catalog 2005-2006 - Benjamin Franklin Institute Of Technology

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catalog 2005-2006 - Benjamin Franklin Institute Of Technology
CATALOG 2005-2006
INFORMATION, POLICIES, PROGRAMS,
COURSES, AND FACULTY OF THE
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
41 Berkeley Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02116
Telephone: 617.423.4630
Fax: 617.482.3706
Web: http://www.bfit.edu
1
Equal Opportunity Policy
BFIT policy prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, handicap, and veteran status. This policy extends to all rights, privileges, programs, and activities, including admission,
employment, financial assistance, and educational programs, and is required by federal law including Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the regulations thereunder. Inquiries
concerning the application of these laws to BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY should be addressed to Affirmative Action Officer, 41 Berkeley St., Boston, MA 02116, or to the Director of the Office of Civil Rights, HEW.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Policy
BFIT complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, also known as the Buckley Amendment.This act protects the rights of the student in matters of access to and release of information contained in the student’s records.
Questions regarding this policy should be referred to the Registrar.
This catalog contains current information regarding the calendar, admission, degree requirements, fees, regulations, and course offerings. The policy of BFIT is to give advance notice of change, whenever possible, to permit
adjustment. However, BFIT reserves the right to make changes at anytime when it is deemed advisable.
The BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY reserves the right, in its sole judgement, to make changes of any nature in its programs, calendar, or academic schedule whenever it is deemed necessary or desirable including
changes in course content, the rescheduling of classes with or without extending the academic term, canceling of scheduled classes and other academic activities, in any such case giving such notice thereof as is reasonably practicable under
the circumstances.
2
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Program of Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Faculty Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Automotive Technology (BS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Staff Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Message from the President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Architectural Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Academic Calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Automotive Technology (AS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Faculty and Staff Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Policies and Disclaimers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Computer Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . 38
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
History and Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Computer Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Electrical Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Electronic Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Overview of Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Marine Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Admissions Procedure and Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Mechanical Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . 49
Tuition Costs and Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Medical Electronics Engineering Technology. . . . 52
Student Services and Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Pharmacy Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Student Rights and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Practical Electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Academic Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Heating,Ventilating, Air Conditioning, &
Refrigeration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
General Education
Academic Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Humanities and Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Mathematics and Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
3
INSTITUTE PROFILE AND ACCREDITATION
PROFILE
Type of School:
Technical Institute
Founded:
1908 under the provisions of the will
of Benjamin Franklin
Enrollment:
350 full-time day and evening students
President:
Michael Taylor
Accreditation:
New England Association of Schools
and Colleges
Accreditation Board for Engineering
and Technology
Degrees:
Programs:
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Bachelor of Science
Associate in Science
Associate in Engineering
Cer tificate of Proficiency
Architectural Technology, A.E.
Automotive Technology, B.S., A.S.
Computer Engineering Technology, A.E.
Computer Technology, A.E.
Electrical Technology, A.E.
Electronic Engineering Technology, A.E.
Heating,Ventilating, Air Conditioning
& Refrigeration, Certificate
Marine Technology, Certificate
Mechanical Engineering Technology, A.E.
Medical Electronics Engineering, A.E.
Pharmacy Technology, Certificate
Practical Electricity, Certificate
Tuition:
$ 12,500 per year
Financial Aid:
Federal, S t a t e, private, and institutional
aid available
Location:
In Boston’s South End
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
ACCREDITATION
New England Association of Schools
and Colleges (NEASC)
Accreditation Board for Engineering
and Technology (ABET)
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology is accredited
by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges,
a non-governmental, nationally recognized organization
that accredits institutions of higher education.
The Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC) of the
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
(ABET) has accredited the Benjamin Franklin Institute of
Technology engineering technology curricula in the day
school programs in Computer Engineering Technology
and Electronic Engineering Technology.
Accreditation of an institution by the New England
Association of Schools and Colleges indicates that it meets
or exceeds criteria for the assessment of institutional
quality, periodically applied through a rigorous review
process. An accredited school or college is one that has
the resources necessary to achieve its stated purposes
through appropriate educational programs, is substantially
doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will
continue to do so in the foreseeable future.
Accreditation by the New England Association is not
partial, but applies to the institution as a whole. As such,
it is not a guarantee of the quality of every course or
program offered, or the competence of individual
graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance
about the quality of opportunities available to students
who attend the institution.
Inquiries regarding the status of an institution’s accreditation by the New England Association of Schools and
Colleges should be directed to:
Commission on Technical and Career Institutions
New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.
209 Burlington Road, Bedford, MA 01730-1433
(781) 271-0022.
Inquiries regarding the status of BFIT’s accreditation by
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
should be directed to the administrative staff of the
college. Individuals may also contact ABET:
Accreditation Director for Engineering Technology
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, MD 21202
(410) 347-7700
A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
Welcome to the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology.
BFIT offers you a variety of technical degrees in a supportive and nurturing environment.
We are uniquely capable to prepare you for the new global economy, with small classes, individual student focus and hands-on
skills development.
A dedicated and caring faculty and staff await your enrollment to instill hope, inspire learning, and create opportunity.
Ben Franklin’s gift to Boston founded this institute, and his leadership was significant in the founding of our country.Thanks to him,
we are strengthened by almost a century of dedicated academic excellence. Like Ben Franklin, we have remained innovative and
collaborative, evidenced by our new and exciting certificate programs in Pharmacy Technology in partnership with CVS, and Marine
Technology in partnership with the Massachusetts Marine Trade Association.
Programs like these offer the opportunity to receive a technical education that prepares you to enter the workforce directly.You
may choose to pursue an Associate Degree in a variety of technical fields or a Bachelor of Science in Automotive Technology, or take
advantage of our strategic alliances with Northeastern University and the Boston Architectural Center.
We are committed to your success and will assist you in pursuing an advanced degree and securing employment in your chosen
career.
Our faculty, staff, and students join me in welcoming you to the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology.
Sincerely,
Michael Taylor
President
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
5
ACADEMIC CALENDARS
ACADEMIC CALENDARS
Fall Semester
Day
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
Labor Day
Monday
September 5
September 4
September 3
Classes Begin
Tuesday
September 6
September 5
September 4
Columbus Day
Monday
October 10
October 9
October 8
Mid Term Ends
Friday
October 21
October 20
October 19
Veterans’ Day
Friday
November 11
November 10
November 12
Thanksgiving
Wednesday – Friday
November 23-25
November 22-24
November 21-23
Classes End
Friday
December 9
December 8
December 7
Exams
Monday – Thursday
December 12-15
December 11-14
December 10-13
December 16
December 15
December 14
Winter Recess
6
Spring Semester
Day
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
Mar tin L. King Jr.
Monday
January 16
January 15
January 21
Classes Begin
Tuesday
January 17
January 16
January 22
Presidents’ Day
Monday
February 20
February 19
February 18
Mid Term Ends
Friday
March 3
March 2
March 7
Spring Break
Monday – Friday
March 6 –10
March 5-9
March 10-14
Patriots Day
Monday
April 17
April 17
April 15
Classes End
Friday
April 28
April 27
May 2
Exams
Monday – Thursday
May 1-4
April 30 – May 3
May 5-8
Graduation
Saturday
May 20
May 19
May 17
Summer Session 1
Day
May 15-June 30
May 14 – June 29
May 12 – June 27
Memorial Day
Monday
May 29
May 28
May 27
Summer Session 2
July 3–August 18
July 2 – August 17
June 30-August 15
Independence Day
July 4
July 4
July 4
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
OVERVIEW
POLICIES AND DISCLAIMERS
HISTORY AND MISSION
Equal Opportunity Policy
History
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology prohibits
discrimination on the basis of race, color, national or
ethnic origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, a g e, handicap,
or veteran status.This policy extends to all rights,
privileges, programs, and activities, including admission,
employment, financial assistance, and educational programs,
and is required by federal law including Title IX of the
Educational Amendments of 1972, and section 504 of
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the regulations
thereunder. Inquiries concerning the application of these
laws to Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology should
be addressed to Affirmative Action Officer, 41 Berkeley
St., Boston, MA 02116.
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology is a twoyear college with a rich history built on tradition and
innovation. One of the oldest technical institutes in
New England, BFIT owes its existence to Benjamin
Franklin, who in the 1789 codicil to his will bequeathed
a gift to help educate “the inhabitants of the Town of
Boston.” His desire was to equip young people with
quality technical skills, believing that “good apprentices
are most likely to make good citizens.” In 1906, aided
by an additional gift from the industrialist Andrew
Carnegie and land donated by the city of Boston, the
managers of the Franklin Fund decided that a technical
institute would best accomplish Franklin’s original
purpose. Franklin Institute opened its doors to students
in 1908. Since then, BFIT has graduated more than
85,000 students, all of whom have benefited from its
unique approach to technical education. BFIT remains
Dr. Franklin’s living legacy to Boston.
Family Educational Rights
and Privacy Policy
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology complies
with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.
This law protects the rights of the student in matters of
access to, and release of, information contained in the
student’s educational records. Questions regarding this
policy should be referred to the Dean of Students.
Changes to this Catalog
The information in the printed version of this catalog
was current as of July 1, 2005.The Benjamin Franklin
Institute of Technology reserves the right to update,
modify, and change calendars, degree requirements,
course offerings, course descriptions, regulations, tuition
and fees, and other information as necessary. The
Institute will endeavor to provide timely notice of these
changes to the persons affected. An updated version of
this catalog can be found online at http://www.bfit.edu.
A more extensive history of BFIT can be found on our
website at www.bfit.edu.
Mission
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology strives to
prepare students for a meaningful technical career and
lifelong learning. A dedicated faculty and staff create a
network of learning and support that serves a culturally
diverse student body in an urban setting. Through a
broad range of technical programs, the Institute is
committed to helping students advance themselves
educationally and professionally. BFIT continually seeks
input and support from business and industry to keep
at the forefront of rapidly changing technology. The
Institute’s goal is to ensure high-quality programs that
balance liberal studies courses with applied skills, thus
fulfilling the will of its benefactor, Benjamin Franklin, to
develop students who will aspire not only to advance
themselves but also to benefit society.
GOVERNANCE
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology is
governed by the twelve-member Franklin Foundation,
established under Chapter 569 of the General Laws of
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Eight members
are lifetime appointees, appointed by the Massachusetts
Supreme Judicial Court.The four remaining positions
are ex officio and tied to an official position: the Mayor
of Boston and the ministers of the three oldest
Congregational, Episcopal, and Presbyterian churches
in Boston.
In addition, there is a separate 501(c)(3) board, the
Franklin Institute, Inc. Its bylaws require that the
President, and at least three other Franklin Foundation
members, serve on this board. Its membership consists
of at least seven, but not more than twenty-five,
members who serve three-year terms.The boards meet
jointly. Headquarters of both boards are at 41 Berkeley
Street, Boston, MA 02116.
The President of the Benjamin Franklin Institute of
Technology carries out the policies and directives of the
Board. He consults frequently with the Chair of the
Franklin Foundation and meets weekly with an administrative council consisting of the Chief Operating Officer,
the Vice President for Corporate and External Relations,
the Dean of Faculty, the Dean of Enrollment Services,
the Dean of Students, and the Registrar.
The academic department chairs meet weekly with the
Dean of Faculty.The faculty is involved in curriculum
matters, personnel matters, and faculty development
through three standing committees:
l
A faculty academic advisory committee (FAAC)
advises on academic and curriculum matters and
reviews new program proposals.
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A faculty personnel advisory committee (FPAC) deals
with personnel issues.
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A faculty development committee (FDC) deals with
professional development and in-service training.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
7
OVERVIEW
FACILITIES
The Institute includes laboratory, classroom, student, and
office space on its three-acre campus in the South End
neighborhood of Boston. The campus centers on the
Franklin Union building, an historic 1908 structure
designed specifically for technical education. For its
400 students, BFIT provides 28 general classrooms,
14 specialized laboratories, a library, an academic support
center, an electronic classroom, a 600-seat auditorium,
a student lounge, and a school store.The central place
on campus is the historic, high-ceilinged lobby where
students study, talk, and meet with their teachers.
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BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Laboratories
Library
Since effective technical education focuses on experimentation and hands-on work, BFIT’s facilities center on
these sixteen labs:
The Lufkin Memorial Library supports the learning and
teaching functions of the Benjamin Franklin Institute of
Technology by offe ring services, collections, and programs
that facilitate the effective use of information and
information literacy.
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Architectural design lab
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Automotive engines lab
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Automotive transmissions lab
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Automotive electric lab
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Automotive diagnostics lab
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Computer networking lab
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Computer programming labs (2)
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Computer diagnostics lab
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Computer Aided Design (CAD) lab
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Electric machinery lab
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Electric wiring lab
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Electronics lab
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HVAC lab
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Mechanical engineering lab
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Pharmacy lab
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Physics lab
In support of this mission, the library provides
information in all formats and embraces appropriate
new technologies to enhance the electronic learning
community. More than14,500 volumes are available to
patrons in paper and e-book formats, in addition to 80
print periodical subscriptions, and 14 electronic resources
providing access to the full text of over 8,000 journals.
The Lufkin Memorial Library is a member of the Boston
Regional Library System Consortium (BRLS), part of the
Massachusetts Library & Information Network. Through
the BRLS system, the Institute has guaranteed students
access to over 100 academic, public, school, and special
libraries located within the cities of Boston, Chelsea, and
Malden.
The Lufkin Library is also a member of the New
England Library and Information Network (NELINET).
NELINET is a member-owned, member-governed
cooperative of more than 500 academic, public, and
special libraries in the six New England states. NELINET
promotes resource sharing and interlibrary cooperation
among the member libraries.
OVERVIEW
OVERVIEW OF PROGRAMS
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology offers a
range of technical programs that lead to a variety of
careers and further educational opportunities.They range
from one-year certificates in HVAC, marine technology,
pharmacy technology, and practical electricity, to
two-year academic degrees in industrial technologies, as
well as engineering technologies designed to prepare
students for transfer to four-year degree programs.The
Institute also offers the only Bachelor’s of Automotive
Technology in the Northeast. All of our programs
provide hands-on laboratory work combined with
classroom technical concepts and a strong general
education component.
The Institute is organized into nine departments:
Academic Development provides students with the
remedial and developmental courses they need to
succeed in their major field of study. This department
also coordinates student assessment, placement, and
counseling.
Architecture offers an associate in engineering degree
program that provides an introduction to architectural
concepts and skills, preparing students for careers in
architecture, and for further study at schools such as the
Boston Architectural Center.
Automotive offers associate and bachelor degrees in
automotive technology, as well as a certificate in marine
technology, through an array of courses in engines,
electricity, fuels, diagnosis, and repair.
Humanities and Social Sciences provides a range of
courses in composition, literature, history, and the social
sciences that provide general education to enable and
complement the technical courses.
Mathematics and Physics teaches the concepts that
underlie all of the technical specialties of the school,
offering both academic and applied math, as well as
classroom and laboratory physics.
Mechanical provides an intensive associate’s degree
program that prepares students for further engineering
study. A one-year certificate program in heating,
ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC)
is also available, leading to work in this field.
Computers offers two degree programs: an ABETaccredited associate’s degree in computer engineering
technology that provides a solid basis for transfer to a
four-year engineering degree program; and an associate’s
degree in computer technology that prepares students
for work in computer system operation and maintenance.
Electrical offers an associate’s degree program in
electrical technology, as well as a one-year certificate
course in practical electricity. Both programs help
students get started in a career as an electrician.
Electronics offers ABET-accredited associate degree
programs in electronics engineering technology and in
medical electronics engineering technology. These
courses prepare students for transfer to bachelor
degree programs, as well as for work in industry.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
9
ADMISSIONS
ADMISSIONS PROCEDURE AND CRITERIA
Application Deadlines
l
Applications for admission to the fall semester must be
received by May 1. For international applications, the
deadline is March 15.
Admission Requirements
Because the intensity of the studies at the Benjamin
Franklin Institute of Technology varies from program to
program, the level of high school preparation for
admission varies accordingly.
l
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l
l
10
Applicants to the associate degree programs in the
engineering technologies (electronics, medical
electronics, computer, and mechanical) should have
completed in high school: four full-year courses in
English, at least three years in mathematics through
Algebra II, and at least one course in science.
Applicants to the associate degree programs in
automotive, marine, electrical, and architectural
technologies should have completed in high school:
four full-year courses in English, at least three years
in mathematics, and at least one course in science.
Applicants to the certificate programs in pharmacy
technology, HVAC, and practical electricity should have
undertaken high school courses that reflect satisfactory
development of basic English, mathematics, and
science or technical skills.
Applicants to the automotive technology program
must have correctable vision and hearing, an ability to
stand for long periods, and, for continuation into the
second year of the program, a valid driver’s license.
These requirements stem from the machinery, repair
equipment, and running engines encountered in the
automotive laboratories and shops.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
l
Applicants to the Bachelor of Science degree program
in Automotive Technology must have earned an associate’s
degree in Automotive Technology from BFIT or
another accredited college, with a minimum grade of
“C” in all English courses.
Massachusetts applicants who graduated high school
in 2003 or later, are required to submit proof that
they have passed the Massachusetts Comprehensive
Assessment Test (MCAS). Students who have not
passed MCAS can take the Accuplacer test at BFIT,
to determine if they have an ability-to-benefit. If they
pass Accuplacer, they will be eligible to enroll and
apply for financial aid.
How to Apply for Admission
All applicants must complete the Application for Admission,
included with our viewbook or an on-line application
at www.bfit.edu.The application must be submitted with
a $25 processing fee ($50 for international students)
to the Office of Admissions. Application fees are not
refundable.
Official high school or secondary school records or
transcripts, or official GED scores, must be submitted
before the application can be processed. High school
guidance counselors or records offices may send official
copies of transcripts to BFIT.
Applications are processed on a rolling basis, with
applicants notified of their admission status shortly after
all required documents have been received. All offers of
conditional admission require the applicant’s successful
completion of the items listed in his or her acceptance
letter. Official final secondary school transcripts are
required in order to complete an applicant’s file and
initiate the registration process.
Entrance Examinations
Applicants are encouraged, but not required, to take the
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance
Examination Board or the American College Testing
Assessment (ACT).These tests may be used to supplement
the high school record if there is some question about
the adequacy of preparation in mathematics or English.
Most applicants will be asked to take BFIT’s placement
tests to determine their level of proficiency in English
and mathematics.
Applicants who are native speakers of other languages
must demonstrate English proficiency for entrance to
all programs.
September Admission
Applications for all programs are accepted for
September enrollment.
January Admission
Applicants for January enrollment are considered for
admission on a program-by-program basis.
Transfer Students and
Advanced Standing Credit
Students who have completed studies at another
accredited college or university and wish to enroll at
BFIT must meet all entrance requirements.They must
also submit an official transcript of their academic
record from all colleges previously attended.
Credit will be awarded for work completed at other
accredited colleges that is equivalent in content and
credit hours to BFIT courses and in which at least a
grade of “C” was earned.The Dean of Faculty must
approve all requests for advanced standing credit on
recommendation of the appropriate Department Chair.
Transfer students must complete at least 51% of their
program’s courses at BFIT.
ADMISSIONS
Readmission of Former Students
Students who have voluntarily withdrawn from BFIT, or
those who have been dismissed and wish to re-enroll,
should submit a new application for admission and
application fee. Students dismissed from BFIT will be
considered for admission only after consultation with
the Dean of Faculty and the appropriate Academic
Department Chair.
Part-Time Students
Part-time students may enroll in courses for which
they meet all prerequisites and should follow the same
procedures as students seeking regular admission.
Students taking fewer than 12 semester hours are
considered part-time and pay tuition according to the
semester hour rate.
Summer Session
For students needing additional instruction in algebra,
language skills development, or ESL (based on the results
of the placement assessment), BFIT provides academic
s k i l l s - building summer courses. Selected technical courses
are also available in the summer. Inquiries concerning
summer study should be directed to the Office of
Admissions.
International Applicant Information
Fall Semester (September)
Deadline: March 15
English Language Proficiency
All applicants must demonstrate fluency in English.
Completing at least one of the following may do this:
l
The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)
administered by the College Entrance Examination
Board.
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Certificate of completion of English as a Second
Language program from a recognized language institute.
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Satisfactory completion of the BFIT ESL course.
Spring Semester (January)
Deadline: August 15
Requirements for Admission
International applicants must submit to the Office of
Admissions: secondary-school educational records or
transcripts, accompanied by certified English translations
as necessary. Documents should include year of secondary
school graduation, courses undertaken, and grades
earned in each course, as well as exam results.
Applicants who have taken external examinations, such
as the GCE “O” and “A” levels, or the International
Baccalaureate, should submit the results in support of
their application.
The agency listed below provides evaluations of
educational credentials and course-by-course reports
for students educated at foreign secondary schools,
colleges, or universities.
Center for Education Documentation
P.O. Box 231126
Boston, MA 02123
Telephone: (617) 338-7171
Fax: (617) 338-7101
Web: http://www.cedevaluations.com
BFIT, not the agency, determines the final decision for
the acceptance of transfer credit. If accepted, students
must pay the required $100 (U.S.) tuition deposit and
$70 (U.S.) for processing the Certificate of Eligibility
(I-20 Form).
Financial Documentation
All international students are expected to have sufficient
funds available to cover all academic and living expenses
for the duration of their stay in the U.S. International
applicants are required to provide BFIT with a financial
statement showing proof of ability to pay these costs
for the first year of study. BFIT has estimated that
$25,000 should be sufficient to cover first-year expenses,
including tuition, room and board, books, and fees.
Application Procedure
Complete the BFIT Application for Admission.
Application forms which have been completed by
second parties or agents will not be accepted.
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Attach an international money order for $50 (U.S.)
to application.This fee is non-refundable.
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Submit a transcript (with certified English translation,
if needed) of secondary school records and relevant
examination scores. (Transfer students should also
submit university transcripts and course descriptions.)
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Submit evidence of English proficiency.
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Submit a completed Financial Declaration Form or a
current bank statement and letter of support from
sponsor.
When to Apply
Applications and all supporting material should be
submitted no later than six months prior to the intended
date of enrollment.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
11
ADMISSIONS AND TUITION COSTS
Form I-20
BFIT issues the Certificate of Eligibility (Form I-20) only
after payment of the $70 (U.S.) I-20 processing fee and
a $100 (U.S.) tuition deposit. All fees and deposits are
non-refundable.
TUITION COSTS AND FINANCIAL AID
Financial Aid Policy for International Students
BFIT does not offer financial assistance to international
students. Students are advised to investigate sources of
financial aid in their own countries such as government
agencies, civic organizations, industry, or lending
institutions.
Through its financial aid programs, BFIT has made it
possible for thousands of students to afford the cost of
their education.The Financial Aid section of this catalog
describes the process of applying for aid.
Tuition for the 2005-2006 academic year is $12,500 for
Associate Degree programs and $13,700 for the
Bachelor of Science Program in Automotive Technology.
The tuition cost per credit is $521.
Tuition and other fees are due before each semester
begins. For the fall semester, tuition and fees are paya bl e
by August 15; for the spring semester, they are payable
by December 15. Installment payment plans are available.
Tuition Deposit
A non-refundable tuition deposit of $100 is required to
reserve a place on the class roster. This tuition deposit is
not refundable and is applied toward the first semester
tuition bill. For applicants offered admission, the deposit
is payable by May 1 or within 14 days of notification of
acceptance after May 1. Deposits received before May 1
may be refunded after the student has submitted a
written request.
Application Fee (Non-refundable Fee)
An application fee of $25 ($50 for international applicants)
must accompany each application for admission to BFIT.
Health Insurance Plan (Non-refundable Fee)
Under the provisions of Chapter 23, Section 22, of the
1988 Massachusetts Health Security Act, effective
September 1, 1989, each institution of higher education
must require all full- and part-time students to participate
in the student health insurance program or provide
evidence of participation in a health insurance program
with comparable coverage. For this purpose part-time
students are defined as those participating in at least
75% of the academic requirements for full-time students.
The charge for the school’s health insurance plan for
2005-2006 is $339.This fee will be charged to all students
and will be removed only if a waiver card, showing
12
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
comparable coverage, is submitted before the start of
the school year.This fee covers a full year and cannot be
refunded due to withdrawal.
Books, Supplies, and Equipment
Students supply their own textbooks, drawing equipment,
and other supplies, which may be purchased through
BFIT’s bookstore. Special tool kits are also required
for students in the Automotive Technology, Marine
Technology, Practical Electricity, and Electrical Technology
programs.
Withdrawals and Refunds
Students who find it necessary to withdraw completely
from the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology must
file an Official Withdrawal Form with the Dean’s Office
within a few days of withdrawal. Absence from class
does not reduce a student’s financial obligation nor
guarantee that a final grade will not be recorded.
Upon receipt of the Official Withdrawal Form from the
Dean’s Office, BFIT’s Business Office may make a partial
tuition refund.The date on which such notice is received
will be considered the effective date of withdrawal.
Students failing to file an Official Withdrawal Form will
be provided a refund consistent with Federal Regulations.
Federal regulations provide that students who are
receiving Federal student aid, and withdraw prior to
completing 60% of the semester, will have up to 100%
of their Federal Title IV financial aid awards returned to
the issuing agency. If withdrawal is past the 60% point
of the semester, the student will receive 100% of all
financial aid. All other students are refunded according
to the following schedule:
Withdrawal notice filed:
Amount of refund
During the first week of classes
80%
During the second week of classes
70%
During the third week of classes
60%
During the fourth week of classes
40%
During the fifth week of classes
20%
After the fifth week of classes
0%
FINANCIAL AID
Payment of Fees
Diplomas, transcripts, and grade reports will be withheld
from every student who has not paid all bills due the
Institute. Students with delinquent accounts may be
prohibited from attending class until the matter is
cleared through the Business Office.
Address Change
Students are required to report all address changes to
the Registrar’s Office. Failure to do this will prevent
important material, such as grade reports or registration
forms, from reaching the students.
FINANCIAL AID
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology is fully
aware that the cost of a college education can be a
major obstacle to pursuing academic goals.The Financial
Aid Office works with students and their families to
make sure they receive any financial aid for which they
are eligible.
Though the financial aid process seems complex and
confusing, students who apply early (by April 15),
maintain contact with the Financial Aid Office, submit
the proper documentation, and ask for assistance when
they need it, consistently receive the most financial aid
for which they are eligible.
Students should be aware that there are limits to the
financial aid available through BFIT. Therefore, other
sources of financial help — such as personal savings,
summer and part-time jobs, family help, outside grants
and scholarships — should be part of a student’s
financial plan.
Application Procedure
In order to apply for Financial Aid, an applicant must
complete the following:
l
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
provided by your high school or BFIT.You can also
apply via the internet at www.fafsa.ed.gov.The FAFSA
determines your eligibility for Federal, State, and
institutional funds. Our Federal code is 002151.
l
The necessary Federal Income Tax Forms (copies
with signatures) and Employer W-2’s to the Financial
Aid Office.
l
Any other documents requested by the Financial Aid
Office to verify income, family size, selective service
registration, or legal residence.
Financial Aid Programs –
Understand Your Options
Ninety percent of BFIT students receive some type of
financial aid.The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology,
the State, and the Federal gove rnment assist in subsidizing
a student’s total cost of education, based on financial
need.These programs make it possible for most
students to attend BFIT without putting too much of a
financial burden on families.
To be eligible for any of BFIT’s financial aid programs,
the student must submit the FAFSA to the Federal
Department of Education.The Department of Education’s
analysis of the information submitted on the FAFSA will
be used to determine student eligibility for need-based
financial aid. Most programs are administered on a firstcome-first-served basis until funds are exhausted.To be
considered for maximum financial aid, it is critical to
apply early. Students should use April 15 as a priority
application deadline in order to be considered for all
financial aid programs.
Grants and Scholarships
Grants and scholarships are monetary awards which do
not need to be repaid.This type of award can be given
by the Federal government, the State of Massachusetts,
BFIT, or a private organization.
Franklin Grant
Every year BFIT awards a number of scholarships to
students, based on financial need.
Pell Grant
The Pell Grant is a federally-sponsored grant awarded
to undergraduates who qualify based on financial need.
Applicants must be enrolled on at least a half-time basis.
Eligibility is determined through an analysis of the
information given in the FAFSA.
Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
The FSEOG is a federally-sponsored grant for full-time
undergraduate students. Eligibility is based on financial
need as determined by the FAFSA. Pell Grant recipients
are given first priority for FSEOGs. Non-Pell Grant
recipients with the lowest estimated family contribution
(EFC) and those students with exceptional circumstances
who provide acceptable documentation, will also be
considered.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
13
FINANCIAL AID
State Grants
Most states, including Massachusetts, offer grants and
loans to students on the basis of financial need.The
FAFSA is used to apply for the Massachusetts State
Grant. Students in all BFIT programs are eligible to apply
for the Massachusetts State Grant if Massachusetts
residency has been established. Early application of the
FAFSA is recommended, as the deadline for State grants
is May 1. Non-Massachusetts residents should inquire
about similar programs in their home states.
Loans
College Work Study
Loans can be given to students or parents at a low
interest rate and are to be paid back over a period of
time. As with grants and scholarships, loans can be made
by the federal government, the State of Massachusetts,
BFIT, or a private organization.
College Work Study is a federally-funded program
providing part-time work to full-time undergraduate
students. Students can work on campus or at a
designated community service organization. Eligibility is
based on need. Applicants must submit a FAFSA and
meet Federal Title IV eligibility requirements to be
considered for this program.
Federal Direct Loans to Students
There are three kinds of Direct Loans:
l
Federal Direct Stafford Loans – These are
subsidized loans in which the federal government
pays the interest while the student is in school and
during specified deferments. The student must
demonstrate financial need to receive the loan.
l
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans –
Students may receive these loans regardless of need,
but are required to pay all interest charges.
l
Federal Direct PLUS Loans – Parents of a dependent
student may apply for a PLUS loan to pay for the
student’s education. Parents may borrow up to the
difference between financial aid and the cost of
schooling.To apply for a Federal Direct PLUS Loan
(parent loan), the dependent student’s parents must
complete a separate Federal Direct PLUS application
and promissory note, available at the school.The
school will provide counseling on the terms, conditions,
and repayment of the loan.
Unsubsidized Direct Loan for Independent Students
This loan is available to independent students, as defined
in the FAFSA. Students may borrow up to $4,000 per
academic year. Interest is variable and is normally billed
immediately, but can be deferred. Principal is normally
billed immediately after graduation, withdrawal from
school, or change in full-time status.
14
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Private Sources
Applicants are urged to seek additional aid from their
own community. Many towns and cities have civic
organizations or churches, which may offer scholarships
on the basis of need or academic merit. Labor unions
and corporations are often good sources of scholarship
assistance to children of employees. Applicants should
consult their high school guidance counselors or local
libraries for additional information. An excellent source
for information on financial aid is the Higher Education
Information Center at the Boston Public Library at
Copley Square.
Veterans Benefits
Other sources of student aid are veterans benefits for
veterans, widows of veterans, and children of deceased
or disabled veterans. Students with certain physical or
emotional disabilities may seek aid from the State
Rehabilitation Commission in their area.
Those who qualify for benefits under any Veteran Bill or
Massachusetts Rehab must contact the Registrar’s Office
at the beginning of the school year concerning the
processing of the necessary fo rm s . Forms should be filed
as soon as possible after being accepted to the Institute.
STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES
STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES
Dean of Students and
the Student Services Team
The Dean of Students, Director of Student Life,
Director of Placement and Career Services, and Men’s
Head Basketball Coach, comprise the Student Services
Team. These individuals coordinate life for students
outside of the classroom, including academic support,
student organizations, campus activities, job readiness
preparation, and sports. This team of people strives to
be highly accessible and helpful and is dedicated to
enriching the lives of BFIT students.
Academic Support Center
The Dean of Students is located in, and coordinates the
efforts of, the Academic Support Center. The Academic
Support Center (ASC) provides a place for students to
find a tutor or work together in study groups. Along
with providing tutorial services, the ASC can coach you
in study skills, time management, goal setting, and more.
The ASC also has self-directed, computer-based tutorials
for student use. If you need help for any class or would
like to be a tutor, stop by the ASC – Room 118 (across
from Lufkin Memorial Library) Monday through Friday
from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tutoring
A schedule for all tutoring is posted around the campus
throughout the year. You can simply drop into the ASC
or you can schedule a meeting with a tutor in advance
— your choice. Note that if you don’t see tutoring in a
subject you need or at a time you’re available, stop by
the ASC and we’ll see what we can do! Often special
arrangements can be made to meet individual student
needs not met by the established tutoring schedule.
Tutoring is provided by faculty and student peer tutors
and is free for all BFIT students.
Academic Advisors
Personal Advising
Each student is assigned a member of the BFIT community
to serve as his/her advisor. Advisors keep in touch with
you, help review academic progress, provide information,
and offer suggestions for career preparation success.
Students dealing with personal challenges are encouraged
to make a visit to the Director of Student Life. BFIT
places high priority on making available to students
every opportunity possible for personal growth and
satisfaction.
Career and Placement Services
The Office of Placement and Career Services coordinates
the work of the Student Development Team — a collegewide effort to make the BFIT experience a smooth and
seamless one for all students—from point of entry
counseling and coordination through career preparation
and employment.This includes an active student/alumni
placement service, the on-campus Job Fair, job listings
for full-time, part-time, and summer employment, as well
as for internships and volunteer work. Alumni of the
Institute are entitled to free lifetime placement services.
In addition to the Spring Job Fair, the Office also hosts
an advanced studies fair for spring graduates interested
in continuing their educations at four-year institutions.
Office of Student Life
The Director’s responsibilities are very broad. They
include: coordinating all campus activities, serving as
Athletic Director, managing all disciplinary issues and
providing “first-line” counseling. All students are
encouraged to talk with the Director about any idea,
suggestion, concern or problem.
The Director of Student Life is frequently consulted for
many reasons including: inability to concentrate; family
problems; relationship problems; sexuality issues; coping
with loss; feelings of depression, anxiety, suicide; physical
abuse; alcohol and drug abuse.
Student Activities
Intercollegiate Sports
The intercollegiate spor ts program at BFIT provides for
Men’s Varsity Basketball participation through the
National Junior College Athletic Association, Division III.
The regular season schedule runs from November to
March and consists of teams from the New England
region.There is an opportunity to qualify for post-season
play at the regional and national levels. In order to be
eligible, students must be full time (12 or more credits)
and maintain the eligibility standards set forth by NJCAA
and the Institute. All members of the BFIT community are
encouraged to come out and suppor t our SHOCKERS!
Intramural Sports
All students have the oppor tunity to participate in
recreational activities throughout the school year. Students
sign up on a voluntary basis competing with and against
peers of the Institute. The Director of Student Life
coordinates and oversees league and tournament play.
Awards are presented annually to the top finishers in
each sport.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
15
STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES
Student Government
Students attending BFIT are encouraged to join the
Student Government Association (SGA).The SGA is
active in organizing events such as the holiday toy drive,
walk-a-thons, year-end carnival, and other activities. SGA
members also develop ideas and discuss concerns
with the Director of Student Life to enhance the BFIT
community for all students.
Women’s Forum
Women who attend the Institute are encouraged to join
the Women’s Forum. The goal of the group is to bring
the women that study or work on campus together to
help balance out the experience of being in an academic
setting with a high percentage of male students and
faculty. Forum activities have included guest speakers,
workshops, special events, and service projects.
E-Yearbook
BFIT’s yearbook is called the “Almanac”, in honor of
Benjamin Franklin’s famous publication. Members of the
yearbook club will have an opportunity to catch great
moments on film, work closely with staff on the layout,
and produce a great gift for each graduating class to
treasure. It is produced using current technology in a
ready-to-run CD!
Engineering Technology Olympics
Each February, during National Engineering Week, BFIT
holds its own Engineering Olympics. Students form
teams and compete against one another in a day-long
series of events. Events are geared toward majors
offered at the Institute. Popular events from the past
include, “Math Mindbenders”, “Domino Tower”, and
“Bridge Building”.
16
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Professional Organizations
Phi Theta Kappa
All students will have an opportunity to join an international honor society at BFIT. Students will need to have
a cumulative grade point average of 3.35, or higher,
for membership. There will be an induction ceremony
for new members each year. Members will conduct
meetings on campus and focus on projects that involve
volunteering in the community.There is a membership
fee for active members of the honor society.
IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics
Engineers)
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
(IEEE) is a social and educational club that promotes
the use of Electronics through extracurricular activities.
This includes films, lectures, and social events with IEEE
members from local Institute chapters. All interested
students of either the electronics or electrical programs
may become members. The IEEE award is presented
each commencement to a student in the organization
who has contributed the most to the organization.
SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers)
BFIT’s SME student chapter keeps student members in
the Mechanical Engineering Technology Program up to
date with recent breakthroughs in the field of
Manufacturing Engineering. An award is given at each
commencement to the SME student member who has
shown the most improvement in their scholastic standing.
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Student Code of Conduct
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology has a rich
tradition in which all members of the community teach
and learn in an environment conducive to intellectual
and moral development. All members of the BFIT
community must take responsibility for their actions and
be willing to accept the consequences of their deeds.
The Institute has a set of regulations, not meant to limit
a student’s freedom, but to ensure the well-being and
rights of all. Students are required to conduct themselves
in a manner reflecting favorably on the Institute. Failure
to comply with student regulations will lead to disciplinary
action and may lead to separation from the Institute.
Listed below is a series of rules and regulations, which
apply to all students. It is not a complete list, but it
provides a basic idea of the expected Code of Conduct.
Note that the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology
operates within the laws and statutes of the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Prohibited are:
l
The possession, use, or sale of illegal drugs, narcotics
or alcoholic beverages;
l
Physical or verbal abuse, intimidation, harassment, or
injury of another person or group of persons;
l
Deliberate or careless endangerment of others;
tampering with safety alarms or equipment; violation
of safety regulations; failure to render reasonable
cooperation in an emergency; possession or use on
campus of firearms, guns, knives, or other weapons;
l
Theft, vandalism, unauthorized use or damage of
personal property, including Institute property, as
well as unauthorized entrance into the building, and
possession of stolen property on Institute grounds;
attempted or actual theft of Institute proper ty;
l
Dishonesty, including provision of false information,
alteration or misuse of documents, plagiarism and other
academic cheating, impersonation, misrepresentation,
or fraud;
l
Behavior or activities which endanger your safety or
the safety of others, including, but not limited to, the
throwing of objects from Institute buildings, or the
unauthorized storage, possession of hazardous
chemicals or materials on the Institute premises;
l
Smoking in any building at the Institute;
l
Gambling on school grounds;
l
Obstruction or disruption of Institute activities,
including teaching, Institute services, discipline, events,
and operation and maintenance of facilities;
l
Failure to comply with the lawful directions of any
Institute official, staff member, faculty or student
employee who is acting in accordance with the duties
of the position or who has responsibility on behalf of
the Institute in the absence of a particular official;
Refusal to identify oneself when requested to do so
by Institute security or Institute staff member;
l
Disregard for the privacy of others and self, including
such actions as obscene, indecent or inconsiderate
behavior; use of vulgar and profane language, dressing
in a manner that is inappropriate for an academic
environment and not within the established standards
of good taste;
l
Hazing, in compliance with the 1985 chapter 536
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Act; or,
l
Inciting others to commit any of the acts listed
above; involvement as an accessory to any of these
acts; failure to take responsibility for his/her guest(s);
assisting or encouraging others to engage in violations, and staying with violators when there is enough
time and opportunity to leave.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
17
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Disciplinary Policy
It is the policy of the Institute that the Office of Student
Life is the preferred office for resolving disciplinary or
behavioral problems. A student, who demonstrates
u n a c c e p t a ble behavior, thereby failing to be a responsibl e
member of the BFIT community, may be subject to
disciplinary action. Reports of alleged violations will be
sent to the Director of Student Life who will deal with
the matter, calling in members of the faculty, administration
and students, for counsel in justly dealing with the issue
at hand. Violations of established school policy may
result in a range of sanctions from warning to expulsion
(permanent separation from the Institute).
Appeal Process
Any student who wishes to appeal a disciplinary action
may do so by filing a written appeal with the Dean of
Students within five business days of the decision.
Complaints about offensive student behavior are
referred to the Director of Student Life.
l
The Director of Student Life will meet with the
accused student, complainant(s), and relevant witnesses
to determine the appropriate disciplinary action.
Dependent upon the severity of an accusation, the
Director may consult with the Dean of Students.
l
18
The Director of Student Life notifies the student of
the disciplinary action levied. In the case of suspension
or expulsion, the student’s instructors, Academic
Advisor, and Department Chair will be notified, as
well as the Dean of Faculty and President.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Legal Basis
Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act
The Dean of Students will prepare all case materials
and provide them to the Disciplinary Hearing
Committee (DHC).
Title XI of the 1972 Educational Amendments
l
The DHC will consist of the Academic Dean, the
Chairperson of the student’s department, and one
member of a standing committee of the Institute’s
faculty.The DHC will conduct a hearing to which the
student may bring another member of the BFIT
community as a support person.The Director of
Student Life attends as an ex officio participant and
any witnesses will be heard one at a time and will
only be present during their own statements. The
student will be notified at least two days prior to the
hearing as to its date, time, and place. The hearing will
be recorded and its outcome will be provided to the
student in writing.
l
If the student wishes to appeal the disciplinary
outcome of the DHC hearing, this may be done by
again filing a written appeal with the Dean of
Students within five business days of the decision.
Policy
Sexual harassment of a student, an employee, or any
other person at the Benjamin Franklin Institute of
Technology (BFIT) is impermissible and intolerable.
Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination and a
violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and
Title XI of the Educational Amendments of 1972. It is
against the policies of BFIT for any member of the
student body, administration, faculty or staff to sexually
harass another person at BFIT. Institute students or
personnel who are found to be sexually harassing
another person shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary
action. Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual
advances, requests for sexual favors, or other physical
conduct or expressive behavior of a sexual nature.
Examples of sexual harassment include:
l
The Dean of Students will collect all the case
materials and provide them to the President.
l
Discipline Resolution Procedure
The Institute believes it is in the best interest of the
student and the BFIT community to resolve disciplinary
matters as quickly, equitably and informally as possible
following the procedures outlined here.
l
Sexual Harassment Policy
l
The President may uphold or overturn the decision
of the DHC, return the case to the DHC for further
review, or lessen or retain any disciplinary action.
l
The President’s decision is final and will be recounted
in writing to the student.
Governor’s Executive Order 200, as amended by
Executive Order 240
…threats that the rejection of sexual advances will
adversely affect academic or professional progress
…conduct that has the purpose or effect of
substantially interfering with a person’s academic
or professional performance, or of creating an
intimidating, hostile or demeaning educational or
employment environment.
Violations of this policy by faculty, administrators, staff
or students will lead to disciplinary action, including
suspension, expulsion or termination.
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Grievance Procedures
Informal Grievance Procedure
The informal process will encourage individuals who
believe that BFIT’s Equal Employment Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Policy and/or Sexual Harassment
Policy has been breached, to discuss the concern or
breach with any involved Institute official who may be
helpful in resolving the matter, including the Director of
Student Life, Academic Advisor, Supervisor, Dean of
Faculty, etc.
The purpose of the informal grievance process is to
allow for any misunderstanding to be aired and resolved
and to provide an opportunity for the aggrieved
individual and the alleged perpetrator to attempt to
resolve the concern prior to the formal grievance
process. The aggrieved individual should use this
process to clarify the problem, seek counsel for himself
or herself, and decide on a course of action.
A student shall initiate the informal grievance process by
informing the Director of Student Life. The individual
initiating the complaint must do so within twenty (20)
calendar days from the date s/he knew or should have
known of the alleged discriminatory action.
Within seven (7) calendar days of the initial complaint,
the individual, the Director of Student Life, and other
involved persons, shall meet to discuss the complaint
with the intention of finding a satisfactory solution.
Within seven (7) calendar days from the date of
discussion, the Director of Student Life shall offer the
proposed initial resolution to the individual in writing.
Every effort is made to resolve the complaint informally
at this level.
Formal Grievance and Hearing Procedure
If the initial resolution does not resolve the complaint
to the satisfaction of the student, s/he, within seven (7)
calendar days from the date the resolution was offered,
may initiate the formal grievance procedure by filing a
grievance in writing with the Equal Employment
Opportunity/Affirmative Action Officer.
The grievance shall contain a statement of all known
facts pertaining to the alleged violation and shall be filed
with the EEO/AA Officer.
Within seven (7) calendar days from the date the formal
grievance is filed, the EEO/AA Officer shall attempt to
resolve the complaint through discussion with the
complainant, the Director of Student Life, and other
involved persons.
l
If the Institute decides not to amend the record as
requested by the student, the Institute will notify the
student of the decision and advise the student of
his/her right to a hearing regarding the request for
amendment. Additional information regarding the
hearing procedures will be provided to the student
when notified of the right to a hearing.
l
The right to consent to disclosure of personally
identifiable information contained in the student’s
education records, except to the extent that FERPA
authorizes disclosure without consent.
l
One exception that permits disclosure without
consent is disclosure by school officials with legitimate
educational interest. A school official is a person
employed by the Institute in an administrative,
supervisory, academic, support position (including law
enforcement); a person or company with whom the
Institute has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor,
collection agency); a person serving on the Board of
Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee,
such as a disciplinary or grievance committee; or
assisting another official in performing his/her tasks.
A school official has legitimate educational interest if
the official needs to review an education record in
order to fulfill a professional responsibility.
l
The right to file complaint with the U.S. Department
of Education concerning alleged failures by the
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology to comply
with requirements of FERPA. The name and address
of the Office of FERPA is:
Family Educational Rights To Privacy Act
The Institute maintains the confidentiality of student
educational records and protects the student’s right of
access to those records in accordance with the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974
(P.L. 93-380) as amended (P.L. 93-5681) (also known as
the Buckley Amendment).
FERPA affords students certain rights with respect to
their educational records. They are:
l
The right to inspect and review the student’s education
records within 45 days of the day the Institute
receives a request for access. Students should submit
to the Registrar or Academic Dean, or other
appropriate official, written requests that identify the
record(s) they wish to inspect. The Institute official
will make arrangements for access and notify the
student of the time and place where records may be
inspected. If the records are not maintained by the
Institute official to whom the request was submitted,
that official shall advise the student of the correct
official to whom the request should be addressed.
l
The right to request the amendment of the student’s
education records that the student believes are
inaccurate or misleading.
l
Students may ask the Institute to amend a record
that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They
should write a letter to the Institute official responsible
for the record, clearly identify the part of the record
they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate
or misleading.
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
19
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Computer Use Policy
This policy governs computer and network usage for
faculty, staff and students at the Institute. As a user of
these resources, you are responsible for reading and
understanding the following document. This document
protects the consumers of computing resources,
computing hardware and networks, and system
administrators. (Contact the Director of Computing
Services if you have any questions.)
Rights and Responsibilities
Computers and networks can provide access to resources
on and off campus, as well as the ability to communicate
with others worldwide. Such open access is a privilege
and requires that individual users act responsibly. Users
must respect the rights of other users, respect the
integrity of the systems and related physical resources,
and observe all relevant laws, regulations, and contractual
obligations. Since electronic information is volatile and
easily reproduced, users must exercise care in acknowledging and respecting the work of others through strict
adherence to software licensing agreements and copyright laws.
Existing Legal Context
All existing laws (Federal and State) and Institute
regulations and policies apply, including not only those
laws and regulations that are specific to computers and
networks, but also those that may apply generally to
personal conduct and harassment.
Users do not own accounts on Institute computers, but
are granted the privilege of exclusive use. Under the
Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986 (Title
18 USC, section 2510 etc. Seq), users are entitled to
privacy regarding information contained on these
accounts. This act, however, allows system administrators
or other Institute employees to access user files in the
normal course of their employment when necessary to
protect the integrity of computer systems or the rights
or property of the Institute. For example, system
administrators may examine or make copies of files that
are suspected of misuse or that have been corrupted or
damaged. User files may be subject to search by law
enforcement, which may be used as evidence in a court
of law. In addition, student files on Institute computer
facilities are considered “educational records” under the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (Title
20 U.S.C. section 1232[g]).
Misuse of computing, networking or information
resources may result in the loss of computing and/or
networking access. Additionally, misuse can be
prosecuted under applicable Institute or campus
policies, procedures, or collective bargaining agreements.
Illegal production of software and other intellectual
property protected by U.S. copyright law is subject to
civil damages and criminal punishment, including fines
and imprisonment.
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology supports
the policy of EDUCOM on Software and Intellectual
Rights, which states, “Respect for intellectual labor and
creativity is vital to academic discourse and enterprise.
This principle applies to wo rks of authors and publishers
in all media. It encompasses respect for the right to
acknowledgement, right to privacy, and the right to
determine the form, manner, and terms of publication
20
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
and distribution. Because electronic information is
volatile and easily reproduced, respect for the work and
personal expression of others is especially critical in
computer environments. Violations of authorial integrity,
including plagiarism, invasion of privacy, unauthorized
access, and trade secrets and copyright violations, may
be grounds for sanctions against members of the
academic community.”
Other organizations operating computing and network
facilities that are reachable via the Institute may have
their own policies governing the use of those resources.
When accessing remote resources, users are responsible
for obeying both the policies set forth in this document
and the policies of the other organizations.
Enforcement
Minor infractions of this policy, when accidental, such as
consuming excessive resources or overloading computer
systems, are generally resolved informally by the unit
administering the accounts or network. This may be
done through electronic mail or in-person discussion
and education.
Repeated minor infractions or misconduct that is more
serious may result in the temporary or permanent loss
of computer access privileges or the modification of those
privileges. More serious violations include, but are not
limited to, the unauthorized use of computer resources,
attempts to steal passwords or data, unauthorized use
or copying of licensed software, repeated harassment, or
threatening behavior. In addition, offenders may be
referred to their sponsoring advisor, department,
employer, or other appropriate Institute office for further
disciplinary action.
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Violations
Conduct which violates policy includes, but is not limited
to, the activities in the following list:
l
Unauthorized use of computer accounts.
l
Using the BFIT network to gain unauthorized access
to any computer system.
l
Connecting unauthorized equipment to the campus
network.
l
Unauthorized attempts to circumvent data protection
schemes or uncover security loopholes. This includes
creating and/or running programs that are designed
to identify security loopholes and/or decrypt intentionally secure data.
l
l
Knowingly or carelessly performing an act that will
interfere with the normal operation of computers,
terminals, peripherals, or networks.
Knowingly or carelessly running or installing on any
computer system or network, or giving to another
user, a program intended to damage or to place
excessive load on a computer system or network.
This includes, but is not limited to, programs known
as computer viruses,Trojan Horses, and worms.
l
Deliberately wasting/overloading computing resources,
such as printing too many copies of a document.
l
Violating terms of applicable software.
l
Violating copyright laws and their fair use provisions
through inappropriate reproduction or dissemination
of copyrighted text, images, etc.
l
Using Institute resources for commercial activity such
as creating products or services for sale.
l
Using electronic mail to harass or threaten others.
This includes sending repeated, unwanted email to
another user.
l
Initiating or propagating electronic chain letters.
l
Inappropriate mass mailing. This includes multiple
mailings to newsgroups, mailing lists, or individuals,
e.g. ‘spamming’, ‘flooding,’ or ‘bombing’.
l
Forging the identity of a user or machine in an
electronic communication.
l
Transmitting or reproducing materials that are
slanderous or defamatory in nature, or that otherwise
violate existing laws or Institute regulations.
l
Displaying obscene, lewd, or sexually harassing images
or text in a public computer lab or location that can
be in view of others.
l
Attempting to monitor or tamper with another user’s
electronic communications, or reading, copying,
changing, or deleting another user’s files or software
without the explicit agreement of the owner.
Adapted with permission from the University of California,
Davis, Computer and Network Use Policy.
Security Services and Safety
Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act
In November 1990, the Student Right-to-Know and
Campus Security Act were signed into law. The act
requires each institution receiving Title IV student aid
assistance to prepare and distribute an annual report
which sets forth its policies on crime prevention issues
and gives statistics on a number of specific crimes. In
addition to publishing crime statistics, the act requires
colleges and universities to provide timely warnings to
the campus community of certain crimes reported to
the campus security or law enforcement which may be
considered a threat to other students and employees.
The information must be disseminated in a manner that
will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences.
The Director of Security is trained in CPR and as a “first
responder”. In the case of an emergency, the Director is
the first individual to contact.The telephone is extension
168, or request a page by contacting the school receptionist
located on first floor of the Kendall Administration
Building by dialing ‘O’ for Operator.The Campus
Security and Safety Office is located on the lower level
of the Franklin Union Building.
BFIT Drug and Alcohol Policy
If a student is found in unlawful possession of, using, or
distributing illicit drugs or alcohol, s/he may be expelled
from the Institute. Not only are the above behaviors
in violation of City, State and Federal law, they are in
violation of the Institute’s general regulation and policies.
Students are reminded that strict penalties may apply to
trafficking in drugs –from incarceration to the payment
of high fines. The Institute is in full cooperation with
government authorities regarding legal ramifications of
drug and alcohol usage.
Students seeking counseling or professional services for
alcohol or drug-related matters should meet with the
Director of Student Life. Referrals can be made for the
student to seek outside assistance.
Campus Security
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology is protected
and served by its own security personnel, which is
available 24 hours per day. The Institute’s security staff is
present on campus to detect, deter, and apprehend
criminal offenders through prevention, cooperation and
enforcement. Be aware that firearms and other weapons
are strictly prohibited from the campus.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
21
ACADEMIC POLICIES
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Grading System
The grading system employs the five letters and
corresponding values defined below:
Grade
A
Superior
Grade Weight
4.00
A-
3.67
B+
3.33
B
Above Average
3.00
B-
2.67
C+
2.33
C
Average
2.00
C-
1.67
D+
1.33
D
Below Average
1.00
F
Failure
0.00
I
Incomplete
Calculating Grade Point Average (GPA)
The GPA demonstrates the level of success in college
studies. It is based on the earned grade (the weight of
each is shown above) and the number of credit hours
(see individual course descriptions for credit hour
details) for each course. To calculate the GPA, multiply
the earned grade weight of each course by its assigned
credit hour(s). The sum of these is then divided by the
sum of the total semester credit hours for the courses
included in the calculation. The result is the GPA.
Distribution of Grades
All final grade reports are mailed directly to the
student’s home address from the Registrar’s Office,
unless other arrangements are made by the student
in advance. Academic Advisors distribute mid-term
grades to students.
22
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Dean’s List
Course Withdrawal
The Dean’s List is comprised of those students who have
a grade index of 3.35 or higher, have no current grade
below C, and are taking a minimum of 12 credit hours.
A student may withdraw from a course through the
eighth (8th) week of class and receive a grade of “W”
(withdrawal) recorded on the official transcript. After the
eighth (8th) week, the grade earned will be recorded
on the official transcript.
Attendance Policy
Students of the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology
are expected to attend all classes. Attendance is taken
at each class meeting and absences become a part of
students’ records. The Institute recognizes that occasions
may arise that prevent students from attending class. If
this occurs, a student should talk to the instructor as
soon as possible to determine any missed work. It is
important for students to understand that they are
responsible for any work missed and that missed classes
and/or work can seriously harm grades.
As a guide for students who wish to avoid failing grades,
the Institute has established a fixed number of hours a
student might be able to miss in a class before falling
into the danger of failing for lack of attendance. These
fixed hours are determined by multiplying the total
credit hours for the course by two. Once a student has
exceeded this maximum in any class, that student may
be strongly advised to withdraw from the course. Two
consecutive weeks of absences may result in an automatic
withdrawal from the Institute.
Incomplete Grades
A grade of I (incomplete) is given to students, who, due
to circumstances acceptable to their instructors, failed
to complete all the requirements of a course. The
incomplete must be made up before the end of the
third week of the following semester or it will be
changed to an F (failure). Any request for extension of
the three-week time limit must be made in writing to
the Dean of Faculty before the end of the extension
period. NOTE: All arrangements for completing course
requirements are made with the course instructor, and
with the student’s advisor.
Satisfactory Academic Progress
Satisfactory academic progress is determined by the
faculty in terms of a student’s ability to complete his or
her academic program. Students applying for financial
aid (Federal, State or institutional) must maintain
satisfactory academic progress in order to be eligible for
financial aid. The requirements for satisfactory academic
progress are detailed below.
1. Full-time students enrolled in a minimum of 12 credit
hours per semester must complete a minimum of
24 credit hours of class work per academic year.
Full-time students have 1.5 times the normal length
of their program, as described in the curriculum
portion of this document, in which to complete their
graduation requirements. Part-time students, defined
as students enrolled in less than 12 credit hours per
semester, are allowed a maximum of three (3) times
the normal program length to graduate and must
satisfactorily complete 50% of the credits attempted
each year.
2. Students must also maintain a minimum Cumulative
Grade Point Average (CGPA) as shown in the table
below. The percentage represents total credits
attempted compared to the credit hours required to
complete the particular program.
% Credit Hours Completed
CGPA Required
0-25%
1.60
26-50%
1.80
51-75%
1.90
More than 75%
2.00
ACADEMIC POLICIES
3. All students are evaluated each academic year to
determine whether standards of academic progress
are being met. Students not maintaining the standards
outlined above will not be eligible for financial aid
until their academic standing complies with the
conditions of satisfactory academic progress. These
students may appeal to the Financial Aid Appeals
Committee, which will consider extenuating or
unusual circumstances.
Academic Challenges
Students in academic difficulty need to seek help.
Students who fall behind in school work or receive
Midterm Grades or Final Grades of ‘D’ or ‘F’ must
report to their advisor and also seek assistance through
the Academic Support Center.
Academic Probation
Any student whose cumulative grade point average
(CGPA) falls below the standard outlined in the previous
section on Satisfactory Academic Progress will be
placed on academic probation and may be subject to
other action by the faculty. To remove the academic
probation status, the student must meet the academic
standard by the end of the next enrolled semester.
When a student has been placed on academic probation,
s/he will be notified in writing by the Dean of Faculty.
A student on academic probation will be excluded
from membership in student organizations, but is not
excluded from participation in student or class activities.
Academic Honesty
Students with Learning Disabilities
Honesty in all academic work is expected of every
student at all times. This means each individual does his
or her own work without assistance from other sources
on quizzes, examinations, and assigned written work,
unless otherwise directed by the instructor. It is the
responsibility of each student to understand the
Institute’s expectations for academic honesty and to seek
help in understanding them if necessary. It is important
to note that ignorance is not an acceptable excuse and
academic dishonesty will result in disciplinary action.
See the “BFIT Student Handbook” for full details.
Students with learning disabilities, who seek accommodations, must provide clinical documentation to the
Director of Academic Support before receiving services.
All information regarding the disabilities is treated
confidentially. For students in the Bachelor’s Program of
Automotive Technology, accommodations for learning
disabilities pertaining to course enrollment at
Northeastern University must be made separately.
These students should speak with the Automotive
Department Chair who will serve as a liaison for
services provided by Northeastern’s Support Services.
Grade and Attendance Action
For proper and timely accommodations, students with
disabilities must follow these steps:
Any student who feels there has been an error in his
or her grade or attendance record in any class should
contact the instructor immediately and arrange a meeting
to determine whether an error or omission has occurred.
If a student is dissatisfied with the results, s/he should
contact the Department Chair and Academic Advisor
to arrange a meeting. Students are reminded that
attendance at the Institute is very important.
l
Bring clinical documentation that contains specific
academic recommendations to the Director of
Academic Support. (If your documentation is older
than three years, you will need to have a new
evaluation.) A licensed psychologist or educational
specialist must do the clinical evaluation. Notes
from special education teachers or tutors are not
acceptable forms of documentation. It is the
student’s responsibility to arrange for all testing
necessary to receive proper accommodations.
l
If it is determined that accommodations are needed
and you have signed a release, introductory letters,
describing the accommodations you need, will be
sent to your professors, with copies to you.
l
You will be encouraged to contact your professor(s)
to let them know about your disability and the types
of accommodations you require.
l
If you are requesting extended time for test taking,
completing papers or take-home assignments,YOU
should remind your professor(s) at least two weeks
prior to the due date. The professors need sufficient
time to make alternative arrangements.
l
If you fail to notify or remind your professors(s)
about your needs for accommodation at least two
weeks prior to exams or other due dates,YOU will
have to make other arrangements with the professor.
Accommodation Policies
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology is dedicated
to extending all available services and support systems to
everyone, without regard to race, color, national origin,
religion, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, veteran or
disabled veteran status. Toward the goal of providing an
equal and unbiased education, the Institute is prepared
to take every possible step within its means to allow
students access to its services, and to provide the
broadest possible oppor tunity for par ticipation at BFIT.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
23
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Students with Medical Disabilities
Change of Program
Graduation Requirements
For students with medical or invisible disabilities,
appropriate documentation from a physician should be
submitted to the Director of Student Life when
requesting accommodations.
All changes of program after registration are handled
through the Dean of Faculty’s Office. Initial requests will
be made to the appropriate Department Chair with
final decision given by the Dean. Students will be
notified of the decision.
Students in good standing who satisfy the following
minimum requirements will be recommended by the
Faculty for graduation:
Tips for Talking with your Faculty when
Seeking Accommodations
l Students who need accommodations should meet
with their Academic Advisor and with each faculty
member by the first week of class to confirm the
specific accommodations they will need for the
course.
l
Introduce yourself to faculty and identify your disability.
l
Explain your contact with the Director of Academic
Support or the Director of Student Life.
l
l
Present suggestions by identifying the types of
accommodations that will work for you during exams
and in the classroom.
Make it clear that you are a serious, motivated
student who will succeed in class if reasonable
accommodations are made for you.
In accordance with the American Disabilities Act (of
1990), the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology is
committed to providing reasonable accommodations for
students with documented disabilities.
24
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
l
Complete successfully the prescribed curriculum with
no failure in any subject
Transfer of Credit
l
Students who wish to take courses at other colleges to
satisfy requirements in their programs at BFIT must:
Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or
better
l
Receive a satisfactory recommendation by Faculty on
the basis of attendance, interest and character
l
Obtain course descriptions from the prospective school.
l
Receive endorsement from the appropriate
Department Chair at BFIT.
Graduation with Honors is provided when these
additional requirements are met:
l
Receive approval from the Dean of Faculty.
l
l
If approval is given, the student must earn a grade
of C or better in the course and provide an official
transcript of this grade to the Registrar.
Earn a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or
better
l
Be distinguished as a Dean’s List designee all semesters
Petition to Graduate
Seniors who plan to graduate must inform the Registrar
of their intention by filing a Petition to Graduate form
at least six weeks before the graduation date. The
Registrar then verifies that all individual program
requirements have been met and that the student is
qualified to graduate.
ACADEMIC POLICIES
Graduation Honors and Awards
The Dean’s Award
Given at commencement exercises every year, the
Dean’s Award goes to the Engineering and Industrial
Technology graduate with the most outstanding record.
The Louis J. Dunham, Jr. Memorial Award
This award has been established through funds donated
by the family and friends of the late Louis J. Dunham, Jr.,
former Director of BFIT, and for whom the Dunham
Building is named. It is awarded annually to the graduating student who best exemplifies the leadership, humanitarian sensibilities, humility, generosity, and high moral
standards characteristic of Mr. Dunham.
The Ralph G. Adams Memorial Award
This award has been established through funds donated
by friends of the late Dean Adams who was Dean of
Faculty and Head of the Mechanical Engineering
Department. It is awarded annually to the student graduating in Mechanical Engineering Technology who best
exemplifies the high principles of integrity and scholarship, which Dean Adams labored to promote for nearly
half a century.
The I.E.E.E. Powell H. Humphries Memorial Award
This award has been established by the Student
Chapter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic
Engineers to honor the late Professor Powell H.
Humphries, former Head of the Electrical Depar tment
and Dean of Admissions. Dean Humphries served on
the faculty of BFIT for 30 years. His contributions to the
academic programs, administration, student welfare, and
BFIT were many and significant.This award is presented
annually for scholastic excellence in the field of
Electrical, Computer, or Electronic Engineering
Technology.
The Irving Fisher Memorial Award
This award has been made possible by the Donald R.
Fisher family in memory of the late Irving Fisher, who
attended BFIT and was involved in electrical design and
construction for 65 years as President of the Fisher
Electrical Corporation of Boston, Massachusetts.
The John J. Holmes Memorial Award
This award has been made possible by the family of the
late John J. Holmes, a BFIT alumnus and former Head of
the Automotive Department. Professor Holmes was a
faculty member in the Automotive Technology program
for over 35 years and was an inspiration to his students
and colleagues. His contributions to BFIT in general, and
to the Automotive Department in particular, were
numerous and great.The award is made annually to a
graduating student in Automotive Technology, on the
basis of character, scholarship, and achievement.
The Donald C. MacTavish Memorial Award
This award has been established by the Donald C.
MacTavish Foundation in memory of Mr. MacTavish,
Class of 1961, who lost his life in a racing accident at
Daytona Beach. It is awarded annually to a second-year
student in Automotive Technology for meritorious
achievement and scholarship.
The Robert E. Lee Award
The family of Robert E. Lee, former President and
founder of Lee Imported Cars of Wellesley,
Massachusetts, established this award. It is given annually
to two graduates of the Automotive Technology
program who exemplify the characteristics of high
ethical standards, integrity, and sense of community
service that are the hallmarks of Robert E. Lee’s
personal life and the characteristics, which were integral
to his business.
Student Service Award
Each year the BFIT Student Service Award is given to
a graduating senior who has demonstrated a positive
involvement at BFIT. The recipient is selected by the
Faculty and Administration as someone who has
motivated and influenced other students to be involved
with promoting dynamic school spirit and pride through
school activities.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
25
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
This Bachelor of Science program is offered in collaboration with Northeastern
University. Certain courses are taught at the Northeastern campus by university
faculty, providing the student with a diverse educational experience. Graduates of this
program can establish mid- and upper-level management careers throughout the
automotive and related industries. BFIT enhances employment opportunities through
close association with Boston area dealerships, as well as national manufacturers such
as Audi, BMW, Daimler-Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Nissan, Subaru,Toyota
and Volkswagen.
The Automotive Department endorses ASE Certification. All members of the
Automotive Faculty are ASE Certified Automobile Technicians and members of STS,
an affiliate of SAE.The Department also offers a student chapter of STS.
Outcomes
Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science degree in Automotive Technology, students
will have expanded on Associate degree Outcomes and should have competency in
the following:
l
Demonstrate a mastery of electronic principles, as applicable to engine management
and emissions systems; demonstrate logical diagnostic strategies, and effectively
repair these systems in accordance with manufacturer’s procedures.
l
Present written and verbal reports, as well as electronic presentations commensura t e
with management level standards.
l
Demonstrate an understanding of the synergies among accounting, human relations,
organization, finance, marketing and sales as related to managing a profit center or
business section.
l
Demonstrate an understanding of the laws and regulations relating to safety and the
environments within the automotive industry.
l
Demonstrate an understanding of the dynamic nature of the automotive industry
with national and international economies by participating in a Capstone Project.
Curriculum
The objectives of the Bachelor program, which build upon those of the Associate
Degree, are to provide advanced-level education for management employment by
combining practical, technical and academic experience for career progression. This
Bachelor Degree program devotes over one-third of the courses to technical or
technically related studies, approximately one-quarter to business and management
studies, one-fifth to mathematics and science, and one-fifth to communications/social
sciences and the humanities.
Humanities, social science and English courses comprise part of the curriculum to
ensure that graduates possess broader social visions and effective communication skills.
Special Admission Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Program
In order to qualify for this program, students must have either graduated from the BFIT
Associate Degree program or another accredited associate degree program, and
achieved a minimum grade of “C” in all English courses.
Facilities
The Automotive Department maintains up-to-date laboratories for support of its
theory-based courses. Students utilize modern computer laboratories, as well as
r e c e i ve hands-on automotive experience in a well equipped ten-bay working laboratory,
and a Driveability Clinic outfitted with the industry’s latest diagnostic tools and a
chassis dynamometer. Additionally, the Institute serves as an MA Certified Emissions
Repair Facility.
26
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Faculty
Richard A. Jennings, Chair
Donald L.Tuff, Bachelor Program Coordinator
Instructor Staff: Richard E. Cadotte, John Cosimini, Peter Jackowski,Terence S. Murphy,
Gerald Sears
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES
Degree Requirements: Automotive Technology (BS)
Technical Courses: 23 credits
Course #
Course Title
AT373
Typical Course Sequence for the Bachelor’s in Automotive Technology
Junior Year
Credits
Lecture
Lab
3
2
2
AT373
Advanced Engine Performance
Microeconomics
Advanced Engine Performance
Semester 1
AT474
Enhanced Emissions and Drivability
3
3
0
BS311
AT481
Automotive Marketing
3
3
0
CT100
Computer Applications
AT482
Vehicle Appraisal
3
3
0
MA130
Pre-Calculus
AT483
Computers in Auto Industry
3
2
2
General Chemistry
AT485
Senior Seminar I
1
0
2
TS310
Semester 2
AT494
Service Management
4
3
2
BS324
Managing Organizations
AT495
Senior Seminar II
3
3
0
BS332
Financial Accounting
BS334
Business Law & Legislation
General Education Courses: 37 Credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
EN320
Technical Communications
MA270
Statistics
BS311
Microeconomics
3
3
0
BS324
Managing Organizations
3
3
0
Senior Year
BS332
Financial Accounting
3
3
0
Semester 1
BS334
Business Law & Legislation
3
3
0
AT482
Vehicle Appraisal
Computers in Auto Industry
BS431
Management Accounting
3
3
0
AT483
BS432
Personnel Management
3
3
0
AT481
Automotive Marketing
CT100
Computer Applications
3
1
2
AT485
Senior Seminar
EN320
Technical Communications
3
3
0
BS431
Management Accounting
HU/SS
Semester 2
Elective
AT474
Enhanced Emissions and Drivability
AT494
Service Management
AT495
Senior Seminar II
BS432
Personnel Management
HU/SS
Elective
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
MA130
Pre-Calculus
3
3
0
MA270
Statistics
3
3
0
TS310
General Chemistry
4
3
3
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
27
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES
Course Descriptions
AT373
Advanced Engine Performance
3 Credits
An advanced level course, which builds upon the basic computerized engine control
diagnostic skills acquired in AT271, AT274, and the Driveability Clinic. Special emphasis
is placed on oscilloscope pattern interpretation, serial data communications, database
configurations and functional testing of major computerized engine control systems
and subsystems. Prerequisite: AT274
AT474
Enhanced Emissions and Drivability
3 Credits
An advanced level of enhanced emissions and drivability diagnostics using
dynamometer-based transient testing covering ASM 50/15, ASM 25/25 and RG-240
drive traces. This course also includes advanced On Board Diagnostics - Generation II
(OBD II) and Controller Area Network (CAN) diagnostics. Students will become
proficient in chassis dynamometer testing, 5-gas exhaust analysis, and scan tool data
stream information and applications.
AT481
Automotive Marketing
3 Credits
Distribution and sale of automotive vehicles and related parts and accessories. Policies
pertaining to wholesale and retail transactions, parts inventory and turnover, service
sales, dealership personnel, and warranty.
AT482
Vehicle Appraisal
3 Credits
Instruction and practical application in the use of estimating manuals to produce
reports for buying, selling and trading of vehicles, including damage appraisal.
AT483
Computers in the Automotive Industry
3 Credits
Microcomputer applications of database, spreadsheet, and office management in the
automotive industry. Specific automotive management packages which service an entire
automotive enterprise including sales, parts and inventory, and service will be covered.
Prerequisite: CT100
AT485
Senior Seminar I
1 Credit
The preliminary section of a two-part course of study that will explore research tools
and methods utilizing vir tual and physical library resources as well as Internet
Meta-search tools. Skills acquired will allow students to develop individual research
topics and hypothesis statements that will lead to the formal presentation of a Senior
Research Project in AT495. Prerequisites: EN-320, CT100
AT494
Automotive Service Management
4 Credits
Theory and practice of service management are explored, including OSHA laws,
record keeping, productivity, efficiency, and profitability.
28
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
AT495
Senior Seminar II
3 Credits
This concluding course expands on the topics previously developed and approved in
AT485. Students will have the opportunity to discuss, organize and refine their chosen
projects.The culmination of this course will be the presentation of a formal written
Senior Research Project. Prerequisite: AT485
BS311
Microeconomics
3 Credits
A broad introductory survey in which special attention is given to the role of economic
principles in analyzing and understanding current economic problems. Emphasis is
placed on the functioning of markets and on examining the behavior of individual
economic units such as the business firm and the consumer.
BS324
Managing Organizations
3 Credits
Examines theory, research, and practice in the management of organizations.
Students learn to make use of analytical tools for recognizing, diagnosing, and acting
on managerial problems related to organizations, to the objectives, and to the
development of human resources.The course emphasizes topics at the macro level,
such as organizational analysis and design, and at the micro level, such as managerial
behavior, motivation, and interpersonal relations.
BS332
Financial Accounting
3 Credits
Presents the theory and techniques of financial accounting.The course encompasses
the basic functions of collecting, processing, and reporting accounting information for
interested third parties (e.g., owners, investors, and government) and enables students
to analyze, interpret, and use accounting information.
BS431
Management Accounting
3 Credits
Presents the theory and technique of managerial accounting from the particular
perspective of the manager. The course covers the identification and analysis of the
behavior of costs within the organization, and illustrates how managers use such
knowledge for planning and control. Major topics include responsibility accounting,
comprehensive and cash budgeting, and standard job order and process cost systems.
Prerequisite: BS332
BS432
Personnel Management
3 Credits
Examines the role of the human resources manager in the areas of selection and
placement; training and development; performance appraisal; wage, salary, and benefit
programs; and labor-management relations.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES
BS334
Business Law and Legislation
3 Credits
This course reviews the American legal system, organizational structures, and the
regulatory environment pertinent to business. Critical examination is conducted
regarding: business ethics; contracts; business associations (agency, partnerships,
corporations); and other legal entities.
EN320
Technical Communications
3 Credits
Principles of effective organizational communication on both the employee and
organizational levels are emphasized. Students use common word processing and other
software to create format-appropriate, professional documents such as memos, letters,
instruction manuals, reports, and proposals, as well as to conduct effective oral
presentations. Use of email and other Internet resources are incorporated.
MA270
Statistics
3 Credits
This course studies the collection, analysis and presentation of data, frequency
distributions, probability and probability distributions. Making inferences from statistical
data and the techniques used for making business and management decisions will be
discussed. Data analysis and presentation make use of statistical software.
Prerequisite: MA120 (College Algebra)
TS310
General Chemistry
4 Credits
Introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry including atomic structure,
stoichiometry, the periodic table of the elements, chemical bonding, molecular
structure, and states of matter based on kinetic theory. Laboratory work presents an
introduction to methods of quantitative chemical techniques.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
29
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY
The Architectural Technology program provides students with the knowledge and skills
required to pursue a successful career in the architectural technology field or to
achieve further academic goals.
Outcomes
This program enables its graduates to become skilled and knowledgeable Architectural
assistants. They will make important contributions to the architectural or engineering
team that produces complete working drawings from which buildings, residences, and
other structures are constructed. Employment opportunities for which graduates of
the program will qualify include architectural assistant, CAD drafter, and technician
level work in manufacturing, fabricating, and construction. The program also prepares
students for further academic study in architecture.
l
Draw plans, elevations, sections and isometric views of three-dimensional objects
and use architectural symbols and conventions appropriately.
l
Create design compositions using and organizing principles such as axis, symmetry,
hierarchy, and grid. Understand that formal elements in a design such as points, lines,
planes, and volumes can assume symbolic meanings subject to personal or cultural
interpretation.
l
Produce a set of working drawings for a wood frame, single-family residence using
the AutoCAD computer program.
l
Analyze environmental factors influencing an architectural design including:
cultural/historical, legal/economic, and climatic.Translate graphic diagrams into
AutoCAD generated floor plans, sections, and elevations.
l
Setup and operate the AutoCAD computer drawing program including creating
drawing parameters, opening, saving, and plotting drawings productively, utilizing
basic AutoCAD commands to create and edit drawings.
l
Utilize advanced principles of the AutoCAD program, including hatching, blocks, and
attributes in the creation of working drawings. Perform at an acceptable level on a
simulated AutoCAD assessment exam.
l
Create and view three-dimensional drawings by various methods using the
AutoCAD program. Render a three-dimensional structure, including selecting views,
placing lights, assembling a scene, and incorporating materials and landscape objects
in a scene.
l
Select materials that are compatible with the architectural and structural design
regarding their appearance, strength, properties, and behavior against natural and
manmade stressing forces.
l
Understand the basic fundamentals involved in the analysis and design of structural/architectural building elements.
l
Calculate heating and cooling loads in buildings, estimate the annual costs of various
heating and cooling systems, evaluate site drainage, calculate water demand and
drainage requirements for a building, and calculate building electrical loads.
Many graduates decide to pursue advanced Architectural degrees at other colleges or
universities. Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology has an articulation agreement
with the Boston Architectural Center (BAC). Under this agreement, students receive
full credit for courses passed at BFIT with a grade of C or better towards an
Architectural, Architectural Technology or Interior Design Bachelor’s degree at BAC.
In addition, BFIT students may elect to take a course at the BAC during their final
semester of study, allowing them to achieve further advanced standing upon transfer
to the BAC.
Curriculum
This comprehensive program provides students with a thorough introduction to the
fundamental skills of architectural technology, including familiarization with up-to-date
architectural office practices including computer aided design and drawing. Studio
work allows students to express their individual styles in various architectural projects
and model making. A general education foundation is provided with the inclusion of
courses in physics, mathematics, technical writing, humanities, and technical electives.
Facilities
The Architectural Technology Department maintains a drafting and computer-aideddrawing lab which provides students with ample opportunity to experience hands-on
training in the Architectural Technology field.The drafting lab, consisting of drafting
tables, allows students to express their hands-on drafting and model-making capabilities.
The computer-aided-drawing lab provides students the ability to construct computer
generated drawings in 2D and 3D formats with up-to-date computer software. A
desktop printer and a large scale plotter allow students to display their drawings in
various viewable formats.
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree in Architectural Technology, the
graduate will be able to:
Faculty
Barney Barnhart, Chair
Instructor Staff: Marilyn Phelan, Samuel Wang
30
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Degree Requirements: Architectural Technology
Technology Courses: 42 Credit Hours
Course #
Course
Typical Course Sequence for Architectural Technology
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Semester 1
AR100
Architectural Graphics
AR100
Architectural Graphics
4
3
2
AR110
Introduction to CAD
AR110
Introduction to CAD
3
1
4
CT100
Computer Applications
AR150
Introduction to Architectural Design 4
3
2
EN130
College Composition I
AR160
Building Construction
4
3
2
MA105
Technical Math I
AR200
Contract Drawings
4
3
2
SK101
Freshman Seminar
AR210
CAD I
4
3
2
AR250
Environmental Systems
4
3
2
Semester 2
AR150
Introduction to Architectural Design
AR260
Architectural Design Studio
4
3
2
AR160
Building Construction
AR270
CAD II
4
3
2
EN140
College Composition II
Elective
Technical Math II
AR280
Statics & Strength of Materials
4
4
1
HU/SS
CT100
Computer Applications
3
2
2
MA106
Credits
Lecture
Lab
General Studies Courses: 29 Credit Hours
Course#
Course Title
Semester 3
AR200
Contract Drawings
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
0
AR210
CAD I
EN140
College Composition II
3
3
0
PH212
Physics I
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
PH215
Physics Lab I
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
MA105
Technical Mathematics I
3
3
0
Semester 4
AR250
Environmental Systems
MA106
Technical Mathematics II
3
3
0
AR260
Architectural Design Studio
CAD II
Technical Elective
PH212
Physics I
3
3
0
AR270
PH215
Physics Lab I
1
0
2
AR280
Statics & Strength of Materials
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1
1
0
HU/SS
Elective
Technical Elective
3
3
0
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
31
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Course Descriptions
AR100
Architectural Graphics
4 Credits
The fundamental principles and practices of architectural drafting are systematically
presented in weekly lectures and are developed in the studio through a wide variety
of graphics projects. Emphasis is placed on proper use of instruments, the acquisition
of good linework, lettering skills, graphic symbols, conventions, dimensioning, sheet
layout, geometric construction, isometrics, and orthographic projection.
AR110
Introduction to CAD
3 Credits
Introduction to the use of the computer for the preparation of drawings is presented
through lectures and hands-on laboratory sessions. AutoCAD software is used to
set up and create drawings. Basic drawing, modifying and editing commands are utilized
to complete and save various architectural drawing projects similar to those produced
in architectural offices.
AR150
Introduction to Architectural Design
4 Credits
Through a variety of two- and three-dimensional design projects, students are introduced
to the fundamental theories and principles of architectural design, including the evolution
and development of architectural form generated by user/owner requirements, site
studies, structural systems, spatial organization and relationships, circulation, massing,
building technologies, economic considerations, codes, and related planning considerations.The use and development of graphic problem-solving and communication
techniques are demonstrated and explored. Students study examples drawn from
architectural history, including site visits to major buildings in the Greater Boston area.
Prerequisite: AR100
AR160
Building Construction
4 Credits
A study of the various types of building systems and the materials, methods, and
techniques used in their assembly and installation, from ground-breaking through their
initial occupancy, including visits to construction sites and examples of the building
types explored in the classroom.
32
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
AR200
Contract Drawings
4 Credits
This course develops the graphic skills and technical knowledge that are needed to
communicate essential, detailed information to clients, builders/contractors, and
consulting engineers. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of a complete set of
working drawings for a single-family residence, using AutoCAD software.The methods
and techniques of light wood frame construction are explored in depth. Sample
specifications are studied and prepared by each student.The objective is to understand
the purpose of contract drawings as a means of communicating design ideas to a
builder/contractor and to expand and strengthen the student’s skills in the fundamental
methods and techniques of light wood frame construction. Prerequisite: AR100, AR110
AR210
CAD I
4 Credits
This course logically builds on the foundation built in AR110 until the student has
competency in the basic functions of the AutoCAD program. Students then move on
to intermediate topics involving dimensioning, hatching, boundaries, blocks/attributes
and external references.These additional tools allow the student to complete more
elaborate drawing projects in a more productive manner. At course end, students take
a simulated AutoCAD assessment exam in order to demonstrate their proficiency in
AutoCAD. Prerequisite: AR110
AR250
Environmental Systems
4 Credits
The study of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, plumbing and electrical systems for
buildings, both residential and commercial, are studied. Also included is the presentation
of the basic principles found in vertical pedestrian circulation, security, fire protection,
noise control and room acoustics, energy sources, and green building design considerations.
Field trips to area construction and building sites augment class studies.
AR260
Architectural Design Studio
4 Credits
The student is assigned a simulated light construction project – a single-family residence,
for example – and takes it through successive stages. Initially, an analysis of the
environmental factors influencing design are explored: cultural/historical, legal/economic
and climatic. Each student then develops a program based on user/owner requirements
and determines the design criteria and objectives for each project. Using graphic
diagrams as a means of testing ideas, students explore various spatial organizations
and circulation patterns to develop a concept diagram.The concept is then further
developed into schematic design drawings; floor plans, elevations and isometric
drawings, using AutoCAD software. The selection of materials and technologies
appropriate to the student’s project is developed individually in the studio.
Prerequisite: AR200, AR210. Co-requisite: AR270
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
AR270
CAD II
4 Credits
Introduction to the three-dimensional drawing capabilities and features of the AutoCAD
software application program. Overview of the world coordinate system (WCS) and
user coordinate system (UCS). 3D construction, editing, and viewing of wireframe
models and objects. Creating and displaying multiple viewports. Construction of
isometric, orthographic, perspective, and axonometric views of three-dimensional
objects. Creation of exterior prospective views of models and rendering model
features, including assembling a view, lighting a scene, and attaching materials and
landscape objects to a scene. Prerequisite: AR210
AR280
Statics and Strength of Materials
4 Credits
Introduction to the basic fundamentals of statics and strength of materials relating to
structural components of a building or structure.The principles of static equilibrium
and free-body diagrams are applied to basic building structural elements and simple
structural systems commonly found in buildings.The principles of stress, strain, and
material properties are studied as they relate to materials commonly used in the
building industry. Bending, shear, and deflections and associated stresses are investigated
and used as design requirements.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
33
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
The automotive industry offers exciting and rewarding careers for people who have
an interest in diagnosing and repairing mechanical components and computer/electrical
circuitry. Additionally, these careers contribute significantly to a cleaner environment
and the safety of the general public. This industry is not limited to automobiles, as it
covers a broad spectrum that includes aviation, marine, heavy-duty trucks, off-road
equipment, recreational vehicles and stationary power plants.
Graduates of the Automotive Technology program are prepared for employment in
the automotive industry as technicians, machinists, unit specialists, emission and
performance diagnosticians, department managers, and manufacturer’s representatives.
The Institute enhances opportunities for employment through close association with
dealerships in the Boston area, as well as national manufacturers such as Audi, BMW,
Daimler-Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Nissan, Subaru,Toyota and Volkswagen.
Successful completion of this program provides the student with an Associate in Science
degree and the opportunity to continue in the Plus Two Bachelor of Science Program.
The Automotive Department strongly endorses Automotive Service Excellence
Cer tification. All of the Automotive Faculty are ASE Certified, and we encourage our
students to take these tests for national certification, as they are ready.
Curriculum
In keeping with the Institute’s Mission, the objectives of this Associate in Science
program are to provide a theory-based automotive education, supported by practical
experience that meets the Institute’s history of high academic standards. Additionally,
these standards allow graduates to improve themselves personally, economically and
socially, and to provide a foundation for lifelong learning. Degree requirements are
further supported by general education components, including proficiency in oral and
written communication, math, and physics.
The majority of this two-year program is devoted to automotive technical specialties,
including actual work on live vehicles in the student instructional garage. In addition
to the mechanical technologies, the program is complemented by the study of
mathematics, physics, humanities, and social sciences. Humanities, social sciences, and
English courses comprise part of the curriculum to ensure the graduates possess
broader social visions and effective communication skills.
34
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Special Admission Requirements for Automotive Technology Program
Due to the unique environment of automotive laboratories and repair facilities with
regard to the safe operation of machinery, repair equipment, running engines, etc., the
following is required of applicants to the Automotive Program:
l
Correctable vision and hearing
l
Ability to stand on one’s feet for long periods
l
Additionally, for continuation into the second year of the program involving the
automotive repair garage: Students are required to have a valid driver’s license
Facilities
The Automotive Department maintains laboratories for the study of automotive
electricity, internal combustion engines, automatic transmissions, chassis and brakes,
as well as a ten-bay working laboratory and a Driveability Clinic equipped with a
state-of-the-art chassis dynamometer. Additionally, the Institute serves as an MA
Certified Emissions Repair Facility.
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Outcomes
Faculty
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree in Automotive Technology, the
graduate will be able to:
Richard A. Jennings, Chair
l
Demonstrate an understanding of the internal combustion engines; demonstrate
diagnostic strategies; effectively repair an internal combustion engine.
l
Understand DC electricity; demonstrate diagnostic strategies to automotive
electrical systems and components, effectively repair electrical components.
l
Utilize mathematical calculations, principles, and formulae to a variety of tasks
related to automotive system repair.
l
Research in a variety of modes appropriate to a range of settings encountered in
the automotive industry.
l
Present verbal and written reports appropriate to a range of automotive settings.
l
Understand the inter-relationship of numerous sub-systems used in the modern
automobile.
l
Effectively diagnose, repair, and adjust various sub-systems, including: suspensions,
brakes, transmissions, heating and air conditioning, and lighting systems.
l
Identify and repair safety-related issues, relative to automotive vehicles, that concern
the operator, passengers and general public.
l
Demonstrate an understanding of electronic principles, as applicable to engine
management and emissions systems; demonstrate diagnostic strategies; effectively
repair these systems in accordance with manufacturer’s procedures, as well as,
State and Federal requirements.
l
Understand the dynamic nature of the automotive industry and international
economies relating to government regulations, product development, alternative
fuels, etc.
l
Demonstrate an understanding of the laws and regulations relating to safety and the
environments within the automotive industry.
l
Understand the various business models applicable to the automotive industry
relating to consumer goods and services.
Donald L.Tuff, Bachelor Program Coordinator
Instructor Staff: Richard E. Cadotte, John Cosimini, Peter Jackowski,Terence S. Murphy,
Gerald Sears
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
35
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Degree Requirements: Automotive Technology
Technology Courses: 46 credits
Course#
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Semester 1
AT150
Engines
AT132
Chassis & Brakes
4
3
3
AT170
Electricity & Electronics
AT150
Engines
4
3
3
CT100
Computer Applications
AT170
Electricity & Electronics
4
3
3
EN130
College Composition I
AT173
Automotive Electrical Systems
4
3
3
MA105
Technical Math I
AT233
Advanced Chassis
2
1
3
SK101
Freshman Seminar
AT241
Manual Transmissions
2
1
2
AT244
Automatic Transmissions
2
1
2
Semester 2
AT132
Chassis & Brakes
AT252
Air Conditioning
2
1
2
AT173
Automotive Electrical Systems
AT253
Automotive Lab I
4
0
10
EN140
College Composition II
Technical Math II
Physics
AT254
Automotive Lab II
4
0
10
MA106
AT255
Alternative Fuels
3
2
2
PH102
AT271
Engine Performance I
4
4
0
AT274
Engine Performance II
4
4
0
Semester 3
AT233
Advanced Chassis
AT282
Service Advising
3
3
0
AT241
Manual Transmissions
AT253
Automotive Lab I
General Education Courses: 25 credits
Course #
Course Title
CT100
36
Typical Course Sequence for Automotive Technology (AS)
Credits
Lecture
Lab
AT255
Alternative Fuels
3
1
2
AT271
Engine Performance I
Elective
Computer Applications
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
0
HU/SS
EN140
College Composition II
3
3
0
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
Semester 4
AT252
Air Conditioning
MA105
Technical Math I
3
3
0
AT254
Automotive Lab II
MA106
Technical Math II
3
3
0
AT244
Automatic Transmissions
PH102
Physics
3
3
0
AT274
Engine Performance II
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
AT282
Service Advising
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1
1
0
HU/SS
Elective
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Course Descriptions
AT-150 Engines
4 Credits
Lecture and laboratory covering designs, nomenclature, and operational theory of
internal combustion engines. Includes valves and operating mechanism, piston and
connecting rod assembly, crankshaft and bearings, lubrication system, crankcase
ventilation, lubricants, and complete engine overhaul procedure. Laboratory practice
and instruction in servicing engines.
AT-170 Electricity and Electronics
4 Credits
Fundamentals of electricity and magnetism.Topics include current, voltage and resistance;
Ohm's Law; series and parallel circuits; electric power ; electromagnetic circuits; electrical
measurement; electronic devices and circuits.
AT-173 Automotive Electrical Systems
4 Credits
Operation, construction, and servicing of automotive electrical equipment including
lighting circuits, ignition systems, cranking motors and controls, and alternator-regulator
circuits. Prerequisite: AT-170
AT-132 Automotive Chassis, Brakes and Suspension Systems
4 Credits
A combination of theory and practice centered around the automotive chassis,
covering body designs, alignment angles, front and rear suspension systems, steering
linkage systems, rack and pinion systems, clutches, CV joints, drive axles and
differentials. Braking system theory of operation, including hydraulics and anti-lock
brakes, is also covered.
AT-233 Advanced Chassis, Brakes and Suspension Systems
2 Credits
This advanced level course builds upon the fundamentals of AT-173 and AT-132.
Lecture and laboratory covering anti-lock brakes, traction control, four-wheel steering,
electronic power-assisted steering, electronic shock absorbers and struts, active
suspension and stability control systems. Emphasis is placed on troubleshooting these
sophisticated systems using the latest diagnostic techniques and equipment.
Prerequisite: AT-173 and AT-132
AT-271 Engine Performance and Diagnosis I
4 Credits
This course applies the theory learned in AT-150 Engines and AT-170/173 Electricity
to properly diagnose mechanical and electrical problems that affect driveability and
emissions. Material includes current tune-up and maintenance procedures, the
development of diagnostic routines, basic ignition diagnosis, on-vehicle electrical testing,
volumetric efficiency theory and testing, turbocharger/supercharger theory and
diagnosis, and On-Board Diagnosis — Generation One. Prerequisites: AT-173
AT-241 Automotive Manual Transmissions
2 Credits
The theory, operation and service of manual transmissions and transaxles, including
domestic and imported units. Emphasis is on the diagnosis, repair, and servicing of
component parts.
AT-255 Introduction to Alternative Fuels
3 Credits
This course looks at the present use of alternative fuels in the automotive industry,
along with future technology.The focus is on fuel properties, vehicle operation, and
the pros and cons of using alternative fuels.The course includes using alternative fuels
with the internal combustion engine, as well as other means of producing power.
Technologies covered include diesel/biodiesel, electric, hybrid electric, compressed
natural gas, liquid petroleum gas, methanol, and hydrogen.
AT-253 Automotive Laboratory I
4 Credits
Practical, hands-on garage experience is acquired in the automotive laboratories,
including major service work on live vehicles and the operation of test instruments
and other specialty diagnostic equipment. Students will apply the theory learned in the
first-year automotive classes to become more proficient in the diagnosis of engines,
electrical, suspension, steering, and brake systems.This practical experience incorporates
strategy-based engine performance, emission failure diagnosis, and engine rebuilding
and machining.
AT-274 Engine Performance and Diagnosis II
4 Credits
This course builds on AT-271, enabling students to understand the complexities of
electronic engine management systems and how they affect driveability and emissions.
Diagnosis topics include fuel systems theory, fuel injection systems, microprocessor
theory and operation, Electronic Ignition Systems (E.I.S.), four- and five- gas analysis,
emission failure, and On-Board Diagnosis — Generation Two. Prerequisites: AT-271
AT-282 Automotive Service Advising and Customer Relations
3 Credits
Topics of study include customer interviewing and complaint assessment, flat rate and
hourly methods of payment and benefit packages. Case studies are presented and
guest lecturers from industry are utilized to reinforce service-advising principles.
AT-252 Air Conditioning
2 Credits
This course is a comprehensive study of automotive cooling, heating, ventilation and air
conditioning systems. Studies include topics on bodily comfort, heat and pressure, and
temperature relationships.The course culminates with a study of computer controlled,
dual-zone climate control systems.
AT-244 Automatic Transmissions
2 Credits
Continuation of AT-241. Study of principles of operation, maintenance, and diagnosis of
automatic transmissions. Prerequisite: AT-241
AT-254 Automotive Laboratory II
4 Credits
Continuation of AT-355. Study of principles of operation, maintenance, and diagnosis of
automatic transmissions. Prerequisite: AT-241
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
37
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The Computer Engineering Technology program prepares students to apply engineering
principles and computer technology to solve technical problems and support the
engineering process. Graduates of this program are prepared for positions which rely
on an understanding of hardware and software applications of computer-based systems.
Emphasis is on the technical, analytical, problem-solving, and communications skills
necessary to excel in the information technology workplace.
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree in Computer Engineering
Technology, the graduate will be able to:
l
Apply computer programming, software applications, analog and digital electronics,
operating systems, and networking systems to the building, testing, operation, and
maintenance of computer and associated software systems.
l
Understand mathematics, through introductory calculus, and the ability to apply this
knowledge as practiced in physics, electronics, and computer courses.
l
Program computers to perform specific functions.
l
Install and maintain computer and related network systems.
Employment positions for which students in this program are prepared include
computer systems and support specialist, entry level computer programmer, help desk
support, computer manufacturer representative, and sales engineer. Other employment
opportunities may include working with senior engineers in the design, development,
and testing of computer systems, setting up and configuring various computer platforms,
and installing computer systems and software packages. Graduates of this program may
also transfer to engineering colleges, where they complete more advanced studies in
their field, leading to the bachelor’s degree.
l
Analyze and solve computer hardware and software problems.
l
Effectively communicate technical observations, results, issues, and successes, in both
oral and written form.
l
C o n t i nue education toward a bachelor degree in Computer Engineering technology
and/or related fields.
l
Recognize the need for, and develop the ability to engage in, lifelong learning.
l
Understand professional ethical, and social responsibilities.
Curriculum
Faculty
Students of this program receive a solid foundation in computer hardware technology,
computer systems, programming languages, data communications and networking,
mathematics, and physics. Humanities, social sciences, and English courses round out
the curriculum to ensure that graduates possess a broad social understanding and
effective communication skills.
The curriculum is structured to provide a broad underg raduate education, with students
taking courses in each of the recognized areas of computer concepts and architecture,
computer programming, operating systems, network systems, and digital and analog
electronics principles. A strong foundation in mathematics, through calculus and
calculus-based physics, provide the student with a strong engineering foundation.The
student’s education is rounded off with an emphasis in the humanities and social
sciences. The computer and humanities courses allow students to develop their written
and oral presentation skills, promoting lifelong learning. Computer-intensive hands-on
assignments are provided throughout this program.
Facilities
The Computer Technology Department facilities include more than 70 computer
workstations in four classroom laboratory settings and a computer diagnostics laboratory.
The workstations are equipped with up-to-date software and dual operating system
e nvironments to provide all students with hands-on computer programming, installation,
and networking capabilities for their learning.The computer diagnostics laboratory
p r ovides the students with the necessary equipment to perform hardware and software
troubleshooting.The electronics laboratory is utilized for courses in digital and analog
technology taken with the Electronics Engineering Technology Department.
38
Outcomes
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Christos J. Dabekis, Chair
Instructor staff: Richard Azzi,Vivian Hatziyannis, Mozhgan Hosseinpour, Richard Shibley
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Degree Requirements: Computer Engineering Technology
Technical Courses: 36 credits
Course #
Course Title
Typical Course Sequence for Computer Engineering Technology
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Semester 1
CT111
Computer Concepts
CT111
Computer Concepts
3
2
2
CT141
Visual Basic
CT134
LINUX Operating System
3
2
2
EE130
Digital Principles
CT141
Visual Basic
3
2
2
EN130
College Composition I
CT142
C++ Programming
4
3
2
MA120
College Algebra
CT241
Assembly Language
4
3
2
SK101
Freshman Seminar
CT242
Java Object Programming
4
3
2
CT261
Data Communications & Networking 4
3
2
Semester 2
CT134
LINUX Operating System
CT262
Networking Essentials
4
3
2
CT142
C++ Programming
EE130
Digital Principles
3
2
2
EE214
Electricity and Electronics
2
EN140
College Composition II
MA130
Pre-Calculus
EE214
Electricity and Electronics
General Education Courses: 35 Credits
Course #
Course Title
4
3
Credits
Lecture
Lab
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
0
Semester 3
CT241
Assembly Language
EN140
College Composition II
3
3
0
CT261
Data Communications & Networking
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
HU/SS
Elective
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
MA240
Calculus I
University Physics I
Physics Lab I
MA120
College Algebra
3
3
0
PH222
MA130
Pre-Calculus
3
3
0
PH215
MA240
Calculus I
4
4
0
MA250
Calculus II
4
4
0
Semester 4
CT242
Java Object Programming
PH222
University Physics I
3
3
0
CT262
Networking Essentials
PH215
Physics Lab I
1
1
2
MA250
Calculus II
PH223
University Physics II
3
3
0
PH223
University Physics II
PH225
Physics Lab II
1
1
2
PH225
Physics Lab II
0
HU/SS
Elective
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1
1
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions for this program may be found at the end of the Computer
Technology Program description.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
39
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM
The Computer Technology Program prepares students with the theoretical background
and the practical skills necessary to qualify for entry-level field service and technical
support positions in the computer industry.
Outcomes
This program exposes students to a broad range of technical knowledge, providing the
basic hardware, software, and networking skills necessary to function in an entry level
information technology position. Upon graduation from this program, a student may be
employed as a technician responsible for the installation, maintenance, troubleshooting
and repair of computer systems. Other employment opportunities may include
providing systems and networking support for a company’s computer infrastructure,
technical sales support in a commercial environment, sales support and sales positions
with a computer systems vendor.The student is also prepared for A+ and Network+
industry certification.
l
Apply analog and digital electronics, operating systems, and networking systems to
the building, testing, operation, and maintenance of computer systems.
l
Install and maintain computer and related network systems.
l
Analyze and solve computer hardware and software problems.
l
Effectively discuss and communicate computer architecture, software, networking
and electronics concepts.
l
Understand and apply the fundamental knowledge of mathematics.
l
Effectively communicate technical observations, results, issues, and successes, in both
oral and written form.
l
Recognize the need for, and develop the ability to engage in, lifelong learning.
l
Understand professional ethical, and social responsibilities.
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree in Computer Technology, the
graduate will be able to:
Curriculum
The curriculum is structured to provide a broad range of technical knowledge by
providing a core base of courses in computer concepts and architecture, operating and
network systems, electronics, and digital and analog principles. A fundamental foundation
in mathematics and physics is included in order to provide the student with a sound
engineering foundation.The student’s education is rounded off with an emphasis in the
humanities and social sciences. The computer and humanities courses include segments
that allow for students to develop their written and oral presentation skills, promoting
lifelong learning.
This program is structured so that students are afforded a group of computer electives
from which students may pursue a concentration in a particular area, such as Linux
administration, computer programming, networking , or electronics and hardware
diagnostics.
Facilities
In addition to the facilities cited previously in the Computer Engineering Technology
program section, students in this program make further use of the computer
diagnostics laboratory.
40
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Degree Requirements: Computer Technology
Technical Courses: 30 credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
General Education Courses: 26 Credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
CT111
Computer Concepts
3
2
2
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
0
CT134
LINUX Operating System
3
2
2
EN140
College Composition II
3
3
0
CT141
Visual Basic
3
2
2
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
CT212
PC Maintenance & Management
3
1
4
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
CT214
Contemporary Technologies
3
2
2
MA105
Technical Math I
3
3
0
CT261
Data Communications & Networking 4
3
2
MA120
College Algebra
3
3
0
CT262
Networking Essentials
4
3
2
MA130
Pre-Calculus
3
3
0
EE130
Digital Principles
3
2
2
PH212
Physics I
3
3
0
EE214
Electricity and Electronics
4
3
2
PH215
Physics Lab I
1
0
2
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1
1
0
Computer Technology Electives (Select 3): 11-12 credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
CT216
Introduction to Relational Databases 4
3
2
CT215
Web Technologies
4
3
2
CT142
C++ Programming
4
3
2
CT231
LINUX System Administration
3
2
2
CT241
Assembly Language
4
3
2
CT242
Java Programming
4
3
2
EE240
Embedded Processors
4
3
2
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
41
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Typical Course Sequence for Computer Technology
Course Descriptions
Semester 1
CT111
Computer Concepts
CT100
Computer Applications
3 Credits
This course is intended for the student who has had little or no exposure to computer
applications.Topics covered include an introduction to the Microsoft Windows
Operating System, the File Management System, the Internet and email. Students will
use the Microsoft Office Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint applications to complete
an assigned project based on the student’s major of study. Students will also be
exposed to the importance of information literacy using various search engines to
search internet databases and evaluate researched information.Topics in computer
ethics and social issues are presented for discussion at the end of the course.
CT141
Visual Basic
EE130
Digital Principles
EN130
College Composition I
MA105
Technical Math I
SK101
Freshman Seminar
Semester 2
CT134
LINUX Operating System
CTxxx
Computer Elective
EN140
College Composition II
MA120
College Algebra
EE214
Electricity and Electronics
Semester 3
CT261
Data Communications & Networking
CTxxx
Computer Elective
MA130
Pre-Calculus
PH212
Physics I
PH215
Physics Lab I
HU/SS
Elective
Semester 4
CT212
PC Maintenance & Management
42
CT214
Contemporary Technologies
CT262
Networking Essentials
CTxxx
Computer Elective
HU/SS
Elective
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
CT111
Computer Concepts
3 Credits
This course presents a comprehensive look at computer architecture, including the
system unit, memory, input/output and storage devices. Personal computers are utilized
in a laboratory setting to provide students with hands-on exposure to hardware
components. Students are introduced to the Microsoft Windows Operating System
and how the hardware and software work together. An in-depth look at the
motherboard, memory management and storage devices, is included. Other topics
include the application of Microsoft Word and Excel to prepare lab reports, an
introduction to the Internet and an understanding of information literacy through the
use of various Internet search engines.The course concludes with a discussion of
computer ethics and social issues.
CT134
Linux Operating System
3 Credits
This course introduces the student to the major concepts and principles of the Linux
Operating System.Topics covered include the Linux file system and directory management,
pipes, redirection, the vi editor, the Bash Shell, user controlled security, and Unix/Linux
utilities. Shell scripting is introduced and the X Windows Environment is explored.
Students will apply covered topics through hands-on lab assignments. Prerequisite: CT111
CT141
Visual Basic
3 Credits
This course introduces the student to developing Windows applications using the
Visual Basic programming environment.The course covers the essential of forms,
objects and properties, controls and dialogs, and event-driven programming.Text and
graphics processing, file handling, and user interface design; the basics of object-based
programming, and the use of the grid and data controls.
CT142
C++ Programming
4 Credits
This course covers the fundamentals of structured programming and the procedural
aspects of the C++ programming language.Topics covered include: data types, control
structures, user-developed functions, scope rules, arrays, strings, data structures, pointers,
dynamic memory allocation, and the C++ I/O library and library functions. Inline
functions, default arguments, function overloading and function templates are also
introduced.The Microsoft Visual C++ Integrated Development Environment is used
as the primary development tool. Prerequisite: CT111 and CT141
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
CT212
PC Maintenance and Management
3 Credits
This course provides advanced coverage of the internal components of a personal
computer system, from the processor to the keyboard to the video display.The course
focuses on troubleshooting and diagnostics and starts off with diagnostic tools, operating
system software and troubleshooting, as well as data recovery.This course also
instructs the student in troubleshooting the kind of hardware problems that can make
PC upgrade and repair difficult. Prerequisite: CT111
CT214
Contemporary Technologies
3 Credits
This course allows the student to apply the basic knowledge of previous computer
courses into system solutions.The latest technologies are discussed, along with their
application to contemporary problems.The students will select a project, with the
concurrence of the instructor, to apply topics such as networking, use of the Internet,
and/or programming. Each student will make an oral presentation of his/her completed
project. Students will also make presentations on assigned topics during the semester
to simulate a work environment of explaining a product to a customer. Prerequisites:
CT111, CT134, CT141, and CT261.
CT215
Web Technologies
4 Credits
This course begins with an understanding of how Information Technology and Web
Technologies work. It teaches students how to design and develop Web sites using
HTML, Extensible HTML (XHTML) and related technologies, including XML, style
sheets, and Java scripting. Web site planning, web page layout and navigation, use of
color and images, and publishing to a server are all covered. Students reinforce the
skills learned in this course through the design, development and publishing of their
own website. Prerequisite: CT111 and CT141
CT216
Introduction to Relational Databases
4 Credits
This course introduces students to relational database management concepts.Topics
covered include table design and the relationships between them, form development,
report generation, and queries. Microsoft Access is used as the relational database
manager. Prerequisite: CT111 and CT141
CT231
Linux System Administration
3 Credits
This course introduces the Linux file system, group administration, and system hardware
controls.Topics include installation, creation and maintaining file systems, NIS client and
DHCP client configuration, NFS, SMB/Samba, Configure X, Gnome, KDE, basic memory,
processes, and security. Upon completion, students should be able to perform system
administration tasks including installation, configuring and attaching a new Linux
workstation to an existing network. Prerequisite: CT231
CT241
Assembly Language
4 Credits
This course teaches typical microprocessor assembly language and includes the
writing and running of programs on a microprocessor based system. CPU architecture,
instruction sets, addressing modes, binary operation, code conversion, subroutines,
macros, and input/output are covered. Prerequisite: CT142
CT242
Java Object Programming
4 Credits
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the Java programming language.
Students utilize the object-oriented features and main classes of the language to build
a wide variety of Java applications and applets. In addition to object-oriented programming
and classes, topics covered include flow control, streams, threads, packages, graphics
and animation. Prerequisite: CT142
CT261
Data Communications and Networking
4 Credits
This course introduces the student to the concepts and terminology of data communications and networking.Topics covered include data communication protocols and
standards, the OSI model, network topologies, communications media, network
transport systems and protocols. High-speed network transport systems and protocols
are also covered including: Fast Ethernet and the IEEE 802.12 and 802.3u standards,
FDDI, X.25, ISDN, Frame Relay, ATM, SMDS, and SONET.The course concludes with
the exploration of network and internetwork connectivity devices: MAUs, multiplexers,
repeaters, bridges, brouters, hubs, gateways and virtual LANs. Laboratory hands-on
activities and case studies are used to reinforce the concepts covered in the classroom.
Prerequisite: CT111 and EE114
CT262
Networking Essentials
4 Credits
This course continues where CT261 Data Communications and Networking leaves off
with further exploration of the network and internetwork connectivity devices and
follows with “planning a network”. The network plan includes selection of the right
media and topology, estimating network costs, managing network performance through
centralized planning, and managing performance through network segmenting, account
management and planning for network security. Fault-tolerance techniques, remote
network access, network monitoring, network management, and troubleshooting of
network problems are then explored. Case studies and projects are used in the
laboratory to apply the concepts covered in the classroom. Completion of CT261 and
this course should provide the student with the theoretical knowledge and practical
application to perform as a network administrator and prepare the student for Exam
70-058, the Networking Essentials elective for certification as a Microsoft Certified
Systems Engineer (MCSE). Prerequisite: CT261
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
43
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY
The Electrical Technology program prepares students for a variety of choices in the
electrical field. From the designing of construction projects in residential, commercial,
and industrial areas to the completion of these projects, students experience all phases
of an electrical project. A ten-hour OSHA course provides students with an understanding
of job site safety. Students are awarded hours by the Board of Electricians towards
work experience, and also hours toward the requirement of education that is needed
for licensure as a journeyman electrician.
Experienced personnel in the trades, as well as state regulators, such as the Board
of Electricians and the Division of Apprentice Training assures that the program is
aggressive and ever-changing, with new methods and technology. In addition, our
material is constantly updated to conform to the National Electric Code, which
changes every three years. Graduates of our program have many career options,
including electrical technicians, field service representatives, quality control technicians,
field systems support positions.
Curriculum
The curriculum is structured to provide a broad education, with students taking many
courses in the electrical field, as well as in the electronics field. Some of these courses
include: DC and AC circuits, electrical design and layout, lighting design, estimation,
telecommunications wiring, and security and fire alarm technology. Hands-on
experience constitutes approximately half of the time required for this program.
Facilities
The Electrical Department has two laboratories, which are equipped to provide students
ample and meaningful hands-on experience in the electrical field. The two labs provide
students with the opportunity to learn the basics of wiring, as well as the proper
methods of application to the many theoretical principles of motors, transformers,
telecommunications, and industrial electronics.
44
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree in Electrical Technology, the
graduate will be able to:
l
Read, understand and follow the National Electric Code.
l
Solve basic electrical engineering technology problems, e.g. short circuit calculations,
selective coordination, voltage drops, wire sizing, overcurrent protective devices.
l
Perform basic service calculation, both standard and optional methods for single
and multi-family dwellings, stores, banks, office buildings, and industrial buildings.
l
Design motor circuits and motor controls.
l
Mark up drawings according to specification sheets.
l
Calculate and size transformers both single and three phase.
l
Recognize different types of telecommunications cables and networks.
l
Understand fire and security systems.
l
Take direction and responsibility.
Faculty
John Murphy, Chair
Instructor Staff: Ron Dion, Mike McGuinness
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Degree Requirements: Electrical Technology
Technical Courses: 36 Credits
Course #
Course Title
Typical Course Sequence for Electrical Technology
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Semester 1
CT100
Computer Applications
CT100
Computer Applications
3
2
2
EE110
DC Circuits
EE110
DC Circuits
4
3
3
EN130
College Composition I
EE213
AC Circuits
4
3
3
HU/SS
Elective
EL128
Intro Security and Fire Alarm
3
3
0
MA105
Technical Math I
EL126
Electrical Design and Layout I
3
2
2
SK101
Freshman Seminar
EL216
Intro to Electronics
4
3
2
EL227
Electrical Design and Layout II
4
3
2
Semester 2
EE213
AC Circuits
EL238
Lighting Design and Estimating
4
4
0
EL128
Introduction to Security and Fire Alarm Technology
EL240
Electrical Machinery
3
3
2
EL126
Electrical Design and Layout I
2
EN140
College Composition II
MA120
College Algebra
EL242
Telecommunications Wiring
4
3
General Studies Courses: 30 Credits
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
0
EN140
College Composition II
3
3
0
Semester 3
EL216
Introduction to Electronics
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
EL227
Electrical Design and Layout II
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
HU/SS
Elective
MA105
Technical Math I
3
3
0
MA130
Pre-Calculus
MA120
College Algebra
3
3
0
PH212
Physics I
Physics I Lab
MA130
Pre-Calculus
3
3
0
PH215
PH212
Physics I
3
3
0
PH215
Physics I Lab
1
0
2
Semester 4
EL238
Lighting Design and Estimating
PH213
Physics II
3
3
0
EL242
Telecommunications Wiring
PH225
Physics II Lab
1
0
2
EL240
Electrical Machinery
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1
1
0
HU/SS
Elective
PH213
Physics II
PH225
Physics II Lab
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
45
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Course Descriptions
EL126
Electrical Design and Layout I
3 Credits
Study of the fundamentals of electrical design based on the requirements of the
Massachusetts Electrical Code.Topics include polarity identification of systems and
circuits; factors affecting conductor size and type of insulation; calculation of raceway
size; principles of overcurrent protection; application of switches; emphasis on circuit
wiring diagrams. Application of general wiring methods, boxes, fittings and cabinets.
Review of branch circuit requirements. Laboratory included.
EL128
Introduction to Security and Fire Alarm Technology 3 Credits
This course uses the NEC and NFPA 72 standards for the study of the different
types of detection systems from magnetic to dual technology systems. The wiring and
designing of different circuits to meet the needs of a wide range of consumers will be
covered.The many types of smoke detection and heat rise time detection for both
class A and B fire circuits, and audible signal equipment is included.
EL216
Introduction to Electronics
4 Credits
A study of active and passive devices beginning with diodes and continuing through
operational amplifiers.The course will take a student from graphing characteristics
curves to the study of power control devices for industrial applications. Some of the
components to be introduced will include diodes, transistors, SCR’s, diacs, triacs, timers,
and operational amplifiers; all taught with the process of design and troubleshooting as
the main focus.
EL227
Electrical Design and Layout II
4 Credits
Study of installation requirements for branch circuits, feeders and electrical service;
feeder diagram calculations; motor and motor control installations; motor load
calculations; principles of grounding systems and equipment; transformers and vault
requirements; hazardous locations; requirements for special occupancies; load surveys.
Continuation of the Massachusetts Electrical Code; Laboratory included. Prerequisite:
EL-226
EL238
Lighting Design and Estimating
4 Credits
Study of light characteristics and measurements; distribution curves; light sources;
principles of illumination; lighting calculations; interior and exterior lighting and industrial
lighting. Study of principles of electrical blueprint reading with references to applicable
Electric Code. Use of plans for material take-off. Study of electrical estimating standards
and procedures. Application of standard estimating.
46
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
EL240
Electrical Machinery
3 Credits
Study of the operating characteristics of single-phase and three-phase transformers,
voltage and current transform ratio, transformer modeling. Effects of loads, voltage
regulation, losses and efficiency. Study of the operating characteristics of DC generators
such as shunt, compound, series and separately excited generators, voltage build-up,
regulation and efficiency. Study of the operating characteristics of DC motors, counter
EMF, torque and starters. Study of single-phase and three-phase AC generators and
motors.
EL242
Telecommunications Wiring
4 Credits
This course is designed to introduce the student to structured premises cabling system
with an emphasis on the national standards such as ANSI,TIA, EIA 568A, 569, 570, 606
and 607, along with the National Electrical Code articles 700 and 800 series.
Communication media and interfaces associated with different technologies will be
explored, and basic blueprint reading is introduced.
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The field of Electronics Engineering Technology involves testing, troubleshooting,
repairing, and installing a variety of electronic printed circuit boards or systems.
Graduates are electronic technicians that may perform a broad range of tasks for
manufacturing companies or providers of telephone or data networks. An electronic
technician generally works under the supervision of engineers and may support design
engineers in developing a new product by assembling prototypes and testing them to
verify their operation. Or the technician may be in the manufacturing department and
test and repair products. They also may repair customer products, provide technical
advice to customers, or assist the sales organization with technical support. Datacom
and telecom companies employ electronic technicians to install and maintain their
networks. Technicians are hands-on practitioners who know how to apply algebra
and trigonometry to real-life problems, or run computer simulations to analyze circuits.
To advance in these careers, it is also important to develop skills in communicating
the problems, ideas and solutions to others in the company. Those graduates in
departments, which interface with customers, must also develop people skills.
Many graduates choose to continue their education and are accepted into Electronic
Technology programs leading to the bachelor of science degree. Alternatively, a graduate
could choose to pursue a degree in business, acquiring both technical and business
skills. Others, who choose to enter the workforce, are employed by companies
producing consumer products, technology for other companies, defense contractors, or
network providers.
The quality of the program is reflected in the fact that the Technology Accreditation
Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place,
Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012- telephone: (410) 347-7700 has accredited the
Electronics Engineering Technology program.
are analyzed and discussed. In the laboratory the students learn how to use standard
test equipment to build circuits, create schematics, and test circuits using standard
laboratory test equipment.
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree in Electronic Engineering
Technology, the graduate will be able to:
l
Analyze or troubleshoot in three recognized major electronic engineering areas:
analog circuits, digital circuits, and processors.
l
Understand and apply fundamental knowledge of mathematics, especially algebra
and trigonometry, through introductory calculus, and applied in physics and analog
courses.
l
Conduct experiments, building or bread-boarding when required. Use basic test
equipment and tools to measure performance, and to critically analyze and interpret
data.
l
Identify, formulate, and solve electronic engineering problems using modern
engineering tools, techniques, and skills.
l
Effectively communicate technical observations, results, issues, and successes.
To request action effectively, preferably by persuasion and avoiding confrontation,
if possible.
l
Apply computer skills for preparing technical documents or to analyze data: using
applications for word processing, spreadsheets, simple programming, schematic
capture, and simulations.
l
Understand inventory costs, product material costs, time-to-market costs, and cost
advantages of programmable parts.
l
Read and create schematics and recognize components on a printed circuit board.
l
Understand the principles of time management and managing multiple priorities.
l
Understand the importance of compliance with professional practice and ethical
issues, such as: honest product test reporting, honest time reporting, responsible
disposal of industrial chemicals, responsible anti-static protection, privacy of
information, security of information, etc.
l
Understand the impact of electronic engineering solutions on health, general
welfare, safety, environmental quality and economy in a global context.
l
Apply proper laboratory procedures.
Curriculum
The curriculum is structured to provide a broad education with students taking courses
in each of the recognized areas of analog circuits, digital circuits, processors, writing
skills, presentation skills, algebra, trigonometry and elementary calculus, computer
application skills, programming skills, and problem solving skills. Typically the electronics
courses are three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory work, reinforcing
concepts and principles taught in the classroom and providing extensive hands-on
education.
Facilities
The electronics laboratory is equipped to provide students ample and meaningful
hands-on experience in bread-boarding, testing, schematic capture, and simulation of
analog and digital circuits. Students will typically spend four hours a week in the
laboratory, confirming that the lecture material works in real life and is not unproven
theory. Students follow the laborator y experiment with a report where the results
Faculty
Richard Le Blanc, Chair
Instructor Staff: Paul Bazelais, Mozhgan Hosseinpour
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
47
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Degree Requirements: Electronics Engineering Technology
Technical Courses: 37 credits
Course #
Course Title
Typical Course Sequence for Electronics Engineering Technology
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Semester 1
CT111
Computer Concepts
CT111
Computer Concepts
3
2
2
EE110
DC Circuits
CT141
Visual Basic
3
2
2
EE130
Digital Principles
EE110
DC Circuits
4
3
2
EN130
College Composition I
EE113
AC Circuits
4
3
2
MA120
College Algebra
EE122
Electronic Devices
4
3
2
SK101
Freshman Seminar
EE223
Electronic Circuits
4
3
2
EE130
Digital Principles
3
2
2
Semester 2
CT141
Visual Basic
EE235
Programmable Logic
4
3
2
EE113
AC Circuits
EE240
Embedded Processors
4
3
2
EE122
Electronic Devices
2
EN140
College Composition II
MA130
Pre-Calculus
EE250
Electronic Communications
General Education Courses: 35 Credits
Course #
Course Title
4
3
Credits
Lecture
Lab
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
0
Semester 3
EE223
Electronic Circuits
EN140
College Composition II
3
3
0
EE235
Programmable Logic
EN320
Technical Communications
3
3
0
EN320
Technical Communications
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
MA240
Calculus I
MA120
College Algebra
3
3
0
PH212/222
Physics I or University Physics I
Physics Lab I
MA130
Pre-Calculus
3
3
0
PH215
MA240
Calculus I
4
4
0
MA250
Calculus II
4
4
0
Semester 4
EE250
Electronic Communications
PH222
University Physics I
3
3
0
EE240
Embedded Processors
PH215
Physics Lab I
1
1
2
MA250
Calculus II
PH223
University Physics II
3
3
0
PH-213/223 Physics II or University Physics II
PH225
Physics Lab II
1
1
2
PH-225
Physics Lab II
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1
1
0
SS/HU
Elective
Course Descriptions
See Course Description after Medical Electronics.
48
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
The objective of the Mechanical Engineering Technology Program is to prepare its
graduates both for immediate employment as technicians and for further study at the
Bachelor’s level in Mechanical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering Technology.
Outcomes
This program keeps a close connection with industry. Its Industrial Advisory Committee,
consisting of mechanical engineering and mechanical engineering technology professionals
in Greater Boston and New England, meet periodically to evaluate the objectives,
curriculum, and course content, to keep the program updated and practical.
l
Utilize SolidWorks to manufacture engineering drawings and to analyze interference
fits and tolerances.
l
Program and operate CNC equipment in an industrial environment.
l
Understand manufacturing processes and their uses in industry.
l
Design and build products and equipment for a changing technical environment.
l
Demonstrate a knowledge of mathematics through Calculus II and the ability to
apply this knowledge as practiced in Physics and Thermodynamics and heat transfer.
l
Effectively communicate technical observations, results, issues and successes in both
oral and written form.
l
Demonstrate the fundamental skills necessary for continuing their education
towards a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering technology or related fields.
l
Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities.
l
Work effectively in a team-oriented/project-focused work environment.
With a strong foundation in manu f a c t u ring processes and CAD (SolidWorks), graduates
of the Mechanical Engineering Technology program are prepared for employment as
Machinists, Mechanical Designers, Design Drafters, Assistant Mechanical Engineers,
Engineering Research Assistants, Mechanical Engineering Associates, Manufacturer’s
Representatives, Specifications and Technical Specialists, etc. Those students who have
successfully completed Calculus II and University Physics I and II are prepared with a
solid and sound academic foundation to transfer to a four-year college or university to
pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering
Technology.
Curriculum
The Mechanical Engineering Technology Program includes fundamental and advanced
courses in statics, materials, thermodynamics and heat transfer, CAD with SolidWorks,
machine design with 3-D solid modeling design, manufacturing processes, and CNC
machine programming.
Four semesters of mathematics are required for graduation. Students will be placed in
an appropriate math course, based on math skills assessment. It is recommended that
students, planning to transfer to an upper division university, t a ke math through Calculus
II and University Physics I and II.
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree in Mechanical Engineering
Technology, the graduate will be able to:
Faculty
Robert Kane, Acting Chair
Instructor Staff: David Post, Norman Truscott
Humanities, social sciences, and English courses comprise part of the curriculum to
ensure the graduates possess broader social visions and proficient and effective
communication skills.
Facilities
The Mechanical Engineering Technology Department maintains a CAD room, a material
testing laboratory, a machine shop, a fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer
laboratory, and CNC equipment.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
49
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Degree Requirements: Mechanical Engineering Technology
Technical Courses: 40 credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Semester 1
CT100
Computer Applications
CT100
Computer Applications
3
2
2
EN130
EE214
Electricity and Electronics
4
3
2
MA105/120 Technical Math I or College Algebra
ME105
CAD with SolidWorks
3
2
2
ME105
CAD with SolidWorks
ME106
Advanced CAD
3
2
2
ME110
Statics
ME110
Statics
4
4
0
ME150
Introduction to Manufacturing
ME141
Materials
3
3
0
SK101
Freshman Seminar
ME150
Introduction to Manufacturing
4
2
4
ME151
Manufacturing Processing & CNC
4
2
4
Semester 2
EN140
College Composition II
ME240
Machine Design with SolidWorks
4
3
2
HU/SS
College Composition I
Elective
ME250
Advanced Manufacturing & CNC
4
2
4
MA120/130 College Algebra or Pre-Calculus
ME252
Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer
4
4
0
ME106
Advanced CAD
ME141
Materials
ME151
Manufacturing Processing & CNC
General Education Courses: 35 Credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1
1
0
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
3
Semester 3
HU/SS
Elective
EN140
College Composition II
3
3
3
MA240
Calculus I
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
3
ME252
Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer
Physics I
Physics Lab I
3
3
3
PH212/222
MA105/120 Technical Math I/College Algebra
3
3
3
PH215
MA130
Pre-Calculus
3
3
3
MA240
Calculus I
4
4
0
Semester 4
EE214
Electricity and Electronics
MA250
Calculus II
4
4
0
MA250
Calculus II
PH212/222
Physics I
3
3
0
PH213/223
Physics II
PH215
Physics Lab I
1
1
2
PH225
Physics Lab II
PH213/223
Physics II
3
3
0
ME250
Advanced Manufacturing & CNC
2
ME240
Machine Design with SolidWorks
HU/SS
PH225
50
Typical Course Sequence for Mechanical Engineering Technology
Elective
Physics Lab II
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
1
1
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Course Descriptions
ME105
CAD with SolidWorks
3 Credits
Introduction to the use of CAD systems for the production of engineering drawings
through lectures and hands-on laboratory sessions. SolidWorks software is used to
create basic drawings related to mechanical equipment and machine par ts. Modifying
existing drawings similar to those produced in mechanical engineering firms.
ME106
Advanced CAD
3 Credits
The use of SolidWorks to generate complicated 3D Assembly Models. Extensive projects
given to challenge the student and extend their knowledge. Prerequisite: ME105
ME110
Statics
4 Credits
Study of fundamental concepts and principles governing the equilibrium of rigid bodies
under the action of forces. Resolution and addition of forces by graphic and analytical
methods, moment of a force, couples, equivalent systems of forces, analysis of trusses
and frames, and distributed loads. Also, centroids and centers of gravity, and friction.
Corequisite: MA105/120
ME240
Machine Design with SolidWorks
4 Credits
The study of the fundamentals of machine design using SolidWorks.Technical drawings
as a method of solving engineering problems with the use of Cosmos as an analytical
tool. Prerequisite : ME106, MA220
ME250
Advanced Manufacturing and CNC Programming
4 Credits
Rapid prototyping is covered form concept to completed part. The use of SolidWorks
models to generate CNC programs and parts. Prerequisite: ME151, ME106
ME252
Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer
4 Credits
First and Second Law of Thermodynamics; thermodynamic properties of substances;
reversible and irreversible processes, entropy; thermodynamic processes, power and
refrigeration cycles; three modes of heat transfer, conduction, convection and radiation;
heat transfer through plain surfaces and fins, in tube flow and in heat exchangers.
Prerequisites: ME110, ME141, Corequisite: MA-130
ME141
Materials
3 Credits
The study of metals, plastics, ceramics, and composite materials. A basic understanding
of crystal structures, heat treating, annealing, cold working and how they affect
mechanical properties. Stress strain diagrams and failure analysis of engineering
materials.
ME150
Introduction to Manufacturing
4 Credits
Introduction to the basic processes related to machining and cutting engineering
materials. Methods of joining both mechanical and welding, brazing, and soldering.The
use of measuring Instruments for the production of accurate parts.
ME151
Manufacturing Processes and CNC Machining
4 Credits
The study of advanced manufacturing processes such as forging, casting, forming
processes, injection molding, thermo forming and composite layups. Programming and
operation of CNC equipment. Prerequisites: ME105, ME150
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
51
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
MEDICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
(BIOMEDICAL)
Medical Electronics Engineering Technology appeals to students desiring to be both
technical and, at the same time, devote their careers to saving lives by helping doctors
and hospital patients. Graduates become biomedical technicians and maintain, repair,
and calibrate the electronic medical instruments used in healthcare. To advance in
these careers it is also important to develop skills in communicating problems, ideas
and solutions to other employees.
This program will develop troubleshooting skills in analog circuits, digital circuits, and
processors. In addition they must understand physiology, medical terminology and the
operation of medical instruments such as EKG instruments, defibrillators, and incubators.
Some graduates choose to continue their education and are accepted into Electronic
Technology bachelor degree programs in several area colleges and universities.
Alternatively, a graduate could choose to pursue a degree in business, acquiring a mix
of technical and business skills, possibly leading to managing a biomedical team. In the
workforce, they are typically employed by hospitals or a subcontractor for a hospital.
Some graduates are employed by manufacturers of medical instruments or medical
devices as field support technicians. Graduates may continue their education in
business, engineering or clinical programs.
Program Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the Associate Degree in Medical Electronics
Engineering Technology, the graduate will be able to:
l
Analyze or troubleshoot Medical Electronic Equipment.
l
Understand and apply fundamental knowledge of mathematics, especially algebra
and trigonometry, through introductory calculus, and applied in physics and analog
courses.
l
Conduct experiments, building or bread-boarding when required. Use basic test
equipment and tools to measure performance, and to critically analyze and interpret
data.
l
Identify, formulate, and solve electronic engineering problems using modern
engineering tools, techniques, and skills.
l
Effectively communicate technical observations, results, issues, and successes. To
request action effectively, preferably by using persuasion and avoiding confrontation
if possible.
l
Employ computer skills for preparing technical documents or analyzing data: using
applications for word processing, spreadsheets, simple programming, schematic
capture, and simulations.
l
Understand inventory costs, parts costs, and time costs.
l
Read manuals and schematics and identify components in systems.
l
Understand principles of time management and managing multiple priorities.
l
Understand the importance of compliance with professional practice and ethical
issues, such as honest product test reporting, honest time reporting, privacy issues,
and security of information.
Curriculum
The curriculum is structured to provide a broad education with students taking courses
in each of the recognized areas of analog circuits, digital circuits, processors circuits and
programming, writing skills, presentation skills, algebra, trigonometry, and elementary
calculus. Typically the electronics courses are three hours of lecture and two hours of
laboratory work, reinforcing concepts and principles taught in the classroom and
providing extensive hands-on education. The freshman year is identical to the
Electronic Engineering Technology program and transfer between the two programs
is easy during the first year.
Facilities
The electronics laboratory is equipped to provide students ample and meaningful
hands-on experience in bread-boarding, testing, and schematic capture. Students
will typically spend four hours a week in the laboratory confirming that the lecture
material works in real life and is not unproven theory.
Second-year students will be trained on the theory and operation of the medical
instruments in late afternoon and evening courses at a local medical facility and also
have an internship in their last semester at a local hospital.
52
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Faculty
Richard Le Blanc, Chair
Instructor Staff: Paul Bazelais, Mozhgan Hosseinpour
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Degree Requirements: Medical Electronics Engineering Technology
Technical courses: 37 credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Typical Course Sequence for
Medical Electronics Engineering Technology
CT111
Computer Concepts
3
2
2
Semester 1
CT111
Computer Concepts
CT141
Visual Basic
3
2
2
EE110
DC Circuits
EE110
DC Circuits
4
3
2
EE130
Digital Principles
EE113
AC Circuits
4
3
2
EN130
College Composition I
College Algebra
Freshman Seminar
EE122
Electronic Devices
4
3
2
MA120
EE130
Digital Principles
3
2
2
SK101
EE240
Embedded Processors
4
3
2
MD223
Medical Instrumentation I
4
2
4
Semester 2
CT141
Visual Basic
MD225
Medical Instrumentation II
4
3
3
EE113
AC Circuits
MD242
Internship
4
3
2
EE122
Electronic Devices
EN140
College Composition II
MA130
Pre-Calculus
General Education Courses: 34 Credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
0
EN140
College Composition II
3
3
0
Semester 3
EN320
Technical Communications
EN320
Technical Communications
3
3
0
MA240
Calculus I
Medical Instrumentation I
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
MD223
MA120
College Algebra
3
3
0
PH222
Physics I and PH215 Physics Lab
MA130
Pre-Calculus
3
3
0
HU/SS
Elective
MA240
Calculus I
4
4
0
MA250
Calculus II
4
4
0
Semester 4
EE240
Embedded Processors
MD238
Human Physiology
3
3
0
MA250
Calculus II
PH222
University Physics I
3
3
0
MD242
Internship
PH215
Physics Lab I
1
1
2
MD225
Medical Instrumentation II
0
MD238
Human Physiology
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1
1
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
53
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Course Descriptions
EE110
DC Circuits
4 Credits
Introduction to basic DC circuit theory. Topics include a study of SI units; Ohm’s Law
and Kirchhoff ’s Law; series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits, power and energy
relations. Also Mesh analysis,Thevenin’s, Norton’s and Maximum Power Theorems,
inductors and capacitors, R-L and R-C constants.Topics reviewed and reinforced in
the accompanying laboratory.
EE223
Electronic Circuits
4 Credits
A study of the design and analysis of specialized semiconductor electronic circuits using
graphical and equivalent circuit analysis techniques.Topics include voltage and current
amplifiers; Darlington circuits; multistage amplifiers; class A, B, and C power amplifiers;
field-effect and FET circuit analysis. Evaluation of frequency effects of uni-polar and
bipolar devices. A study of operational amplifiers. Prerequisites: EE122, MA130
EE130
Digital Principles and Applications
3 Credits
An introductory course in digital concepts which includes number systems, codes,
Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, gating circuits, characteristics and properties of
integrated circuit logic families, logic circuit analysis and logic circuit design.Types of
flip-flops, counters, registers and their applications are explained.Temporary and
permanent storage devices, dynamic and static integrated circuit memories, and memory
operation are covered in depth. Arithmetic circuits, timing and control functions, digital
to analog and analog to digital converters are combined to illustrate the fundamentals
of computer operation. A weekly laboratory enables the student to apply the principles
taught in the theory portion of the course.
EE250
Electronic Communications
4 Credits
This course will cover the concept of electronic communications and networking. It
will provide students with a practical focus that can better prepare them for real life
practices and experiences.The contents are: fundamental concepts, Fourier Series,
amplitude modulation and demodulation, angle modulation and demodulation,
multiplexing, digital modulation, analog to digital conversion, digital to analog conversion,
telecommunications, fiber optics, Ethernet, and TCP/IP protocol. Prerequisites: EE122,
MA240
EE113
AC Circuits
4 Credits
Continuation of topics in EE110 with emphasis on basic AC circuit concepts.Topics
include: generation of single-phase alternating potential; average and RMS values of
sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal waveforms; phasers; power in AC circuits; application of
general AC circuit analysis; network theorems, resonance in circuits, circuit Q and
bandwidth; mutual inductance, and the ideal transformer.Topics reviewed and reinforced
in accompanying laboratory. Prerequisites: EE110. Corequisite: MA120. Highly
recommended corequisite: MA130
EE122
Electronic Devices
4 Credits
Basic electronics including energy levels and bands, semiconductor construction,
electron-hole conduction characteristics and areas of application of various bipolar
semiconductor devices. Application of diodes including clippers, clampers, and rectifier
circuits and filters. Transistor operation analysis for common emitter configurations.
Topics include DC biasing arrangements and stabilization methods for DC operating
point. Prerequisites: EE110, MA120; Corequisite: EE113
EE235
Programmable Logic
4 Credits
Students will study the both the technical and business benefits of programmable
integrated circuits. They will learn to simulate both combinational circuits and
sequential logic circuits, and Finite State Machines. In the laboratory CAE tools will
enable the student to design, program and test circuits. Prerequisites: EE122, EE130,
CT111, MA120
54
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
EE240
Embedded Processors
4 Credits
This course focuses on micro-controller/microprocessor technology, basic hardware
components of a micro-controller, programming concept, A/D converter and timing
operations with interfacing concepts to perform I/O operations. Students will be
exposed to assembling, downloading and running assembly language programs to
control these components as well as hardware interfacing skills. Prerequisites: EE130,
CT111.
EE214
Electricity and Electronics
4 Credits
The study of electrical and electronic devices used in electrical measurements with
basic DC and AC circuit theory. Topics include Ohm’s Law; Kirchhoff ’s Laws;
Applications of Thevenin’s Theorem; reactive elements; diodes and power supplies;
transistors; linear and digital integrated circuits.Topics reviewed and reinforced in
accompanying laboratory. Prerequisite: MA105. Corequisite: MA120.
MD223
Medical Instrumentation I
4 Credits
Study of medical devices and transducers used in Intensive Care Units and general
patient floors. Covers typical circuits, applications, safe usage of devices, and
interpretation of derived data. Emphasis on troubleshooting and repair techniques as
applied to medical devices. Prerequisites: EE113, EE122, MA130
ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
MD238
Human Physiology
3 Credits
Introduction to the basic structure and function of the various organ systems of the
human body. Discussion of normal, as well as some pathological, physiology. Presentation
of terminology encountered in a medical environment. Examination of basic properties
of nerves and muscles and their relationships with the central nervous system in
producing motion and sensation. Study of various functions of the respiratory and
cardiovascular systems. Introduction to instrumentation and techniques for evaluation
of normal and abnormal functions.
MD225
Medical Instrumentation II
4 Credits
Medical devices and transducers other than those covered in MD-323. Covers typical
circuits of operating room and clinical laboratory devices, along with specialized
systems such as ultrasound x-ray, and nuclear medicine. Prerequisite: MD-223,
Corequisite: MD242
MD242
Clinical Internship
4 Credits
A clinical rotation program at hospitals within the greater Boston area where students
will study Federal, S t a t e, and industry codes, standards and procedures relating to medical
devices. Supervised in-hospital work with emphasis on the calibration, preventive
maintenance and repair of electronic-medical devices. Prerequisite: MD-223;
Corequisite: MD-225
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
55
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING,
AND REFRIGERATION (HVAC&R)
Heating,Ventilation and Air Conditioning is rated by the U.S. Department of Labor as
one of the fastest growing job areas in the country. There are excellent employment
opportunities available, both locally and nationally, for graduates of certificate programs.
This ten-month evening certificate program is designed to provide students with the
knowledge and hands-on skills to become successful HVAC technicians. HVAC technicians
work for heating and cooling contractors, refrigeration and air conditioning service and
repair shops, schools, hospitals, office buildings, a variety of industries, and local, State
and Federal governments.
Under the supervision of a licensed technician, the HVAC apprentices help with the
installation, troubleshooting, diagnosis and repair of equipment.Today’s HVAC&R
Technician needs to be EPA certified. BFIT’s HVAC program provides test preparation
for the EPA certification. In addition, the program offers 100 hours of electrical code
needed for state licensure.
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the HVAC&R Certificate, the graduate will be able to:
l
Demonstrate the principles of refrigeration and air conditioning.
l
Identify principals of different refrigerants and their temperature pressure relationships.
l
Demonstrate a knowledge of refrigeration and air conditioning components,
including compressors, evaporators, metering devices and condensers.
l
Solder and braze pipes and fittings.
l
Test pressure and detect leaks.
l
Recover, reclaim and recycle refrigerant in accordance with EPA and Mass. Dept. of
Public Safety guidelines.
l
Flare and swage tubing.
l
Troubleshoot electrical and mechanical malfunctions of commercial and domestic
units.
l
Use HVAC tools and measuring devices effectively.
Curriculum
The course curriculum is structured to provide a basic knowledge of the refrigeration,
air conditioning, and heating fields. Core courses in the first semester cover topics such
as: refrigeration and heating principles, electricity for HVAC, safety in the HVAC field,
and use of HVAC tools and equipment. An EPA course covering the reclamation and
recycling of refrigerant completes the first semester.
In the second semester of the program, students concentrate on commercial and
industrial refrigeration, air conditioning and testing. This semester also covers heating,
including oil and gas-fired units, and forced hot air and hydronic systems.
Facilities
The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology maintains a HVAC laboratory with two
Hampden Engineering Trainers. HVAC Lab equipment gives students real world
hands-on training on commercial refrigeration and air conditioning and also on oil and
gas-fired burners.The HVAC Lab contains a wide variety of tools and equipment used
in the heating and ventilation industry.
Certificate Requirements for HVAC&R Technology
Technology Courses: 28 credits
Course #
Course Title
Lab
Theory of Heat
4
3
3
HV102
Safety, Tools, & Shop Practices
4
3
3
HV103
Electricity for HVAC&R
3
2
3
HV104
EPA Regulations
3
2
3
HV201
Commercial Refrigeration
4
3
2
HV202
AC, Heating, & Humidification
4
2
6
HV203
Commercial & Industrial AC
4
3
3
HV204
Electrical Codes & Schematics
2
2
0
Donald Broza, Program Coordinator
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Lecture
HV101
Faculty
56
Credits
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Course Descriptions
HV101
Theory of Heat
4 Credits
This course covers refrigeration and heat transfer. Students also develop an
understanding of basic electricity principles, refrigeration, refrigerants and pressure and
temperature relationships.
HV102
Safety, Tools, Equipment and Shop Practices
4 Credits
This portion of the course covers basic hand tools and their uses. In addition, students
examine safe workshop practices, the use of vacuum pumps, charging refrigeration
systems, tubing and piping and leak detection.
HV103
Electricity for HVAC&R
3 Credits
A. Basic Controls
HV103 covers basic electricity and magnetism, the use of automatic controls,
components and their applications. Also, troubleshooting basics, automatic and
programmable controls.
HV203
Commercial and Industrial Air Conditioning
4 Credits
A. Students will study all weather systems that incorporate electric, gas-fired and
oil-fired systems. Other topics will include air source and geothermal heat pumps.
B. Covered in this section will be high and low pressure chillers, absorption chill water
systems, cooling towers, condensers and chill water pumps. Operation, maintenance
and troubleshooting will also be covered.
HV204
Electrical Codes and Schematics
2 Credits
This course introduces students to electrical blueprints used in the design and
implementation of HVAC systems in a variety of environments. In addition, students
are acquainted with current electrical code standards.
B. Electric Motors
This section of the course covers types of motors and related wiring, motor
applications and problem diagnosis, troubleshooting electric motors and their controls.
HV104
EPA (Environmental Protection Agency)
Recovery, Reclamation and Recycling Program
3 Credits
This section concentrates on Federal EPA certification test preparation and also test
the use of recovery equipment.
HV201
Commercial Refrigeration
4 Credits
Students will study commercial applications of evaporators as applied to commercial
refrigeration condensers and compressors. Also, this course will include different types
of expansion devices for these applications, special refrigeration systems, trouble
shooting and typical operating conditions.
HV202
Air Conditioning, Heating and Humidification
4 Credits
This course covers electric and gas heat and oil-fired systems, hydronic systems and
indoor air quality. Students will also examine A/C installation, air distribution, balance
and controls for the operation of these systems. Typical operating conditions and
troubleshooting will also be presented.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
57
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
MARINE TECHNOLOGY
Marine transportation involves the movement of people and goods over the water for
the purposes of commerce and recreation. In the Northeast, the growth in recreational
boating has led to the development of an active industry with oppor tunities for
technicians who install, troubleshoot, and maintain marine engines, electrical systems,
rigging, and propulsion systems in vehicles ranging from fishing boats to yachts to jet
skis. Marine technicians apply the principles of science, mathematics and logical thinking
to the development and operation of these vessels.
Marine technicians work in marinas, boatyards, dealerships, manufacturers, and specialty
shops throughout the coastal and lakeside communities in the Northeast. Beyond
their technical work installing and maintaining the systems, they are involved in daily
customer communication, research, and problem-solving work. While recreational
boating activity is concentrated in the summer, the work of installing and maintaining
vessels and their equipment is a year-round responsibility.
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the certificate in Marine Technology, the graduate will
be able to:
l
Understand the various components of the marine industry in Massachusetts, their
economic structure, and the technologies necessary to each.
l
Explain the principles of the internal combustion engine, identify its component
parts, and understand how it operates.
l
Understand the principles of DC electricity, and how they apply to marine
transportation settings.
l
Speak, read, write, and research in a variety of modes appropriate to a range of
settings likely to be encountered in the marine trades.
l
Apply mathematical calculations, principles, and formulae to a variety of technical
tasks necessary to a marine technician.
l
Diagnose and repair outboard and other types of engines commonly used in the
recreational marine industry.
l
Understand the principles of marine propulsion systems, including transmissions,
drive systems, propellers, and jets.
l
Explain the principles behind the laws and regulations relating to safety and
environment in a marine trades setting, and apply them to daily work situations.
Curriculum
This one-year full-time daytime course of study leading to a certificate in marine
technology is developed in cooperation with the Massachusetts Marine Trades
Association.The curriculum includes the principles of engines and of electricity; a surve y
of marine industry; marine engines and propulsion systems, rigging, and environmental
and safety practices, as well as math, science, humanities, and communication. The
program includes a paid summer internship at a marine site.
Facilities
Most courses are delivered at BFIT, in classrooms and laboratories shared with the
a u t o m o t i ve technology program.These include an engines laboratory and fully - e q u i p p e d
machine shop, as well as an electrical lab specially designed for DC transportation
systems. Courses that teach boat systems and rigging are taught on-site at a Boston
area marine trades shops.The program includes site visits to a variety of MMTA member
sites for instructional purposes and to expose students to the industry.
58
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Faculty
Peter Jackowski, Marine Program Coordinator
Instructor Staff:Terence Murphy, John Cosimini, Ed Lofgren
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Certificate requirements for Marine Technology
Course Descriptions
Technology Courses: 23 credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
MT 150
Engine Principles
4 credits
3
3
MT 170
Fundamentals of Electricity
and Electronics
4 credits
3
3
MT 101
Survey of Marine Industry
2 credits
1
2
MT 155
Marine Engines
4 credits
3
3
MT 177
Marine Electricity and Electronics 3 credits
2
2
MT 161
Boat Systems, Rigging
and Cosmetics
3 credits
2
2
MT 171
Environmental & Safety
3 credits
3
0
MT 200
Supervised Internship
0 credit
General Education Courses: 6 credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
EN 110
Oral Communications
3 credits
3
0
EN 130
English Composition 1
3 credits
3
0
Typical course sequence for Marine Technology
First Semester
MT101
Survey of Marine Industry
MT150
Engine Principles
MT170
Fundamentals of Electricity & Electronics
EN110
Oral Communications
Second Semester
EN130
College Composition I
MT155
Marine Engines
MT177
Marine Electricity and Electronics
MT161
Boat Systems, Rigging and Cosmetics
MT171
Environmental Systems & Safety
MT200
Supervised Summer Internship
MT101
Survey of Marine Industry
2 Credits
A broad introductory survey of the marine industry field focusing on history, current
modes, and future expectations. The course spans: types of facilities, including equipment
and operations; the role and responsibilities of the marine technician; the economics of
the industry; and consumer relations.
MT150
Engine Principles
4 credits
This course covers fundamental theory, troubleshooting, and maintenance of marine
engines and related equipment. Emphasis is placed on maintenance and operational
procedures, including corrosion control, lubrication, propellers, carburetors, fuel
injection, direct fuel injection, two-cycle theory, magneto ignition, batteries, starters,
alternators, and trailers. Upon completion, students should be able to understand
how a marine engine and related components work, perform minor repairs, and
properly maintain them.
MT155
Marine Engines
4 Credits
The course introduces the basics of outboard engines: two-stroke and four-stroke,
carbureted and injected. All aspects of engine functioning and maintenance are included:
electrical and cooling systems, fuel systems, power tilt and trim, lubrication.
MT161
Boat Systems, Rigging and Cosmetics
3 Credits
A course designed to acquaint the student with boat structure systems and rigging,
including: hull designs, masts and sail systems, and marine plumbing. In addition, external
repair methods are addressed, such as fiberglass, gelcoat, coatings, osmosis, and blister.
MT170
Fundamentals of Electricity and Electronics
4 credits
Theory, principles and measurements of DC and AC electricity and electronics are
covered. Schematic and conventional wiring diagram interpretation allows the student
to become familiar with common 12-volt marine electrical systems. Hands-on
troubleshooting includes various gauge, trim, battery, lighting, ignition feed, dash, engine,
accessory, lanyard, relay and other systems found in small craft. Battery systems and
battery types.
MT171
Environmental and Safety
3 Credits
This course focuses on compliance with OSHA, EPA, DEP, CZM, and other Federal and
State regulators. It reviews safety and environmental procedures, use and maintenance
of protective equipment, safe operation of tools, preventive maintenance and the use
of recycling systems.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
59
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
MT177
Marine Electronics
3 Credits
This course is aimed at identifying and understanding electronic components and
systems. Course content includes marine electrical standards (ABYC), AC and DC
applications, breakers, troubleshooting, and preventive maintenance.
MT 200
Supervised Internship
0 Credit
The student will be placed at a marine technology facility or dealership at which the
various operation systems of the field will be introduced and practiced.
PHARMACY TECHNOLOGY
This one-year daytime certificate, developed in cooperation with CVS, is designed to
prepare students for work as pharmacy technicians in pharmacies, hospitals, clinics, and
other settings.The curriculum includes math, general education, communication and
customer-service skills, as well as pharmacology and pharmacy operations. It will be
delivered through courses at BFIT, internships in CVS pharmacies, and part-time work
at CVS.
The pharmaceutical miracle of the last two decades, curing diseases and treating
conditions for millions, has created more and more demand for prescription drugs.
The number of pharmacies and the number of prescriptions that need to be delivered
are on the rise, and so is the demand for well-educated pharmacy technicians. As the
demands on the profession of pharmacy increase, many of the former responsibilities
of the pharmacist are delegated to the pharmacy technician.
These professionals assist the pharmacist to measure, prepare, and package
medications, and carry out the important processes of recording and billing the
prescriptions. Pharmacy technicians are licensed by the State, and require a solid
educational preparation, as well as extensive experience in pharmacy work. The
demand for qualified pharmacy technicians is strong in the Boston area, as well as in
other parts of the country, and is predicted to grow over the coming years.
Pharmacy technicians work in the local drugstore, in regional and national pharmacy
chains, and in hospitals and other health-care settings. Wherever prescription drugs
are prepared, you will find pharmacy technicians at work.The work of a pharmacy
technician combines health care, customer communication, and careful attention to
detail in a clean and professional setting, with good compensation. A pharmacy
technician training program, combined with work in a pharmacy, is a good way to get
started along this career path.
Curriculum
The certificate program consists of eight required courses and one elective, as well as
two supervised internships that add up to 29 credits.The courses are taken over two
semesters.The internship consists of a structured and supervised placement in a
CVS pharmacy one day per week.The one-year certificate curriculum is designed to
prepare well-educated pharmacy technicians, and to assist them in passing the national
pharmacy technician examination (PTCB).
Facilities
Pharmacy courses are taught in a pharmacy laboratory at BFIT, designed by CVS and
BFIT faculty especially for this program.This lab consists of six pharmacy work
stations configured exactly as in a CVS pharmacy. General education courses are taught
in regular classrooms at BFIT, and internships take place in CVS pharmacies in the
Boston area.
60
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the certificate in Pharmacy Technology, the graduate will
be able to:
l
Develop an understanding of common pharmaceuticals that will be dealt with in
everyday practice.
l
Communicate effectively with patients and other health care professionals.
l
Decipher and transcribe prescriptions from doctors as well as phone-in requests.
Certificate Requirements for Pharmacy Technology
Technology Courses: 17 Credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
CT100
Computer Applications
3
0
0
PR101
Pharmacology I
3
3
0
PR103
Pharmacy Operations I
3
1
2
PR151
Pharmacology II
3
3
0
PR153
Pharmacy Operations II
3
1
2
PR155
Internship I
1
0
4
PR157
Internship II
1
0
4
Manage pharmacy inventory with regards to ordering, ensuring proper medication
amounts, and arranging drug placement.
General Education Courses: 12 Credits
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
l
Effectively operate pharmacy-specific software.
EN130
College Composition I
3
3
0
l
Understand and utilize the telephone V-Net system.
EN320
Technical Communications
3
3
0
l
Decipher and enter third-party information into the prescription database.
HU/SS
Elective
3
3
0
l
Demonstrate non-verbal communication skills.
MA105
Technical Math 1
3
3
0
l
Perform calculations specific to pharmacy practice.
Retain the information taught during the year in order to pass the State and Federal
pharmacy technician licensure exam.
Typical Course Sequence Pharmacy Technology
l
l
Demonstrate the steps involved in the flow of prescriptions.
l
Identify the location of all types of medications within the pharmacy.
l
Locate over-the-counter medications, guide patients/customers through their
decision-making process, and refer them to the pharmacist when necessary.
l
Faculty
John Rocchio, Program Coordinator
Instructor Staff: Maegan McEachern, Megan Connolly
First Semester
CT100
Computer Applications
EN130
College Composition I
MA105
Technical Math I
PR101
Pharmacology I
PR103
Pharmacy Operations I
PR155
Internship I
Second Semester
EN320
Technical Communications
HU/SS
Elective
PR151
Pharmacology II
PR153
Pharmacy Operations II
PR 157
Internship 2
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
61
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
PRACTICAL ELECTRICITY
Course Descriptions
EN320
Technical Communications
3 Credits
Principles of effective communication on both the employee and organizational levels
are emphasized in this course. Students create professional documents such as memos,
letters, instruction manuals, procedural descriptions, proposals, and reports. Use of
PowerPoint, email and other Internet resources are incorporated. There will also be a
strong emphasis on oral communications. Through class discussions, working groups,
and formal presentations, students will consider and present on various workplace
scenarios. These situations will provide students the opportunity to practice
negotiation, conflict management, ethical decision-making, leadership roles, and
presentation skills. Professionalism in all forms of communication, written and oral,
will be expected.
PR101
Pharmacology I
3 Credits
Introduction to medical terminology, Pharmaco-kinetics and biopharmaceutics, human
physiology, drug therapy, disease state management, patient care therapeutics, and
major organ systems.
PR103
Pharmacy Operations I
3 Credits
Orientation to the pharmacy, the role of the pharmacy technician, customer service,
pharmacy management, introduction to pharmacy software, prescription preparation,
prescription billing, prescription interpretation, pharmacy regulations: Federal and State,
and hospital pharmacy.
PR151
Pharmacology II
3 Credits
Covers disease states, drug interactions, therapeutic equivalents, narrow therapeutic
index drugs, alternative medicine, and pharm tech examination review.
PR153
Pharmacy Operations II
3 Credits
Includes inventory management, scheduling, pharmacy calculations, advanced
prescription billing, pharm tech examination review.
PR155
Internship I
Student will be placed in a supervised internship.
1 Credit
PR157
Internship II
Student will be placed in a supervised internship.
1 Credit
The Practical Electricity program gives the students the knowledge and experience
starting in the electrical trade. The students will learn job site safety with the 10-hour
OSHA course. The many different forms of wiring methods will be introduced to the
students, as well as motors and transformers. Both single- and three-phase systems are
presented. Hands-on Labs are reflected to the classroom theory and National Electric
Code subjects that are taught. Problem solving and troubleshooting techniques that
reflect real case scenarios.The students are given hours by the Board of Electricians for
hours towards work experience and hours to the requirement of education that is
needed for licensure as a journeyman electrician.
Curriculum
Our curriculum is reviewed every year by top people in the trade, as well as the State
regulators such as the Board of Electricians and the Division of Apprentice Training.
This allows our programs to be very aggressive and ever-changing with new methods
and technology. Also, with the National Electric Code changing every three years, our
material has to be constantly updated to conform to these changes.
Facilities
The Electrical Department has two laboratories that are used only for our students.
The first lab, which we call the wiring lab, is where the students are taught the use of
tools and the proper methods of hands-on experience. Our second lab introduces
the students to electrical theory and how to apply that theory to motors, transformers,
telecommunications and industrial electronics.
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the Practical Electricity Certificate, the graduate will be
able to:
l
To read, understand and follow the National Electric Code.
l
Solve Basic Electrical problems, e.g. voltage drops, wire sizing, overcurrent protective
devices.
l
Apply basic service calculation, both standard and optional methods for single and
multi-family dwellings, stores, banks, and office buildings.
l
Design motor circuits and motor controls.
l
Take direction and responsibility.
l
Calculate and size transformers, both single- and three-phase.
Faculty
John Murphy, Chair
Instructor Staff: Ron Dion, Mike McGuinness
62
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Certificate Requirements and Typical Course Sequence
Semester 1
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
PE101
Electrical Code I
4
5
0
PE102
Electrical Wiring Lab I
6
2
8
PE103
Electrical Circuit Theory
5
5
0
PE104
Electrical Circuit Lab
1
0
2
PE105
Mathematics for Electricians
2
3
0
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Semester 2
Course #
Course Title
PE206
Electrical Code II
4
5
0
PE207
Electrical Wiring Lab II
6
2
8
PE208
Electrical Machinery
5
5
0
PE209
Electrical Machinery Lab
1
0
2
PE210
Motors and Motor Controllers
2
3
0
Course Descriptions
PE101
Electrical Code I
4 Credits
A study of the requirements of the Massachusetts Electrical Code, including the
applications of overcurrent devices, switches, conductors, conductor identification and
the practical safeguarding of persons and property with respect to the installation of
general wiring methods.
PE102
Electrical Wiring Lab I
6 Credits
Practical application of the requirements of the Massachusetts Electrical Code as
applied to general wiring methods, signal and communications system, and residential
wiring.Training in the use of electrical tools, along with testing and troubleshooting of
basic circuits. Installation of common cable and raceway wiring methods. Development
of wiring diagrams and electrical stock lists. Lectures include a study of various wiring
devices, methods, and materials.
PE104
Electrical Circuit Lab
1 Credit
Experiments to review and reinforce topics covered in Electrical Circuit Theory course.
Organizing and wiring lab reports.
PE105
Mathematics for Electricians
2 Credits
A course reviewing the fundamentals of basic mathematics, fractions, basic algebra,
factoring, signed numbers, square roots, trigonometric functions, graphs, ratios and
proportions as they apply to practical electricity.
PE206
Electrical Code II
4 Credits
A continuation of study of the Massachusetts Electrical Code, including wiring methods
for commercial construction, branch circuits, feeders, branch circuit and feeder
calculations, services, and grounding.
PE207
Electrical Wiring Lab II
6 Credits
Advance work on services and feeders, branch circuits supplying power for heat,
fluorescent and HID lighting and motors. Installation and troubleshooting of motor
control circuits, signs, communication circuits, and appliances. Lectures include planning
and estimating of electrical work and electrical plans.
PE208
Electrical Machinery
5 Credits
Advance coverage on AC circuits and power factor. A study of the theory of polyphase
circuits, fundamentals of rotating electric machinery and machine characteristics,
transformers.
PE209
Electrical Machinery Lab
1 Credit
Experiments to review and reinforce topics covered in Electrical Machinery course.
PE210
Motors and Motor Controllers
2 Credits
A study of AC and DC motors, motor controllers and motor control circuits, as
related to commercial and industrial installations. Code application on calculations of
loads for branch circuits and feeders supplying motors. Introduction to solid-state
electronics, drive systems and programmable controllers.
PE103
Electrical Circuit Theory
5 Credits
A study of the concepts of voltage, current, resistance, and electrical power as applied to
common DC and sinusoidal AC circuits. Ohm’s Law, series and parallel, and combination
circuits. Other topics include magnetism, AC waveforms, inductance, capacitance,
reactance, and impedance, along with phasers and RC, RL and RLC circuits.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
63
GENERAL EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT OF ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT
Students enter the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology with varying levels of
academic preparation. We feel it is important for all students to begin their major
studies at BFIT on the same academic level so that everyone has an equal opportunity
to make the most of their education.The Department of Academic Development
offers a range of courses for students needing additional preparation for the rigorous
academics required in the pursuit of a college degree at BFIT. Courses focus on the
specific academic skills and content required for each individual’s success in the
engineering and industrial technologies.
Depending on placement and performance, a student may need an additional semester
of course work in order to complete the requirements for an Associate’s degree. In
order to continue the student’s major course of study, the following criteria must be
met: passing grades in all courses; grades of C or better in all mathematics and language
courses; satisfactory completion of course requirements; and instructor recommendations.
In addition, they may also be required to complete courses during the summer session.
Samples of Typical Course Schedules
Students needing Developmental Math and Developmental Language:
Course #
Course Title
Credits
Lecture
Lab
EN090
Academic Language Skills
7
7
0
EN091
Reading & Writing
4
4
0
MA090
Fundamental Mathematics
6
6
0
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1*
1
0
EN110
Oral Communication
3*
3
0
Lecture
Lab
3*
3
0
or
Students needing Developmental Math only:
Course #
Course Title
Credits
EN130
College Composition I
MA090
Fundamental Mathematics
6
6
0
HU/SS
Elective
3*
3
0
Academic Development courses are designed to build the skills necessary for more
advanced study in mathematics, technology, the humanities and social sciences. Since
the assimilation of basic math skills is central to success in technology studies, students
needing to develop their math skills will begin their technical studies upon successful
completion of MA090. Students needing extensive work on their language skills will
successfully complete EN090 before beginning their technical studies.
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1*
1
0
Credits
Lecture
Lab
7
7
0
All first semester freshmen are enrolled in SK101-Freshman Seminar. This course
introduces students to the BFIT community and focuses on the study skills essential for
a successful transition into college. Among the topics covered in the course are: setting
goals, time management, identifying sources of support, effective note-taking, and
critical thinking skills.
MA105/120 Tech. Math/College Algebra
3*
3
0
EN110
Oral Communication
3*
3
0
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1*
1
0
Credits
Lecture
Lab
Each student’s course of study will be customized to address the individual’s strengths
and needs.
Curriculum
Students needing Developmental Language only:
Placed in EN090
Course #
Course Title
EN090
Academic Language Skills
Placed in EN 091
Course #
Course Title
EN091
Reading & Writing
4
4
0
MA105/120 Tech. Math/College Algebra
3
3*
0
Tech Course
3+*
3
0
Tech Course
3+*
3
0
1*
1
0
SK101
Freshman Seminar
* denotes graduation credits
64
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
GENERAL EDUCATION
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the Academic Development courses, the student will
be able to:
l
Demonstrate proficiency in the basic concepts of algebra.
l
Demonstrate proficiency in basic reading skills and writing conventions and be
capable of addressing increasingly complex academic writing tasks.
l
Em p l oy effective communications skills in a variety of social, academic and technology
settings.
l
Employ efficient study skills including time management, materials organization,
note-taking, and critical thinking.
Faculty
Paul Zarbo, Chair
Instructor Staff: Nancy Gordon, Sally Heckel
Course Descriptions
EN090
Academic Language Skills
7 Credits
This Academic Development course is designed for English speakers of other languages
who have a foundation in English structures and vocabulary that enables them to
participate in social settings.The purpose of the course is to further develop language
skills in order to facilitate the students’ participation in an academic environment using
an integrated skills approach that focuses on: effective strategies for critical reading;
rhetorical patterns; grammatical structures that often prove troublesome to second
language learners; and academic listening comprehension and note-taking. In addition,
the course will provide opportunities for students to develop effective discussion skills
for the college classroom.
EN091
Reading and Writing for Academic Success
4 Credits
This Academic Development course integrates the development of both critical
reading strategies and academic writing skills. Students are introduced to the writing
process and a deeper understanding and application of academic writing conventions.
In order to enhance their participation in an academic environment, students will
develop critical reading, thinking, and writing skills by working through a set of
high-interest readings.
MA090
Fundamental Mathematics
6 Credits
This Academic Development course is an introduction to basic algebra. Topics
covered include fractions, mixed numbers, decimals, fraction to decimal conversion,
ordered pairs, coordinate systems, basic rules of algebra, real numbers and operations,
exponents, order of operations, the simple inequality, simple linear equations, formulas,
percents, graphing, slope, linear equations in two variables and introduction to problem
solving. In this class the use of calculators will not be allowed in most instances.
SK101
Freshman Seminar
1 Credit
The Freshman Seminar introduces students to the Institute and develops skills necessary
for success in college.Topics include goal setting, support networks, time management,
and study skills, critical reading, note-taking, learning styles, and academic advising.
Successful completion of the Freshman Seminar is a graduation requirement.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
65
GENERAL EDUCATION
HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
The Department of Humanities and Social Sciences provides a means for exploring
human experience and is dedicated to the growth and support of the educated student.
It provides a core curriculum in the Liberal Arts, which promotes student thinking,
creativity, understanding, and appreciation. Courses emphasize historical, cultural, and
social issues and develop analytical skills and effective communication, thereby challenging
the intellect and encouraging self-knowledge, while instilling a basis for life-long learning.
Curriculum
The Humanities and Social Sciences curriculum provides 12 to 15 credits of courses
for each technical program. The courses provide students with an opportunity to think
analy t i c a l ly, w rite clearly, and speak confidently. All of these skills are necessary ingredients
for the successful student in any technical program, as well as in the workforce.
Two standard three-credit English courses, EN130 College Composition I , and EN140
College Composition II, are required for all students in the first two semesters. The
goal of these writing courses is to develop cognitive, as well as effective written and
oral communication skills, which are supported and advanced by the technical
programs. Students are encouraged to write and speak about strategies of effective
writing and are also expected to become independent writers and thinkers by
evaluating and assessing their own approaches and processes. Students who earn a B
or better in College Composition I may elect another literature course in lieu of
College Composition II.
The department also offers many elective courses to satisfy the remaining six to nine
credits required to complete the degree requirements. While the electives are
designed to promote lifelong learning, these courses also build on the critical thinking,
reading, and writing practiced in College Composition I and II. Throughout all courses,
the depar tment aims to instill a sense of socio-cultural and ethical awareness, and
encourages self-understanding and sensitivity. The department places a strong emphasis
on the connections between the humanities and the technologies. Students have input
into which courses are offered each semester.
66
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the courses in the Department of Humanities and
Social Sciences, the student will be able to:
l
Be proficient in written and oral communication.
l
Use critical reading and thinking skills for professional and life-long learning.
l
Be aware of socio-cultural and ethical issues.
l
Make connections between the humanities and the technologies.
Faculty
Ellen O’Keefe, Chair
Instructor Staff: Jackie Cornog, David Drucker, Brittanie Greco, Denise Paster
Course Descriptions
EN110
Oral Communications
3 Credits
This course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of the communication process and to enable them to develop their communication competence in
various contexts. We will study the styles of speech used in these contexts, and will
explore issues of articulation, and purpose, as well as the cultural diversity factors
that may influence all aspects of communication.The course aim is to develop an
awareness of the many ways in which we communicate with one another, and to
promote confidence and overall speaking skills. The course will provide numerous
and varied opportunities for students to practice communication techniques. At the
conclusion of the course, all students should be knowledgeable of the elements of
good communication and capable of recognizing and participating in several types of
speech activities.
EN130
College Composition I
3 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the reading, writing, and thinking they
will be doing throughout their work at BFIT and in professional settings. It will help them
build on the competence they bring from the rest of their experiences as readers,
writers, learners and language-users, and extend that competence to new contexts.
The goal of the course is to support students’ development as writers and to provide
them with ways of analyzing what they need to do whenever they write in new
settings.The course also focuses on the research process, and students write two
research papers, using both primary and secondary sources.
GENERAL EDUCATION
EN140
College Composition II
3 Credits
A continuation of College Composition I, this class considers many written genres
while focusing on such issues as work, social class, culture, and identity. By examining
these issues through the genres of oral history, narrative, short story, poetry, drama,
and film, students will build on their abilities to work reflectively, develop their responses,
and incorporate the voices of others into their own texts through the use of quotations.
Students will have the opportunity to write texts similar to the ones they are reading.
Through the practice of close reading and creative and expository writing, students will
develop the ability to comment on not only specific genres, but also on the world
around them. In addition to the study of literary genres, students will examine the
types of writing produced in their fields of study. They will also have the opportunity
to participate in the kinds of group and presentational work that might be practiced in
a professional setting. Prerequisite: EN130
HU103
Introduction to the Humanities
3 Credits
A personalized exploration of a range of art forms, including fiction, poetry, drama, film,
television, photography, art, and music. The course studies issues and concepts related
to humankind’s cultural heritage focusing on human values and human experiences. In
addition to theory, application will be incorporated: poetry writing, oral interpretation,
film critiquing, painting, musical composition and theatrical presentation.
HU113
Technology in the Humanities
3 Credits
This multi-media course explores the creation and innovation of technology from the
Stone Age period to the present. Students assess how technology has changed human
existence (both personally and professionally) through discussions, papers, projects, and
presentations.Technology in several genres is explored, including literary readings about
technological issues, film and the implementation of computerized special effects, and
the use of robotics in factory lines.
EN230
Creative Writing
3 Credits
A study of the composition of short stories, poetry, and drama.Through the exploration
of both student work and professional writing, we will examine issues of invention,
form, and style.There will be frequent writing workshops and conferences, and students
will regularly share their work.
HU203
World Religions
3 Credits
An introduction to the study of religion, this course will cover the origins, themes and
practices of a selection of the major religions of today’s world, including Islam,
Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, and Hinduism.
EN240
Topics in Contemporary Literature
3 Credits
An examination of contemporary literature, the focus of this class will be on the works
of 10-12 authors and may include fiction, drama, and poetry based on selected topics.
Students will hone in on critical reading, writing, and thinking skills as they consider
contemporary texts in light of their social, political, and economic contexts. Students
will do reflective work in this class, and will explore prevalent topics. These topics,
which may vary by semester, will include women in litera t u r e, urban litera t u r e, literature
of the outsider, working class literature, and regional literature.
HU213
Ethics
3 Credits
What are the differences between right and wrong? What actions and thoughts can be
called moral? What are moral standards? Who sets these standards? Should an entire
society adhere to these standards? While many of us consider morality an important
aspect of life, we do not frequently examine moral principles.To explore these issues
and to begin to draft answers to the questions posed above, we will spend the semester considering morality and moral principals by examining philosophical texts and by
c o n s i d e ring ethical dilemmas.This class will also address ethical questions dealing with
technology.
EN320
Technical Communication
3 Credits
Principles of effective communication on both the employee and organizational levels
are emphasized in this course. Students create professional documents such as memos,
letters, instruction manuals, procedural descriptions, proposals, and reports. Use of
PowerPoint, email and other Internet resources are incorporated.There will also be a
strong emphasis on oral communications. Through class discussions, working groups,
and formal presentations, students will consider and present on various workplace
scenarios. These situations will provide students the opportunity to practice negotiation,
conflict management, ethical decision-making, leadership roles, and presentation skills.
Professionalism in all forms of communication, written and oral, will be expected.
HU 223
Logic
3 Credits
This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to logic and the
principles of reasoning. Students will study concepts such as the nature of argument as
well as various forms of arguments, including inductive and deductive. By considering
issues such as soundness and validity, students will come to evaluate arguments in
complex ways. Through continuous practice, written exams, and papers, students will
build upon their ability to think logically and look critically at the ways in which language
and emotion can affect argumentation.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
67
GENERAL EDUCATION
HU233
Introduction to Film
3 Credits
The technical aspects of filmmaking are introduced to teach students how to watch
films for more than just entertainment.Various cinematic approaches are studied
through the viewing of pertinent films. Moreover, the stylistic and psychological
conditioning in images and plot are discussed in groups and through individual papers
and presentations.
SS105
Twentieth Century World History
3 Credits
A study of the developments of the modern century. Emphasis is placed upon the
international history of the major world powers, the role played by ideology, the
development of political history, and the development of modern international
economic relationships.
SS115
Introduction to Psychology
3 Credits
A basic course emphasizing psychology as a scientific study of human behavior and
mental processes.Topics include: history, aims, methods, biological processes, learning,
memory, personality, and human development.
SS125
Introduction to Sociology
3 Credits
This course takes an introductory look at the many issues regarding the relationship
between individuals and society. Topics include culture, socialization, deviance, families,
education, and the social inequalities of class, ra c e, and gender.Through lecture, discussion,
and activities, students learn to view their daily experiences from a sociological
perspective, perceiving and understanding the social forces present in contemporary
social problems as well as interpersonal interactions.
SS135
Introduction to Anthropology
3 Credits
An introductory course that studies human cultures across time and place in their
various environmental and historical contexts. The majority of the course focuses on
cultural anthropology, and the evolution and development of human societies. Elements
of community, kinship, religion, economic structure, and political order will be explored.
In addition, the ways in which culture shapes experience is discussed, and students will
be called to recognize their role as both creators and byproducts of culture.
SS205
Contemporary Social Issues
3 Credits
A course that analyzes, in both empirical and theoretical terms, many of the social
problems currently facing Americans. Among these are deepening inequality and
poverty among working and middle-class Americans, particularly racial minorities,
women, and youth; related problems of racism and sexism; growing unemployment;
deterioration of the health system; crime; and war and militarism. Strategies and
political options for solving these problems are considered.
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BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
SS215
Race, Class, and Gender
3 Credits
This course will provide an analysis of society based on the interrelationships between
these three factors and their influence on our social structure and behavior.There will
be special focus on the ways in which any type of minority status impacts the social
experience and the definition of personal and cultural roles. Both historical and
contemporary perspectives will be explored through selected ar ticles and films.
Prepared and thoughtful discussion will be integral to the student’s experience.
SS225
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
3 Credits
This course focuses on the psychological and sociological influences present in the
work environment.Topics include: organizational structure, group dynamics, motivation,
decision making, management and leadership. Students will explore concepts of
effective organizational behavior through activities and case studies.
SS235
Economics Principles and Planning
3 Credits
A study of the economic system in today’s world: economic principles, money and
banking, investments, insurance, risk management, real estate and other related subjects
of interest.The course will provide a framework for personal economic planning and
effective economic decision-making.
SS245
Photography and the Human Condition
3 Credits
This course provides students with a general introduction to photography as an art
form and reflection of the human condition. Students will explore various styles of
photography and the relationships among theme, technique, and aesthetic experience
by taking and viewing photographs.
SS255
Select Topics in Psychology
3 Credits
An exploration of the ways in which human behavior and mental processes relate to
everyday life. Basic concepts of psychology are introduced with special emphasis on
their application to the students’ understanding of themselves and their interactions
with others.
GENERAL EDUCATION
MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS
Mathematics and Physics are the foundation for any technical discipline. Being successful
in technology requires understanding mathematical theory and the ability to apply the
concepts to familiar situations and newly encountered problems. Physics introduces
the fundamental laws and principles that govern virtually everything around us.
Studying math and physics promotes critical reasoning, creative thinking, and logical
analysis, which are central skills in the classroom and in life. The Math and Physics
Department at BFIT places an emphasis on problem solving, using practical everyday
problems related to the Industrial and Engineering Technologies. Internet tutorials are
used wherever possible.
Curriculum
The mathematics curriculum at BFIT is designed to provide a solid foundation in
mathematics through a range of course offerings relevant to the technical degree
programs. Each degree program at BFIT requires at least two semesters of college
math that emphasize the fundamentals. Additional math courses and math electives
are designed to be relevant to the chosen field of study. Engineering students planning
on transferring after two years to obtain a bachelor’s degree from a four-year school
are required to complete the math sequence through Calculus II. Students planning to
obtain an engineering technology associate’s degree take math courses designed for
the requirements of their field of study. Different entry points into the math sequence
are available depending on the student’s skill level. Refer to the section dedicated to
the degree program of interest for specific degree requirements.
The Physics curriculum at BFIT is designed to provide an additional technical foundation
in the student’s major as well as practical applications for the mathematics. A physics
lab with hands-on instruction is provided to reinforce topics covered in the lecture
classroom and to demonstrate that the governing laws of physics exist beyond the
pages of the text. The physics requirement varies with each major, however, most
students will take at least one semester of physics. Refer to the section dedicated to
the degree program of interest for specific degree requirements.
Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the courses in the Department of Mathematics and
Physics, the graduate will be able to:
l
Solve math problems in a systematic and logical manner.
l
Use critical reasoning skills for life-long learning.
l
Effectively apply math concepts to technical problems.
l
Understand basic physical principles of the world around us.
l
Apply physics to various situations encountered in life.
Faculty
James Giumarra, Chair
Instructor Staff: Mitra Bahary, Ray Porch, David Post
Course Descriptions
MA090
Fundamental Mathematics
6 Credits
This course is an introduction to basic algebra that focuses on building skills. Topics
covered include, fractions, mixed numbers, decimals, fraction to decimal conversion,
ordered pairs, coordinate systems, basic rules of algebra, real numbers and operations,
exponents, order of operations, the simple inequality, simple linear equations, formulas,
percents, graphing, slope, linear equations in two variables and introduction to problem
solving.
MA105
Technical Mathematics I
3 Credits
This course is designed as an in-depth study of the basic topics in Algebra as they apply
to technical applications. Practical examples of the math as it is used in the various
technical fields are used as much as possible.Topics covered in depth are, linear
equations, systems of linear equations, literal equations, simple linear inequalities,
slope review, simple factoring, algebraic fractions, exponents and radicals, metric units,
scientific notation, ratio and proportion, and intermediate problem solving.
Prerequisite: MA090 or Placement Exam
MA106
Technical Mathematics II
3 Credits
This course, the second in the technical math sequence, continues to develop the
students understanding of algebra through the use of practical examples. Topics
covered are functions and their graphs, right angle trigonometry, geometry, simple
exponential functions and logarithms, and advanced problem solving. The use of the
scientific calculator is emphasized. Prerequisite: MA105 (Technical Mathematics I) or
Placement Exam
MA120
College Algebra
3 Credits
This course continues to develop the students’ understanding of Algebra.The scientific
calculator is used extensively in this course. Right triangle trigonometry is expanded
into trigonometric functions of any angle as well as studying functions and their graphs,
exponential functions, the rules of logarithms and a cursory review of geometry. The
course concludes with a study of vectors and oblique triangles. Many of these topics
will include applications from the various technical fields. Prerequisite: MA105
(Technical Mathematics I) or Placement Exam
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
69
GENERAL EDUCATION
MA130
Pre-Calculus
3 Credits
This course extends the students’ knowledge of trigonometry by developing the
graphs of the trig functions. It then progresses into solving trigonometric equations as
well as developing and proving the trig identities. The course continues with a study of
complex numbers, trigonometric and analytic geometry applications. Sequences, series
and the binomial theorem are also covered. Prerequisite: MA120 (College Algebra) or
Placement Exam
MA240
Calculus I
4 Credits
This course introduces differential and integral calculus. It begins with the study of
limits and continuity, which naturally leads to the development of the derivative. Topics
covered include, the rules of differentiation of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric,
inverse-trigonometric, and polynomial functions, rates of change, implicit differentiation,
tangents, the definite and indefinite integral, properties of integrals, the fundamental
theorem of calculus, integration by substitution, and applications of integration.
Prerequisite: MA130 (Pre-Calculus) or Placement Exam
MA250
Calculus II
4 Credits
This course builds upon the techniques and applications covered in Calculus I.Topics
include an introduction to integration by parts, by trigonometric substitution and by
use of tables, area of region between two curves, parametric equations, improper
integrals, applications of integration to volumes, first-order and second-order differential
equations, applications of differential equations,Taylor and MacLaurin series, and
complex numbers. Prerequisite: MA240 (Calculus I)
MA270
Statistics
3 Credits
This course studies the collection, analysis and presentation of data, frequency
distributions, probability and probability distributions. Making inferences from statistical
data and the techniques used for making business and management decisions will be
discussed. Data analysis and presentation make use of statistical software.
Prerequisite: MA120 (College Algebra)
MA210
Linear Algebra
3 Credits
This elective course is an introduction to Linear Algebra, including the study of linear
equations and matrices, solving linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations,
and determinants. Additional topics include inner product spaces, eigenvalues, and
eigenvectors, if time permits. Prerequisite: MA130 (Pre-Calculus)
MA260
Calculus III
3 Credits
This elective course, the third semester in the calculus sequence, begins with matrices
and the general chain rule in matrix form.Topics covered include, partial derivatives,
differentials, the gradient, convergence, and curl, multiple integrals, vector fields, Green’s
theorem, and Stokes’ theorem. Prerequisite: MA250 (Calculus II)
70
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
HU/MA208 Logic
3 Credits
This elective course is intended to provide students with an introduction to logic
and the principles of reasoning. Students will study concepts such as the nature of
argument as well as various forms of arguments, including inductive and deductive.
By considering issues such as soundness and validity, students will come to evaluate
arguments in complex ways.Through continuous practice, written exams and papers,
students will build upon their ability to think logically and look critically at the ways in
which language and emotion can affect argumentation. Prerequisite: none
PH102
Physics
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to physics of mechanics and basic concepts in chemistry,
including the study of motion, Newton’s Laws, energy, conservation laws, physics of
matter, temperature, heat transfer, the atom, the periodic table, chemical bonding, the
Mole, and balancing chemical equations. There is no lab co-requisite for this course.
Prerequisite: none
PH212
Physics I
3 Credits
This course is an algebra-based introduction to the Physics of Mechanics that includes,
a math review (algebra, geometry and trig), scalars and vectors, force, mass, equilibrium,
torque, acceleration, gravity, Newton’s Laws, work, energy, power, impulse, momentum,
circular motion and rotation of rigid bodies. Prerequisite: MA130 (Pre-Calculus),
Co-requisite: PH215 (Physics Lab I)
PH222
University Physics I
3 Credits
The topics of PH212 are covered using calculus. A math review is not included.
Co-requisite: MA240 (Calculus I) and PH215 (Physics Lab I)
PH215
Physics Lab I
1 Credit
P hysics Lab focuses on supporting the topics in the Physics lectures, PH212 and PH222.
This lab offers the opportunity to practice laboratory techniques, data collection, and
written reports. Topics include kinematics and mechanics.
PH213
Physics II
3 Credits
This course is an algebra-based approach to Physics of Mechanics, Thermodynamics,
Waves, Sound, Electricity and Optics. Topics include, SHM, Doppler Effect, sound waves,
Snell’s Law, Len’s Law, thermal expansion, Pressure Law, First Law of Thermodynamics,
heat transfer, Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff ’s Rules, DC/AC circuits and magnetism. Prerequisite:
PH212 (Physics I), Co-requisite: PH225 (Physics Lab II)
GENERAL EDUCATION
PH223
University Physics II
3 Credits
The topics of PH213 are covered using calculus. Prerequisite: PH222 (University
Physics I), Co-requisite: PH225 (Physics Lab II)
PH225
Physics Lab II
1 Credit
P hysics Lab focuses on supporting the topics in the Physics lectures, PH213 and PH223.
This lab offers the opportunity to practice laboratory techniques, data collection, and
written reports. Topics include: mechanics, thermodynamics, harmonic motion, electric
charge, and optics. Prerequisite: PH215 (Physics Lab I)
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
71
FACULTY
FACULTY
Richard Azzi, Assistant Professor of Computer Science
B.S. in Computer Science, Mathematics, and Chemistry, University of Texas Pan
American. M.S. in Mathematics,Texas Tech University. Member American Mathematical
Society, Computers of America.
Mitra Bahary, Instructor of Mathematics and Physics
B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Chicago; Ph.D. in Chemical
Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology. Member: American Institute of Chemical
Engineers (AIChE). Formerly Research Engineer with Raytheon Engineers &
Constructors, and Research Technology Corporation.
Barney R. Barnhart, Professor of Architectural Technology
Chair, Architectural Technology. B.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Florida.
M.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Florida. Formerly Principal Structural Engineer,
Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation.
Paul Bazelais, Assistant Professor of Electronic Engineering Technology
B.S in Electronic Engineering, B.S. in Engineering Physics, Wentworth Institute of
Technology; M.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Lowell. Former
Network Engineer, E-initiative.
Sharon Bonk, Associate Professor & Director of Library Services
B.A. in Journalism, University of Rhode Island; B.A. in Political Science, University of
Rhode Island; M.L.S., University of Rhode Island. Member: American Library Association.
Part-time Reference Librarian, Lesley University.
Donald Broza, Instructor of HVAC and Refrigeration
HVAC&R Program Coordinator. Graduate, Peterson School of Steam Engineering.
Graduate, Northeast Technical Institute and Associated Technical Institute.
Massachusetts Licenses in Refrigeration, Oil Burners, and Sprinklers. Universally
Cer tified by EPA in Refrigerant, Recycling, and Recovery. Proctored EPA Instructor.
Member Air Conditioner Contractors of America and Refrigeration Service Engineers
Society. Associated with Ferris State University.
Richard E. Cadotte, Assistant Professor of Automotive Technology.
Cer tificate in Vocational Education, Commonwealth of Massachusetts; ASE Certified
Automobile Technician; ASE Certified L-1 Advanced Level Engine Performance;
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Registered Emissions Repair Technician;
Massachusetts Motor Vehicle Safety/Emissions Inspector. Member STS/SAE. Former
owner/operator of independent automobile repair facility.
Megan Connolly, Instructor in Pharmacy Technology
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BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Jackie T. Cornog, Assistant Professor of Humanities and
Social Sciences
B.A. in English and Women’s Studies, University of Massachusetts, Boston; Certificate of
Creative Writing, University of Massachusetts, Boston; M.A. in English with concentration
in composition and creative writing, University of Massachusetts, Boston.
John Cosimini, Instructor of Automotive Technology
Certificate in Automotive Technology, Franklin Institute of Boston. ASE Master Certified
Automobile Technician; ASE Certified L-1 Advanced Level Engine Performance
Technician; Massachusetts Registered Emissions Repair Technician; Massachusetts Motor
Vehicle Safety/Emissions Inspector. Former Master Technician with Oldsmobile Division
of General Motors.
Christos J. Dabekis, Associate Professor of
Computer Engineering Technology
Chair, Computer Engineering Technology Department. B.S. in General Engineering,
Lowell Technological Institute; M.S. in Computer Information Systems, Boston University.
Formerly Computer Engineering Programmer and Computer Techniques Specialist,
General Electric; Systems Engineer and Marketing Support Manager, Honeywell
Information Systems; Marketing Systems Engineer, Amdahl Corporation. Member IEEE,
ASEE.
Ronald L. Dion, Assistant Professor of Electrical Technology
B.A. Providence College. Massachusetts Licensed Journeyman and Master Electrician.
Formerly Electrical Technician,Texas Instruments, Inc.; Electrical and Instrumentation
Supervisor at Ivex, Incorporated and at Hollingsworth & Vose, Inc;, and Electrical
Engineer at Bostomatic, Incorporated; Construction Electrician Chief, USNR (Ret.).
David W. D ru c ker, Adjunct Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences
B.A. in Psychology, Syracuse University, New York; M.Ed. Counselor Training, University
of Massachusetts at Boston.
James J. Giumarra, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Physics
Chair, Mathematics Department. B.A. in Physics, State University of New York at
Geneseo; M.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Illinois at
Chicago. Member, New England Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges.
Formerly with Argonne National Laboratory, GSI Lumonics, Janis Research Company.
Nancy J. Gordon, Instructor of English as a Second Language
B.A. in French Language & Literature, Boston University; Ed.M. in Education (Teaching
English to Speakers of Other Languages), Boston University. Member TESOL, NCTE,
MLA
FACULTY
Brittanie Greco, Instructor in Humanities and Social Sciences
Vivian M. Hatziyannis, Assistant Professor of
Computer Engineering Technology
Richard E. Le Blanc, Associate Professor of Electronics and
Medical Technology
B.S. in Management Information Systems, Boston University; M.S. in Management
Information Systems,Tufts University; Certificate in Business, Burdett College;
post-graduate courses, Northeastern University. eCollege Cer tified Teaching OnLine
Courses. Part-time instructor: School of Professional Continuing Studies, Northeastern
University. Member: Northeastern University Faculty Society, Hellenic Scientists
Association. Formerly Computer Research Analyst, Fidelity Management and Research.
Chair, Electronics and Medical Electronics Department. A.S. in Electronic Engineering
Technology, Franklin Institute of Boston; B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Northeastern
University; M.S. in Electrical Engineering, Northeastern University. Member of the
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and the American Society of Engineering
Education. Member of MassMEDIC, and Member of the Cluster Hubs Initiative.
Formerly:Technical Aide and Member of technical staff of Bell Laboratories; Project
Lead and Section Manager for Wang Laboratories, Hardware Manager for Multilink,
Inc., and Director of Hardware Development at NMS Communications.
Sally Heckel, Associate Professor of ESL
Ed Lofgren, Instructor in Marine Technology
B.A. in Psychology, University of New Hampshire; MAT in ESL, School for International
Training; Preparatory Certificate for TEFL, International Teacher Training Institute, Rome.
Member TESOL, MATSOL.
Mozhgan Hosseinpour, Associate Professor of
Electronic Engineering Technology
B.S. in Electrical Engineering, Boston University.
CompuMaster Certificate in Troubleshooting and Upgrading.
Certified in Computer Studies. Formerly at Massachusetts Bay Community College,
Alpha Industries, M-A/COM, Alpha Industries, CP Clare Corporation. Former personal
computer consultant at Liaison Microcomputer Systems.
Peter R. Jackowski, Instructor of Automotive Technology
Marine Program Coordinator. ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician; Certified
Hunter Alignment Specialist; Formerly Shop Foreman/Technician with Mercedes Benz,
Dodge, Chrysler, and Infinity. Member U.S. Power Squadrons.
Richard A. Jennings, Associate Professor of Automotive Technology
Chair, Automotive Technology Department; A.S. in Automotive Technology, Franklin
Institute of Boston; M.Ed., Cambridge College. ASE Certified Master Automobile
Technician; Charter Member STS/SAE; North American Council of Automotive
Teachers; MA Department of Environmental Protection/Registry of Motor Vehicles
Advisory Committee. Former retail service manager with Volkswagen, Audi, Porsche,
Honda, and Mazda.
R o b e rt Kane, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Technology
Chair, Mechanical Engineering Department. A.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Wentworth
Institute. B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Northeastern University. Formerly Instructor in
Mechanical Engineering at M.I.T. Research experience in materials and materials testing,
instrumentation, process control, and manufacturing.
Maegan McEachern, Instructor in Pharmacy Technology
Michael McGuinness, Instructor of Electrical Engineering Technology
Licensed Master and Journeyman Electrician, Commonwealth of Massachusetts;
Licensed Hoisting Engineer; Certified Instructor in Electricity, Massachusetts Dept. of
Education; Member, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 103;
Supervisor of Electricians, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary; Electrical Contractor.
John J. Murphy, Professor of Electrical Engineering Technology
Chair, Electrical Technology Department. A.S., Franklin Institute of Boston; B.E.T. and
B.G.E.T. in Electrical Engineering Technology, Northeastern University. Licensed
Unlimited Electrical Contractor in NJ, MD, NC, SC,VA, FL, AL, MS, LA, TN, KY. Licensed
Master and Journeyman Electrician in MA, RI, CT. Authorized 10-30 hour OSHA
Instructor; 15-hour Code Update Provider, CT, RI, NH,VT, ME, MA. Registered
Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD). Member ASEE, ASSE, NFDA, BISCI.
Retired from AT&T; previous owner M & M Electrical; Safety/Training Administrator,
Wayne J. Griffin Electric.
Terence S. Murphy, Assistant Professor of Automotive Technology
A.S. in Automotive Technology, Franklin Institute of Boston; B.S. in Mechanical
Engineering, Northeastern University. ASE Certified Automobile Technician. Member
STS/SAE. Former project engineer, Westerbeke Corporation.
Ellen O’Keefe, Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences
Chair, Humanities and Social Sciences Department. B.A., St. Mary-of-the-Woods; M.A.,
Dramatic Literature, English, Catholic University of America. Member NCTE,TYCA.
Denise Paster, Assistant Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences
B.A. in English and Philosophy, Bridgewater State College; M.A. in English and
Composition, University of Massachusetts, Boston.
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
73
FACULTY
Marilyn Phelan, Instructor of Architectural Technology
Norman R. Truscott, Instructor of Mechanical Engineering
B.Arch., Boston Architectural Center, BFA, Sculpture, Boston University. Registered
architect, Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Member AIA, BSA. Formerly Project
Manager, Rothman Partners, Inc. Currently Principal, M P Architects.
B.S. in Engineering, Central New England College of Technology; M.B.A., Nichols
College. Certified, U.S. Coast Guard, Master 50-ton License; Member OSA, ASME.
Former Engineering Manager, Electro optics; Engineering Manager, Machine Tool
Industry; Senior Principal Mechanical Engineer, Defense Industry. Holder, U.S. Patent
3,987,427 for laser support system.
Ray Porch, Instructor of Mathematics
B.A. in Sociology and English, University of Massachusetts, Boston. Massachusetts
Teacher Certification, K-12. Accounting Certification, series 6, 63, 7. Licensed broker
dealer. Formerly Mathematics Instructor, Boston Renaissance School; Senior Accountant,
City of Boston Retirement Board; funds analyst, Chase Global Funds Company.
David Post, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Physics
B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, M.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Northeastern University;
Graduate studies, Boston State Teachers College. Registered Professional Mechanical
Engineer. Formerly with Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation, Principal
Engineer/Equipment Specialist.
John Rocchio, Instructor in Pharmacy Technology
Emilio Salvador, Instructor of Practical Electricity
B.S. Candidate in Electronic Systems Engineering Technology, Wentworth Institute of
Technology; A.S. in Industrial Productivity, El Salvador; MA Licensed Journeyman and
Master Electrician.
Gerald Sears, Instructor of Automotive Technology
ASE Certified, ASE L1 Certified in Advanced Level Engine Performance; MA State
Enhanced Emissions/Safety Inspector; MA State Enhanced Emissions Registered Repair
Technician; AC-Delco Certifications; GM Certified. Member CAAT, Volunteer Advisor
of MA State Emissions/Safety Program’s I/M and VMI Subcommittees, former board
member AASP. Former technician for Chevrolet and Land Rover. Former shop
foreman/service writer, independent repair facilities.
Richard Shibley, Instructor of
Computer Engineering Technology Networking
A.B. in Government, Harvard; M.B.A., Boston University. Microsoft Certified Systems
Engineer (MCSE), Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT), CompTIA Security+, CompTIA
Network+, CompTIA A+; Project Manager & Senior Engineer, Corporate IT Solutions;
former Chief Information Officer, Massachusetts Secretary of State; former Lead
Instructor for Microsoft Windows and PC Support, Clark University Computer Career
Institute.
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BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Donald L. Tuff, Assistant Professor of Automotive Technology
Bachelor Program Coordinator. M.Ed., Cambridge College. ASE Certified Automobile
Technician. Charter Member STS/SAE. Former corporate senior instructor for
Volkswagen, Porsche, and Audi.
U. Henry Valentini, Lecturer of Electrical Technology
University of Massachusetts, Boston, 54 credits. Licensed Journeyman and Master
Electrician, Commonwealth of Massachusetts; Massachusetts Cer tified 15-hour Provider
Instructor; Master CAT-5 Certified Cabling Specialist; Fiber Optic Certified;Vocational
Education, Provisional Approval, Commonwealth of Massachusetts; Member, MTA, NTA,
International Association of Electrical Inspectors; Master Electrician Instructor,
Northeast Metropolitan Regional Vocational High School.
Samuel C.M. Wang, Lecturer of Architecture
B.S. in Architecture, Rhode Island School of Design; M.Arch., Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. Formerly Chief Architect, Parsons Main, Inc. Formerly Registered Architect
in thirteen states and Senior Vice President, Cannon Design.
Andrew Wong, Lecturer of Labor Law and Legislation
B.A. in Political Science and Austrian Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst;
J.D. in Business Transactions and Regulation, American University Law School; MBA in
Long-Term Strategic Planning and Integration; S u f folk University School of Management.
Member, Massachusetts Bar Association, Association for Financial Professionals; Notary
Public. Prior Experience: Financial Product Risk Management, Mediation / Arbitration,
Cash Management and Corporate Treasury Operations.
Paul Zarbo, Associate Professor of ESL
B.A. in English Literature, Saint Lawrence University; M.A.T. in ESL, School for
International Training.
STAFF
STAFF
Officers of Administration
Administrative Staff
Michael Taylor
President
Jennifer Carr
Assistant Director of Admissions
Stephen Lozen
Chief Operating Officer
Andrea Dawes
Assistant Director of Admissions
Paul Zarbo
Interim Dean of Faculty
Joanne Hobson
Executive Assistant
Paula Coyle
Dean of Students
Nanette Jones
Registrar Assistant
Norman Kraft
Dean of Enrollment Management
Julie Hankinson
Assistant Librarian
Madalena Gomes
Controller
Mary Kenney
Administrative Support
Wildolfo Arvelo
Director of Corporate & External Relations
George Morgan
Associate Director of Financial Aid
Sharon Bonk
Director of Library Services
Janice Panico
Business Office Assistant
David Drucker
Director of Student Life
Raymond Porch
Student Life Assistant and Men’s Basketball Coach
Kevin Sullivan
Registrar & Director of Financial Aid
Jamie Sherwood
Admissions Assistant
Frances Rose Gage
Director of Facilities & Security
Sa Ngo
Director of Computing Services
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
75
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Blair Brown
President, Franklin Foundation
Chair, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Co-founder and former President
Charrette Corporation
William Spring
Member, Franklin Foundation
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Former Vice-President, Public and Community Affairs
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
Rev. Stephen Ayres, ex officio
Treasurer, Franklin Foundation
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Vicar, Old North Church in Boston
Anne Bailey Berman
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Co-founder and President
Chadwick Martin Bailey, Inc.
Daniel J. Finn
Assistant Treasurer, Franklin Foundation
Vice-Chair, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Former Vice-President of Development
Boston University
Peter M. Kelly
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Legal Advisor
Boston Public Schools
Michael Taylor
President, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
President, Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology
Michael C. Mazzola
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Former President
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology
Ralph Young
Member, Franklin Foundation
Treasurer, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Owner, M.C. Engineering
Charles E. McAfee
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Headmaster & Director
Madison Park Vocational Technical High School
Honorable Thomas M. Menino, ex officio
Member, Franklin Foundation
Mayor of the City of Boston
Christopher Morss
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Retired high school teacher and author
Rev. Helen Nablo, ex officio
Member, Franklin Foundation
Pastor, Church of the Covenant in Boston
Louis Rudolph
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Owner, Rudolph Electric Company
Marcia Casey
Member, Franklin Foundation
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Former Counsel, Corporate Law Division
John Hancock Financial Services, Inc.
Kathleen C. Stone
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
Affiliated with the law firm of Looney, Cohen, Reagan & Aisenberg, LLP
George Cuker
Member, Franklin Foundation
Member, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Inc.
President, First Russian Real Estate Corporation
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BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
FACULTY AND STAFF DIRECTORY
FACULTY AND STAFF DIRECTORY
Name
Office location
e-mail address
extension
Name
Office location
e-mail address
extension
Arvelo, Wilfdolfo . . . . . . . 2nd flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 127
Kenney, Mary . . . . . . . . . . Registrar’s Office. . . . . . . . . no email address . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Azzi, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . Union, 402. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Kraft, Norman . . . . . . . . . Admissions Office. . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Bahary, Mitra. . . . . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . 155
Le Blanc, Richard . . . . . . . Union, 310 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 148
Barnhart, Barney . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . 157
Lozen, Stephen. . . . . . . . . 3rd flr., Kendall. . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Bazelais, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . Union, 310. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . 146
McGuinness, Michael . . . . Electric Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . 143
Bonk, Sharon . . . . . . . . . . Lufkin Library . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Morgan, George. . . . . . . . Admissions Office. . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . 120
Broza, Donald. . . . . . . . . . Union, 310. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Murphy, John. . . . . . . . . . . 2nd flr., Dunham . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 142
Cadotte, Richard . . . . . . . Garage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 138
Murphy,Terence . . . . . . . . Dunham, 21. . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 141
Carr, Jennifer. . . . . . . . . . . Admissions Office. . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Ngo, Sa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Union, 303 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Cornog, Jackie . . . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 161
O’Keefe, Ellen . . . . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 158
Cosimini, John. . . . . . . . . . Dunham, 21. . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 135
Panico, Janice . . . . . . . . . . 3rd. flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Coyle, Paula . . . . . . . . . . . Union, 117. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Paster, Denise . . . . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Dabekis,Christos . . . . . . . Union, 310. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 145
Phelan, Marilyn . . . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 165
Dawes, Andrea. . . . . . . . . Admissions Office. . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Porch, Ray . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student Lounge . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Dion, Ronald. . . . . . . . . . . Electric Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Post, David . . . . . . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Drucker, David . . . . . . . . . Student Life Office . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . 114
Sears, Gerald . . . . . . . . . . Driveability Lab . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Gage, Frances . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Office . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Sullivan, Kevin . . . . . . . . . . Registrar’s Office. . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 125
Giumarra, James. . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . 152
Sherwood, Jamie . . . . . . . Admissions Office. . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . 121
Gordon, Nancy . . . . . . . . Union, 109. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 151
Taylor, Michael . . . . . . . . . 2nd flr., Dunham . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 112
Greco, Brittanie . . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Truscott, Norman . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . 164
Hankinson, Julie . . . . . . . . Lufkin Library . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . 123
Tuff, Donald . . . . . . . . . . . Dunham, 21. . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Hatziyannis,Vivian . . . . . . Union, 402. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Woychik, Greg . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Office . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . 169
Heckel, Sally . . . . . . . . . . . Union, 109. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Zarbo, Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . 2nd flr., Dunham . . . . . . . . . [email protected]it.edu . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Hobson, Joanne . . . . . . . . 2nd flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . 116
Adjunct Faculty
Hosseinpour, Mozhgan . . Union, 310. . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . 147
Mesires, Nicholas
Jackowski, Peter . . . . . . . . Engines Machine Shop . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . 141
Salvador, Emilio
Jennings, Richard. . . . . . . . Dunham, 21. . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . 135
Schaffner, Christopher
Jones, Nanette . . . . . . . . . Registrar’s Office. . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Shibley, Richard
Kane, Robert . . . . . . . . . . 4th flr., Kendall . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Valentini, Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] 6039431202
Wang, Samuel
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
77
INDEX
A Message from the President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Campus Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Academic Advisors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Career and Placement Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-74
Academic Calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Certificate Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56-63
Faculty and Staff Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Academic Challenges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Change of Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Policy. . . . 2, 7, 19
Academic Honesty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Changes to this Catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 7
Federal Direct Loans to Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Academic Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-25
College Work Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Federal Direct PLUS Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Academic Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Computer Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38-39
Federal Direct Stafford Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Academic Support Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Computer Technology Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40-43
Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans . . . . . . . . 14
Accommodation Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Computer Use Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 47
Course Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Accreditation Board for
Engineering and Technology (ABET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Dean’s List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-14
Dean of Students and the Student Services Team . . . 15
Financial Aid Policy for International Students . . . . . . . 12
Address Change. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Department of Academic Development . . . . . . . . 64-65
Financial Documentation for International Applicants. . 11
Administrative Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Disciplinary Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Form I-20 for International Applicants . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Admissions Procedure and Criteria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Discipline Resolution Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Formal Grievance and Hearing Procedure. . . . . . . . . . 19
Admission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Distribution of Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Franklin Grant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Appeal Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Electronics Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47-48
Governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Application Deadlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Electrical Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44-46
Grade and Attendance Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Application Fee (Non-refundable Fee) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Engineering Technology Olympics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Grade Point Average (GPA) – Calculating . . . . . . . . . 22
Application Procedure for International Applicants. . . 11
Grading System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Application Procedure – Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
English Language Proficiency for
International Applicants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Architectural Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-33
Entrance Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Associate Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-55
Equal Opportunity Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 7
Grants and Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-14
Attendance Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
E-Yearbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Grievance Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Automotive Technology (Associate Degree) . . . . . 34-37
Health Insurance Plan (Non-refundable Fee). . . . . . . . 12
Automotive Technology (Bachelor of Science) . . . 26-29
Bachelor of Science Degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-29
Heating,Ventilation, Air Conditioning,
and Refrigeration (HVAC&R) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56-57
BFIT Drug and Alcohol Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Humanities and Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66-68
Books, Supplies, and Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
78
Graduation Honors and Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
INDEX
Incomplete Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Professional Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Informal Grievance Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
The Dean’s Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) . . 16
Readmission of Former Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
The Donald C. MacTavish Memorial Award. . . . . . . . . 25
Intercollegiate Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
The I.E.E.E. Powell H. Humphries Memorial Award. . . 25
International Applicant Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-12
Requirements for Admission for
International Applicants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Intramural Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Satisfactory Academic Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23
The John J. Holmes Memorial Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
January Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Security Services and Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
The Louis J. Dunham, Jr. Memorial Award. . . . . . . . . . . 25
Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
September Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
The Ralph G. Adams Memorial Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Sexual Harassment Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
The Robert E. Lee Award. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Legal Basis – Sexual Harassment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers). . . . . . . . . . 16
Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Special Admission Requirements for the
Bachelor of Science Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Tips for Talking with your Faculty when
Seeking Accommodations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Marine Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58-60
The Irving Fisher Memorial Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Transcripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 11, 13, 22, 24
Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Transfer of Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
State Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Transfer Students and Advanced Standing Credit . . . . 10
Student Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Tuition Costs and Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14
Student Code of Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Tuition Deposit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Student Government. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Tutoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
New England Association of Schools and Colleges
(NEASC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Student Service Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Unsubsidized Direct Loan for Independent Students . 14
Student Services and Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-16
Veterans Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Office of Student Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Student Rights and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-21
Withdrawals and Refunds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Officers of Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Students with Learning Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Women’s Forum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Overview of Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Students with Medical Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Part-Time Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Summer Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Mathematics and Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-71
Mechanical Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49-51
Medical Electronics Engineering Technology
(Biomedical) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52-55
Payment of Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Pell Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Personal Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Petition to Graduate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Pharmacy Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60-62
Phi Theta Kappa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Policies and Disclaimers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Practical Electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62-63
Private Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2005 / 2006 COURSE CATALOG
79
NOTES
80
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

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