Fall 2009 - Haystack Mountain School of Crafts

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Fall 2009 - Haystack Mountain School of Crafts
FA L L 2 0 0 9
H AY S TA C K G AT E WAY
FROM THE DIRECTOR
eadlines can be our friends.
How else would we get our
tax-returns and grant proposals
completed? How else would we get
pedestals painted and artwork framed if it
weren’t for an exhibition opening? A
deadline has a way of sharpening our
instincts and helping us to focus on the
work at hand. That’s the way I’ve always
felt about helping to make Haystack’s
entry for the Deer Isle Fourth of July
Parade. A beautiful float, completed a day
late, would travel down an empty road.
The Island parade is a wonderful
manifestation of small town life in
America. It features, among other things,
handmade floats, costumed walkers, fire
engines, antique cars, horseback riders,
and a rock band or two on flat bed trailers—over fifty entries. The parade makes
its way through the center of town, and
then turns around at the old elementary
school and heads back again—I think
because it’s worth appreciating twice.
The streets are lined with year-round
Islanders, summer residents, and tourists,
an estimated audience of a few thousand
altogether. Usually the parade has a theme
about the Island, or history, or cultural
heritage. Having a theme makes a framework within which to work; I think of it
as the deadline’s partner. This year, however, the parade committee chose the nontheme of ‘anything goes’, which left us
scratching our heads for a while.
While we didn’t have the theme, we
still had the deadline, and had to get to
work. I remembered that our summer
assistants, Stephen Kent and Lindsay Miś,
both had unusual talents—Stephen played
the bagpipes and Lindsay could create
hats and animals from balloons. If
D
Haystack’s entry in the annual Deer Isle Fourth of July Parade.
anything goes, certainly bagpipes and
balloons would be a start. The weather
provided some inspiration too; June was
the rainiest month on record in the
Northeast—rain and more rain with fog
or clouds in between. With this in mind,
we began to create a rain dance marching
band, where we would wear balloon hats
and ponchos made of green garbage bags,
carry multi-colored umbrellas, and hold
signs with the icons of the forecast—all
rain and lightning. Ellen Wieske, our
assistant director, created a rain cloud
(filled with a hundred helium balloons)
that floated over our heads, and Gene
Koch, our facilities manager, made drums
out of 5 gallon buckets, tin cans, and
small raised copper vessels. We were set to
march—an entourage of about twentyfive Haystack staff, family members, and
students—including ones from Canada,
England, Denmark, and Japan experiencing their first American Fourth.
The morning of the parade was foggy,
with a feeling of imminent rain, the legacy
of the wet June continuing. We quickly
improvised our routine—the bagpipes
alternating between two songs—“Rain,
Rain Go Away” and “You Are My
Sunshine”—the bucket drums making
syncopated rhythms. We were joyous
marchers, chanting for the rain to go
away, dancing and juggling our way along
the mile-long route. By the end of the
parade it appeared that our anti-rain
dance had worked. In what seemed like
the first time in weeks, the sky cleared and
the sun appeared. Elsewhere along the
Eastern seaboard and among meteorologists there may have been other explanations, but for many in the parade crowd,
our dancing was credited for the miracle.
All that it took was an odd assortment of
regular materials, some helium, a little
ingenuity, and a beat that you can dance
to. For a brief moment the world was
transformed, as were we.
Stuart Kestenbaum
Fall Programs at Haystack
HAYSTACK HOSTS
TWO SYMPOSIA
aystack hosted two invitational
symposia in September. The goal
of these symposia is to address
issues related to the hand and craft making within a broader context of other disciplines. Held for a fourth year, Creating
in Maine: Makers, Manufacturers, and
Materials, the school’s two-day retreat
that was developed to bring together sixty
manufacturers, designers, and artists from
around the state, took place September
21–22. Participants contribute to an ongoing discussion of ideas and practices relating to making; the creative economy; new
business initiatives throughout the state;
and ways to support these efforts. These
topics are explored through various activities including lectures, discussions, presentations by participants, and studiobased design exercises held in Haystack’s
studios. O Brave New World: Looking at
Time, Making, and Creativity took place
September 24–27. Through a combination
of lectures, studio-based design activities,
and informal discussions, a number of
ideas and questions were addressed,
including: Technology is increasingly
making connections that seem instantaneous. What does this do to the ‘slow
time’ of making? How does art-making/
creating help us to pay attention? How do
we measure creative time and how do we
experience it? How are we making use of
and adapting new technologies?
Former Maine Governor Angus King
was the keynote speaker for Creating in
Maine. His talk focused primarily on the
topics of creativity and innovation—
particularly in regard to the practice of
combining and using materials and information, that are already established and
available, to create something altogether
new, and often, pioneering (i.e. ideas,
approaches, products, etc.).
Additional presenters included Fritz
tools and objects. These explorations of collective creativity have proven to be both
sophisticated and playfully entertaining,
and have successfully helped to form new
and reinforce existing relationships amongst
a cross section of Maine’s most talented
artist, designers, material specialist and
manufacturers.”
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Former Maine Governor Angus King gave the
keynote address for Creating in Maine.
Photo by Ginger Aldrich.
Grobe and Stephen Voltz of Eepybird,
which explores creativity, and in particular, the ways in which everyday objects can
do extraordinary things; Deb Soule,
founder and owner of Avena Botanicals;
and Doug Green of Green Design
Furniture. Studio based design activities
were led by Jamie Johnston, faculty member in the woodworking and furniture
design program at Maine College of Art
and designer Scott Nash.
Patric Santerre, designer for Arcadia
designworks of Portland, Maine, has
attended Creating in Maine since it was
first offered and has been integral to the
program’s development each year.
Reflecting on his experiences with the symposium, he recently shared the following:
“(The Greek verb sympotein means "to
drink together")
“Having participated in the Creating in
Maine Symposium since it’s inception, I’ve
been fortunate to experience a variety of
creative expressions from the making of a
shoe out of twigs and moss, to a symphonette of water dripping and gurgling
from and into vessels, as well as delighting
in a cacophony show of animated metal
O Brave New World was developed in a
similar vein to the school’s past symposia—
Digital Dialogues: Technology and the Hand
(2002), in collaboration with the MIT
Media Lab; Craft and Design: Hand, Mind,
and the Creative Process (2004), in collaboration with the Cooper Hewitt National
Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution;
and Craft and Community: Sustaining Place
(2006).
The forty-seven participants for
O Brave New World represented a wide
range of fields including craft making,
design, literature, music, science, and slow
food. Presenters for the program included
Wesley McNair, author of seven books of
poetry, published books of essays, and
three anthologies of Maine writing;
Melissa Franklin, the Mallinkrodt
Professor of Physics and Director of
Graduate Studies, Harvard University;
Dennie Palmer Wolf, former Senior
Scholar at the Annenberg Institute at
Brown University; D.Y. Begay, from the
Navajo Nation, a weaver and a textile consultant; Edward Behr, publisher of the
magazine The Art of Eating; Christina
Bertoni, who teaches at The Rhode Island
School of Design; and Robert Krulwich,
correspondent for NPR’s Science Desk
and co-host of WNYC’s Radio Lab.
Studio activities and leaders for this
symposium included: Blacksmithing, led
by David Secrest, artist, designer, and
blacksmith; Ceramics, led by James
Makins, a potter and Professor in the
Crafts Department, University of the Arts,
Philadelphia; Site Specific led by Diane
Willow, a multi-modal artist and Assistant Professor in the Time and
Interactivity Area at the University of Minnesota; and Textiles led by Piper
Shepherd, studio artist and Professor in the Fiber Department at Maryland
Institute College of Art.
Haystack will be publishing a monograph with essays from symposium
presenters.
Robert Krulwich was the final speaker for the program, summing up the
week’s presentations and activities—below is an excerpt from his talk.
…I also got the sense…that the folks who gathered here had a real feel for
time passing, whether it was the colors of a desert sunset reflected in a gorgeous
weaving by D.Y…or the wonderful amble of that chair, that mechanical chair
invented by Arthur Ganson that waddled like a slightly drunk gentleman to the
very edge of some precipice…You could almost hear the music in that chair…or
time as measured in the shuffle of a snail in a bottle cap captured by Diane
Willow’s weird microphone or the groans of a tree trunk catching the wind up
above in its upper branches that somebody told me they heard with that mike…
The point is people seemed to already know that time has beats and moves
and colors and noises and time DESERVES attention…
Haystack’s symposia are supported by an anonymous foundation.
During O Brave New World, many hands contributed to the
textiles project (led by Piper Shepard), which included hand
cutting an intricate lace design into a long piece of gessoed
muslin. Photo by Ginger Aldrich.
Center for Community Programs
he gallery at Haystack’s Center for Community Programs has been the site
of four exhibitions since spring. The exhibition season began with
Haystack’s annual Student Mentor Program Exhibition in April, followed by
two summer exhibitions—Arthur Ganson/Bobby Hansson and Haystack Creative
Process: RISD Connection—and closed with our fall exhibition, Katie Greene/Katy
Helman, which featured the work of two local artists, who also teach art in local
high schools. Visit www.haystack-mtn.org/Exhibitions.php to read more about
Haystack’s 2009 exhibitions, the individual artists’ narratives included in each
show, and to see a short video clip of Bobby Hansson and friends playing handmade instruments at the opening reception for Arthur Ganson/Bobby Hansson.
T
Katie Greene (left) and Katy Helman at the opening
reception for their exhibition, which ran from
September 27–October 23. Photo by Susan Webster.
“
A remarkable resource, Haystack has broadened my skill base and introduced me to new ideas and mediums which have expanded my
options both as an artist and a teacher. Whether I am participating in workshops, going to “walk-throughs” or furtively creeping around
the studios taking photos during Sunday brunch, I marvel that here on this small island I have such easy accessibility to other artists and
their visions.
~ excerpt from Katy Helman’s Artist Statement,
included in Katie Greene/Katy Helman
”
“
At the core of this [my] philosophy is the human aspect of design, our relationship to the environment and the sensitivity that
accompanies the production and perception of physical objects. These qualities are integral to the Haystack experience. The
opportunity to teach at Haystack offers an ideal space to try fresh methods of exploring concepts with a diverse group of thinkers.
~ excerpt from Peter Walker’s Artist Statement,
included in Haystack Creative Process: RISD Connection
”
H AY S TA C K
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2009 3
Studio Based Learning
rom September 14–16, Haystack
Mountain School of Crafts held its
annual Studio Based Learning program, a three-day intensive studio session
for seventy high school students from
Deer Isle-Stonington High School and
George Stevens Academy, Blue Hill, who
were also joined this year by six students
from The Heritage School, an arts-based
public high school in New York City.
Students worked from 9 a.m.–10 p.m.
in the workshops. At the close of the session, family, friends, and the public were
invited to view work created in the
workshops. Meaghan Gayle Robinson,
a Senior at Deer Isle-Stonington High
School, has participated in Studio Based
Learning for the past three years.
F
Recently she told us that, “Studio Based
Learning had been a great experience for
me. Working with Haystack I have learned
that the spectrum of Art is endless. It is a
great release from our daily lives and has
taught me that the creative side of life is
essential. I love Haystack!”.
This year’s workshops were led by
Eddie Dominguez (clay), Rebecca
Goodale (book arts), Tucker Houlihan
(lighting/mixed media), Mark Maiorana
(blacksmithing), Susan Webster (printmaking), and Ellen Wieske (metals).
Haystack’s Studio Based Learning
was supported this year by Parker Poe
Charitable Trust and by Haystack’s
Program Endowment Fund.
Caroline Altman, a Senior at George Stevens
Academy, made a lamp in the lighting/mixedmedia workshop, taught by Tucker Houlihan.
Photo by Lindsay Miś.
Fall Community-Based Artist Residency brings
Environmental Artist to Deer Isle
aystack Mountain School of
Crafts hosted a communitybased artist residency with environmental artist, Bryant Holsenbeck, from
November 2–6. Students and community
members worked with her on two projects—a mandala and “flowers” and “butterflies”—using a variety of used items,
such as plastic bottles, caps, lids, rope,
paint, etc., collected locally. Bryant
Holsenbeck uses these kinds of materials
to make temporary installations documenting the “stuff ” of our society with
items that are used once and thrown away,
to bring awareness to waste and to transform the objects. Caps and lids are re-used
in each new installation. In all cases,
Holsenbeck’s works are made with assistance from the local community in which
she is working.
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Deer Isle-Stonington High
School students and community members created a mandala
ten feet in diameter in the
middle of the gallery floor of
Haystack’s Center for
Community Programs.
Elementary school students
made butterflies and flowers
from plastic bottles, which were
attached both inside and
outside the building.
Haystack’s CommunityBryant Holsenbeck (right) and Sophie Kumiega, a junior
Based Artist Residencies are
at Deer Isle-Stonington High School, add items to the
supported by the Maine Arts
mandala at Haystack’s Center for Community Programs.
Commission’s SMART (Schools Sophie has also worked in the kitchen at Haystack for the
past two summers and has participated in the school’s
Make Arts Relevant Today)
Studio Based Learning and Student Mentor Program.
grant program, the Hancock
Foundation, and Haystack’s Program
County Fund of the Maine Community
Endowment Fund.
Foundation, the Quimby Family
A Beckoning, relief printing, letterpress, acrylic, 11" x 92" opened,
by Pati Scobey, who will be co-teaching a book arts/printmaking
workshop during the first session, May 30–June 11.
Razzle Dazzle Boat, fused and wheel carved glass; slab technique,
5 1/2" x 19 1/4" x 5 3/4", by Richard Marquis, who will be teaching a glass workshop during the second session, June 13–25.
Planning for the Future—Giving Options at Haystack
“Haystack has been extremely important to my development as a potter. Since my first workshop in 1963—to the present, it has provided
instruction and inspiration. It also has been a place of connection to the varied disciplines and artists of the Craft World. I cannot imagine
a world where Haystack does not exist.
The reason I have made a bequest to Haystack is so it can continue the amazing work it does, as I believe art makes the world a better
place. I want others to have the inspiration that Haystack instills.”
~ Laurie Adams, Haystack Circle Member
aurie Adams has been a longtime friend of Haystack—as a student of our workshops and generous donor to our auctions,
annual fund, and scholarship programs. Laurie has also made planned gifts to Haystack, from which both she and the school
benefit. Leaving a bequest to Haystack is a simple way for donors to make a future gift without affecting their current cash
flow. Because the future of Haystack depends on our supporters and since no two supporters are alike, several planned giving options
are available through the school. Explore the following options, which can include significant tax benefits, with your legal and
financial advisors.
L
BEQUESTS Include Haystack in your estate plans, making a lasting contribution. An estate planned gift to Haystack can
take a number of forms, including a specific dollar amount or a portion of your estate after obligations to others are
fulfilled.
CHARITABLE GIFT ANNUITIES Gifts of $25,000 or larger will result in a life income to the beneficiary. Haystack has a
program with Bar Harbor Trust Services through which a sample illustration of tax benefits can be provided, upon request.
CHARITABLE REMAINDER TRUSTS AND CHARITABLE LEAD TRUSTS An arrangement where dollars or other
assets are donated to Haystack. Donors receive an income stream from the property. When the annuitant(s) pass away the
remainder goes to Haystack.
LIFE INSURANCE & RETIREMENT PLANS Donors may deduct insurance premiums by assigning a life insurance
policy to Haystack as owner and beneficiary.
Every gift is significant and helps to ensure the longevity of Haystack, preserving the school’s leadership role in the international
craft world. Your gifts will benefit generations to come with Haystack’s innovative programming, exceptional faculty and staff, and
award-winning architecture and facilities that, together, create memorable and life-changing experiences.
For more information about planned gifts, please contact Development Director, Ginger Aldrich at (207) 348-2306 or
[email protected]
H AY S TA C K
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2009 5
2010 Summer Workshops
H
aystack’s 2010 summer season is shaping up! We are pleased to announced the faculty, workshops, and summer conference
for next year—the first session begins on May 30, with the final summer workshops ending on September 4. A preview of
Haystack’s 2010 schedule is also posted on our website and available for download at www.haystackmtn.org/Summer
WorkshopsPreview.php. In January, we will post complete course descriptions on our website, www.haystack-mtn.org, and catalogs
will be mailed to our alumni and friends. If you, or someone you know, would like to receive a catalog or be added to our eNewsletter
list for notifications, please contact us at [email protected] or (207) 348-2306.
SESSION 4
July 18–30
SESSION 1 (two weeks)
May 30–June 11
BASKETS:
BLACKSMITHING:
BOOK ARTS/PRINTMAKING:
CLAY:
FIBER:
METALS:
WRITING:
Dail Behennah
Alice James
Pati Scobey &
Barb Tetenbaum
Josh DeWeese
Mark Newport
Kiff Slemmons
Barbara Hurd
CLAY:
FIBER:
GLASS:
METALS:
PAPER:
WO OD:
VISITING MUSICIAN:
Julia Galloway
Gerhardt Knodel
Benjamin Edols
Rob Jackson
Beatrice Coron
John Dunnigan
Dr. Michael White
SESSION 5 (two weeks)
August 1–13
SESSION 2 (two weeks)
June 13–June 25
CLAY:
DRAWING:
FIBER:
GLASS:
METALS:
MIXED MEDIA:
(two weeks)
Gail Kendall
Larry Thomas
Rowland Ricketts
Richard Marquis
Boris Bally
Arthur Ganson
CLAY:
FIBER:
GLASS:
METALS:
PAPER:
WO OD/MIXED MEDIA:
VISITING WRITER:
Christa Assad
Rebecca Ringquist
Sonja Blomdahl
Ellen Wieske
Amanda Degener
David Fobes
Bill Harris
SESSION 6 (two weeks)
August 15–27
SESSION 3 (two weeks)
June 27–July 9
BEGINNING GLASS:
CLAY:
Helen Lee
Steven Heinemann
& T om Spleth
EN AMELING:
Linda Darty
PRINTMAKING:
Susan Webster
QUILTS:
Jan Myers-Newbury
SCULPTURE/ MIXED MEDIA: Matt Hincman
VISITING SCIENTIST/ FAB LAB:
Neil Gershenfeld
SUMMER CONFERENCE:
July 11–15
The H and
Jeanne Jaffe
Tom Joyce
Michael Moore
Jeanne Quinn
Roberta Smith
Polly Ullrich
Anne Wilson
Frank Wilson
6 H AY S TA C K G AT E WAY FA L L 2 0 0 9
CL AY/MIXED MEDIA:
FIBER:
GL ASS:
ENCA USTIC PAINTING:
BEADMAKING:
WO OD:
Kristen Morgin
Jerry Bleem
Angus Powers
Cynthia Winika
Caitlin H yde
Matthias Pliessnig
SESSION 7 (one week)
August 29–September 4
BASKETS:
BLACKSMITHING:
B O OK ARTS:
CLAY:
METALS:
WO OD:
WRITING:
Workshop schedule subject to change.
Jackie Abrams
Stephen Yusko
Sas Colby
Cristina Cordova
Donna Penoyer
Chris Pye
Naomi Shihab Nye
Haystack People, News & Notes
HAYSTACK TRUSTEES have elected
four new members to their board.
MATT HUTTON, an Assistant Professor
in woodworking and furniture design at
Maine College of Art; CHRISTY
MATSON, an artist working primarily
with traditional textile practices as a
means to explore new technology and
Assistant Professor in the Fiber and
Materials Studies Department at the
School of the Art Institute of Chicago,
where she teaches all levels of hand
weaving; ALLEGHANY MEADOWS, a
studio potter in Carbondale, Colorado,
founder of Artstream, a nomadic gallery,
and co-founder of the Harvey/Meadows
Gallery, Aspen, Colorado; and KRISTIN
MITSU SHIGA, who splits her work
between art-making and administration,
having been a Gallery Director at Museum
of Contemporary Craft, Portland, Oregon,
and proprietor of her own jewelry
business.
STEPHEN S. ALPERT, MACY LASKY,
and CLAIRE SANFORD were re-elected
to their second three-year terms. E. JOHN
BULLARD, ECK FOLLEN, and JEANNE
JAFFE were re-elected to their third threeyear terms. LISSA HUNTER was elected
President. RICH HOWE, recently retired
from the board, was elected as a
Life Trustee.
A fond farewell to outgoing trustees
SONYA CLARK, Haystack president for
the 2009 year and trustee since 2000;
ANNE CURRIER, trustee since 2003;
HARRY ELSON, trustee since 2005; and
PAUL SPROLL, trustee since 2006.
HAYSTACK STAFF
Haystack Development Director,
GINGER ALDRICH, participated in a
week-long Digital Photography Workshop
at Maine Media Workshops in Rockport,
March 2009.
CAROLE ANN FER, Haystack
Administrative Assistant and studio potter,
had work included in the Baltimore
Clayworks invitational, “Spoon It! Fork It!
Cut It Up!,” curated by Gail Brown, Spring
2009 and attended a Utilitarian Clay symposium at Arrowmont School of Arts and
Crafts, September, 2008.
Haystack Director, STUART KESTENBAUM, was the commencement speaker
for the May 2009 graduation ceremony at
Maine College of Art in Portland. This fall
Stuart and SUSAN WEBSTER, Haystack’s
Community Programs Coordinator, had
two exhibitions of their work
combining images and text, at the
University of Maine Farmington
and the George Marshal Store
Gallery in York, Maine.
GENE KOCH, Haystack Facilities
Manager, had a solo show, “Lines
of Sight,” at Isalos Fine Art,
Stonington, Maine, August 2009.
Heron Andirons, forged and fabricated steel,
26" x 26" x 22", by Alice James, who will be teaching
a blacksmithing workshop during the first session,
May 30–June 11.
Haystack Assistant Director,
ELLEN WIESKE’s work will be
Amber/Blue Green, blown glass; incalmo technique, 6 1/2" x 12 3/4" x 12 3/4", by Sonja
Blomdahl, who will be teaching a glass workshop during the fifth session, August 1–13.
included in the show, “From Minimal to
Bling: Contemporary Art Jewelry,” at the
Society of Arts and Crafts, Massachusetts,
from November 2009 –January 2010 and
she will be teaching workshops this winter
in San Diego, California and at Oregon
College of Art and Craft in Portland.
2009 VOLUNTEERS
With appreciation to Island residents
SUZANNE CARMICHAEL for her work
on our press book and media lists and to
MARY HOWE and HUB WHITE for
supervising exhibitions in the gallery at
Haystack’s Center for Community
Programs.
NEWS BRIEFS
An exhibition featuring Haystack
Mountain School of Crafts was on
display throughout the month of
September at the Center for Maine Craft.
For more information about the show,
visit www.haystack-mtn.org/
Exhibitions.php#September2009.
Haystack partnered with The Furniture
Society to award a fellowship for a wood
student, through Powermatic. The
recipient, Trevor Hadden of Petaluma,
California attended Wendy Maruyama’s
Session 4 workshop.
H AY S TA C K
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2009
7
Campaign for Haystack: Innovation and Community
$1.42 million raised to date
he Campaign for Haystack:
Innovation and Community is
nearing its $1.5 million goal, with
$1.42 million raised so far. The campaign
will provide support for renovations to
the school’s Center for Community
Programs and add to endowment funds
for our community and innovative programs. These programs, from intensive
workshops for Maine high school students
to retreats and symposia for leaders in the
crafts and related fields, have distinguished Haystack as a leader in craft education, but are not self-supporting. The
new endowments will help create a stable
financial base for these initiatives.
T
A 2 to 1 matching grant of $65,000 from
the Maine Community Foundation’s
Belvedere Traditional Handcrafts Fund has
been a great catalyst for raising funds to
create an endowment for the Student
Mentor Program, which provides opportunities for local high school students to work
with artists in their studios in the winter.
This summer, two donors created named
funds to help match this grant. Annie and
Chuck Holland, whose grandchildren have
participated in the mentor program and
other programs for teens, endowed a fund
with a gift of $45,000. Elizabeth Rowland,
who first came to Haystack in the 1960s,
and has since returned for the last two
summers, established the Rowland Family
Fund with a gift of $25,000.
The renovations to the Center are nearly complete—this summer a new roof and
dormer were added. The new exhibition/
workshop space makes it possible for
Haystack to offer a range of programming—including exhibitions, short workshops, and community-based residencies.
We are grateful to our donors, whose
generosity will ensure Haystack’s leadership role in craft education. A list of
recent contributors to the campaign is on
page 11. To learn more about the campaign or if you would like to make a gift,
visit our website www.haystack-mtn.org.
2009 Open Door
During Haystack’s 2009 Open Door session, the school’s 27th, Cecil Benson (left)
from Kennebunkport and Noah Bly from Tenants Harbor, worked collaboratively,
making tongs, in the blacksmithing workshop, led by Doug Wilson of Little
Deer Isle.
Ninety students participated in this intensive program for Maine residents that
provides beginning and professional artists the opportunity to retreat and devote
extended time to one’s work, to investigate new media, and to connect with the
larger Maine craft community. Open Door is supported by a grant from the
United Maine Craftsman.
8 H AY S TA C K
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Rosie IV, London Plane, 28", by Chris Pye,
who will be teaching a wood workshop
during the seventh session, August 29–
September 4.
2009 Summer Auction Raises Over $32,000
for Scholarships and Community Programs
n July 17, Haystack held its Summer Auction, which featured the work of faculty and staff. An Underwriter Reception and
Dinner, held on the deck and in the dining room overlooking Jericho Bay, kicked off the festivities. The Underwriter event
was catered by Moveable Feasts of Blue Hill, followed with tea cakes created by Joan Schlosstein of Deer Isle. For the public
auction in Gateway Auditorium, Haystack’s head cook, Tom Smith, and the kitchen staff, provided beverages and desserts.
The Summer Auction was attended by local community members, friends and supporters, collectors, and summer visitors, who all
contributed to an enjoyable evening and successful fundraiser in support of Haystack’s scholarship and community programs! It is a
dedicated group of people who make it all happen and we appreciate all of their hard work. Thank you to: the artists and donors, who
generously contributed terrific work for the auction; our many long-time, as well as new, underwriters and supporters of the underwriter reception and dinner; our in-kind donors for their contributions of goods and services; the local businesses with whom we
worked and the tireless group of Haystack volunteers, staff, and board members who made it all happen.
O
ARTISTS AND
DONORS
Jackie Abrams
Sean Albert
Michael Alpert
Boris Bally
Suzanne Barnes
Jeffrey Becton (donated
Anonymously)
Mark Bell
Paulus Berensohn
Dan Bouthot
Claudia Brahms
Andy Buck
Nancy Callan
Carolee Campbell
Joel Carreiro
David K. Chatt
Paul Cunningham
(donated by Jack
Hemenway)
Amanda Degener
Lynn Duryea
Robert Ebendorf
Sanam Emami
Carole Ann Fer
Arline Fisch
Julia Galloway
John Garrett
Jenna Goldberg
Katherine Gray
Bobby Hansson
David Hering
Helena Hernmarck
Eric Hopkins (donated by
Bunzy Sherman)
Lissa Ann Hunter
Matt Hutton
Jeanne Jaffe
Stephen Kent
Stuart Kestenbaum
Gene Koch
Tracy Krumm
Jane Lackey
Jack Lenor Larsen
Christy Matson
Wesley McNair
Alleghany Meadows
Ingrid Menken
Hiro Morimoto (donated
by Alfred and Nancy
Merritt II)
Noel Mount
Nancy Nicholson
Richard Notkin
Lisa Orr
Jan Owen
Ron Pearson (donated by
Jane Hall)
Barbara Putnam
Emily Richardson
Claire Sanford
Michael Schunke
Mark Sfirri
Kristin Mitsu Shiga
Gay Smith
Ron Smith
Christopher Staley
Michael Stasiuk
Jack Troy
William van Gilder
Susan Webster
Trent Whitington
Ellen Wieske
Douglas E. Wilson
James Walsh
Fred Woell (donated by
Patti King)
Stephen Yusko
GIFT DONORS
Anonymous
Artist & Craftsman
Supply Company
Blue Hill Wine Shop
El El Frijoles
Lily’s Café & Wine Bar
Nervous Nellie’s Jams &
Jellies
Les fenêtres (edition of 3), cut paper, 39” x 10”, by Béatrice Coron, who will be teaching a paper workshop during the fourth session, July 18–30.
Old Quarry Adventures,
Inc.
Roger Olsen
The Vinery
The Whale’s Rib
UNDERWRITERS
Laurie Adams
Stephen and Stephanie
Alpert
Stephen and Betty Jane
Andrus
Bar Harbor Banking &
Trust Co.
Cynthia and Al Boyer
Susan Haas Bralove and
Steven Bralove
E. John Bullard
Judith Burton
John Buzbee
Bev Cairns
Katherine Cheney and
Tom Chappell
Solveig and Wendell Cox
Cross Insurance—Belfast
Deborah Cummins
Elaine Daniels
Darwin and Jacqueline
Davidson
Molly and Ned Felton
Eck Follen & Charles
Swanson
Bryan Fuermann
Andrew Fuller
Julia Galloway
Jane Weiss Garrett and
Milton Garrett
John Garrett
Ann E. Grasso
Jack Hemenway
Helena Hernmarck and
Niels Diffrient
Mary Hill
Ann and Chuck Holland
Richard and Mary Howe
H AY S TA C K
J. Richard Klein and
Marcia Marcus Klein
Rayanne and Eduard
Kleiner
Sam and Kathleen
Kriegman
Roger and Belle Kuhn
Macy and Robert Lasky
Calvert and Harry Lester
Monie and Bill Lonergan
Ernestine and
George Lyman
Ken and Cherie Mason
Alfred and Nancy
Merritt II
Marlin and Ginger Miller
Roger Moss and Gail
Winkler
John and Lucy Myers
John and Ann Ollman
Charles and
Kathleen Osborn
Andrew and Jane Palmer
G AT E WAY
FALL
2009 9
Charlotte Podolsky
Rosanne and Ed Raab
Duncan Ralph and
Edward Whitehead
Joanne and James Rapp
Chris Rifkin
Mark Robinson and
Susan Moxley
Eleanor Rosenfeld
Robert A. Roth and
Cleo Wilson
Iggy Samuels
Claire Sanford
George Smith and
Amy Curtis
Ruth and
Rick Snyderman
Joan and Paul Sorensen
Frances Merritt
Thompson and
Eric Benke
Arthur and Lillian Weiss
William and
Barbara Whitman
Sue Wilmot
SUPPORTERS
Elaine Daniels
Darwin and
Jacqueline Davidson
Molly and Ned Felton
Monie and Bill Lonergan
Roger Moss and
Gail Winkler
Charles and
Kathleen Osborn
Charlotte Podolsky
Arthur and Lillian Weiss
DONATIONS AND
DISCOUNTS ON
GOODS AND
SERVICES
Berry & Berry Floral
Blue Hill Wine Shop
Claudia Brahms
Mary Cevasco
D.L. Geary Brewing
Company
Jonathan Doolan
Carole Ann Fer,
Dowstudio
Downeast Graphics
El El Frijoles
VOLUNTEERS
Abby Barrows
Claudia Brahms
Richard Buxton
Sonya Clark
Julia Galloway
Ann E. Grasso
Katy Helman
Matthew Hincman
Lissa Ann Hunter
Ben Jackson
Jeanne Jaffe
Julie Morringello
Noel Mount
Farrell Ruppert
Toni Stephan
Susan Webster
EVENT
COORDINATOR
Ginger Aldrich
AUCTIONEER
Stuart Kestenbaum
RINGMAN
Dan Bouthot
AUCTION
ASSISTANTS
Carole Ann Fer
Stephen Kent
Ingrid Menken
Lindsay Miś
Ellen Wieske
Dedicated Volunteers Help Prepare the Campus for Summer Workshops
e are grateful to our pre-session volunteers, who are essential in getting the campus ready for the summer sessions. Fifty-two hard working volunteers braved the changeable Maine weather during two weeks in May, scraping and painting buildings, cleaning debris, building
shelves, gardening, preparing studios and cabins, and more! We invite you to join this capable and enthusiastic group of volunteers next season.
Haystack provides accommodations and meals. For more information, or to be added to the pre-session mailing list, please contact the school.
W
2009 VOLUNTEERS
Suzanne Barnes
Olivia Becker
Chris Becksvoort
Meg Beaudoin
Polly Bishop
Randy Blake
Alan Bradstreet
John Bravo
Bruce Brennen
John Brown
Jessica Chaples
Victor Chiarizia
Fiona Clark &
Vincent DeLisle
Bill Clifford
Alexia Cohen
Ray Cooper
Aaron Demuth
Craig Dietrich
Danielle Doucet
Catherine Ellis
Scott Fraumemi
Nancy Halpern
Matthew Hincman
Leslie King &
Stuart McDonough
Brittany Kleinman
Alison Layton
Stephanie Lee
Lauren McAvoy
Amanda McKeever
Rebecca Macomber
Janet Macy
Brandon Massey
Khiem Nguyen
Joan & George Packard
Stacy Petersen
Daniel Portolido
Jane Proctor
Kris Sadar
Charles Schreiber
Anna Schwarcz &
Wil Mercer
Mary Ann Schwarcz
Leslie Shershow
Karen Spitfire
Lindsay Stockbridge
Jed & Julie Taft
Hannah Taylor
Margaret Weigang
Maureen Wesley
Andrew White
2009 Annual Appeal—Thank You Donors!
hank you to all who contributed in 2009. Your gifts directly benefit the artists who study at Haystack, helping to provide
critical support for essential functions at the school—maintaining our award-winning facilities, offering high quality programs that can be life-changing experiences to participants, awarding current year scholarships to several students annually—
and making it possible for Haystack to keep tuition costs affordable.
Haystack’s 2009 annual appeal raised $207,000 from 868 (117 from first time donors to the annual fund) donors as of October 31,
2009. The lists below include donations received since the last issue of Gateway and anyone inadvertently omitted from the Spring
2009 issue. Please contact us if you find that a correction is in order.
Haystack’s 2010 annual appeal is currently underway. If you have already made a gift to the 2010 annual fund, thank you. To make
a gift now, use the form at the back of this newsletter or make a secure donation on our website, www.haystack-mtn.org.
T
TRUSTEES
Stephen S. Alpert
Jill Greene Ammerman &
Robert Ammerman
E. John Bullard
Eck Follen &
Charles Swanson
Jane Weiss Garrett &
Milton Garrett
Matt & Erin Hutton
Jeanne Jaffe
Macy & Robert Lasky
Eleanor Rosenfeld
Cynthia Schira
10 H A Y S T A C K
FALL
G AT E WAY
2009
ALUMNI, FACULTY &
FRIENDS
Rick & Lainy Abbott
Marcie Amory
Linda Arbuckle &
Lee Shaw
Arcadia Designworks
Mara Baldwin
Debra Barnet
Rosie Bensen
Lisa Blackburn &
John Hartom
Jeff Blakley
Judy Bowen
Ron Boyko
Sebert & Barrett Brewer
Shanon Brunskill
Steven Byrne
Betsey Carter
Jennifer Cole
Ray Cooper
2009 Annual Appeal
Andy Cooperman
Tom & Nancy Crowe
Cheryl Daigle
Paul & Marion Fishman
Emil & Bea Friedman
Barbara &
Howard Fussiner
James Guggina
Merna Guttentag
Barbara Haack
Ralph &
Katherine Harding
Christopher M. Harte &
Katherine S. Pope
Rebecca Harvey &
Steven Thurston
Connie Hayes &
George Terrien
Sophie Henderson
Mary Hill
Linda & John Hillman
Christina Hills
Tucker Houlihan
Molly Hueffed &
Dan Dundon
Amy Husten & Family
Nancy & Allen Jervey
Randy Johnston & Jan
Mckeachie-Johnston
Philip & Sherrie Kaminsky
Margo Kellar
J. Richard Klein &
Marcia Marcus Klein
LEF Foundation
Levi Strauss Foundation
Denise Linet
Eleanor Lux
Barbara MacCallum
Susan MacDougall &
Karta Owens
Janet Maddox
Judy Madson
Kirsten Magnani
Georgiann Mason
Joan & David Maxwell
Kenneth McIver
Wesley McNair
Kate Fowle Meleney
Alfred & Nancy Merritt II
Sequoia Miller
Barbara Minor
Richard &
Susanne Monson
John & Ann Ollman
Allen Gary Palmer
Dylan Palmer
George Perez Jr.
Laura Pike
Al Pine
Tia Pinney &
Kevin Groppe
Plum Creek Foundation
Elizabeth B. R alph
Donors continued
Tony & Ann Marie Ramos
Mark Robinson &
Susan Moxley
Warren Seelig &
Sherrie Gibson
Nancy & Steve Selvin
Lisa Sheinin
Geoffrey Smith
Steven Stichter
Elizabeth & Roger Turrell
H. Andrew Van Styn
Peter Walker
Marjorie Weed
Trent Whitington
Marilyn Whitney
Janislee Wiese
Susan Wilson
Yoka & David Witham
Mutsuo &
Akiko Yanagihara
IN KIND DONORS
Corning Museum of
Glass
N.B. Aldrich
Edward Behr
Stephen Bowers
Chris Breedlove
Brian & Heidi Burgess
Nancy Callan
Carolee Campbell
Sonya Clark &
Darryl Harper
Maureen Ann Connolly
Amanda Degener
Barbara Falkowska
Julius & Jane Fraser
Sue Freienmuth
Jack Hemenway
Sam Hernandez
Helen Hiebert
Susanne Johnsen
Judd & Sue Jones
Stuart Kestenbaum &
Susan Webster
Jane Lackey
Al Levine
Joan Livingstone
Patricia Maier
Walter &
Sharon McConnell
Tim McCreight
Alfred & Nancy Merritt
Jeannette DeNicolis
Meyer &
William Meyer
Barbara Minor
Jeffrey Mongrain
Kathleen Mundell
Rosanne & Edward Raab
Jon Eric Riis
Eleanor Rosenfeld
John Grew Sheridan
Jay M. Siegelaub
Joan & Paul Sorensen
Irvin Tepper
William van Gilder
Julian & Elsa Waller
Scott Wing
Nancy Worden
Monographs and
Librar y
Paul Nowicki &
Barbara Tam
Gerhardt Knodel
Waive , steam bent white oak, 45" x 35" x 31", by
Matthias Pliessnig, who will be teaching a wood
workshop during the sixth session, August 15–27.
GIFTS TO THE
ENDOWMENT FUND
COMMEMORATIVE
GIFTS
jackandharriet
Program Fund
Glenda Arentzen
Jack Hemenway
Kimberly McArthur
in honor of . . .
Candy Haskell
Scholarship Fund
Trent Whitington
Howard
Kestenbaum &
Vijay Paramsothy
International
Fellowship Fund
Jan Baker
Candy & Richard Haskell
Trent Whitington
Stuart J.
Kestenbaum
Director’s Fund
Matthew Hincman &
Elena White
Susan Levin
Francis S. Merritt
Scholarship Fund
Tiby Kolson Burke
Richard Allen
Merritt
Scholarship Fund
Ichiro Kurihara/
Chestnut Field Inc.
RAM/NPO
Nor ito Saimaru
Irving Sherman
Scholarship Fund
Miriam Lazar to honor
Bunzy Sherman
William Wyman
Scholarship Fund
Marilyn Pappas
Duncan Ralph
Elizabeth B. Ralph
Stephen Kent
Anonymous
in memory of . . .
Betty Catto
Falding Bishop Gadola
Almeda Hunter
Mr. & Mrs.
Christopher K elly
Harry & Wanda Piper
Plante & Moran, PLLC
Mr. & Mrs.
Dennis W. Younger
Frances Dintenfass
Elyse Allen
Charles R. Gailis
Janet Maddox
Samuel J.
Rosenfeld
J. Richard Klein &
Marcia Marcus Klein
New Haystack
Circle Member
Lois Ireland
Campaign for
Haystack:
Innovative and
Community
Programs
Finn Alban
Stephen S. Alpert
Stephen &
Betty Jane Andrus
Glenda Arentzen
Jane Benson
E. John Bullard
Marcia Kenney Collins
Posie & Doug Cowan
Robert &
Deborah Cummins
Martha Bruin &
Doug Degen
Richard A. Fuller
John Garrett
Jack Hemenway
Christine Higgins
Matthew Hincman &
Elena White
Peggy Whitney Hobbs
Ann & Chuck Holland
Richard & Mary Howe
Lissa Hunter &
Kirby Pilcher
Sarah Khan &
Henry Drewal
Ruth King
Roger & Belle Kuhn
Robert & Macy Lasky
Susan Levin
Kimberly McArthur
Barbara MacCallum
Alfred &
Nancy Merritt II
Barbara O’Brien
Caro Peterson
Betsy Rowland
Arturo Sandoval
Claire Sanford &
Charles Crowley
Margot Smith &
Kevin Dunne
Robert &
Rose-Marie Smith
Paul Sproll &
Cheryl Williams
Steven Stichter
Y. I. Wada &
H. D. Morphopoulos
Rebecca Watson
Jack Wax &
Miyuki Nishiuchi
Anne Wilson
H AY S TA C K G AT E WAY FA L L 2 0 0 9
11
NON-PROFIT
H AY S TA C K
ORGANIZATION
U.S. POSTAGE
PA I D
LEWISTON, MAINE
HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN
SCHOOL OF CRAFTS
PERMIT NO. 82
P.O. BOX 518
DEER ISLE, ME 04627
www.haystack-mtn.org
Address Service Requested
New Grant Awards
Since last spring, Haystack has received the following grants:
■ American Scandinavian Foundation— $3,000 fellowship
for student from Iceland to attend a summer session
■ Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation—$2,500 in support of the
2009 visiting writer, Akiko Busch
■ LEF Foundation—$6,000 for Operating Support
✁
■ Maine Arts Commission, Cultural Facilities Accessibility—
$13,155 in support of technology and equipment upgrades
in Gateway Auditorium
■ Maine Arts Commission, American Masterpieces—$5,000
to support public lectures and exhibitions in 2009
■ Maine Community Foundation, Hancock County Fund—
$3,500 to support community-based artist residencies and
the 2010 Island Workshop
■ Maine Humanities Council—$500 in support of the 2009
visiting writer, Akiko Busch
■ Parker Poe Charitable Trust—$15,000 in support of 2009
Studio Based Learning
■ Quimby Family Foundation—$15,000 to support Maine
programs in 2010
NAME (Please print your name(s) as you wish it to appear on contributors’ lists.)
E-MAIL
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
HOME PHONE
ALTERNATE PHONE
❑
❑
WORK
ZIP
CELL
I want to make a contribution to the 2010 Haystack Annual Appeal in the amount of:
❑ $3,000 ❑ $2,000 ❑ $1,000 ❑ $500 ❑ $250 ❑ $100 ❑ $50 ❑ $35 ❑ Other $ ____
Please charge my ❑ MasterCard
❑ Visa ❑ Discover or ❑ Enclosed is a check in the amount of $ _____________________
/
NAME ON CARD
Please use my gift for:
❑ Haystack general operating fund
❑ Studio/facility improvements
❑ Current year scholarships
/
CARD NUMBER
SIGNATURE
EXPIRATION DATE
❑ I have included Haystack in my will.
❑ Please contact me about a transfer of securities.
❑ Please contact me about including Haystack in my will, or about other planned
❑ I wish to remain anonymous in Haystack publications.
gifts including gifts of life insurance, gift annuities, or trusts.
Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, P.O. Box 518, Deer Isle, ME 04627, (207) 348-2306, [email protected], www.haystack-mtn.org
Donations may also be made securely on our website.
Writer/Editor: Ginger Aldrich
Design: Mahan Graphics