsequently resulted in the
appendicitis. All of Roethlisberger’s known injuries
from the crash — a broken
nose, orbital bones and upper and lower jaw, damaged
teeth and a concussion —
were to his head.
According to various
medical
journals,
one
cause of appendicitis can
be a perforation in the appendix. But, unless there
is severe bleeding, an otherwise healthy patient
such as Roethlisberger often is released within 24
hours of an appendectomy and has a relatively
short recovery time.
Roethlisberger is the
youngest quarterback to
win a Super Bowl, doing
so at age 23 as the Steelers
beat Seattle 21-10 on Feb.
5. He has a 27-4 record
while leading the Steelers
to two AFC championship
games and one Super
Bowl in two seasons.
STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006 - Page 9
Cutcliffe
n Continued from 7
the hot seat.
• As soon as the Volunteers
whipped the Golden Bears, the
same national writers that sang
Cal’s praises prior to the season
were off the bandwagon calling
the squad overrated.
Ladies and gents, the Golden Bears aren’t that overrated.
Tennessee is just that darn
good.
Mark it down, Cal runs the
table up to their big meeting
with USC and will finish the
regular season in the Top 20
playing in a decent bowl game.
• What about Jerod Mayo?
People were commenting
about John Chavis’ new linebackers and Mayo didn’t disappoint.
The sophomore linebacker
recorded a career-high seven
tackles, including three quarterback sacks, in the Vols’ rout
earning the Walter Camp Division 1-A National Defensive
Player of the Week and SEC Defensive Player of the Week
awards.
Mayo anchored a Tennessee
defense that held Heisman candidate Marshawn Lynch and
the Golden Bears offense to 64
yards rushing for the game.
He also became the first Vol
since Kevin Simon to log three
sacks in a game.
• Our media competition
will be more excited than most
for this week’s Tennessee-Air
Force game.
Air Force brings the last East
Tennessee State football coach,
Paul Hamilton, into Neyland
Stadium.
Hamilton, who currently
coaches the Falcon fullbacks
following a dismal stint at Elon,
won some big games as skipper
of the Buccaneers. He also
failed to coach hyped teams to
their potential.
Paul’s a nice guy and is a
good position coach. I don’t
think he’s an overwhelmingly
good head coach, and the interest of ETSU football collapsed
during his tenure.
• I’m one of many who believe the fans in Neyland Stadium should give the Air Force
football team a standing ovation when they run through the
tunnel at Neyland Stadium
These are the same young
men that protect our country
everyday, allowing guys like
me to be writing this column.
Saturday’s game kicks off at
7 p.m. and will be available only on pay-per-view
• Speaking of Cutcliffe, I
wonder who he’ll be pulling for
during NBC’s Sunday Night
Football debut this week?
The NFL’s opening weekend is highlighted by the first
meeting between Peyton and
Eli Manning, perhaps the top
two quarterbacks he’s coached,
as the Indianapolis Colts square
off against the New York Giants.
I bet Archie and Olivia will
be glad when this week’s over.
Luckily for the loser of the
game, revenge will be available
during the next season of ESPN’s “Battle of the Gridiron
Stars.”
———
Local Prep Picks
UNICOI COUNTY AT
HAMPTON
The Blue Devils of Erwin are
a much-improved squad this
season. A lot of credit goes to
new coach Doug Cooper.
Can the team stop Hampton’s speedy backfield? I’m not
so sure.
The Bulldogs will also need
to stop the Blue Devil run, led
by quarterback Ryan Scott. If
Hampton can contain Scott and
Daniel Bishop, they win.
BULLDOGS 24-6
UNAKA AT TEMPLE
One of the state’s top games
will take place this week as two
Class A teams vying for a spot
in the top ten rankings will
meet in Chattanooga.
The state’s 11th-ranked Temple squad will host the 12thranked Rangers in what could
be a solid contest.
A year ago, Temple handed
Unaka a lopsided loss on the
Creek. Again, that was last
year’s Ranger team.
I expect Donald Ensor’s
squad to surprise some in Chattanooga with their improvement, but Temple plays in a
tougher league and has beaten
tougher opponents thus far.
TEMPLE 21-16
CLOUDLAND AT
CHEROKEE
The Highlanders fell to a
tough Cosby squad last week,
lifting the Eagles to a number
eight ranking in this week’s
Class Apoll.
They now face the task of
facing an unbeaten Chiefs
squad that returns several from
last season. It’ll be a tough task
in Rogersville. CHIEFS 33-14
Elizabethton and Happy
Valley have this week off.
———
Statewide Prep Picks
Oak Ridge 28, Dobyns-Bennett 7
Cosby 55, West Greene 0
Coalfield 21, Oliver Springs
12
Grace Christian 7, Red Boiling Springs 0
Sullivan
South
32,
Greeneville 22
Tennessee High 28, Science
Hill 21
Sullivan East 21, Volunteer
20
MBA14, CPA0
Goodpasture 21, Pope John
Paul 14
Pearl-Cohn 24, Overton 10
Meridian, MS 18, Brentwood Academy 13
Trousdale County 44, Smith
County 21
MUS 22, ECS 21
CBHS 27, Melrose 20
Whitehaven 15, Trezevant 11
Central-Merry 15, Haywood
County 0
Alcoa 36, Fulton 20
Last Week: 14-6
Overall: 34-16
A little better on the
statewide selections, but I was
far from right on a few local
picks.
———
STAR OFFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE WEEK: Adam
Townsend, Hampton
Touching the football just
four times in the first half,
Townsend reeled off four quick
scores in the Bulldogs’ victory
over Jellico Friday night.
“O.J.” also hauled in a receiving score to finish the contest with 292 total yards and
five scores.
In two weeks, Townsend has
381 rushing yards and four
scores. It’ll be hard to keep his
name off the Mr. Football trophy if the Bulldogs keep winning and he keeps putting up
those numbers.
STAR DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE WEEK: Jacob Estep, Unaka
Somebody else needs to step
up and knock Estep off his
perch. For the third consecutive
week, Estep takes this award after recording 14 tackles and an
interception in the Rangers’ victory over Grace Christian.
BEEFY BOYS AWARD:
Hampton Bulldogs line
The big boys in blue take the
award this week, allowing 396
yards of offense in the team’s
win over Jellico.
———
Statewide Player to Watch:
Rae Sykes, Alcoa
No wonder Gary Rankin left
Riverdale to coach Alcoa. He
gets to coach players such as
Rae Sykes.
The 6-4, 240-pound defensive end is ranked No. 22 in the
country at his position as a
four-star prospect by Scout.com
Last season he recorded 85
tackles, but didn’t get to participate in Alcoa’s State Championship victory over Goodpasture due to breaking his humorous bone.
Sykes has medium interest
in Florida State, LSU and Tennessee, who have all offered
him.
Florida State signed teammate Brandon Warren, who
starred at the opposite end at
Alcoa, a year ago.
He has also fielded offers
and has low interest in Clemson, Georgia, Mississippi and
Notre Dame.
(Wes Holtsclaw can be
reached
via
e-mail
at
[email protected])
Photo by Eveleigh Hatfield
Twins congratulate Brian Dinkelman after he took the lead in the fifth inning with a home
run against the Braves.
Twins
n Continued from 7
“That’s the biggest hit I’ve
ever had in my life,” stated
Brezeale. “I thought about it
while in the on deck circle and
it worked out for me this
time.”
Dinkelman, Santiesteban,
and Land collected two hits
each for Elizabethton.
“Everything was setup for
us pretty good,” said Twins
skipper Ray Smith. “We
brought Land in to face some
of those left handed bats but
we just didn’t make the pitches
when we had two.
“On the ball that Brezeale
hit, I actually thought the ball
speeding on pit road halfway
through the 250-lap race
could stop Kahne, who fell
back briefly to 24th. His No. 9
Evernham
Motorsports
Dodge stuck with the leaders
and, thanks to a two-tire pit
stop on lap 176 that got him
up to second, Kahne was in
position to drive past Dale
Earnhardt Jr. for the lead after
the green flag came back out
on lap 180.
After falling back again
when several other cars made
two-tire pit stops, Kahne outdueled new teammate Elliott
Sadler to regain the top spot
on lap 197. But there was yet
another challenge.
Several drivers tried to
stretch their final tank of gas
to the finish and the 20-yearold Sorenson, who drives for
Chip Ganassi Racing with Felix Sabates, almost pulled off
his first victory and the first
for the team since 2002. He
took the lead on lap 241 after
most of the top cars pitted for
a splash of gas and two tires.
Kahne, who gave up the
lead when he made his final
stop on lap 238, found himself in fifth, nearly 14 seconds
behind Sorenson. Kahne
charged hard, grabbing second from rookie Clint
Bowyer on lap 247, but was
still more than 7 seconds behind the leader.
But Sorenson lost his gamble, running out of gas starting lap 249. Kahne zoomed
past and raced away for the
sixth victory of his career,
beating Earnhardt to the finish by 3.428 seconds. Sorenson wound up 21st.
“You think a lot,” Kahne
said of all the ups and downs
in the race. “You think about
not making mistakes, not doing anything wrong. But you
still have to be aggressive.
“We made a lot of good
calls tonight and we definitely deserved this one.”
Kahne had slumped badly
after getting off to a tremendous start this season, with
four wins in the first 15 races.
He started the night 90
points behind 10th-place
Mark Martin and remained
11th in the battle for a spot in
the 10-man Chase. But he will
go to Richmond for next Saturday night’s race just 30
points behind Jeff Burton,
who fell behind Martin into
10th.
“I wasn’t sure how far
we’d be back, but 30’s a lot
closer than 90, and it could
have been a lot worse than
90,” Kahne said. “It’s a big
jump. Anything can happen
at Richmond. It’s going to be
a wild race there and, hopefully, we’re on the good side
of things.”
Earnhardt, who has struggled on the California oval in
his last five starts, was very
happy with his strong run
this time.
formance from Matt Williams
who retired 14 of the 16 batters
he faced working 4 2/3 innings
to get the win.
Elizabethton cut the margin
in half at 4-2 after three, then rallied for three runs in the fifth to
grab the lead for good. A Valencia homer fueled the fire while
Land and JW Wilson added run
scoring singles in the inning.
Danny Hernandez picked
up his 19 save on the season by
closing it in the seventh. Gregory Yersich provided three
hits for Elizabethton while
Santiesteban
and
Land
chipped in with two apiece.
his career against Miami —
wide left at the end of the 2002
game, another in the 2004 Orange Bowl loss to Miami, then
a block in the Hurricanes’ 1610 win that opened the 2004
season.
But Cismesia — who
missed an extra point and then
two field goals in overtime
against Penn State last season
in the Orange Bowl — finally
delivered a dagger.
Without
Weatherford’s
clutch play in the third quarter,
Cismesia may never have gotten his chance.
Weatherford — now 2-0
against Miami as a starter —
had third-down passes of 28
and 34 yards to breathe life into a stagnant Florida State offense, setting up Surratt’s score
that pulled the Seminoles into
a 10-10 tie.
A close game shouldn’t
have surprised anyone at the
Orange Bowl — this marked
the seventh time in the last
eight meetings between the
schools that the outcome was
decided by eight points or less.
Cismesia hit a 37-yard field
goal 6:04 into the game, opening the scoring.
Miami’s first scoring drive
was highlighted by a 27-yard
catch by Jenkins, who adjusted
and spun to grab a slightly underthrown ball shortly before
Jones’ touchdown run with
13:02 left in the half.
Jon Peattie added a 20-yard
field goal later in the half,
pushing the margin to 10-3.
Miami’s Brandon Meriweather had an interception shortly
before halftime, giving the
Hurricanes the ball at Florida
State’s 31 — but the offense
couldn’t extend the lead, and
that
missed
opportunity
proved costly.
“We made no plays. We
made no plays in the second
half,” Coker said
FSU-Miami
n Continued from 7
With one swing of Cismesia’s right leg, finally, Gerry
Thomas, Dan Mowrey, Matt
Munyon and Xavier Beitia
could enjoy seeing a late-game
kick against the Hurricanes.
Each of Florida State’s former
kickers had missed pivotal
chances late in games against
Miami in recent years, a trend
that has long befuddled the
Seminoles.
Thomas missed in 1991,
Wide Right I.
Mowrey missed the next
year, Wide Right II.
Munyon’s miss was in 2000,
Wide Right III.
And Beitia missed three in
Kasey Kahne wins at Fontana
FONTANA, Calif. (AP) —
Kasey Kahne figured that
winning the NASCAR Nextel
Cup race at California Speedway was the one way he
could assure himself of remaining in the fight for the
upcoming playoffs.
“I came here telling myself, ‘You’ve got to win.
You’ve got to win. You have
to go out there and lead
laps,”’ Kahne said. “That’s all
you can do if you want to
make this Chase.”
Still, the 26-year-old Cup
star thought he might be setting his sights a little too
high.
“You can’t expect to win.
You can’t expect to lead the
most laps just because you
want to,” he said. “It’s way
too tough competition. But
we just hit everything right
this weekend.”
Kahne started by winning
Saturday night’s Busch Series
event on the 2-mile oval, then
led a race-high 132 of 250 laps
Sunday on the way to his series-leading fifth victory of
the season. He closed in on a
spot in the Chase with one
race remaining to get it done.
To win Sunday, Kahne had
to overcome a penalty, a series of challengers and a daring fuel gamble by rookie
Reed Sorenson at the end.
“These guys fought back
with great pit stops,” Kahne
said. “I just can’t thank this
team enough. They just
worked their butts off to get
us back in this Chase and at
least now we have a chance
going into Richmond next
week.”
Not even a penalty for
was down and away and the
kid just goes out and hits the
thing over the wall. They got
some guys who can swing the
bats. We were tying to get to
our closer.”
Game One
Elizabethton, 5-4
The Twins forced game three
by rallying from a 4-0 deficit to
defeat Danville 5-4 in the second game of the series.
Daniel Velencia provided the
offense going 4-for-4, including
a home run and two RBI’s to
key the win.
After falling behind early, the
Twins got a stellar relief per-
“We’re glad to get a second
anywhere, especially in California and (on) this kind of
race track,” said Earnhardt,
who failed to make the Chase
last year. “We’ve really
turned that around.
“I don’t really get into the
pressure of the Chase. The
pressure is trying to run
good, no matter what.”
Bowyer held on for third
place, followed by Carl Edwards, three-time California
winner Jeff Gordon, rookie
Denny Hamlin and new
points leader Matt Kenseth.
Jimmie Johnson, who finished 11th Sunday night, had
led the standings for all but
two weeks this season but
now trails Kenseth by nine
points. Those two remain the
only drivers who have
clinched berths in the 10-race
Chase. Kevin Harvick remained third, but the rest of
the top 10 was shuffled considerably.
Heading for Richmond, 72
points separate fourth-place
Jeff Gordon from Burton,
with Kyle Busch, Earnhardt,
Hamlin, defending series
champion Tony Stewart and
Martin in between.
Mauresmo beats Williams;
Roddick wins
NEW YORK (AP) — Gasping for breath after long exchanges, Serena Williams ran
out of energy and answers
against Amelie Mauresmo.
In a showdown between
two women who’ve been
ranked No. 1 and own a total
of nine Grand Slam titles, the
top-seeded Mauresmo won
nine of the last 12 points
Monday night to beat the unseeded Williams 6-4, 0-6, 6-2
and reach the U.S. Open
quarterfinals.
Williams, a seven-time
major winner and 9-1 against
Mauresmo coming in, was
superb in the second set. But
the outcome turned at 3-2 in
the final set, when a 35-stroke
exchange
ended
with
Williams pushing a backhand into the net.
The U.S. Open did indeed
proceed
without
Andre
Agassi, although a fan cried
out, “Do it for Andre!” during Andy Roddick’s fourthround match.
Roddick obliged, putting
together a 6-3, 6-4, 6-3 victory
over Benjamin Becker, the
German qualifier who ended
Agassi’s career the day before.
Roddick and No. 5 James
Blake, whose fourth-round
match against No. 12 Tomas
Berdych is Tuesday, are the
only U.S. men left in the tournament. No. 18 Robby
Ginepri bowed out with a 7-6
(1), 6-4, 3-6, 3-6, 7-6 (1) loss to
No. 14 Tommy Haas.Open
but lost in the first round last
year, part of a dismal stretch
that briefly dropped him out
of the top 10. Now he has
Jimmy Connors as his coach
and a 10-match winning
streak.
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Page 10 — STAR — TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006
Annie
Sally Forth
Dilbert
Dick Tracey
Zits
Garfield
Blondie
Hi and Lois
Peanuts
Snuffy Smith
On The Lighter Side
Crossword Fun
By: Eugene Sheffer
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Unfortunately, you are likely
to be more inclined to find
nothing but excuses as to why
things can’t be done — instead
of simply doing what needs to
be done. Unattended duties
will only get worse.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
You may not be in the mood to
display your customary ingratiating qualities when in social
situations. Friends who get on
your wrong side could be dealt
with harshly.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) You’re especially good at
being able to achieve your
objectives. Sadly, however,
you might only select targets
that are likely to produce hollow victories instead of meaningful goals.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) Take care not to operate under the false assumption
that you are the only person on
this planet capable of conceiving bright ideas. Your pals will
resent it if you belittle their
concepts.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) Cautiously scrutinize
involvements with others that
promise big returns from a
nominal investment. If your
seed money isn’t enough, you
could end up losing it to a
failed endeavor.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Persons you consort with
will have a strong influence on
your attitude, so stay away
from those who see only storm
clouds and would have you
reach for an umbrella as well.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Should you have a friend
who is never satisfied with
whatever is going on, regardless of all that is done for
him/her, chances are this person will be pounding on the
complaint desk again.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Be careful you do not accidentally malign a mutual good
friend while talking to others.
If you do, it’s likely you’ll be
putting the focus squarely on
your own shortcomings.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) If you’d like to achieve an
important goal, it would be
best not to involve others in
your endeavor. Although they
may mean well, they could end
up retarding your progress.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Be certain the facts you
have are accurate before presenting the information to others. If you haven’t checked
them out first, don’t take them
for granted. You’ll be held
accountable.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Old obligations have a way
of rearing their ugly heads at a
most inconvenient moment.
Soon, you may encounter one
of those embarrassing times
when you are challenged on a
debt in front of others.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
One-on-one dealings with others might not be one of your
strong suits. This is because
the faults you see in people
could be due to the speck in
your own eye.
WHAT’S ON TONIGHT
Donald Duck
For Tuesday
September 5, 2006
Mickey Mouse
A Look at the Stars
Henry
Cryptoquip
C C
O A
M L
M E
U N
N D
I A
T R
Y S
• Yoga Class will be held at the
Elizabethton Senior Citizens Center, 428 East G St., from 1-2 p.m.
The class will be taught by certified instructor, Barbara Webb.
There is a $2 charge. The public is
invited to attend.
• The Watauga Association
of Genealogists will meet at 5
p.m. at the Johnson City Public
Library, 101 Millard St. Contact
Margaret Hougland at 926-5964
or Mary Jane Erwin at [email protected]
• The Green Pastures Group
of Alcoholics Anonymous will
meet at 8 p.m. in the Conference Room at Crossroads, 413
East Elk Ave., Elizabethton.
• Al-Anon “Free to Be Me”
meeting will be held at the
Watauga Association of Bap-
TUESDAY, SEPT. 5
• The American Legion
Watauga Post No. 49 and the
Ladies Auxiliary will meet at the
Post Home on Watauga Avenue
at 5 p.m. This is the annual post
picnic and all members of the
Post and Auxiliary are urged to
attend.
• The Unaka Rangers Quarterback Club will meet at Unaka
High School at 7 p.m. All interested persons are invited to attend.
• Elizabethton Area Chapter
No. 1438 AARP will have a regular monthly meeting in the fellowship hall of First United
Methodist Church on E Street beginning at 2 p.m. All members
and anyone interested in becoming a member are invited to attend.
STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006 - Page 11
Johnson City. Ms. Shounda of Alcoholics Anonymous will
Stevenson of the American Red meet at 8 p.m. in the ConferCross will be the guest speaker. ence Room at Crossroads, 413
For additional information, call East Elk Ave., Elizabethton.
Wayne Robertson at 323-6219.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 9
FRIDAY, SEPT. 8
• The Community Arts Center
• Country and Bluegrass at the Bonnie Kate welcomes the
Dance Hall, located at the Out- community to an open house and
doorsman Building, 4535 High- silent auction from 10 a.m. to 3
way 11W, Kingsport, will host p.m. While visiting, the public can
Jack Willis and Eddie Trent also view artwork, meet others inwith the Countrymen Band terested in the arts, enjoy refreshfrom 7-10:30 p.m. Tickets are ments and sign up for a class.
adults $5, children $1. For more Everyone is also welcome to take
information, call 968-9637.
part in a silent auction for gifts do• The Women’s Easier Softer nated by area merchants. A meetWay Recovery Group of Alco- ing will be held at 3 p.m. to elect
holics Anonymous will meet new board members. Community
from 6-7 p.m. in the Conference participation is always welcome.
Room at Crossroads, 413 East For more information, call 542Elk Ave., Elizabethton.
5983 or send e-mail to: communit• The Green Pastures Group [email protected]
tists office, across from Elizabethton Lumber, from 6-7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 6
• The Carter County Republican Women’s Club will meet
at 12 noon in the Winford Floyd
Center of First Freewill Baptist
Church, Second St., Elizabethton. All prospective and regular
members are urged to attend.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 7
• The Roan Mountain 12
Step Group of Alcoholics
Anonymous will meet at 6 p.m.
at the McGill Presbyterian
Church, 194 Hwy. 143, Roan
Mountain.
• The Johnson City John Sevier Chapter No. 324 of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees will meet at 11
a.m. at Ryan’s Steakhouse in
FOR INFORMATION ON STOCKS, BONDS, MUTUAL FUNDS, CDs, AND IRAs CALL US.
STOCK
REPORT
DAVID WORTMAN, AAMS
504 East “E” Street
543-7848
CURT ALEXANDER, CFP
401 Hudson Drive
543-1181
Edward Jones
www.edwardjones.com
Member New York Stock Exchange, Inc and Securities Investor Protection Corporation
DAVID
CURT
THE WEEK IN REVIEW
STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS
u
NYSE
8,435.75 +117.72
GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name
Last
Systemax lf11.84
EngyPrt 25.01
AFrance wt 2.55
VeriFone 28.47
Sirva lf
2.93
Blyth
21.73
ParTech s 9.98
Vonage n 8.90
Salton h
2.68
Chiquta wt 3.20
Chg
+3.78
+6.61
+.62
+6.63
+.67
+4.82
+2.18
+1.82
+.46
+.53
%Chg
+46.9
+35.9
+32.1
+30.4
+29.6
+28.5
+27.9
+25.7
+20.7
+19.9
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
u
AMEX
2,030.22 +26.53
GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name
Last Chg %Chg
AnorM gn 9.94 +4.43 +80.4
BNP ResP 23.65 +6.40 +37.1
PolyMet gn 3.58 +.89 +33.1
Sinovac
2.65 +.63 +31.2
CVD Eqp 3.08 +.63 +25.7
OdysMar 2.59 +.51 +24.5
TgtLogis n 3.05 +.54 +21.5
HawHold 4.02 +.70 +21.1
HstnAE n 3.20 +.54 +20.3
SulphCo n 6.58 +1.10 +20.1
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
u
NASDAQ
2,193.16 +52.87
GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)
Name
Last
Summa 14.80
Versant 10.46
Expedia wt1 3.00
PSB Bn 15.83
Oilgear
14.71
Anadigc
7.97
Intervideo 12.67
PranaBio 3.15
NMT Med 14.10
Mikron
13.37
Chg
+6.34
+4.07
+1.00
+4.83
+3.93
+1.97
+3.07
+.70
+3.00
+2.70
%Chg
+74.9
+63.7
+50.0
+43.9
+36.5
+32.8
+32.0
+28.6
+27.0
+25.3
LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)
%Chg
-25.8
-22.0
-15.7
-12.0
-11.3
-10.8
-10.1
-9.9
-9.6
-9.3
Name
Last Chg %Chg
PreMD g 2.50 -.33 -11.7
iMergent 12.90 -1.64 -11.3
Xethanol n 4.40 -.55 -11.1
PyramdO n 5.84 -.71 -10.8
Jed Oil gs 15.60 -1.81 -10.4
Celsion rs 2.80 -.31 -10.0
SvcAcq wt 3.25 -.30 -8.5
Accelr8
2.20 -.20 -8.3
EXX A h
3.00 -.25 -7.7
NevGCas 5.50 -.46 -7.7
Name
Last
PegasusW n2.38
SGX Phm n 2.29
PeerlssSys 2.93
VA Sftwr 3.70
Voxware n 4.10
Bookham 3.09
SundayCm 5.90
UnivBcp
2.15
ChinaTDv lf 3.46
Kirklnds
4.25
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SPDR 2388138 131.42 +1.61
iShRs20001769575 71.82 +2.22
SemiHTr 783300 33.84 +1.07
SP Engy 707124 56.50 -1.72
OilSvHT 427085 138.23 -1.62
SP Fncl 332569 33.52 +.29
DJIA Diam 209484 114.70 +1.86
iSh EAFE 206481 68.10 +1.32
iShEmMkt 174499 98.71 +2.65
SP Util
160759 34.80 +.49
MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Nasd100Tr3879476 39.08 +.76
Intel
3274590 19.88 +.98
JDS Uniph2972397 2.27 -.31
Cisco
2672550 22.27 +1.22
SunMicro 2149520 4.99 +.14
Microsoft 1649742 25.84 -.01
CienaCp 1466934 4.02 -.12
Oracle 1357329 15.50 +.09
eBay
1208234 28.15 +2.85
AppleC lf 1195233 68.38 -.37
Name
Last
SeaCntB lf 2.22
NamTai 11.43
Advo
30.99
Natl RV h 3.46
Culp Inc h 5.25
SeaCntA lf 2.24
DmRsBW 34.00
R&G Fnc lf 7.20
Tween
31.80
Goldcrp g 27.35
Name Vol (00)
Lucent 2047936
FordM 1457305
Pfizer
1192725
ExxonMbl1018226
NortelNt lf 933748
SprintNex 858705
GenElec 823707
EMC Cp 787854
TimeWarn 754493
Motorola 739860
Chg
-.77
-3.22
-5.78
-.47
-.67
-.27
-3.80
-.79
-3.39
-2.80
Last
2.34
8.27
27.96
68.10
2.14
17.09
34.14
11.85
16.76
23.41
Chg
+.11
+.27
+.73
-2.33
+.02
+.80
+.30
+.62
+.40
+.67
DIARY
DIARY
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume
2,870
634
378
48
3,572
68
10,292,092,799
Star
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume
**********
********
*******
ELIZABETHTON
STAR
Newspaper
tubes
are the Property of
the
Elizabethton
STAR and are used
for the delivery of
our product. Any
unauthorized use of
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STAR
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tubes for distribution of any material
will result in a minimum $300 charge
to the responsible
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*****
3 ARTICLES
LOST & FOUND
BLACK, tan Aussie
Shepherd mix, female.
Lost on Smalling Rd.,
near Central School.
(423)232-0293.
DIARY
786
339
137
34
1,176
51
1,283,774,206
5 SPECIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS
EVERY
SATURDAY
NIGHT AUCTION 543
Hwy. 91, across from
the Lynn Valley Bridge.
7:00PM
WANT to buy 2 acres
+. With or without
building. Suitable for
church. Elizabethton
area or building to
rent. (423)725-3935.
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume
542-1530
2,350
889
197
104
3,317
78
7,911,260,643
AT&T Inc
AMD
Altria
Amgen
Anheusr
AppleC lf
ApldMatl
ATMOS
Avanex
BP PLC
BkofAm
BellSouth
Boeing
BrMySq
Brdcom slf
BrcdeCm
CSX s
Cendant s
Chevron
CienaCp
Cisco
Citigrp
CocaCl
Comc sp
Conexant
Corning
DaimlrC
DellInc
DirecTV
Disney
DowChm
eBay
EMC Cp
EastChm
EKodak
EmrsnEl
ExxonMbl
Finisar
FstHorizon
FleetEn
FordM
GenElec
GnMotr
GlaxoSKln
HCA Inc
Heinz
HewlettP
HomeDp
HonwllIntl
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
NY
Nasd
Nasd
NY
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
Nasd
NY
NY
Nasd
Nasd
NY
NY
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
1.33
...
3.44
...
1.18
...
.20
1.26
...
2.25
2.24
1.16
1.20
1.12
...
...
.40
...
2.08
...
...
1.96
1.24
...
...
...
1.82
...
...
.27
1.50
...
...
1.76
.50
1.78
1.28
...
1.80
...
.20
1.00
1.00
1.64
.68
1.40
.32
.60
.91
31.61
24.66
83.81
68.39
49.45
68.38
16.84
28.67
1.68
68.00
51.66
41.36
75.43
22.95
27.95
6.32
30.39
1.93
64.83
4.02
22.27
49.37
45.07
35.15
2.00
22.00
53.19
22.55
19.20
29.89
38.38
28.15
11.85
52.92
21.47
82.69
68.10
3.78
38.18
7.04
8.27
34.14
30.27
56.76
49.40
41.92
36.53
34.64
38.77
+.98
+.10
-.29
+.87
-.01
-.37
+.71
+.42
+.04
-.31
+.09
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-.59
+.16
+.70
-.04
-1.94
-.12
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+.73
+.55
-.25
-.13
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+.79
+.57
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+.15
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+.22
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+.30
+.94
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+.21
+.57
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+.12
+3.2
+0.4
-0.3
+1.3
...
-0.5
+4.4
+1.5
+2.4
-0.5
+0.2
+3.4
+2.0
+5.9
-2.1
+2.6
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-2.0
-2.9
-2.9
+5.8
+1.5
+1.2
-0.7
-6.1
+0.9
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+3.6
+3.1
+3.2
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+11.3
+5.5
+3.7
+8.0
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-3.3
+4.1
-4.5
+3.2
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+0.4
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-19.4
+12.2
-13.3
+15.1
-4.9
-6.1
+9.6
+22.6
+5.9
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+52.6
+7.4
-.1
-11.1
+55.3
+19.7
-16.5
+14.2
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-11.5
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-34.9
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-43.0
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-2.6
+55.9
+12.4
-2.2
+24.3
+27.6
-14.4
+4.1
Name
Ex
iShRs2000
Intel
IBM
JDS Uniph
JohnJn
Kellogg
Kennmtl
LSI Inds
Level3
Libbey
Lowes s
Lucent
McDnlds
MeadWvco
Merck
Microsoft
Motorola
Nasd100Tr
NortelNt lf
Nvidia s
OCharleys
Oracle
PepsiCo
Pfizer
ProctGam
Qualcom
QwestCm
Rambus lf
RiteAid
SanDisk
SaraLee
SemiHTr
SiriusS
SnapOn
SwstAirl
SprintNex
SPDR
SP Engy
SunMicro
Symantec
TempleIn
TimeWarn
Tribune
ValeroE
VerizonCm
WalMart
Wendys
Wyeth
Yahoo
Amex
Nasd
NY
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
NY
Nasd
NY
Nasd
Nasd
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
NY
Nasd
NY
Nasd
NY
Amex
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
Amex
Amex
Nasd
Nasd
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
NY
Nasd
.73 71.82
.40 19.88
1.20 81.41
... 2.27
1.50 64.72
1.16 50.52
.76 54.05
.48 18.31
... 4.31
.10 8.27
.20 27.33
... 2.34
.67 36.76
.92 25.80
1.52 40.96
.36 25.84
.20 23.41
.16 39.08
... 2.14
... 27.89
... 18.57
... 15.50
1.20 65.41
.96 27.96
1.24 61.91
.48 38.35
... 8.68
... 15.88
... 4.32
... 58.73
.79 16.70
.31 33.84
... 4.10
1.08 43.79
.02 17.22
.10 17.09
2.27 131.42
.64 56.50
... 4.99
... 18.74
1.00 45.29
.22 16.76
.72 31.25
.32 57.77
1.62 35.57
.67 45.45
.68 63.87
1.00 49.04
... 29.49
+2.22
+.98
+1.53
-.31
+.05
+1.02
+2.25
+.73
+.12
-.47
+.58
+.11
+1.53
+.35
+.90
-.01
+.67
+.76
+.02
+1.41
+1.21
+.09
+1.23
+.73
+1.04
+.97
+.02
+2.12
+.16
+4.12
+.03
+1.07
-.02
+1.46
+.28
+.80
+1.61
-1.72
+.14
-.16
+.63
+.40
-.06
-4.63
+.87
+1.57
+1.50
+1.38
+.72
+3.2
+5.2
+1.9
-12.0
+0.1
+2.1
+4.3
+4.2
+2.9
-5.4
+2.2
+4.9
+4.3
+1.4
+2.2
...
+2.9
+2.0
+0.9
+5.3
+7.0
+0.6
+1.9
+2.7
+1.7
+2.6
+0.2
+15.4
+3.8
+7.5
+0.2
+3.3
-0.5
+3.4
+1.7
+4.9
+1.2
-3.0
+2.9
-0.8
+1.4
+2.4
-0.2
-7.4
+2.5
+3.6
+2.4
+2.9
+2.5
+7.6
-20.4
-1.0
-3.8
+7.7
+16.9
+5.9
+16.9
+50.2
-19.1
-18.0
-12.0
+9.0
-8.0
+28.8
-1.2
+3.6
-3.3
-30.1
+52.6
+19.7
+26.9
+10.7
+19.9
+7.0
-11.0
+53.6
-1.9
+24.1
-6.5
-11.6
-7.6
-38.8
+16.6
+4.8
-19.3
+5.5
+12.3
+19.1
+7.1
+1.0
-3.9
+3.3
+12.0
+18.1
-2.9
+15.6
+6.4
-24.7
Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC.
n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt =
Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or
receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables
at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
12,000
11,500
For the week ending
Friday, Sept. 1
11,000
+180.10
10,500
11,464.15
10,000
Record high: 11,722.98
Jan. 14, 2000
S O N D J F M A M J J A S O
STOCK MARKET INDEXES
52-Week
High
Low
11,670.19 10,156.46
5,013.67 3,550.55
443.49
378.95
8,651.74 7,211.14
2,046.65 1,555.08
2,375.54 2,012.78
1,326.70 1,168.20
784.62
614.76
13,472.98 11,630.20
3,360.57 2,822.20
Last
Wk
Chg
Wk
%Chg
11,464.15
4,310.38
441.39
8,435.75
2,030.22
2,193.16
1,311.01
721.56
13,128.38
3,101.73
+180.10
+70.87
+2.13
+117.72
+26.53
+52.87
+15.92
+22.32
+206.82
+60.08
+1.60
+1.67
+.48
+1.42
+1.32
+2.47
+1.23
+3.19
+1.60
+1.98
Name
Dow Jones Industrials
Dow Jones Transportation
Dow Jones Utilities
NYSE Composite
AMEX Index
Nasdaq Composite
S&P 500
Russell 2000
Wilshire 5000
Lipper Growth Index
YTD 12-mo
%Chg %Chg
+6.97
+2.73
+8.96
+8.79
+15.41
-.55
+5.02
+7.18
+4.88
+.07
+9.73
+18.01
+6.56
+12.01
+20.84
+2.43
+7.63
+8.78
+7.70
+5.87
MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets
Name
Obj ($Mlns)
American Funds A: GwthFdA p XG 77,404
American Funds A: IncoFdA p BL 53,188
American Funds A: InvCoAA px LV 69,548
American Funds A: WshMutA p LV 63,207
Fidelity Invest: Contra n
XG 63,846
Fidelity Invest: Magellan n
LC 44,468
Oppenheimer A: DiscFd p
SG
538
Putnam Funds A: GrInA p
LV 11,404
Putnam Funds A: VoyA p
LG
5,535
Vanguard Fds: Wndsr n
XV 13,099
NAV
32.09
19.70
33.70
33.21
66.23
87.12
43.22
20.61
16.63
18.05
Total Return/Rank
4-wk 12-mo
5-year
+2.7 +10.0/A
+41.1/A
+1.6 +12.0/A
+55.4/A
+2.0 +12.0/B
+38.8/B
+1.9 +10.5/C
+32.8/C
+1.5 +10.6/A
+62.6/A
+2.8 +5.9/D
+12.7/D
+1.8 -0.6/E
+12.6/D
+2.1 +7.8/E
+25.2/D
+2.5 -0.6/E
-3.3/D
+3.4 +9.3/D
+39.3/D
Pct Min Init
Load
Invt
5.75
250
5.75
250
5.75
250
5.75
250
NL
2,500
NL
2,500
5.75
1,000
5.25
500
5.25
500
NL
3,000
BL -Balanced, GL -Global Stock, IL -International Stock, LC -Large-Cap Core, LG -Large-Cap Growth, LV -Large-Cap
Val., XC -Multi-Cap Core, XG -Multi-Cap Growth, XV -Multi-Cap Val.Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum
$ needed to invest in fund. NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence. Source: Lipper, Inc.
Classifieds
928-4151
6 GOODS TO EAT
& SELL
10 HELP WANTED
GENERAL
10 HELP WANTED
GENERAL
10 HELP WANTED
GENERAL
15 SERVICES
OFFERED
15 SERVICES
OFFERED
EARLY APPLES and
RASPBERRIES JOHNSON’S SMALL FRUITS,
984 Buck Mountain
Road, Elk Park, NC
(828)733-4766
benefit plan. Apply on
THURSDAY, September
7th from 3:00 p.m. to
4:30 p.m. and bring TN
Driver License, Proof of
Vehicle Liability Insurance, Social Security
Card or Birth Certificate and High School
Diploma or GED COMCARE
VOCATIONAL
TRAINING
CENTER, 3018 South
Roan Street, Johnson
City, TN (EOE) No
phone calls please.
Positions are also
available in Greeneville.
HOUSEKEEPING: Temporary, with possible
full-time future. Available to start immediately. Monday-Friday
6am-2:30pm. General
cleaning; must have
valid driver license;
some heavy lifting required.
Experience
preferred.
Applications can be obtained
at the Milligan College
Physical
Plant
(423)461-8734.
TRUCK driver wanted
for local deliveries.
Must have CDL license. 341-4735
ALLEN PLUMBING, for
all your plumbing
needs, 24 hour service, free estimates,
(423)543-5572.
L&T ROOFING METAL &
SHINGLE ROOFS. All
home improvements.
Lawn
mowing.
(423)542-2011.
Patterson
Roofing.
Shingles or metal. Reasonable prices. 25
years
experience.
Quality work. Free Estimates. (423)725-2259
LOCAL HVAC company now hiring experienced service technicians, installers and
helpers. We offer
competitive wages,
health insurance, dental insurance, life insurance, paid vacations,
holidays and 401K retirement plan. Call
928-6168. Valid drivers
license and drug testing required.
12 WORK WANTED
GEN./PROF.
BRIAN’S
STORAGE
BUILDINGS! For sale.
Display lot in Hunter
on Hwy. 91. 647-1084.
ELIZABETHTON:Construction, Trackhoe,
backhoe,
frontloader, landcleared,
site work septic systems, dirt, shale for
sale. (423)547-0408,
895-0499.
Handy Andy Home
Improvements for all
your interior & exterior
repairs, pressure washing, painting. Home:
543-1979
Cell:
423-242-8187.
HAUL gravel for driveways, dirt for sale,
also backhoe work of
any
kind.
Call
423-542-2909.
HOMES & MOBILE
HOME IMPROVEMENTS.
Additions, sunrooms,
textured
ceilings,
porches, carports, garages. Work guaranteed. (423)542-9483.
Immaculate Mowing,
Weekly yards only. Dependable
service,
reasonable rates, references,
(423)
542-6911.
JLJ HOME IMPROVEMENT, remodeling,
room additions & vinyl siding. Licensed &
Insured. 423-543-2101.
KY CONSTRUCTION
Specializing in finished
grade
work
and
demolition. All types
of front end loader
work. Dirt for sale.
Quality, honest work
at the best price. Will
beat any other estimates, guaranteed.
Keith
Younce,
(423)543-2816.
423-341-7782
7 BEAUTY &
BARBER
BEAUTY shop equipment for sale. Good
condition at a reasonable
price.
(423)542-9201, (423)
542-4416.
HEATHER
TIERNEY,
COSMETOLOGIST, IS
NOW DOING HAIR
AND FACIAL WAXING.
By
appointment
Rosie’s
Place
(423)543-8803.
10 HELP WANTED
GENERAL
COMCARE, INC.
COME GROW WITH US
CAREERS IN HELPING
PEOPLE WITH MENTAL
RETARDATION LIVE
MEANINGFUL LIVES IN
THE COMMUNITY
The following Full Time
Direct Support Positions are available in
Johnson City and Erwin.
LOST German Shepherd, male, black with
tan paws, lost in
Stoney Creek area,
(423)878-4563,
(423)360-2994.
%Chg
-57.2
-51.3
-28.0
-19.9
-19.0
-16.7
-15.6
-15.4
-14.8
-14.7
Ex
WEEKLY DOW JONES
Wk Wk YTD
Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
LINE AD DEADLINES
word rates:
15 WORDS OR LESS
1 DAY - $4.75 2 DAYS - $7.00
6 DAYS - $10.00
PUBLIC NOTICES
Chg
-3.18
-2.41
-1.14
-.92
-.96
-.62
-1.09
-.39
-.60
-.73
Name
Wk Wk YTD
Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
Weekday
Shared
Sleepover Position (40
hours) $10.15 hour
Working Monday-Friday
2:30
p.m.-10:30p.m.
and sleeping over in
our home every other
week (5 nights) from
11:30 pm to 7:30 am in
the morning.
Applicants must be 19
years of age, have a
clean driving record,
and pass pre-employment physical, drug
test, TB test and FBI/TBI
background check.
Comcare is a Drug
Free Workplace and
we have an excellent
AVON can pay for
your summer vacation- and gas! Only
$10.00 to join. Lisa
(423)542-0057.
BE PART OF THE
COLONELS
TRADITION KFC
Wants hard working
Intelligent People. We
are in search of
friendly cashiers, outgoing people for
lobby work, prep
work, cooks, and
much
more.
Advancement opportunities are always available.
WE OFFER
• Flexible hours
• Quick raises
• Paid Vacations
• Meal Discounts
All applicants are welcome. We are an
equal opportunity employer.
Come join the
Team at KFC
Elizabethton
(423)543-2271
DINO’S Restaurant 420
Elk Ave. now hiring
waitress and part time
cashier. Apply in person.
HOME from trip. Help
with Aunt. Positive, enthusiastic, high school,
college person. Current license. 926-6902
LOOKING for an extra
$250-$400 + a week?
Perfect 2nd job, with
flexible PT PM/AM hrs.
Paid training. Great
people and atmosphere.
Call
423-283-4759
MOWING
helper
needed. Must have
drivers license, transportation, needs personal phone.
Call
(423)542-6911.
NEEDED presser for
Quik Cleaners, 201
Broad St. Please apply
in person.
PART-TIME
position
available. 29hrs. Salvation Army Store, Interested
persons,
please call Pat Westmoreland
(423)
547-0094.
PYRAMID
Masonry
seeking masons for a
job in Boone, NC. Call
Darrel
@
(704)
496-1419.
11 PROFESSIONAL
HELP WANTED
TEACHERS,
Tutors
Needed. $20-25/hr,
PT, your own schedule. Certified or 4-year
degree. Apply online.
www.atoztutoring.com
call Jen 866-505-2869
ext. 105
LADY will sit with elderly, any shift. Have
good references, own
transportation.
Call
anytime.
(423)542-5935.
MR. Oddjob. minor repairs, carpentry, yard
work, haul away,
cleaning, screens repaired, exterior painting. 474-2360
SOUTHERN COMFORTS:
Cleaning, hauling off,
organizing.
yards,
homes, offices, debris,
more. References. Licensed. 423-542-5309,
423-213-7937.
13 MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
PIANO FOR SALE
HOME SIZE, LIKE NEW
STORED LOCALLY. NO
DOWN PAYMENT.
CALL ANYTIME,
1-800-648-4522
15 SERVICES
OFFERED
A Cut Above Mowing
Service. For all your
yard work needs. Free
estimates. 213-6663,
418-4738.
A-1 ATLAS TREE &
LANDSCAPING:Tree removal, stump grinding. Insect, Disease
Analyst. Licensed, Insured. (423)542-4525,
895-6018.
PLEASANTLY
Clean
Cleaning
Services:
Commercial, residential. Dependable, honest. Free estimates.
(423)331-0473, (423)
314- 2857.
Rainbow Home Improvements. Vinyl siding, soffit, windows,
patios. Licensed and
Insured. Free Estimates. 423-543-5773
423-895-0908
16 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
103 EMILY DRIVE
HUNTER
MONDAY------------FRIDAY 2:00 P.M.
TUESDAY-------------MONDAY 2:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY--------TUESDAY 2:00 P.M.
THURSDAY------WEDNESDAY 2:00 P.M.
FRIDAY------------THURSDAY 2:00 P.M.
SUNDAY---------------FRIDAY 2:00 P.M.
16 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
16 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
RED NECK GIFT SHOP.
Large variety of items.
Approximately $20,000
inventory. Must move.
Does not include
building or Real Estate.
Priced for quick sale.
$6,000. (423)543-7677.
2234 WEST G STREET
Valuable commercial
property, located in
the high visibility area
of West Elizabethton.
Existing building was
constructed as a service station, but, with
1,960 square feet, offers many numerous
possibilities for conversion. Gas tanks have
been removed from
site. Property fronts on
three streets, with 175'
of frontage on West
G Street, 150' frontage on Gap Creek
Road and 300' frontage on Caleb. Rarely
does business property of this size, with
existing zoning in
place, plus high density traffic county and
visibility
become
available. $225,000
RUSS SWANAY
REALTY
543-5741
Tri-plex
apartment
building located in
Hunter Community.
Unit #1 features 3BR,
& rents for $450. 2
Units are 2BR, 1BA
units and rent for $360
each. This investment
property has been
well maintained, has
a good rental history
and is situated on a
level lot with paved
parking in the popular
Hunter Community of
Elizabethton. $124,900
Nice, four 1BR apartments.
Ample
off-street parking in
downtown Kingsport.
$99,900.00
RUSS SWANAY
REALTY
543-5741
C21 WHITEHEAD
SHERREE HOLT
543-4663.
714 Mapleoak Lane
Kingsport
19 BUILDINGS
SALE/RENT
OFFICE space for rent
in Elizabethton, new
brick building. 1100 sq.
ft.
Rogosin
Drive,
across from the Elizabethton High School.
For more information
please call 543-6868.
20 ARTICLES
FOR SALE
32”TV, $60.00, Solid
wood table 4 chairs,
$200.00, Cedar bed,
chest, $75.00. Aquarium
$30.00
423-543-7090
BEAUTIFUL traditional
style 2-cushion 6’ long
couch in soft green
upholstery, $100. Call
(423)543-4528.
FULL size motorized
bed.
$300.
(423)543-5573,
(423)213-8110.
KELTEC RIFLE .223 New
in box. $450. Call Dan
(423)213-0304.
RESTAURANT
style
dishes! Heat lamp,
chopper,
blender.
(423)538-8903
Single Crypt inside
Chapel. Mausoleum
of Peace. HVMP.
Regular $6500. Sell
$4500. Cell #895-3326
Page 12 - STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006
Star
LINE AD DEADLINES
word rates:
15 WORDS OR LESS
1 DAY - $4.75 2 DAYS - $7.00
6 DAYS - $10.00
542-1530
Classifieds
20 ARTICLES
FOR SALE
31 APARTMENT
FOR RENT
BEDROOM sets, dinettes, sofas, miscellaneous. 2008 Forsyth
Drive,
Elizabethton
(423)542-2322.
2BR,
CH&A,
W/D
hook-up. No pets.
$385.mo plus deposit.
(423)725-4068
(423)725-5946.
ONE private trailer
space for mobile
home or RV, Charity
Hill Road. $150 month.
(423)725-2634.
25 PETS
& SUPPLIES
ROAN
MOUNTAIN:
2BR, upstairs, $250.deposit, $300.month. No
pets. Stove, refrigerator,
heat,
W/D
(423)772-3472.
434-9272, weekends.
STONEY CREEK: 2BR,
fully furnished. Private
entrance. No drugs,
drinking. $325.mo. References, $300.dep. required. 474-2854.
Talladega Apts Upstairs
EFFICIENCY
$310.mo. $175.dep.
Upstairs 1br, $340.mo.
$175.dep. Utilities paid
542-8493,
956-0068
before 5 pm
VARIETY of 1BR and
2BR apartments available. Rent starts at
$225month. Call property
manager,
(423)547-2871.
LARGE LOT’s 70’, 80’
OR
DOUBLEWIDE,
GAP CREEK AREA. No
outside
pets.
$125.-$150.month
(423)725-2770,
(423)612-2847.
AKC Standard poodle
pups, Some related to
#1 Standard in world.
Family
raised.
$600-$1000.
423-542-4343
MINIATURE
DACHSHUND
PUPPIES
One female, one
male left. Unusal dappled colors. Registered parents on
premises. Born March
10th. $350 each. To a
good home only.
Call
423-342-8100.
(Elizabethton)
Precious Kittens. Free
to good homes. 7wk.
old Calico & yellow
tabby.
Home213-5263.
29 TOWNHOUSES
CONDOS FOR
SALE/RENT
148 BERYL BLEVINS
ROAD UNIT #2, 2BR, 1
1/2BA, new wood
floors in living room,
ceramic tile in kitchen,
150 foot back yard.
$73,000. (423)612-6242
2BR, 1.5BA Townhouse.
W/D hookup, appliances, carpet, D/W,
deck, paved driveway. $460.mo. plus
deposit. 423-538-0458.
30 ROOMS
FOR RENT
LARGE room with private bath and entrance. Fully furnished
plus utilities. Monthly,
weekly (423)542-4475,
(423)612-0132.
31 APARTMENT
FOR RENT
**ALL Real Estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the
Fair Housing Act which
makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status, or national origin, or an intention, to
make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. ”Familial
status includes children under the age of
18 living with parents
or legal custodians;
pregnant women and
people securing custody of children under
18. This newspaper will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our
readers
are
hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this newspaper
are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD
Toll-free
at
1-800-669-9777. The
Toll-free
telephone
number for the Hearing
Impaired
is:
1-800-927-9275
1320 Charity Hill Rd.,
1BR, dishwasher, W/D
hook-up, quiet neighborhood, close to
town. (423)543-7468.
1BR, livingroom, dinningroom,
kitchen,
appliances,
W/D
hook-up, water, garbage pick-up.
No
pets, drinkers, drug users. References. Deposit. (423)542-4276.
1BR, oak cabinets,
washer/dryer, refrigerator with ice maker,
CH&A, water, garbage
pickup,
$315.mth, $200.dep.,
(423)543-3960.
1BR, stove, refrigerator, water, garbage
pickup
furnished,
mini-blinds.
Call
(423)542-9200.
2BR, phone, cable in
each room, hardwood floor entrance.
W/D hook-up. No
pets.
$350.mth.
(423)542-9417.
2BR, 1BA, between
J.C.,
Elizabethton,
W/D hookup, heat
pump, $420.mo., deposit, lease. No pets.
423-467-8480
Alexander Apts Large
Upstairs 2br 2ba,
Formal dining, new
carpets. Great View
Employed
& ref's
$425mo $220 dep
542-8493
956-0068
before 5 pm
BROOKVIEW APARTMENT AND STORAGE.
2BR, appliances, W/D
hook-up. NO PETS.
$350mth.,
deposit.
(423)543-2632, (423)
543-4671.
Brownlow Apts 425
West G St Ground
floor 2br 1ba. Quiet
$375.mo $175.dep
542-8493
956-0068
before 5 pm
32 HOUSES
FOR RENT
3BR, 1BA, full basement
075
acre
$550.mo. $400.dep.
Dry Creek Rd, Elizabethton. Call Mark
957-1166
ASSORTMENT of rentals: Farm, brick, frame,
pets, rent to own, furnished and unfurnished. 282-6486.
AVAILABLE now! 3BR,
1BA, Fitzsimmons Hill,
FP,
appliances, private,
$550.mth.
$300.dep.
(423)
543-5638.
DISCOUNT WITH LEASE.
Nice 1920’s Vintage, 3
large BR home, sunroom, dining room,
gas fireplace, French
doors, convenient location, pets allowed,
$775month, deposit,
(423)512-1119.
JENNIFER THIS HOUSE
IS AVAILABLE.
33 MOBILE HOME
FOR RENT
2BR,
appliances,
walk to schools, bank,
supermarkets, Hampton. Garbage, Lawn
maintenance.
No
pets. (423) 725-4792.
2BR, CH&A, porches,
washer, dryer, stove &
refrigerator.
References. $250. month,
$100.
deposit.
423-474-3307.
2BR, Nice trailer on
beautiful lot. Charity
Hill Rd. $400.mo. deposit negotiable. BETTER
HURRY
423-725-2634
3BR, 2BA, Roan Mountain partially furnished,
utility building, private
lot,
$450month,
$200deposit,
(423)772-4278
.
MILLIGAN COLLEGE
16x80 3BR, 2BA,; 2BR
2BA, 14X70 REFERENCES
REQUIRED
257-2106,
(423)543-2651.
RENT OR RENT TO
OWN 3BR, 2BA, 1970
12X70 ON SEMI-PRIVATE RENTAL LOT.
GREEN ACRES AREA.
$800down, owner financing,
(423)895-0456.
RENT TO OWN: 2BR,
1BA, downtown Elizabethton, rental lot, no
pets, $700down with
owner
financing,
$300month
(423)895-0456
37 LAND W/PHOTO
FOR SALE
37 LAND W/PHOTO
FOR SALE
BROOME REAL
ESTATE
(423)542-4386
Siam Area
Off Hamilton Road, 4
acres,
mostly
wooded.
Several
building sites. Creek,
water meter on property. Very Private.
$39,500.00.
HORSESHOE COVE
Beautiful 0.93ac located directly on the
shores of Watauga
Lake. Horseshoe cove
offers a coded security gate. $149,900.00
C21 WHITEHEAD
LISA POTTER
543-4663
TESTER ROAD
Beautiful 7.68 acres,
very secluded, great
for developers, Couple of different locations to build the perfect dream home.
$69,500.00
42 HOUSES
FOR SALE
1002
DeJarnette
Street,
2BR,
1BA,
CH&A, carport, newly
remodeled kitchen,
(423)542-6600,
(423)647-8213.
3BR Hud home! Buy for
$21,000! Stop Renting!
For
listings
800-391-5228xF738.
A foreclosure. 4BR,
2BA. Only $39,900! For
listings.
800-391-5228xH652
BUY A HOME FOR
NOTHING DOWN, call
Dan (423)929-0222 ext.
105.
VICTORIAN Splendor
at Covered Bridge,
Elizabethton. Restored
and updated. Call
Mary Gean Watford
(423)676-6836
or
(423)282-1885 Century
21 Pro Service, REALTORS. www.DunganMansion.com
WHY rent when you
can buy? 100% financing. No money
down. All types of
credit. Low rates. Call
(423)926-5887 or toll
free 1-800-980-5793.
Apply
online
at
www.easyapprovalonline.com
38 LOTS
FOR SALE
Lots/Land
Wanted:
West Carter County
Area.
Please
call
(423)677-5771.
MOBILE HOME LOT.
Panhandle
Road,
Stoney Creek, 100x200
$16,950 Call Hank
542-2131
119 Lincoln Drive
Scenic Location in
Lynn Valley! Brick
Ranch. LR, DR, FP, 3BR,
2BA.
Move-in Condition
With Many Updates!
$REDUCED $149,000.
Century 21
Whitehead Realty &
Auction
Lisa Potter
102 EMERALD HILLS
DRIVE
Very private 2 story
perched on 1.57
wooded acres in a
nice subdivision. Approximately 5 miles
from
Elizabethton.
4BD, 2BA, large walk
in closet and an extra
storage room, 1 car
detached
garage
and laundry room off
kitchen. Great family
home. $129,000
1117 BLUEFIELD AVE.
You have to see this
land! Beautiful 4BR,
2BA Home, Downstairs office, den, 2
heat pumps, 3 outbuildings. $199,000.00
C21 WHITEHEAD
TERESA MUSICK
543-4663
120 Hamilton Rd.
FSBO
Beautiful 3BR, 2BA,
Clayton Home in
Siam. Fenced 1/2
acre lot, nice views,
covered front porch,
small deck, patio,
heat pump, 12x20
storage
building.
$87,500.00
423-547-9515
152 SHALOM DRIVE
Custom built 2 story
home, 3 or 4br, 2ba, 2
car garage, outbuilding, very secluded,
option to buy 7.68
acres $179,900.00
Nice lot on dead end
street located in
beautiful area between Elizabethton
and Johnson City.
Public water and
electric already ran
to the end of street.
Lot is wooded, 100 x
150 and adjoins second lot of same size
that can be purchased for less if
bought
together.
Zoned for sight built
homes only. Name of
street has changed to
Wild Rose Lane. See
attachments for all
protective covenants.
$16,000
C21 Whitehead
Tom Payne
543-4663
115 HUGH
WILSON ROAD
VOYD HOLTSCLAW,
HAMPTON
4 LOTS AVAILABLE,
GREAT FOR LOG CABINS, ALSO MODULAR
HOMES OK. LOTS OF
WILD LIFE. $16,000.00
TO $27,000.00.
C21 WHITEHEAD
TOM WHITEHEAD
543-4663
3BR 2BA home on lg
landscaped lot in
choice
neighborhood.
Amenities:
pool, clubhouse, and
tennis courts.
C21 Whitehead
Sarah Presnell
$209,000
543-4663
C21 Whitehead
Tom Payne
543-4663
692
PLEASANT GROVE
Ranch 3BR, 3BA, dazzling kitchen with
stainless steel appliances, Jacuzzi tub,
1.83ac quiet country
setting and more!!
$219,900.00
C21 WHITEHEAD
LISA POTTER
543-4663
BROOME
REAL ESTATE
542-4386
516 Cedar Ave
Walking distance to
Harold McCormick
School. 3BR, 1.5BA, LR,
with
Berber
over
hardwood, large den
with natural wood
walls, also large sun
room with gas log
fireplace, CH&A, new
vinyl, Anderson windows, 1 car drive-under, plus paved driveway from rear alley
entrance.
V.A. & FHA Ready
$98,500.
267 Piercetown
Completely
remodeled
Wonderful
family
home in nice area
just outside the city
limits. 4BD, 2BA. 2
woodburning Fireplaces. Split Foyer
design with 3BR, Living Room with fireplace,
Bathroom
and Large eat in
Kitchen on upper
level. Lower level
features 1BR, 1BA,
den with fireplace
and 1 car drive under garage. Oversized deck overlooks
semi private back
yard. Roof is less than
a year old. $118,000
1616 BURGIE STREET
8 room home in
Great location. 3
bdrm, 1 bath situated on double lot in
the city. Central
heat
and
air.
MLS#234540
$99,900
3BR, 2BA, Den with FP,
oak cabinets, new
heat pump, deck,
minutes from beautiful Watauga Lake!!
$132,500.00
Charming 2br home.
New carpet, Cozy eat
in kitchen with stove
and
refrigerator.
Beautiful back yard
offers
privacy.
$42,000.00
C21 WHITEHEAD
PATSY WOODSON
543-4663
C21 WHITEHEAD
LISA POTTER
543-4663
RAINBOW REALTY
(423)547-2800
2BR, older home with
over 2 acres land.
$45,900.
HWY. 19E
220’ of highway frontage, 1100 sq.ft. 3BR,
1BA home. .7 acre lot
with well. Appraised
at 70K, will take
$48,000.
(423)725-4145
310 Old Watauga
1998 Old Bristol Hwy.
Watauga, TN.
BY OWNER
Nice home with 9.09
acres. Large den
and family sized
kitchen. Partial basement. MLS#232536
$97,000
RAINBOW REALTY
(423)547-2800
929 NOAH
SNYDER ROAD
Description: 3 bedrooms, 2 bath Chalet.
Only minutes from
Watauga Lake! Great
room with stone fireplace. Screened in
porch, balcony and
acreage too! Hurry
and call today!
$184,900
Blue Ridge Properties
282-5182
Sheryl Garland
895-1690
BY OWNER
103 AVIATION DRIVE
3BR.,
2BA,
brick
ranch, recently updated. 1855 sq. ft.,
great views! A must
see.
$139,000.
(423)213-5115
to view by
appointment
140 Camelot
New
construction!
Beautiful, 3BR, 2BA
huge master bedroom
with
bath,
walk-in closet, breakfast nook, 2 car garage.
Wonderful
neighborhood.
$199,900.00
C21 WHITEHEAD
JOSHUA IRICK
543-4663
204 WEST G
Sweet and Low!!
Sweet house,
low price!!
3BR, FP, new windows. Private backyard, short walk to Historic Downtown.
$117,900.00
C21 WHITEHEAD
LISA POTTER
543-4663
3BR 2BA home on 1
acre level lot. Lots of
storage, sunroom, appliances stay, garage
and outbuilding.
C21 Whitehead
Linda Whitehead
$144,500
543-4663
151
SARAH ANNIE DRIVE
Only $59,900
118 LEWIS
BLEVINS ROAD
6 room home located on 3.1 acres.
Great views of surrounding mountains.
Open floor plan.
MLS#234757
$199,900
RAINBOW REALTY
(423)547-2800
BANJO RIDGE
Beautiful log home on
4 acres. Only 1/2 mile
from Johnson Co. airport and minutes to
the lake.
3500 NORTH
HIGHWAY
955 N Church
Country Cottage with
3.95 acres, in beautiful Mountain City. 2br,
1ba, some updating.
Basement, fruit tree.
Private but Convenient. $82,000.00
Beautiful
historic
home in Mtn. City.
4BR 2BA with modern
kitchen and many
updates. Must see!
C21 WHITEHEAD
SHERREE HOLT
213-9611
C21 Whitehead
Tom Payne
543-4663
$269,000
EAST SIDE
COMMUNITY
1017 Walker St.
2BR, 1BA brick home,
CH&A
hardwood
floors, full size basement (partially finished). $61,400.
(423)542-0094
Appointment Only
148 Crestview
Elk Ridge Estates
Gayle Eggers
(423)342-8801
C21 WHITEHEAD
JOSHUA IRICK
543-4663
633 Noah Snyder
FOR SALE
BY OWNER
219 FIRST STREET
2BR, 1BA home on
corner lot in excellent
location, house has
new vinyl siding, new
windows, new heat
pump, house has
been completely remodeled inside and
out to brand new
condition. $79,000.
Call (423)474-0074
706 FAIRVIEW
RUSS SWANAY
REAL ESTATE
543-5741
2BR, 1 1/2 BA, farmhouse, CHA, barn,
detached garage,
workshop,
on
4
acres in Stoney
Creek,
(423)542-4703
to view by
appointment
BLUE RIDGE
PROPERTIES
(423)282-5182
43 HOUSES
W/PHOTO
C21 WHITEHEAD
JOSHUA IRICK
543-4663
114 EAST K STREET
2 LOTS,
IDLEWYLDE
ADDITION,
ELIZABETHTON
4br,
4ba
Home.
Country
setting,
panoramic views of
National
Forest,
Watauga River, and
minutes
from
Watauga
Lake.
$219,900.00
2524 Beechwood,
Quail Hollow
RUSS SWANAY
REALTY
543-5741
Tastefully
updated
brick in a walk to
town location. Lovely
hardwood floors, fireplace with gas logs
surrounded
with
built-in
bookcases.
Updated
custom
kitchen. Huge dining
room with lots of windows. Extra room in
back could be third
bedroom or office.
Laundry room and
Basement. 2BD, 1BA,
walk-in closet in the
master
bedroom.
1,300 SF. $87,900
43 HOUSES
W/PHOTO
RUSS SWANAY
REALTY
543-5741
For Sale By Owner
423-391-1275
22 lots with mtn. views
of Watauga Lake.
Gated community,
lots to be 2-3 acres
with lake access.
C21 WHITEHEAD
SHERREE HOLT
543-4663
43 HOUSES
W/PHOTO
240 STEEL BRIDGE
ROAD
126
OLD CHARITY HILL
ROAD
39 LOTS W/PHOTO
FOR SALE
Lot #119 Saratoga
Circle
2 ACRES+/-
NESTLE YOUR HOME
ON 1.42 ACRES. IN
BEAUTIFUL
MOUNTAINS OF BUTLER. MINUTES FROM WATAUGA
LAKE
WITH
BOAT
DOCK ACCESS. UNDERGROUND UTILITIES.
$45,000.00
43 HOUSES
W/PHOTO
43 HOUSES
W/PHOTO
C21 WHITEHEAD
JOSHUA IRICK
543-4663
RUSS SWANAY
REALTY
543-5741
This is a nice building
lot in Colonial Acres,
just outside Elizabethton. Beautiful timbers set the stage for
a great log home. An
entrance road already
exists.
No
building allowed on
the lots behind this
property insuring privacy on a quiet
cul-de-sac.
40 LOTS
FOR RENT
928-4151
MONDAY------------FRIDAY 2:00 P.M.
TUESDAY-------------MONDAY 2:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY--------TUESDAY 2:00 P.M.
THURSDAY------WEDNESDAY 2:00 P.M.
FRIDAY------------THURSDAY 2:00 P.M.
SUNDAY---------------FRIDAY 2:00 P.M.
2Br, 2Baths, single
wide with an addition that boast large
open kitchen, living
room and Den. Sunroom leads out to
the wonderful decking that surrounds the
above ground pool.
2 car garage, workshop, 2 car carport.
The lot next door is
also available with
the single wide or lot
only. This home has
so much to offer!
Call today!
Blue Ridge Properties
282-5182
Sheryl Garland
895-1690
205
Davis Hollow Road
Cute 2BD, 1BA cottage nestled on 2
acres in the country.
Very private, this
would be ideal for
summer home or
starter home for small
family. $63,000
3BR, 2BA Brick ranch,
Lynn Valley, inground
pool, outbuilding,
16x24 detached garage/
workshop,
fenced in backyard,
large laundry room,
window treatments,
appliances stay.
Must see! $219,900.
423-512-1394,
423- 512-1393.
RUSS SWANAY
REALTY
543-5741
A Must See!!!
4BR, 2.5BA, with over
2600 fin. Sq ft. Remodeled with beautiful woodwork, cherry
cabinets, hardwood
flooring. It has a great
screened in porch
with swing and skylights. Great location
that is minutes from
Johnson
City. A
great buy for only
$229,900.
Call Tina Smith at
612-1725,
State of Franklin
Real Estate
MLS#233416
259 Ollie Collins
Road
First time on the market. Ready for immediate
occupancy.
Brick and vinyl. VA
approved home features 3BR and 1.5
baths, has bonus
room and a den.
Level lot, country setting. Won't last long at
only $115,000.
Century 21
Act 111
423-282-1200
400 EAST K STREET
206 MARION
BRANCH ROAD
$214,000
WOW! You must see
the views from the
deck! This home has
room for the whole
family. You will not
believe how much
square footage you
get for the price.
3BRs, 2FBAs, 2 half
BAs. Formal living and
dining, den, office.
It Is A Must See!
Call Today!
Blue Ridge Properties
Sheryl Garland
895-1690
3BR 1.5Bath, 1 car attached garage, bonus room, could be
used for workshop,
family room, etc.
Hardwood through
out, new vinyl in
kitchen and bath.
Large walk-in closet in
Master Bdrm. Gorgeous
columned
archway between living room and dining
room, living room has
gas log fireplace. Relax on large full front
porch. Corner lot
75X153 with mature
plantings.
Very
charming home in
Great
location!
$89,900.00
RUSS SWANAY
REAL ESTATE
543-5741
Beautiful one owner
home featuring 3 BR,
1.5
BA,
LR,
Kitchen/Dining, Den
in BSMT, garage plus
2 car carport located on large lot.
State of Franklin Real
Estate, Inc.
Kaye Carroll
Matheson
423-914-1092 Cell
423-247-2600 Office
FOR SALE BY OWNER
1.92 fenced level
acres
with creek
frontage. One level,
1850
sq.ft. finished,
plus 750 sq.ft. Finished
(not heated) with
2BR's Possible 3. New
Heat Pump, windows,
and newer roof. 4
Car Detached, Carport, 2-two story storage buildings, 20X40
Greenhouse.
Well
and Public water.
$184,00.00
Call Lora
For More Details
423-677-6606
STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006 - Page 13
Star
LINE AD DEADLINES
word rates:
15 WORDS OR LESS
1 DAY - $4.75 2 DAYS - $7.00
6 DAYS - $10.00
43 HOUSES
W/PHOTO
For Sale By Owner
Nice 1/2 acre lot, in
Hampton with 14x70
mobile home with
large porches and
outbuilding.
Ready To Move In!
$30,000
Classifieds
542-1530
45 MOBILE HOMES
W/PHOTO
Beautiful 1800 sq.ft.
Clayton home with
lots of storage! 3 large
bedrooms
with
walk-in closets, 2
linen closets, coat
closet, walk-in pantry,
lots of upgrades.
SMITH HOMES
(423)542-2131
(423)928-9224
60 AUTOS
W/PHOTO
2005 Chevrolet
Impala
V-6, automatic, air,
cruise control, power
windows
&
door
locks, CD, 34 MPG,
31,000 miles. $9,850.
542-2789 or
957-0600 cell
anytime
423-725-4668
423-725-3209
64 4X4 W/PHOTO
FOR SALE
1999 Ford
Ranger Sport
Ext Cab
PUBLIC NOTICES
PUBLIC NOTICES
PUBLIC NOTICES
PUBLIC NOTICES
PUBLIC NOTICES
claims will be forever
barred.
All persons indebted
to the above Estate
must come forward
and make proper settlement with the undersigned at once.
This the 30th day of
August , 2006.
a joint, non-exclusive
easement
and
right-of-way, as an
easement appurtenant, for the benefit of
the herein conveyed
Lot No. 1, the right to
take water, for domestic purposes from
that certain spring located and designated as A Spring
[email protected], on Lot No. 2
of the Pauline Campbell Property as shown
on Plat dated August
8, 2001, of record in
Plat Cabinet [email protected],
Slides 41 and 42, Register=s Office for Carter County, Tennessee,
together with the right
to install necessary
pumps, pipes, wiring
and other necessary
appurtenances to facilitate the conveyance of water from
said spring located on
Lot 2.
erty conveyed to John
Berry by Warranty
Deed dated November 30, 2001, from
Pauline
Campbell
(widow), individually
and in her capacity as
Executrix of the Estate
of Thedford W. Campbell, of record in Deed
Book 466, Page 362,
Register=s Office for
Carter County, Tennessee.
chanic's or materialmen's liens or of any
suit to enforce same.
redeem the land as
provided for in 26
U.S.C. Section 7425(b)
or Tennessee Code
Annotated, Section
67-1-1433(c)(1),
respectively.
Bobby E. Kennedy, III
and
Carol Dudley
Co-Executors
Stock #LB6532
Pre-Owned
4x4, 5-speed, red,
A/C, AM/FM cassette, bedliner, alloy
wheels. $8,995.
J&L MOTORS
198 HWY. 91
Elizabethton
423-542-2664
Deceased:
Joann Peters Kennedy
John Banks
Attorney
CHARLOTTE MCKEEHAN
Clerk and Master
9/5, 9/12
TRUSTEE'S SALE
NORRIS
KEYSTONE
Johnson City
32X64
Serial #17839
2BR cottage with new
windows, cabinets,
plumbing and paint.
5% Down Payment
Reasonably Priced
At $29,900.
LOADED
DEAN BLEVINS
(423)542-2092
213-6738
Art’s Finer
Homes
(423)282-8505
$586. a Month
STOCK # 2427
PRE-OWNED
SOLD
2001 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
STOCK #9107
PRE-OWNED
Leather, power, CD,
77K.
Extra
nice.
$10,995.
2000 CADILLAC
ESCALADE
ELIZABETHTON AUTO
SALES
(423)543-7592
4x4, leather,
wheels. $11,995.
20’’
ELIZABETHTON AUTO
SALES
(423)543-7592
SHELL & ASSOCIATES
(423)543-2393
NEW CONSTRUCTION
STOCK #8368
PRE-OWNED
This 28x52
Shows Big!
351 Nave Hollow
This beautiful 3BR,
2BA,
home
has
walk-in closet, spacious rooms, hardwood floors, ceramic
tile, custom cabinets,
large deck, 2 car garage, concrete drive
on wooded lot at foot
of Iron Mountain.
$148,500.
423-512-1135
Open floor plan, 3BR,
2BA, walk-in closets,
large kitchen, lots of
cabinets, big living
room with fireplace
sliding glass door in
dining room. Ashley
furniture, upgraded
GE appliances. Less
than $500. per month.
57 MOTORCYCLES
FOR SALE
Call Tina Smith
612-1725
Owner/Agent MLS
# 230855
State of Franklin
Real Estate
44 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
1997 28X56 DOUBLEWIDE 4BR 2FBA with
garden tub. Secluded
1ac. lot, large building,
deck.
423-772-4865
3BR, Foreclosure. Only
$19,616! For listing
800-391-5228
ext
G-179.
owner.
ELIZABETHTON AUTO
SALES
(423)543-7592
2004 Gold Wing 1800
includes 84 months extended
warranty,
great
condition,
$15,000.
Call
(423)213-0964.
2004 Mazda Tribute,
automatic, 4wd, 32K,
6-disk CD, sunroof.
$17,500. 423-542-9115
1991 Firebird, V-8,
T-tops,
automatic.
Runs great. $2,500.
O.B.O.
Must
sell!
895-1928,
(423)
542-3904.
60 AUTOS
W/PHOTO
STOCK # 0614
PRE-OWNED
2004 PONTIAC
GRAND PRIX
Leather, sunroof, auto,
GT. $12,900.
ELIZABETHTON AUTO
SALES
(423)543-7592
118
Hazelwood Hollow
2000 Clayton doublewide 28x56. 3BR, 2BA.
New hardwood floors,
2Lg. porches. Must be
moved. Owner will
pay $1000. toward
moving. $30,000.
#895-0856
Stock #LB7363
Pre-Owned
4 cylinder, automatic, air, power
windows and locks,
AM/FM, 27K, red.
$9,495.
CD, 92K, 20’’ wheels.
$12,995.
1990 Chevrolet Kodiak
2 1/2 ton, 14’ Flat bed,
Caterpillar
Diesel.
101,000 miles. $6,975
OBO. 423-610-7300
69
MISCELLENEOUS
FOR SALE
NEW Pressure Washer
10HP -3800PSI with
soap mixing valve
Used 2 hours. $400
obo 542-8493 before 5
pm
IN THE CHANCERY
COURT, PROBATE
DIVISION OF CARTER
COUNTY, AT
ELIZABETHTON,
TENNESSEE
2002 Ford
Windstar 4.0 LX
Stock #LB9410
Pre-Owned
Green, automatic,
65K miles, all power,
rear air, 7 passenger,
alloy wheels. $9,495.
J&L MOTORS
198 HWY. 91
Elizabethton
423-542-2664
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
per
TCA 30-2-306
Clayton, 16x80, 3BR,
2BA, nice kitchen with
upgraded cabinets
and lots of counter
space, separate tub
and shower in master,
large walk-in closet,
living room and dining room furnished.
$39,900.
Includes Delivery
And Set-up
SMITH HOMES
(423)542-2131
(423)928-9224
2001 Buick
Century
Stock #LB3932
Pre-Owned
Automatic,
silver,
PW, PL, PM, A/C,
cruise, tilt, AM/FM
cassette, 52K. $8,295.
J&L MOTORS
198 HWY. 91
Elizabethton
423-542-2664
BEING Lot No. 15, containing 0.48 acres and
Lot No. 16, containing
0.47 acres, more or
less, of the Pauline
Campbell property, as
shown on Survey Plat
of Glenn Allen Shelnutt, Tennessee Registered Land Surveyor
No.
1542,
dated
August 8, 2001, titled
APauline Campbell
[email protected], of record
in Plat Cabinet [email protected],
Slides 41 and 42, Register=s Office for Carter County, Tennessee,
to which Plat reference is here had and
made for all [email protected]
Phone
543-2632 days or
543-4671 evenings
and week-ends.
64 4X4 W/PHOTO
FOR SALE
BEING the same prop-
The sale is subject to
conditions, restrictions,
rights-of-way
easements and reservations contained in the
Deeds forming the
chain of title to this
property.
Any improvements on
subject property will
be sold in "as is" condition without warranty
of any kind.
Sale is made in bar of
all homestead, dower,
and curtsy, and in bar
of the right of equity
of redemption and
the statutory right of
redemption, all of
which are expressly
waived in the Deed of
Trust.
It will be the responsibility of the successful
bidder to obtain possession of the property
at his expense.
The successful bidder
shall be responsible for
any damage, vandalism, theft, destruction,
etc., of the property
occurring subsequent
to the date of sale.
This sale is subject to
prior liens, judgments
or unpaid taxes, if any.
This sale is further subject to valid filed or
unfiled (if any) mechanic's and materialmen's liens. There are
no
representations
made by the Trustee
as to the validity or enforceability of any
memorandum of me-
In the event the Trustee deems it best for
any reason at the time
of sale to postpone or
continue this sale from
time to time, such notice or postponement
or setting over will be
in a manner deemed
reasonable by the
Trustee.
Every lien or claimed
lien of the United
States with respect to
which the provisions of
26
U.S.C.
Section
7425(b) require notice
to be given to the
United States in order
for the sale of land
thus advertised not to
be subject to such lien
or claim of the United
States and every lien
or claim of the State
of Tennessee with respect to which the
provisions of Tennessee Code Annotated
Section
67-1-1433(b)(1) require
notice to be given to
the State of Tennessee
in order for the sale of
the land as advertised
not to be subject to
such lien or claim of
lien of the State of
Tennessee has been
given to the United
States or the State of
Tennessee,
respectively.
In the event there is a
lien or a claim of lien
by the United States or
the State of Tennessee, the land herein
advertised will be subject to the right of the
United States or the
State of Tennessee to
CITCO TITLE CO., INC.
TRUSTEE
8/21, 8/28, 9/5
IN THE CHANCERY
COURT, PROBATE
DIVISION OF CARTER
COUNTY, AT
ELIZABETHTON,
TENNESSEE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
per
TCA 30-2-306
PROBATE NO. P060137
ESTATE OF
LYNDA R. MILLER a/k/a
LINDA R. MILLER
DECEASED
Notice is hereby given
that on the
31st
day of August, 2006
Letters of Administration, in respect to the
Estate of
Lynda R. Miller a/k/a
Linda R. Miller
deceased, were issued to the undersigned by the Chancery Court Clerk and
Master, Probate Division, of Carter County,
Tennessee.
All persons, resident
and
non-resident,
having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the Estate of
Lynda R. Miller a/k/a
Linda R. Miller
are required to file the
same with the Clerk
and Master of the
above Court within
four (4) months from
the date of the first
publication of this Notice; otherwise, their
claims will be forever
barred.
All persons indebted
to the above Estate
must come forward
and make proper settlement with the undersigned at once.
This the 31st day of
August , 2006.
Jeffrey A. Miller
Administrator
Deceased:
Lynda R. Miller a/k/a
Linda R. Miller
David W. Bush
Attorney
CHARLOTTE MCKEEHAN
Clerk and Master
9/5, 9/12
Statewide Classified Ads
REACHING OVER 1.1 MILLION READERS EVERY WEEK!
For placement information, contact this newspaper’s classiÀed advertising department.
ESTATE OF
DECEASED
Notice is hereby given
that on the
30th day of August,
2006 Letters of Testamentary, in respect to
the Estate of
Joann Peters Kennedy
2000 CHRYSLER
SEBRING
CONVERTIBLE
Silver with black top,
88k miles, $6,500.00.
THERE
IS
FURTHER
CONVEYED HEREWITH
IT IS EXPRESSLY UNDERSTOOD AND AGREED
that the owner of the
herein conveyed Lot
No. 1 of the Pauline
Campbell
Property
shall share, on a pro
rata basis, together
with the owners of
other lots of the Pauline Campbell Property expenses for installation, repair of
and expenses in connection with the taking of water from the
spring located on Lot
No. 2 which may arise
from the common usage of by the owners
of said lots of pumps,
wiring, pipes, pipe
lines, appurtenances,
utilities and utility services.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH.
A bidder's deposit of
ten percent (10%) will
be required. The entire amount of the successful bid must be
paid in full, in cash
within thirty (30) days
after sale. Purchaser
shall pay all recording
fees, examination of title, settlement fees,
and all costs of conveyance,
including
preparation of a Deed
of Bargain and Sale
by Special Warranty.
Listing of known Lienholders:
(If
none,
please state)
Citizens Bank
Colorado Capital
Tennessee
Department of Revenue
JOANN PETERS KENNEDY
deceased, were issued to the undersigned by the Chancery Court Clerk and
Master, Probate Division, of Carter County,
Tennessee.
All persons, resident
and
non-resident,
having claims, matured or unmatured,
against the Estate of
Joann Peters Kennedy
are required to file the
same with the Clerk
and Master of the
above Court within
four (4) months from
the date of the first
publication of this Notice; otherwise, their
1995 Nissan
Pathfinder XE
Stock #LB4681
Pre-Owned
Amazing Value!
SITUATE in the Twelfth
(12th) Civil District of
Carter County, Tennessee and being
more particularly described as follows:
THE HEREIN CONVEYED
Lot No. 1 is conveyed
subject to an easement appurtenant for
the benefit of Lots
Nos. 4 and 14 of the
Pauline
Campbell
property as shown on
Plat dated August 8,
2001, of record in Plat
Cabinet [email protected], Slides
41 and 42, Register=s
Office
for
Carter
County, Tennessee, for
purposes of installing,
and constructing necessary pipes, pipe lines
and appurtenances
for the conveyance of
water from that certain spring located on
Lot 2 of the Pauline
Campbell Property as
shown on said Plat for
the benefit of said Lots
Nos. 4 and 14 together with an easement to enter upon
the herein conveyed
property from time to
time as necessary for
the maintenance of
said pipe line.
ADDRESS OF PROPERTY:
770 Hwy 91
Elizabethton, TN 37643
The Trustee reserves
the right:
1.
To waive the
deposit requirement;
2.
To
extend
the period of time
within which the Purchaser is to make full
settlement;
3.
To withdraw
the property from sale
at any time prior to
the termination of the
bidding;
4.
To keep the
bidding open for any
length of time;
5.
To reject all
bids;
6.
To postpone
or set over the date of
sale; and
7.
Should the
highest bidder fail to
comply with the terms
of the bid at public
sale, then the Trustee
shall have the option
of accepting the second (2nd) highest bid,
or the next highest bid
with which the buyer is
able to comply.
PROBATE NO. P060136
J&L MOTORS
198 HWY. 91
Elizabethton
423-542-2664
SOLD
UNDER AND BY VIRTUE
OF AUTHORITY vested
in the undersigned
Trustee, and in execution of that certain
Deed of Trust made
by John S. Berry,
dated the 11th day of
April, 2002, and recorded in Trust Book
T619, Page 289, at the
Register's Office of
Carter County, Tennessee, default having been made in the
payment of indebtedness thereby secured,
the undersigned Trustee, at the request of
the holder of said
Note, will offer for sale
at public auction at
the front door of the
Courthouse in Carter
County, Tennessee on
the 14th day of September, 2006 at 10:00,
a.m. (ET) the following
described parcel of
land and improvements:
PUBLIC NOTICES
45 MOBILE HOMES
W/PHOTO
2005 Neon
SXT
2001 CHEVROLET
TAHOE
65 TRUCKS &
SEMI’S
59 AUTOS
FOR SALE
1990 Honda Accord
$650.
Police
Impounds! For listings
800-391-5227 ext 7395
STOCK #9708
PRE-OWNED
ELIZABETHTON AUTO
SALES
(423)543-7592
(423)542-2131
(423)928-9224
COMMERCIAL REAL
ESTATE LOANS call
Dan (423)929-0222 ext.
105.
Located in S. JC with
Stainless appliances,
3br, 1ba, Full unfin.
Basement and sits on
a beautiful lot with
Mountain Views.
17K,
one
$15,995.
SMITH HOMES
51 COMMERCIAL
SALE/LEASE
NEW CONSTRUCTION
AT A GREAT PRICE
129,900.00
2006 CHEVROLET
IMPALA
928-4151
MONDAY------------FRIDAY 2:00 P.M.
TUESDAY-------------MONDAY 2:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY--------TUESDAY 2:00 P.M.
THURSDAY------WEDNESDAY 2:00 P.M.
FRIDAY------------THURSDAY 2:00 P.M.
SUNDAY---------------FRIDAY 2:00 P.M.
4x4, 5-speed, blue,
V-6, PW, PL, PM, A/C,
cruise, tilt, AM/FM
cassette. $4,495.
J&L MOTORS
198 HWY. 91
Elizabethton
423-542-2664
Security Federal Bank
has employment opportunities for
PART-TIME and FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES
with Bank Experience preferred.
Please call543-1000 to schedule an interview.
Security Federal Bank is an equal
opportunity employer.
Adoption
ADOPT: HAPPILY MARRIED COUPLE
wishes to adopt. Offering love- laughterfinancial security. A warm bright future.
Expenses paid. Please call Louise/Michael.
1-866-483-7578
Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn
$800 in a day? Your own local candy route.
Includes 30 Machines and Candy All for
$9,995. 1-888-745-3351
Equipment For Sale
SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $2,990.00 -Convert your Logs To Valuable Lumber
with your own Norwood portable band
sawmill. Log skidders also available.
www.norwoodindustries.com -Free
information: 1-800-578-1363- Ext: 300-N.
Financial
$$CASH$$ IMMEDIATE CASH FOR
Structured Settlements, Annuities,
Law Suit, Mortgage Notes & Cash Flows.
J.G. Wentworth #1 1-(800)794-7310.
Help Wanted - Drivers
DRIVERS- FLATBED OUR TOP drivers
earn up to $.50 per mile! All benefits plus
longevity “Bonus” of $10,000! Call 1-800344-1532 x 123 www.holmestrck.com
WANT HOME MOST WEEKENDS With
More Pay! Run Heartland’s Southeast
Regional! $.45/mile company drivers
$1.22 for Operators! 12 month OTR
required. Heartland Express 1-800-4414953 www.heartlandexpress.com
BEEN OFF THE ROAD awhile?
Want to get back to driving over-theroad again? We offer a “refresher”
program for drivers like you! For details
call 1-800-441-4953 Heartland Express
www.heartlandexpress.com
DRIVER FLATBED SMALL COMPANY
Big Pay Starting Up To 46cpm Guaranteed
Hometime, Three Weeks Vacation, Lease
Purchase, BC/BS, 6 Months Experience
Required 800-441-4271 ext.-TN-100
DRIVER OPERATORS FLATBED, WE
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Page 14 - STAR - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2006
MEDICAL CARE
LLC
Panel
No
Appointment
Necessary!
Elizabethton - 1900 W. Elk Avenue (423) 543-2584 • Mon - Fri: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Johnson City - 401 E. Main Street (I-26 Exit 32) (423) 929-2584 • Mon - Fri: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sat: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Hampton • 437 Highway 321 (423) 725-5062 • Mon - Fri: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
www.medicalcarellc.com
“Medical Care with a Heart.”
AccuWeather 5-Day Forecast for Elizabethton
®
TODAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
National Weather for Sep. 5, 2006
SATURDAY
-10s -0s
0s
10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s
Seattle
76/52
DRY
Billings
87/54
Minneapolis
80/57
COOL
Intervals of
clouds and
sunshine
Variable
clouds, a tstorm
70°
79°
54°
78°
54°
A t-storm
possible in
the afternoon
An afternoon
t-storm
possible
56°
San Francisco
74/55
54°
79°
55°
80°
Bristol Almanac
RealFeel Temp
UV Index Today
Statistics are through 6 p.m. yest.
The patented RealFeel Temperature® is
AccuWeather’s exclusive index of the effects
of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine,
precipitation and elevation on the human
body. Shown are the highest values for each
day.
8 a.m. .............................................. 0
Noon ............................................... 3
4 p.m. .............................................. 2
Temperature:
High yesterday ........................ 85°
Low yesterday ......................... 66°
Precipitation:
Today ........................................... 76°
Wednesday .................................. 82°
Thursday ...................................... 82°
Friday ........................................... 81°
Saturday ....................................... 81°
24 hrs. ending 6 p.m. yest. ... 0.34”
AccuWeather.com
0-2:
3-5:
6-7:
Low
Moderate
High
8-10:
11+:
Very High
Extreme
The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Forecasts and graphics provided
by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2006
Tennessee Weather
Nashville
80/58
Camden
81/58
Knoxville
73/56
The State
Sunrise today ....................... 7:03 a.m.
Sunset tonight ...................... 7:51 p.m.
Moonrise today ................... 6:50 p.m.
Moonset today ..................... 4:08 a.m.
City
Athens
Bristol
Chattanooga
Clarksville
Cleveland
Cookeville
Crossville
Erwin
Franklin
Greeneville
Johnson City
Moon Phases
Full
Last
New
First
Sep 7
Sep 14
Sep 22
Sep 30
Today
Hi Lo W
73 57 t
71 54 t
80 60 t
80 56 pc
78 59 t
75 56 t
70 55 t
72 55 t
80 58 pc
71 55 t
71 54 t
Hi
80
79
82
80
82
80
80
78
80
79
79
Wed.
Lo W
57 pc
53 pc
58 pc
54 pc
58 pc
57 pc
56 pc
53 pc
58 s
53 pc
53 pc
Atlanta
81/63
Los Angeles
90/66
El Paso
78/60
Houston
86/66
Cold front
Warm front
Stationary front
Today
City
Hi Lo W
Kingsport
71 55 t
Knoxville
73 56 t
Memphis
84 62 pc
Morristown 72 56 t
Mountain City 70 53 t
Nashville
80 58 pc
Newport
73 57 t
Oak Ridge
77 56 t
Pigeon Forge 73 56 t
Roan Mtn.
69 52 t
Sevierville
73 56 t
Hi
79
82
83
80
75
80
81
80
82
75
82
Miami
87/76
Showers
T-storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.
Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures
are given for selected cities.
The World
The Nation
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.
Sun and Moon
Denver
82/53
Rain and thunderstorms will expand northward on the Atlantic
Seaboard today, where flooding is possible in poor drainage areas.
Drenching rain and thunderstorms over the Southwest are expected to expand to the northwest Gulf Coast.
Murfreesboro
80/57
Waynesboro Chattanooga
80/60
82/58
Memphis
84/62
HOT
National Summary
Elizabethton
70/54
Union City
80/57
Chicago
74/56
New York
Detroit
71/62
76/59
Washington
72/64
Kansas City
79/57
Partly sunny
Wed.
Lo W
55 pc
56 pc
63 s
55 pc
52 pc
58 s
56 pc
56 pc
56 pc
51 pc
56 pc
Today
City
Hi Lo W
Atlanta
81 63 t
Boston
73 60 r
Charleston, SC 87 71 t
Charlotte
80 62 t
Chicago
74 56 c
Cincinnati
75 54 c
Dallas
85 63 s
Denver
82 53 pc
Honolulu
89 76 pc
Kansas City 79 57 s
Los Angeles 90 66 pc
New York City 71 62 r
Orlando
88 73 t
Phoenix
98 80 t
Seattle
76 52 s
Wash., DC
72 64 r
Wed.
Hi Lo W
84 63 pc
68 58 r
85 66 pc
82 60 pc
78 54 pc
76 52 pc
86 60 s
83 52 pc
89 76 pc
82 58 s
86 66 pc
74 64 r
90 75 pc
100 80 t
76 52 s
76 61 pc
Today
City
Hi Lo W
Acapulco
86 77 t
Amsterdam 72 58 sh
Barcelona
82 70 s
Beijing
86 59 pc
Berlin
68 56 pc
Dublin
70 59 c
Hong Kong 90 80 pc
Jerusalem
80 61 s
London
76 58 s
Madrid
99 70 s
Mexico City 70 54 t
Montreal
75 61 c
Paris
84 62 s
Rome
84 66 s
Seoul
77 58 pc
Singapore
86 77 pc
Wed.
Hi Lo W
88 78 t
73 59 pc
76 65 pc
83 58 s
72 57 pc
68 55 sh
89 79 t
84 64 s
79 61 pc
99 70 s
73 54 r
74 59 sh
86 63 pc
86 66 s
77 65 pc
87 79 pc
Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
TODAY’S WEATHER BROUGHT TO YOU FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT
ELIZABETHTON ELECTRIC SYSTEM
542-1100
(8 am - 5 pm)
www.eesonline.org
542-1111
(After Hours)
TN public universities
ramp up federal lobbying
CHATTANOOGA (AP) —
Tennessee’s public universities are ramping up their
lobbying of Congress, a
newspaper analysis found.
State universities more
than doubled their spending
on lobbying between 2003
and 2005, from $352,000 to
$708,500 last year, the Chattanooga Times Free Press reported in Sunday’s editions.
The University of Tennessee has a federal relations director who works
full-time in Washington, and
also contracts with an outside firm to help lobby lawmakers, spokeswoman Gina
Stafford said.
“We have an advocate on
the ground to make sure
that UT is heard in all matters,” she said.
The university’s federal
funding jumped from $8
million in 2003 to $42 million in 2006, Stafford said.
Schools around the country are paying more attention to federal lobbying, said
Travis Reindl of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities.
“In the fiscal environment
that we’re in, institutions are
looking out for themselves,”
he said. “You have to really
work hard and be very
strategic, and that’s where
lobbyists come in.”
Joe Bales, vice president
of development and university relations at Middle Tennessee State University, said
the Mufreesboro school took
in less than $500,000 in federal money before it started
lobbying Congress. It now
brings in $2.5 million to $3
million, he said.
“Certainly, it’s given us
another avenue of resources
to bring projects to fruition,”
Bales said.
U.S. Rep. Zach Wamp, RTenn., said he doesn’t mind
university employees guiding lobbying efforts, but said
he opposes the use of contract lobbyists.
“I tell them, ‘I don’t think
you need a lobbyist. You got
me, and that’s one of the
things I’m elected for,”’ said
Wamp.
Drew Johnson, president
of the nonpartisan Tennessee Center for Policy Research, said the money spent
to lobby Congress should be
used for educational purposes.
“Instead, the money was
used to line the pockets of
lobbyists,” he said.
Two toddlers drown near Watts Bar Dam
CHATTANOOGA (AP) —
A 2-year-old Maryville girl
and her 4-year-old brother
drowned Monday near Watts
Bar Dam when a piece of Styrofoam they were floating on
overturned, officials said.
John Argo, chief of the
Rhea County Sheriff’s Department, said the incident
occurred around 3:10 p.m.
After the two children fell
into the reservoir, Argo said
a piece of metal detached
from the Styrofoam, which
appeared to be from a nearby
dock, and pinned the boy
and girl underwater.
A 12-year-old brother of
the children and a 12-yearold friend who were with the
toddlers began yelling for
help and got the attention of
two nearby boats, Argo said.
“They got the children out
of the water and started
CPR,” he said of the responders.
The children were eventually airlifted to East Tennessee Children’s Hospital in
Knoxville where they were
pronounced dead.
Police have not released
the names of the victims.
But Argo said the mother
of the two children is an assistant manager at the Watts
Bar Resort and was working
at the time of the incident,
which occurred off a wooded
bank behind the resort.
He said the mother had
instructed the children not to
get near the lake, and that
they apparently “wandered
off from their mom.”
“She had no idea they
were down around the water,” Argo said. “We think
they were trying to drift
across to a small island.”
Death row inmate chooses electric chair
NASHVILLE (AP) — If
death row inmate Daryl Keith Holton has his way, he
will become the first prisoner
to die in Tennessee’s electric
chair in 46 years.
The Shelbyville man, who
is scheduled to be executed
Sept. 19, has asked to be executed by electric chair instead of lethal injection.
Holton shot to death his
three young sons and his exwife’s daughter in 1997. The
Gulf War veteran said he was
suffering from severe depression when he killed the children.
Under Tennessee law,
death-row
inmates
can
choose between the electric
chair and lethal injection if
their crimes were committed
before 1999, said David Ray-
bin, a Nashville attorney and
legal scholar who wrote the
state’s death penalty statute.
The inmates were allowed
that option when the state
adopted lethal injection as
the method of execution to
avoid appeals of the process.
Last
week,
Holton
checked electric chair as his
preferred way to die, said
Dorinda Carter, spokes-
woman for the Department
of Correction.
It wasn’t clear why Holton
chose electrocution over
lethal injection. His attorneys
could not be reached for
comment.
The last time the electric
chair was used in Tennessee
was Nov. 7, 1960, when inmate William Tines was executed for rape, Holton said.
success is because of the residents, the Housing Authority and the Police Department
all coming together and
working together,” she said.
Geagley stated that having the substation in Rolling
Hills along with the Neighborhood Watch program has
been very beneficial to the
EHDA and that the crime
rate in Rolling Hills has gone
down tremendously.
“When we applied for our
last crime related grant we
were not eligible because less
than 1 percent of the crime in
Elizabethton occurs in public
housing,” he said.
Hilbert stated that he
hopes the success story of the
Neighborhood Watch pro-
gram in public housing will
inspire other communities to
take action as well and start
Neighborhood Watch programs.
He also stated that as the
holiday season approaches,
crimes such as home burglaries will increase and “there
will be no time like the present to get a Neighborhood
n Continued from 1
Bredesen earlier appointed Criminal Appeals Judge Gary
R. Wade to fill one of two Supreme Court vacancies created
by last month’s retirements of Justices E. Riley Anderson and
Adolpho A. Birch Jr., the only black member of the Supreme
Court. Dinkins and Gordon were finalists for the first vacancy, too.
District Attorney General Mike Bottoms, who chairs the
commission, said the person ultimately selected will be the
most qualified — regardless of race.
“We need the very best person we can find to lead us,”
said Bottoms, who chairs the commission. “We’re looking for
someone who’s a good citizen as well as a legal scholar in
Tennessee.”
Commission member Gary Brewer said the governor is
right to want a minority member on the Supreme Court, but
he said the commission has “to look at all things.”
“We don’t intend to be at odds with the governor. We are
committed to a very good Supreme Court,” Brewer said.
“Sometimes we disagree with how we get there, but we all
have the right motivation in our efforts.”
House Speaker Jimmy Naifeh, who appointed members of
the commission along with Senate Speaker John Wilder, said
he’s remained neutral in the process even though Gordon is
from Naifeh’s hometown of Covington.
“I don’t get involved with issues with the Judicial Selection
Commission, and I have not spoken to one person about
Houston Gordon’s name being before that commission nor
will I,” Naifeh said. “His merits stand on their own.”
Troops
n Continued from 1
di as the second most important al-Qaida in Iraq figure behind Abu Ayyub al-Masri,
who is believed to have taken
over the group after Abu
Musab al-Zarqawi was killed
by a U.S. airstrike in June.
Al-Saeedi was involved in
the Feb. 22 bombing of a Shiite
shrine in Samarra, al-Rubaie
said. The attack inflamed tensions between Shiite and Sunni
Muslims and set off reprisal
killings that have killed hundreds of Iraqis, like those
found in Baghdad on Monday.
Police said they the 33 bullet-riddled bodies all showed
signs of torture and had their
hands and feet bound. The
men had been dumped
around several neighborhoods, police said.
Two other bodies were
found dumped on a highway
in Kut, 100 miles southeast of
Baghdad. Both had been shot
in the head and chest, said
Maamoun Ajil al-Robaiei at
Kut hospital’s morgue.
The Mujahedeen Shura
Council’s statement also said
insurgents have been inflicting
heavy losses on U.S. troops in
western Anbar province and in
Baghdad.
The U.S.-led coalition said
seven of its personnel had
been killed the past two days
— five Americans and two
Britons.
On Sunday, two U.S.
Marines were killed in Anbar
and two Army soldiers died
from roadside bombs in Mosul, 225 miles northwest of
Baghdad, and near Baqouba,
35 miles northeast of the capital. Another soldier was killed
Monday by a roadside bomb.
A sixth American died of noncombat injuries, the military
said.
In the south, a roadside
bomb killed two British soldiers and seriously wounded a
third north of the southern city
of Basra, a British military
spokesman, Maj. Charlie Burbridge, said.
British Foreign Secretary
Margaret Beckett arrived in the
capital Monday on an unannounced visit — her first to
Iraq since taking up the post in
May.
“We do not underestimate
the challenges ahead,” Beckett
said in a statement. “But we
must not forget the progress
made in the last twelve
months in bringing the first
democratically elected national unity government to the
country, with a constitution
voted for by the people.”
South of the capital, Iraqi
soldiers clashed with gunmen
near the holy city of Karbala
during an operation to secure
the city ahead of a Shiite religious festival, the prime minister’s office said. Tens of thou-
sands of Shiite pilgrims are expected in Karbala, 50 miles
south of the capital on Saturday to observe Shaaban, a
mid-month religious celebration.
Fourteen gunmen were
killed and another 22 were arrested, while one Iraqi soldier
was also killed and another
was wounded, the statement
said.
On Saturday, police said 13
Pakistani and Indian Shiite pilgrims and their Iraqi driver
had been ambushed and killed
on their way to Karbala.
Assailants abducted Ghanim Ghudayer, a soccer star and
member of Iraq’s Olympic
team. Considered one of the
best players on Baghdad’s Air
Force Club, the 22-year-old
was taken Sunday evening by
unknown assailants, some of
whom were wearing military
uniforms, police said.
The U.S.-led coalition said
the Iraqi army had begun
searching the capital’s Mansour district as part of a crackdown aimed at tackling violence in Baghdad neighborhood by neighborhood. U.S.
soldiers would “observe and
advise” during the operation,
the military said.
The coalition also said five
suspected insurgents and a
child were killed and a second
child was wounded during a
raid in Muqdadiyah, about 60
miles north of Baghdad. The
raid targeted “an individual
with ties to movement of terrorist finances and foreign
fighters into Iraq,” the military
said in a statement.
The Iraqi Defense Ministry
said that over the previous 24
hours, its troops had killed 15
people suspected of involvement of insurgent activities.
Iraqi police said clashes between gunmen and Iraqi
forces in Musayyib, 40 miles
south of Baghdad, resulted in
the death of an Iraqi soldier
and the arrest of about 100
gunmen.
Disagreements continued
over the handover of Iraq’s
armed forces command from
the U.S.-led coalition to the
Iraqi government, and the Defense Ministry said a ceremony
to mark the transition had
been postponed indefinitely.
The two sides still need “to
complete some legal and protocol procedures that will lead
to a complete understanding
between the Iraqi government
and the multinational troops,”
the ministry said.
Handing over control from
the coalition to Iraqi authorities is a key part of any eventual drawdown of U.S. troops in
the country.
Watch started.”
Hilbert stated that anyone
who is interested in finding
out how to start a Neighborhood Watch program in the
city should contact him.
“We’ll enforce the law, that’s
what we do. They just need
to be our eyes and ears to
help us do our job and enforce the laws,” he said.
“When someone calls me
and wants to start a Neighborhood Watch it just thrills
me because I know they are
interested in making their
community better.”
Those interested in obtaining information on a Neighborhood Watch program can
reach EPD Sgt. Danny
Hilbert at (423) 547-6417.
Watch
n Continued from 1
with information about criminal activity going on in the
community. She also stated
that when the EHDA sends
out their monthly newsletter
a crime tips sheet is included
in that and that the residents
can use that to report any
suspicious activity.
“I think the biggest reason
this community watch is a