Table of Contents - Chemistry

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Table of Contents - Chemistry
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY
ANNUAL
REPORT
2013
2013 ANNUAL REPORT
REPORT BY HEAD OF DEPARTMENT
I present to you the 2013 Annual Report of the Department of Chemistry at Curtin University. This Report
highlights the teaching and research achievements of the Department over the 2013 calendar year. The
Department consists of an enthusiastic, extremely talented group of chemists and chemistry-related
scientists. This Report showcases and celebrates their achievements.
In the sections below I expand upon the Department’s achievements, and briefly highlight other aspects of
Chemistry’s performance in 2013.
STAFFING
In 2013 Associate Professor Damien Arrigan was promoted to the rank of Professor and Drs Daniel Southam
and Francky Busetti were promoted to Senior Lecturer. I extend my congratulations to Damien, Daniel and
Francky on these outstanding career advancements.
In addition, a number of staff were recognised for their outstanding professional contributions by receiving
a variety of awards. Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino, together with Professor Shelley Yeo (Faculty
Office) and Associate Professor Mario Zadnik (Physics), received an Australian Award for University Teaching,
under the Programs that Enhance Learning category, for their well-established demonstrator training
program. Dr Debbie Silvester-Dean was a finalist in the 2013 Early Career Scientist of the Year category of
the WA Science Awards. Professor Kliti Grice was the runner-up for Curtin’s John De Later Award for Research
Leadership, part of the Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence and Innovation.
Professor Grice was also elected a Geochemical Fellow by the Geochemical Society and European Association
of Geochemistry. Kliti was honoured for her research in the field of organic and isotope geochemistry,
including molecular fossils, mass extinction events and evolution of life, environmental geochemistry,
petroleum and mineral exploration. She is one of just a few Australian researchers and the first researcher
at Curtin to receive this honorary fellowship.
Several new staff joined the Department during 2013. Dr Thanh Vinh Nguyen joined the Department as a
Curtin Research Fellow. These fellowships are intensely competitive and provide clear evidence of Vinh’s
excellent early-career track record as a researcher. We welcome Vinh and look forward to his contributions
in the synthesis/organic/biomolecular chemistry area. Dr Yang Liu also joined the Department as a Research
Fellow in the electrochemical sensors group lead by Professor Damien Arrigan.
A number of staff also finished up with the Department over 2013. Drs Stuart Bailey and Christopher Taylor
retired from academic service at the end of 2013. Both Stuart and Chris have been long serving members of
the Curtin academic community and we thank them for the many years of committed service. At the
beginning of 2013 Associate Professor Anna Heitz moved from the Department of Chemistry to the
Department of Civil Engineering. Anna is continuing her research into improving drinking water quality and
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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exploring better wastewater treatment technologies. Finally, Dr Suzanne McDonald finished her
employment contract in the Department. We wish Suzie all the best with the next stage of her career.
RESEARCH
The Department of Chemistry’s research performance, and associated reputation, continues to improve. A
particular highlight was the success of Drs Max Massi and Paolo Raiteri who both secured prestigious and
highly competitive Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowships.
Other national competitive grants success was achieved by Professors Damien Arrigan, Kliti Grice and Andrew
Rohl who all lead successful ARC Discovery Project proposals administered at Curtin. Associate Professor
Kate Trinajstic was also successful in securing ARC Discovery Project support with a grant awarded for
administration via Flinders University in South Australia.
Associate Professors Cynthia Joll and Jeff Charrois, together with Dr Kathryn Linge secured ARC Linkage
Project funding as part of their on-going collaboration with the Water Corporation of WA. This particular
funding is targeted at understanding wastewater treatment technologies for alternative water use.
Beyond the Australian National Competitive Grant Schemes, Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino and Dr
Daniel Southam, together with John Curtin Distinguished Professor David Treagust from the Faculty’s Science
and Mathematics Education Centre (SMEC) and Dr Shelia Qureshi from the Weill Cornell Medical College in
Qatar, secured a three-year grant of $888,000 by the prestigious Qatar National Research Fund. This
international collaborative team will examine the efficacy and cultural transferability of student inquiry
learning approaches in foundation chemistry that builds on the innovative and outstanding teaching and
related research in First Year chemistry at Curtin.
Full details of the Department’s overall grant success, industry collaborations, research outputs and awards
are contained within this Report.
TEACHING AND LEARNING
2013 saw the Department roll out our innovative, student-centred First Year chemistry curriculum. The new
tuition pattern, involving 1 x 1-hour lecture, 1 x 2-hour active learning workshop and 1 x 3-hour laboratory
session per week has been implemented across the entire First Year chemistry program. The program itself
consists of a suite of four units, each available in both Semesters 1 and 2, that cater to the needs of more
than 1600 students each year.
The development of Chemistry’s new First Year curriculum has required the dedicated commitment of all
staff across the Department. I remain most grateful for all the hard work that has been, and continues to be,
devoted to this endeavour.
The fruits of the Department’s efforts in the curriculum redesign process are continuing to ripen. The
Department continues to receive consistently high-level feedback from students via the Curtin University
eVALUate program. This feedback tells us that students are responding positively to the changes
implemented.
The Department of Chemistry is committed to employing evidence-based evaluation and assessment
frameworks to monitor the effectiveness of all of our education programs.
Concluding Remarks
The 2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report shows that the Department continues to be a vibrant
centre of academic research and education. The Department can only ever be as good as the people who
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work and study within it, and it remains my privilege to continue to lead such a wonderfully gifted, talented
and dedicated team of students and staff. Our aspiration of being regarded as one of the very best chemistry
departments in Australia remains well on track for realisation.
In closing I thank Ms Marija Predojevic, supported by the rest of the Chemistry administration team, for her
dedicated hard work in preparing this Annual Report. Marija has collated a huge amount of information and
formatted this into an impressive document. I also thank Dr Daniel Southam for his graphic design
contributions to the Report’s preparation.
Professor Mark A. Buntine, FRACI C Chem
Head of Department
October 2014
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Table of Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.
Staff............................................................................................................................................................. 9
1.1
Academic Staff ................................................................................................................................. 10
1.2
Professional Staff ............................................................................................................................. 12
1.3
Communication, Public Relations and Awards ................................................................................ 13
1.4
Membership of School, University, and Related Committees/Roles .............................................. 14
1.5
Curtin-related Community Service .................................................................................................. 15
1.6
Miscellaneous Information .............................................................................................................. 16
Students ....................................................................................................................................................19
2.1
Chemistry Total Teaching Load (EFTSL) ........................................................................................... 20
2.2
Chemistry Service Teaching Load (EFTSL)........................................................................................ 20
2.3
Honours Students – BSc (Honours) Chemistry Major ..................................................................... 21
2.4
Honours Students – BSc (Honours) Nanotechnology ...................................................................... 21
2.5
New HDR Enrolments for 2013........................................................................................................ 21
2.6
Postgraduate Research Students .................................................................................................... 22
2.7
Successful Postgraduate Completions............................................................................................. 26
2.8
HDR Yearly Completions and Enrolments ....................................................................................... 27
2.9
Student Prizes and Awards .............................................................................................................. 27
2.10
Enrolments (EFTSL) .......................................................................................................................... 28
2.11
Teaching Allocations ........................................................................................................................ 33
Visitors ......................................................................................................................................................37
3.1
Seminars by Visitors ........................................................................................................................ 38
3.2
Other Visitors to the Department ................................................................................................... 39
Invited Presentations................................................................................................................................41
4.1
International Invited Presentation .................................................................................................. 42
4.2
Domestic Invited Presentation ........................................................................................................ 43
5.
Scientific and Professional Involvements and External Activities ............................................................47
6.
Research Grants........................................................................................................................................53
7.
6.1
National Competitive Grants ........................................................................................................... 54
6.2
Grants and Awards from Industry and Other Sources .................................................................... 57
6.3
Curtin Research Grants, Institutional Partnerships ......................................................................... 60
Publication List..........................................................................................................................................63
7.1
Prestigious Journal Publications ...................................................................................................... 64
7.2
Journal Publications ......................................................................................................................... 67
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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7.3
8.
Book Chapters ................................................................................................................................. 72
Research Report .......................................................................................................................................75
8.1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 76
8.2
Research Profiles ............................................................................................................................. 77
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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1
STAFF
1.1
Academic Staff
1.2
Professional Staff
1.3
Communication, Public Relations and Awards
1.4
Membership of School, University, and Related Committees/Roles
1.5
Curtin-related Community Service
1.6
Miscellaneous Information
1.1
Academic Staff
Head of Department
 Professor Mark Buntine, B.Sc.(Hons) and M.Sc. (Monash), Ph.D.(Stanford), GCert.Ed.(Higher Ed.)
(Adelaide), FRACI CChem.
Professors






Julian Gale, B.A. (Hons) (Oxon), DPhil (Oxon), MA, CChem, MRSC, FRACI, CChem.
Kliti Grice, B.Sc. (Hons) (Kingston, UK), Ph.D. (Bristol, UK), FRACI, CChem.
Rolf Gubner, Professor of Corrosion Engineering, Ph.D. (University of Portsmouth, UK)
Simon Lewis, B.Sc. (Hons) (Hull), Ph.D. (Plymouth), CChem., FRSC, FRACI, CChem.
Mark Ogden, B.Sc. (Hons) and Ph.D. (W. Aust), FRACI, FRSC
Andrew Rohl, B.Sc. (Hons), DPhil
Associate Professors






Damien Arrigan, BSc (Hons), Ph.D., CChem., MICI, FRSC, MRACI.
Jeffrey Charrois, B.Sc., B.Sc. (ENCS), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Alberta)
Cynthia Joll, B.Sc. (Hons)(WAust), Ph.D.(Murdoch), MRACI, CChem.
Nigel Marks, B.Sc. (Hons), Ph.D.
Mauro Mocerino, B.Sc. (Hons), DipEd, Ph.D., FRACI
Katherine Trinajstic, B.Sc. Biology Murdoch University, Ph.D. Geology University of WA
Senior Lecturers
 Stuart Bailey, B.Sc. (Hons), Ph.D. (WAust)
 Franca Jones, B.Sc. (Hons), Ph.D.
 Massimiliano (Max) Massi, B.Sc.(Hons), Ph.D.(Bologna), MRACI, MRSC
Lecturers
 Alan Payne, B.Sc. (Hons), Ph.D. (W. Aust)
 Daniel Southam, BAppSc (Hons), Ph.D. (Tas), MRACI, CChem.
 Irene Suarez-Martinez, MChem, Ph.D.
Associate Lecturers
 Chris Taylor, B.Sc. (Hons), PGCE (S’ton)
Research Fellows
















Sebastian Allard, Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences (University of Poitiers, France)
Bruno Basic – Ph.D., B.Sc., B.E.d.
Thomas Becker, Ph.D. (Physics)
Lyndon Berwick, Ph.D. (Curtin), B.Sc. (Curtin)
Alison Blyth - Ph.D (Newcastle Upon Tyne), M.Res (UCL), M.Sci (UCL)
Francesco Busetti, Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences, B.Sc. (Hons 1) Industrial Chemistry (University
Ca’ Foscary of Venice, IT)
Damien Carter, Ph.D. (Applied Chemistry), (Curtin)
Raffaella Demichelis, Degree in Chemistry, Ph.D. in Chemical Sciences, Master Degree in
Advanced Chemical Metodologies, Molecular Specialization (Università degli Studi di Torino, I)
Jeffrey Dick, B.Sc., BA, Ph.D.
Yolanta Gruchlik, BSc. (Hon.), PhD. - Projects Coordinator
Caroline Jaraula, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.
Piotr Kowalczyk - Ph.D. (Chiba University), M.Sc.Eng. (Military University of Technology)
Ina Kristiana, Ph.D., B.Sc. (Hons)
Kathryn Linge, Ph.D., B.Sc. (Hons 1), (UWA)
Yang Liu – Ph.D. (Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences), BE
(Changchun University of Technology, China)
Robert Lockhart, B.Sc(Hons), MSc, Ph.D.
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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





Thanh Vinh B.E (UNSW, Hon. 1), Ph.D (ANU)
Paolo Raiteri, M.Sc., Ph.D.
Marc Robinson, B.Sc (Hons), Ph.D.
Michel Sassi, M.Sc., Ph.D.
Debbie Silvester, M.Sc. (Bristol), DPhil (Oxford)
Feiwu Zhang, M.Sc., Ph.D.
ARC Research Fellows





Kliti Grice, Discovery Outstanding Researcher Award (DORA)
Max Massi, Future Fellowship (FT)
Paolo Raiteri, Future Fellowship (FT)
Debbie Silvester, Discover Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA)
Katherine Trinajstic, (QEII Fellowship)
Curtin Research Fellows




Damien Arrigan
Raffaella Demichelis
Piotr Kowalczyk
Thanh Vinh Nguyen
Emeritus Professors




Robert Alexander
Jeffrey Dunn
Robert Kagi
Bill van Bronswijk
Adjunct Title Holders








Roland De Marco
Steve Errington
Leslie Glasser
Paul Greenwood
Roger Lewis
Lorenz Schwark
Morry Silberstein
Urs Von Gunten
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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1.2
Professional Staff
Laboratory Manager
 Kristy Blyth, B.Sc. Ph.D (Curtin)
Laboratory Technical Officer
 Peter Chapman, B.Sc. (App Chem)
 Geoffrey Chidlow, BAppSc (WAIT)
Senior Laboratory Technicians




Stephen Clayton
Robert Herman, B.Sc. (Curtin)
Edi Twiss, B.Sc. (Hons)
Joyce Wong
Laboratory Technicians
 Ching Yong Goh, B.Sc. (Hons), Ph.D. (Curtin), MRACI
 Tomoko Radomirovic
Stores Officer
 Grant Cope
Senior Research Officer
 Deborah Liew, M.Eng (University of QLD)
 Suzanne McDonald, Ph.D.
 Ying Han (Jace) Tan, B.Sc., M.Sc.,
Research Assistants
 Andrew (Wei Ming) Chan, B.Sc. (App Chem)
 Lise Fouche, M.Sc.
Administrative Staff







Christopher Chambers – Administrator Officer
Emily Greygoose - Receptionist
Alicia Harrison – Team Leader
Pauline Howat – Administrative Assistant
Marija Predojevic – Secretary/ Administrative Assistant
Katherine Reynolds – Project Coordinator
Yee Ching Wong – Receptionist
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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1.3
Communication, Public Relations and Awards
Professor Mark Buntine
 Citation: RACI Chemical Education Division
Professor Julian Gale
 Physical Chemistry Division Medal, 2013, Royal Australian Chemical Institute
 Lifetime Achievement in Research Award, 2013, Pro-Vice Chancellor’s Awards
 Professor, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucléaires (INSTN), Saclay
Professor Kliti Grice
 Runner up for the John de Laeter Research Leadership Award, Curtin University
 ARC DORA-3 Professorial Level
 Awarded John Curtin Distinguished Professor December
 Awarded Honorary Fellow of the Geochemical Society and European Association of Organic
Geochemistry for In 1996, The Geochemical Society and The European Association of Geochemistry
established the honorary title of Geochemistry Fellow, to be bestowed upon outstanding scientists
who have, over some years, made a major contribution to the field of geochemistry
Dr Franca Jones
 Light Metals Alumina and Bauxite Division Prize 2013
Dr Ina Kristiana
 Swiss Government Excellence Scholarship – Postdoctoral Scholarship to conduct a research project
at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in academic year 2013-2014
Dr Piotr Kowalczyk
 The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellowship
Dr Max Massi
 ARC Future Fellowship (2013-2017)
Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino
 Office of Learning and Teaching Australian Award for Programs that Enhance Student Learning
(with M. Zadnik and S. Yeo)
Dr Thanh Vinh Nguyen
 Curtin Early Career Research Fellowship
 Thieme Chemistry Journal Award for outstanding young academics
Professor Andrew Rohl
 Inaugural Australian Computer Society Dennis Moore Distinguished Orator
Dr Paolo Raiteri
 ARC Future Fellowship
 PVC award: “Researcher of the year”
 Curtin Senior Research Fellowship
Dr Debbie Silvester
 A.M. Bond Medal from the electrochemistry division of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute
(RACI)
 Finalist for the Woodside Early Career Scientist of the Year Award at the Western Australian Science
Awards
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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1.4
Membership of School, University, and Related Committees/Roles
Dr Alison Blyth
 Member of the staff pool for the Student Disciplinary Board
Professor Mark Buntine
 Member, Academic Board (elected by the professoriate in the Faculty)
 Member, School of Science Executive
Professor Julian Gale
 Chair, Department of Chemistry Research Committee
Professor Kliti Grice
 Member, Department of Chemistry Research Committee
 Board of the Australian Sustainable Development Institute
Dr Piotr Kowalczyk
 Chartered Member, The Royal Australian Chemical Institute (MRACI CCHEM)
Associate Professor Cynthia Joll
 Member, Department of Chemistry Teaching and Learning Committee
 Member, Advisory Board of Curtin Water Quality Research Centre
 Deputy Director, Curtin Water Quality Research Centre
 Member, Curtin Water Quality Research Centre Management Committee
Dr Franca Jones
 Member, Department of Chemistry Research Committee
 HDR co-ordinator
Professor Simon Lewis
 Director, Teaching and Learning, Department of Chemistry
 Deputy Dean, Teaching & Learning, Faculty of Science & Engineering
 Member, Faculty Teaching and Learning Committee
 Member, Faculty Courses Management Committee
 Member, Curtin Excellence and Innovation in Teaching Award Committee
 Member, John Curtin Undergraduate Scholarship Selection Committee
Dr Max Massi
 Member, Research and Development Committee, Faculty of Science and Engineering
 Member, Health and Safety Committee, School of Science
Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino
 Member, Chemistry Learning and Teaching Committee
 Science & Engineering staff representative on Academic Board
 Postgraduate coursework coordinator - MSc: Water Quality and Supply Systems
Dr Thanh Vinh Nguyen
 Member, MRACI of the RACI
Dr Alan Payne
 2nd Year coordinator for the Department of Chemistry
 Chemistry T&L Committee
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Dr Paolo Raiteri
 Member, Department of Chemistry Research Committee
 Coordinator of the Department of Chemistry Seminar Series
Professor Andrew Rohl
 Chair, [email protected]
Dr Daniel Southam
 Member, School of Science representative, Faculty of Science and Engineering Teaching and
Learning Committee
 Member, Faculty of Science and Engineering representative (elected), University Teaching and
Learning Committee
 Member, Unit Coordinators’ Focus Group, Academic Administration Project
Dr Debbie Silvester
 Member, Chemistry Department Research Committee
Dr Kate Trinajstic
 Research Associate, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Museum of Western Australia
1.5
Curtin-related Community Service
Professor Kliti Grice
 BioGenuis student mentor
 Mentor for French Internship
 Mentor for Chinese of Academy Science Masters student
 Took part in Petroleum Exploration workshop with Woodside Petroleum
Associate Professor Cynthia Joll
 “Treatment of Wastewater in Perth”, science presentation at local High School
 “Water Recycling: A New Vision for Water Security in WA”, oral presentation to teachers,
PICSE2013
 “Water Recycling in WA”, oral presentation to high school students, PICSE2013
Dr Franca Jones
 Scientist in School participant (Thornlie Primary School, WA)
Professor Simon Lewis
 Presentation on Forensic Chemistry to students from Bunbury Senior High School, 24 April
 Public Lecture: The Many Murders of Harold Shipman: A Case Study In Forensic Science, Kenwick
Library, 10 August
 Radio interview, Curtin FM on forensic science, 16 August
 National Science Week Lecture: The fickle finger of fate: the science of fingerprint detection,
Western Australian Maritime Museum, Fremantle, 16 August
 National Science Week Lecture: Traces of Contact: Murder Amongst the Military, A Case Study in
Forensic Science, 19 August
 Presentation on Forensic Chemistry to students from St Andrews Grammar School, 4 September
 RACI WA Branch Meeting presentation: Traces of Contact: Murder Amongst the Military, A Case
Study in Forensic Science, 17 September
 Invited Speaker, CrimeScene WA 2013, 12-13 October
 Public lecture: Soham Murders: a Case Study in Forensic Science, Belmont Library, 19 November
 STAWA Future Science Conference Presentation: Traces of Contact, A beginners guide to exchange
evidence, 29th November
 Scientist in Schools Activities, Oberthur Primary School, November
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino
 Scientists in Schools participant
 RACI Crystal Growing competition, August - November 2013
Dr Thanh Vinh Nguyen
 Coordinator of total synthesis seminars for the Synthetic Collective
Professor Mark Ogden
 Nanotechnology: Past, Present, Future”. Presentations to: University of the Third Age, Lesmurdie
Hills Region, 5th February, Wider Vision Bassendean, 4th September
Dr Kate Trinajstic
 Preservation and taphonomy of exceptionally preserved fossils from the Gogo Formation, Western
Australia National Youth Science Forum, January
 The evolution of vertebrate reproduction Nature Live Series Natural History Museum London,
March
 Rock Fishing in the Kimberley Rotary Club of Freshwater Bay, April
 Muscle attachments revealed through synchrotron virtual histology of extinct and extant animals
Guest Speaker Conference Dinner Royal College of Rheumatology Australia, May
 Palaeontology gets high tech – new ways of looking at old bones University of the 3rd Age
September,
 How I developed my research career Dalkeith Primary School, December
1.6
Miscellaneous Information
Dr Sebastien Allard
 Reviewer, Environmental Science & Technology
 Reviewer, Water research
 Reviewer, Journal of Chromatography A
 Reviewer, PLOS ONE
 Reviewer, Science of the total environment
 Reviewer, Desalination and Water Treatment
 Reviewer, Journal of agricultural science and technology
 Reviewer, Water Quality Research Journal of Canada
Dr Thomas Becker
 Secondment to Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis at UWA: Scanning Probe
Microscopy, confocal Raman Microscopy, nanomechanical testing
 Bayliss Seminar Series (September 2013): “Scanning Probe Microscopy and new capabilities in WA”
Professor Mark Buntine
 Chair, Shelley Primary School Council
Dr Francesco Busetti
 Reviewer, Journal of Chromatography A, Water Research,
Engineering Chemistry Research
Food Chemistry and Industrial
Professor Kliti Grice
 Selected to host the AAAPG conference in Perth, WA
Dr Yolanta Gruchlik
 Member, Australian Water Association (AWA)
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Dr Ina Kristiana
 Invited for a visit and to give a seminar at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 18-20 March
 Organised the inaugural Australian Water Association – Water Quality Research Australia Student
Forum at Curtin University, 21 February
Professor Simon Lewis
 Invited research seminar, Every Contact Leaves a Trace: Forensic Chemistry Research involving
Exchange Evidence,
 Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute Seminar, 15 March 2013
 Invited research seminar, Fingerprint research at Curtin University, US Secret Service Forensic
Laboratory, Washington DC, 20 June 2013
 Invited research seminar, Contacts that leave Traces: Forensic Chemistry Research involving
Exchange Evidence, Washington DC Consolidated Forensic Laboratory, 21 June 2013
 Presentation of short courses and workshop on chemical development of latent fingermarks,
Washington DC Department of Forensic Sciences, 22-23 June 2013
 Invited research seminar, Forensic Chemistry Research involving Exchange Evidence, Edith Cowan
University, 22 November 2013
 Invited research seminar, Fingerprint research at Curtin University, Western Australian Police
Forensic Division, 16 December 2013
Dr Kathryn Linge
 Australian Research Council National Competitive Grants Programs Assessor
Dr Thanh Vinh Nguyen
 Reviewer for Chemical Communication (RSC), Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry (Wiley), Australian
Journal of Chemistry, Crop Protection (Elsevier)
Professor Mark Ogden
 Visiting Professorship, University of Montreal, June 2013
Dr Marc Robinson
 Member, Institute Of Physics
Professor Andrew Rohl
 Executive Director, iVEC
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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2
STUDENTS
2.1
Chemistry Total Teaching Load (EFTSL)
2.2
Chemistry Service Teaching Load (EFTSL)
2.3
Honours Students – BSc (Honours) Chemistry Major
2.4
Honours Students – BSc (Honours) Nanotechnology
2.5
New HDR Enrolments for 2013
2.6
Postgraduate Research Students
2.7
Successful Postgraduate Completions
2.8
HDR Yearly Completions and Enrolments
2.9
Student Prizes and Awards
2.10
Enrolments (EFTSL)
2.11
Teaching Allocations
2.1
Chemistry Total Teaching Load (EFTSL)
2009
Total
EFTSL
354.4
2010
370.5
2011
371.3
370.0
2012
389.6
360.0
2013
404.0
Year
410.0
400.0
390.0
380.0
350.0
340.0
330.0
320.0
2009
2.2
2010
2011
2012
2013
Chemistry Service Teaching Load (EFTSL)
2009
Total
EFTSL
290.8
2010
309.8
2011
320.1
2012
332.5
Year
400.0
350.0
300.0
250.0
200.0
150.0
2013
351.1
100.0
50.0
0.0
2009
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
2010
2011
2012
2013
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2.3
Honours Students – BSc (Honours) Chemistry Major
Name
Project Title
Supervisor
Rene Phe
Synthesis and Photophysical Investigation on NHeterocyclic Carbene-Copper (I)Complexes
Dr Massi
Benjamin Errington
An alternative method for the detection of latent
fingermarks using NIR luminescence imaging
Prof. Lewis
Karen Lopez
Compound Specific δ34S Analysis of Organic Sulfur
Compounds in Oils from Source-Rocks Spanning the
Permian Triassic Extinction Event
Prof. Grice, Dr Jaraula, Prof.
Greenwood
Jamal Abdullahi Haji
Proteins at liquid liquid interfaces: Nanopipette-Based
Interfaces
A/Prof. Arrigan
Michael Wolter
Studies of Ligand-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles
Produced by Laser Ablation
Prof. Buntine, Dr Massi
2.4
Honours Students – BSc (Honours) Nanotechnology
Name
Project Title
Supervisor
Claire Siedlovskas
Synthesis and Application of Functionalised Calixarenes
A/Prof. Mocerino
2.5
New HDR Enrolments for 2013
Akabar, Nurshadrina
Beebany, Shakhawan
Cullen, Danica
Currie, Iain
Grotheer, Hendrik
Horton, Rhiannan
How, Zuo Tong
Hussain, Ghulam
McMulkin, Callum
Plet , Chloe
Sauzier, Georgina
Tilbury, Rhys
Wen, Zhao
2013 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
21
2.6
Postgraduate Research Students
HDR Headcount and EFTSL
Head Count
EFTSL
2009
51
35
2010
54
36.4
2011
60
40.2
2012
56
46
2013
61
44.7
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2009
Head Count
Name
Commenced
PhD
2010
2011
2012
2013
EFTSL
Supervisor
Statusi
Supportii
Abdul Aziz, Salmah
7/02/2011
A/Prof. Arrigan, Dr Silvester-Dean
FT
MARDI
Akabar, Nurshadrina
25/02/2013
Dr Massi, Nelson, Jackaman
FT
APA
Alvarez De Aulate, Eva
Beebany, Shakhawan
21/10/2010
12/12/2013
A/Prof. Arrigan, Dr Silvester-Dean
Dr Bailey, Mike Tan
FT
FT
CIPRS
Chapman, Nicole
13/02/2006
Prof. Van Bronswijk, Prof. Watling
FT
APA/SFS
Clegg, Robert
26/10/2012
Dr Payne, A/Prof. Mocerino
FT
CUPS
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Title
Biosensors Based on Ion-Transfer with Bio-Modified
Nanopore Membranes
Photochemical Investigation of Functionalised Rhenium (I) NHeterocyclic Carbene Complexes
Electrochemical Studies Toward Proteomic Analysis
Investigation in to the Structure of Structure of Oilfield
Corrosion Inhibitors Adsorbed onto the Surface of Mild Steel.
Prediction, modelling and fundamental understanding of
nickel laterites and its impact on the leaching process
Development of a new class of inhibitor of N-myris
Page
22
Cesar Colmenares, Jamie
Rafael
3/02/2014
Prof. Grice, Dr Blyth, Murray
FT
Cullen, Danica
25/02/2013
FT
APA
Currie, Iain
4/02/2013
A/Prof. Mocerino, Dr Payne, Keenan,
Best
Dr Payne, A/Prof. Mocerino
FT
APA
D’Alessio, Daniel
30/06/2011
Dr Massi, Prof. Ogden
FT
APA/AINSE
Dogra, Aneeta
23/08/2011
Dr Southam, Prof. Treagust, A/Prof.
Mocerino
PT
RTS
Driessen, Hanna
Driscoll, Christopher
1/03/2006
19/03/2012
A/Prof. Joll, A/Prof. Heitz
Prof. Ogden, Dr Massi
FT
FT
CRC WQT
RTS
Ehsani, Hoda (Master of
Philosophy)
Frick, Amanda
12/04/2010
FT
14/03/2011
Prof. Gubner, Dr Lepkova, Mr
Charlesworth
Prof. Lewis, Prof. Van Bronswijk
FT
BAKER/
WOODSIDE
APA/CUPS
Fritz, Patrick
10/10/2011
Prof. Lewis, Prof. Van Bronswijk
FT
APA/CUPS
Grotheer, Hendrick
29/01/2013
FT
CSIRO
Gyem, Phub
28/02/2005
Prof. Grice, Dr Dick, Dr Blyth, Yeats,
Prof. Greenwood
Prof. De Marco, Dr Bailey
SUB
Hamilton, Stacey
1/03/2004
A/Prof. Joll, Dr Greenwood
LOA
Hartley, Jeremy
8/07/2009
A/Prof. Joll, A/Prof. Heitz, Dr Linge,
Prof. VonGunten
FT
APA(I)/CRS
Holman, Alexander
1/02/2011
FT
APA/CSIRO
Horton, Rhiannan
1/02/2013
Prof. Grice, Dr Jaraula, Dr Evans/Dr
Huston/Dr Yeats
Prof. Lewis, Dr Southam
FT
APA
How, Zuo Tong
25/02/2013
FT
Hussain, Ghulam
19/12/2013
A/Prof. Joll, Dr Linge, Dr Busetti,
A/Prof. Charrois
A/Prof. Arrigan, Dr Silvester
CIPRS/ORD/W
QRA
CIPRS
Jee, Elaine Ai Yung
17/03/2008
Prof De Marco, Dr Pejcic, Dr Ross
FT
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
FT
APA/CRS/
CSIRO PS
Fundamental discrimination between fluids originating in the
Triassic Mungaroo Formation of coal vs. other candidate
source rocks of Jurassic age
Development of Phenylephrine Based Analogues for the
Treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis
Synthesis of Isocoronene and an Investigation of the Physical
and Chemical Properties
Radiocomplexation and Bioconjugation of Calix[4]AreneBased Systems for Nuclear Diagnosis and Therapy.
Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning in Australian
Secondary Science Classroom: A Model Padagogy to Develop
Science Inquiry Skills.
Chlorinous Off-Flavours In Drinking Water
Lanthanoid-containing calixarene-polymers for light emitting
devices
Influence of MEG on the Corrosion Inhibition of Wet-Gas flow
lines
In-Situ Studies of the Composition of Latent Fingermark
Residues Using Chemical Imaging
In-Situ Studies of the Composition of Latent Fingermark
Residues Using Chemical Imaging
The Importance of Organic Matter on Fixation and Transport
of Gold
Deployment of chemical sensors for long-term monitoring of
water quality in mine void lakes (Lake Kepwari) in Collie, WA
Characterisation and Treatability of Natural Organic Matter in
Groundwaters Used for Drinking Water
Mechanisms of N-Nitrosamine Formation in Secondary
Wastewaters and their Removal by Advanced Oxidation
Processes
Organic Geochemistry of the Paleoproterozoic Here's Your
Chance Pb/Zn/Ag Deposit
Curriculum at the Interface: Exploring Learning Outcomes and
Their Application to Interdisciplinary Science
Organic Halamines: An Emerging Class of Nitrogenous
Disinfection By-Products
Modification of Electrode Surfaces for the Sensing of Toxic
Gases
Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Hydrocarbon Detection
Page
23
Ladjavardi, Mojgan
16/03/2009
Prof. Grice, Prof. Horsfield, Dr Volk
FT
CIPRS
Langsa, Markus
27/02/2012
FT
AusAID
Lee, Wade Junqiao
8/02/2010
FT
CIPRS
Loi, Clara
3/03/2009
A/Prof. Joll, A/Prof. Heitz, Dr
McDonald, Dr Kristiana
A/Prof. Arrigan, Dr Silvester, Prof. De
Marco, Dr Carter, Prof. Mancera
A/Prof. Joll, Dr Linge, Dr Busetti
FT
APA/CRS/SFS
Lombardo, Daniel
12/09/2011
Dr Payne, A/Prof. Mocerino
FT
APA
Magee, Karen
22/02/2011
Dr Brown, Dr Massi, A/Prof. Baker
PT
APA
Maric, Mark
31/01/2011
FT
APA/CUPS
McMulkin, Callum
14/05/2013
Prof. Lewis, Prof. Van Bronswijk, Dr
Pitts
Dr Jones, Dr Massi
PT
RTS
Melendez Mogollon, Ines
Mercedes
Morton, Jonathon
1/07/2010
Prof. Grice
FT
CIPRS
31/03/2003
Prof. Ogden, Prof. Rohl, Dr Ward
Moussa, Vasoulla
31/01/2011
Dr Payne, A/Prof. Mocerino
PT
APA
Mulder, Ashley
22/02/2011
PT
APA
Murugappan, Krishnan
Musa, Muftah
27/02/2012
19/03/2012
Prof. Buntine, Dr Massi, A/Prof.
Charrois
Dr Silvester, A/Prof. Arrigan
Dr Payne, Singh, A/Prof. Mocerino
FT
FT
O’Sullivan, Shane
27/10/2010
A/Prof. Arrigan, Dr Silvester
FT
CIPRS
Libyan
Embassy Cultural
Affairs
CIPRS
Pages, Anais
28/01/2011
Prof. Grice, Lockhart, Greenwood
FT
Pandarinathan, Vedapriya
25/03/2010
Prof. Gubner, Dr Lepkova
FT
CIPRS/APA/CSI
RO
CIPRS
Patton, Emma
3/03/2008
Prof. Lewis, Dr Brown
FT
APA/CRS
Pierce, Kieran
24/07/2006
Prof. Alexander, Prof. Kagi, Prof. Grice
PT
CUPS/CRS
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
LOA
Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction of the
Induan/Olenekian Event of the Lower Triassic and to Establish
the Source of Gas in the Perth Basin, WA
Halogen-specific adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) in treated
drinking waters and wastewaters
Electrochemical Sensing of Oxygen Gas in Ionic Liquids
Benzotriazoles and Benzothiazoles in Australian Wastewaters
and Drinking Water Sources
Development of New Anti-inflammatory Drugs to Treat Soft
Tissue Injuries
Polydentate N-Heterocyclic carbine metal complexes – a
single platform for new catalysts and medical agents
Spectroscopic Characterisation of Automotive Paint for
Forensic Science
The Crystallization of Biologically Important Solids in the
Presence of Tetrazoles
Biomarkers and Stable Isotopic Compositions Associated with
Sulfide-Rich Ancient Deposits From Mass Extinction Events
Better Batteries via Controlling the Properties of Electrolytic
Manganese Dioxide
Efficient Synthesis for Drug Discovery Using Australian Plants
and Thiopene-1, 1-Dioxide
Laser Chemistry Studies in Liquids
Electrochemical Sensing of Toxic Gases
Structure Activity Relationship Studies of the Ethylene
Receptor in Plants and the Rational Design of New Antagonist
to Prevent Fruit Ripening
Electrochemical Detection of Biomolecules at Liquid – Liquid
Interfaces
Biogeochemical Cycles ( C,N,S,P and Fe ) of Modern and
Ancient Microbialites ( Western Australia )
Investigating of Inhibition Processes as Sand-Deposited
Surfaces
The Role of Metal Ions in the Development of Latent
Fingermarks on Porous Surfaces
Hydrocarbon Reaction Mechanisms During Petroleum
Formation
Page
24
Plet, Chloe
27/05/2013
Prof. Grice, Dr Blyth, Schwark
FT
CIPRS/ORD
Reid, Brodie
16/01/2012
Dr Massi, Prof. Ogden
FT
RTS
Rtimi, Aboaleid
19/03/2012
Dr Payne, A/Prof. Mocerino
FT
Sairi, Masniza
1/02/2011
A/Prof. Arrigan, Dr Silvester, Dr Li
FT
Libyan
Embassy Cultural
Affairs
MARDI
Sauzier, Georgina
1/02/2013
FT
APA
Senaputra, Alexander
14/06/2010
Prof. Lewis, A/Prof. Arrigan, Prof. Van
Bronswijk
Dr Jones, Dr Fawell, Prof. Wright
FT
Smith, Erin
28/03/2011
FT
Tilbury, Rhys
1/02/2013
Dr Payne, Prof. Mocerino, Dr Best, Dr
Keenan
Prof. Buntine, Dr Massi
Parker
Centre/MERI
WA
APA/CUPS
FT
APA
Travers, Guy
Vaughan, Jamila
8/02/2010
1/08/2011
Dr Brown, Dr Payne
Dr Brown, Dr Massi
FT
FT
APA/CUPS
APA/CUPS
Wen, Zhao
16/09/2013
Prof. Gale, Dr Raiteri
FT
Werrett, Melissa
30/03/2011
Dr Massi, Rigby, Prof. Ogden
FT
Wilson, Tracy
4/01/2010
Prof. Ogden, Dr Jones
FT
Wright, Phillip
23/01/2012
Dr Massi, Prof. Gale, Dr Raiteri
FT
APA
APA/CUPS
Recovery of Life Across the Largest Extinctions of the
Phanerozoic: Clues to the Pace of the Current Climate Change
Lanthanoid Cluster complexes Utilizing new B-diketonate and
B-ketotetrazolate Protecting Ligands. The Synthesis,
Magneto-optical investigation, and application to materials
Chemistry of Dittrichia Graveolens and its Application to the
Inhibition of Enzymes Acting on Co-enzyme A
The Preparation and Electrochemical Characterization of
Nanopore Array Membranes
Applications of Chemometrics to the Analysis and
Interpretation of Forensic Transfer Evidence
The Impact of Desilication Product on the Flocculation,
Sedimentation and Consolidation Properties of Bauxite
Residue
Development of Fungal Sterol Biosynthesis Inhibitors as New
Drug Leads for the Treatment of Chagas Disease
Laser-Based Formation and Chemical Behaviour of Metal
Nanoparticles in Solution
New Carbene-Nickel Complexes as Catalysts
Novel Biological Imaging Agents Based on Rhenium NHeterocyclic Carbene Complexes
Understanding the Nucleation and Growth Mechanisms of
Calcium Oxalate in Aqueous Solution by Computer Simulation
Design, Synthesis and Application of Luminescent Metal
Tetrazolato Complexes in Biological Imaging
Silver-Rich Gold Ores: A study of the Hydrometallurgical
Processing of Gold Ores Containing Concentrations of Silver
Synthesis and Characterisation of multimetallic tetrazolato
complexes
i
FT: Full Time; PT: Part Time; SUB: Submitted in 2013
AusAID: Australian Agency for International Development; AINSE: Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering Scholarship; APA: Australian Postgraduate Award; APA(I): Australian
Postgraduate Award (Industry); CCS: Curtin Completion Scholarship; CIPRS: Curtin International Postgraduate Research Scholarship; CRC CS: CRC Care Scholarship; CRC WQT: CRC Water Quality and
Treatment Scholarship; CRS: Curtin Research Scholarship; CSIRO PS: CSIRO Postgraduate Scholarship; CSIRS: Curtin Strategic International Research Scholarship; CUPS: Curtin University Postgraduate
Scholarship; MARDI: Malaysian Agriculture Research & Development Institute; SFS: School Funded Scholarship; SPIRT: Strategic Partnership Industry Research Training Scheme; TIGeR: The Institute for
GeoScience Research (TIGeR); WA:ERA Western Australian Energy Research Alliance
ii
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
25
2.7
Successful Postgraduate Completions
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD):
Dr Kristy Blyth
Causes of Growth Rate Inhibition in Lactose
Dr Ching Yong Goh
Amino Acid Functionalised Calixarenes: Crystal Growth Modifiers and Low Molecular Weight Gelators
Dr Sergey Lunkov
Modelling Metal Complexation in Solvent Extraction Systems
Dr Laura Machuca Suarez
Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of Common Alloys used for Subsea Applications
Dr Jens Maier
Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of 13Cr Weldable Martensitic Stainless Steels
Dr Mike Oehler
Top of The Line Corrosion Control By Continous Chemical Treatment
Dr Shani Sperinck
Metakaolin as a Model System for Understanding Geopolymers
Dr Svenja Tulipani
Novel Biomarker and Stable Isotopic Approaches for Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction of Saline and
Stratified Ecosystem: The Modern Coorong Lagoon and Devonian Reefs of the Canning Basin
Dr Dawn White
The use of stable isotopes for the characterisation of NOM and investigation of the different organic
precursors of aquatic systems
Masters of Philosophy (MPhil):
Hoda Ehsani
Influence of Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) on the Corrosion Inhibition of Wet-Gas flow lines
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
26
2.8
HDR Yearly Completions and Enrolments
Timely HDR
Completions
Completions
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Completions
Newly
Enrolled
6
6
8
6
10
4
3
6
2
4
12
7
18
8
13
Timely HDR Completions
Newly Enrolled
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
2009
2.9
2010
2011
2012
2013
Student Prizes and Awards
John Wiley & Sons Australia Prize
The Cristal Global Company Prize
The Royal Australian Chemical
Institute, WA Branch Prize
Intertek Geotech Prize
Kagi-Alexander HDR Publication
Prize
Most outstanding Full Time Student enrolled in a
Bachelor of Science completing Principle and
Processes in Chemistry 100 and Reactivity and
Function in Chemistry 120
Most outstanding Full Time Student in 2nd Year
Chemistry enrolled in a Chemistry Major
Daniel Yeap
Most Outstanding Full Time Student in 3rd year
Chemistry enrolled in a Chemistry Major
Most Outstanding Full Time Chemistry Honours
Student
HDR student, enrolled in the Department of
Chemistry, who has published an outstanding
paper in a peer-reviewed journal in the previous
calendar year
Matthew Stout
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Stephanie Fernandez
and Emily Aitken
Michael Wolter
Shane O’Sullivan
Page
27
2.10
Enrolments (EFTSL)
First Year EFTSL
Unit
Number
1626
7039
7040
7042
7076
7077
7078
7079
7080
7230
7231
7348
7726
8686
10009
10223
305541
307628
308006
310764
310769
310770
310772
310776
310777
310800
311025
314448
314449
314450
314451
314452
314453
Unit Title (Full)
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Chemistry 143
Chemistry 101
Chemistry 102
Analytical Chemistry 112
Chemistry 123
Chemistry 124
Chemistry 141
Chemistry 142
Chemistry 144
Chemistry 117
Chemistry 181
Chemistry 118
Chemistry 182
Chemistry 119
Chemistry 187
Chemistry 128
Chemistry 127
Chemistry 131
Chemistry 184
Introduction to Forensic Science 101
Chemistry 027
Chemistry 028
Crime Scene Investigation 100
Forensic Administration 100
Forensic Investigation 100
Forensic Quality Management 100
Latent Fingerprints 100
Chemical Development and Image Capture of Fingerprints 100
Scientific Instruments Used for Document Examination 100
Introduction to Pharmaceutical Chemistry 121
Principles and Processes in Chemistry 100
Biological Chemistry 110
Reactivity and Function in Chemistry 120
Introduction to Chemistry 180
Engineering Chemistry 185
Introduction to Biological Chemistry 190
10.9
39.9
35.6
10.1
20.8
15.5
13.5
0.6
5.4
33.1
17.9
1.0
3.5
10.0
11.0
6.4
2.8
13.1
8.5
0.3
1.1
0.3
0.1
17.9
-
41.8
43.8
22.1
15.3
3.3
3.8
59.3
25.9
14.3
1.0
7.9
2.9
21.4
13.5
0.8
0.1
0.8
0.6
18.4
-
47.5
43.0
18.3
13.6
3.0
0.9
81.4
29.4
1.9
5.4
2.4
26.6
16.1
0.1
0.8
0.1
0.3
20.8
-
48.9
43.9
19.1
14.4
107.9
26.3
0.6
0.4
1.4
21.1
13.9
1.6
0.5
0.8
15.0
-
2.3
25.9
14.1
0.3
0.4
1.3
0.1
59.6
33.8
63.9
112.5
4.9
28.3
Total EFTSL for First Year Students
279.2 296.7 311.4 315.6 347.3
400.0
First Year EFTSL
350.0
300.0
250.0
200.0
150.0
100.0
50.0
0.0
2009
2010
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
2011
2012
2013
Page
28
Second Year EFTSL
Unit
Number
2950
8024
8025
8026
8027
8028
8029
8030
13574
302549
310762
310766
310767
310768
310773
310774
310780
310781
310782
310787
311070
312485
312489
312490
312491
312492
312493
313998
313999
314001
314006
314007
Unit Title (Full)
Chemistry Work Experience 201
Analytical Chemistry 201
Physical Chemistry 201
Physical Chemistry 202
Organic Chemistry 201
Organic Chemistry 202
Inorganic Chemistry 201
Inorganic Chemistry 202
Forensic Trace Evidence 270
Chemistry Work Experience 202
Bloodstain Pattern Analysis 200
Digital Photography for Forensics 200
Fingerprint Science 200
Footwear and Tyre Impression Evidence 200
Physical Comparison 200
Post Blast Examination 200
Fingerprinting of Deceased 200
Questionable Latents 200
Case Law and Historical Events of Fingerprints 200
Introduction to Document and Handwriting for Forensics 200
Fingerprint Fundamentals and Identification Systems 200
Chemical Energetics and Kinetics 211
Chemical Structure and Spectroscopy 201
Analytical Chemistry 202
Materials Chemistry 231
Chemical Reactions and Mechanisms 212
Medicinal and Biological Chemistry 222
Biological Chemistry 222
Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Design 222
Chemical Structure and Spectroscopy 201
Analytical Chemistry 202
Chemical Reactions and Mechanisms 212
Total EFTSL for Second Year Students
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
0.1
3.1
4.4
5.5
5.4
4.6
2.3
5.8
0.6
1.1
1.3
0.9
1.8
0.1
0.4
0.3
0.6
-
0.6
1.1
2.4
3.1
0.4
0.1
0.5
0.3
0.5
1.0
1.0
5.3
8.6
7.0
6.8
7.4
4.6
-
0.8
3.1
0.6
0.4
0.4
0.2
0.5
0.1
6.9
6.1
6.5
6.0
4.9
4.8
-
0.4
2.4
0.6
0.1
0.4
0.6
0.8
6.9
4.6
3.9
1.5
5.8
6.4
5.1
2.8
0.5
0.1
1.0
0.8
0.1
4.8
1.4
2.5
2.5
5.6
5.1
4.1
38.0
50.6
41.3
39.4
31.3
Second Year EFTSL
60.0
50.0
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
2009
2010
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
2011
2012
2013
Page
29
Third Year EFTSL
Unit
Number
7753
7754
7755
7756
7757
9048
12196
13572
13574
13579
302546
305409
305410
310759
310762
310765
310774
310784
310785
310786
312487
312488
312494
312495
312496
312497
312498
314003
314008
314009
314010
Unit Title (Full)
Physical Chemistry 301
Physical Chemistry 302
Inorganic Chemistry 301
Organic Chemistry 301
Organic Chemistry 302
Chemistry Project 390
Chemistry Project 311
Introduction to Toxicology 301
Physical Examination of Evidence 302
Forensic Toxicology 302
Analytical Chemistry 301
Nanochemistry 301
Nanochemistry 302
Forensic Case Studies 370
Blood Stain Pattern Analysis 300
Crime Scene Management for Forensics 300
Explosion Investigation 300
Post Blast Examination 300
Fingerprint Analysis 300
Court Presentation for Forensics Experts 300
Advanced Chemical Development Techniques for Forensics 300
Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy 301
Materials Chemistry 332
Environmental Chemistry 352
Medicinal and Biological Chemistry 321
Synthetic Methods in Chemistry 311
Chemical Sensing and Measurement 310
Nanochemistry 341
Chemical Research Methods 362
Biological Chemistry 321
Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy 301
Synthetic Methods in Chemistry 311
Chemical Research Methods 362
Total EFTSL for Third Year Students
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
1.3
1.6
2.0
2.6
0.5
3.4
1.8
0.9
2.8
0.8
3.4
1.3
1.5
1.1
0.5
0.1
-
1.8
2.3
2.3
2.4
2.1
3.8
1.1
3.3
0.6
2.8
1.3
1.0
1.3
1.0
0.2
-
0.8
2.6
0.8
0.9
1.0
0.1
5.0
2.9
2.4
1.6
4.9
1.8
9.0
-
2.5
2.0
0.6
0.9
0.9
1.3
2.4
2.1
3.1
6.1
3.9
1.0
2.1
0.6
0.5
0.1
2.8
3.0
1.9
5.0
4.0
25.4
26.9
33.6
8.3
34.0
8.3
29.2
Third Year EFTSL
40.0
35.0
30.0
25.0
20.0
15.0
10.0
5.0
0.0
2009
2010
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
2011
2012
2013
Page
30
Honours EFTSL
Unit
Unit Title (Full)
Number
13573
Legal Issues in Forensic Science 401
302540
Analytical Chemistry 401
302877
Forensic Science Honours Dissertation 497
302878
Forensic Science Honours Dissertation 498
302991
Chemistry Honours Dissertation 497
306891
Forensic Investigation Practicum 401
310759
Forensic Case Studies 401
310878
Chemistry Honours Dissertation 498
312429
Chemistry Honours Dissertation 498
314568
Chemistry Honours Dissertation 400
Total EFTSL for Honour Students
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
0.2
1.1
2.0
0.1
0.9
1.3
5.6
0.3
0.5
0.5
2.5
0.4
1.1
5.3
10.6
0.1
1.5
0.1
2.3
3.9
3.3
3.8
7.0
0.4
6.0
6.4
Honours EFTSL
12.0
10.0
8.0
6.0
4.0
2.0
0.0
2009
2010
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
2011
2012
2013
Page
31
Postgraduate - Coursework EFTSL
Unit
Unit Title (Full)
Number
5779
Chemistry Project Report 591
302553
Analytical Chemistry 502
310854
Chemistry Project Report 590
310855
Chemistry Project Report 592
Total EFTSL for Postgraduate Students
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
0.1
0.1
0.1
-
0.3
0.3
-
0.3
-
0.3
0.3
-
0.3
0.0
0.6
0.3
0.6
Postgraduate - Coursework EFTSL
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0.0
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2013 Total EFSTL Enrolments
Year
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Total Enrolments
348.9
385.2
391
396.6
414.8
8.57%
1.76% 0.07%
9.95%
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Honours
Postgraduate Coursework
79.6%
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
32
2.11 Teaching Allocations
Teaching and Learning - Coordinated
Director of Teaching and Learning
 Professor Simon Lewis
Director of First Year Studies
 Dr Daniel Southam
Second Year Coordinator
 Dr Alan Payne
Third Year Coordinator
 Dr Stuart Bailey
Honours Coordinator
 Professor Mark Ogden
 Dr Max Massi
Postgraduate (Research) Coordinator
 Dr Franca Jones
Postgraduate Coursework Coordinator
 Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino
BSc Forensic Investigation Course Coordinator
 Professor Simon Lewis
Teaching and Learning - Delivered
Associate Professor Damien Arrigan
 Analytical Chemistry 202
 Biological Chemistry 321
 Chemical Sensing and Measurement 310
 Chemistry Honours Dissertation 400
Dr Stuart Bailey
 Chemical Energetics and Kinetics 211
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Chemistry 402
 Materials Chemistry 231
 Environmental Chemistry 352
 Introduction to Chemistry 180/Engineering Chemistry 185
 Reactivity and Function in Chemistry 120
Dr Thomas Becker
 Chemistry 401
 Chemical Sensing and Measurement 310
Professor Mark Buntine
 Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy 301
 Chemical Energetics and Kinetics 211
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
33




Chemical Research Methods 362
Environmental Chemistry 352
Chemistry Honours Dissertation 400
Principles and Processes in Chemistry 100
Dr Francesco Busetti
 Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy 301
Associate Professor Jeffrey Charrois
 Environmental Chemistry 352
Raffaella Demichelis
 Chemistry 401
Professor Julian Gale
 Chemistry 402
Professor Kliti Grice
 Environmental Chemistry 352
 Chemistry Honours Dissertation 400
Associate Professor Cynthia Joll
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Environmental Chemistry 352
 Biological Chemistry 110/Introduction to Biological Chemistry 190
Dr Franca Jones
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Materials Chemistry 231
 Chemical Energetics and Kinetics 211
 Chemistry 401
 Nanotechnology Project 310
Dr Ina Kristiana
 Analytical Chemistry 202
Professor Simon Lewis
 Analytical Chemistry 202
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Forensic Case Studies 370
 Forensic Trace Evidence 270
 Introduction to Forensic Science 101
 Chemical Sensing and Measurement 310
 Chemistry Honours Dissertation 400
Dr Max Massi
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Chemistry 401
 Synthetic Methods in Chemistry 311
 Biological Chemistry 222
 Biological Chemistry 321
 Chemistry Honours Dissertation 400
 Biological Chemistry 110/Introduction to Biological Chemistry 190
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
34
Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino
 Biological Chemistry 222
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Design 222
 Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy 301
 Chemical Reactions and Mechanisms 212
 Chemical Structure and Spectroscopy 201
 Introduction to Chemistry 180/Engineering Chemistry 185
 Reactivity and Function in Chemistry 120
Professor Mark Ogden
 Chemical Reactions and Mechanisms 212
Dr Alan Payne
 Chemical Reactions and Mechanisms 212
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Chemistry Honours Dissertation 400
 Synthetic Methods in Chemistry 311
 Biological Chemistry 321
 Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Design 222
Professor Andrew Rohl
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Materials Chemistry 231
 Principles and Processes in Chemistry 100
Dr Debbie Silvester
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Chemical Sensing and Measurement 310
 Chemistry Honours Dissertation 400
Dr Daniel Southam
 Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy 301
 Chemical Research Methods 362
 Chemical Structure and Spectroscopy 201
 Principles and Processes in Chemistry 100
Dr Irene Suarez-Martinez
 Chemistry 402
Mr Chris Taylor
 Biological Chemistry 110/Introduction to Biological Chemistry 190
 Introduction to Chemistry 180/Engineering Chemistry 185
 Reactivity and Function in Chemistry 120
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
35
3
VISITORS
3.1
Seminars by Visitors
3.2
Other Visitors to the Department
3.1
Seminars by Visitors
Coordinated by Dr Paolo Raiteri
 Jennifer Lewis - Measurement in Chemistry Education: The Value of Nomological Networks, 18th April
 Dr Keith Barnard - LIX63 Chemistry in Synergistic Solvent Extraction Systems, 20th April
 Prof. Brett Paull - Production and characterisation of surfacemodified monolithic materials for
separation science, electrochemistry and beyond, 27th April
 Prof. Yifei Zhang, Doctor Fangfang Chen and Doctor Shaotao Cao - Research on cleaner production
and comprehensive utilization of non-ferrous metal resources, 14th May
 David W. Lupton - Discoveries in Catalysis using Nucleophilic N-heterocyclic carbenes, 13th June
 Steen Brøndsted Nielsen - Spectroscopy of isolated porphyrin and heme ions in vacuo, 20th June
 Ethan D. Goddard-Borger - Towards Enzyme Enhancement Therapies for Gaucher Disease, 20th July
 Nigel Lengkeek - Isosteric Approaches to Radiometal Ligand Design and Radioligands for Neuropeptide
Y1 and Caspase 3/7 receptors, 25th July
 Oliver Warshkow - A Computational Chemists Perspective on Molecular Nanotechnology and Atomic
Scale Device Fabrication, 27th July
 Prof. Chris Aldrich - Recent Advances and Future Trends in Chemometrics, 10th August
 Lt Col Roger Lewis - Cause of Death: A Case Study in Forensic Science, 24th August
 Prof. Scott Kable - Chemistry at the threshold: Unexpected products, unusual mechanisms, and
generally weird things that happen near the energetic threshold for a reaction, 7th September
 Dr Ioannis Michaloudis - Sky Cloning Project, 21st September
 Associate Professor Ross McGeary - A Tale of Two Metalloenzymes: Purple Acid Phosphatase and
Metallo-β-Lactamase, 2nd October
 Dr Leone Spiccia - Nanoparticulate Manganese Oxides as Water Oxidation Catalysts, 9th October
 Dr Manickam Minakshi Sundaram - Aqueous battery technology, 19th October
 Prof. Roy Tasker, The Department of Chemistry and HERDSA Special Seminar - Visualisation of the
molecular world for a deep understanding of chemistry, 29th October
 Dr Ute Schmidt - Introduction to the WITec alpha 300 SR Microscope: features, capabilities, fields of
application, 21st November
 Dr Ekaterina Pas - First principles approaches to studying ionic liquids, 29th November
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
38
3.2
Other Visitors to the Department
Short term visits to the Department of Chemistry from industry representatives, researchers from
universities and other research organisations and others during 2013 included:





































Prof. Richard Bush, SCU
Prof. Clinton Foster, Geoscience Australia
Prof. Roger Summons, MIT
Prof. Lorenz Schwark, Kiel University
Prof. Peter Liley, BHP
Prof. John Walshe, CSIRO
Prof. Steve Barnes, CSIRO
Dr Chris Yeats, CSIRO
Dr Andrew Murray, Woodside
Dr Leon Bagas, CET
Dr Xavier Moreau, Minerals Energy Australia
Prof. Clinton Foster, Geoscience Australia
Greg Spinks and Bernadette Spinks visit to ORD for COE bid
Dr Linda Stalker, CSIRO
Dr Walter Pickle
Dr John Moreau, University of Mebourne
Dr Susan Cumberland, University of Melbourne
Mr Jonathon Law, CSIRO
Dr Robert Hough, CSIRO
Prof. Robert Large, University of Tasmania
Prof. David Leach, USGS
Prof. Martin van Kranandonk, UNSW
Dr Emma Grosjean, Geoscience Australia
Dr Dianne Edwards, Geoscience Australia
Dr Eric Tohver, UWA
Geoff Vivian Kimberely, Science News
Prof. William (Bill) Carlson, University of Texas
Dr Jeffery Pigott, Ohio State University
Dr Ante Bilic, CSIRO
Prof. Andrew Putnis, University of Muenster
Prof. Christine Putnis, University of Muenster
Dr Christopher Knight, Argonne National Laboratory
Prof. Urs von Gunten, Swiss Federal Institute for Aquatic Sciences and Technology (EAWAG)
Prof. Michael Berg, Eawag
Dr Rita Henderson
Dr Justine Criquet, France
E/Prof. Steve Hrudey, University of Alberta
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
39
4
INVITED
PRESENTATIONS
4.1
International Invited Presentation
4.2
Domestic Invited Presentation
4.1
International Invited Presentation
Dr Damien Arrigan
 Keynote Lecturer at Bioelectrochemistry, Bochum, Germany, 19 March: ”Electrochemistry of the
polypeptide Amylin at the interface between aqueous and gelled organic electrolyte phases”
 Research seminar at Laboratoire d’Electrochimie Physique et Analytique (LEPA), Ecole Polytechnique
Federal de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland, 25 March: ”Electroanalytical adventures at liquid-liquid
interfaces”
 Research seminar at Dept of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Canada, 10 May: “Analytical
adventures at electrified liquid-liquid interfaces”
 Research seminar at Dept of Chemistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, 14 May:
“Bioanalytical opportunities from electrochemistry at liquid-liquid interfaces”
Dr Raffaella Demichelis
 The multiple structures of vaterite: Goldschmidt 2013, Florence, Italy, 25 – 30 August
 Revealing structural and thermodynamic details of calcium carbonate crystallization intermediates
through ab initio methods. 17th International Conference on Crystal Growth and Epitaxy, Warsaw,
Poland, 11 - 16 August
Professor Julian Gale
 Towards Reality in Nanoscale Materials IV, Levi, Finland
 From atomistic calculation calculations to thermodynamic modelling, Frankfurt, Germany
 Gordon Research Conference on Thin Films and Crystal Growth Mechanisms, Maine, USA
 International Conference on Crystal Growth and Epitaxy (ICCGE-17), Warsaw, Poland
Professor Kliti Grice
 Goldschmidt Conference, Florence
 International Meeting of Organic Geochemistry
Dr Caroline Jaraula
 International Meeting of Organic Geochemists. Tenerife, Spain, September
Dr Piotr Kowalczyk
 Seminar at California Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (Thomas Miller Group),
Pasadena, November
Professor Simon Lewis
 A large-scale donor trial to examine the performance of selected latent fingermark development
techniques: Preliminary considerations, International Fingerprints Research Group Meeting 2013,
Ma’ale Hachamisha, Israel, June
 Reagents for the detection of latent fingermarks on paper surfaces derived from histochemical stains,
International Fingerprints Research Group Meeting 2013, Ma’ale Hachamisha, Israel, June
Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino
 ChemEd2013, Dunedin, New Zealand, 12-17 July
 Keynote Lecture: Nanochemistry: Making and "seeing" nano-structures
 15th Asian Chemical Congress, Singapore, Aug 19-23
 Invited Lecture: Using POGIL type activities to identify student understanding of concepts in
organic chemistry
Dr Paolo Raiteri
 245th ACS National Meeting – Spring Meeting – New Orleans, 7-11 April
 Goldschmidt Conference – Florence, 25-30 August
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
42
Dr Andrew Rohl
 The First International Conference and Summer School in Molecular and Materials Informatics, 4-6
Feb Melbourne, Australia
 eResearch NZ 2013, 2-4 July, Christchurch, New Zealand
Dr Marc Robinson
 Radiation Effects in Insulators 17 (REI), Helsinki, Finland, 30th June – 5th July
Dr Daniel Southam
 “Chemistry Upside-Down: Reimagining first year in an inverted curriculum”, New Zealand Institute
of Chemistry, Conference
Dr Katherine Trinajstic
 Fossilized ontogenies and evolution: Gogo placoderms reveal embryonic development in 370 million
year old early vertebrates Palaeontology Association Meeting University of Zurich
4.2
Domestic Invited Presentation
Dr Damien Arrigan
 Research seminar at School of Chemistry, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, 21 August 2013:
“Soft electrochemical interfaces in chemical and biochemical detection”
 Research seminar at Nyrstar, Hobart, Tasmania, 21 August 2013: “Electroanalytical chemistry at
liquid-liquid interfaces”
 Research seminar at School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, 27
November: “Electrochemistry at liquid-liquid interfaces: bioanalytical opportunities”
Dr Bruno Basic
 Glycosciences Workshop at University of Western Australia
Dr Alison Blyth
 Invited speaker at the ANSTO Biomarkers Workshop, February
Dr Raffaella Demichelis
 Poster: The multiple structures of vaterite: RACI PhysChem, Hobart, 4 – 6 December
Professor Julian Gale
 PhysChem, Hobart, December
Professor Kliti Grice
 Australasian and Environmental Isotope Conference, UWA, Perth, Australia
 Australian and New Zealand Mass Spectrometry Society
 CSIRO cluster workshop
 Melbourne University
Dr Caroline Jaraula
 Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Association, Sydney, Australia, February
Associate Professor Cynthia Joll
 NOM5 Conference, Perth, September
Dr Piotr Kowalczyk
 Seminar at The University of Melbourne, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering (Paul
Webley Group), December
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
43
Professor Simon Lewis
 Redesigning Curtin Chemistry, Informal Inaugural Student Experience Conference, 4-5th December
Dr Alan Payne
 “Chemistry of terpenes isolated from Dittrichia Graveolens and Dodonaea Ceratocarpa” at
SynthCon2, Yarra Valley, Vic, 2-5 April
Dr Debbie Silvester
 AM Bond Medal presentation at the 19th Australian and New Zealand Electrochemistry Symposium
(19ANZES), November
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
44
5
SCIENTIFIC &
PROFESSIONAL
INVOLVEMENTS &
EXTERNAL ACTIVITIES
Associate Professor Damien Arrigan
 Member, Editorial advisory board of the journal Analyst (Royal Society of Chemistry)
 Treasurer, Electrochemistry Division of The Royal Australian Chemical Institute
 Vice-Chair of the Bioelectrochemistry Division of the International Society of Electrochemistry
 Member, Faraday Discussion on Electroanalysis at the Nanoscale, Durham University, UK, 1-3 July
 Co-organiser of the symposium on “Dynamic Ion Sensors: ITIES to ISEs”, International Society of
Electrochemistry Annual Meeting 2014, Lausanne, Switzerland, 31 August – 5 September
 Member, International committee of the Electroanalytical Sensing Systems Group, Royal Society of
Chemistry
 Member, Series Editor, Editorial Board of Royal Society of Chemistry Detection Science Book Series
 Member, Editorial Board of Current Analytical Chemistry
 Member, Editorial Board of ISRN Electrochemistry
Dr Alison Blyth
 Fellow of the Geological Society of London
 Member, European Association of Organic Geochemists
 Member, Organising Committee, Australian Environment and Isotope Conference, July
Professor Mark Buntine
 President, RACI
 Fellow, RACI
 Member, Executive Committee, Australia & New Zealand Society for Mass Spectrometry
 Member, American Chemical Society
 RACI Titration Stakes, Curtin University
 Editor, ASELL Experiment Database
Dr Raffaella Demichelis
 Membership, MRACI CChem, European Association of Geochemistry (EAG), Australian
Nanotechnology Network (ANN)
 Reviewer, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Crystal Growth & Design, Journal of Solid State
Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Journal of Molecular Modeling, Journal of Crystal
Growth, Surface Science
 Volunteer, Mathematicians in Schools program (CSIRO Education)
 Organiser and Lecturer, MolSim 2014 Downunder – a one-week computer simulation workshop,
Curtin University, 10 – 14 February
Professor Julian Gale
 Member, ARC College of Experts
 International Chair in Materials Science and Engineering, Saclay, France
 Member, Merit Allocation Committee, National Computational Infrastructure, Canberra
 Member, National Committee for Materials Science, Australian Academy of Science
 Member, Systems Project Control Group, Pawsey Centre, WA
 Editorial Advisory Board, Theoretical Chemistry Accounts, Springer
 Advisory Board, Cyberinfrastructure for Atomistic Materials Science, NSF Centre, University of
Florida
Professor Leslie Glasser
 Member, International Advisory Board of South African Journal of Chemistry (2009-)
 Peer Reviewer for National Priorities Research Program of Qatar National Research Fund (2009-)
 Member, Editorial Team of Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry (AusJEC) (2010-)
 Member, Editorial Board of Nanomaterials (ISSN 4991-2009) (2010-)
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
48
Professor Kliti Grice
 Guest Editor, Royal Society of Chemistry
 Associate Editor, International journal of Geology
 Associate Editor, International journal of Organic Geochemistry
 Executive Member, Australian Academy of Science for Earth Sciences panel decadal planning
 Selection panel for Australian Eureka Prizes
 Selection panel for Australian Academy of Science
 Scientific Advisory Committee Sinopec Petroleum Exploration Research, WUXI, China
 Executive Member, Geological Society of Australia
 CSIRO Cluster Leader of Minerals Down-under collaboration cluster fund, Australia.
 Executive Member, European Association of Organic Geochemistry (EAOG) Awards
 Secretary of the Australia and New Zealand Society for Mass Spectrometry
 Committee member, EAOG Travel Awards
 Azolla Foundation http://theazollafoundation.org/home/foundation-associates/
 Member, Petroleum Exploration Society of Australia
 Member and Fellow, Royal Australian Chemical Institute
 Australasian Research Management Society, WA Chapter
 Member, European Association of Organic Geochemistry
Dr Yolanta Gruchlik
 Reviewed, conference papers for the OzWater 2014 conference
Dr Caroline Jaraula
 Reviewer, Organic Geochemistry, Environmental Science & Technology, Geochimica et
Cosmochimica Acta, Science Diliman
 Member, American Chemical Society
 Member, American Geophysical Union
 Member, European Association of Organic Geochemists
Associate Professor Cynthia Joll
 Member, The Royal Australian Chemical Institute
 Member, Australian Water Association
Dr Franca Jones
 RACI Ambassador for Curtin University
 Secretary, Australian Association for Crystal Growth
 Member, American Chemical Society
 Member, RACI
Dr Piotr Kowalczyk
 Reviewer, Journal of Physical Chemistry C and B, Langmuir, Carbon
Dr Ina Kristiana
 Vice President (Membership & Training) of the National Representatives Committee of the
Australian Water Association Young Water Professionals (AWA YWP) Specialist Network
 Australian YWP representative for the International Water Association – Australia Committee
 Member, Western Australia branch of the AWA YWP Specialist Network Committee
 Chair, Organising Committee for the 5th International Water Association Specialist Conference on
Natural Organic Matter Research (Pan Pacific Hotel, Perth, 1-4 October)
 Member, Water Research Australia Education Committee
 Member, H2Oz Careers in Water Project Advisory Committee
 Member, Judging Panel for 2013 AWA Research Innovation Award and Research and
Development Award
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
49
 Member, Scientific Program Committee for the 7th IWA YWP International Conference
 Reviewer, ACS, Elsevier, IWA, and Springer journals
Professor Simon Lewis
 Chair, Royal Australian Chemical Institute WA Branch Chemical Education Group
 Member, Royal Australian Chemical Institute WA Branch Committee
 Member, Australian and New Zealand Forensic Science Society WA Branch Committee
 Editorial Board, The Encyclopedia of Forensic Sciences (2nd Edition), Elsevier
 Editorial Board, The Journal of Forensic Identification
 Infrared Program Advisory Committee, Australian Synchrotron
Dr Kathryn Linge
 Member, Editorial Board of Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research
 Standard Methods Committee (American Public Health Association, American Water Works
Association, and the Water Environment Federation)
 Water Research Australia Education Committee
 Selection Committee for 2013 RACI WA Branch Wilf Ewers Award
 Member, Royal Australian Chemical Institute, the Australian Water Association, and the
International Water Association
Dr Max Massi
 Member, the Scientific Committee for the Australian Society of Molecular Imaging
 Visiting scientist at the University of Bologna, December 2013 to February 2014
Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino
 Member, WA Chemical Education Group of the RACI
 Editor, Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry
 European Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Education Network 2 (International
representative)
 IUPAC CCE Project: Design for International Standards for Chemistry Education (ISCE)
Professor Mark Ogden
 Editorial Board, Supramolecular Chemistry
Dr Alan Payne
 Chair, RACI Western Australian Synthetic and Organic Group
Dr Marc Robinson
 Workshop on A2BO5 compounds, IME, ANSTO, 1st-3rd May
Professor Andrew Rohl
 Independent Board Member, New Zealand eScience Infrastructure (NeSI)
Dr Debbie Silvester
 Editor, ISRN Electrochemistry Journal
 WA representative for the electrochemistry division of the RACI
Dr Daniel Southam
 National Secretary (elected), Division of Chemistry Education, Royal Australian Chemical Institute
 Member, Management Committee, ChemNet: Chemistry Discipline Network of Educators
 Editor, International Journal of Innovation in Science and Mathematics Education
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
50
Dr Irene Suarez-Martinez
 Secretary and newsletter editor of the Australian Carbon Society
 Scientist in Schools visiting Mel Maria Primary School
Dr Kate Trinajstic
 Vice President, Royals Society of Western Australia
 Fellow, Society of Biology
 Member, Geological Society of Australia
 Review editor, Frontiers in Earth Science, section Paleontology
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
51
6
RESEARCH GRANTS
6.1
National Competitive Grants
6.2
Grants and Awards from Industry and Other Sources
6.3
Curtin Research Grants, Institutional Partnerships
6.1
National Competitive Grants
Investigators
Project
Fund Reference
Funding Organisations
Year Range
2013-2015
Awarded
(Cash)
$360,000.00
Awarded
2013
$124,617.00
D Arrigan
Nanoscale liquid interfaces properties and molecular sensitivity
DP130102040
Australian Research Council
K Grice, R E Summons
Tackling the resurgences of life,
advanced dating tools of oils by
sophisticated molecular and isotopic
analyses from major geological events
Mapping the family tree of carbon
nanostructures: investigation of
nanoscrolls and herringbones
DP130100577
Australian Research Council
2013-2015
$710,000.00
$267,080.00
DP110104415
Australian Research Council
2011-2014
$279,158.00
$93,183.00
Fleshing out the fossil record: using
organically preserved soft tissues and
bone to explore the evolution of
unique vertebrate characters.
Imaging defects at atomic resolution
via state-of-the-art atomic force
microscopy and petascale simulations
DP110101127
Australian Research Council
2011-2016
$710,000.00
$142,510.00
DP140101776
Australian Research Council
2013-2016
$327,000.00
-
Understanding mineral reactivity
using computer simulations at
realistic pH
Accessing the therapeutic potential of
carbon monoxide
FT130100463
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology
2013-2017
$594,200.00
-
FT130100033
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology
2013-2017
$705,120.00
-
D S Silverster-Dean
Electrochemical behaviour of toxic
gases and explosives in room
temperature ionic liquids
DE120101456
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology,
Curtin University of Technology
2012-2016
$533,580.00
$138,147.00
D Arrigan
Biomolecular sensing via miniaturised
liquid-liquid interfaces
Curtin University of Technology
2009-2014
$587,890.86
-
I Suarez-Martinez
K Trinajstic, C
Boisvert, P Ahlberg, Z
Johansen, M Smith,
A L Rohl
P Raiteri
M Massi
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
54
J D Gale, P Raiteri
Learning to predict polymorphism
through simulation of nucleation and
nanoparticle evolution
DP0986999
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology,
Other ARC Funding
2009-2013
$907,160.00
$205,505.00
R De Marco
Calibration Free Coulometric Sensors
Based on Polymeric Thin Layer Films
DP0987851
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology,
Other ARC Funding
2009-2013
$800,000.00
-
A Heitz, C A Joll, U von
Gunten, K L Linge
Treating wastewater for potable
reuse: removal of chemicals of
concern using advanced oxidation
processes
LP0989326
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology,
Other ARC Funding, GHD, Water
Corporation of Western Australia
2009-2013
$1,080,000.00
$10,000.00
C A Joll, J Charrois, K L
Linge, R Henderson, S
Hrudey
Advanced water treatment
technologies to minimise nitrogenous
disinfection by-products in drinking
water: understanding the role of
organic nitrogen
LP110100548
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology,
University of New South Wales,
The, Water Corporation of
Western Australia, Water Quality
Research Australia Limited
(WQRA)
2010-2014
$325,000.00
$235,496.00
C A Joll, J Charrois, K L
Linge U N Ryan, U von
Gunten, D Halliwell, R
Trolio
Understanding wastewater treatment
technologies for alternative water
use: transformation of inorganic and
organic nitrogen
LP130100602
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology,
Water Corporation of Western
Australia, Water Quality Research
Australia Limited (WQRA),
Murdoch University, Eawag, Swiss
Federal Institute of Aquatic
Science and Technology
2013-2016
$490,000.00
$88,270.00
K Grice, J Charrois, M
Wolering, A Blyth
Three dimensional analysis of
important organic components in
Energy, Environmental and Earth
Systems.
LE130100145
Australian Research Council,
Murdoch University, Southern
Cross University, University of
Western Australia, Curtin
University of Technology, Curtin
University of Technology
2013
$175,509.60
$166,509.60
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
55
C A Joll, A Heitz, U von
Gunten
Novel water treatment technologies
for minimisation of bromide and
iodide in drinking water
LP100100285
Australian Research Council,
Water Quality Research Australia
Limited (WQRA), Water
Corporation of Western Australia,
Curtin University of Technology,
Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of
Aquatic Science and Technology
2010-2013
$720,000.00
$197,996.00
K Grice, K A Evans, B
Rasmussen, J D Gale
Organic-inorganic interactions in
mineral systems
CSIRO Flagship
CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific
and Industrial Research
Organisation)
2011-2014
$3,000,000.00
$996,500.00
M Ogden, S P Jiang, D
Arrigan, D S SilvesterDean, C Buckley
A Facility for the Nanoscale Imaging
and Characterisation of Materials
LE130100121
Australian Research Council,
Murdoch University, University of
Western Australia, CSIRO
(Commonwealth Scientific and
Industrial Research Organisation),
Curtin University of Technology
2013
-
$725,000.00
M Massi, C Li, M
Buntine, K Linge
Western Australian Advanced
Fluorescence and Phosphorescence
Characterisation Facility
LE130100052
Australian Research Council,
Curtin University of Technology,
Murdoch University, University of
Western Australia, Curtin
University of Technology
2013
$220,000.00
$220,000.00
B I McInnes, A K
Kennedy, N
Mcnaughton, K Grice,
C E Buckley, F Jourdan,
P Bland, P R Edwards, J
Charrois, S Tessalina
John de Laeter Centre - Isotope
Research for the Earth and
Environment
A4813086
WA Department of Commerce,
Curtin University of Technology,
University of Western Australia,
CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific
and Industrial Research
Organisation), Chinese Academy
of Sciences, Thermo Fisher
Scientific, Agilent Technologies
Foundation
2012-2017
$700,000.00
$650,000.00
$13,686,186.13 $4,260,813.60
Bold font highlights the Curtin Chemistry Staff
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
56
6.2
Grants and Awards from Industry and Other Sources
Investigators
Project
Fund Reference
Funding Organisations
Year Range
M Massi, M I Ogden
Synthesis and Zirconium-89
radiolabeling of calix[4]arenes as
potential PET imaging agents
ALNGRA13034
Australian Institute of Nuclear
Science and Engineering (AINSE)
A Blyth
Low abundance compound specific
radiocarbon dating of organic matter
preserved in cave deposits
10678
K Grice, A Blyth
Molecular, stable isotopic and
radiocarbon analyses of organic
matter preserved in terrestrial
records
Computer Simulation of Nuclear
Materials
AINSE
N Marks, J Gale, P
Raiteri
J Charrois, A Heitz
T V Nguyen
Micropollutants, mixtures and
transformation products in recycled
water: how much do we really
know?
Discovery of Novel Antibiotics via
Diversity-Oriented Synthesis
2013
Total
Awarded
$2,000.00
Awarded
2013
$16,800.00
Australian Institute of Nuclear
Science and Engineering (AINSE)
2013
$17,045.00
$7,240.00
Australian Institute of Nuclear
Science and Engineering (AINSE),
Curtin University of Technology
2011-2015
$687,595.00
$107,292.50
Australian Nuclear Science and
Technology Organisation (ANSTO)
2010-2013
$501,734.00
$100,000.00
Australian Water Recycling Centre
of Excellence Ltd, University of
Queensland
2011-2013
$270,000.00
$115,000.00
CRF130129
Curtin University of Technology
2013-2017
-
-
R Demichelis
Understanding serpentinization
through virtual exploration
CRF130041
Curtin University of Technology
2013-2016
-
-
P Kowalczyk
Thermodynamics and Kinetics of
Multi-Component Greenhouse Gas
Mixtures in Nanoconfinement
CRF10084
Curtin University of Technology
2011-2015
$616,323.10
-
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
57
A L Rohl
Western Australian Interactive
Virtual Environment Centre
Department of Industry and
Resources(NOW DEPT OF
COMMERCE), CSIRO
(Commonwealth Scientific and
Industrial Research Organisation),
Curtin University of Technology,
Murdoch University, University of
Western Australia, Australian
Partnership for Advanced
Computing (APAC), Central TAFE,
Edith Cowan University,
Department of Innovation,
Industry, Science & Research
(DIISR) PREVIOUSLY DEST
Department of the Environment,
Water, Heritage and the Arts
2004-2013
-
$303,121.00
Anna Heitz, Y Tan, C A
Joll, J Charrois
EVALUATION OF VIBRATORY SHEAR
MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY FOR
CONCENTRATE MINIMISATION &
BRINE RECOVERY/RECYCLING.
2010-2016
$184,368.00
$13,000.00
J Charrois
Optimising low-pressure membrane
pretreatment for desalination
Department of the Environment,
Water, Heritage and the Arts,
Murdoch University
Energy and Minerals Australia
2011-2014
$68,000.00
$22,200.00
K Trinajstic
Energy and Minerals Australia PhD
Support - Charlotte Mack
EMS
2012-2014
-
-
P Kowalczyk
Quantum molecular dynamics
designing of highly selective
nanopores for H2-D2 mixtures.
S13718
Japan Society for the Promotion of
Science
2013-2014
-
-
N Marks, J D Gale
Radioparagenesis: Robust
NuclearWaste Form Design and
Novel Materials Discovery
Los Alamos National Laboratory
2011-2014
$261,000.00
$84,716.06
B Nair
Collaborative Research and
Development Projects in the Fluid of
Processing of Nanomaterials and
Slurries
Noritake Company Ltd
2005-2014
$33,101.00
-
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
58
D F Treagust, M
Mocerino, D C
Southam
The efficacy and cultural
transferability of student inquiry
learning approaches in foundation
chemistry: improving conceptual
understanding and confidence
NPRP6-1424-5178
Qatar National Research Fund
2013-2016
$307,369.40
-
K Grice, R Bush, J
Moreau, L Sullivan, E
Burton, A Rose, S
Johnston, A McElnea, C
Ahern
A L Rohl, S D Fleming
Electron flow in iron hyper-enriched
acidifying coastal environments:
reaction paths and kinetics of iron
sulfur-carbon transformations
LP110100732
Southern Cross University,
Australian Research Council
2011-2013
-
$109,006.00
University of Queensland
2012-2013
$317,217.00
$317,217.00
Y Gruchlik, L Fouche, A
Heitz, J Charrois, C A
Joll
Laboratory Scale Investigations of
Potential Odour Reduction Strategies
– Phase II
Water
Corporation
2012-2013
$174,000.00
$100,000.00
J Charrois, D Arrigan, F
Busetti, K L Linge
NatVal2.2 Stage 2.2 Phase 2
Research Execution
3018-12
Water Corporation of Western
Australia, Australian Water
Association, Water Corporation of
Western Australia
Water Quality Research Australia
Limited (WQRA)
2013-2015
$198,920.00
-
J Charrois
Transformation of EDCS/PPCPS and
resulting toxicity following drinking
water disinfection
WRF SIEDC-1103
Water Research Foundation, Water
Quality Research Australia Limited
(WQRA)
2012-2014
$20,000.00
-
Rolf Gubner, L Capelli,
H Ehsani, D Wasnik, M
Slowig, V
Pandarinathan
Carbon Steel for Low Cost
Development of Production
Flowlines
Woodside Energy Ltd
2010-2013
$430,000.00
-
$4,351,115.50
$1,295,592.56
Decommissioning of the Data Fabric
Bold font highlights the Curtin Chemistry Staff
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
59
6.3
Curtin Research Grants, Institutional Partnerships
Investigators
Project
Funding Organisations
Year Range
M I Ogden
Nanochemistry Research Institute (NRI)
Rolf Gubner
Corrosion Centre for Education, Research and Technology (CCERT)
J Charrois
Curtin Water Quality Research Centre (CWQRC)
Rolf Gubner
Professorial Chair in Corrosion Engineering
Curtin University of
Technology, Curtin
University of Technology
Curtin University of
Technology, Curtin
University of Technology
Curtin University of
Technology, Curtin
University of Technology
Woodside Energy Ltd,
Chevron Australia Pty
Ltd
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
2008-2017
Awarded
Total
$725,000.00
Awarded
2013
-
2010-2013
$150,000.00
-
2010-2017
$100,000.00
-
2008-2013
$1,250,000.00
-
$2,225,000.00
-
Page
60
7
PUBLICATIONS
7.1
Presitgious Journal Publications
7.2
Journal Publications
7.3
Book Chapters
Refereed Journal Articles
Journal publications are categorised for 2009-2011 according to the Excellence in Research for
Australia (ERA) rankings that remained active until the end of the first quarter of 2011. In 2012 and
2013, Journals are clasified by a Curtin University ranking scheme that distinguishes ‘prestigious’
Journal Publications.
Refereed Journal Publications
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
2009
Non ERA
7.1
ERA C
ERA B
2010
ERA A
2011
ERA A*
2012
Journal Publications
2013
Prestigious Journal Publications
Prestigious Journal Publications
1.
Allard, S., & Gallard, H. (2013). Abiotic formation of methyl iodide on synthetic birnessite: A mechanistic
study. Science of the Total Environment, 463, 169-175.
2.
Allard, S., Taylor, C. E., Chan, W. M., Joll, C. A., & Von Gunten, U. (2013). Ozonation of iodide-containing
waters: Selective oxidation of iodide to iodate with simultaneous minimization of bromate and I-THMs.
Water Research, 47(6), 1953-1960.
3.
Bailey, S. I., Gubner, R., Lepkova, K., & Pandarinathan, V. (2013). Inhibition of under-deposit corrosion
of carbon steel by thiobenzamide. Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 160, C432-C440.
4.
Bielicka, A., Wisniewski, M., Terzyk, A. P., Gauden, P. A., Furmaniak, S., Roszek, K., Kowalczyk, P. &
Bieniek, A. (2013). Carbon materials as new nanovehicles in hot-melt drug deposition. Journal of Physics:
Condensed Matter, 25.
5.
Blyth, A. J., & Schouten, S. (2013). Calibrating the glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether temperature signal
in speleothems. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, 109, 312-328.
6.
Blyth, A. J., Smith, C. I., & Drysdale, R. N. (2013). A new perspective on the d13C signal preserved in
speleothems using LC–IRMS analysis of bulk organic matter and compound specific stable isotope
analysis. Quaternary Science Reviews, 75, 143-149.
7.
Brown, D. H., Buckley, C. E., Chumphongphan, S., Paskevicius, M., Pitt, M. P., & Sheppard, D. A. (2013).
First-order phase transition in the li2b12h 12 system. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 15(38),
15825-15828.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
64
8.
Brown, D. H., Buckley, C. E., Paskevicius, M., Pitt, M. P., & Sheppard, D. A. (2013). Thermal stability of
Li2B12H12 and its role in the decomposition of LiBH4. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 135(18),
6930-6941.
9.
Bustillo, M. A., Plet, C., & Alonso-Zarza, A. M. (2013). Root calcretes and uranium-bearing silcretes at
sedimentary discontinuities in the miocene of the Madrid Basin (Toledo, Spain). Journal of Sedimentary
Research, 83, 1130-1146.
10.
Cheng, Z., Liu, T., Yang, C., Gan, H., Chen, J., & Zhang, F. (2013). Ab initio atomic thermodynamics
investigation on oxygen defects in the anatase TiO2. Journal of Alloys and Compounds, 546, 246-252.
11.
Chow, N., George, A. D., Trinajstic, K., & Chen, Z.-Q. (2013). Stratal architecture and platform evolution
of an early frasnian syn-tectonic carbonate platform, Canning Basin, Australia. Sedimentology, 60, 15831620.
12.
Cui, X., Rohl, A. L., Shtukenberg, A., & Kahr, B. (2013). Twisted aspirin crystals. Journal of the American
Chemical Society, 135, 3395-3398.
13.
Carter, D. J., Warschkow, O., Gale, J. D., Scappucci, G., Klesse, W. M., Capellini, G., Rohl, A. L., Simmons,
M. Y., McKenzie, D. R., & Marks, N. A. (2013). Electronic structure of phosphorus and arsenic d-doped
germanium. Physical Review B, 88(11), 15203-15201-15203-15210.
14.
Carter, D. J., Warschkow, O., Marks, N. A., & McKenzie, D. R. (2013). Electronic structure of two
interacting phosphorus d-doped layers in silicon. Physical Review B, 87, 045204-045201-045204-045208.
15.
Demichelis, R., Raiteri, P., Gale, J. D., & Dovesi, R. (2013). Examining the accuracy of density functional
theory for predicting the thermodynamics of water incorporation into minerals: The hydrates of calcium
carbonate. The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part C: Nanomaterials and Interfaces, 117(34), 1781417823.
16.
Demichelis, R., Raiteri, P., Gale, J. D., & Dovesi, R. (2013). The multiple structures of vaterite. Crystal
Growth and Design, 13(6), 2247-2251.
17.
Dick, J., Evans, K. A., Holman, A. I., Jaraula, C., & Grice, K. (2013). Estimation and application of the
thermodynamic properties of aqueous phenanthrene and isomers of methylphenanthrene at high
temperature. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, 122, 247-266.
18.
Dick, J., & Shock, E. L. (2013). A metastable equilibrium model for the relative abundances of microbial
phyla in a hot spring. PLoS ONE, 8(9), e72395-e72395.
19.
Fenter, P., Kerisit, S., Raiteri, P., & Gale, J. D. (2013). Is the calcite–water interface understood? Direct
comparisons of molecular dynamics simulations with specular X-ray reflectivity data. Journal of Physical
Chemistry C, 117(10), 5028-5042.
20.
Fong, Y.-Y., Gascooke, J. R., Visser, B. R., Harris, H. H., Cowie, B. C., Thomsen, L., Metha, G. F., & Buntine,
M. A. (2013). Influence of cationic surfactants on the formation and surface oxidation states of gold
nanoparticles produced via laser ablation. Langmuir, 29, 12452-12462.
21.
Furmaniak, S., Terzyk, A. P., Gauden, P. A., Kowalczyk, P., Harris, P. J. f., & Koter, S. (2013). Applicability
of molecular simulations for modelling the adsorption of the greenhouse gas CF4 on carbons. Journal of
Physics: Condensed Matter, 25.
22.
Glasser, L. (2013). Ambient heat capacities and entropies of ionic solids: A unique view using the debye
equation. Inorganic Chemistry, 52(11), 6590-6594.
23.
Ho, D., Peerzade, S. A. M. A., Becker, T., Hodgetts, S., Harvey, A. R., Plant, G. W., Woodward, R. C.,
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
65
Luzinov, I., St Pierre, T. G., & Iyer, K. S. (2013). Magnetic field directed fabrication of conducting polymer
nanowires. Chemical Communications, 49(64), 7138-7140.
24.
Kristiana, I., Tan, J., Joll, C. A., Heitz, A., Von Gunten, U., & Charrois, J. W. (2013). Formation of Nnitrosamines from chlorination and chloramination of molecular weight fractions of natural organic
matter. Water Research, 47, 535-546.
25.
Linge, K. L., Blythe, J. W., Busetti, F. M., Blair, P., Rodriguez, C., & Heitz, A. (2013). Formation of
halogenated disinfection by-products during microfiltration and reverse osmosis treatment:
implications for water recycling. Separation and Purification Technology, 104, 221-228.
26.
Lockhart, R., Berwick, L., Greenwood, P. F., Grice, K., Kraal, P., & Bush, R. (2013). Analytical pyrolysis for
determining the molecular composition of contemporary monosulfidic black ooze. Journal of Analytical
and Applied Pyrolysis, 104, 640-652.
27.
Luo, G., Wang, Y., Grice, K., Kershaw, S., Algeo, T. J., Ruan, X., Yang, H., Jia, C., & Xie, S. (2013). Microbialalgal community changes during the latest Permian ecological crisis: Evidence from lipid biomarkers at
Cili, South China. Global and Planetary Change, 105, 36-51.
28.
Machuca, L., Bailey, S. I., Gubner, R., Watkin, E. L., Ginige, M., Kaksonen, A. H., & Heidersbach, K. (2013).
Effect of oxygen and biofilms on crevice corrosion of UNS S31803 and UNS N08825 in natural seawater.
Corrosion Science, 67, 242-255.
29.
Maric, M., Van Bronswijk, W., Lewis, S. W., Pitts, K., & Martin, D. E. (2013). Characterisation of chemical
component migration in automotive paint by synchrotron infrared imaging. Forensic Science
International, 228, 165-169.
30.
Marks, N. A., Carter, D. J., Sassi, M., Rohl, A. L., Sickafus, K. E., Uberuaga, B. P., & Stanek, C. R. (2013).
Chemical evolution via beta decay: a case study in strontium-90. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter,
25.
31.
O'Sullivan, S., Alvarez de Eulate, E., Yuen, Y. h., Helmerhorst, E., & Arrigan, D. W. M. (2013). Stripping
voltammetric detection of insulin at liquid–liquid microinterfaces in the presence of bovine albumin.
Analyst, 138, 6192-6196.
32.
O'Sullivan, S., & Arrigan, D. W. M. (2013). Impact of a surfactant on the electroactivity of proteins at an
aqueous-organogel microinterface array. Analytical Chemistry, 85, 1389-1394.
33.
Pandarinathan, V., Lepkova, K., Bailey, S. I., & Gubner, R. (2013). Evaluation of corrosion inhibition at
sand-deposited carbon steel in CO2-saturated brine. Corrosion Science, 72, 108-117.
34.
Qin, M. J., Kuo, E. Y., Whittle, K. R., Middleburgh, S. C., Robinson, M., Marks, N. A., & Lumpkin, G. R.
(2013). Density and structural effects in the radiation tolerance of TiO 2 polymorphs. Journal of Physics:
Condensed Matter, 25(35).
35.
Roach, D. L., Ross, K. D., Gale, J. D., & Taylor, J. W. (2013). The interpretation of polycrystalline coherent
inelastic neutron scattering from aluminium. Journal of Applied Crystallography, 46(6), 1755-1770.
36.
Robinson, M., Suarez-Martinez, I., & Marks, N. A. (2013). Generalized method for constructing the
atomic coordinates of nanotube caps. Physical Review B, 87(15), 155430-155431-155430-155438.
37.
Sanchez, S., Dupret, V., Tafforeau, P., Trinajstic, K., Ryll, B., Gouttenoire, P.-J., Wretman, L., Zylberberg,
L., Peyrin, F., & Ahlberg, P. (2013). 3D Microstructural Architecture of Muscle Attachments in Extant and
Fossil Vertebrates Revealed by Synchrotron Microtomography. PLoS ONE, 8(2), e56992-e56992.
38.
Schouten, S., Hopmans, E. C., Rosell-Melé, A., Pearson, A., Adam, P., Bauersachs, T., Bard, E., Bernasconi,
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
66
S. M., Bianchi, T. S., Brocks, J. J., Carlson, L. T., Castaneda, I. S., Derenne, S., Selver, A., Dutta, K., Eglinton,
T., Fosse, C., Galy, V., Grice, K., Hinrichs, K.-U., Huang, Y., Huget, C., Hurley, S., Ingalls, A., Jia, G., Keely,
B., Knappy, C., Kondo, M., Krishnan, S., Lincoln, S., L,ipp, J., Mangelsdorf, K., Martinez-Garcia, A., Menot,
G., Mets, A., Mollenhauer, G., Ohkouchi, N., Ossebaar, J., Pagani, M., Pancost R.D., Pearson, E. J., Peterse,
F., Reichart, G.-J., Schaeffer, P., Schmitt, G., Schwark, L., Shah, S. R., Smith, R. W., Smittenberg, R. H.,
Summons, R. E., Takano, Y., Talbot, H. M., Taylor, K. E. R., Tarozo, R., Uchida, M., Van Dongen, B. E., Van
Mooy, B. A. S., Wang, J., Warren, C., Weijers, J. W. H., Werne, J. P., Woltering, M., Xie, S., Yamamoto,
M., Yang, H., Zhang, C. L., Zhang, Y., Zhao, M., & Sinninghe Damsté, J. S. (2013). An interlaboratory study
of TEX86 and BIT analysis of sediments, extracts and standard mixtures. Geochemistry Geophysics
Geosystems, 14(12), 5263-5285.
39.
Steel, K. M., Alizadehhesari, K., Balucan, R. D., & Basic, B. (2013). Conversion of CO2 into mineral
carbonates using a regenerable buffer to control solution pH. Fuel, 111, 40-47.
40.
Suarez-Martinez, I., Mittal, J., Allouche, H., Pacheco, M., Monthioux, M., Razafinimanana, M., & Ewels,
C. P. (2013). Fullerene attachment to sharp-angle nanocones mediated by covalent oxygen bridging.
Carbon, 54, 149-154.
41.
Trinajstic, K., Sanchez, S., Dupret, V., Tafforeau, P., Long, J. A., Young, G. C., Senden, T., Boisvert, C.,
Power, C., & Ahlberg, P. (2013). Fossil Musculature of the Most Primitive Jawed Vertebrates. Science.,
341, 160-164.
42.
Veder, J.-P., De Marco, R., Patel, K., Si, P., Grygolowicz-Pawlak, E., James, M., Alam, M. T., Sohail, M.,
Lee, J., Pretsch, E., & Bakker, E. (2013). Evidence for a surface confined ion-to-electron transduction
reaction in solid-contact ion-selective electrodes based on poly(3-octylthiophene). Analytical Chemistry,
85(21), 10495-10502.
43.
Wallace, A. F., Hedges, L. O., Fernandez Martinez, A., Raiteri, P., Gale, J. D., Waychunas, G. A., Whitelam,
S., Banfield, J. f., & De Yoreo, J. (2013). Microscopic evidence for liquid-liquid separation in
supersaturated CaCO3 solutions. Science, 341(6148), 885-889.
44.
Zhang, F., Gale, J. D., Uberuaga, B. P., Stanek, C. R., & Marks, N. A. (2013). Importance of dispersion in
density functional calculations of cesium chloride and its related halides. Physical Review B, 88(5),
054112-054111-054112-054117
7.2
Journal Publications
45.
Adjizian, J. J., De Marco, R., Suarez-Martinez, I., El Mel, A. A., Synders, R., Gengler, R. Y. N., Rudolf, P.,
Ke, X., Van Tendeloo, G., Bittencourt, C., & Ewels, C. P. (2013). Platinum and palladium on carbon
nanotubes: Experimental and theoretical studies. Chemical Physics Letters, 571, 44-48.
46.
Allard, S., Fouche, L., Dick, J., Heitz, A., & Von Gunten, U. (2013). Oxidation of manganese(II) during
chlorination: Role of bromide. Environmental Science and Technology, 47, 8716-8723.
47.
Alvarez de Eulate, E., O'Sullivan, S., Fletcher, S., Newsholme, P., & Arrigan, D. W. M. (2013). Ion-transfer
electrochemistry of rat amylin at the water–organogel microinterface array and its selective detection
in a protein mixture. Chemistry - An Asian Journal, 8(9), 2096-2101.
48.
Alvarez de Eulate, E., Serls, L., & Arrigan, D. W. M. (2013). Detection of haemoglobin using an adsorption
approach at a liquid – liquid microinterface array. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 405, 38013806.
49.
Andrews, P. C., Gee, W. J., Junk, P. C., & Massi, M. (2013). Variation of structural motifs in lanthanoid
hydroxo clusters by ligand modification. New Journal of Chemistry, 37(1), 35-48.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
67
50.
Arrigan, D. W. M. (2013). Voltammetry of proteins at liquid-liquid interfaces. Annual Reports of the
Progress in Chemistry, Section "C" (Physical Chemistry), 109, 167-188.
51.
Bailey, S. I., Gubner, R., Lepkova, K., & Pandarinathan, V. (2013). Impact of mineral deposits on CO2
corrosion of carbon steel, Houston, Texas, USA.
52.
Bailey, S. I., & Li, X. (2013). Corrosion of Stainless Steels in the Marine Splash Zone, Switzerland.
53.
Basavaraj, S., Benson, H. A. E., Brown, D. H., & Chen, Y. (2013). Application of Solvent Influenced
Fluorescence-quenching and Enhancement to Develop a Highly Sensitive HPLC Methodology for Analysis
of Resveratrol-PEG Conjugates. Current Pharmaceutical Analysis, 9(2), 199-207.
54.
Blyth, A. J., Shutova, Y., & Smith, C. (2013). d13C analysis of bulk organic matter in speleothems using
liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Organic Geochemistry, 55, 22-25.
55.
Brisson, I. J., Levallois, P., Tremblay, H., Sérodes, J., Deblois, C., Charrois, J. W., Taguchi, V., Boyd, J., Li,
X. F., & Rodriguez, M. J. (2013). Spatial and temporal occurrence of N-nitrosamines in seven drinking
water supply systems. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 185, 7693-7708.
56.
Costine, A., Loh, J. S. C., Busetti, F. M., Joll, C. A., & Heitz, A. (2013). Understanding hydrogen in bayer
process emissions. 3. Hydrogen production during the degradation of polyols in sodium hydroxide
solutions. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, 52(16), 5572-5581.
57.
Ennis, B., Muzzioli, S., Reid, B., D'Alessio, D., Stagni, S., Brown, D. H., Ogden, M., & Massi, M. (2013).
Recyclable calix[4]arene–lanthanoid luminescent hybrid materials with color-tuning and color-switching
properties. Dalton Transactions, 42, 6894-6901.
58.
Femoni, C., Muzzioli, S., Palazzi, A., Stagni, S., Zacchini, S., Monti, F., Accorsi, G., Bolognesi, M., Armaroli,
N., Massi, M., Valenti, G., & Marcaccio, M. (2013). New tetrazole-based Cu(I) homo- and heteroleptic
complexes with various P^P ligands: synthesis, characterization, redox and photophysical properties.
Dalton Transactions, 42(4), 997-1010.
59.
Francis, M. J., Rzechowicz, M., Charrois, J. W., & Pashley, R. M. (2013). Removal of glass particles from
compost mixtures at laboratory and pilot scales. Compost Science and Utilization, 21(1), 34-46.
60.
Frick, A. A., Fritz, P., Lewis, S. W., & Van Bronswijk, W. (2013). Sequencing of a modified oil red o
development technique for the detection of latent fingermarks on paper surfaces. Journal of Forensic
Identification, 63(4), 369-385.
61.
Fritz, P., Van Bronswijk, W., Lepkova, K., Lewis, S. W., Lim, K. F., Martin, D. E., & Puskar, L. (2013).
Infrared microscopy studies of the chemical composition of latent fingermark residues. Microchemical
Journal, 111, 40-46.
62.
Fritz, P., Van Bronswijk, W., & Lewis, S. W. (2013). p-Dimethylaminobenzaldehyde: preliminary
investigations into a novel reagent for the detection of latent fingermarks on paper surfaces. Analytical
Methods, 5(13), 3207-3215.
63.
Fritz, P., Van Bronswijk, W., Patton, E., & Lewis, S. W. (2013). Variability in visualization of latent
fingermarks developed with 1,2-Indanedione–Zinc Chloride. Journal of Forensic Identification, 63(6),
698-713.
64.
Furmaniak, S., Kowalczyk, P., Terzyk, A. P., Gauden, P. A., & Harris, P. (2013). Synergetic effect of carbon
nanopore size and surface oxidation on CO2 capture from CO2/CH4 mixtures. Journal of Colloid and
Interface Science, 397, 144-153.
65.
Furmaniak, S., Terzyk, A. P., Gauden, P. A., Kowalczyk, P., & Szymanski, G. S. (2013). Influence of
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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activated carbon surface oxygen functionalities on SO2 physisorption – Simulation and experiment.
Chemical Physics Letters, 578, 85-91.
66.
Furmaniak, S., Terzyk, A. P., Kaneko, K., Gauden, P. A., Kowalczyk, P., & Itoh, T. (2013). The first atomistic
modelling-aided reproduction of morphologically defective single walled carbon nanohorns. Physical
Chemistry Chemical Physics, 15, 1232-1240.
67.
Furmaniak, S., Terzyk, A. P., Kowalczyk, P., Kaneko, K., & Gauden, P. A. (2013). Separation of co2-ch4
mixtures on defective single walled carbon nanohorns - tip does matter. Physical Chemistry Chemical
Physics, 15(39), 16468-16476.
68.
Gauden, P. A., Terzyk, A. P., Furmaniak, S., Wisniewski, M., Kowalczyk, P., Bielicka, A., & Zielinski, W.
(2013). Porosity of closed carbon nanotubes compressed using hydraulic pressure. Adsorption Science
and Technology, 19, 785-793.
69.
Glasser, L. (2013). Estimation of the thermodynamics of ionic materials. Journal of Materials Science and
Nanotechnology, 1(1), 1-2.
70.
Glasser, L. (2013). Single-ion values for ionic solids of both formation enthalpies, delta h-f(298)(ion), and
gibbs formation energies, delta(f)g(298)(ion). Inorganic Chemistry, 52(2), 992-998.
71.
Glasser, L. (2013). Table for 118. Chemistry World, -, ---.
72.
Glasser, L. (2013). Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials. Journal of Solid State Chemistry, 206, 139144.
73.
Goh, C. Y., Mocerino, M., & Ogden, M. I. (2013). Macrocyclic gelators. Supramolecular Chemistry, 25(911), 555-566.
74.
Greenwood, P. F., Brocks, J., Grice, K., Schwark, L., Jaraula, C., Dick, J., & Evans, K. A. (2013). Organic
geochemistry and mineralogy. I. Characterisation of organic matter associated with metal deposits. Ore
Geology Reviews, 50, 1-27.
75.
Gruchlik, Y., Heitz, A., Joll, C. A., Driessen, H., Fouche, L., Penney, N., & Charrois, J. W. (2013). Odour
reduction strategies for biosolids produced from a Western Australian wastewater treatment plant:
results from Phase I laboratory trials. Water Science and Technology, 68(12), 2552-2558.
76.
Gubner, R., Lepkova, K., Pandarinathan, V., & Van Bronswijk, W. (2013). Synchrotron infrared
microspectroscopy study of the orientation of an organic surfactant on a microscopically rough steel
surface. vibrational spectroscopy, 68, 204-211.
77.
Horton, R., Kelly, T., Lenehan, C. E., Lennard, C., Lewis, S. W., Lim, K., Rouc, C., & Southam, D. C. (2013).
Assessing students’ attitudes toward forensic science: Collecting an expert consensus. Forensic Science
Policy and Management: An International Journal, 3(4), 180-188.
78.
Jaraula, C., Grice, K., Twitchett, R., Bottcher, M. E., Le Metayer, P., Dastidar, A. G., & Opazo, L. (2013).
Elevated pCO2 leading to late triassic extinction, persistent photic zone euxinia, and rising sea levels.
Geology, 41, 955-958.
79.
Johanson, Z., Trinajstic, K., Carr, R., & Ritchie, A. (2013). Evolution and development of the synarcual in
early vertebrates. Zoomorphology, 132(1), 95-110.
80.
Kowalczyk, P., Gauden, P. A., Terzyk, A. P., & Neimark, A. V. (2013). Screening of carbonaceous
nanoporous materials for capture of nerve agents. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 15, 291-298.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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81.
Kowalczyk, P., Gauden, P. A., Terzyk, A. P., Pantatosaki, E., & Papadopoulos, G. K. (2013). Constant
pressure path integral Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo method. Journal of Chemical Theory and
Computation, 9(7), 2922-2929.
82.
Kowalczyk, P., He, J., Hu, M., Gauden, P. A., Furmaniak, S., & Terzyk, A. P. (2013). To the pore and through
the pore: thermodynamics and kinetics of helium in exotic cubic carbon polymorphs. Physical Chemistry
Chemical Physics, 15(40), 17366-17373.
83.
Ladjavadi, M., Berwick, L., Grice, K., Boreham, C., & Horsfield, B. (2013). Rapid offline isotopic
characterisation of hydrocarbon gases generated by micro scale sealed vessel pyrolysis. Organic
Geochemistry, 58, 121-124.
84.
Lee, J., Murugappan, K., Arrigan, D. W. M., & Silvester, D. S. (2013). Oxygen reduction voltammetry on
platinum macrodisk and screen-printed electrodes in ionic liquids: Reaction of the electrogenerated
superoxide species with compounds used in the paste of Pt screen-printed electrodes? Electrochimica
Acta, 101, 158-168.
85.
Leong, J., Tan, J., Charrois, J. W., & Ladewig, B. P. (2013). Review of high recovery concentrate
management options. Desalination and Water Treatment: science and engineering, 51, 1-19.
86.
Liu, Y., Du, Y., & Li, C. M. (2013). Direct electrochemistry based biosensors and biofuel cells enabled with
nanostructured materials. Electroanalysis, 25(4), 815-831.
87.
Loi, C., Busetti, F. M., Linge, K. L., & Joll, C. A. (2013). Development of a solid-phase extraction liquid
chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for benzotriazoles and benzothiazoles in
wastewater and recycled water. Journal of Chromatography A, 1299, 48-57.
88.
Machuca, L., Bailey, S. I., & Gubner, R. (2013). Crevice Corrosion Studies on Corrosion Resistant Alloys in
Stagnant Natural Seawater, Switzerland.
89.
McDonald, S. R., Joll, C. A., Lethorn, A. F., Loi, C., & Heitz, A. (2013). Drinking water: the problem of
chlorinous odours. Journal of Water Supply: Research and Technology. AQUA, 62(2), 86-96.
90.
McGee, K., Wright, P. J., Muzzioli, S., Siedlovskas, C. M., Raiteri, P., Baker, M. V., Murry, V., Brown, D.
H., Stagni, S., & Massi, M. (2013). Enhanced deep-blue emission from Pt(II) complexes bound to 2pyridyltetrazolate and an ortho-xylene-linked bis(NHC)cyclophane. Dalton Transactions, 42(12), 42334236.
91.
Melendez, I., Grice, K., & Schwark, L. (2013). Exceptional preservation of palaeozoic steroids in a
diagenetic continuum. Scientific Reports, 3.
92.
Melendez, I., Grice, K., Trinajstic, K., Ladjavadi, M., Greenwood, P. F., & Thompson, K. (2013).
Biomarkers reveal the role of photic zone euxinia in exceptional fossil preservation: An organic
geochemical perspective. Geology, 41(2), 123-126.
93.
Metcalfe, I., Nicoll, R. S., Willink, R., Ladjavadi, M., & Grice, K. (2013). Early triassic (Induan–Olenekian)
conodont biostratigraphy, global anoxia, carbon isotope excursions and environmental perturbations:
New data from Western Australian Gondwana. Gondwana Research, 23, 1136-1150.
94.
Nazneen, F., Schmidt, M., McLoughlin, E., Petkov, N., Herzog, G., Arrigan, D. W. M., & Galvin, P. (2013).
Impact of surface nano-textured stainless steel prepared by focused ion beam on endothelial cell
growth. Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 13(8), 5283-5290.
95.
Nguyen, T. V., Hartmann, J. M., & Enders, D. (2013). Recent synthetic strategies to access sevenmembered carbocycles in natural product synthesis. Synthesis, 45(7), 845-873.
96.
Peterson, S. M., Casadio, Y. S., Brown, D. H., Shaw, J., Chirila, T. V., & Baker, M. V. (2013). Laser scanning
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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confocal microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy for characterization of polymer morphology:
sample preparation drastically distorts morphologies of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-based
hydrogels. Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 127, 4296-4304.
97.
Paterson, S. M., Shadforth, A. M., Shaw, J., Brown, D. H., Chirila, T. V., & Baker, M. V. (2013). Improving
the cellular invasion into phema sponges by incorporation of the rgd peptide ligand: The use of
copolymerization as a means to functionalize phema sponges. Materials Science and Engineering C,
33(8), 4917-4922.
98.
Poinern, G. E., Le, X., Hager, M., Becker, T., & Fawcett, D. (2013). Electrochemical synthesis,
characterisation, and preliminary biological evaluation of an anodic aluminium oxide membrane with a
pore size of 100 nanometres for a potential cell culture substrate. American Journal of Biomedical
Engineering, 3(6), 119-131.
99.
Payne, A. D. (2013). Photochemistry of 3H-furo[3,4-c]pyrazoles and 3H-thieno[3,4-c] pyrazoles.
Tetrahedron, 69, 9316-9321.
100. Plimpton, S. J., & Gale, J. D. (2013). Developing community codes for materials modeling. Current
Opinion in Solid State & Materials Science, 17(6), 271-276.
101. Radomirovic, T., Smith, P. G., & Jones, F. (2013). Using absorbance as a measure of turbidity in highly
caustic solutions. International Journal of Mineral Processing, 118, 59-64.
102. Radomirovic, T., Smith, P. G., Southam, D. C., Tashi, S., & Jones, F. (2013). Crystallization of sodalite
particles under Bayer-type conditions. Hydrometallurgy, 137, 84-91.
103. Reid, B., Briggs, S. B., Karagiannidis, L. E., Muzzioli, S., Raiteri, P., Light, M. E., Stagni, S., Brulatti, P., Gale,
P. A., Ogden, M. I., & Massi, M. (2013). Blue emitting C2-symmetrical dibenzothiazolyl substituted
pyrrole, furan and thiophene. Journal of Materials Chemistry C, 1, 2209-2216.
104. Ridgway, H. F., Gale, J. D., Hughes, Z. E., Stewart, M. B., Orbell, J. D., & Gray, S. R. (2013). Molecular Scale
Modeling of Membrane Water Treatment Processes. Functional Nanostructured Materials and
Membranes for Water Treatment (pp. 249-299). Germany: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.
105. Sairi, M., Strutwolf, J., Mitchell, R. A., Silvester, D. S., & Arrigan, D. W. M. (2013). Chronoamperometric
response at nanoscale liquid–liquid interface arrays. Electrochimica Acta, 101, 177-185.
106. Sarker, D. C., Sathasivan, A., Joll, C. A., & Heitz, A. (2013). Modelling temperature effects on ammoniaoxidising bacterial biostability in chloraminated systems. Science of the Total Environment, 454, 88-89.
107. Sauzier, G., Frick, A. A., & Lewis, S. W. (2013). Investigation into the performance of physical developer
formulations for visualizing latent fingerprints on paper. Journal of Forensic Identification, 63(1), 70-89.
108. Sauzier, G., Maric, M., Van Bronswijk, W., & Lewis, S. W. (2013). Preliminary studies into the effect of
environmental degradation on the characterisation of automotive clear coats by attenuated total
reflectance infrared spectroscopy. Analytical Methods, 5(19), 4984-4990.
109. Senaputra, A., Fawell, P., Jones, F., & Smith, P. (2013). Sodalite solids formation at the surface of iron
oxide and its impact on flocculation, USA.
110. Song, Q., Wang, B., Deng, K., Feng, X., Wagner, M., Gale, J. D., Mullen, K., & Zhi, L. (2013). Graphenylene,
a unique two-dimensional carbon network with nondelocalized cyclohexatriene units. Journal of
Materials Chemistry C, 1(1), 38-41.
111. Southam, D. C., & Lewis, J. (2013). Supporting alternative strategies for learning chemical applications
of group theory. Journal of Chemical Education., 90, 1425-1432.
112. Southam, D. C., Shand, B., Buntine, M. A., Kable, S. H., Read, J. R., & Morris, J. C. (2013). The timing of
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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an experiment in the laboratory program is crucial for the student laboratory experience: acylation of
ferrocene as a case study. Chemistry Education: Research and Practice, 14, 476-484.
113. Tulipani, S., Grice, K., Greenwood, P. F., & Schwark, L. (2013). A pyrolysis and stable isotopic approach
to investigate the origin of methyltrimethyltridecylchromans (MTTCs). Organic Geochemistry, 61, 1-5.
114. Vaughan, J. G., Reid, B., Ramchandani, S., Wright, P. J., Muzzioli, S., Skelton, B. W., Raiteri, P., Brown,
D. H., Stagni, S., & Massi, M. (2013). The photochemistry of rhenium(I) tricarbonyl N-heterocyclic
carbene complexes. Dalton Transactions, 42(39), 14100-14114.
115. Veder, J.-P., Patel, K., Lee, J., Alam, M. T., James, M., Nelson, A., & De Marco, R. (2013). Is ballistic
transportation or quantum confinement responsible for changes in the electrical properties of thin
polymer films? Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 15(5), 1364-1368.
116. Wang, H., Stern, H. A., Chakraborty, D., Bai, H., DiFilippo, V., Goela, J. S., Pickering, M., & Gale, J. D.
(2013). Computational Study of Surface Deposition and Gas Phase Powder Formation during Spinel
Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 52(44), 1527015280.
117. Wright, P. J., Affleck, M. G., Muzzioli, S., Skelton, B. W., Raiteri, P., Silvester, D. S., Stagni, S., & Massi,
M. (2013). Ligand-induced structural, photophysical, and electrochemical variations in tricarbonyl
rhenium(I) tetrazolato complexes. Organometallics, 32(13), 3728-3737.
118. Wright, P. J., Muzzioli, S., Skelton, B. W., Raiteri, P., Lee, J., Koutsantonis, G. A., Silvester, D. S., Stagni,
S., & Massi, M. (2013). One-step assembly of Re(I) tricarbonyl 2-pyridyltetrazolato metallacalix3arene
with aqua emission and reversible three-electron oxidation. Dalton Transactions, 42(23), 8188-8191.
119. Zadnik, S., Van Bronswijk, W., Frick, A. A., Fritz, P., & Lewis, S. W. (2013). Fingermark simulants and
their inherent problems: A comparison with latent fingermark deposits. Journal of Forensic
Identification, 63(5), 593-608.
7.3
Book Chapters
120. De La Pierre, M., Dovesi, R., Ferrari, A. M., Noel, Y., & Orlando, R. (2013). 9.36 – Structure and Vibrational
Spectra. In Reedijk & Poeppelmeier (Eds.), Comprehensive Inorganic Chemistry II (pp. 971-987).
Netherland: Elsevier.
121. Gale, J. D., Gray, S. R., Hughes, Z. E., Orbell, J. D., Ridgway, H. F., & Stewart, M. B. (2013). Molecular Scale
Modeling of Membrane Water Treatment Processes Functional Nanostructured Materials and
Membranes for Water Treatment (pp. 249-299). Germany: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.
122. Dawson, D., Grice, K., Horsfield, B., Maslen, E., & Wang, S. X. (2013). Stable hydrogen isotopes of
isoprenoids and n-alkanes as a proxy for estimating the thermal history of sediments through geological
time. In P. K. E. Harris Nb (Ed.), Analyzing the thermal history of sedimentary basins: Methods and case
studies (pp. 29-43). Tulsa, Oklahoma: SEPM Society for Sedimentary Geology.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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8
RESEARCH REPORT
8.1
Introduction
8.2
Research Profiles
8.1
Introduction
The Department of Chemistry continues to be active in a wide range of research programs in both
fundamental and applied chemistry. Although the Department is engaged in a broad range of research
programs, there are seven key areas of research that are aligned with the Department's teaching
program, the needs of the Australian chemical community, and current international developments in
chemistry research.
Through the leadership provided by the Department Research Committee (established in 2009), the
Department has also invested considerable effort into defining its priority areas of research activity
and focus. These are:







Analytical chemistry
Chemistry education
Computational chemistry
Corrosion science
Materials chemistry and spectroscopy
Minerals, water and geochemistry
Synthesis, medicinal and biological chemistry
Most staff members are engaged in more than one of these areas, and the summaries of research
progress in 2013 are documented as brief Research Profiles.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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8.2
Research Profiles
Dr Sebastien Allard
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3206
500-3227
9266 7949
[email protected]
I was recruited in July 2009 as a Research Fellow to work on the ARC-funded project "Treating wastewater
for potable reuse: removal of chemicals of concern using advanced oxidation processes" with Water
Corporation, GHD and WQRA as industry partners. The aim of the project was to investigate the formation
of emerging disinfection by-products such as nitrosamines and organoiodide compounds formed during
monochloramination of wastewater, and to evaluate the performance of various advanced oxidation
processes to limit their formation and release into the aquifer prior to water reuse (ARC LP0989326). This
project was completed last year with the delivery of a report to Water Corporation. The second project is
ARC LP100100285 “Novel water treatment technologies for minimisation of bromide and iodide in drinking
water”, with Water Corporation and WQRA as industry partners. I was also involved in a research project
investigating the oxidation of manganous ions and the effect of NOM and bromide ions in chlorination. I am
currently employed (2012-2014) as a full-time Research Fellow on an Australian Water Recycling Center of
Excellence (AWRCoE) project entitled ‘Micropollutants, mixtures and transformation products in recycled
water: how much do we really know?’. Together these projects yielded three publications in 2013.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Professor Damien Arrigan
Office:
500-3115
Lab:
500-2222
Phone:
9266 9735
Email: [email protected]
Electroanalytical Chemistry at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces
Our interests are in electrochemical behavior at interfaces between immiscible liquids and the use of that behavior
as the basis for chemical and biochemical detection and sensing. Key progress during 2013 was made in the
following areas:
Detection of haemoglobin using an adsorption approach
The behaviour of haemoglobin at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES) was examined
for analytical purposes. When the protein is fully protonated, under acidic conditions (pH < pI) in the aqueous
phase, it undergoes a potential-dependent adsorption and complexation, at the interface, with the anions of the
organic phase electrolyte. This behavior was utilised as the basis of a simple and fast analytical method, consisting
of adsorbing the protein at the interface, in conjunction with a voltammetric desorption step. Utilising this
adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) approach with a 60 s adsorption step and linear sweep voltammetry, the
voltammetric response to Haemoglobin concentration in aqueous solution was linear over the range 0.01 – 0.5
μM. The calculated detection limit (3σ) was 48 nM for a 60 s preconcentration period, while the relative standard
deviation was 13.3 % for 6 successive measurements at 0.1 µM Hb. These results illustrate the prospects for
simple, portable and rapid label-free detection of biomacromolecules offered by electrochemistry at arrays of
microinterfaces.
Ion transfer electrochemistry of rat amylin: selective detection in a protein mixture
Amylin is a polypeptide that is co-secreted with insulin from B-islet cells and is implicated in fibril formation in
humans. In this work, carried out in collaboration with Curtin’s School of Biomedical Sciences, rat amylin (or islet
amyloid polypeptide) was studied at the interface formed between liquid aqueous and gelled organic phases, as
amylin from rat does not undergo aggregation. The polypeptide was found to undergo an interfacial transfer
process, from water to the gelled organic phase under applied potential stimulation. The voltammetry exhibited
steady-state forward and peak-shaped reverse voltammograms, which are consistent with a diffusion-controlled
water-to-organic transfer and a thin-film stripping or desorptive back-transfer. The diffusion-controlled forward
current was greater when amylin was present in an acidic aqueous phase than when it was present in aqueous
phase at physiological pH, reflecting the greater charge on the polypeptide under acidic conditions. The amylin
transfer current was concentration-dependent over the range 2 - 10 µM, at both acidic and physiological pH. At
physiological pH, amylin was selectively detected in the presence of a protein mixture, illustrating the bioanalytical
possibilities for this electrochemical behaviour.
Detection of insulin at liquid–liquid microinterfaces in the presence of bovine albumin
Adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) was implemented at an array of microinterfaces for the detection of the
antidiabetic hormone insulin. In collaboration with Curtin’s School of Biomedical Sciences, the potentialcontrolled adsorption of insulin at the liquid-liquid interface was exploited for detection of insulin down to 10 nM.
This is the lowest detected concentration reported to-date for a protein by electrochemistry at these types of
interfaces. In a step toward assessment of selectivity, the optimum adsorption potentials for insulin and albumin
were determined to be 0.900 V and 0.975 V, respectively. When present in an aqueous mixture with albumin,
insulin was detected by tuning the adsorption potential to 0.9 V, albeit with reduced sensitivity. This provides the
first example of selective detection of one protein in the presence of another by exploiting optimal adsorption
potentials. The results presented here provide a route to the improvement of detection limits and achievement
of selectivity for protein detection by electrochemistry at the liquid-liquid interfaces.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Dr Thomas Becker
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-1313
500-C120
9266 7806
[email protected]
Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM)
Scanning Probe Microscopes are powerful instruments for the nano-characterization of sample surfaces. The
Scanning Probe Microscopy Facility is equipped with 6 top-range Scanning Probe Microscopes and 5 optical
Microscopes to characterize samples from the micrometer- down to the nanometer-scale. In my position I
am responsible to manage the SPM facility, which involves the maintenance and calibration of the
equipment, training of new users, consultancy work and involvement in various research projects as well as
giving lectures and seminars about Scanning Probe Microscopy.
The instruments of the facility include all standard imaging and operation modes for Scanning Tunneling
Microscopy (STM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and are used to measure the surface characteristics
of a wide range of different samples. The measurements can be performed in air, liquids or controlled
environment including temperature and humidity control. Advanced imaging modes like Magnetic Force
Microscopy (MFM), Electric Force Microscopy (EFM), Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy (SKPM) and current
sensing AFM (C-AFM) and dedicated SPM based force spectroscopy tools are also available.
The Scanning Probe Microscopes are used for imaging and characterizing sample surfaces and to investigate
interaction forces between a sample and a probe using the Force-Spectroscopy. Surfaces can be modified on
the nanometer scale as well as being tested using the nano-indentation equipment.
The WITec alpha300SR combines AFM, Scanning Near Field Optical Microscopy (SNOM), Confocal Microscopy
and Confocal Raman Imaging in one instrument. The combination of AFM and confocal Raman microscopy
allows investigation of topography as well as imaging with chemical sensitivity.
In August 2013 a new Bruker Dimension FastScan/Icon SPM system was installed in the SPM facility. This
instrument is currently the World’s fastest AFM and includes a range of new imaging modes, including
PeakForce Tapping and PeakForce QNM (quantum nanomechanical mapping). In these imaging modes the
force between probe and sample is precisely controlled and imaging of very delicate samples. Additionally,
PeakForce QNM allows to map properties such as adhesion, elastic modulus, dissipation and stiffness and
correlate them directly to the topography.
PeakForce QNM imaging of a thin film of a Polystyrene (PS) – Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) blend
The Height Sensor (left) represents the topography of the film and shows a phase separation of PS and
PMMA. The PS forms small spheres which are embedded in a matrix of PMMA. Mapping of the mechanical
properties shows that the adhesion of the probe on the PS is larger than on PMMA and that the PMMA has
a greater elastic modulus compared to PS (DMT modulus image shows the relative change of elastic modulus)
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Dr Alison Blyth
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-3203
9266 9388
[email protected]
DR ALISON BLYTH - AINSE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP
The aim of this research is to expand our understanding of biomarkers, isotopic proxies and radiocarbon in
terrestrial environments, and especially cave deposits. 2013 was the second year of this fellowship, and
research focused in two areas: the development of radiocarbon dating of organic matter in speleothems
(supported by an AINSE research award in collaboration with ANSTO), and the further development of new
biomarker proxies in speleothems, particularly furthering our understanding of the sources of microbial
membrane lipids that have been shown to preserve temperature data. The latter forms a collaboration with
the Royal Netherlands Sea Research Institute (NIOZ), and the University of New South Wales. Good progress
was made in both areas, with a new protocol being developed for dating detrital organic matter in
speleothems which may open up the palaeoenvironmental use of samples not previously amenable to
chemical dating. In the biomarker field, I successfully demonstrated that the microbial membrane lipids
preserved in speleothems are predominantly sourced from inside the cave environment, which will allow
refinement of my previously published temperature calibration. In the second half of 2013, my team was
joined by Samantha Hawken, a 4th year MChem student from the University of Southampton, who undertook
a research project on microbial membrane lipids in cave sediments, and demonstrated that the mode of
sediment formation may be a major influence on lipid composition. In 2014, I am pursuing these themes
further, with the application of a microbial temperature proxy to samples from the last ice age, and a
continuing collaboration with ANSTO to expand organic dating in speleothems to individual lipid fractions.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Dr Bruno Bašić
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-2207
500-2229
9266 9383
[email protected]
Development of organic compounds for treatment of osteoarthritis
This project is funded by NHMRC grant (1051455), and done in collaboration with Dr Alan Payne and Prof
Deirdre Coombe. It concerns the synthesis of small organic molecules for use in treatment of osteoarthritis.
Osteoarthritis, a crippling condition that adversely affects quality of life, manifests as a severe degradation
of cartilage. People suffering from the condition will often present tender, inflamed joints that greatly restrict
their range of motion. The causes of osteoarthritis may be hereditary, developmental, metabolic, and
mechanical. The chance of suffering from the condition increases with age. As the average human life
expectancy increases, the need for effective and if possible permanent treatment for joint inflammation
becomes ever more desirable.
The aim is to develop molecules that will assist with the control of cartilage turnover following mechanical
injury and inflammation. The molecules in question are sulphated glycosaminoglycans that can be thought
of as sugar molecules with a negative charge. These molecules are to be tested against receptors that are
responsible for the biological cascade within the body that leads to cartilage degradation and loss. The
current focus is on delivering simpler analogues of a sulphated glycosaminoglycan in sufficient quantities and
purity so that it can be tested for its effectiveness.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Professor Mark A. Buntine
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-2114
500-1239
9266 7265
[email protected]
My research interests include laser chemistry and spectroscopy and chemistry education.
Laser Chemistry and Spectroscopy:
During 2013 our on-going research focused on the laser-based formation kinetics and physical properties of
metal nanoparticles, MNPs, in aqueous solution was extended to include an exploration of the changes in
electronic properties of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) encapsulated with a variety of nitrogen-based ligands,
and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) encapsulated with various sulfur-based ligands. Varying the nature of the
ligand has been shown to significantly influence the surface plasmon absorption characteristics of the MNPs.
Associated synchrotron X-ray photoelectron studies have highlighted differing AuNP surface oxidation states
as a function of surfactant (rather than ligand) environment. We also explored the influence of surfactant
concentration on resultant AuNP size distributions [1].
Chemistry Education:
The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory (ASELL) project and its progenitor chemistryonly ACELL variant have also continued. These projects are designed to improve student learning outcomes
in the undergraduate laboratory. The interested reader is directed to the project website (www.asell.org)
for more details. In 2013 we published a paper exploring the influence of the timing of an experiment during
a semester of study on student motivation for learning [2].
[1].
Influence of Cationic Surfactants on the Formation and Surface Oxidation States of Gold Nanoparticles
Produced via Laser Ablation; Y.-Y. Fong, J. R. Gascooke, B. R. Visser, H. H. Harris, B. C. C. Cowie, L.
DOI:
Thomsen, G. F. Metha and M. A. Buntine, Langmuir, 29, 12452-12462 (2013).
10.1021/la402234k.
[2].
The timing of an experiment in the laboratory program is crucial for the student laboratory experience:
acylation of ferrocene as a case study; D. C. Southam, B. Shand, M. A. Buntine, S. H. Kable, J. R. Read
and J. C. Morris, Chem. Educ. Res. Pract., 14, 476-484 (2013). DOI: 10.1039/c3rp00011g.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
82
Dr Fancesco Busetti
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3212
500-3225
9266 3273
[email protected]
WATER QUALITY AND TREATMENT - Micropollutants, mixtures and transformation products in recycled water:
how much do we really know? - This is a strategic project between Curtin University and the University of
Queensland. The aims of the project are 1) to give evidence on the effects of mixtures of chemicals and their
transformation products; 2) to identify previously un-identified compounds that are exerting toxic responses as
part of complex mixtures; 3) to support future policy and regulatory action in addition to making significant
contributions to chemical risk assessments of recycled water. The results of this 2 years project have been
accepted for publication in the peer reviewed international journal “Water Research” as well as have been
presented in international conferences (e.g. SETAC-AU Melbourne 2013). Additional results involving the
application of Advanced Oxidation Processes for removal of pharmaceuticals, EDCs and pesticides as well as the
identification of their transformation by-products using LC-HRMS will be published in upcoming peer reviewed
international journals. Current project status: on-going.
Swan-Canning Project - The Swan-Canning River Basin is a state icon, and holds significant social, cultural and
ecological values for the broader community. The Basin is also under strain due to urbanization, climate change
and land-use changes. This project will contribute to our understanding of some of the potential environmental
stressors associated with the Swan-Canning System. A variety of micropollutants including pharmaceuticals,
hormones, antibiotics, X-ray contrast media, benzotriazoles and benzothiazoles have been monitored at selected
study sites within the Swan-Canning River Basin. Results of this research will be published in an upcoming peer
reviewed international journal. Current project status: completed.
ALUMINA INDUSTRY - The Bayer process. This research has been conducted in collaboration with CSIRO Minerals
and has been funded by the Australian Mineral Resource Centre (Parker Centre, T3 Core Capability Research
Project). The main interest is to understand the impact of wet oxidation on the organic chemical composition of
Bayer liquors. The Bayer process is the industrial process used to produce aluminum from bauxite ores. Organic
compounds originally present in the bauxite ores are thought to “poison” the aluminum quality causing huge
economic losses every year. The determination of such unknown organics compounds in Bayer liquor is key for
their effective removal through wet oxidation. Such process, however, is also responsible for production of a very
explosive gas, hydrogen. This obviously has OSH implications that need to be addressed to ensure a safe work
environment. The results from this research have been published in the peer reviewed international journal (e.g.
DOI: 10.1021/ie4028268; dx.doi.org/10.1021/ie400435k)”. Current project status: completed.
FOOD and Health SCIENCE - Formation and degradation of beta-casomorphins in dairy processing – This research
is conducted in collaboration with School of Public Health Faculty of Health Sciences at Curtin University and aims
to understand the processes leading to the formation and degradation of bioactive molecules (betacasomorphins) in dairy products. This type of molecules is suspected of causing type-2 diabetes, and therefore is
of public interest their removal in dairy products for human consumption. In this research we have been successful
in developing a cutting edge analytical method enabling measurements of beta-casomorphins-5 and 7 in dairy
products at very low levels. We have also established the formation and degradation process of such molecules in
yoghurt. The results of this research have been published in peer reviewed international journals (e.g.
DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.09.057). Current project status: on-going.
FORENSIC SCIENCE - Finger printing and characterization of novel fluorescent dyes – This research area is
conducted in collaboration with the Forensic Science group within the Department of Chemistry at Curtin
University and includes investigation on post-mortem indicators, decomposition chemistry and estimation of time
of death, finger printing and characterization of novel fluorescent dyes for forensic applications. The results of this
research have been published in a peer reviewed international journals (e.g. DOI: 10.1039/C3CC49577A).
Additional results of this research have been also presented at an international conference (e.g. IFRG 2013).
Current project status: on-going.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
83
Dr Damien Carter
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-3127
9266 3126
[email protected]
Beta-decay in solids
Using 90Sr as an illustrative isotope, we presented a framework for understanding beta decay in the solid
state. We quantified key physical and chemical principles of the various processes that can occur, which in
turn leads to the
concept of chemical evolution (or transmutation) over time. Using density functional theory calculations,
combined with phonon calculations and Bader change analysis, we showed that beta decay in two
prototypical solids, namely SrTiO3 and SrH2, lead to counter-intuitive behavior that has implications for
synthesis of novel materials and accelerated again in nuclear waste forms. This article was published in the
Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter [1].
Delta-doping of semiconductors
In 2013, we continued our theoretical calculations of phosphorus delta-doped layers in silicon, by examining
a pair of interacting delta layers. We investigated changes in the electronic structure, in particular band
energies, valley splittings and donor densities, as the two isolated layers are brought together and begin to
interact. We also developed a hybrid model that enabled us to calculated accurate splittings of realistically
disordered systems at tractable computational cost. This work was published in the journal Physical Review
B [2].
A related area of interest is delta-doping in Germanium, which we also began investigating in 2013. In
particular, we examined arsenic and phosphorus delta-doped layers in germanium. We characterized the
important band minima as a consequence of the delta doping, and examined their dependence on the dopant
concentration. We also examined the valley splittings and effective masses, and investigated the effect of
disorder in the dopant arrangements within the delta-layer. This work was published in the journal Physical
Review B [3].
[1] Marks, N.A., Carter, D.J., Sassi, M., Rohl, A.L., Sickafus, K.E., Uberuaga, B.P. and Stanek, C.R. (2013), “Chemical evolution via beta decay: A case
study in strontium-90”, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, Vol. 25, p. 065504.
[2] Carter, D.J., Marks, N.A., Warschkow, O. and McKenzie, D.R. (2013). “Electronic structure of two interacting phosphorus δ–doped layers in silicon.
Physical Review B. Vol 87, p. 045204.
[3] Carter, D.J., Warschkow, O., Gale, J.D., Scappucci, G., Klesse, W., Capellini, G., Rohl, A.L., Simmons, M.Y., McKenzie, D.R., and Marks, N.A. (2013).
"Electronic structure of phosphorus and arsenic δ-doped germanium". Physical Review B. Vol. 88, p. 115203.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
84
Dr Raffaella Demichelis
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-1105
9266 3780
[email protected]
My research activity during 2013 has been focused on the investigation of mineral properties and processes
using computational methods.
In particular, in collaboration with Dr. Raiteri and Prof. Gale (Computational Materials Chemistry group), I
have been mostly working to improve the understanding of calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth.
Calcium carbonate is a mineral that plays an important role in biochemistry and in geochemistry, as well as
being a technological hindrance in the form of scale. The three known crystalline polymorphs are the final
result of a non-classical nucleation process involving the formation of stable precursors (pre-nucleation
clusters), the nucleation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), and the transformation of ACC into the
crystalline forms. My research is contributing to reveal the atomic details of the various steps of this complex
process, which is currently attracting the interest and the curiosity of a broad and international scientific
community.
In the past year, I have contributed to the development of accurate models able to predict the early stages
of calcium carbonate nucleation (Meth. Enzymol. 2013, 532, 3). I have also contributed to describe the
structure of crystallization intermediates, such as vaterite and hydrated carbonates. The former is a
particularly challenging material, and we have shown that it can assume multiple structures (see figure),
rather than correspond to one particular atomic arrangement (Cryst. Growth. Des. 2013, 13, 2247). The latter
are quite rare materials, and the reason for their formation and their stoichiometry is currently not fully
understood. We have investigated the thermodynamics of water inclusion into these phases (J. Phys. Chem.
C 2013, 117, 17814) and provided a reference for an atomic description of their structure and hydrogen bond
pattern (J. Cryst. Growth, DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2013.10.064). Notably, both for vaterite and for one
hydrate, we have pointed out their intrinsic chirality, a property that is expected to be particularly significant
for their crystallization under biogenic conditions.
The multiple structure of vaterite: the “disorder” experimentally observed can be interpreted with the presence of many
energetically equivalent structures, differing for the stacking of carbonate layers. The rotation of carbonate units and
the presence of chiral images add further level of complexity to these structures.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
85
Professor Julian Gale
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3122
500-1105
9266 7800
[email protected]
Below is a selection of some of the research highlights from our team during the past year:
1) Nucleation mechanism of calcium carbonate:
Calcium carbonate is one of the most abundant minerals at the Earth’s surface and is an example par
excellence of a mineral that can be created by the process of biomineralisation. In nature, this substance can
be found as anything from optical lenses to the complex protective shell of marine organisms. Understanding
how this mineral is initially formed by nucleation is central to our understanding of biomimetic chemistry. In
the last five years there has been considerable discussion regarding the pathway by which calcium carbonate
forms, including the role of so-called non-classical species. Working with researchers from Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley, we have shown the first nucleation event for
calcium carbonate involves a liquid-liquid separation, rather than formation of a solid nucleus. Here a dense
liquid phase separates from a low concentration phase to create spherical droplets that subsequently
dehydrate to form amorphous calcium carbonate. This work was published in the journal Science.
2) The multiple structures of vaterite:
Vaterite is an important intermediate phase of CaCO3 that can be formed as part of the transformation of
amorphous calcium carbonate through to more stable crystalline phases, namely calcite and aragonite.
Unlike the other crystalline phases of this mineral, vaterite has a disordered structure and so there has been
considerable debate as to the details of the structure for several decades. In our previous work we had used
ab initio quantum mechanical calculations to demonstrate that the all of the previously proposed ordered
structural models in the literature were either transition states, or so high in energy that they were unlikely
to exist. More recently we have examined different permutations of carbonate group orientations within a
six-layer repeat. Based on this we were able to propose that vaterite is likely to be composed of at least three
different polytypes, each one of which is an average over multiple disordered configurations. At the same
time that our work was in press a paper appeared in Science identifying two different vaterite forms from
electron microscopy, thereby providing experimental evidence to support our theoretical hypothesis.
3) Structure of water at the calcite surface:
In collaboration with Dr Paul Fenter from Argonne National Laboratory and Dr Sebastien Kerisit from Pacific
Northwest National Laboratory, both in the US, we have used the direct comparison of molecular dynamics
simulation results and X-ray reflectivity data to probe the calcite-water interface. This is a prototypical
mineral-water interface since it is possible to grow large single crystals of calcite, which also exhibit extensive
regions of flat basal surface. While both previous experimental and theoretical work had demonstrated that
there is substantial ordering of water at this interface, this is the first work to quantitatively benchmark how
accurate simulation results are in comparison to experiment by comparing model X-ray reflectivity data, as
opposed to comparing structural data extracted from the spectra. Comparison of four different force field
models made it possible to determine which are the most accurate interatomic potentials for structure, and
showed that analysis of the experimental data can be improved by use of information from simulation to
relax constraints on intensities.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
86
Professor Leslie Glasser
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-3127
9266-3126
[email protected]
Objectives
We have developed a systematic system of Volume-Based Thermodynamics (VBT), applicable to condensed
phases, which is now widely applied to many systems, including minerals, ionic liquids, and in inorganic
synthesis. A feature of VBT is its simplicity, resulting in ready applicability without specialist knowledge or
extensive computation. Present work is directed towards extending the range of materials and
thermodynamic properties to which VBT is applicable.
Activities
The research involves collecting and collating thermodynamic data and examining correlations and
relationships among the data.
Outcomes
Publication of results in well-recognised chemistry journals.
Future Work
Work will continue in these directions. Study of hydration thermodynamics has resulted in a number of
publications, now proceeding to experimental studies in conjunction with Dr Franca Jones of this
Department.
A joint project is proceeding with Cornell University, USA, and the University of Gdansk, Poland, to study the
development of presbyopia (age-related hardening of the lens) resulting from racemization of crystallin
proteins which occur in the human eye lens, This study involves computational studies of the rigidity of
crystallins before and after partial racemization. Ms Ewa Golas spent a month at Curtin University during
2013 where she undertook preliminary studies of stretching alpha-crysallin using atomic force microscopy
(AFM), under the direction of Dr Tom Becker in this Department.
I am currently in active collaboration internationally with the following scientists:
Prof HDB Jenkins, University of Warwick, UK – VBT collaborator
Prof. Dr. T. M. Klapötke, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich - VBT collaborator
Prof. HA Scheraga, Cornell University, USA – crystallin dynamics
Prof. A. Liwo, University of Gdansk, Poland – crystallin dynamics
Ms E. Golas, University of Gdansk, Poland – crystallin dynamics
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
87
Professor Kliti Grice
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-2116
500- 3220
9266 2474
[email protected]
Prof. Grice leads the WA-OIGC program and in 2013 secured funding for a GC x GC TOFMS (installed Dec 2013), a
John Stocker Fellowship (led to appointment of Anais Pages) and ARC DORA 3 (Professor Grice). Grice has continued
to successfully lead Organic Geochemistry Minerals System Cluster.
Project Title ARC DORA 3: Tackling the resurgences of life, advanced dating tools of oils by sophisticated molecular
and isotopic analyses from major geological events
Summary: The long-term impacts (over millions of years) of present global warming are poorly understood.
However, recovery mechanisms evident in past related mass extinctions are invaluable in helping to understand the
pace of recovery of marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Grice’s world-leading expertise in biomarkers and stable
isotopes will be applied to paleoclimate change, evolution and energy. Cutting-edge petroleum exploration
technologies especially dating oil without having to drill its source is important in addressing the global energy crisis.
Strongly interrelated themes also support Grice’s enthusiasm for training young scientists meeting Australia’s Earth
science research and industry needs.
Progress: 1 PhD student (Chloe Plet appointed to work on cherts and fossilised wood (jet) in concretions), a second
PhD student will commence 20th March 2014 to work on the Triassic/Jurassic of the NW Shelf and associated oils
and sediments. 1 research fellow Dr Svenja Tulipani was appointed to assist in extinction work. Preliminary analyses
on fossilised wood structures (e.g. cell walls) have yielded significant results. A preliminary elemental mapping using
SEM-EDS has been performed which shows that jet is mainly composed of carbon (up to 81 wt%), oxygen (up to 11
wt%) and phosphorus (up to 1.6 wt%). After performing a lignin breakdown by CuO oxidation, a detailed analysis of
monomeric lignin phenols will allow to assess the woody origin of the organic matter. A compound specific isotope
study will be carried out on the wood specific biomarkers leading to some insights on terrestrial palaeoenvironment
in place during an anoxic oceanic event. Perturbations of the major biogeochemical cycles during the end-Permian
extinction event have been broadly evaluated across the world, but little is known of the behaviour of such cycles
and how they governed the recovery of the marine and terrestrial ecosystem during the Early Triassic. An exhaustive
evaluation of an extended Early Triassic marine section of the northern hemisphere in a sedimentary basin from the
former Boreal Sea was carried out. New data for13C andD of bulk biomass and individual biomarkers is now
available along with biomarkers identification and quantification, including alkanes, isoprenoids, Chorobi derived
aryl isoprenoids and n-alkyl cyclohexanes. Molecular and sedimentological evidence show episodic anoxic/euxinic
conditions during the lower part of Early Triassic, intensified in the Lower Dienerian, and later declined towards the
Olenekian suggesting a more oxygenated water column by the end of the Early Triassic. Marked positive excursions
in the 13C and D of organic matter coincide with transgressive horizons at the Griesbachien-Dienerian boundary.
This isotopic profile and the molecular assemblage at this time suggest hothouse conditions were established
causing the incursion of warm saline bottom water deficient in oxygen and nutrients, promoting eradication of
photosynthetic organisms and favouring the development of opportunistic bacterial blooms, as predicted by the
Haline Euxinic Acidic Thermal Transgressions (HEATT) model. Recurrent and massive volcanism during the early
Triassic might have triggered a replicate of the HEATT conditions previously thought to occur only at the Permian
Triassic Boundary. This work has been submitted to Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Inside a fossil
concretion containing soft tissue of a fossil an entire diagenetic continuum of sterols to steroids were identified.
This is first occurrence of biomolecules (oldest sterols) and geomolecules. This was reported in Scientific reports.
Similar environmental conditions to the largest extinction event are reported for the end-Triassic demonstrating
almost an identical cascade of environmental changes that occurred during both these events and their aftermath.
This was published in Geology. In 2013 Grice supervised 2 PhDS to completion and 1 Honours student. She has
continued to attract outstanding ECRs some whom have obtained their own fellowships through her collaboration
and extensive mentorship.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
88
Dr Yolanta Gruchlik
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3116
500-3227
9266 9748
[email protected]
Laboratory Scale Investigations of Potential Odour Reduction Strategies in Biosolids – Phase II Background
Phase I of this project was completed in June 2012 and additional funding ($174,000) was obtained to expand the
scope of the Phase I study. In Phase 1 study, aluminium sulphate addition to liquid biosolids (mesophilic digested)
prior to dewatering was found to be the most promising odour reduction measure among the different options
investigated, resulting in a 40% reduction of the peak concentration of total volatile organic sulphur compounds
(TVOSC), relative to a control sample. The work completed in the Phase I project and preliminary work conducted
in the Phase II project was presented at the 5th IWA Conference on Odours and Air Emissions held in San Francisco,
4-7 March 2013, and at the OzWater 2013 conference held in Perth, 7-9 May 2013.
Objectives of Phase II Study
The objectives of the Phase II study were to: (a) expand biosolids and sludge sources to provide information on
the odorous compounds present in biosolids produced at other Western Australian WWTPs, in addition to those
studied in Phase I; (b) determine if the best odour reduction strategy identified in the Phase I project (i.e. alum
addition to digested/treated sludge prior to dewatering) is applicable to wastewater sludge and biosolids
produced from different treatment processes and (c) conduct dilution olfactometry measurements and
correlate/compare the results with measurements obtained using HS SPME/GC-MS.
Outcomes to date
The applicability of alum addition to wastewater sludge and biosolids produced from different treatment
processes was evaluated as a means of odour reduction. Four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were chosen
for this study: two used mesophilic anaerobic digestion (WWTPs 1 and 2) and two used oxidation ditch processes
(WWTPs 3 and 4). Alum addition was effective in reducing odours in biosolids from wastewater treatment plants
that used mesophilic anaerobic digestion to process wastewater sludge (WWTPs 1 and 2). For example, addition
of 4% Al to liquid biosolids from WWTP 1 prior to dewatering resulted in a 50% reduction in the overall odour
concentration in the lab dewatered cake, relative to the control sample. However, alum addition did not reduce
odours in sludge from wastewater treatment plants which used oxidation ditch processes (WWTPs 3 and 4). Thus,
alternative odour reduction measures need to be investigated for processed sludge from WWTPs 3 and 4 which
use oxidation ditch processes. Possible options for further investigation include: addition of potassium
permanganate and/or calcium nitrate to processed sludge prior to dewatering. No simple linear correlations were
observed between the TVOSC concentrations (chemical analyses by HS SPME-GC-MS) and the odour
concentrations (olfactometry). This lack of correlation between the results may, in part, have been due to the
different methods in which the samples were analysed as well as the presence of other odour compounds which
were not quantitated by the HS SPME-GC-MS method but contributed to the overall odour concentrations
determined by olfactometry. An abstract based on the work conducted in the Phase 2 study has been accepted
for an oral presentation at the AWA Biosolids and Source Management National Conference to be held in
Melbourne 25-27 June 2014.
Novel Treatment Technologies for the Minimisation of Bromide and Iodide in Drinking Water Project Aims
(a) Better understand the impact and occurrence of high concentrations of bromide and iodide in source waters;
(b) develop innovative new water treatment processes to selectively remove both bromide and iodide from
potable water sources that are relatively easy to install and operate and that are economically viable for
installation at both metropolitan and regional schemes and (c) determine if reducing the bromide and iodide
concentration reduces the concentration of DBPs and improves the organoleptic properties of chlorinated and
chloraminated finished waters.
Outcomes to date
Laboratory work in this project is now complete. In the process of preparing the final report and finalising journal
articles based on the work conducted in this project.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
89
Dr Caroline Jaraula
Office:
Phone:
Lab:
Email:
500-3203
9266 3819
500-3220
[email protected]
Dr Caroline Jaraula is currently employed as a Research Fellow on a Commonwealth Scientific Industrial and
Research Organization Flagship program on the Organic Geochemistry of Mineral Systems. She focuses her
research on carbonaceous uranium ore deposits and co-supervises students working on carbonaceous leadzinc and gold ore systems. Organic matter can play important roles in the source, transport and accumulation
of metals. In the Mulga Rock uranium and multi-element mineralised deposit of Western Australia, uranium
bears a close spatial relationship with organic matter. Petrological, bulk, molecular and isotopic geochemical
characterisation are undertaken to understand the relationship between organic matter, uranium
distribution and effects of ionizing radiation.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
90
Associate Professor Cynthia Joll
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3117
500-3222, 3225, 3227
9266 7229
[email protected]
As Deputy Director of the Curtin Water Quality Research Centre (CWQRC), A/Prof Joll was involved in a variety of
projects in 2013. A/Prof Joll supervised 5 PhD students during 2013, with two other PhD students having their
Theses under examination. An ARC Linkage grant on nitrogenous compounds in rural wastewater systems, with
partner organisations, Water Corporation and Water Research Australia, was awarded in June 2013. She also led
the submission of an ARC Linkage application, again with Water Corporation and Water Research Australia, in
November 2013 to study bromine chemistry in drinking waters. Collaborations with Water Corporation continued
through the CWQRC Alliance. Seven refereed journal articles and 5 refereed conference papers were published in
2013. A/Prof Joll gave an oral presentation at the NOM5 Conference in Perth in 2013. A/Prof Joll was a Lead CI on
3 ARC Linkage projects funded in 2013 and on one ARC LP with an extension into 2013. Progress on these ARC
projects is described briefly below.
Treating wastewater for potable reuse: removal of chemicals of concern using advanced oxidation processes
(LP0989326: 2009-2011) The aim of this project was to minimise key micropollutants in treated wastewater to be
used for groundwater replenishment. Novel advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), for treatment of a suite of
micropollutants, have been investigated. A new Orbitrap-mass spectrometer has been purchased under ARC LIEF
funding and has been commissioned. The impact of the performance of the wastewater treatment process on
the advanced water treatment process for water recycling has been investigated. A study of parameters affecting
formation of a particular micropollutant at the Advanced Water Recycling Plant in Perth has been completed. PhD
student Clara Loi has completed a study period at Eawag, Switzerland, with PI von Gunten. A final report was
prepared for the partner organisations. The ARC extended the end date of the project.
Novel water treatment technologies for minimisation of bromide and iodide in drinking water (LP100100285:
2010-2013): The project aim is to develop innovative new water treatment processes to selectively remove both
bromide and iodide from potable source waters. Two French Research Fellows have worked on three separate
strategies: one of these Fellows is located at Curtin and the other was located at Eawag in Switzerland. The latter
Fellow resigned from the project after obtaining an Academic appointment in France. PI von Gunten has continued
progress on the first strategy through collaboration with a Spanish researcher. Excellent progress was made in the
project. DBP formation and aesthetic water quality of disinfected waters containing high concentrations of
bromide and iodide has been examined at Curtin. Method development on the specific adsorbable organic
halogen analyzer and the ion chromatograph has continued to be a focus at Curtin in 2013. One journal article was
published in Water Research, and two refereed conference papers were published in the Ozwater 2013 conference
proceedings.
Advanced water treatment technologies to minimise nitrogenous disinfection by-products in drinking water:
understanding the role of organic nitrogen (LP110100548: 2011-2013): This study commenced in 2011 with the
major aims to study the occurrence of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in WA drinking water systems and to
demonstrate the efficacy of different water treatment processes in removing precursors to nitrogenous
disinfection by-products and provide new understanding of the chemistry of these precursors. Analysis of various
water samples for nitrogenous disinfection by-products demonstrated that the partner organisation’s drinking
water systems studied contained very little nitrogenous disinfection by-products. PhD student at the University of
New South Wales, Xiang Li, with CI Dr Rita Henderson as Principal Supervisor, and CIs Joll and Linge as CoSupervisors, continued his studies this year and presented at the NOM5 Conference in Perth. One refereed
conference paper was published in the Ozwater 2013 proceedings. A new PhD student, Zuo Tong How, on a Curtin
International Postgraduate Research Scholarship and a Water Research Australia Top Up PhD Scholarship,
commenced a PhD project aligned with LP110100548.
Understanding wastewater treatment technologies for alternative water use: transformation of inorganic and
organic nitrogen (LP130100602: 2013-2016)
This project was in the contracting phase in the second half of 2013.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
91
Dr Franca Jones
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-4121
500-2222
9266 7677
[email protected]
My research is focused on all aspects of crystallization from solution. This covers the entire spectrum from the
fundamental to the applied. The crystallization of barium sulfate is studied as a model system but this solid
also has interest from an industrial point of view; since it is a common but unwanted crystallization in off-shore
oil production. In addition, I am interested in the fundamental process of crystallization and, in particular, the
role of water during crystallization from aqueous solutions.
We have been investigating the impact of tetrazoles on the crystallization of calcium oxalate and compared
them to the equivalent carboxylic acid analogues. This work has shown that the tetrazole group influences
calcium oxalate crystallization to the same degree if not greater than the carboxylic acid containing molecules
and these promising results are being pursued further with a PhD student, Calum McMulkin. Currently, more
tetrazole molecules are being prepared that will allow the investigation of structure-activity relationships.
On the more applied side - in many Australian alumina refineries hematite residue is altered by the
crystallization of desilication products (DSPs), making residue handling difficult and sometimes unpredictable.
Our research in this area has shown that different flocculants have different effects on these solids depending
on their mode of action and their chemisty. Some flocculants rely on adsorbing onto the hematite surface and
are adversely impacted when the surface alters to that of DSP. Others act more as coagulants, allowing the
fines to be aggregated to a greater degree. This work is part of a PhD project by Alex Senaputra and is close to
submission.
A new area of interest during this period is in understanding the role of water and the formation of hydrates.
Experiments with calcium sulfate have been performed in DMSO in order to understand what phases form in
the absence of water and what happens as water is slowly introduced into the system. These solids now need
to be fully characterized in order to determine their structure and the position of water (if any).
In addition, infrared experiments have been performed looking at the formation of calcium carbonate from
solution and determining whether the solids undergo a disorder to ordered transition as has been
computationally predicted and observed in biogenic systems.
Finally, work looking at impurity effects on barium sulfate crystallization continued. Calixarene molecules have
been useful in this area due to their ease of preparation and variety of functionalization. We have previously
looked at the type of functional group and this year we looked at the impact of calixarene ring size. The
calixarene ring can be varied and we synthesized phosphonated calixarenes with ring sizes of 4, 5, 6 and 8. The
crystallization behavior of barium sulfate was determined and the results show that the ring size has a complex
impact on crystallization, which can be understood in terms of whether the organic is able to incorporate into
the solids or mainly adsorbs on the surface.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
92
Dr Piotr Kowalczyk
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3119
500-1105
9266 7882
[email protected]
Research into the development and application of analytical/computer simulation techniques to problems in soft
condensed matter was conducted during the year. Below is a selection of some of the areas of research activity for
2013:
(1) Quantum dynamics and thermodynamics at finite temperatures: Quantum particles, such as electrons and light
atoms including hydrogen, are ubiquitous in many chemical and physical systems of current interest. Often
understanding the dynamics and thermodynamics of these particles is of crucial importance. Arguably nowhere is
this more significant at present than in the search for sources of clean energy. Here proton diffusion through
membranes, hydrogen storage materials and electron transport for solar devices are just but a few examples of the
role of mobile quantum particles. Since its original formulation in 1948, Feynman's path integral representation of
time-dependent quantum mechanics has provided a powerful tool for studying many-body problems at finite
temperatures without introducing uncontrolled approximations. We are developing and applying novel path integral
techniques to understand the quantum world at the nanoscale and finite temperatures. Fundamental research is
directed towards the atomistic level understanding of phase transitions and quantum dynamics at nanoscale
confinement.
(2) Adsorption-induced deformation of porous materials: Global warming, caused by a build-up of greenhouse
gases, in particular carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere, has led to numerous proposals on how to capture and store
carbon dioxide in order to mitigate the damaging emissions from fossil fuels. The sequestration of carbon dioxide
into geologic formations is very promising method. Moreover, because the binding energy of carbon dioxide with
the carbon matrix is higher than methane, the coalbed methane is displaced and desorbed during the carbon dioxide
geosequestration. Thus, the invested money can be partially recovered. In practice, injected and compressed carbon
dioxide produce a very high internal adsorption stress that can result in swelling of the coal matrix. Detailed
understanding and prediction of adsorption-induced deformation of coal matrix upon geosequestration is crucial
for avoiding of ecological catastrophes, such as leakage of carbon dioxide from underground reservoirs to water.
Moreover, as has been experimentally reported the efficiency of carbon dioxide geosequestration can be drastically
reduced due to closing of pores as well as transport channels by the swelled coal matrix. We are developing and
applying new theory of adsorption-induced deformation of porous material in order to understand this complex
phenomenon.
(3) Adsorption and separation of fluid mixtures in nanoporous materials: The study of adsorption and separation
of complex fluid mixtures on novel nanoporous materials is appealing from both practical as well as fundamental
perspectives. From a practical perspective: developing methods to efficiently capture greenhouse and ozonedepleting gases is a challenge with enormous environmental implications. From a fundamental perspective: nanospaces have a distinctively strong interaction potential for molecules, giving rise to unusual confinement effects. The
nanoconfinement effect can accelerate a separation of fluid mixture components without the use of expensive
technologies (e.g. absorption of carbon dioxide onto various amine-based solvents, cryogenic distillation, etc.). We
have been studying various subjects related to the fundamental understanding of fluids at the nano-scale
confinement. In particular, we have been focus on the problem of carbon dioxide capture and storage.
(4) Computational Methods: One major problem in performing large-scale simulations of light particles at finite
temperatures is a correct treatment of quantum effects (i.e., zero-point energy and tunnelling). We have developed
Constant Pressure Path Integral Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo method for simulations of quantum particles at finite
temperatures.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
93
Dr Ina Kristiana
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3206
500-3227
9266 9389
[email protected]
Advanced Water Treatment Technologies to Minimise Nitrogenous Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water:
Understanding the Role of Organic Nitrogen (ARC LP110100548)
Many nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) have been found to be more toxic than the regulated DBPs
in drinking waters, but their formation and occurrence have not been studied as extensively as the regulated DBPs.
The aim of the project is to develop the fundamental science to enable prediction and minimisation of N-DBP
formation in a variety of source waters, focusing on the characterization of N-DBP precursors in key source waters
in Western Australia, and testing innovative water treatment strategies for the removal of N-DBP precursors. In
2013, several algal-impacted source waters in WA were selected for N-DBP formation potential study to
investigate any correlation between key water quality parameters and the formation of N-DBPs. The results
obtained provided a basis for the prediction of N-DBPs formation and insights to develop management strategies
for the minimization of N-DBPs. Two papers are being prepared to communicate the outcomes of the project to
the wider scientific community.
Novel Treatment Technologies for the Minimisation of Bromide and Iodide in Drinking Water (ARC
LP100100285)
Many drinking water sources in Western Australia contain high concentrations of bromide and iodide, which leads
to the formation of brominated and iodinated disinfection by-products (DBPs) upon disinfection. These DBPs have
been reported to be more toxic and carcinogenic than the chlorinated species, highlighting the importance of
removing bromide and iodide from these water sources. The project aims to better understand the impact and
occurrence of high concentrations of bromide and iodide in source waters, as well as the formation and occurrence
of brominated and iodinated DBPs, ultimately to develop innovative water treatment processes that are able to
selectively remove both bromide and iodide from drinking water sources. The formation of brominated and
iodinated DBPs, as measured by halogen-specific adsorbable organic halogen (AOX), were studied, to investigate
the factors affecting their formation including pH, organic matter characteristics, and disinfectant dose. The results
obtained provided insights to develop management strategies for the minimization of brominated and iodinated
DBPs.
Bulk Dosing of Monochloramine into Tanks and Reservoirs to Maintain Disinfection Residuals – Stage 2 (funded
by Water Corporation of Western Australia)
The project aims to develop a method to industrially prepare concentrated monochloramine solution that is stable
under typical field conditions, to be used for disinfectant re-dosing in the Goldfields and Agricultural Water Supply
Scheme to maintain disinfectant residual in the system. Stage 1 of the project was completed in December 2011.
Due to the further interest from Water Corporation, Stage 2 of the project was proposed, accepted, and
developed. In 2013, CWQRC team collaborated with a project team at Water Corporation to design a portable
system which will allow for the pilot-scale and full-scale trials of bulk-dosing of monochloramine into tanks and
reservoirs. Ideal sites for these trials were also identified.
Identifying and Quantifying the Outcomes of Disinfection Byproduct Research: Impacts on the Australian and
International Water Industry (funded by Water Research Australia)
CWQRC was engaged by Water Research Australia to conduct an impact study on DBP research. The aim of the
study is to demonstrate the benefits and impact of DBP research for the water industry, and draw out specific case
studies that highlight these benefits. The scope of the project includes an overview of DBP research and
development in the water industry, understanding of the drivers and measures of success of DBP research,
emerging issues, and lessons learnt. Preliminary findings of the impact study were presented at the 2013 Water
Research Australia Annual General Meeting in October. A report to Water Research Australia is being prepared.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
94
Professor Simon Lewis
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-4122
500-3229
9266 2484
[email protected]
My interests fall in the field of analytical chemistry techniques applied to forensic science. My main research
foci have been latent finger mark chemistry, including the detection of latent finger marks, and the
application of spectroscopy in conjunction with chemometrics to the characterization and classification of
chemical trace evidence. This research is carried in collaboration with industry contacts in the US Secret
Service Forensic Laboratory, UK Home Office Centre for Science and Technology, Western Australia Police
Forensic Division and ChemCentre. Significant portions of the research have been carried out utilising the
infrared beamline at the Australian Synchrotron.
Chemistry and Detection of latent fingermarks (with Prof Wilhelm van Bronswijk): The research is carried
out in collaboration with Assoc Prof Kieran Lim (Deakin University) and Prof Chris Lennard (University of
Canberra) as well as international industry collaborators. Fingermarks are an
extremely important form of contact evidence in criminal investigations, allowing
the establishment of links between the scene, victims and the perpetrators. Work
in this area during 2013 has included the development of new approaches to the
detection of latent fingermarks [1], investigations into existing techniques [2] as
well as a major program of study investigating the chemical composition of latent
fingermarks. This utilises a variety of advanced analytical techniques, including
synchrotron IR microscopy [3], and the information gained will provide knowledge
useful for the development of new methods for the detection of latent fingermarks.
This research was presented at the meeting of the International Fingerprint
Research Group (IFRG), held at Ma’ale Hachamisha, Israel in June 2013. Attendance at an IFRG meeting is by
invitation only and represents recognition of relevant research contributions in the field.
Chemical Characterization and Classification of Trace Evidence for Forensic Science (with Prof Wilhelm van
Bronswijk): The term trace evidence is used to describe microscopic material that may be recovered in the
course of a forensic investigation. Due to its small size it is highly likely to be transferred and is hence very
useful in making links between people, places and objects. We have been investigating the infrared
spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics to characterise and classify a
collection of automotive paint samples, encompassing a range of Australian and
international vehicle manufacturers [4]. The ability to rapidly provide
information concerning the vehicle origin and manufacturer will facilitate the
procuring of investigative leads from questioned paint samples located at crime
scenes. This approach is also being extended to other types of evidence such as
polyethylene film and fibres. This research is being carried out in collaboration
with Dr John Goodpaster and Prof Jay Siegel at Indiana University-Purdue
University, Indianapolis (IUPUI) as well as scientists at ChemCentre.
[1] P. Fritz, W. van Bronswijk and S.W. Lewis, p-Dimethylaminobenzaldehyde: Preliminary
investigations into a novel reagent for the detection of latent fingermarks on paper surfaces,
Analytical Methods, 2013, 5 (13), 3207.
[2] A. A. Frick, P. Fritz, S. W. Lewis and W. van Bronswijk, Sequencing of a Modified Oil Red O Development Technique for the
Detection of Latent Fingermarks on Paper Surfaces, Journal of Forensic Identification, 2013, 63 (4), 369.
[2] P. Fritz, W van Bronswijk, S.W. Lewis, K. Lepkova, K.F. Lim, D.E. Martin and L. Puskar, Infrared Microscopy Studies of the
Chemical Composition of Latent Fingermark Residues, Microchemical Journal, 2013, 111, 40
[3] M. Maric, W. Van Bronswijk, S. W. Lewis, K. Pitts, and D. E. Martin, Characterisation of chemical component migration in
automotive paint by synchrotron infrared imaging, Forensic Science International, 2013, 228, 165.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
95
Dr Kathryn Linge
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3207
500-3227
9266 7534
[email protected]
Dr Linge is a Senior Research Fellow in the Curtin Water Quality Research Centre (CWQRC), which is
recognised globally for its excellence in research associated with its ability solve potable water issues. Dr
Linge worked was involved with 2 major projects in 2013 as described below. Her other activities within the
Department of Chemistry include supervision of undergraduate and postgraduate research students and
undergraduate lecturing.
2011-2014 ARC Linkage project LP110100548 ‘Nitrogenous disinfection by-products including Nnitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and other N-nitrosamines in Australian drinking waters’
Role: CI and Project Leader
Research and Funding Partners: University of NSW, University of Alberta (Canada), Australian Research
Council, Water Corporation of WA, Water Research Australia
Nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) have not been studied extensively, but may form particularly
in water sources with a high content of dissolved organic nitrogen. While N-DBPs are not yet regulated, many
N-DBPs have been shown to be more genotoxic and cytotoxic than the presently regulated DBPs. However,
analysis of N-DBPs in drinking water remains relatively rare. The objectives of this project are to determine
the presence of N-DBPs in raw and distributed Western Australian drinking water supplies, and to identify
and test methods of treatment to remove or minimise the concentration of N-DBPs
2014-2016 ARC Linkage project LP110100548 ‘Understanding wastewater treatment technologies for
alternative water use: transformation of inorganic and organic nitrogen’
Role: CI and Project Leader
Research and Funding Partners: Murdoch University, Eawag (Switzerland), Australian Research Council,
Water Corporation of WA, Water Research Australia
Reuse of treated wastewater for non-potable purposes is an important water management strategy in many
parts of rural Australia, however industry uptake is hampered by a lack of knowledge of the chemical and
microbial risks of alternative uses of treated wastewater. This study will provide a new understanding of the
chemistry of inorganic and organic nitrogen removal in rural wastewater treatment systems, and use novel
molecular tools to profile the microbial community in wastewater before and after treatment. Improved
knowledge of wastewater treatment process efficacy will improve compliance with health guidelines, protect
public and environmental health, and enable an increased uptake of alternative water use options in rural
Australia.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
96
Dr Max Massi
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-4126
500-2219
9266-2838
[email protected]
Research in our group focuses on the design and synthesis of phosphorescent metal complexes and their
application in materials and life science.
Research themes conducted in 2013 have concentrated
on rhenium(I) and platinum(II) complexes bound to
tetrazolato ligands, with an emphasis on elucidating the
influence of the tetrazole heterocycle in governing the
photophysical properties of the complexes. A library of
these species was synthesised by chemical variations of
the ligands and we were able to obtain complexes
characterised by a wide range of emitted colours, from
sky-blue to red. Moreover, we discovered that
reversible electrophilic additions to the tetrazolato
ligand in the complexes have profound effects on the
emitted colour and quantum yield. These aspects are
currently being investigated in the area of cellular
labeling. In this field, our group has extensive national
collaborarions including the University of Western
Australia (Prof. Paul Rigby), the University of South
Australia (Dr Sally Plush and Dr Tetyana Shandala),
Mcquarie University (Prof Ewa Goldys).
Another area of interest is related to the synthesis of emissive
species that can be incorporated into Organic Light Emitting
Devices (OLEDs). In particular, we have concentrated on
dibenzothiazolyl-substituted pyrrole, furan and thiophene
compounds, which exhibit photo- and electroluminescent skyblue emission. The species were successfully employed in the
fabrication of devices characterised by blue colour and whitelight emission controlled by the relative concentration of the
emissive dyes incorporated into the device. Further
luminescent materials based on phosphorescent copper(I)
tetrazolato complexes and multinuclear lanthanoid assemblies
are being investigated. International collaborations in this area
include the University of Bologna (Dr Stefano Stagni) and the
Italian National Research Centre (Dr Massimo Cocchi).
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
97
Associate Professor Mauro Mocerino
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-4115
500-2219
9266 3125
[email protected]
Chemistry Education
1. A curriculum inquiry of preservice chemistry teachers’ content knowledge of the particulate nature of matter.
This research examines the development of preservice teachers' understanding about the particulate nature
of matter. The curriculum was examined using the four aspects of curriculum: intended, implemented,
perceived and achieved. The achieved curriculum was examined through POE (predict, observe and explain)
activities and two-tier diagnostic instruments. Project status: ongoing. Collaborators: D. Treagust (SMEC), T.
Widhiyanti (PhD student)
2 Using active learning strategies to enhance student learning. Curtin University is a national leader in an ALTC
project designed to develop and promote active learning strategies suitable for use in science classes with the
Australian higher education context (the ALIUS project). We have developed and implemented a number of
activities and strategies and are now developing and implementing tools to evaluate their effectiveness.
Project status: ongoing. Collaborators: D. Southam, M. Buntine, V. Vishnumolakala (PhD student), D. Treagust
(SMEC) and M. Zadnik (Physics).
3. Design for International Standards for Chemistry Education (ISCE) (IUPAC CCE project). The project aims to
identify and specify the chemistry literacy that needs to be developed during the school years (K-12). Currently
a dataase of curriculum standards is being developed for each of the collabortors home countries. Project
status: ongoing. Collaborators: M.-H. Chiu (Taiwan - Project Chair), J. Apothker (Netherlands), S. Boniface (New
Zealand), M. Droescher (Germany), R. Hartshorn (New Zealand), M. Kamata (Japan), L. Lazo Santibaňez (Chile),
R. Mamlok-Naaman (Israel), H. Sevian (USA), M. Sözbilir (Turkey)
4. The utility and cultural transferability of student inquiry learning approaches in foundation chemistry: improving
conceptual understanding, attitude and self-efficacy. This study aims at comparing attitudes and learning
outcomes between Australian and Qatari students to demonstrate the efficacy and cultural transferability of
this pedagogy. The study also focuses on the effect of POGIL activities on students’ confidence level in
understanding of essential key concepts and effective use of these concepts in laboratory experiments. Project
status: ongoing. Collaborators: D. Treagust (SMEC), D. Southam, V. Vishnumolakala, and S. Qureshi (WeillCornell Medical College in Qatar).
Chemistry synthesis
1. Development of Phenylephrine Based Analogues for the Treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT).
HAT is one of many neglected tropical diseases that affect millions of the worlds poorest people. This project
aims to prepare a library of phenylephrine based compounds and test these against the parasites responsible
for HAT. Project status: ongoing. Collaborators: D. Cullen (PhD student), A. Payne, M. Keenan (Epichem Pty
Ltd) and W. Best (Epichem Pty Ltd).
2. Amino acid functionalised calixarenes. We have shown previously that calixarenes functionalised at the lower
rim with aspartic acid or glutamic acid moieties have a dramatic effect on the growth of calcium carbonate and
barite. This project investigated the impact of wide rim functionalisation of calix[4]arene derivatives and
narrow rim functionalisation of calix[6]arenes, and whether there was a synergistic effect on crystal growth.
Project status: ongoing. Collaborators: C. Y. Goh (PhD student), C. Siedlovskas (Hons student), M. Ogden and
F. Jones.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
98
Dr Thanh Vinh Nguyen
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-4125
500-2222
9266 3102
[email protected]
Prior to Curtin, I finished my Ph.D in Chemistry at ANU in 2010 then moved to Germany to do my postdoctoral
research under the auspices of the internationally prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship during
2011-2013. In 2013, I won a four-year Curtin Research Fellowship to work as an independent researcher at
Curtin. Starting in June 2013, I have developed my own research directions in the fields of organocatalysis,
chemical process catalyzed by small non-metallic organic compounds, and synthesis of bioactive natural
products. Within 6 months, I have been able to set up my own research group with two project students and
one co-supervised Ph.D student and publish one research paper in Org. Lett. There are also two manuscripts
recently submitted to JACS and Synlett with several more to come this year. These journal papers report my
work on a novel method for aromatic cation activation of several types of substrates for nucleophilic
reactions. My performance has won me a 2014 Thieme Chemistry Journal Award for outstanding young
academics. I have also been invited to talk at several Australian universities and conferences, including a
plenary lecture at the Southern Highland Conference.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
99
Professor Mark Ogden
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-2118
500-2218
9266 2483
[email protected]
My research is centred on the interaction of organic molecules with inorganic species, leading to properties that
are greater than the sum of the two parts. When a metal cation interacts with an organic molecule, the resulting
coordination complex can have dramatically different properties from the individual components. The results can
include changes in solubility (leading to industrial applications such as solvent extraction), light emission
(applications in sensors, imaging etc), and controlled assembly (resulting in changes in bulk properties, such as the
formation of gels). Molecules can also be designed to interact with surfaces, and that leads into areas such as the
control of crystal growth and self-assembled materials. Examples of specific research areas are given below.

Crystal growth. A longstanding interest is the control of crystal growth (in collaboration with Franca Jones),
typically using additive molecules, both industrial and newly synthesised. While much of this work focussed
on systems relevant to the hydrometallurgical industries, Kristy Blyth completed her PhD in 2013 looking at
the crystal growth of lactose, an important and problematic step in cheese production. A key outcome of
this work was the discovery that the impact of electrolytes on lactose crystal growth is complicated by
synergistic behaviour of certain cation/anion combinations.

Supramolecular gels. Our work on novel electrolyte-responsive hydrogelators has continued (with Mauro
Mocerino), and a comprehensive review of macrocycle-based gelators was published.1 The emphasis of this
work in future will be the use of cutting-edge scanning probe
microscopy techniques to examine the gel formation process
at high resolution in situ, working with Thomas Becker.

Light emitting polymeric materials. A highly collaborative
project (involving Max Massi, David Brown, and collaborators
from the University of Bologna), we have shown that loading
an appropriate mixture of lanthanoid cations into these
materials can produce any colour of light that is desired (Fig.
2).2 Polymers incorporating a range of different metal binding
sites are now being synthesized, to optimize the light-emitting
properties, and probe the fundamental properties of these
hybrid materials.
1.
2.
Fig. 2 Lanthanoid metallopolymers demonstrating the
transparency of the matrix (top) and variations of colors
obtained by loading single lanthanoid salts or mixtures.
“Macrocyclic Gelators”, C.Y. Goh, M. Mocerino and M.I. Ogden, Supramol. Chem., 25, 555 – 566, (2013).
“Recyclable Calix[4]arene-Lanthanoid Luminescent Hybrid Materials with Color-Tuning and Color-Switching Properties”, B.W. Ennis, S. Muzzioli,
B.L. Reid, D.M. D’Alessio, S. Stagni, D.H. Brown, M.I. Ogden and M. Massi, Dalton Trans., 42, 6894 - 6901, (2013).
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
100
Dr Alan Payne
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-4120
500-2219/2222/2229
9266 1917
[email protected]
My research mainly focuses on the preparation of organic molecules for applications in medicine and
agriculture. There are 4 main areas of interest:
New treatments for neglected diseases. In an ongoing collaboration with Epichem Pty Ltd, synthesis and
testing of new compounds for the treatment for the causative agents of Chagas disease (Trypanosoma Cruzi)
and African Sleeping Sickness (Trypanosoma Brucei) are being investigated. The program focuses on the
inhibition of two enzymes CYP51 and N-myristoyl transferase. This has led to the discovery on a new class of
compounds with nanomolar activity against T. Cruzi.
Prevention of postharvest losses. A new class of ethylene receptor antagonist has been discovered. These
compounds prevent fruit from ripening and prevent spoilage of flowers. Initial test have shown these
compounds to effectively retard and reduce the effects of ethylene in apples, plums and Geralton Wax.
Prevention of inflammation. As part of an NHMRC grant and collaboration with Glycan Biosciences Pty. Ltd.
simplified heparin mimetics have been prepared. Heparin is a molecule belonging to the family known as
glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) which are known to have anti-inflammatory properties. Also derivatives of proresolving lipid mediators, Resolvin E1 have been synthesized through a tandem Sonigashira-Stille coupling.
Natural Products as starting points for drug discovery. Plants provide a rich source of complex molecules. In
particular, most Western Australian plants have a thick resin protecting them from the harsh environment.
Simple aqueous extractions of these resins provide a rich source of sequiterpenes and diterpenes. The
compounds are then transform to molecules with interesting biological activity, such as HMG-CoA reductase
inhibitors which are used as cholesterol lowering drugs.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
101
Dr Paolo Raiteri
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-3120
500-1105
9266 2687
[email protected]
In the past year my research was mainly focused on the study of dissolution and growth of minerals from
solution using computational chemistry techniques. After the work published in Nature Communications at
the end of 2011 that showed that calcium and carbonate ions aggregate in solution to form pre-nucleation
clusters we further investigated the problem and suggested that the pre-nucleation cluster may aggregate
to form a dense liquid phase. This phase is highly supersaturated and eventually transforms to amorphous
calcium carbonate, a precursor of the stable crystalline phases (Science, 2013, 341, 885-889). In this area of
research I also published 5 other papers where we characterized the calcite water interface and vaterite, a
metastable phase of calcium carbonate.
In 2013 I also started collaborating with Prof Voth and Dr Knight at Argonne National Laboratory/University
of Chicago to develop and apply a new computational technique to study chemical reactions in materials
using classical force field techniques. This tool has become immediately useful for a project we had with the
group of Prof Dezanneau at the Ecole Centrale Paris to study the effect of anisotropic strain on the proton
conduction in BaZrO3, a material of interest for applications in fuel cells. This collaboration already resulted
in a paper in the Journal of Materials chemistry A (accepted in 2013 but printed in 2014). In the next few
years the technique developed in collaboration with Prof Voth and his group will be key for the success of
the research project outlined in the ARC Future Fellowship that I was awarded later in 2013.
Another important research direction of mine is that of the study of the electronic and optical properties of
transition metal complexes (in collaboration with Dr. Max Massi). Here we use first principles techniques to
calculate the absorption spectra of transition metal complexes to interpret the photo-physical properties of
the molecules synthesized in Dr. Massi’s group. Together with Dr Massi I published five papers were
published in this area in 2013.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
102
Dr Marc Robinson
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-1104
9266 3780
[email protected]
Materials for future nuclear applications must all share one important property: the ability to maintain
functionality during exposure to extreme levels of irradiation. Developing such materials requires an in-depth
understanding of the atomic processes that attribute to the build up of radiation damage. Working in
conjunction with ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization), this project employs
atomic-scale simulations to discover the mechanisms of defect formation. This allows us to see first hand
which factors contribute to a material’s radiation tolerance or susceptibility.
During our research, we have developed new techniques based on Molecular Dynamics (MD) computer
simulation. MD allows us to accurately track the pathways of energetic particles through a material and
predict the evolution of the damage created. Combining MD with thousands of processors from High
Performance Computing (HPC) facilities has allowed us to carry out quantitative analysis to a very high degree
of precision.
A main area of investigation was the determination of the threshold displacement energy, Ed that is defined
as the minimum kinetic energy required to permanently displace an atom in a particular system. This is an
important quantity, central to the study of radiation damage in materials. We developed a systematic
approach to calculating values of Ed in a range of materials for nuclear applications, from nuclear waste forms
(TiO2 and Y2Ti2O7) to reactor materials (graphite).
The studies involving Y2Ti2O7 also have valuable connections with the development of Oxide Dispersion
Strengthened (ODS) steels which are being considered for use in extreme environments. ODS steels contain
nano-sized yttrium titanate particles which have been shown to improve the steels mechanical
characteristics. The exact composition of the nanoparticles is unknown but various Y-Ti-O containing
compounds have been reported. In addition to Y2Ti2O7 which adopts a pyrochlore structure, phases of the
Y2TiO5 family may be present. We have investigated two such phases; the orthorhombic phase and the
pyrochlore-like cubic phase. This work is ongoing and has involved the development of new models to
capture both the Y2Ti2O7 and Y2TiO5 structures. Currently, extensive simulations are being carried out to
determine the differences in radiation response between the various yttrium titanate phases.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
Page
103
Professor Andrew Rohl
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-3121
9266 3124
[email protected]
Twisting Crystals
Crystals usually have very regular polyhedral shapes that can be manipulated by the introduction of additives
that work on the basis of well-defined intermolecular interactions between themselves and crystal surfaces.
However, additives can also be used to make molecular crystals grow in a non-polyhedral twisted helical
shape, a fact known for over 80 years but that is almost completely absent from contemporary crystal growth
literature. Consequently, we are combining forces with Prof. Kahr’s group at New York University to
undertake an integrated experimental and computational program is to understand and control this
phenomenon.
In 2013 we explored the twisting of aspirin crystals by the additive salicylic acid. Through modeling the strain
introduced by replacing an aspirin molecule in the crystal structure with a salicylic acid molecule, we were
able to determine the pitch of the twist of aspirin as a function of how much salicylic acid was incorporated
and that this was in agreement with experimental data. These findings were published in the prestigious
Journal of the American Chemical Society.1
Polymorph Prediction
Many compounds can crystallize in different crystal structures; this phenomenon is termed polymorphism
and is particularly significant in the pharmaceutical industry as the polymorph can determine the physical
properties of the compound as well as affect its patents. In the last few years, promising new methods for
finding polymorphs have been proposed but their applicability has only been demonstrated for very simple
systems due to their computational intensiveness. The arrival of petascale computing in WA means that we
can try out these techniques on pharmaceutically
relevant systems for the first time.
The first new method is to utilise metadynamics to
predict polymorphs, where one starts with a known
polymorph and forces the lattice parameters to
change by successively adding Gaussian penalty
functions to them. It has been demonstrated in
benzene that this procedure can lead to all of its
known polymorphs. In 2013, we showed that
metadynamics did not work in even simple systems
with hydrogen bonds (in this case resorcinol). Thus we
attempted another new method, where small unit
cells with the molecule of interest placed randomly
within them are evolved using molecular dynamics
with snapshots periodically taken and then minimized.
This method has produced some potential candidate
structures that will be further examined in 2014.
[1] X. Cui, A.L. Rohl, A.G. Shtukenberg and B. Kahr, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 135, 3395-3398 (2013).
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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104
Dr Debbie Silvester
Office:
Lab:
Phone:
Email:
500-4112
500-2222
9266 7148
[email protected]
Objectives: The aim of our research is to understand the fundamental electrochemical behavior of gases at
solid/liquid interfaces and use this knowledge as the basis for the design of improved gas sensors for oxygen and
toxic gases (e.g. ammonia, methylamine, chlorine and hydrogen chloride). The solvents employed as the
electrolyte are room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), since they are non-volatile, requiring only microliter
volumes and leading to eventual miniaturization of the sensor.
Activities: The progress that has been made during 2013 is described below:
1.) Fundamental Behaviour of Methylamine Gas on Bare Metal Disk Electrodes in RTILs:
Since the behaviour of methylamine had not been previously investigated in RTILs, this work involved studying the
electrochemical reaction mechanism for methylamine oxidation on bare platinum and gold macrodisk electrodes.
It was determined that a five-electron oxidation occurred, with ammonia gas as a by-product. Two reduction peaks
and an oxidation peak were observed on the reverse voltammetric scan, indicating the formation of protonated
reaction products following the oxidation. Six different RTILs were explored as solvents, and the behaviour at
different concentrations was explored in two ionic liquids that gave the best voltammetric responses
([C2mim][NTf2] and [C4mpyrr][NTf2]). High currents and excellent linearity was observed, indicating that
methylamine is highly soluble in RTILs and that RTILs are favourable non-volatile solvents for use in methylamine
gas sensing. This work has been submitted to the Journal of Physical Chemistry C.
2.) Analytical Utility for Chlorine Detection on Microdisk Electrodes and a Range of Screen-Printed Electrodes
Chlorine gas (Cl2) is known to undergo a 2-electron reduction at platinum electrodes with an unusual mechanism
involving adsorption of chlorine on the electrode surface (i.e. non-diffusional) for 100% Cl2. Much lower
concentrations were investigated in this work, and it was found that diffusional behaviour occurs when the RTIL
is not fully saturated with chlorine. As a result, the analytical utility was studied for chlorine gas in [C2mim][NTf2]
on a Pt microdisk electrode. The behaviour on various screen-printed electrode surfaces was also investigated,
with Pt surfaces giving lower limits of detection and reproducible currents compared to gold, carbon and various
carbon-modified SPE surfaces, but very similar detection limits to Pt microdisk electrodes. This work is in
preparation and due to be submitted to Analytical Chemistry.
3.) Polishing of Screen-Printed Electrodes to Improve Their Performance for Oxygen Reduction
In our previous work (published in 2013 in Electrochimica Acta), it was found that superoxide reacted with
materials in the screen-printed pastes, and this reduced the lifetime of a SPE when used for oxygen sensing.
Therefore, various pre-treatment methods were explored to reduce this unfavourable reaction. Of the five
methods tested, mechanical polishing was found to be the best method to improve the electrode kinetics,
voltammetric reversibility and electrode reusability. A full characterisation with reversible redox couples was
performed, followed by the quasi-reversible oxygen/superoxide redox couple. Two journal articles are being
prepared for publication, and are due to be submitted to J. Phys. Chem. C and Anal. Chem.
4.) Deposition of Mesoporous Metal Frameworks on Electrode Surfaces (with Dr. Petra Szilagyi, Curtin Physics)
Polystyrene beads of various diameters were deposited onto bare metal surfaces (glassy carbon, gold and
platinum). These electrodes were then employed for electrodepostion reactions, with gold or platinum metals
being deposited from their respective complexes in solution. The beads were then dissolved in an organic solvent,
leaving a porous metal framework on the electrode surface, confirmed by SEM imaging. These modified electrode
surfaces will be investigated for gas sensing, and also for their hydrogen storage capabilities.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Dr Daniel Southam
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-4119
9266 2380
[email protected]
Chemistry Education is my area of research interest. My broad aim is to improve students’ perceptions of
chemistry and to develop capacity for real change in the depth of their understanding and enjoyment of
Chemistry. During 2013 my research fell into three categories:
Affective domain in chemistry
In 2013 the Department implemented a renewed first year curriculum, which deemphasised lectures in place
of active and engaging workshops. As a tangent to this change a research project was established to examine
changes to student motivation and attitude toward chemistry in this social learning environment. Motivation
and attitude are important variables in the affective domain, and they are found to be essential factors in
student achievement and retention. Results from this study are being utilised to further understand the
influences of the affective domain, and to reflexively refine this curriculum as it is embedded in practice.
Crossing sociocultural boundaries
Having a population that is scientifically literate is important to the future prosperity of any nation, but
innovations in teaching and learning science may not immediately translate from one locale to another.
Understanding how sociocultural affordances may influence the adaptability of curriculum or pedagogy is
essential to promote and foster continual improvement. This series of research projects involve a number
of partners across Australia, and internationally in North America, Europe and the Middle East. The aims are
to explore how innovative curriculum and pedagogy adapts from one context to the next, and to understand
the importance of sociocultural factors.
Interdisciplinary education
A recent explosion of interdisciplinary courses, such as Forensic Science and Nanotechnology, pose particular
challenges. These areas have a unique place in popular culture, and we have a diverse range of students who
opt to study it at a tertiary level, potentially without an understanding of the underlying cross-disciplinary
nature. This area of research aims to relate this diversity of attitudes and expectations and link it with a
student’s discipline-specific cognitive and logical ability. Early publications establishing a framework to
examine these issues in Forensic Science are currently emerging, and findings being disseminated to the
broader community.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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106
Dr Irene Suarez-Martinez
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-3126
9266 1843
[email protected]
Chemistry of carbon nanomaterials
The underlying structural differences of each carbon nanoform can fundamentally alter their reaction
chemistry and mechanical and electronic properties. First principles calculations allows to study the
chemistry of each individual defects such as pentagons, heptagons, vacancies and dislocations. Based on
those results we have proposed a geometrical model which predict the behaviour of graphitic surface. The
model is tested for the oxidation of a number of carbon nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes,
graphene and nanocones. As well as giving unique insight into experimental results, such calculations can
predict fascinating new behaviour and open up undiscovered pathways for synthesis and post-processing.
This work has been funded by Australian Research Council Discovery grant DP110104415 ‘Mapping the family
tree of carbon nanostructures: investigation of nanoscrolls and herringbones”.
Aggregation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
It is known from observation that certain stars are surrounded by and envelope of dust. These particular
stars emit more carbon and less oxygen than most other stars. Other work has accumulated evidence that
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exist in the interstellar medium. Since from terrestrial investigations, it is
known that flames produce polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a hypothesis has grown that around these
carbon rich stars polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are synthesized in a manner similar to that occurring in
flames. As these molecules become larger the forces of attraction between the large molecules become
sufficient to allow molecules to aggregate together at temperatures of about 1000 K. Using Molecular
Dynamics simulations, we are investigating how those molecules interact and aggregate into bigger clusters.
Preliminary results show the importance of small aromatic molecules such as benzene acting as nucleation
seeds for larger agglomerates.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Dr Katherine Trinajstic
Office:
Phone:
Email:
500-3202
9266 2492
[email protected]
Background
I am a palaeontologist specializing in the evolution of early vertebrates mainly jawless and jawed fishes. My
current research is largely focused on investigating the evolution of the musculo/skeletal system. I’m
particularly interested in how soft tissue is preserved in the fossil record.
Projects 2013:
QEII Fellowship
I commenced my QEII Fellowship in August of 2011. This project concentrates on looking at the soft tissue
anatomy of fossils, which comprises about 95% of the average vertebrate body but is rarely preserved in
fossils. However, fossils from Gogo, Western Australia, preserve three-dimensional soft tissues and bone.
Our aim is to formulate an understanding of the evolutionary origin and establishment of the
musculo/skeletal system. We are using the European Synchrotron Research Facility and the Australian
synchrotron to scan uniquely informative Australian material, both fossil and living, in order to investigate
the origin of vertebrate anatomy and preserved biomolecules. We have been successful in describing the
oldest 3D preserved vertebrate fossil musculature known.
2012 Department of Chemistry Annual Report
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Department of Chemistry
Curtin University
GPO Box U1987
Perth, Western Australia 6845
Tel: +61 8 9266 7265
Fax: +61 8 9266 2300
Web: chemistry.curtin.edu.au
CRICOS Provider Code 00301J (WA)