Goodmayes Park Management Plan

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Goodmayes Park Management Plan
Goodmayes Park
Management Plan
2011-2016
Goodmayes Park
Green Lane
Ilford
IG3 9PH
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Contents
1. Introduction / preface
2
2. About Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure
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3. Location map
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4. History and setting
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5. Aerial view
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6. Geography of the park
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7. Understanding Goodmayes Park
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8. Park management
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9. Consultation
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10. SWOT analysis
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11. Vision and objectives
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12. A welcoming place
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13. Healthy, safe & secure
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14. Maintenance of equipment, buildings and
landscape
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15. Litter. clean and vandalism
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16. Environmental sustainability
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17. Conservation and heritage
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18. Community involvement
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19. Marketing
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20. Events
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21. Management and structure
43
22. Infrastructure
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Action plan
53
Appendices
Available as hard copy only
A - Metropolitan Police Statistics
B - Audit of Facilities
C – By Laws
D – Management Systems Procedure – The Landscape
Group
E – Playground Inspection Sheet
F – Sustainable Planting
G – Risk Assessments
H – Park Tracker Sample
Available as hard copy only
I – Arboricultural Summary
J – Biodiversity Action Plan Species
Available as hard copy only
K – COSHH Data Sheet
L – Goodmayes Judges Feedback 2010 / 2011
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
1. Introduction
Preface
The purpose of establishing the Management Plan is to provide a guide to the principles of conservation,
repair, enhancement, adaptation, and the use of Goodmayes Park that safeguards the significance of the site
and ensures a sustainable future for it. The management plan will set out the service levels and be the
operational basis with which they will be carried forward by Vision - Redbridge Culture and Leisure for the
foreseeable future.
The purpose of the Goodmayes Park Management Plan is to:
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Identify, discuss and resolve issues relating to Goodmayes Park infrastructure, its users and available
resources
Develop and cost the way in which Goodmayes Park is managed and maintained, to ensure an
enjoyable experience for present and future users;
Identify and address who is responsible for certain aspects of management;
Provide a benchmark against which delivery and performance of the identified service levels can be
measured.
Retain and protect the historic fabric and character of Goodmayes Park and its role as a wildlife habitat
and public amenity
Provide a sound basis for the ongoing repair and maintenance of the landscape
Establish guidelines for the use of the landscape
Ensure continuation of the harmony between the needs of conservation and use of the park by the
public
This Management Plan examines the various management issues that arise from the present use of the park
and establishes a series of action plans that seek to ensure that the significance of the park can continue to be
preserved and enhanced as a heritage, wildlife, sports facility and public asset.
It is a ‘working document’ that brings together all the information relating to Goodmayes Park, for use by all
those involved in its management. It will be updated, revised, periodically reviewed and formally rewritten in
the 5th year.
Goodmayes Park
Goodmayes Park was purchased by the formerly named Ilford Urban District Council (now known as the
London Borough of Redbridge) and designed and opened by Mr Cameron Corbett M.P. This was purchased
and opened in 1905.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
2. About Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure (VRCL)
As a charitable leisure trust, Vision has been providing sport and leisure facilities on behalf of the London
Borough of Redbridge since April 2007. Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure aims to increase participation
and accessibility across its services, developing partnerships and sharing best practice throughout the
facilities we manage.
Following extensive consultation in 2006 the London Borough of Redbridge agreed to transfer Fullwell Cross
Leisure Centre, Ilford Pools, Cricklefields Athletic Ground and Ashton Playing Fields to a charitable leisure
trust. The new company began operating in April 2007 under the name Vision - Redbridge Culture & Leisure.
Since the enforced closure of Ilford Pools in September 2008, Fairlop Waters, Redbridge Cycling Centre and
Wanstead Leisure Centre have been successfully transferred to Vision RC&L and we also deliver an Exercise on
Referral Scheme in partnership with the Redbridge Primary Care Trust.
The idea of delivering leisure services through the form of a charitable trust has been successfully put into
practice in many other local authorities in order to sustain and develop the service.
In May 2011, Vision became responsible for a much wider range of additional services in Redbridge which
includes: Libraries, the Museum, Local Studies & Archives, Parks, Open Spaces, Country Parks, Sport and
Physical Activity, Arts, Events, Glasbury House, Fairlop Outdoor Activity Centre and Halls Lettings including Sir
James Hawkey Hall.
More information about these additional services can be found at www.redbridge.gov.uk
The Company is overseen by a Board of 16 Director Trustees including 13 Community representatives and 3
local councillors. The company is led by Iain Varah – Chief Executive. The Sport and Leisure arm of Vision is led
by Keith Newton – Director of Sport and Leisure / Deputy Chief Executive, Liz Petyt- Operations Manager and
Andy Jones – Facilities Manager who oversees the work of the teams in each of the Vision Sport and Leisure
managed facilities.
Charity starts with you
Vision is a registered charity and as a non-profit organisation, any surplus we make will be reinvested for
community benefit, to improve the quality of facilities and services offered to you. As a social enterprise Vision
is committed to working in partnership with the London Borough of Redbridge to deliver a wide range of
leisure services to the communities that we serve.
You’re our most important customer
Vision is a customer focused organisation and our aim is to continually improve the delivery of sustainable
leisure and cultural services. We play a vital role in improving the quality of life of those living, working and
visiting Redbridge and are confident that you will see improvements in our operations and enjoy visiting the
facilities and services that we manage.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
3. Location Map
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
4. Brief History and Setting
Goodmayes Park is an area of Parkland, Playing Fields dominated by lime trees and grassland.
Goodmayes area was largely undeveloped until the end of the 19th century, when large scale suburban
development took place as London expanded. However, Goodmayes does appear on maps as early as the
1770s. Most of the area here and in neighbouring Seven Kings was built up between 1898 and 1910 by the
developer A. C. Corbett who used new stations on the Great Eastern Railway to promote the new suburbs.
Goodmayes station was built in 1901. Since then, little has changed in the area and the lines of Edwardian
terraced housing continue to dominate the area with relatively few more recent additions.
Administratively, Goodmayes has always been a part of Ilford, and its political history has followed that of its
parent from being part of a ward of Barking parish to the London Borough of Redbridge today.
Goodmayes Park is centrally located to the largest housing estate in the world which was erected in 1921 by
the London County Council (LCC), the same year Goodmayes Cricket Club was formed and changed its name
in 1995 to Goodmayes and Blythswood Cricket Club and 1921 was also the year that Goodmayes Bowls Club
was first established and is still in existence and forms part of the Essex County Bowling Association.
Goodmayes Park enjoys a lake which is naturally fed and is predominantly a balancing lake for the nearby
Mayesbrook River and provides water run for the immediate roads. There are no recorded species of fish
within the lake however it does have a small island which is frequented by many species of nesting birds.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
5. Aerial View of Goodmayes Park
Toilets
Tennis Courts
Basketball Courts
Cricket Pitches
Bowling Green
Outdoor Gym / Parcour
Sensory Garden
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Lake
Football Pitches
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
6. Geography of Goodmayes Park
The map below gives the reader the opportunity to see the location of Goodmayes Park in relation to other
local green spaces within this part of East London / Essex.
Valentines Park
Mayesbrook Park
Goodmayes Park
Barking Park
Seven Kings Park
South Park
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
7. Understanding Goodmayes Park
Goodmayes Park forms part of what were large expanses of farmland and grassland.
Geology
Goodmayes lays mostly on a London clay base rock.
Hydrology
Generally, the site is well drained and does not waterlog during the winter months.
The lake is fed by surrounding streams and surface water, including road surface run-off, making it susceptible
to pollution.
Landscape
Given the urban density of the park there are a number of natural habitats and species found in the park.,
including species listed on the local biodiversity action plan.
Grasslands
Most of the grassland is managed as amenity and sports lawns.
The bowling green is leased to Goodmayes Bowls Club, who is responsible for its day to day general upkeep.
The bowling green and its surrounds are maintained by the external grounds maintenance provider The
Landscape Group
An area in the north- west of the park is managed as a wildflower meadow. This provides valuable habitat for
birds, small mammals and invertebrates.
There are three football pitches hired to local football clubs and two cricket pitches hired to one cricket club.
This is managed by the Parks Operation section and once again the maintenance is provided by The
Landscape Group. Bookings for the clubs are administered by Vision Business Support team.
(Photo of Pitch No 1 looking out towards the east side of the park)
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
8. Park Management
The management of the park has to be considered under the 3 separate headings of
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Landscape
Ecology
Public use
Landscape
A considerable amount of research work has been carried out into the historical background of the site and it
has been established that there are elements that deserve particular attention for their future preservation.
There are also some important views within the park, particularly those looking from inside the park looking
out towards the Goodmayes extension and towards the Green Lane entrance which are important
considerations.
There are two principal man-made elements in the landscape of Goodmayes Park for which action plans will
need to be considered; the lake area and the footpaths
Ecology
Goodmayes Park is a designated Site of Importance for Nature Conservation (Borough Importance Grade II). It
is a valuable ecological resource containing a variety of habitats and species (see section 14 for details).
Improvements are being made to improve the park for wildlife where possible, recent projects include the
extension of the wildflower meadow, the installation of 9 bat boxes and the planting of 12,000 trees in the
east of the park to create a native woodland and specimen tree arboretum.
The park’s ecology is promoted through on site interpretation, events and practical conservation volunteer
workdays led by the nature conservation ranger team.
Public Use
Pedestrians can gain access via seven separate entrances, making the park easily entered from the direction of
Ilford, Becontree and by residents living in the roads surrounding the park.
Goodmayes Park is well served by public transport services. The London Underground Jubilee Line from
Westminster and Central London stops at Stratford Underground Station where the National Express
train to Shenfield can be boarded and alighted at Goodmayes train station. This is a ten minute walk from
the park via Goodmayes Lane or Green Lane.
Many local bus services all stop outside the park (128, 364, 150 and 387) managed by Arriva London.
Organised football takes place at weekends in the Park on prior booking and payment of a fee to the Vision
Redbridge Culture and Leisure Business Support Unit. This is on the same basis as other football in the
Council’s parks. The main usage takes place on Saturday afternoons and Sunday mornings.
There are four tennis courts and two basketball courts available for play at no charge.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
The revenue that is generated from the sports bookings are shown below:
Football
Charge
Every Sunday Adult Teams
Alternate Sundays Adult Teams
£1222.48
£611.24
Every Saturday Adult Teams
Alternate Saturday Adult Teams
£902.35
Cricket
Charge
Every Week
Alternate Weeks
£924.11
£456.87
Bowls
Charge
Goodmayes Park
£5234.90
Passive Recreation
The majority of visitors to Goodmayes Park do not use formal facilities nor take part in organised activities, but
quietly enjoy their visit by walking, exercising their dog, jogging, bird watching or feeding ducks, squirrels and
other wildlife or playing, meeting friends and relaxing.
The ability of visitors to use the full extent of the park's facilities depends on good directional signage that
clearly guides people to areas of specific interest. The signs installed provide information on the history and
location of facilities within the park.
Toilet facilities are kept in a clean, safe, and good working condition by the Cleansing staff of the Council and
is a completely separate Service area of the Council. It is managed on a performance style contract with
checks completed when the park opens and repeated throughout the day until it is locked.
9. Consultation
A MORI survey was conducted during 2006/07 of leisure facilities in the London Borough of Redbridge which
included parks and open spaces.
The key finding from the survey indicates that:Usage ratings
The latest usage patterns indicate that the parks are well used with almost half of Redbridge residents using
the parks at least once a week. This equates to over 6 million visits per year.
Goodmayes Park being one of the 6 major parks in the Borough could expect somewhere in the region of
125,000 visits per year.
How frequently
have you used
Parks and Open
Spaces in the last
12 months? Parks
and Open Spaces
Almost every day
At least once a
week
About once a
2004/2005
2005/2006
2006/2007
13%
30%
14%
32%
14%
31%
22%
21%
22%
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
month
Within the last 6
months
Within the last
year
Longer ago
Never used
Do you think the
service has got
better or worse
over the last
three years, or
has it stayed the
same? Parks and
Open Spaces
Better
Stayed the same
Worse
15%
16%
15%
8%
7%
7%
6%
7%
7%
4%
6%
6%
2004/2005
2005/2006
9%
79%
12%
16%
69%
14%
In a recent survey of Goodmayes Park - 110 people were surveyed, 62% female and 38% male. 95% were aged
12 and under, so the outcome reflects children’s views predominantly.
In summer, about a third goes to the park once a week and almost a quarter go a few times a week. Two thirds
stay for up to an hour. In winter, almost half never visit the park and of those who do, two thirds stay for up to
an hour. Through the year, over three quarters say that only bad weather conditions prevents them from
going to the park.
44% travel to the park on foot although a similar proportion, (41%) travel by car. Over half say it only takes 5
minutes or less to get there. 70% go with friends or family and school visits account for a quarter.
The improvements which people have noticed in the past year are to the increased presence of parks staff
(64%), the outdoor gym (63%), park furniture (54%) and general cleanliness (48%). Just over a quarter noticed
improvements to the play area. Almost two thirds say they would like to see boats on the lake, 60% would like
water play and more than half would like a better/bigger play area.
When asked about accessibility, four in five noted the even and wide paths, around three quarters
commented on the accessible/inclusive play area and the wide/user friendly gates. Over half noticed suitable
parking and the clear signage/info.
Asked to make ratings on a scale of 1 to 10, grounds maintenance (grass, shrubs, flower beds) scored highest
(7.4 average) with all other categories (variety of activities, events provided, access, local community
involvement, appearance of park furniture and the appearance/quality of the play area) scoring over 6, except
for the variety of wildlife habitat, which came very close with 5.7.
Just over half (52%) said the play area equipment was “just right” although 45% thought it was “too hard”. The
swings were most popular and the slides least popular. Almost three quarters (71%) said they felt happy in the
play area and nearly half (47%) said it was exciting. The average safety score (scale of 1 to 10) was 7.8. When
asked to comment on what made them feel safer, the most frequent response was “not too many dogs”, with
suggestions for a separate area for dogs.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
10. SWOT Analysis
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Strengths
Large green space
Sports facilities
Good transport links
Close to amenities
Mature landscaped grounds and trees
Dog Free Area
Outdoor Gym facility
Parcour facility
Sensory garden
Good access and well designed paths and routes
Recycling bins
Flower and Biodiversity meadow
Diversity of culture
Heritage perspective
Play area
Lake
Cycle path
Opportunity to re-tender grounds maintenance
contract
New management structure
Static park keeper
Serves a wide community
Diverse wildlife habitat
Drainage
Education value
Cross borough network
Friends of Goodmayes Park group
New Toilet Facility
Dedicated Metropolitan Police patrols
Opportunities
Retain Green Flag award
Increase children’s play equipment and
playgrounds
Capital funding
Boundary hedge planting
Interpretation boards
Landscape of lake area
Introduction of freshwater fish
Fishing licenses & bailiffs
Green Grid participation
Toilet facilities
Café/refreshments stand
Review grounds maintenance contract specification
Change contract provider
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Weaknesses
Poor boundary planting
Signage and Waymarkers
Lack of standardised furniture
Graffiti
Tree damage
Furniture support
Redundant foundations & surface damage &
corrosion
No running water
Cycle rack
No lighting
No surveillance
Litter in lake
Too few dog bins
Grounds maintenance provider
Contract monitoring
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Threats
Not retain the award
Resident objections
Lack of interest from public / members
Vandalism of projects
Anti social behaviour
Delay in the re-tendering of the contract
No action to re-address monitoring of the contract
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Strengths included the fact that the management reorganisation had provided a much stronger and more
proactive parks team. Management have been assisted by the work of the Friends group, who have assisted
both in terms of liaising with the local community. The facilities the park has to offer were perceived to be
varied and interesting, including the improved playground area. The park’s heritage and history is a plus
point, and one that could be more fully exploited. The current investment programme for the toilets, signage,
playground equipment and grounds maintenance and new planting schemes were considered to be making
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
a real difference to the quality of the Park, and maintenance standards were seen to have markedly improved
over the last 12 months. The new dedicated Metropolitan Police patrols were established during 2011 to
replace the redundant Park Police as part of a restructure programme which in turn will improve the security
and safety of the park. 2011 was also the year that Goodmayes Park had Parcour, Outdoor Gym and a Sensory
Garden installed in its redundant areas of the old tennis courts.
Weaknesses previously included antisocial behaviour including damage and graffiti by a minority of users.
Results from Parks Police statistics advise that there have only been a small amount of verbal warnings issued
for minor offences in Goodmayes Park during 2010. The infrastructure (footpaths, redundant spaces etc.) was
seen to be failing, although this is being addressed in a number of areas. There are still relatively few
biodiversity habitats within Goodmayes Park.
Opportunities, Parks staff saw the chance to build on the excellent structure, buildings and landscape within
the park. This Management Plan and the Council’s own aims and objectives were seen as an opportunity to
build on. We will look at opportunities to explore other sources of income, particularly those from external
sources e.g Heritage Lottery Fund. The relationship with the Friends Group was an area which could be built
upon to draw down on other resources, and to involve the local community within the management of the
park. Finally the chance to improve local standards was seen to provide the opportunity to make the park
more fit for purpose in relation to the current and future demands of users.
Threats to Goodmayes Park. A change in government policy away from the current view of parks as central to
sustainable communities could affect public perception. Any change in terms of the way other public services
were viewed in terms of funding could draw resources away from the Park and towards other Council-run
activities.
(Photo shown – Tree Avenue towards Mayesbrook Road)
11. Vision and Objectives
The overall Vision for Goodmayes Park is:
“Create an open space which provides a wide range of opportunities for outdoor recreation,
contemplation and education in keeping with the needs of its local community, its heritage and
history.”
The key objectives are to:
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Provide a park which is welcoming to visitors.
Ensure that the Park is healthy, secure, and safe to use.
Create a green space which is clean and well-maintained
Ensure that the Park and its buildings are managed sustain ably.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
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Ensure that the Park and its buildings are well conserved, and to interpret its history and heritage
through good signage, publicity and literature.
Increase links with the local community and the Friends group through the planning and
management of the Park.
Restore and maintain the grassland, amenity, sports and play facilities.
Monitor, review and manage effectively the infrastructure.
The Council places high value on the importance of its parks and open spaces and they are central to many of
the Council’s overall Aims and Objectives.
Council’s Aims and Objectives
There are a number of Council strategies and plans that are directly relevant to Goodmayes Park objectives
and the maintaining of Green Flag status. These documents, also available on the council website, are in many
cases very detailed and as such for the purposes of this green flag document have been summarised by
selecting the appropriate sections and paragraphs and presenting them here.
The Council’s Vision:
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To make Redbridge a better place to live
The Council’s Aims:
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A safer place to live
A cleaner, greener place to live
A better place to learn
A better place for care
A better place for business
A better place to live together
Corporate Strategy 2006-2010
http://www.redbridge.gov.uk/cms/leisure_and_libraries/leisure/parks_and_open_spaces/list_of_p
arks_and_open_spaces-/goodmayes_park.aspx
The Corporate Strategy sets out the London Borough of Redbridge strategic ambitions, high-level
priorities and how the Council intends to achieve these. The plan links with the Community Strategy in
its overarching corporate vision and values, which will guide the Council’s work and direction. These
vision and values have been informed by resident’s views and feedback, and are taken forward at
Directorate and Service level.
The London Borough of Redbridge Corporate Strategy includes a number of Key Drivers. Page 15 relates
to parks and specifies “Improve parks and open spaces as community and tourism assets for the
borough”.
The London Borough of Redbridge’s Community Strategy: “In 10 years Redbridge will be a safe and
clean place where people are proud to live, work and invest. A place that is caring, vibrant and
healthy”
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Community Strategy
http://www.redbridge.gov.uk/cms/leisure_and_libraries/leisure/parks_and_open_spaces/list_of_p
arks_and_open_spaces-/goodmayes_park.aspx
This strategy draws attention to working and living together to make Redbridge a safer place.
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To make Redbridge safer
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To promote a positive attitude to the environment and have a cleaner, greener Redbridge
Sports & Physical Strategy
G:/parks&countryside\strategies\natureconservationstrategy1997-2002
This strategy draws particular attention to the importance of sport involvement amongst the
community within Redbridge.
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Widen access to sport and physical activity
Develop places for sport and physical activity
Develop a workforce for sport and physical activity
Improve health and well being
Develop sporting pathways
Cultural Strategy
https://insidelbr/files/publications/67.pdf
This strategy draws particular attention to the involvement of all age groups, into more cultural
activities within Redbridge and improves awareness of the environment
 Improve health and well being through increasing participation in cultural activities
 Protect and enhance the environment including open spaces, wildlife, heritage sites, buildings
and public art.
 Overcome physical and social barriers to participate in enjoyment of cultural activity and
celebrate Redbridge’s cultural diversity
 Ensure that young people of all ages and backgrounds have the opportunity to engage in
cultural activities.
Redbridge and Paralympics Games Strategy
This strategy draws attention to the importance of the partnership with local schools to improve
awareness and the importance of tackling obesity amongst young people and about getting them
involved with sport in local schools and within parks and open spaces. Below are the priorities set out in
the strategy that draw particular importance to green space and community involvement amongst
young people:
Priority 1 - All children and young people in Redbridge will enjoy good physical and mental wellbeing
as part of a healthy lifestyle.
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Support the Healthy Schools Programme and aim to ensure that by 2012 Redbridge schools are
Healthy Schools
Tackle obesity and support healthy lifestyles through the development of green spaces, play,
leisure and sporting opportunities.
Priority 2 - The 2012 Games will encourage young people to get the most out of life.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
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Increase the provision of sport during school time in order to achieve a minimum of 2 hours
participation, as well as safe and supervised extra curricular activities to encourage 3 hours
participation outside school
Support the implementation of the Play Strategy to improve the range and quality of play
opportunities within the borough.
Priority 4 – Promote the existing tourism offer including green spaces, cultural and heritage
programmes and proximity to the games.
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Invest in green Infrastructure, with particular emphasis on the Green Belt
Raise the profile of local cultural activities, green spaces, leisure and conference opportunities.
Children & Young People Strategy https://insidelbr/files/publications/4667.pdf
This strategy highlights the need for continued improvement by strengthening the play facilities
within Redbridge and increasing the development of green spaces.
Children & Young People
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Promote healthy lifestyles through the development of green and open spaces, play, leisure and
sporting opportunities
Create opportunities to contribute to living in a sustainable, clean and pleasant environment.
Create opportunities for work experience and volunteering.
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Play Strategy
http://www.redbridge.gov.uk/cms/leisure_and_libraries/leisure/parks_and_open_spaces/list_of_parks
_and_open_spaces-/goodmayes_park.aspx
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Strengthen and promote Play in Redbridge
Increase play opportunities for children with disabilities
Provide challenging adventure play particularly for 11-16 year olds.
Develop innovative play projects that promote health and physical activity.
Nature Conservation Strategy
http://www.redbridge.gov.uk/cms/leisure_and_libraries/leisure/parks_and_open_spaces/list_of_parks
_and_open_spaces-/goodmayes_park.aspx
Local Strategy
The Redbridge nature conservation strategy aims to promote, protect and enhance biodiversity in the London
Borough of Redbridge. This is delivered through the Redbridge Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP).
The Redbridge BAP sets out the Council’s main aims and targets to:
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conserve local priority habitats and species
to promote and enhance urban green space
to promote and enhance green corridors
to promote community involvement throughout the whole Borough.
The Redbridge BAP is made up of species and habitat action plans, those that are relevant for
Goodmayes Park are the species action plans for house sparrows and bats and the habitat action plan
for parks. The Parks Habitat Action Plan is an overarching document which influences all Redbridge
park management plans and should therefore be read in conjunction with this document.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Regional and National Strategy
‘Biodiversity is ultimately lost or conserved at the local level… Local authorities provide the main framework within
which environmental care is organised at local level and public attitudes to the environmental cultivated’. UK
Biodiversity Plan
The UK and London Biodiversity Action Plans target habitats and species of high ecological interest or of
conservation concern and list actions required to conserve and enhance them within the UK and London
respectively. The Government has a duty to ensure that parties take reasonable practicable steps to further
the conservation of BAP listed species under Section 41 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities
Bill (2006) (NERC Act). Several BAP species are likely to be present in Goodmayes Park (see Appendix J for a
list).
In addition, the NERC Act places a Biodiversity Duty on public authorities who “must, in exercising their
functions, have regard, so far as is consistent with the proper exercise of those functions, to the purpose of
conserving [including restoring and enhancing] biodiversity” (Section 40 (1).
As well as those mentioned above, the Council has many other duties and responsibilities regarding
nature conservation in Goodmayes Park, which are set out in several pieces of legislation and policy
framework
1. EU Habitats Directive
2. UK Conservation (Natural Habitats &c.) Regulations
3. UK Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended)
4. UK Planning Policy Statement 9: Biodiversity & Geological Conservation
5. The London Plan (2004)
6. Mayor’s London Biodiversity Strategy (2002)
7. Redbridge’s Environment Action Plan 2007-2017 (REAct)
8. Local Development Framework: Strategic Policy 2: Green Environment
Parks Strategy G:\New G Drive\Dev&Delivery\Parks Dev
The Parks Department have produced a draft Parks Strategy, which sets out a broad direction for
Redbridge’s parks over the next 10 years. It is important that actions are translated into plans for
individual parks, which are discussed and agreed with Parks Friends Groups. The plans do not have to
be elaborate or complex but should set out a clear view of the needs of the park and how it is aiming
to develop and/ or change over a 5 to 10 year period. It should also show how the park could respond
to and contribute to the aims of the strategy.
Goodmayes Park’s future
A thorough examination of the SWOT analysis, consultation with the local residents and users of the site has
guided the future of Goodmayes Park and how the park is to respond to local needs.
The following plan uses the Green Flag criteria as a template for the summary of the actions to be taken
throughout the park.
12. A Welcoming Place
There are a number of improvements designed to assist in making Goodmayes Park a more welcoming place
during 2010/11. These are included in the Action Plan that is outlined in the final section of this plan to ensure
that implementation is achieved in a realistic fashion and accords to an achievable timescale.
The gates at the main entrance were completely renovated during 2008 – this included repainting of the
gates to ensure that as visitors enter the Park, the entrance looks cared-for and well-managed now and
provides a much welcoming feel when entering the park.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
The tired shrub beds on the left side of the Aberdour Road entrance were rejuvenated during 2009/10. This
involved removing the tired shrubs, applying soil improvers and mulch and then replanted with sustainable,
colourful and interesting plants which improved the colour and welcome appeal of the park.
The Parks management team have set out their priorities in ensuring Goodmayes Park retains the Welcoming
charm it now has:

To make the main entrance welcoming and interesting

To provide colour in the form of swathes of perennial shrub species throughout spring, summer and
autumn

To ensure the signage is always clean and visible.

Ensure there is always a Park keeper

To educate the friends group, schools and members of the general public in relation to the use of
colourful planting which is sustainable and requires no irrigation once established, and which needs
low levels of maintenance.
During 2009/2010, new signage for the entrances which informs the public the location of the facilities within
the Park was installed.
This includes the following elements:




Coloured plan of the Park including sports facilities, footpaths and entrances
Résumé of the history of Goodmayes Park, including its acquisition and the characters and activities
associated with it
Contact details for enquiries
Byelaws
This will convey a message that the Park is well-maintained, and that visitors are welcomed
(Photo shown is the -main thoroughfare from the bowling green towards Green Lane)
13. Health, Safety and Security
There are a number of improvements that have taken place which will make Goodmayes Park a healthier,
safer, and more secure place to use. These include:
Health and safety
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
The Parks Service is committed to ensuring the Health and Safety of its parks staff and users of the facilities.
The Health and Safety Plans for the Council, Group and Service extending to individual parks and buildings
demonstrate the following objectives

To eliminate or reduce to minimum, accidents, incidents and work related ill health.

To achieve and maintain a safe and healthy working environment for all and to ensure that others who are
not our staff are not harmed by our work activities.

To strive to bring about improvements to our provisions for Health and Safety, enabling them to evolve
and develop, thus meeting the needs of future activities and changes in legislation.
 Appropriate monitoring systems are in place to comply with the requirement of the Corporate Policy for
Health and Safety.
There is a Health and Safety Policy issued to all staff within the Council and Vision Redbridge Culture and
Leisure and it is for them to ensure that all parks staff has a copy. Managers will monitor and enforce the
standards embodied within the policy and emphasise to staff that they also bear an individual responsibility
to ensure that procedures are appropriately implemented.
Visitors
The Council has a duty of care to all visitors and users of the park. The Vision staffs pay particular attention to
this aspect of Health and Safety regulations.
Notices are displayed at appropriate places indicating where help and information is available.
Where staff become aware of the existence of a particular item or situation which may be hazardous to users
and which cannot be dealt with immediately, those who are likely to be in the vicinity of the risk are advised
and informed of any necessary precautions. Additionally, suitable warning notices and, where appropriate,
physical barriers and/or alternative routes and means of access and egress will be advised.
Parks staff
All staff are aware of their responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 Sections to:


Take reasonable care for the Health and Safety of themselves and of others who may be affected by their
acts or omissions at work.
co-operate with Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure insofar as is necessary to enable that duty or
requirement to be performed or complied with to assist clear understanding of staff duties while at work.
Incidents involving near misses, accident, injury or damage are recorded on site and copies of the records are
forwarded to managers and the Councils central Safety Unit. When such incidents occur, the Park Operations
Officer will assess the situation and work with the Parks Manager and ultimately the overall Health and Safety
Manager to ascertain whether any modifications to existing practice are required, and ensure that any action
required is expedited.
Contractors
A proportion of the services provided in Goodmayes Park are carried out through, or supported by,
Contractors. Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure fully accepts its obligations under the law, both as an
operator of an undertaking, an employer and as an occupier of premises, to try to eliminate hazards and,
failing that, to take all reasonable steps to minimise the risks that may arise from its own and its Contractors’
work activities that may affect our staff, those who enter the park, (for whatever purpose) our residents and
members of the public. It is firm policy to take all reasonable steps to minimise risks, which may arise from its
own undertakings that may affect its Contractors, their staff and others.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Vision makes it clear to all Contractors who carry out services in the borough, that they are expected to
comply fully with the spirit and intent of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.
Method Statement and Risk Assessment
All Contractors who carry out work in our parks and open spaces are required to supply a method statement
and risk assessment, with reference to the works that they will be carrying out on our property, and in what
manner the work will be done.
No work is allowed to start until we are satisfied fully with the statement provided to us from the Contractor.
Risk assessments are carried out for Goodmayes Park and the associated works carried out within the site. A
sample of such an assessment is attached within the Appendices document
Smoking Ban
Administrative and operational premises owned by London Borough of Redbridge Council are non-smoking
environments. No provision will be made for separate smoking areas or smoking breaks. The Personnel
Service will be responsible for informing all job applicants of the policy before offers of appointment are made
or accepted. Managers will be responsible for overseeing the implementation.
Annual Survey
An annual survey of all infrastructures, including footpaths, buildings, car parks, railings, fences, etc. has been
conducted by parks staff to identify condition and to ensure that:
 Immediate heath and safety risks are identified
 Longer-term potential health and safety risks are identified
 Features are fit for purpose (is the path in the right position? constructed of suitable materials? etc)
New Police Team (Parks)
The Redbridge Community Police Team, started operations on the 31 October 2011. They have responsibility
for the patrolling of Redbridge's Parks and Open Spaces and take part in partnership operations, focused on
licensing and anti-social behaviour issues. The new Redbridge Community Police Team consists of 12
constables, two sergeants and is managed by an Inspector. The team have access to additional resources,
working closely with the Special Constabulary and Redbridge Council's Enforcement Teams. The Council
hosts weekly meetings with the Police, Vision Trust - Redbridge Culture and Leisure and the Council's
Community Safety Service. This enables the team to set patrols and task the team, based on up-to-date
information and intelligence about emerging issues or hotspots. The team patrol Redbridge's parks and open
spaces, providing a visible policing presence seven days a week. They work closely with Vision Trust Redbridge Culture and Leisure, Park Keepers and staff. The team will also work with parks user groups and
Friends of the Park organisations along with other stake holders.Twelve of the Boroughs larger parks have
been allocated a member of the team, who will act as a single point of contact for park keepers and park user
groups, in the same manner as Safer Neighbourhood teams.
As well as patrolling the parks, the team carries out joint partnership activities with the Council's Enforcement
Teams. The team deals with anti-social behaviour, licensing, trading standards and street scene issues. The
team will work until 3 am on Friday and Saturday nights. The Police Service provides the following:



High visibility patrols and proactive intelligence-led operations to combat anti-social behaviour.
A reassuring presence for park users.
Liaising with key stakeholders in relation to crime and antisocial behaviour.
Park users who witness anti social behaviour in the Borough’s parks and open spaces are requested to call the
Operational Response 07904 640042 which is the same number as with the previous service.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Incidents of a serious nature should still be reported direct to the police via 999.
Goodmayes Park is located within a deprived area of the Borough, and as a result does experience some low
levels of crime such as dog related issues and anti social behaviour top the list of enquiries for the Park, but in
the summer the Park can also attract under age drinkers and drug use. The Police also issue fixed penalty
notices for such offences as littering and dog fouling, however the fixed penalty notices for non payment of
parking is dealt with by Wing Security.
Photo of new Police Service in one of the Borough’s parks
Dog Control
The exercising of dogs in the park is very popular, however, there are two problems associated with this
activity. Firstly, some visitors can be frightened or intimidated by loose dogs running free and secondly, dog’s
excreta is unpleasant, unhygienic and a national concern. To encourage responsible dog ownership London
Borough of Redbridge Council applied for dog control orders that were effective from the 14th July 2010.
www.redbridge.gov.uk/cms/leisure_and_libraries/leisure/parks_and_open_spaces/dog_control_in_pa
rks.aspx
London Borough of Redbridge Council's Dog Control Orders.
Removal of dog faeces - Dog faeces must be picked up and removed by the owner.
The exclusion of dogs from certain areas - Dogs are not allowed in fenced areas within the park such as
children's playgrounds, multi use games areas and tennis courts.
The keeping of dogs on leads by direction - Dogs must be placed on a lead if asked to do so by an
authorised Officer.
Offences against any of the Orders are punishable by way of an £80 fixed penalty notice. Authorised officers
are Police officers. A zero tolerance approach is adopted in relation to all offences against the Orders.
Feeling safe (5 day park staff rota)
Impressions of safety are considerably enhanced by the presence of park staff. To this end a new staff rota has
been established to ensure that instead of the previous sporadic day cover, this is extended to include a
rotating shift to allow cover to be provided for five days per week, i.e. to include the busy weekend period and
early evenings. This will be reviewed to ensure that it meets the needs and demands of visitors.
The public respond positively to staff that project a positive impression of high standards of care and
professionalism. Park Keepers and Maintenance Staff are issued with new uniforms including protective boots.
Uniform is worn at all times whilst the park is being maintained.
14. Maintenance of Equipment, Buildings and Landscape
Improving management of grounds maintenance standards
A review of quality standards has ascertained that they are adequate for Goodmayes Park. However, a new
piece of monitoring software has been purchased and in operation called “Park Tracker” to ensure the
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
grounds maintenance specification is adhered to and standards is maintained throughout the park. An
example of this is shown in Appendix H.
The maintenance of the site is set through a well constructed
maintenance schedule Quantity
SHRUB BEDS
Spring / Summer maintenance
Autumn / Winter maintenance
ROSE BEDS
Spring / Summer maintenance
Autumn / Winter maintenance
HEDGES
Hedges and Hedgerows
GRASS MAINTENANCE
Grass Cutting
Edging and Trimming
Leaf Clearance
LITTER CLEARANCE
Litter picking & bin emptying
Graffiti removal
PATHS AND HARD SURFACES
Paths and hard surfaces
PLAYGROUNDS
Playgrounds
PUBLIC CONVENIENCES
Clean convenience Daily
Checking daily
FOOTBALL
Football - senior
TENNIS
Tennis courts
TOTAL HOURS =
Annual hours
2825m2
6.26
10.18
868m2
11.02
14.19
1313 m2
6.20
157441m2
109
159.12
17.74
693
60
2534m2
168
1 unit
163
3 unit
127.40
72
3 pitches
6 courts
8.30
1615.41
9.15
Building maintenance
Buildings are assessed through a condition survey every 3 years by the Council’s Property Group and
identified works are added to the repair and maintenance programme. The results are then prioritised and
funding allocated.
Day-to-day reports of vandalism or wear and tear are dealt with through predetermined response times and
prioritised e.g. safety – immediate
The park has three buildings in total within the park and all have a working function. There is a sports pavilion
which serves three teams including Goodmayes & Blythswood Cricket Club and two football teams. The
pavilion itself has two changing rooms, shower cubicles and toilets. The pavilion also boasts a small drinks bar
managed by the cricket team. There is a mess hut that is furnished with heating, washing facilities, eating
area and tool storage. The hut is located fairly central to the park and is visible to all park users where they
can seek information and speak with the park keeper. Finally the park boasts a further building namely the
Bowls clubhouse. The clubhouse is a relatively new building following a significant arson attack on the
previous one. The arson attack took place in 2008 and as you can see below the bowls pavilion is a rather
impressive parks building. The pavilion itself consists of q fully equipped kitchen, toilets and washing facilities
and a licensed bar for its members. This is used every day during the playing season and used occasionally in
the winter months for functions. The Friends of Goodmayes Park are set to use this for their meetings from
winter 2011.
Playground inspections
A sample daily inspection sheet is attached in Appendix E these are undertaken by parks staff daily before 10
a.m. Parks Management produce a full risk assessment that helps inform and prioritise the repair and
maintenance of playgrounds year on year. The Council invested in training in 2010 for Parks Staff to go on a
Playground Inspection Course managed by ROSPA.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Maintenance of machinery
Below is a machinery maintenance document from the external contractor The Landscape Group. These are
the contracted grounds maintenance providers for Goodmayes Park and for much of the Borough’s green
space, highways and housing sites.
What machinery is serviced:
How often is the machinery serviced:
Who services the machinery:
Who monitors the maintenance of the
machinery:
All machinery used by TLG on the London
Borough of Redbridge Contact is serviced – all
servicing requirements are in-line with the
manufacturer’s recommendations.
This is dependant on the manufacturer’s
recommendations and the type of machinery –
once a machine is no longer required due to the
change in seasons (e.g. grass cutting equipment Nov – Feb) it will undergo a full service.
A full-time mechanical engineer over sees the
maintenance and servicing of all the machinery
on the contract. For certain servicing
requirements some machinery may need to be
sent back to the manufacturer or to an external
contractor- if this is the case the full-time
engineer will arrange and liaise with the relevant
people to get this achieved.
Each operative is required to fill out a daily check
sheet for that particular machine before taking it
out and using it. This ensures that the machinery
has had the relevant safety checks in-line with
manufacturer’s recommendations before use; this
is overseen by the Contract Manager, Supervisor
and mechanical engineer.
If a machine is found to be unfit for use a red tag
will be attached – containing information for
engineer and indicating that it is not safe to be
operated.
15. Litter, cleanliness and vandalism
Clean
The park contributes to the Council’s overall open space portfolio and as such has subjected to assessment
under NI199. Regular litter picking, bin emptying and refuse collection assures that appropriate cleanliness
standards are maintained.
The maintenance regime for the park of daily bin emptying, daily litter patrols and regular path sweeping
ensure that continued high standards are maintained.
Cleanliness is measured in terms of two key indicators, litter and detritus. The NI 199 grading system is
designed to reflect the way that a child would perceive the local environment.
The park keeper litter picks the park each morning and carries out further litter picks throughout the day as
and when required. During the summer months in Goodmayes Park mobile teams will support the static park
keeper if the park is busy and litter is more prevalent.
London Borough of Redbridge invests a great deal in the cleaning up of litter in terms of both time and cost;
therefore, prevention is a key strategy.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Re-siting of litter bins - this will assist in the control of litter by siting infrequently used bins nearer to areas
where litter tends to accumulate and where no provision has been made e.g. by the soccer pitch touch lines. It
is intended that covered bins will be purchased for future provision on replacement bins.
The issuing of Fixed Penalty Notices by Police is seen as vital in combating the source of the problem in parks.
All enforcement staff is encouraged to operate a zero tolerance policy when encountering a littering offence.
The park keeping service carries out a daily inspection of all furniture and equipment within the park and
records any repairs, defects or damages with them. The Parks Service do not have a surplus of furniture and
always looks to renovate and repair in the main but does have a small budget to purchase furniture should
the need arise. Goodmayes Park has suffered greatly in the past with vandalism especially on its furniture and
assets which has meant that an even greater response has been required from its repairing teams.
Toilets
Toilets are cleaned daily and further inspected during the course of the day by cleansing staff with any
deficiencies recorded and rectified as soon as possible. The opening hours of the toilets are 7:30am and
locked at 5pm throughout the year. They are managed by the Cleansing Department of the Council and
solely funded through their budget.
Dog Bins
The Council operates a ‘poop-scoop’ system and encourages all dog owners to clean up after their dog.
Special bins coloured red are strategically provided around the park principally by gates to facilitate disposal
of collected waste.
There is information available through various leisure providers and the council internet website on cleaning
up after your dog. The Council has a specific dog bin-emptying contract that provides for bin emptying on a
once or twice a week cycle depending on volume of usage.
All materials taken away are destined for a licensed landfill.
Graffiti
The Parks take their responsibility for providing a clean and green borough very seriously. The removal of
graffiti is seen as a key element of that objective. Graffiti is removed as soon as practicable with offensive
graffiti being removed immediately. To achieve this ambitious target a number of parks staff has been trained
in graffiti removal. If there are spates of graffiti that Parks staff cannot remove, the Cleansing department
within the Council have a mobile resource team that have equipment to combat this.
16. Environmental Sustainability
Redbridge Parks Environmental Policy
The Redbridge Parks Environmental Policy is derived from London Borough of Redbridge’s Environment
Strategy, REAct. REAct’s aim is to maintain and, where possible, improve the environment and to make sure
that Redbridge meets the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future
generations to meet their own needs.
As a borough-wide strategy, it promotes joint and efficient working to ensure the environment remains a top
priority in Redbridge.
REAct details 5 key themes:
1) Sustainable Buildings and Transport
2) Climate Change
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
3) Natural Environment and Heritage
4) Waste and Recycling, Clean Streets and Pollution
5) Partnerships and Communication
Below details how the themes above relate to parks and open spaces and what can be done within them to
contribute to achieving the actions set out by REAct.
Sustainable Buildings and Transport
The council requires all new buildings, including its own to achieve high levels of sustainable design and
construction. Adaptations can also be made to existing buildings, including those in parks such as pavilions,
changing rooms, compounds, etc. to make them more energy efficient and sustainable. These changes could
include replacing old lighting with new energy saving technologies and looking at ways to save/harvest
water.
Parks vehicles make up part of the council’s fleet. One of the aims of REAct is to “constantly review use of
alternative fuels in fleet vehicles”. This is being carried out by the Council’s cleansing and DSO service area
and is being achieved through an ongoing review of what is available and what the Council can realistically
use and purchase.
Another of the aims under this theme is to develop a cycle network for the borough; this will make use of
cycle ways through parks. Cycling is encouraged through Goodmayes Park through the provision of cycle
lanes and bike racks. The proximity of the park and the park extension to Mayesbrook Park in the London
Borough of Barking and Dagenham makes an excellent green cycle way across the borough boundary.
Cyclists of all ages are also encouraged to Goodmayes Park through the provision of the Re-cycle circuit,
which contains a mix of weaving posts, limbo beams, a take of ramp and so on designed to teach riders
balance and co-ordination.
Climate Change
Many of REAct’s climate change targets relate to reducing the borough’s CO2 emissions. Parks can contribute
to reducing emissions through the measures mentioned above to improve energy efficiency of park buildings
and vehicles. Parks can also contribute by offsetting emissions through the planting of trees (where
appropriate) to increase carbon sequestration. Several thousand trees have been planted in Redbridge Parks
in the last 3 years. Most recently, in December 2011, 12,000 trees were planted within Goodmayes Park, this
equates to approximately 4,800kg of carbon sequestered, which will increase as the trees grow and mature.
As well as contributing to reducing carbon emissions, parks have a role to play in adapting to climate change.
When designing new planting schemes several factors including drought tolerance and maintenance are
carefully considered. Preference is given to hardy, native species that require less watering than other more
exotic varieties.
A risk associated with climate change is an increase in the number and abundance of non native invasive
species. The UK Climate Impacts Programme predicts that flood risk in the Thames Basin will increase due to
climate change. In the mid 20th century many rivers in London were encased in concrete channels, this has
made river maintenance difficult and reduced the ability of river channels to cope with increasingly intense
summer storms.
The Mayes Brook River runs through Goodmayes Park in an underground culvert. It is partially culverted
immediately south of the park, adjacent to Mayesbrook Park in the London Borough of Barking and
Dagenham. Restoration of the Mayes Brook through Mayesbrook Park has commenced in 2010. The works
will realign the river and allow it to meander through the park. It will break the river out of the concrete casing
creating a more natural bank profile and introduce backwater areas.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Both Goodmayes Park and Mayesbrook Park make up part of the East London Green Grid. Due to the
proximity of the two parks, a natural continuation of the works would be to undertake a similar restoration
project in Goodmayes Park. It would greatly add to the habitat value of the park and would increase the
storage capacity of the Mayes Brook, thereby helping to prepare the area for the effects of climate change. It
would also add to the aesthetics of the park and provide further opportunities for recreation. Options and
funding opportunities for restoring the Mayes Brook should be explored. The Environment Agency has
identified the Mayes Brook as one of the rivers in need to restoration work and has pledged their support for
such a project.
Natural Environment and Heritage
Natural environment and heritage is where parks have the biggest role to play. Actions to improve parks for
wildlife are set out in the Parks Habitat Action Plan, which sits within the Redbridge Biodiversity Action Plan.
Enhancing parks for wildlife is one of the key roles of the nature conservation team, who are continually
looking at improving habitats within parks through a range of projects, be it planting trees, adjusting mowing
regimes where appropriate, creating wildflower meadows and dead wood habitat, or tackling litter.
Promoting the natural environment is another of the team’s aims and this is achieved through a programme
of events and undertaking practical conservation tasks with volunteers, as well as on site interpretation.
Parks’ heritage is promoted through a variety of means including on site interpretation and plaques and in
some cases, exhibits, displays and events. Some parks have a very detailed historical record, such as
Valentine’s Park which promotes its heritage through the exhibits and events at Valentines Mansion. In other
parks, historical records are not so in depth but a brief overview is included on signage at park entrances. In
these parks there is also a focus on creating and preserving heritage for future generations. The
transformation of the disused boat house into a wildlife centre in South Park has been documented by the
South Park Users Group. Whilst the Friends of Goodmayes Park are looking to create a formal record of the
park’s development in recent years, focusing on the 2011 tree planting project. They hope to give copies to
local libraries to keep on file for future generations to look back on. Art installations in parks are also being
considered as ways to promote park heritage.
Waste and Recycling, Clean Streets and Pollution
The Re-cycle circuit in Goodmayes Park is made of 100% recycled materials known in the trade as HDRP (high
density recycled products), which are taken directly from the UK waste chain thus reducing waste at a landfill.
Partnerships and Communication
A cleaner, greener and more sustainable Redbridge can only be achieved through effective and continuous
partnership working between the Council, other public organisations, businesses, and voluntary and
community groups. Equally as important is effectively communicating key environmental messages to all
individuals and organisations in the Borough and providing everyone with a way to communicate their
thoughts and ideas to us. In particular Goodmayes Park is able to convey this message through regular
discussions with the Friends of Goodmayes Park and also at the periodic Meet & Greet days in the park where
we can reach a wider audience of the community as well as the businesses that support us or even on
occasion join us.
Planting of main entrance and side entrances
The advantage from the point of view of sustainability is that this style of planting involves minimal
maintenance in the form of irrigation and fertilisation following establishment in the first season. For this
reason it should be possible to eliminate the use of water and chemicals on these beds, unlike the culture of
floral bedding which is more traditionally seen at park entrances or in other formal situations. This style is seen
as an ideal blueprint for attractive planting at a time of increasing drought and public concerns about global
26
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
warming. The good example of sustainable planting within Goodmayes Park is Stevens Road and Aberdour
Road entrances. Map and plant details for Stevens Road are shown in Appendix F.
Pesticide/ Herbicides/ Insecticides
The Council has a policy of limiting the use of pesticides as far as possible. In terms of grounds maintenance,
particular procedures have been written into maintenance regimes to achieve these. Within Goodmayes Park
treatment is normally only used on the bowling greens and hard surfaces.
For weed, pest and disease control, Goodmayes Park will always pursue cultural control practices in the first
instance. Chemical treatment will only be permitted, when a particular problem is exceptional, or deemed
non-viable or impractical by any other methods. The Parks Team will seek to reduce the amount of chemical
applied in ground maintenance situations year on year.
This is monitored and assessed through the Vision’s Contract Monitoring Unit reviewed at meetings
periodically.
Reducing Water Usage
The Council takes seriously its obligations to reduce the overall consumption of water. In this task parks are
using sustainable varieties of shrubs that will need less water whilst retaining a good flowering and foliage
ability.
Mulching for weed control has become widely used at Goodmayes Park; this has the added benefit of
reducing the watering requirement. Currently some 75% of all shrub beds are mulched and all newly installed
or replanted beds are mulched. This generally helps establishment and reduces water usage. Goodmayes Park
is waiting to see if a trial being carried out at Elmhurst Gardens is a success in its bid to harvest rainwater in a
large 1000+ litre water butt and use this to irrigate not only plants but to see if this can be extended to act as
irrigation for the bowling greens and other less drought tolerating features. If this new initiative proves to be
a success then Goodmayes will seek to apply to our Environmental Development Reserve Team for funding
for these new water butts.
Green Waste
The use of day-to-day green waste such as tree clippings and leaf mulch has increased dramatically over the
last three years. All tree works that take place at Goodmayes Park is selectively managed to ensure that the
tree waste is chipped on site and used as mulch for the shrub borders and rose borders Goodmayes Park is
proud to be one of the first parks to use the green waste on the shrub and rose borders. All of our tree mulch
(woodchip) is sourced from arboricultural works carried out in this Borough only; thus cutting down on our
carbon footprint and another key priority is that it has been recycled within our own borough. Large tree
trunks from trees felled here have been sited in and around the wildflower meadow to provide deadwood
habitat and informal seating.
Peat Usage
No peat is used in Goodmayes Park or any other park within the Borough. It is a requirement of procurement
procedures and our suppliers have confirmed that all bought-in bedding stock is grown with non-peat
compost.
Utility Usage
We are currently looking at our electricity, gas and water charges on each site. Parks Operations are looking at
a reduction programme within each park/facility. We already use energy efficient lighting in the pavilions at
Goodmayes Park which has proved to be a success; this has been in action for approximately 12 months. In
addition to the energy efficient lighting we always ensure that our Park Keeper ensures that all appliances
including lights are always switched off when the building(s) are not being used and to carry out routine
checks to ensure this is adhered to.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
External Contractors Commitment to Sustainability
The external grounds maintenance provider (The Landscape Group) has committed its promise to look at
ways of working as environmentally efficiently as it can and to review its policies frequently on ways in which
it can eliminate or reduce the risk and impact its machinery, staff, fuel and chemical usage have on the
environment. There is a Management Systems procedure in Appendix D showing this.
17. Conservation and Heritage
Heritage
According to the source http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report The Mayes Brook is a very important factor
within the Goodmayes heritage. The river itself rises north of Chadwell Heath, flows south-west, to Barking
Creek but passes through Goodmayes and Mayesbrook Parks on its travels. The name, recorded from the 16th
century, and probably derived from a local family occurring about 1300, seems to have been first applied to
the lower reaches of the stream, south of Longbridge. The stretch through Goodmayes was known in 1456
and later as Heavywaters, a name still in use within living memory. Below Longbridge the Mayes Brook fed the
moat and fishponds of Jenkins, south of which it divided into two branches, passing east and west of Upney,
the name of which means an 'island' in the marshes. The western branch is now mostly in culverts; the eastern
feeds the boating lake in Mayesbrook Park.
Goodmayes area like much of East London / South Essex was very much used for farming and little urban
growth took place until the Eastern Railway was created in the early 1900’s when industry and jobs brought
more people to the area and urban populations grew thus putting the Ilford area firmly on the map. 1921 was
the time for urban populations within the Goodmayes Area to really flourish with the London County Council
creating what was to become the largest housing estate in the world the “Becontree Estate”. Although this
housing estate was merely on the fringes of the London Borough of Redbridge, it did provide an opportunity
to link with neighbouring boroughs such as the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham thus supporting
community cohesion in its most broadening sense.
Goodmayes Park is an early 19th Century Park originally furnished with a bandstand, tennis lawns and a
pavilion. The map up until 1919 did not feature a balancing lake but records can confirm this was created
around 1954 / 1955 as one would assume for flood relief due to increased roads and pathways and properties
including the locally famous Mayesbrook Improvements of the 1950’s.
Below is a familiar scene from many parts in and around East London during the Second World War:
Conservation
The grassland is the main focus of conservation in Goodmayes Park.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Detailed Analysis
Trees
In the winter of 2011/12 Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure worked in partnership with the charity Trees for
Cities to increase tree cover in the park. The large field on the east of the park, known locally as Steven’s field
was selected as the most appropriate place to plant trees due to its large size and relative lack of use.
After a detailed consultation period, planting began in November 2011. The planting scheme consists of
12,000 native whips planted to create a woodland belt, divided into 4 zones- coppicing, foraging, biodiversity
and natural play. 20 specimen trees were also planted. Chosen for their aesthetic value, the specimen trees
provide colour and interest throughout the year. All the planting was undertaken by volunteers over a 3 week
period. A community planting day took place on the 5th December, 150 people attended.
Grassland
Most of the park is managed as amenity grassland for playing sports. However, there is potential to introduce
long grass fringes in the park, which will benefit a range of species, primarily invertebrates and birds.
Wildflower Meadow
The wildflower meadow was created in 2006 and occupies the former skate park space. It houses a range of
species including ox-eye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), viper’s bugloss (Echium vulgare), red campion (Silene
dioica) and common knapweed (Centaurea nigra) and attracts a range of invertebrates. The meadow is cut
twice a year and the cuttings are taken off site. This encourages re-growth of the wildflowers and prevents
nutrient enrichment of the soil. The wildflower meadow was extended in 2011 by a further 530m².
(Photo of the wildflower meadow being managed by volunteers and Nature Conservation Officer)
Deadwood
Deadwood provides a vital habitat for many species of invertebrate, including the stag beetle (Lucanus
cervus), which is declining in the London area but has been recorded within 1km of the park. Large tree trunks
left over from tree health and safety works in 2009 were left on site to add to the deadwood habitat in the
park, they also provide informal seating. Tree works are carried out every 3 years in the park, any suitable
deadwood will be left in the park again when the next round of tree works takes place.
A small stag beetle loggery was created in the park in 2010, with the help of local volunteers. Unfortunately
the loggery was vandalised and had to be dismantled. There is potential to create a large loggery in its place.
This will be made using large tree trunks, which will be more robust.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Lake
The lake supports several species of waterfowl including mute swan, Canada goose, tufted duck and great
crested grebes. The lake is nutrient enriched and lacks vegetation. The possibility of planting marginal
vegetation within mesh cages has been discussed with both the Environment Agency and the council’s
engineering department. However, nothing can be attached to the side of bottom of the lake due to the risk
of damaging the concrete apron. A solution could be to install floating reed beds within the lake, this option
will be investigated further over the coming year.
Feeding bread, and other inappropriate food, to the waterfowl is popular at Goodmayes Park. This attracts rats
and leads to the park looking dirty and untidy. Signage has been placed in all the park’s notice boards and
around the lake to encourage responsible feeding of waterfowl. A sign has also been translated into the most
commonly spoken foreign languages in the area to ensure that as many of the local population as possible is
made aware of the issues surrounding feeding wildlife.
Lake Island
The lake island is largely vegetated with shrubs and small trees. It is an ideal site for nesting birds as risk of
predation from foxes, cats, etc. is much reduced. A low fence surrounds the island but is in need of replacing.
Effective fencing will discourage Canada Geese from nesting. There is a large population of Canada Geese in
Redbridge and the London area, which negatively affects other bird species through competition for food,
nesting space, etc.
Hedgerows
Most of the margins of the park are planted with a mix of ornamental shrubs and small trees, which, in places,
have created dense hedgerows. These provide valuable cover for nesting birds. Gaps in the hedgerows should
be planted up to increase their habitat value. Planting thorny and berry bearing species will benefit the local
bird population.
Factors Affecting Biodiversity
There are numerous factors that affect biodiversity in parks. Management and grounds maintenance of the
borough’s green spaces are the main factors that directly affect the habitats and wildlife found within them.
Other factors include:
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Litter and vandalism
Overfeeding of wildfowl
Artificially large wildfowl populations
Limited connectivity between parks
Dogs (fouling, disturbing wildlife and tree damage)
Water body eutrophication e.g. algal blooms
Water pollution from upstream runoff
Light pollution
Pesticides
Public perception (that wildlife areas are untidy or unsafe)
Lack of current wildlife data
Inappropriate management to create ‘tidy’ landscapes
Lack of investment
Introduction of invasive non-native species
Climate change
The Nature Conservation Ranger Team works to eliminate/reduce the effects of the above factors and
improve the park for biodiversity through the measures detailed below.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Nature Conservation Works
The key nature conservation management objective is to maintain, enhance, create and promote habitats for
local and migratory wildlife. This will be achieved in Goodmayes Park through the following measures:
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Providing, maintaining and enhancing suitable tree lines and shrub habitat for bats;
Extending the wildflower meadow
Introducing areas of long grass
Improving hedgerows by planting up gaps
Enhancing areas inside and surrounding the lake for local and migratory wildfowl and waders;
Providing interpretation materials and educational services to the public and local schools to raise
awareness of biodiversity within the park and factors that affect it (see section on factors affecting
biodiversity);
Raising awareness of biodiversity within the park through public events and practical nature
conservation volunteer workdays;
Working with local residents to promote green corridors;
Preventing the spread of non-native invasive species
Increasing the amount and improving the quality and structure of native and wildlife friendly
planting, in ornamental flower and shrub beds
Specific actions relating to the above objectives are listed within the action plan. The Nature Conservation
Ranger Team, with support from parks operations and development, will be responsible for ensuring that
these are implemented.
Community Outreach Work
School groups are encouraged to use Goodmayes Park as a source of outdoor education and play. Several
local schools including, Goodmayes Primary School, Al Noor Primary School and Mayfield Secondary School
already visit the park to supplement their lessons. During October 2009, over 120 children took part in bulb
and tree planting activities at Goodmayes Park as part of “Make A Difference Week”. The nature conservation
ranger team offer to lead on school visits to all the borough’s green spaces and will continue to promote
Goodmayes Park to schools in the local vicinity.
At least three volunteer workdays, organised by the nature conservation ranger team, are held at Goodmayes
Park each year. The volunteers help to undertake practical conservation work. Past workdays have included
planting spring flowering bulbs, cutting back the wildflower meadow and supplementing one of the existing
hedgerows with new whips. A summary of volunteer days and community events organised by the nature
conservation ranger team is included in Table 1 on Page 40.
Nature Conservation Ranger
Goodmayes Park has a dedicated ranger who is responsible for maintaining, enhancing and promoting the
wildlife in the park. They work with park management to deliver biodiversity gains for targeted species and
habitats. They seek to secure external funding for large projects and partnerships with organisations and
community groups. They lead an annual programme of practical volunteer workdays and organise the annual
programme of nature themed events within the park. They develop and lead environmental outdoor
education sessions for local primary and secondary schools. They provide an information and advisory service
to members of the public.
Vision’s Nature Conservation Team leads regular practical conservation tasks throughout the borough with
local volunteers. The tasks vary depending on the site but can include tree planting, litter picking, scrub
clearance, meadow management, invasive species removal, coppicing, dead hedging and much more. The
volunteers meet once to twice a week and the tasks last 4-5 hours. The number of volunteers varies; on
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
average between 5 and 10 people attend each session. Most of the task schedule is planned 3 months in
advance but ad hoc days are arranged at short notice if needs be. Tasks that take place regularly at
Goodmayes Park include meadow management (twice a year - March and October) to cut and collect arisings
from the wildflower meadow in order to prevent soil enrichment and encourage desired species, tree planting
to gap up hedgerows and litter picking (as and when necessary) where winter litter scavenges are publicised.
18. Community Involvement
This is crucial to the development and enhancement of Goodmayes Park and has been improved by:
'Friends of Goodmayes Park’
The 'Friends of Goodmayes Park' group was established in 2008, however they will not formally constitute
until March 2012. The group is made up of local residents, park users, school staff, local Cllr’s and the Councils
Parks and Nature staff. The Group meets publicly every 3 months. The Friends of Goodmayes Park have
agreed the constitution will take place March 2012 as a public meeting AGM at All Saints Church at
Goodmayes Lane, Goodmayes. The Friends of Goodmayes Parks also have now created a website for
further recruitment of new members; it provides a platform for history and photo publications and for future
events at the park. The website itself is brand new and some of the features are still in development stage but
nonetheless it’s a key aim in which to reach the local community and market the park to an even wider
audience. Website address: http://goodmayespark.org
The group want to improve the level of co-operation between the Friends, the Council and other key
stakeholders in the community. Previously, a Council representative has chaired joint meetings; however, as
part of the proposed constitution meetings are chaired and managed by the Friends committee.
The Friends of Goodmayes Park provide an interface between the two crucial parts of the Park usage - the
Local Authority who are the managers of the park and the users of the park. The users are the lifeblood of the
park in that they give the park its reason to exist and the Local Authority is the Statutory Body responsible for
managing and maintaining the park.
With the Friends Group the Local Authority has input in a group that has wide access to the diverse users of
the park and their views. These cover all ages, ethnicity, cultures and views. These range from the casual user
to the more intense that use the park every day, from mum and kids using the park as a green "room", to the
serious health addict. It caters for dog walkers, as well as wildlife enthusiasts, to kiddies feeding the ducks,
to community based activities such as natural gyms and play areas, and open air classrooms.
(Photo of Goodmayes Park Open Day 2008)
Since November 2011 Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure have produced a key element in its strategy to
involve the local community. This key element is creating a Parks Forum that is made up of all the Friends of
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Parks groups in the borough. The forum enables members to share ideas and communicate more effectively
and discuss ways of working in partnership with the Vision, Council and the local community on park
improvements and achieving best practice for groups. The forum is currently scheduled to meet quarterly.
What this co-operation ensures is that the wishes of the majority of the park users can be fed into the Local
Authority and in partnership with them delivered to the park users. This gives the Community a voice and
makes them feel that they are contributing to their park and that sense of ownership empowers people who
would normally not be so empowered. It provides the Local Authority with a clear route to target their
precious resources in such a way that it provides not only a value add but value for money and encourages
greater awareness of the park. It allows the Friends Group to assist in applying for grants otherwise not
available to the Local Authority and clearly demonstrates the commitment the Local Authority and Vision has
in its residents.
Encouragement of Voluntary Friends and Conservation Groups provide opportunities for improvements for
parks and open spaces without any increase in expenditure. Groups such as the 'Friends of Goodmayes Park'
have the chance to apply for funding not available to London Borough of Redbridge Council and can enhance
the Council's parks and open spaces for the wider community, whilst giving those involved a sense of
ownership.
A range of activities include regular meetings to discuss how the Park can be enhanced; volunteer work,
future and present events and for those interested in wildlife conservation and collecting data on wildlife,
carrying out simple tasks that help keep the Park clean and tidy, walks and talks and keeping the group
informed of any changes affecting the park.
A number of events and activities have taken place in this past year and a planned programme of activities
has been publicised in the Nature Conservation Diary 2011 and the Do More publication.
All information is placed on the notice boards within Goodmayes Park in 2011 it is hoped that we could
publicise this on the Council’s website.
.
Encouraging the running of a range of events and activities – as indicated in the SWOT analysis, the events
and activities programme has not been extensive enough to engage the local community to full potential in
the past. A new way of considering this issue for Goodmayes Park will include:
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Making information more accessible - signage has improved at all main entrances to the Park.
To provide interpretation boards where new landscapes or habitats are created.
Temporary notices will advertise improvements before and during implementation.
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High visibility patrols and proactive intelligence-led operations to combat anti-social behaviour.
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A reassuring presence for park users.
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Liaising with key stakeholders in relation to crime and antisocial behaviour.
Residents who witness anti social behaviour in the Borough’s parks and open spaces are requested to call
Redbridge’s Police hotline. The number for Operational Response is 07553771608
Incidents of a serious nature should still be reported direct to police via 999.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
(Photo of Tree Avenue in full bloom near Park Keepers Hut)
19. Marketing
We endeavour to promote our parks and open spaces using many different communication methods in order
to reach those people who live, work and do business in the borough, so that they may take advantage of the
many facilities and activities available in Redbridge.
We currently do this using the following methods:
1. Word of mouth
2. We hand deliver a council event guide called “Do More” to every household in the borough seven
times a year
3. Parks and Open Spaces / Friends’ Groups newsletters
4. Internal communications; Cascade and e-news plus Inside Redbridge (staff intranet)
5. London Borough of Redbridge website (Redbridge-i web pages)
6. Redbridge Life (residents council newsletter)
7. Free listings websites for events
8. Emails to people subscribed to mailing list
9. Postal mailings to people subscribed to mailing list
10. Hand delivered flyers to houses surrounding parks
11. Banners
12. Notice boards
13. Press releases
14. Adverts
15. TV screen advertising for high profile events
1. Word of mouth
The council works with many different groups, including schools, to promote their parks and open
spaces and as a result, information is quite frequently spread by word of mouth.
2. Do More guide
2.1 We produce a quarterly guide for adults, called Do More in Redbridge, which promotes adult and
family events taking place in parks, it also promotes our parks as hireable venues for events. Whenever
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
we have new equipment installed in parks, such as the Adizone at Ray Park and the boulder park at
Fairlop Waters, this is also publicised.
2.2 We produce a guide for children three times a year, called Do More for kids, this concentrates on
child friendly activities and half term and holiday fun. Whenever play areas are improved or new play
installed, this is where we promote it.
3. Newsletters
Newsletters are generated via our Parks Development team, the Nature Conservation team, The
Woodland Trust and the Friends’ groups for individual parks, keeping their users up-to-date on
developments and events.
4. Internal Communications
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The Council produce a corporate communication newsletter called Cascade informing staff of
high level developments, such as the opening of the new James Leal Centre in Ray Park, the
Mayor’s “Help a London Park” funding at Fairlop Waters; Green Flag awards etc.
An internal staff publication called e-news is sent to all staff via email and is more about personal
matters, i.e. a day in the life of a park keeper, staff sporting events at parks and of course general
events that maybe of interest staff members.
Inside Redbridge is the staff intranet system which we use to publicise events, such as the old
school sports day, Children in Need netball tournament etc.
5. Redbridge Web Site
Events that take place in Redbridge parks are advertised on the Redbridge-I in the web events diary
accessible from the homepage of www.redbridge.gov.uk. We also have a page set up for every park
and open space in the borough along with information pages on Green Flag, playgrounds, hiring a
park, sports pitch bookings etc. The homepage search engine is extremely effective and by using a
key word it will enable you to find a specific park or news on an event.
6. Redbridge Life
This is the council newsletter that is distributed to every household in the borough. Redbridge Life
runs features on facilities within the borough and in the past, this has included new play
opportunities, local parks, opening of new venues; such as Ray Park Visitor Centre. It also features new
items and events and is published monthly.
7. Free Listings websites
We regularly send details of all our events to various online websites and printed publications, such as
Primary Times, The Best of Redbridge, Let’s Go with the children, Where we can go, The Wanstead and
Woodford Guardian and Redbridge Life. This gives us the opportunity to advertise our events to an
out of borough audience.
8. Email mailing list
People that subscribe to the email mailing list are regularly sent information as it becomes available
and can opt to receive their parks newsletter via email.
9. Postal mailing list
People that subscribe to the postal mailing list, and live out of the borough are automatically sent the
current Do More guide which contains information on parks events. We also have a Hainault Forest
Country Park mailing list and a parks general mailing list which enables us to send specific mailings to
interested parties if the need arises. For people interested in maintaining their own green spaces, we
have a mailing list for Redbridge in Bloom.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
10. Hand delivered flyers
When events take place in specific parks, we arrange for door-to-door mailings to houses surrounding
the park, to make sure that residents are kept fully informed about what is happening on their
doorstep.
11. Banners
We produce banners for events taking place in parks and these are displayed on the main parks
railings in the borough to help raise awareness of the event. When a big community event is
organised, such as the Cultural Olympiad event, Inspiration, up to 20 banners are produced and
spread around the borough.
12. Notice Boards
We utilise outdoor notice boards of which there are 60 around the borough, to promote such events
as Music in the Parks, over the summer, football foundation courses, sport and fitness activities, play
ranger schemes, tree planting events and community festivals in parks. We also have notice boards in
the borough’s libraries and other council offices all of which display posters promoting park events
and activities.
13. Press release
When we have something to shout about, we issue a press release to the local press and other
relevant media including radio, which our press officers follow up to ensure best coverage. These
press releases are also published in the news section on the council’s website.
14. Adverts
To supplement press releases, we also place adverts in the local press where budgets permit. This
helps to reach an even wider audience, as some of the publications reach beyond the borough
boundaries. Adverts also give the event a higher profile in the public eye.
15. TV screen advertising
We have TV screens at two of our libraries and two of our leisure centres and one screen in the
Housing Advice Office. We produce screen adverts to run at these centres to promote high profile
events or new initiatives, such as the Walk to Health, which we feel the public will be interested in
hearing about. When budget permits, we also buy space on the TV screens in The Mall Shopping
Centre to advertise initiatives or events.
We assess each project on its merit and available budget before deciding what method of publicity
will be utilised. The mix is quite varied and there are other channels we can tap into, such as schools
newsletters and voluntary organisations newsletters should we feel it would be beneficial.
(Photo showing a small selection of the advertising hoardings that the Council use)
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Park Publications
Individual Park leaflets have been phased out and a new publication has been produced that covers all parks,
events and activities under the Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure banner. This is called the “Do More”
leaflet that covers a whole range of activities from: Park Walks, Park Activities, Museums, Dance, Theatre,
Nature Walks, Nature Events etc. It gives a very précis description about the activity but does cover the
important facts. During the Summer months Do More Guides are issued to other neighbouring boroughs
such as Newham, Havering and Barking and Dagenham to encourage visitors to come from wider a field,
these are usually collected in libraries. A snapshot example is shown below:
20. Events
http://www.redbridge.gov.uk/cms/leisure_and_libraries/leisure/parks_and_open_spaces/list_of_parks
_and_open_spaces-/goodmayes_park.aspx
The following events have taken place within Goodmayes Park:
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Meet & Greet (sponsored by Sainsbury’s Chadwell Heath) This was an event aimed at meeting
and greeting local park users and listening to their comments, ideas and suggestions regarding
Goodmayes Park and a chance to meet some of the users from the Friends of Goodmayes Park
group
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Table 1: Summary of volunteer days and community events organised by the nature
conservation ranger team in 2011
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Date
Event Name
Summary of Event
Number of Attendees
10/03/2011
Wildflower Meadow Management
3
26/03/2011
Tree Planting
01/09/2011
Bat Walk
14/09/2011
Bat Walk
11/10/2011
Meadow Management
10/12/2011
Tree Planting Spectacular
A practical nature
conservation workdayvolunteers helped to clear
half the wildflower
meadow
An event run by the nature
conservation team in
conjunction with the
Friends of Goodmayes
Park, planting 200 native
whips donated by The
Woodland Trust.
A guided walk at dusk led
by the nature
conservation ranger team
A guided walk at dusk led
by the nature
conservation ranger team
A practical nature
conservation workdayvolunteers helped to clear
half the wildflower
meadow
A community tree planting
day, run in partnership
with Trees for Cities, as
part of a large project to
plant 12000 trees in the
park.
35
18
12
7
142
Trees 4
Cities in partnership with Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure have scheduled an event in
Goodmayes park week commencing 5th December 2011 to plant 12000 trees in a vastly underused area in
a bid to encourage interest, wildlife habitats and more of an aesthetic appeal for this part of the park. This
event provided a greater inclusion of the local community thus providing a more cohesive approach to
the park users and of course inspired greater involvement within the voluntary sector
Trees for Cities Planting Days:
Weds 23rd
Describe the activities - planting 15 new trees with corporate volunteers from News International (Friends of
Goodmayes also invited)
Time TfC on site - 9:30am
Time volunteers on site – 10:00am
Time volunteer depart – 15:00pm
Time TfC depart – 15:30pm
Volunteer numbers – 22 confirmed
Thursday 24th Describe the activities – Tree Planting
Time TfC on site – 09.00
Time volunteers on site – 10.30
Time volunteer depart – 15.00
Time TfC depart – 16.00
Volunteer numbers – 6 confirmed (max 20)
Date: Tuesday 29th
Describe the activities – whip planting with corporate volunteers from Barclays bank
Time TfC on site - 9.00
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Time volunteers on site – 10:00am
Time volunteer depart – 15:00pm
Time TfC off site - 4.00pm
Volunteer numbers – 20 booked so far aiming for 50
Thursday 1st
Describe the activities – whip planting with school children from Al Noor & Becontree primaries
Time TfC on site - 08.30
Time school groups on site/depart: 09.30 – 10.30, 11.15 – 12.15, 1.15 – 2.15
Time TfC depart – 3pm
Kid numbers - 90
Friday 2nd Dec
Describe the activities – whip planting with children from Goodmayes Primary
Time TfC on site – 12pm
Time school groups on site/depart – 1-2pm & 2- 3pm
Time TfC depart – 3.45pm
Wednesday 7th Dec Describe the activities – whip planting with corporate volunteers from News International
Time TfC on site – 9:30am
Time volunteers on site – 10:00am
Time volunteer depart – 15:00pm
Time TfC depart – 15:30pm
Volunteer numbers – up to 100 (20 confirmed)
Thursday 8th Dec
Describe the activities – whip planting with corporate volunteers from Bloomberg
Time TfC on site - 8.00
Time volunteers on site - 9.00
Time volunteer depart - 1.00
Time TfC depart 2.00
Volunteer numbers – up to 100
Saturday 10th Dec
Describe the activities - whip planting with the community, face painting, live music, arts and craft activities
Time TfC on site – 09:30
Time community on site -11:00
Time community depart – 15:00
Time TfC depart – 16:00
Expected community numbers – 200
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
(Photo - Santa being called upon to lend a hand)
40
(Photo - Live band keeping the Christmas
spirit
alive and spur the troops along)
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
(Photo - The array of volunteers getting stuck
Into the early morning tree plant)
(Photo – Face Painting and refreshment
stalls to aid the
troops)
(Photo – Santa with the younger volunteers taking a well earned break)
There are also a number of informal activities that are undertaken in the park, these include:
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Tai Chi users
Rounders
Walking
Jogging
Meditation
The department will continue to review the opportunity to increase voluntary/recreational activity in the park
The successful ‘Walk to Health programme has a walk in the park on Mondays and Thursday s in Goodmayes
Park and commences at 11:00am inside the entrance at Aberdour Road / Abbotsfield Road. This is managed
by the Sports and Physical Activity Team as part of their Healthy Lifestyles
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Programmes. Due to its popularity in 2010 it has been extended for 2011. Below is a copy of the leaflets that
are distributed around the libraries and leisure centres within the Borough:
21. Management
The objectives of the park management and staff are to develop the site in such a way as to improve the site
and enhance the visitor experience whilst conserving that which is valued in terms of character, heritage and
ecology.
Goodmayes Park is managed by the London Borough of Redbridge and maintained by two contracting
companies. One is our in house contractor - Direct Services Organisation (DSO) and an external contractor –
The Landscape Group
The Landscape Group deliver the grounds maintenance specification for Goodmayes Park
The paragraphs below summarise the overall management framework.
Vision’s Parks Development and Operations team are responsible for the management and development of
the Council's parks and open spaces, grounds maintenance, however the Council are responsible for the
arboricultural service and events in Parks. This includes managing Goodmayes Park.
The Parks Department is now part of Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure (a managing agent) for the Council,
formally Culture, Sport & Community Learning. Plans have been drawn up at Service, Division and
Directorate level to ensure a coordinated approach to service provision and to ensure the Council’s overall
ambitions and priorities, as set out in the Corporate Strategy, Parks Strategy, Sports & Physical Strategy,
Cultural Strategy, Redbridge & Paralympics Games Strategy, Children & Young People Strategy and the Nature
Conservation Strategy are addressed.
By-laws
The by-laws relating to parks, gardens and open spaces were transferred to the London Borough of
Redbridge from the Greater London Council on Ist April 1971 (see copy in Appendix 2). The matters covered by
the by-laws include
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Interpretation
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
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Opening times
Vehicles
Overnight parking
Horses
Climbing
Removal of structures
Erection of structures
Camping
Fires
Children's Play Areas
Children's Play Apparatus
The full lists of byelaws are available as Appendix C
(Photo of mulched rose beds near Aberdour Road entrance)
New Management Structure
Following extensive consultation in 2006 the London Borough of Redbridge agreed to transfer Fullwell Cross
Leisure Centre, Ilford Pools, Cricklefields Athletic Ground and Ashton Playing Fields to a charitable leisure
trust. The new company began operating in April 2007 under the name Vision - Redbridge Culture & Leisure.
Since the enforced closure of Ilford Pools in September 2008, Fairlop Waters, Redbridge Cycling Centre and
Wanstead Leisure Centre have been successfully transferred to Vision RC&L and we also deliver an Exercise on
Referral Scheme in partnership with the Redbridge Primary Care Trust.
The idea of delivering leisure services through the form of a charitable trust has been successfully put into
practice in many other local authorities in order to sustain and develop the service.
In May 2011, Vision became responsible for a much wider range of additional services in Redbridge which
includes: Libraries, the Museum, Local Studies & Archives, Parks, Open Spaces, Country Parks, Sport and
Physical Activity, Arts, Events, Glasbury House, Fairlop Outdoor Activity Centre and Halls Lettings
including Sir James Hawkey Hall.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
More information about these additional services can be found at www.redbridge.gov.uk
The Company is overseen by a Board of 16 Director Trustees including 13 Community representatives and 3
local councilors. The company is led by Iain Varah – Chief Executive. The Sport and Leisure arm of Vision is led
by Keith Newton – Director of Sport and Leisure / Deputy Chief Executive, Liz Petyt- Operations Manager and
Andy Jones – Facilities Manager who oversees the work of the teams in each of the Vision Sport and Leisure
managed facilities.
Vision is a registered charity and as a non-profit organisation, any surplus we make will be reinvested for
community benefit, to improve the quality of facilities and services offered to you. As a social enterprise Vision
is committed to working in partnership with the London Borough of Redbridge to deliver a wide range of
leisure services to the communities that we serve.
Vision is a customer focused organisation and our aim is to continually improve the delivery of sustainable
leisure and cultural services. We play a vital role in improving the quality of life of those living, working and
visiting Redbridge and are confident that you will see improvements in our operations and enjoy visiting the
facilities and services that we manage. Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure manage Goodmayes Park. Two
contractor organisations, one “in-house” and one external carry out the grounds and building maintenance.
Below is the management structure, which describes the roles and responsibilities of the key personnel,
involved in managing and maintaining Goodmayes Park and other parks within the Borough.
Parks Management Structure
Within the Senior Vision Department there is:
Chief Executive
The aim of the Chief Executive and senior management team of Vision-Redbridge Culture & Leisure is to
provide a ‘focused and joined up’ approach to leisure and culture provision for the people of Redbridge in
partnership with the Council. It actively promotes an ethos of self-evaluation to ensure services to the public
continually improve in line with Best Value requirements. The Chief Executive of Vision is also the 2012
Olympics and Paralympic Games lead officer for Redbridge.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Head of Parks and Open Spaces
Head of Parks & Open Spaces is responsible for the day-to-day delivery and development of parks and open
spaces including the management of allotments, grounds maintenance contracts, play, events, nature
conservation and contract monitoring.
In addition, the Head of Parks & Open Spaces leads on our contribution to the Olympics & Paralympics 2012
and overseeing the management of Glasbury House in Wales.
The role involves developing and maintaining constructive relationships with appropriate outside bodies and
agencies, as well as leading the partnership with MET Police with our Redbridge Community Police Team.
Finally, ensuring the preparation, design, planning, programming and implementation of technical
specifications, bills of quantities and all other contract documents related to technical projects within Vision
RCL.
Parks Operations Manager
Reports directly to the Head of Parks and Open Spaces, oversees the management of the park
A brief outline of the Parks Operations Manager is bulleted below:
Undertake overall responsibility for the appointment, management, motivation, performance, deployment,
training and development, supervision and discipline of staff in the Parks Operational service in line with the
Vision’s performance management framework and quality standards
Lead on the development and integration of the Parks Operational service with the Parks Development Unit,
ensuring that they respond to the current government agenda and initiatives and the diverse communities
they serve. Ensure a seamless link with the other units within the service area.
Exercise overall responsibility for the effective management, development and control of the Parks
Operational service capital and revenue budgets. Monitor performance and control action as necessary to
expend budgets to meet objectives.
Ensure the provision of robust mechanisms for establishing and monitoring the standard and effectiveness of
the Parks Operational service.
Co-ordinate and produce a strong evidence base for Comprehensive Performance Assessment, external
inspections and other performance frameworks.
Be responsible for the preparation and implementation of business, development and project plans relating
to the effective delivery of the Service area and plans required by external organisations.
Work together with Parks Development to maximise opportunities in service modernization and contribute to
the achievement of quality standards such as Green flag or Green Pennants awards
Liaise with the Delivery and Development section in relation to the grounds maintenance contracts, and
spearhead the Council’s contribution to the development of high quality public open spaces, parks their
facilities and programming.
Liaise with Delivery and Development to ensure the preparation, design, planning, programming and
implementation of technical specifications, bills of quantities and all other contract documents related to
technical projects within the Parks Operational service.
Liaise with contractors and monitor their performance, undertake all tasks required in the management of
grounds maintenance or other major contracts to ensure effective and high quality service delivery.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Valentines Park Manager
is responsible for the day-to-day management of Valentines Park and the historic mansion. His other role is to
support the development team in the horticultural designs and issues that arise. The team consists of two
further staff in addition to the main contract.
Parks Development Manager
Manages the area budget and has main responsibility for monitoring the quality of maintenance, coordinating
developments in the park and for implementing and reviewing this management plan. The other duties
would be in partnership with the Parks Operations Manager and the Parks Development Officer and they
include:
Liaise with other Officers/Services and where necessary, instructing them to carry out works which falls
outside of general grounds maintenance i.e. car parking control, lighting, buildings, paths and trees.
Engaging the services of others to assist with developments in the park e.g. production of marketing material,
establishment of volunteer programme.
Communicating regularly with key stakeholders
Attend Steering Group meetings.
Liaise with councillors
Respond to queries/complaints about the park.
Monitor the standards of maintenance through at least monthly site inspections (including completion of tick
sheet).
Review this management plan, consulting on any changes.
Assemble Green Flag Award application (when site is deemed ready for entry).
Parks Development Officer
is responsible to the Parks Development Manager supporting in the management and development of the
parks and open spaces within the borough. A brief outline is detailed below in bullet points:
To monitor the performance of contractors who carry out technical works and report on any progress.
To reply directly to complaints from members of the public, Councillors, MP’s and other organisations.
To advise the Parks Development Manager of findings and to respond directly in accordance with the
Council’s complaints procedure.
To instigate remedial action as considered necessary
Attend Council, Committee and Sub Committee meetings when requested and in the absence of the Parks
Development Manager
To give talks and presentations to groups interested in parks and recreation work and allied subjects
To seek out and initiate partnership projects with the private sector in order to raise to profile of the service
within the Borough
To manage to organisation of the annual London /Redbridge in Bloom, and other horticultural competitions
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
within the Borough
To develop new initiatives and opportunities within the borough’s parks
Parks Operation Officer
supports the Parks Operations Manager in supervising day-to day grounds maintenance operations and
communicating on a daily basis with the site based staff at the park to ensure the delivery of the work
programme. They spend around 5% of their time managing and maintaining the park, with responsibilities
for the remainder of the parks. The Parks Operation Officer also has a role in monitoring the standards of
maintenance through regular site visits and completion of a quality monitoring form on at least a monthly
basis.
Park Keeper
is based on site fulltime. The keeper reports to and liaises with the Parks Operations Officer. The park keeper
will carry out a general care-taking role within Goodmayes Park. This includes routine tasks such as litter
collection and disposal, vehicles and tools management and basic maintenance when required, ensuring any
equipment and machinery is maintained to an effective standard, and generally maintaining a high
environmental standard within the allocated park, including any integral buildings and structures.
Nature Conservation Officer
To implement and review the Redbridge Biodiversity Action Plan
To monitor internal and external contractors for the implementation of projects, including surveys of habitats
and species and creation of new habitats
To give strategic advice and input in other services' work programmes if these services are partners in the
Redbridge BAP e.g. Planning, Strategic Services, Property Management, Education and Housing.
To provide information and professional advice on a regular and or ad hoc basis also to members of the public
and to outside bodies when required.
To represent Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure in the Council’s Environment Management Team meetings
and give advice on corporate issues related to nature conservation and biodiversity
To work together with planning and give professional advice on planning applications that impact on
Redbridge's natural resources if and when required
To attend public enquiries and liaise with Planning and Legal services to help providing evidence and drawing
up legal agreements related to nature conservation.
To liaise with the Greater London Authority for updates on current nature conservation sites, major planning
applications, the biodiversity process and the designation of new Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation
To develop partnerships with the private and voluntary sector and with statutory bodies such as Natural
England, Environment Agency, local wildlife groups, resident associations
To liaise with Natural England regarding the implementation and review of the Hainault Lodge Local Nature
Reserve Management Plan
To oversee the management of Hainault Lodge LNR in partnership with the Havering and Redbridge Wildlife
and Countryside Group
To oversee the management of the Recorder database and manage the Service Level Agreement with the
London records centre, Green space Information for Greater London (GIGL)
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Tree Officer
 To assist in the cyclical inspection of trees, prepare work schedules and collate and input all relevant
information onto a computer database to facilitate with maintenance requirements.

To assist in the completion of surveys and implementing measures necessary to control tree related
emergencies and disease outbreaks, such as Dutch elm disease.

To assist in the completion of emergency inspections of trees in need of urgent attention and issue
the appropriate work orders to contractors.

To assist in the provision of an advisory and consultancy service across the Council and a general
advisory service to the public on arboricultural matters.

To deal with correspondence and assist in the inspection of tree related enquiries from residents,
other service areas, Councillors and Members of Parliament,

To have an understanding of legislation relating to trees, with particular reference to: Highways Act
1980, Miscellaneous Provisions Act 1976, Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003 and the Health & Safety at
Work Act 1974, keep abreast of current and relevant case laws and apply relative legislation as
required.

To assist in the design and implementation of new tree planting schemes in the Borough, for Area
Committees, Council’s Service Areas and the public.

To liaise with contractors on operational issues and issue instructions where necessary to ensure
smooth running of contracts

To assist in the supervision of contractors, including site supervision, Health & Safety checks, standards
of work, during emergency call out situations and general contract administration. (Which may
include liaison with emergency services.)

To assist the Contract Consultancy Unit Manager and Arboricultural Officers in the provision of the
day-to-day management and continuity of the service for all matters related to the Service Area.
Management Arrangements
The management of the park is the sole responsibility of the Vision Parks and Open Spaces Service. Vision’s
Parks Service is split into two areas, North and South, the A12 thoroughfare being the dividing line.
Goodmayes Park is part of the southern area. The park is directly managed by one static park keeper, mobile
locking team and the Parks Operations Officer who oversees the day to day management of the park along
with the responsibility of 48 other parks and open spaces across the Borough.
Five day working now means that parks are staffed more frequently. Management has the responsibility of
the horticultural requirements for the park, along with allocation of the parks budget, staff, materials and
equipment.
As part of the rationale for implementation of a more targeted approach to green space provision, a reallocation of revenue funding may be considered, particularly in relation to grounds maintenance
improvements (litter collection, etc) due of its increased profile, Goodmayes Park may need to draw funding
away from less-used areas.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012

This could be achieved by: Introducing lower-profile maintenance of grass areas, e.g. by introducing
far more floral meadow to green spaces (apart from sporting or ornamental areas).

Friends group seeking external funding for improvements to Goodmayes Park
Improving management of grounds maintenance standards
This issue was specifically addressed in the extensive inspections of Goodmayes Park in 2008 by Parks Staff
and the Monitoring Team in partnership with the External Contractor. It is considered that standards have
been improved and a review of quality standards has ascertained that they are adequate for Goodmayes Park.
Having the new inspection software mentioned earlier (ParkTracker) will ensure better delivery of these
standards by ensuring that they are completed to time and in a satisfactory manner. The Monitoring Team will
undertake weekly tours to audit and assess standards.
Arboricultural Service
Regular inspection by the site management and site teams are undertaken to ensure that the treescape is
kept in good condition.
Any tree found to be dead, dying or in a dangerous condition is dealt with immediately, either through tree
surgery or removal. The Council has a 24 hr emergency response agreement with the Arboricultural
contractor for immediate action.
This will involve identification of key features and determining action plans associated with:




Trees bordering the Park’s boundaries
Rows and avenues of trees defining footpaths
Wildlife conservation area and children’s playground
Trees in the vicinity of the sports facilities
There is a document outlining the Arboricultural Teams vision, aims and procedures as Appendix I to this
document.
The action plan associated with the review will be produced and included in the parks maintenance
programme for 2009
22. Infrastructure
An annual survey of all infrastructures, including footpaths, buildings, car parks, railings, fences and litterbins
has been completed. This is further monitored weekly by parks staff to assess condition and to ensure that
repairs are prioritised. Works completed during 2009/10 include Gates and Fencing £3000, Natural Play
Equipment £30,000, Toilet Refurbishment £25,000, Fence and Lake Bridge Painting (Free in partnership with
the Community Payback Team), Sustainable Beds at Stevens Road entrance £2916.00, Sustainable Beds at
Aberdour Road entrance £ 1500.00, Sensory Garden £20,000, Outdoor Gym Facility £28,000 and the Parkour
equipment at a cost of £30,000
Football Pitch Renovation Works
During spring, renovation works to relieve compaction, uneven surfaces and to improve soil fertility are
carried out. This includes the use of a Vertidrain to relieve compaction, re-seeding with suitable species of
hard-wearing grasses in order to provide an improved quality of surface and to reduce the risk of trip
accidents. These will be continued on an annual basis at the end of the football season in May each year.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Playground
The Natural Play Area in Goodmayes Park was funded from the DCSF Playbuilder Grant in 2009 and was
designed using the results of a wide community consultation carried out by council staff. The main focus of
the consultation was with young people in the area. During a “meet and greet” community day
in the park, local schools were invited to take part in a “scavenger hunt” to highlight the benefits of playing in
nature. Consultation was also carried out in local schools. The themes that emerged from the results were that
young people in Goodmayes wanted more challenging play, aimed at older children.
They wanted play that offered an opportunity to climb and hang out with their friends. The winning design
for the play area included mounds, boulders, trees, a seating area, a climbing wall, space net and basket
swing. Climbing trees were rescued from woodlands cleared for the construction of the Olympic Stadium and
were planted in the play area to add to the play experience.
Buildings
The toilets at Goodmayes Park were funded solely from the Repairs and Renewals budget within the Culture,
Sports and Community Learning Service area. The existing toilets have been completely refurbished with new
cubicles and sanitary fixtures including hand dryer and a brand new ambulant toilet facility with a cubicle
installed in accordance with the Disability Discrimination Act. The agreement for the investment of the toilets
was that Area 5 Committee money would be released to the Cleansing Department of the Council for the
management and upkeep of the facility.
As part of the rationale for implementation of a more targeted approach to green space provision, a reallocation of revenue funding may be considered, particularly in relation to grounds maintenance
improvements (litter collection, etc). Sites and tasks will be prioritised to give a more focused maintenance
regime. This could be achieved by for instance, introducing lower-profile maintenance of grass areas, e.g. by
introducing far more floral meadow to green spaces (apart from sporting or ornamental areas).

Rationalising the use of sporting areas within Parks where there are relatively low levels of usage.

Planning agreements. In particular, Section 106 agreements can be used to achieve environmental
improvements.

Lottery funding The Heritage Fund. If works are carried out which are of outstanding interest and
importance to the national heritage, funding is provided for whole-park projects, the conservation of
park features or park activities. Grants are available from £50,000 to £5 million for a period of up to five
years. Projects must be designed to involve all stakeholders, must demonstrate sustainability and
must demonstrate the heritage value of the park in question.

Your Heritage Grants are available from the Heritage Lottery Fund, and are for projects of between
£5,000 and £50,000 in value.

Local Heritage Initiatives. To assist local communities in the preservation of their environment,
landmarks and traditions including archaeological, natural, built and industrial heritage. A community
group such as the Friends Group for Goodmayes Park can investigate and celebrate a historic park,
prepare a public exhibition in a park, and repair a feature. Up to 100% of project costs between values
of £3,000 and £25,000 are payable.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Action Plan for Goodmayes Park
Task
Work Type
Roads, Paths,
Cycle ways and
Accesses – 20
percent each year
Paint / treat litter
bins
Building
Repairs
Repainting of
boundary fencing
Building
Repairs
Create a dog free
area
Building
Repairs
Completed
Constitute
Friends of
Goodmayes
Group
Increase planting
within the
wildflower
meadow
Gap up privet
hedge to original
status
Extend wildflower
meadow
Community
Involvement
In Progress
Refurbish tennis
courts and
basketball courts
Designate areas
for feeding
wildlife
Install new safety
signs around lake
Over mark cycle
path
Resurface cycle
path
Building
Repairs
2009/2010
Status
Completed
2010 /2011
2011/2012
2012/2013
2013/2014
2014/15/16
Completed
On Target
On Target
On Target
On Target
In Progress
On Target
On Target
On Target
Completed
xxxx
Nature
Conservation
Completed
xxxx
£1000 Parks
Budget
Nature
Conservation
£2000 Nature
Conservation
Budget
£25000 Parks
Budget
Completed
Nature
Conservation
Park Safety
xxxx
Completed
Sport
Development
Transport
Strategy
xxxx
xxxx
On Target
On Target
On Target
On Target
£400 Nature
Conservation
Budget
£1000 BMF
Budget
£400 BMF
Budget
£10,000
Transportation
Strategy
Budget
£400 BMF
Budget
Over mark car
Parking facilities
every year
Static park keeper
in place
Park Safety
Completed
Security
Completed
Paint yellow
vehicle barrier
Parks Safety
Completed
Building
Repairs
Completed
£500 Parks
Budget
Grounds
Maintenance
Completed
£8000 BMF
Budget
Carry out repairs
to wooden
fencing around
park depot
Implementation
of sustainable
planting beds
Supply and install
further natural
play equipment
Supply and install
Outdoor Gym
Completed
£200 materials
& labour from
CPT
£1000
materials &
labour from
CPT team
£
Area 5
Discretionary
Fund
n/a
£1000 Nature
Conservation
Budget
Grounds
Maintenance
Building
Repairs
Approx Costs &
Budget
5k within
existing GM
Budget
£27000 per
year from
exiting parks
budget
£400 Parks
Budget
Project
xxxx
£27000 DCSF
Budget
Project
Completed
£28000 DCSF
Budget
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Refurbishment of
park furniture on
a yearly basis
Grounds
Maintenance
Final Entrance
Sign Supplied &
Installed
Paint all gates and
piers
Repair and
renovate toilet
block
Install Parcour
Equipment
Rejuvenate Shrub
Beds with New
Plants
Look at new
initiatives for the
one remaining
basketball court
Toilet
Refurbishment
and Reopening
Sensory Garden
Building
Repairs
Mosaic Design of
the existing
Turnkey
Seed over
redundant rose
beds
Building
Repairs
Building
Repairs
Completed
Completed
£500 Parks
Budget
Completed
£2300 Parks
Budget
Completed
£3500 Parks
Budget
£25000 Repair
& Renewals
Budget
£30,000 DCSF
Completed
Adventure
Play
Grounds
Maintenance
Completed
xxxx
£2000 Parks
Budget
Adventure
Play
xxxx
Building
Repairs
Completed
Grounds
Maintenance
Arts
Grounds
Maintenance
£25000 Area
Committee
Funded
£20000
Completed
Xxxx
Completed
52
Unknown at
this stage
£4000
Unknown
Source of
Funding
£150 Parks
Budget
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Appendix B
Audit of Facilities
An audit of facilities was conducted using the methodology prescribed in the Government’s
Planning Policy Guideline note 17 (PPG17) for the provision of public open space. This consisted
of a review of the following key areas of provision:

















Main entrance
Boundaries
Roads, paths, cycle ways and access
Parking
Lighting
Surveillance
Information
Cleanliness
Planted areas
Grass Areas
Provision of Litter Bins / Dog Bins
Seating
Buildings including toilets
Health and safety
Educational value
Recycling
Additional Facilities
A Main Entrance
Main entrance is of (caste iron) construction. The gates are ornate, large and imposing and at the time of
the inspection it was apparent that the overall structure was suffering from some corrosion and some of
the railings to the centre gates were badly corroded and broken which will require the gates being
removed for renovation. To the entrance immediately left were two adjacent advertising hoardings say 7’
by 4’ each covered with a succession of very poorly maintained posters and just in front of these was a
grassed area albeit overgrown with weeds and litter.
Consideration should be given for hoardings to be removed. Immediately behind the hoardings are the
public facilities, which at the time of inspection were not open (boarded up) and when viewed from the
road were showing signs of dereliction, although when viewed from inside the park did not look that
bad. The overall first impression was not good which is a pity because once inside the park the visitor is
presented with an entirely different picture.
B Boundaries
The boundaries to the park are clearly defined and are a mixture of old (original) and new metal railings
and some of (block concrete) construction. Unfortunately the latter were covered in highly unsightly
graffiti. The tennis court area is in particularly poor condition and will need investment in the very near
future. The boundaries in the main did secure against intrusion although there were a few areas with
gaps in the fencing which compromised security. This would require further remedial works to secure
fully.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
C Roads, Paths, Cycle ways and Accesses
There is a comprehensive footpath system within the park. The path footpath is of a tarmac material and
are all weather in composition and appear relatively level. Edges are reasonably well defined. As is usual
with this type of path the wearing course is cracked in places, shows signs of numerous previous repairs
and requires further remedial work. At the time of inspection the faults shown did not seem to give cause
for particular concern although did look unsightly. A proportion of the main path was handed over to
cycling and whilst say 50% was very well marked out the other half needed redoing. Overall however, it
did not look that bad.
D Parking
There are approximately six facilities within the park which are situated along the main thoroughfare of
the Aberdour Road entrance to the park. These are usually taken up with the bowls members during the
summer months.
E Lighting
There are no lights in the park.
F Surveillance
There are no CCTV cameras within the park
G Information
At the main gate (or at any of the various other gates) there appeared to be few or no notice
boards/maps providing information for park users, (i.e.: events, safety etc.) The information signs that
were in place were in need of repair and in some cases replacement.
H Cleanliness
Whilst overall the park was relatively litter free there was a large number of litter/beer cans at the front
end of the lake, (see ‘other facilities’ below) and around the lake’s perimeter. There was also an indication
that there might be larger items dumped below the water line. There were at the time of the audit four
litterbins within the lake area.
I Planted Areas
The planted borders mainly consisted of mature shrubs and the flowerbeds were given over to rose beds.
Not many of these appeared to be in bloom and they looked very tired at the time of the audit. It was
noted that the formal boundary hedge had various gaps that had given way over the years to various
weed growth such as epicormic, suckers and various bramble. There is a need to ensure that the formal
boundary hedge is restored to its original state in the very near future.
J Grass Areas
The grass areas were in a fair condition, however there were noticeable signs of wheel ruts either to the
edges of the pathways or across the lawn area
K Provision of Litter Bins & Dog Bins
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
There was some evidence of dog fouling although not extensive. Dog bins were however few and far
between, in some cases perhaps not visible at all. A few more would be appropriate.
L Seating
There are deficiencies in terms of the quality and quantity of seating provided in the park. The seating is
of basically two designs, the older wooded slatted variety and the more modern metal alloy.
M Buildings
The buildings in Goodmayes Park consists of one cricket pavilion and one bowls pavilion, they are well
used throughout the year. The cricket pavilion has been at Goodmayes Park for approximately
60 years and has served a variety of local cricket and football teams and has a licensed bar within its
quarters. There is (as stated before) a bowls pavilion in the park that has a long-standing club attached to
it. The park enjoys a further portable building to facilitate the park keeper's) and as a storage facility for
their tools. There are toilets within the park but sadly they are in a state of disrepair.
N Health and Safety
The life buoys around the lake are in need of being replaced, some have been vandalised and some are
missing. Dog bins are in need of being increased due to the amount of dog faeces found in the parks
grounds. Damage to the tarmac surface is a problem and as mentioned earlier there is an ongoing
maintenance programme.
O Education Value
The park has numerous events and nature trails throughout the year and with having the extension a
short distance away, there has been ample space for some large-scale community events. There is a
biodiversity/nature conservation area within Goodmayes Park, which could and should be used to invite
local schools to learn all about the insect life, plant life and nature elements in this area.
P Recycling
The park itself does not have a recycling facility within it but there are recycling facilities in Green
Lane just outside the park.
Q Additional Facilities
Basketball – There are two basketball courts but only three ‘posts’ and these could do with some
Refurbishment
Bowling – A most impressive facility, grounds and buildings the latter was recently built. This bowling
facility enjoys two greens, the only facility within the borough to have two bowling greens and is used
frequently by the club.
Children’s play area – Whilst the play equipment looked fairly modern and in relatively good
condition, once again this was subject to some spray paint graffiti, which distracted from what could be a
very nice facility.
Tennis courts – There were four working tennis courts all in good repair although the wire netting
fencing at the base was in need of repair. There are ten additional court areas – no fencing and only
faintly marked out and overgrown with weeds etc that could be turned over to something else (i.e.) –
Multi Use Games Area (MUGA) and an outdoor sustainable gym facility. At present this area represents a
large area going to waste.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Lake - This is a fairly sizeable feature in the park comprising in effect two parts divided by a metal bridge
more or less in the middle. Something of the litter position has already been mentioned.
Once again, regrettably this area was daubed with graffiti. There is a metal railing fence around the lake,
which was generally in a good condition although small areas were ‘bent. There was also a brick built
structure (say 8’ x 8’ x 4’) by the lake, which may have something to do with drainage. However this was
in poor condition and could do with re pointing. The path also around was suffering from considerable
neglect and covered in weeds. Moreover some of the life buoys were missing.
BMX Area - This is a facility that is perhaps peculiar to Goodmayes Park and consisted of a purpose built
court area with various ‘challenges’ to negotiate together with an adjacent grassed hill area no doubt for
similar purpose. The court area had no ‘safety’ flooring and could be dangerous.
Cricket Pitch - The Park enjoys no less than two tables, which are well marked out, and the grass mown
to a very suitable level. An all round very good facility. There is a synthetic wicket in the park but sadly
this has been neglected and needs remedial works to repair it.
Outdoor Gym – This new facility was created in the summer of 2011 and appears to have a made a
positive impact on the park and its users. The facility itself has 13 stations including an information sign
showing users how to use the equipment and get the best possible results. The finance for this new
facility was sought in partnership with the Department for Children School and Families (DCSF) organised
by our Play Manager and Parks Officers.
Parcour Equipment - this new site incorporates obstacles for participants of all abilities and aims to
replicate an urban environment featuring walls, rails and stairs. The site provides a safe, managed space
for parcour and free running practitioners to take part in the sport and qualified instructors from “Inner
City Monkeys” occasionally asked to assist with presentations / tutorials as they did on its grand opening.
Sensory Garden - This new sensory garden created in one of the redundant basketball courts has been
met with great enthusiasm from park users. This peaceful setting provides the opportunity for the users
to meet and mingle in a unique setting. Access is available to all to enjoy the new garden.
Appendix C
Interpretation
1. In these bye-laws:
“the Council” means the London Borough of Redbridge;
“the ground” means any of the grounds listed in Schedule A to the
bye-laws.
Opening times
2. On any day on which any of the grounds listed in Schedule B to
these bye-laws are open to the public, no person shall enter them
before the time, or enter or remain in them after the time, indicated
by a notice placed in a conspicuous position at the entrance to
the grounds.
Vehicles
3. (1) No person shall, without reasonable excuse, ride or drive a
cycle, motor cycle, motor vehicle or any other mechanically
propelled vehicle in the ground, or bring or cause to be
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
brought into the ground a motor cycle, motor vehicle, trailer or
any other mechanically propelled vehicle (other than a cycle)
except in any part of the ground where there is a right of way
for that class of vehicle.
(2) If the Council has set apart a space in the ground for use by
vehicles of any class, this bye-law shall not prevent the riding
or driving of those vehicles in the space so set apart, or on a
route, indicated by signs placed in conspicuous positions,
between it and the entrance to the ground.
(3) These bye-laws shall not extend to invalid carriages.
(4) In these bye-laws:
“cycle”means a bicycle, a tricycle, or a cycle having four or more
wheels, not being in any case a motor cycle or motor vehicle;
“invalid carriage” means a vehicle, whether mechanically propelled
or not, the unladen weight of which does not exceed
150 kilograms, the width of which does not exceed 0.85
metres and which has been constructed or adapted for use for
the carriage of one person, being a person suffering from some
physical defect or disability and is used solely by such a person;
“motor cycle” means a mechanically propelled vehicle,
whether or not intended or adapted for use on roads, not
being an invalid carriage, with less than four wheels and the
weight of which unladen does not exceed 410 kilograms;
“motor vehicle” means a mechanically propelled vehicle,
whether or not intended or adapted for use on roads, not
being an invalid carriage.
“trailer” means a vehicle drawn by a motor vehicle, and
includes a caravan.
Overnight parking
4. No person shall, in any of the grounds listed in schedule B, without
the consent of the Council, leave or cause or permit to be left any
vehicle in the ground during the hours during which the grounds
are closed to the public.
5. No person shall, in any of the grounds listed in Schedule C,
without the consent of the Council, leave or cause or permit to be
left any vehicle in the grounds between the hours of 12 midnight
and 6 a.m.
Horses
6. (a) No person shall, except in the exercise of any lawful right or
privilege, ride a horse in any of the grounds listed in Schedule
D to these bye-laws.
(b) In any part of any of the grounds listed in Schedule D to these
bye-laws where by any lawful right or privilege horse-riding is
permitted, no person shall intentionally or negligently ride a
horse to the danger of any other person using the ground.
7. (a) Where any part of the ground known as Roding Valley Park has,
by notices placed in conspicuous positions in the ground,
been set apart by the Council as an area where horse-riding is
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permitted, no person shall, except in the exercise of any lawful
right or privilege, ride a horse in any other part of the ground.
(b) In any part of the ground known as Roding Valley Park which
has been set apart by the Council for horse-riding or where
there is a lawful right or privilege to ride a horse, no person
shall intentionally or negligently ride a horse to the danger of
any other person using the ground.
Climbing
8. No person shall, without reasonable excuse, climb any wall or
fence in or enclosing the ground, or any tree, or any barrier, railing,
post or other structure.
Removal of structures
9. No person shall, without reasonable excuse, remove from or displace
in the ground any barrier, railing, post or seat, or any part of
any structure or ornament, or any implement provided for use in
the laying out or maintenance of the ground.
Erection of structures
10. No person shall in the ground, without the consent of the Council,
erect any post, rail, fence, pole, tent, booth, stand, building or other
structure.
Camping
11. No person shall in the ground, without the consent of the Council,
erect a tent or use any vehicle, including a caravan, or any other
structure for the purpose of camping, except in any area which
may be set apart and indicated by notice as a place where
camping is permitted.
Fires
12. (1) No person shall in the ground intentionally light a fire, or place,
throw or let fall a lighted match or any other thing so as to be
likely to cause a fire.
(2) This bye-law shall not apply to any event held with the
consent of the Council.
(3) This bye-law shall not prevent the lighting or use of a properly
constructed camping stove or cooker or barbecue in any area
set aside for the purpose, in such a manner as not to cause
danger of or damage by fire.
Children’s play areas
13. (1) No person who has attained the age of 14 years shall enter or
remain in the children’s play area in any of the grounds listed in
Schedule E to these bye-laws.
(2) This bye-law shall not apply to any person who is bona fide in
charge of a child under the age of 14 years.
Children’s play apparatus
14. No person who has attained the age of 14 years shall use any
apparatus in the ground which, by a notice placed on or near
thereto, has been set apart by the Council for the exclusive use of
persons under the age of 14 years.
Bye-laws
Pleasure Grounds, Public Walks and Open Spaces
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Bye-laws made by the London Borough of Redbridge under section 164 of the Public Health
Act 1875, section 15 of
the Open Spaces Act 1906 and sections 12 and 15 of the Open Spaces Act 1906 with respect to
pleasure grounds,
public walks and open spaces referred to in Schedule A to these bye-laws.
Games
15. Where the Council has, by a notice placed in a conspicuous
position in the ground, set apart an area in the ground for the playing
of such games as may be specified in the notice, no person shall:
(a) play in such an area any game other than the game for which
it has been set apart;
(b) use any such area so as to give reasonable grounds for annoyance
to any person already using that area for any purpose for
which it has been set apart; or
(c) play any game so specified in any other part of the ground in
such a manner as to exclude any person not playing the game
from the use of that part.
(d) when the area is already occupied by other players begin to
play thereon without their permission;
(e) where the exclusive use of the area has been granted by the
Council for the playing of a match, play on that area later than
a quarter of an hour before the time fixed for the beginning of
the match unless taking part therein; or
(f ) except where the exclusive use of the area has been granted
by the Council for the playing of a match in which he is taking
part, use the area for a longer time than two hours continuously,
if any other player or players make known to him a wish to use
the area.
16. No person shall, in any area of the ground which may have been
set apart by the Council for any game, play any game when the
state of the ground or other cause makes it unfit for use and a
notice is placed in a conspicuous position prohibiting play in that
area of the ground.
17. (1) No person shall in the ground play any game:
(a) so as to give reasonable grounds for annoyance to any
other person in the ground; or
(b) which is likely to cause damage to any tree, shrub or
plant in the ground.
(2) This bye-law shall not extend to any area set apart by the
Council for the playing of any game.
Trading
18. No person shall in the ground, without the consent of the Council,
sell, or offer or expose for sale, or let to hire, or offer or expose for
letting to hire, any commodity or article, or provide or offer to
provide any service for which a charge is made.
Grazing
19. No person shall, without the consent of the Council, turn out or
permit any animal to graze in the ground.
Protection of flower beds, trees, grass, etc
20. No person who brings or causes to be brought into the ground a
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
vehicle shall wheel or park it over or upon:
(a) any flower bed, shrub or plant, or any ground in the course of
preparation as a flower bed, or for the growth of any tree, shrub
or plant; or
(b) any part of the ground where the Council, by a notice placed
in a conspicuous position in the ground, prohibits its being
wheeled or parked.
21. No person shall in the ground enter upon:
(a) any flower bed, shrub or plant, or any ground in the course of
preparation as a flower bed, or for the growth of any tree, shrub
or plant; or
(b) any part of the ground set aside for the renovation of grass or
turf, where adequate notice to keep off such grass or turf is
exhibited.
Removal of substances
22. No person shall remove from or displace in the ground any stone,
soil or turf, or the whole or any part of any plant, shrub or tree.
Archery
23. No person shall in the ground, except in connection with an event
organised by or held with the consent of the Council, engage in
the sport of archery.
Field Sports
24. No person shall in the ground, except in connection with an event
organised by or held with the consent of the Council, engage in
the sport of javelin or discus throwing or shot-putting.
Golf
25. No person shall in the ground drive, chip or pitch a hard golf ball
except on land set aside by the Council for use as a golf course,
golf driving range, golf practice area or putting course.
26. No person resorting to the golf course referred to in the preceding
bye-law for the purpose of playing or taking part in the
game shall:
(a) play or take part in that game when a notice is set up in some
conspicuous position prohibiting play on the golf course or
any part thereof;
(b) commence to play, unless he is the holder of a season or
periodical ticket, until he has obtained from the golf
professional/agent/officer of the Council in charge of the golf
course a ticket entitling him to play, which ticket shall be
retained and shown on demand to any authorised officer of
the Council;
(c) having completed a round, or desisted from playing before
completing a round, commence to play again until he has
complied with paragraph (b) of this bye-law.
27. No person resorting to the golf course referred to in the
preceding bye-law shall on the golf course offer his service for hire
as an instructor without the consent of the Council.
28. No person other than a person taking part in the game of golf or a
person accompanying such a person shall, except in the exercise
of lawful right or privilege, walk or run across or over or traverse the
golf course.
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29. No person shall on the golf course play or take part in any game
other than the game of golf.
Cricket
30. No person shall use any cricket ball, except in any part of the ground
which, by a notice placed in a conspicuous position in the ground,
has been set aside as an area where a cricket ball may be used.
Skateboarding and roller skating
31. No person shall in the ground skate, slide or ride on rollers, skateboards,
wheels, mechanical contrivances or other equipment, except
on any part of the ground which has been set apart by the Council
for that purpose and indicated by a notice conspicuously displayed.
Missiles
32. No person shall in the ground, to the danger or annoyance of any
other person in the ground, throw or discharge any missile.
Waterways
33. No person shall:
Bathing
(a) without reasonable excuse, bathe or swim in any waterway
comprised in the ground except in an area where a notice
exhibited by the Council permits bathing and swimming;
Pollution of waterways
(b) intentionally, carelessly or negligently foul or pollute any waterway
comprised in the ground;
Watercourses
(c) knowingly cause or permit the flow of any drain or watercourse in
the ground to be obstructed or diverted, or open, shut or otherwise
work or operate any sluice or similar apparatus in the ground.
Ice Skating
34. No person shall in the ground go or remain upon any ice or frozen
body of water.
Boats
35. No person shall, without the consent of the Council, launch,
operate or sail on any waterway comprised in the ground any boat,
power craft, dinghy, canoe, sailboard, inflatable or any like craft.
Interference with life-saving equipment
36. No person shall, except in case of emergency, remove from or
displace in the ground or otherwise tamper with any life-saving
appliance provided by the Council.
Aircraft
37. No person shall, except in case of emergency or with the consent
of the Council, take off from or land in the ground in an aircraft,
helicopter, hang-glider or hot-air balloon.
Kites
38. No person shall in the ground fly or cause or permit to be flown
any kite in such a manner as to cause a danger, nuisance or
annoyance to any other person in the ground.
Fishing and protection of wildlife
39. (1) No person shall in the ground intentionally kill, injure, take or
disturb any animal or fish or engage in hunting, shooting or
fishing, or the setting of traps or nets or the laying of snares.
(2) This bye-law shall not prohibit any fishing which may be
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authorised by the Council.
Noise
40. (1) No person shall in the ground, after being requested to desist
by an officer of the Council, or by any person annoyed or
disturbed, or by any person acting on his behalf:
(a) by shouting or singing;
(b) by playing on a musical instrument; or
(c) by operating or permitting to be operated any radio,
gramophone, amplifier, tape recorder or similar
instrument.
Cause or permit to be made any noise which is so loud or so
continuous or repeated as to give reasonable cause for
annoyance to other persons in the ground.
(2) This bye-law shall not apply to any person holding or taking
part in any entertainment held with the consent of the Council.
Public Shows and Performances
41. No person shall in the ground, without the consent of the Council,
hold or take part in any public show or performance.
Exhibitions and structures
42. No person shall in the ground, without the consent of the Council,
place or take part in any exhibition, or set up any swing, roundabout
or other like thing.
Gates
43. Where the Council indicates by a notice conspicuously exhibited
on or alongside any gate in the ground that leaving that gate open
is prohibited, no person having opened that gate or caused it to be
opened, shall leave it open.
Obstruction
44. No person shall in the ground:
(a) intentionally obstruct any officer of the Council in the proper
execution of his duties;
(b) intentionally obstruct any person carrying out an act which is
necessary to the proper execution of any contract with the
Council; or
(c) intentionally obstruct any other person in the proper use of
the ground, or behave so as to give reasonable grounds for
annoyance to other persons in the ground.
Savings
45. (1) An act necessary to the proper execution of his duty in the
ground by an officer of the Council, or any act which is
necessary to the proper execution of any contract with the
Council, shall not be an offence under these bye-laws.
(2) Nothing in or done under any of the provisions of these byelaws
shall in any respect prejudice or injuriously affect any
public right of way through the ground, or the rights of any
person acting legally by virtue of some estate, right or interest
in, over or affecting the ground or any part thereof.
Removal of offenders
46. Any person offending against any of these bye-laws may be removed
from the grounds by an officer of the Council or a constable.
Penalty
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47. Any person offending against any of these bye-laws shall be liable
on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding level 2 on the
standard scale.
Revocation
48. The bye-laws made by the Mayor, Aldermen and Burgesses of the
London Borough of Redbridge on 20th January 1972 and
confirmed by the Secretary of State for the Home Department on
23rd May 1972 relating to the ground are hereby revoked.
Schedule A
The Grounds referred to in bye-law 1 are as follows:Ash Plantation
Ashtons Playing Fields
Barkingside Recreation Ground
Barley Lane Recreation Ground
Broadmead Recreation Ground
Brocket Way Open Space
Chigwell Road Green
Christchurch Green
Churchfield Gardens
Clayhall Park
Cocked Hat Spinney
Cricklefields Athletic Ground
Crucible Park
Dartnalls Field
Elmhurst Gardens
Forest Road Playing Fields
Goodmayes Park
Goodmayes Park Extension
Grove Road Gardens
Hainault Recreation Ground
Happy Valley (Eastern Avenue Woodland)
Hurstleigh Gardens Open Space
Ilford War Memorial Gardens (Eastern Avenue)
*Lechmere Avenue Play Area
Little Heath Green
Land opposite Empress Avenue
Lockwood Open Space
Loxford Park
Manford Way Open Space
Martley Drive Play Area
Nutter Lane Recreation Ground
Oaks Lane Recreation Ground
*Onslow Gardens
Ray Park
Redbridge Recreation Ground
Redhouse Play Area
Roding Valley Park
Rose Avenue Play Area
Salway Gardens
Seven Kings Park
South Park
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Uphall Recreation Ground
Valentines Park
Wanstead Park Recreation Ground
Westwood Recreation Ground
Woodford Bridge Greens
*Form part of the Roding Valley Park
Schedule B
The grounds referred to in bye-law 2 and 4 are as follows:Barkingside Recreation Ground
Barley Lane Recreation Ground
Brocket Way Open Space
Churchfields Gardens
Clayhall Park
Elmhurst Gardens
Forest Road Playing Fields
Goodmayes Park
Goodmayes Park Extension
Grove Road Gardens
Hainault Recreation Ground
Ilford War Memorial Gardens (Eastern Avenue)
*Lechmere Avenue Play Area
Loxford Park
Manford Way Open Space
Martley Drive Play Area
*Onslow Gardens Play Area
Ray Park contd./...
Wanstead Park Recreation Ground
Westwood Recreation Ground
Woodford Bridge Greens
*Form part of Roding Valley Park
Schedule E
The grounds referred to in bye-law 13 are as follows:Barkingside Recreation Ground
Barley Lane Recreation Ground
Brocket Way Open Space
Christchurch Green
Churchfield Gardens
Clayhall Park
Crucible Park
Elmhurst Gardens
Goodmayes Park
Hainault Recreation Ground
*Lechmere Avenue Play Area
Loxford Park
Manford Way Open Space
Martley Drive Play Area
Oaks Lane Recreation Ground
*Onslow Gardens
Ray Park
Redbridge Recreation Grounds
Redhouse Play Area
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Rose Avenue Play Area
Seven Kings Park
South Park
Uphall Recreation Ground
Valentines Park
Wanstead Park Recreation Ground
Westwood Recreation Ground
*Form part of the Roding Valley Park
The foregoing bye-laws are hereby confirmed by the Secretary of
State and shall come into operation on the seventeenth day of
October 2001.
Signed by authority of the Secretary of State
P Rowsell
Senior civil servant
in the Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions
20th September 2001
LONDON, SW1E 5DU.
Redhouse Play Area
Rose Avenue Play Area
Salway Gardens
Seven Kings Park
South Park
Uphall Recreation Ground
Valentines Park
Wanstead Park Recreation Ground
Westwood Recreation Ground
*Form part of the Roding Valley Park
Schedule C
The grounds referred to in bye-law 5 are as follows:Ash Plantation
Ashtons Playing Fields
Broadmead Recreation Ground
Chigwell Road Green
Christchurch Green
Cocked Hat Spinney
Cricklefields Athletic Ground
Crucible Park
Dartnalls Field
Happy Valley (Eastern Avenue Woodland)
Hurstleigh Gardens Open Space
Little Heath Green
Land opposite Empress Avenue
Lockwood Open Space
Nutter Lane Recreation Ground
Oaks Lane Recreation Ground
Redbridge Recreation Ground
Roding Valley Park
Woodford Bridge Green
Schedule D
The grounds referred to in bye-law 6 (a) and (b) are as follows:Ash Plantation
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Ashtons Playing Fields
Barkingside Recreation Ground
Barley Lane Recreation Ground
Broadmead Recreation Ground
Brocket Way Open Space
Chigwell Road Green
Christchurch Green
Churchfield Gardens
Clayhall Park
Cocked Hat Spinney
Cricklefields Athletic Ground
Crucible Park
Dartnalls Field
Elmhurst Gardens
Forest Road Playing Fields
Goodmayes Park
Goodmayes Park Extension
Grove Road Gardens
Hainault Recreation Grounds
Happy Valley (Eastern Avenue Woodland)
Hurstleigh Gardens Open Space
Ilford War Memorial Gardens (Eastern Avenue)
*Lechmere Avenue Play Area
Little Heath Green
Land opposite Empress Avenue
Lockwood Open Space
Loxford Park
Manford Way Open Space
Martley Drive Play Area
Nutter Lane Recreation Ground
Oaks Lane Recreation Ground
*Onslow Gardens
Ray Park
Redbridge Recreation Grounds
Redhouse Play Area
Rose Avenue Play Area
Salway Gardens
Seven Kings Park
South Park
Valentines Park contd./...
THE CORPORATE SEAL OF THE
MAYOR AND BURGESSES OF THE
LONDON BOROUGH OF REDBRIDGE
was hereunto affixed in the presence of: The Mayor
The Chief Legal Officer and
The Council’s Solicitor
This 19th day of July 2001
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Appendix D – Management Systems Procedure
Quality, Health, Safety & Environmental Policy Statement
The Landscape Group is a market leader in supplying Landscape Management and Construction Services to a wide
variety of clients including public sector bodies, housing associations and principal construction contractors. Our
integrated targets and objectives are centred on continually improving our services and striving to exceed the
expectations of our customers in respect of quality of service, delivery, cost, performance, health & safety and
environmental management.
We are committed to exceptional levels of Quality, Health & Safety and Environmental control. This is confirmed by
the adoption of an Integrated Management System that conforms to the requirements of ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and
OHSAS 18001, legal and customer requirements. This program has the unqualified support and full involvement of
the Senior Management Team.
Framework for Objectives
The Landscape Group aim to continually improve the effectiveness of the Integrated System that is reviewed
during the Management Review meetings and via the monthly management reports. Integrated targets and
objectives are also reviewed at such meetings. Targets and objectives are cascaded by Area and Contract Managers
down to teams and individuals, through team briefings. The ongoing suitability of this policy is reviewed on an
annual basis.
Continual Improvement The Landscape Group understand that by continuous improvement of our QHSE processes
and product delivery, we ensure a high quality of service as well as safe and environmentally sound working
practices. We aim to protect the environment by implementing effective environmental management systems and
will ensure that as far as practically possible, that environmental impacts are reduced and appropriate measures
put in place to prevent pollution to the environment.
Training & Empowerment
The Landscape Group recognise that the competence and skills of our people need continual development
through training and empowerment, and that this is the responsibility of management at all levels. We strive to
prevent injury and ill health to our employees and anyone working with us or affected by our activities.
Responsibility
Ultimate responsibility for quality, safety and environmental matters within the business rests with the Chief
Executive Officer but all people share this responsibility by following agreed procedures and by our
encouragement of their involvement. This QHSE Policy is issued and explained to all employees upon
commencement of work with the company.
Resources
The Landscape Group recognise that one of the key responsibilities of the Senior Management Team is to provide
the appropriate resources that enable the achievement of our objectives.
Nick Temple Heald
CEO
MSPol 1.2 – 12 May 2009
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Introduction. As an organisation that seeks to continually improve its environmental performance and strive to reduce its
potential impacts on the surroundings in which we live and work, the company has undertaken an environmental aspects and
impacts assessment. (Put very simply, an environmental risk assessment)
Process Explanation The purpose of this document is to firstly review the activities of the group and identify any activities that
may pose a risk, either potential or real, to the environment in which we operate. Secondly, and most importantly, is the
identification and implementation of the control measures which shall manage the level of environmental impact and risk the
company presents.
Terminology used within the assessment.
Environmental Aspect – An activity conducted by the company that has been identified as potentially having an effect, either
positive or negative, on the environment.
Environmental Impact – The effect, either positive or negative, on the environment an activity may have.
Environmental Receptor – The area of the environment that will be, or could be, impacted upon by the company activity.
Likelihood – Refers to the frequency of occurrence of a particular activity.
Consequence – Sometimes considered as the Severity. The effect an activity will, or could have, on the environment. This
caters for the impact generally, as well as the impact relating to the scale within the organisation.
Significance – The combination of likelihood and consequence provides a level of significance, in terms of how serious the risk
of impact is likely to be, the significance is measured as Low, Medium or High.
Calculation of Potential impacts (Risk level)
As with any risk assessment, there needs to be a method of quantifying risk or impact, by assessing the likelihood or
consequence an activity may reasonably be expected to hold. In terms of the environmental aspects and impacts assessment, it
is necessary to set out this Impact rating matrix, including a brief explanation of the rating levels. It is also worth noting that the
levels of significance identified is present before control measures are put in place to reduce this level of risk.
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Appendix K – Work Programme
Date Scheduled
February
Tasks
Cultivate shrub and rose beds and
remove weed cover
February
Application of residual weed killer on Weed management – under review
rose and shrub beds
Cricket and bowls non playing season Bowls & cricket management
maintenance on greens and squares –
top dressing, moss treatment and lawn
sand application
February
February
February
February
Date Scheduled
March
Result
Weed management
Addition of new shrubs in designated Shrub replacement programme
areas of Goodmayes park
built into contract
Spring pruning of roses
Removal of dead, diseased and
dying growth and promote flowers,
leaf and stems
Pruning of winter flowering shrubs
Removal of dead, diseased and
dying growth and promote flowers,
leaf and stems
Tasks
Cricket square maintenance – top
dressing
Amenity grass cutting is carried out
1/3 of designated winter hard surface
edging in Goodmayes park is carried
out
Lawn edging of all rose & shrub beds
Result
Cricket management
Date Scheduled
April
Tasks
Pre season maintenance on bowling
greens including hollow tining and
scarifying
Result
Bowls green management
April
Cricket maintenance and season
begins
Cricket management
April
Selective weed management across
green during this time
Sports pitch weed control
March
March
March
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Grass control
Grass/weed control
Grass/weed control
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
April
Amenity grass cutting is carried out
Grass control
Date Scheduled
May
Tasks
Bowls playing season begins
Result
Bowls management
May
Renovation of worn areas on the
football pitches begins including reseeding
Football pitch renovations
May
Amenity grass cutting is carried out
Grass control
May
Bowling green hedges across
Goodmayes park will be cut once
during the month of may
Hedge pruning
May
A rolling programme of spot treatment Weed management
will be applied to all hard surfaces
throughout the year
Date Scheduled
Tasks
June
Hedge cutting will be carried out on
the formal hedges (usually boundary
hedges) during June
Hedge pruning
June
Amenity grass cutting is carried out
Grass management
Date Scheduled
July
Tasks
Bowling green hedges across
Goodmayes park will be cut once
during the month of July
Result
Hedge pruning
July
Amenity grass cutting is carried out
Grass control
July
A rolling programme of spot treatment Weed management
will be applied to all hard surfaces
throughout the year
Result
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July
Pruning of selected spring flowering
shrubs
Removal of dead, disease and
dying growth and promote flowers,
leaf and stems
July
Lawn edging around flowering
borders
Grass control
July
All epitomic removed on trees up to
2m
Pest and arboricultural
management
Date Scheduled
Tasks
August
Informal hedges are pruned this
month
Hedge pruning
August
Amenity grass cutting is carried out
Grass control
August
Football pre season maintenance
Sports reinstatement
Date Scheduled
September
Tasks
Bowling green hedges across
Goodmayes park will be cut once
during the month of September
Result
Hedge pruning
September
Amenity grass cutting is carried out
Grass control
September
Football season begins - line marking To prepare markings for football
begins
matches which will be over marked
once per week during the season
September
A rolling programme of spot treatment To minimise the appearance of
will be applied to all hard surfaces
perennial weed growth
throughout the year
Result
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September
Lawn edging around flowering
borders
Providing quality presentation of
the flower borders
Date Scheduled
Tasks
October
All formal hedges across Goodmayes Hedge pruning
park will be pruned
October
Winter pruning on shrubs begins
Shrub pruning
October
Football season is underway
Goal post erection, line marking
and grass cutting operations
commencing
Date Scheduled
November
Tasks
Leaf clearance from the park begins
Result
To preserve the life of the grass and
to reduce the risk of slippery hard
surfaces
November
Autumnal pruning of all roses
Removal of dead, disease and
dying growth and promote flowers,
leaf and stems
November
Bowls greens are renovated, levelled
and dressed including seeding
To preserve the longevity of the
green and improve playing surface
Date Scheduled
December
Tasks
Leaf clearance from the park begins
Result
To preserve the life of the grass and
to reduce the risk of slippery hard
surfaces
December
Bowls greens are renovated, levelled
and dressed including seeding
to preserve the longevity of the
green and improve playing surface
Date Scheduled
Tasks
January
Inspection and pruning of roses
Result
Result
72
Removal of dead, disease and
dying growth and promote flowers,
leaf and stems and to provide
replacement if dead
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Appendix J – Biodiversity Action Plan Species
COMMON NAME
SCIENTIFIC NAME
GROUP
Annual Meadow-Grass
Poa annua
flowering plant
Autumnal Hawkbit
Leontodon autumnalis
flowering plant
Barren Brome
Anisantha sterilis
flowering plant
Berberis
Berberis
flowering plant
Bird Cherry
Prunus padus
flowering plant
Black Horehound
Ballota nigra
flowering plant
Black Medick
Medicago lupulina
flowering plant
Blackbird
Turdus merula
bird
Black-Headed Gull
Larus ridibundus
bird
Blue Tit
Parus caeruleus
bird
Bracken
Pteridium aquilinum
fern
Bramble
Rubus fruticosus agg.
flowering plant
Bristly Oxtongue
Picris echioides
flowering plant
Butterfly-Bush
Buddleja davidii
flowering plant
Canada Goose
Branta canadensis
bird
Canadian Fleabane
Conyza canadensis
flowering plant
Carrion Crow
Corvus corone corone
bird
Cock's-Foot
Dactylis glomerata
flowering plant
Collared Dove
Streptopelia decaocto
bird
Colt's-Foot
Tussilago farfara
flowering plant
Common Couch
Elytrigia repens
flowering plant
Common Field Grasshopper Chorthippus brunneus
insect - orthopteran
Common Mallow
Malva sylvestris
flowering plant
Common Mouse-Ear
Cerastium fontanum
flowering plant
Common Nettle
Urtica dioica
flowering plant
Common Orache
Atriplex patula
flowering plant
Common Poppy
Papaver rhoeas
flowering plant
Crataegus
Crataegus
flowering plant
Creeping Bent
Agrostis stolonifera
flowering plant
Creeping Cinquefoil
Potentilla reptans
flowering plant
Creeping Thistle
Cirsium arvense
flowering plant
Curled Dock
Rumex crispus
flowering plant
Dunnock *
Prunella modularis
bird
Elder
Escallonia
Sambucus nigra
Escallonia
flowering plant
flowering plant
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Euonymus
Euonymus
flowering plant
Evergreen Spindle
Euonymus japonicus
flowering plant
False Acacia
Robinia pseudoacacia
flowering plant
False Oat-Grass
Arrhenatherum elatius
flowering plant
Fat-Hen
Chenopodium album
flowering plant
Field Maple
Acer campestre
flowering plant
Fox
Vulpes vulpes
terrestrial mammal
Goat Willow
Salix caprea
flowering plant
Goldfinch
Carduelis carduelis
bird
Great Tit
Parus major
bird
Great Willowherb
Epilobium hirsutum
flowering plant
Greater Periwinkle
Vinca major
flowering plant
Greater Plantain
Plantago major
flowering plant
Green Woodpecker
Picus viridis
bird
Greenfinch
Carduelis chloris
bird
Grey Alder
Alnus incana
flowering plant
Grey Heron
Ardea cinerea
bird
Grey Squirrel
Sciurus carolinensis
terrestrial mammal
Grey Willow
Salix cinerea
flowering plant
Guernsey Fleabane
Conyza sumatrensis
flowering plant
Hawkweed Oxtongue
Picris hieracioides
flowering plant
Hornbeam
Carpinus betulus
flowering plant
Horse-Chestnut
Aesculus hippocastanum
flowering plant
House Sparrow *
Passer domesticus
bird
Hybrid Black Poplar
Populus x canadensis
flowering plant
Ivy
Hedera helix
flowering plant
Japanese Rose
Rosa rugosa
flowering plant
Kestrel
Falco tinnunculus
bird
Lime
Tilia x vulgaris
flowering plant
Linnet *
Carduelis cannabina
bird
London Plane
Platanus x hispanica
flowering plant
Magpie
Pica pica
bird
Mallard
Anas platyrhynchos
bird
Malva
Malva
flowering plant
Marsh-Mallow
Althaea officinalis
flowering plant
Michaelmas-Daisy
Aster
flowering plant
Mock-Orange
Philadelphus
flowering plant
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Mugwort
Muridae
Noctule bat *
Norway Maple
Oak
Osier
Oxford Ragwort
Pedunculate Oak
Perennial Rye-Grass
Perennial Wall-Rocket
Artemisia vulgaris
Muridae
Nyctalus noctula
Acer platanoides
Quercus
Salix viminalis
Senecio squalidus
Quercus robur
Lolium perenne
Diplotaxis tenuifolia
flowering plant
terrestrial mammal
terrestrial mammal
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
Perforate St. John's-Wort
Pied Wagtail
Pine
Pipistrelle bat *
Planted Cherry
Poplar
Prickly Lettuce
Hypericum perforatum
Motacilla alba yarrellii
Pinus
Pipistrellus pipistrellus
Prunus
Populus
Lactuca serriola
flowering plant
bird
conifer
terrestrial mammal
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
Procumbent Yellow-Sorrel
Purple Toadflax
Pyracantha
Red Admiral
Red Clover
Red Fescue
Red Goosefoot
Red Oak
Red Valerian
Redshank
Rowan
Sedum
Shepherd's-Purse
Silver Birch
Small Nettle
Smooth Hawk's-Beard
Smooth Sow-Thistle
Snowberry
Soft-Brome
Song Thrush *
Spanish Broom
Spear Thistle
Spiraea
Oxalis corniculata
Linaria purpurea
Pyracantha
Vanessa atalanta
Trifolium pratense
Festuca rubra
Chenopodium rubrum
Quercus rubra
Centranthus ruber
Persicaria maculosa
Sorbus aucuparia
Sedum
Capsella bursa-pastoris
Betula pendula
Urtica urens
Crepis capillaris
Sonchus oleraceus
Symphoricarpos albus
Bromus hordeaceus
Turdus philomelos
Spartium junceum
Cirsium vulgare
Spiraea
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
insect - butterfly
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
bird
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Square-Stalked
Willowherb
Epilobium tetragonum
flowering plant
Squirrel-Tail Fescue
Vulpia bromoides
flowering plant
Stag Beetle *
Stag's-Horn Sumach
Starling *
Swedish Whitebeam
Swift
Sycamore
Wall Barley
White Campion
White Clover
White Dead-Nettle
Whitethroat
Woodpigeon
Wren
Yarrow
Yorkshire-Fog
Lucanus cervus
Rhus typhina
Sturnus vulgaris
Sorbus intermedia
Apus apus
Acer pseudoplatanus
Hordeum murinum
Silene latifolia
Trifolium repens
Lamium album
Sylvia communis
Columba palumbus
Troglodytes troglodytes
Achillea millefolium
Holcus lanatus
insect
flowering plant
bird
flowering plant
bird
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
flowering plant
bird
bird
bird
flowering plant
flowering plant
76
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Appendix F – Sustainable Planting Plan
Appendix B
Audit of Facilities
An audit of facilities was conducted using the methodology prescribed in the
77
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Appendix G
RISK ASSESSMENT FORM
Vision Redbridge Culture and Leisure
Activity/Task: Litter picking
To be reviewed: October 2012
Hazards
Risk Rating
Controls
(High, Med,
Low)
Picking up used nappies/dog faeces
High

Accident involving other cars
Medium





Wear correct PPE, wash hands or use wipes/gel
provided prior to eating/drinking/smoking
Hold a current clean driving licence. To be
inspected every 6 months by supervisor
Hold a Council Driving licence.
Follow the Highway Code
Carry Council issued mobile phone at all times
when on duty. Do not use the phone whilst
driving
Do not drink any alcohol during your work day
if you are driving

Muscular skeletal injury
Assess rubbish prior to picking up and judge
the weight and potential hazardous content.
 If too heavy or unsafe to lift inform supervisor.
 Use kinetic manual handling techniques
Medium
Injury whilst lone working
Medium
Verbal Assault from public or
contractors
Medium
Physical Assault from public or
contractors
Low/Medium
Trip or fall due to uneven/slippery
terrain
Low/Medium




Report in at start and end of shift
Follow Council codes of practice.
Follow Council policy statements.
Carry Council issued mobile phone at all times
when on duty
 See HSE working alone indg 73.

Assess situation and do not approach a
situation you judge to be dangerous. Move
away and when at a safe distance and/or
hidden from view phone the compound or
colleagues to report the situation.
 Inform police as appropriate.
See HSE Violence at working 69

78
Staff to visually assess terrain. Report any
dangerous paths or surfaces to administrator
and mark with spray paint
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012

Inspect infrastructure for potential hazards to
the public. Report these immediately either by
phone, if an immediate health and safety
problem, or by filling in an incident report form
 See HSE Preventing slips and trips indg 225

Accident due to inclement weather
Low
Injury from moving or stationary
vehicle
Medium
Wear council issued jacket if the weather is
cold
 Wear issued boots whilst at work. Inform
supervisor if tread is worn or becomes slippery.
 Assess the driving conditions and if you judge
it to be unsafe then cease driving until
conditions improve. Report this to your
supervisor.


Refuelling - Risk of Explosion
Assess situation when working in
environment where vehicles are present.
Continually monitor situation and cease
working and/or move aside when moving
vehicles are passing you.
See HSE Avoiding falls from vehicles indg 395
Low

Follow the guidelines when refuelling the
vehicle.
Low

Inspect infrastructure for potential hazards to
the public. Report these immediately following
the correct procedure – phone it in to a
supervisor if it poses an immediate health and
safety risk. Otherwise complete an incident
report form.
Injury to member of Public

Exposure to disease and viruses via
needles/syringes
Low
Exposure to parasites/germs through
exposure to dead/injured animals
Low
Stings/bites through contact with
vegetation/insects or wildlife
Low
People at risk:
Tick appropriate box(s)
Collect needles with litter picker and deposit in
a sharps box.
 Do not pick up needles with bare hands
 When sharp box is full take it to the security
compound, it will be collected from here and
disposed of safely
 See HSE Blood borne viruses indg 342

Wear appropriate PPE, wash hands or use
supplied wipes/gel prior to eating drinking or
smoking, double bag any dead animals and
report to supervisor re disposal.
 Wear appropriate PPE, inform supervisor if
likely to cause anaphylactic.
 If necessary go straight to hospital, inform
office should this be the case.
Employees
Non employees
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
SAFE SYSTEM OF WORK - Control Measures Required to Avoid or Minimise Risk
1) Before Starting Work:
Ensure your mobile phone is charged and that you have it with you
Wear steel toe capped boots at all times whilst at work
Visually inspect vehicle prior to driving it and immediately report to the Transport section any
damage or problems
Appropriate PPE to be worn at all times
2) Safe Working:
Report any damaged or faulty equipment
3) Upon Completion:
Report any problems to callout officer or supervisor
Contact confidential helpline or talk to colleague or supervisor if appropriate
Overall Task Residual Risk (High, Med or Low) After Implementing Control Measures
Low
Are the Risks Adequately Controlled
Yes / No
(If No This Activity Must Not Take Place.
Contact Personnel Health & Safety Service For Further Advice ext. 83497)
Assessor Name: Robert Hobbs
Signature:
Date:
Date Communicated to Staff:
RISK ASSESSMENT REVIEW
Are Employees Complying: Yes / No
ADDITIONAL CONTROL MEAUSURES
Have Any New Hazards Been Identified:
Yes / No
Are the Risks Adequately Controlled:
Yes / No
If No This Activity Must Not Take Place.
Contact Personnel Health & Safety Service For Further Advice ext. 83497
REVIEWED BY:
Signature:
Date Communicated to Staff (if findings different):
80
Date:
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING OF DISCARDED NEEDLES & SYRINGES
The handling of discarded syringes and/or needles is a hazardous activity with
a high risk of needlestick injuries. A needlestick injury occurs when a
hypodermic needle punctures the skin and puts the injured person at risk from
any biological or chemical substance either on or in the syringe/needle.
The following procedure should be followed when removing discarded
syringes (whether with or without a needle):
 Ensure open wounds are covered with water-proof dressings;
 Wear vinyl or powder-free latex gloves;
 Discarded syringes must not be picked-up by hand;
 A litter picking stick should be used (if not available tongs, dustpan
and brush or a shovel could be used);
 The sharps box (conforming to either UN 3921 or BS 7320) should
be positioned on the ground about 1 metre away from the syringe.
If a sharps box is not immediately available another suitable
receptacle can be used (e.g. bottle with screw-cap) for temporary
storage. Under no circumstances should the sharps box be held
whilst syringes are being placed into it, due to the high risk of a
needlestick injury occurring during the process;
 The syringe should ideally be picked up so that the needle is
pointing down;
 Even if the needle cover is available do not attempt to replace the
cover;
 The syringe should be lowered into the sharps box and released;
 When 3/4 full, the sharps box should be locked shut using the
closure mechanism and be disposed of as clinical waste;
 The area where the syringe was found and the equipment used for
picking–up the syringe should be disinfected using a bleach
solution.
 Sharps boxes can be obtained via the Customer Contact Centre,
who will add your establishment to the system (85716)
Notes:
Employees who are regularly required to remove sharps or are at risk of
needlestick injury from hidden sharps must be vaccinated against Hepatitis B.
If employees were undertaking work where they could be exposed to hidden
needles the use of needle-resistant gloves would provide a greater level of
protection than ordinary rigger type gloves. It should be noted that there are
no gloves available that are totally resistant to needles.
Open wounds can provide an entry route for biological/chemical substances
into the body. For this reason open wounds must be covered with waterproof
dressings prior to work involving a risk of contact with bodily fluids.
81
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
PROCEDURE FOR ACTION IN THE EVENT OF NEEDLESTICK INJURIES
STEP 1. EMERGENCY FIRST AID
a) Encourage bleeding of accidental puncture wounds by gentle squeezing,
not sucking of the area.
b) Wash the affected area with soap and warm running water, do not scrub.
STEP 2. ACCIDENT EMERGENCY UNIT
Arrangements should be made to take the Employee by the quickest means
available to the nearest accident/emergency unit:
NB IF THE HYPODERMIC SYRINGE OR NEEDLE CAUSING THE INJURY IS
AVAILABLE IT SHOULD BE TAKEN ALONG WITH THE INJURED PERSON TO THE
HOSPITAL. THE NEEDLE SHOULD BE TRANSPORTED IN A SUITABLE CONTAINER
TO PREVENT FURTHER INJURY.
King George Hospital (Goodmayes)
Tel: 020 8983 8000 Tel: 01708 345533
Minor Injuries Unit (Barking) 9am-7pm Whipps Cross Hospital
(Leytonstone)
Tel: 020 8924 6262 Tel: 020 8539 5522
For immediate counselling and advice please contact Focus on 0800
716619
STEP 3. REPORTING/INVESTIGATION
All needlestick and similar incidents should be reported promptly to the
Supervisor/Head of Department and be investigated and reported in
accordance with London Borough of Redbridge’s accident reporting
procedures.
STEP 4. EMPLOYEE COUNSELLING
Where an employee has been involved in a needlestick injury, the employee’s
Supervisor/Manager should make arrangements for an appointment with the
Occupational Health Unit (Tel: 020 8708 5063/5383). The Occupational Health
Unit will provide appropriate follow-up counselling by providing ongoing
advice and support as well as putting the matter into the right perspective
until the results of the medical tests are known.
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Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Appendix H
Park Tracker Monitoring Software (Front Office)
83
Goodmayes Park Management Plan 2012
Appendix L
84

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