The Sheridan Press E-Edition March 24, 2015

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The Sheridan Press E-Edition March 24, 2015
TUESDAY
March 24, 2015
129th Year, No. 259
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
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SC has rough ride
at weekend rodeo
in Gillette. B1
Creative outlet
Crews working
to clean up
Colorado coal train
derailment
Nonprofit dollars
pile up for local
construction projects
HUDSON, Colo. (AP) — Crews
were working Monday to clean up
a stretch of railroad where a coal
train jumped the tracks in eastern
Colorado, spilling tons of coal.
The 120-car Burlington Northern
Santa Fe train derailed Sunday
near the town of Hudson. At least
27 freight cars derailed and lost
their cargo as the train was traveling from Gillette, Wyoming, in the
coal-producing Powder River
Basin to La Junta, Colorado, BNSF
spokesman Joe Sloan said.
BY MIKE DUNN
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — It’s easy to get
excited about everything happening in Sheridan when you
talk to Whitney Benefits
President Tom Kinnison about
upcoming and current projects
around town.
He talks quickly, and with
enthusiasm, as he starts to list
the projects — Sheridan College
is expanding annually; the ice
rink is getting a new roof over
its head; the Sheridan Senior
Center is looking to expand its
services.
“In five years, (Sheridan) is
going to be fantastic,” Kinnison
said. “ … we have some really
great things going on.”
Recently, Sheridan has been
improving itself on the shoulders of its nonprofit organizations. The numbers are staggering — in the past 12 months, just
shy of $70 million has been slated for building projects for nonprofit organizations in the
Sheridan area. Even more
remarkable is that more than
$57 million of that funding has
or is expected to arrive from private and foundation dollars. Six
local projects are searching for
at least $1 million.
One of the largest nonprofit
building projects taking place is
the new building at The Brinton
Museum. The building itself
was budgeted to cost $15.8 million, but the capital campaign
efforts put the total cost of the
project near $21 million. Forrest
E. Mars Jr. contributed upward
of $10 million to that project,
which began in June 2013 and is
expected to be completed this
summer.
Sheridan YMCA Executive
Director Jay McGinnis said it’s
not too uncommon for fundraising efforts to come in waves;
momentum from one project
often translates into other projects. Soon the city develops a
culture of philanthropy, which
McGinnis says is taking place in
Sheridan right now.
But at the core of every project there has to be a perceived
need from the community and
at least some of the incoming
projects are battling the consequences of aging infrastructure.
“Some of this stuff hasn’t
been looked at for around 35
years,” Kinnison said.
Sheridan High School’s
Leading the Legacy locker room
project, a $5 million construction project which is seeking
around $1 million from private
funds, is responding to 30-yearold facilities that were not constructed to meet gender equity
or disabilities standards.
Likewise, YMCA’s nearly $12.5
million indoor aquatics project
is seeking an alternative to the
aging Kendrick Pool.
SEE COST, PAGE 3
‘...We will take all
appropriate enforcement
actions.’
Federal Railroad Administration
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Dara Johnston applies paint to her canvas during a painting class Saturday evening at The Paint Post. The new
business offers paint lessons in which each participant gets to take home their creation. A wine bar in the back
room is open to help free up creative thinking.
Wyoming committee to
examine juvenile justice reform
CHEYENNE (AP) — Overhauling how
Wyoming approaches crimes and other misbehavior by juveniles will be among a state
legislative committee’s top priorities leading
up to next year’s legislative session.
The Joint Judiciary Interim Committee in
coming months plans to examine how
Wyoming collects juvenile justice data and
how to protect the confidentiality of juveniles’ records. The committee also will discuss programs that attempt to divert youth
away from behavior that gets them into trouble, the Wyoming Tribune Eagle reports.
Officials in Wyoming have been discussing
juvenile justice changes for decades.
Wyoming is among the vast majority of
states where juvenile incarceration is declining.
It’s good that lawmakers will be looking at
these issues and might be able to make incremental reforms, said Donna Sheen, executive
director of the Wyoming Children’s Law
Center.
“I think we have come to realize the system
can’t change all at once,” she said. “So we
have to take a look at what needs to change
first to help us be ready for the next wave of
changes.”
One of the problems facing the state’s juvenile justice system, she said, is each county
has a different way of dealing with young
offenders.
Accurate statewide data could offer
insights into which approaches work best,
she said.
“Data is needed to both know about the
magnitude of the issue in each community
and to know whether or not what communities are doing is having a positive impact,”
Sheen said.
The committee wants to examine which
juvenile diversion programs have been most
successful, said Co-chairman Sen. Leland
Christensen, R-Alta.
“One of the things we’ve heard over and
over is different communities feel like
they’ve had a lot of successes, and they are
not necessarily interested in a one-size-fitsall” solution, Christensen said. “So this is an
opportunity to get that together and see
which programs are working, and see if we
can provide that information to communities
looking for more tools.”
The railroad reopened the line
connecting Denver to Brush at
about 4:30 p.m. Monday. No BNSF
freight trains have been re-routed,
but two trains on Amtrak’s
California Zephyr line had to be
rerouted between Omaha and
Denver through Cheyenne on
Sunday evening and Monday
morning. Monday evening’s eastbound service from Denver to
Omaha was expected to return to
its regular route, Amtrak
spokesman Marc Magliari said.
Both BNSF and federal regulators are investigating the derailment. Neither has speculated on a
possible cause.
“Once completed, our investigation will identify the root cause of
the accident, and we will take all
appropriate enforcement actions,”
the Federal Railroad
Administration said in a statement.
BNSF is legally required to carry
a variety of freight but, in general,
it does not have to report the contents of its trains to regulators.
However, it must notify the state if
it plans to carry 1 million gallons
or more of Bakken crude oil.
BNSF has not signaled any intent
to do so on this line or anywhere
else in Colorado, said Greg
Stasinos of the Colorado
Department of Public Health and
Environment, co-chair of the
state’s emergency planning commission.
SEE JUSTICE, PAGE 3
SEE COAL TRAIN, PAGE 3
Local school districts see additional funding from block grant
BY ALISA BRANTZ
[email protected]
SHERIDAN — Following
action from the 2015 Wyoming
State Legislature, each of the
school districts in Sheridan
County will get a little extra
money in their upcoming budgets.
The Legislature enacted an
increase to the education
resource block grant funding
model and associated categorical grants through an external
cost adjustment above and
beyond what was provided dur-
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ing the 2014 Budget Session for
school year 2015-16.
The increase provides an estimated $20.3 million more
statewide for the school year;
however, the $6 million salary
enhancement provided during
the budget session was eliminated, making the net increase
from what was already enacted
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
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approximately $14.3 million.
The Legislature also provided
for increased appropriations
related to K-12 capital construction for the biennium. School
district capital construction
project funding increased $13.7
million and major maintenance
funding increased $7.4 million
statewide.
Today’s edition is published for:
Susan Huber
of Sheridan
Here in Sheridan County,
these figures equate to substantial increases in revenue for
Sheridan County School
Districts 1 and 2, and a decrease
to the amount slated to be cut
from SCSD3’s budget.
SEE FUNDING, PAGE 2
OPINION
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
4
5
6
7
BUSINESS
SPORTS
COMICS
PUBLIC NOTICES
B1
B2
B4
B7
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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FUNDING: Too early to say how money will be spent
and estimate how much
money each would intake
Though definite budgets
as a result of the ECA.
have yet to be issued by the
At SCSD1, business manstate for each district,
ager Jeremy Smith said
recently, each of the area
that without the ECA they
school district business
would have lost $125,000
manager’s gathered to work from their budget, but with
through the funding model it enacted they are now
FROM 1
gaining $203,000, a total
increase of $328,000.
Smith said it is too early
in the budgeting process to
determine how that money
will be utilized, other than
to say it will support programming for students, but
that this estimated increase
will be reflected in the
preliminary budget presented to the school board.
At SCSD2, business
manager Roxie Taft estimates the district will
receive an additional
$600,000.
The Arvada-Clearmont
schools have seen a
decrease in student enrollment in recent years,
reclaiming the spot as the
smallest school district in
the state. Enrollment numbers affect the finances of a
district, as they are part of
the block grant funding
model.
Though SCSD3 business
manager John Camino
projects an increase in
funding of approximately
$100,000 due to the ECA,
decreases in other areas of
the funding model mean
Camino anticipates the district will now be able to
maintain approximately
the same budget as the
2014-15 school year and not
receive a budget cut as predicted.
• EDITOR’S NOTE: This article corrects external
cost adjustment estimates published in the
March 12 edition of The Sheridan Press.
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
New police video shows Secret
Service SUV nudge barrier
WASHINGTON (AP) — Police surveillance video
shown publicly for the first time Tuesday shows Secret
Service agents in their government vehicle driving
through the secured area and nudging a temporary barrier at low speed as it drove toward a checkpoint. The
incident occurred as on-duty officers and agents investigated a suspicious item thrown near the White House on
March 4.
The House Oversight Committee showed the video
from the Washington Metropolitan Police Department
during a hearing on Capitol Hill. Secret Service Director
Joseph Clancy was testifying for the third time about the
incident, in which two senior agents are accused of
drinking before driving into the White House complex
and pushing the barrier with the SUV’s bumper.
Clancy has been criticized for the agency’s handling of
the incident and has complained that he was not told
about it for five days, which he called unacceptable. He
said he only learned about the incident from discussions
about an anonymous email that was circulating within
the agency.
Community
volunteer
Vista volunteer Karen Walters loads a bag
with groceries Thursday at the
Community Cupboard in the Ranchester
Community Church.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
CDC: Uninsured drop by 11M
since passage of Obama’s law
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of uninsured U.S.
residents fell by more than 11 million since President
Barack Obama signed the health care overhaul five years
ago, according to a pair of reports Tuesday from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Although that still would leave about 37 million people
uninsured, it’s the lowest level measured in more than 15
years.
The most dramatic change took place in comparing 2013
with the first nine months of 2014. As the health care law’s
major coverage expansion was taking effect, the number of
uninsured people fell by 7.6 million over that time.
That’s “much bigger than can possibly be explained by
the economy,” said Larry Levitt of the nonpartisan Kaiser
Family Foundation. “The vast majority has to be due to the
Affordable Care Act.”
Monday was the law’s fifth anniversary, and supporters
and detractors again clashed over its impact.
Obama says the law in many ways is “working even better than anticipated.”
AGENDA |
Sheridan County School District 1
Board of Trustees meeting - amended agenda
6 p.m. today
Big Horn High School Commons area - new location
333 Highway 335, Big Horn
• Call the meeting to order
• Pledge of Allegiance
• Reading of mission statement
• Roll call
• Approval of agenda
• Public hearing — alternative schedule
• Presentations and recognitions
1. BHMS Teton Science participants
2. BHMS Science Fair presentations
3. Teacher of the Month
• Visitors
• Student Ambassador report
• West Sheridan County Education Association report
• Administrators’ reports
• Business Manager’s report
• Superintendent’s report
1. Enrollment report
2. Superintendent update (soccer update, board retreat, board workshop)
• Consent agenda
1. Approval of Feb. 17 and Feb. 23 regular and executive session minutes
2. Approval of bills and salaries
3. Approval of classified resignation
4. Approval of related service agreements
5. Approval of administrator transfer
6. Approval of certified staff resignation
7. Approval of extra duty resignation
8. Approval of extra duty recommendations
• Old business
• New business
1. Approve 2015-2016 professional development calendar
2. Early childhood BOCES membership
3. Approval of 5-Year Facility Plan
• Correspondence
• Board member reports, requests, concerns
• Board signatures
• Executive session
1. Property
2. Personnel
3. Legal
• Adjournment
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TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
City narrows search for financial, administrative director
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The city’s
search for a financial and
administrative services
director, a position
designed to oversee the
clerk and treasurer departments, has been narrowed
down to six individuals.
Sheridan Human
Resources Director Heather
Doke said a committee last
week pared down the list
from 34 total applicants,
and work will continue in
the coming weeks with preliminary interviews of the
six semifinalists.
“I hope to be down to the
finalists by the first part of
April,” Doke added.
Mayor John Heath and
City Council President
Shelleen Smith will be
involved with finalist interviews.
The mayor ultimately
makes the appointment,
which will require Council
approval.
The application period for
the position closed March 2.
The position was originally dubbed clerk/treasurer
and replaces former interim city Clerk/Treasurer
Scott Badley.
“This position is responsible for directing, managing
and overseeing the activities relating to the clerk
and treasurer’s departments, including financial
management, treasurer,
budget administration, city
clerk central files, buildings
and structures, court
administration, purchasing
and IT services; is a member of the executive team,”
a job summary on the original posting states.
Pay will begin at about
$87,000.
Wyoming signs deal
that could boost
number of doctors
CHEYENNE (AP) — More doctors soon could treat
patients in Wyoming after the state became the first to
sign an agreement that aims to make it easier to practice medicine across state lines.
The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact seeks to
create a fast-track process for physicians to become
licensed in another state that is part of the deal, the
Wyoming Tribune Eagle reported Sunday. The compact
would take effect when seven states have signed on.
South Dakota has joined, and the Montana
Legislature appears close to passing its bill. Similar
measures have been introduced in Idaho, Nevada,
Utah, Nebraska and 10 other states.
The compact would make more specialists available
via telemedicine or as visiting doctors, said Kevin
Bohnenblust, executive director of the Wyoming Board
of Medicine.
Right now, many patients have to travel to neighboring states for certain treatments.
“Wyoming is so small that we just can’t support large
numbers of highly specialized physicians,”
Bohnenblust said.
Approving a license for an out-of-state physician in
Wyoming now can take several months and require
Board of Medicine approval at one of its quarterly
meetings. Through the compact, the time could drop to
days.
That could result in a 10 percent increase in the 400
or so board-approved licenses each year, Bohnenblust
said.
State boards of medicine would still be able to decide
for themselves who could practice in their state, said
Humayun Chaudhry, president and CEO of the
Federation of State Medical Boards.
“The commission won’t be issuing licenses or investigating physicians,” he said. “The basic functions of
state medical boards would fully be retained.”
Montana man reports $60,000
gold theft in northern Idaho
COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho (AP) — A Montana man
attending a gold and treasure show in northern Idaho
says someone broke into his vehicle and stole $60,000
worth of gold.
Ralph Smith of Ronan, Montana, tells the Coeur
d’Alene Press that the theft occurred Saturday following the Northwest Gold Prospectors Association’s 16th
annual Gold and Treasure Show at the Kootenai
County Fairgrounds.
Ronan says that after the show he went to a restaurant. He says when he returned to his vehicle he discovered the theft.
The association is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the recovery of the gold.
Coeur d’Alene Police Sgt. Christie Wood says investigators have the name of a possible suspect.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Casting a line
Six-year-old Cole Palm casts a line into the pond Saturday morning at the Kleenburn Recreation Area
near Acme.
COST: Good resources, opportunities
FROM 1
Other community needs highlighted in
upcoming projects include adapting to
evolving demographics. The $20 million
Whitney Center for the Arts building on
Sheridan College’s campus that is currently under construction began in
response to the rise in enrollment at
Sheridan College. The Sheridan Senior
Center’s potential expansion efforts are
intended to support the aging population.
While Sheridan has numerous willing
foundations and donors, there is only so
much money available. This could impact
many nonprofit projects searching for
funding. Kinnison said in times like
these, when there are numerous projects
to potentially give to, organizations like
Whitney Benefits have to maintain focus
on their missions.
“We have a lot of foundations in the
community,” Kinnison said. “… We [at
Whitney Benefits] have to be so extremely cautious of being an entitlement.”
But competition can breed success.
With more nonprofits looking for funding, building projects are forced to
increase the level of readiness which, in
turn, can create a more successful end
product.
“We kind of welcome other projects,”
McGinnis said. “From the foundations’
perspective, they have a better choice of
how their dollars will be spent.”
When the dust settles from all of the
projects, which also include the rehabilitation of the Antelope Butt Ski Area and
many others, nonprofit leaders said the
economic results will be evident. Such
projects can stimulate economic development and bring outside money into the
county.
‘The end result is a quality of life
in Sheridan that invites a greater
engagement to volunteer and a sense of
pride for all of those projects.’
Jay McGinnis
Four trains hauling
crude oil have derailed in
the U.S. and Canada since
mid-February, sometimes
polluting water ways and
igniting spectacular fires.
BNSF has been build-
ing additional track
alongside the main track
in the area as part of $140
million construction and
improvement project
statewide. Last year, ties
on the Denver-Brush line
were replaced, Sloan
said.
JUSTICE: Revisit bills
FROM 1
The committee also
plans to revisit two bills
that failed to pass the
recent legislative session.
One would have added
confidentiality for juveniles during court proceedings. The other
would have allowed juveniles’ criminal records,
except for violent
felonies, in most cases to
be automatically
expunged when the person turns 18.
Currently, records are
expunged only if the person petitions the court.
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Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
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But both Kinnison and McGinnis agree
that perhaps more important than any
economic benefit is an increased standard of living in the Sheridan area.
“It tells me there are some really good
resources and opportunities within this
community that are going to make it better than what it is,” Kinnison said.
“The end result is a quality of life in
Sheridan that invites a greater engagement to volunteer and a sense of pride
for all of those projects,” McGinnis said.
Woman claims late
stepfather’s unearthed
Purple Heart
DENVER (AP) — A
Purple Heart unearthed
in a Denver backyard will
soon be back with the
family of the man who
earned it, and his stepdaughter says the story of
its loss and return brings
back memories of the
only father she ever knew.
After trying unsuccessfully to find relatives,
Purple Hearts Reunited
held a ceremony Sunday
at the Denver grave of
Korean War veteran
Richmond Litman.
Leatra Plick told The
©COPYRIGHT 2015 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
Sheridan YMCA executive director
COAL TRAIN: Derailed
FROM 1
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
Associated Press that a
neighbor watching a
news report about the
ceremony called to alert
her. Plick called the
organization and started
looking through her late
mother’s cedar chest for
photographs and documents. She was able to
provide the group with
Litman’s discharge
papers.
Plick says her mother
and Litman were married
for 34 years and he helped
raise her and her two
older brothers.
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EXECUTIVE STAFF
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Publisher
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Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
OPINION
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
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LETTER |
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
TRENDING ON THE WEB |
Heed the lessons of the past
nytimes.com
Re: Sowell column, March 23
I sincerely hope that my fellow Sheridan Press
readers read Thomas Sowell’s column in
Saturday’s edition. He made an excellent case for
heeding the lessons of the past in approaching
today’s dangers. Citing Winston Churchill’s famous
warnings about the existential threat Adolf Hitler
posed to the world in the late 1930s, Sowell argued
persuasively for America to heed similar clarion
calls concerning the very real threat posed by Iran.
And yet President Obama’s administration seems
deaf to such concerns. In the most recent U.S. intelligence threat assessment report, the “Terrorism”
section excludes any mention of Iran or Hezbollah.
With Iran’s track record since 1979, one wonders
what planet these “experts” are inhabiting.
Even the French — hardly the toughest negotiators or the most ferocious military hawks in the
world — recently expressed serious concern over
the breakneck speed at which the Obama administration is frantically pressing toward a “deal” with
Iran which may well pave the way for the loony
theocrats running Iran to obtain a nuclear weapon.
In his approach to foreign policy, Mr. Obama
seems to be channeling his inner John Lennon
whose old Beatles song “Imagine” included the following thoughts: “Imagine there's no countries;
nothing to kill or die for…. imagine all the people,
living life in peace …. a brotherhood of man; imagine all the people, sharing all the world.”
Wonderfully noble and lofty thoughts, but completely naïve when applied to dealing with a country whose leaders have openly called for the utter
destruction of the United States and Israel, as well
as the annihilation of all Jews everywhere. The
mullahs who control Iran firmly believe in the
Shiite theory of the “Twelfth Imam,” which foretells the return to earth of their messiah (the
“Mahdi”) only after the entire earth has been
engulfed in chaos.
And yet a naïve, almost possessed American president makes a YouTube video addressed to the
Iranian people offering the olive branch of peace,
as if the people of Iran who live in that hermetically sealed society will ever even see it!
Meanwhile, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu courageously warns the American people in a speech to Congress of the dangers of trusting such a regime, only to be put down and scorned
by the Obama administration at the same time
Obama makes irrational video appeals to an imaginary Iranian audience.
Maybe it’s time for us to re-read “Alice in
Wonderland” since it seems that’s where we’re
headed.
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4. This Snookered Isle
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thesheridanpress.com
1. 3 arrested for selling stolen items on UpCycle
2. Sheridan man indicted in County Attorney Office
arson
3. Killy’s gets liquor license, will close grocery store
4. Wild West Wreckers earn first victory
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washingtonpost.com
1. Secret Nazi hideout believed found in remote
Argentine jungle
2. Emmy Noether Google Doodle: Why Einstein called
her a ‘creative mathematician’
3. 5 things you need to know about Ted Cruz
4. Bob Huggins’s daughters make rape jokes about
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5. Offensive tweet about Mo’ne Davis gets college baseball player kicked off team
Charles Cole
Sheridan
T
Assortive mating — social inequality’s deepening roots
he rate of dog ownership is rising ominously. How can a profusion of puppies
be worrisome? A report from the
Raymond James financial services firm
concerning trends in the housing market
explains: Increasing numbers of women “are
adopting dogs for security and/or companionship,” partly because of “the great education
divide.”
Since 1979, the report
says, the number of
women going to college
has accelerated relative to
male enrollments. By
2012, there were 2.8 million more women than
men in college, and by
2020 this “enrollment
gap” is projected to grow
GEORGE
to 4.4 million as women
WILL
account for 74 percent of
|
enrollment growth.
In 2000, the adult populations of college-educated men and women were approximately
equal. By 2013, there were 4.9 million more
women age 25 or older with college degrees
than men in that age group. This means a
shortage of suitable male partners for a
growing cohort of young women, who are
postponing family formation. The report
says that millions of female-led households
are being established by women who, being
THE SHERIDAN
Press
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Office Manager
Mark
Blumenshine
Production
Manager
focused on their careers, are delaying
motherhood, partly because of a shortage
of suitable partners. More about suitability anon.
“Increased ‘competition’ for college-educated males” might mean that college-educated bachelors will feel less incentive to
become domesticated, further depressing
family formation. And for the growing
class of undereducated young men, there
are increasingly bleak “employment,
income and dating prospects.” What is
good news for dog breeders is bad news for
the culture.
Two years ago, Susan Patton, a Princeton
graduate and mother of two sons who
attended Princeton, detonated multiple
explosions in the culture wars when, in a
letter to the Daily Princetonian, she told
“the young women of Princeton” what
“you really need to know that nobody is
telling you.” Which is that their future happiness will be “inextricably linked” to the
men they marry, so they should “find a
husband on campus” because “you will
never again have this concentration of
men who are worthy of you.” She explains:
“Men regularly marry women who are
younger, less intelligent, less educated. It’s
amazing how forgiving men can be about a
woman’s lack of erudition, if she is exceptionally pretty. Smart women can’t (shouldn’t) marry men who aren’t at least their
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we deem libelous, obscene or in bad taste.
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works best and have the best chance of
being published.
intellectual equal. As Princeton women, we
have almost priced ourselves out of the
market. Simply put, there is a very limited
population of men who are as smart or
smarter than we are. . . . It will frustrate
you to be with a man who just isn’t as
smart as you.”
Patton’s brassy indifference to delicacy
served the serious purpose of riveting
attention on what social scientists call
“assortative mating.” Plainly put, America
has always aspired to be a meritocracy in
which careers are open to talents and status is earned rather than inherited. But the
more merit matters to upward mobility, the
more inequality becomes entrenched in a
stratified society.
Those favored by genetics and by family
acculturation of the acquired social capital
(the habits and dispositions necessary for
taking advantage of opportunities) tend to
go to school and then to work together. And
they marry one another, concentrating
advantages in their children.
Hence today’s interest in what is called
privilege theory, which takes a dark view of
the old couplet “All men are by nature
equal/ but differ greatly in the sequel.”
The theory leaps from the obvious to the
dubious. Obviously some people are born
with, and into, advantages, congenital and
social. What is dubious is the conclusion
that government has the capacity and duty
to calibrate, redistribute and equalize
advantages.
Joy Pullmann, writing at the Federalist, a
conservative website of which she is managing editor, notes something else obvious:
This agenda is incompatible with freedom.
Furthermore, although some individuals
have advantages they did not earn, “very
often someone else did earn them” — by,
for example, nurturing children in a stable
family. It is hardly an injustice — an invidious privilege — for nurturing parents to be
able to confer on their children the advantages of conscientiousness. The ability to
do so, says Pullmann, is a powerful motivation for noble behavior that, by enlarging
society’s stock of parental “hard work, selfcontrol and sacrifice,” produces “positive
spillover effects for everyone else.”
Enhancing equality of opportunity is
increasingly urgent and difficult in a progressively more complex, informationintensive society. The delicate task is to do
so without damaging freedom and the
incentives for using freedom for individual
striving, which is the privilege — actually,
the natural right — that matters most.
GEORGE WILL writes on politics, law and social character. Will began
writing for The Washington Post in 1974. He is a contributor for Fox News, a
Pulitzer Prize recipient for commentary, and is the author of 12 books.
IN WASHINGTON |
Letters should not exceed 400 words. The
best-read letters are those that stay on a
single topic and are brief.
Letters can be edited for length, taste,
clarity. We reserve the right to limit frequent letter writers.
Write: Letters to the Editor
The Sheridan Press
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyo. 82801
Email: [email protected]
President Barack Obama Rep. Cynthia Lummis
The White
1004
House
Longworth
1600
HOB
Pennsylvania
Washington,
Ave.
DC 20515
Washington,
DC 20500
Phone: 202-225-2311
Phone: 202-456-1111
Toll free: 888-879-3599
Fax: 202-456-1414
Fax: 202-225-3057
Sen. Mike Enzi
Sen. John Barrasso
Senate
307 Dirksen
Russell
Senate
Building 379A
Office Building
Washington,
Washington,
DC 20510
DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3424
Toll free: 888-250-1879
Fax: 202-228-0359
Phone: 202-224-6441
Fax: 202-224-1724
The 1st Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
PEOPLE
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
Wyoming Women’s Business Networking to host expo Saturday at fairgrounds
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Wyoming Women’s Business
Networking group will host an expo Saturday from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at the Sheridan County Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall.
The event will feature exhibitors, nonprofits and presen-
tations throughout the day alongside various booths featuring food and goods.
Presentations will include information on local nonprofits, essential oils, Zumba, reflecting your youth, touching
lives in a way that can be counted and information on the
upcoming FAB (For. About. By.) Women’s Conference set
Comedy Night to feature John DeBoer on Saturday
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Comedy Night featuring John DeBoer
will begin at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Best Western
Sheridan Center.
The evening of good, clean fun will benefit the Second
Chance Sheridan Cat Rescue.
Hors d’oeuvres and appetizers will be served at 6 p.m.
and the show will begin at 7 p.m., followed by raffle drawings.
Tickets for the event are $25 in advance or $30 at the
door. Tickets can be purchased by calling 461-9555, at the
Best Western Sheridan Center or Second Chance
Sheridan Cat Rescue or online at sheridancatrescue.org.
For additional information about the event, call 4619555.
For additional information about DeBoer, see goodcomedian.com.
The Best Western Sheridan Center is located at 612 N.
Main St.
for April 17.
The event will benefit the Advocacy and Resource
Center, Big Brothers Big Sisters and the local suicide prevention coalition.
The Sheridan County Fairgrounds Exhibit Hall is located at 1753 Victoria St.
ENTERTAINMENT BRIEFS |
James Patterson giving another
$250,000 to school libraries
NEW YORK (AP) — Just two weeks after launching a
$1.25 million project to help public school libraries,
James Patterson is adding another $250,000.
The best-selling author has received more than 10,500
applications for funding, and Patterson announced
Monday he wants to keep up with the “immediate and
overwhelming response.” The project’s co-sponsor,
Scholastic Reading Club, is matching each dollar from
Patterson with points that teachers can use for classroom materials. Schools have been seeking sums ranging from $1,000 to $10,000, for everything from new books
to flooding repairs.
Patterson already has given more than $1 million to
independent booksellers around the country, an initiative he started in 2013.
Obama against compensation
for college athletes
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — President Barack Obama
is coming out against compensation for college athletes.
He says it would lead to bidding wars and “ruin the
sense of college sports.”
Obama says what does frustrate him, though, is seeing
college coaches and the NCAA making huge amounts of
money while an athlete gets banished after getting a tattoo or free use of a car.
He says that’s unfair.
Obama commented in an interview with The
Huffington Post after he was asked whether college athletes should be compensated because they are moneymakers for the NCAA, TV stations and advertisers.
The interview was released Saturday, hours after
Obama cheered as his niece’s Princeton team stayed
undefeated by topping Wisconsin-Green Bay in a first
round NCAA Tournament game played in Maryland.
Stephen King: Maine governor should
‘man up and apologize’
FILE PHOTO | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Participants walk the track during the annual DisABILITY Awareness Walk last year at Sheridan Junior High School. From left, Lara Wollen,
Roger Suiter and Karol Whisler with Trent Shannon in the back.
DisABILITY Awareness Walk set for Saturday at SJHS
Beginning at 10 a.m., the public is
welcome to participate in the walk to
be held at the Sheridan Junior High
School track.
The event is held to raise awareness for DisABILITY Awareness
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan will join
statewide supporters for the annual
DisABILITY Awareness Walk on
Saturday.
Jackalope Jump
to raise money
for Special
Olympics
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — While the event was
rescheduled after ice conditions at
Lake DeSmet didn’t cooperate, the
annual Jackalope Jump to support
Special Olympics will be held at noon
Saturday at Sheridan Junior High
School.
The family friendly polar bear plunge
will be done in a pool outside at the
school.
Spectators are encouraged to attend
Month.
Registration for the walk will be at
the track the day of the event.
For additional information, contact
Ace Young at 751-9874.
SJHS is located at 500 Lewis St.
and cheer on the polar bear plungers.
All proceeds from the event will benefit the Special Olympics Wyoming programs.
For additional information, call
Carrie Pilcher at 672-7841.
To register for the jump, see firstgiving.com/sowy.
Registration will also be available at
the event beginning at noon. The jump
will begin at 1 p.m.
Sheridan Junior High School is located at 500 Lewis St.
Wyoming residents satisfied with state highways
RAWLINS (AP) — A strong majority
of Wyoming residents are satisfied
with how highways in the state are
maintained, according to a recent survey.
Wyoming Survey and Analysis
Center interviewed 1,004 adult
Wyoming residents between Dec. 1
and Dec. 19 by telephone to ask their
satisfaction with Wyoming
Department of Transportation’s state
highway stewardship.
According to the survey, 80 percent
of individuals interviewed expressed
overall satisfaction with WYDOT’s
stewardship. The results remain the
same since the last survey in 2012.
WYDOT performs the survey every
two years.
WYDOT spokesman Dave Kingham
said the survey is conducted to see
how the agency is doing to provide
safer roads.
“There were questions regarding
many topics,” Kingham told the
Rawlins Daily Times. “We asked
about plowing and sanding in the winter and moving traffic through construction zones in the summer.”
Other questions included satisfaction with services, including interactions with highway patrol and drivers
license offices.
The survey sample included residents from every county in Wyoming
through randomly generated phone
numbers to ask residents a maximum
26 questions.
“The survey was short enough so it
didn’t take too much time,” Kingham
said. “But it was detailed enough to
provide good feedback.”
The results have a margin of error
of 3 percentage points with 95 percent
confidence the state population’s opinions, as a whole, fall within that
range.
According to the survey results, 85
percent of the respondents agreed the
state’s highways and interstates usually permit travel with only minimal
delays. Eighty-one percent said they
were satisfied with state highway
maintenance.
On winter highway maintenance, 73
percent of residents said highways
are plowed promptly, and 71 percent
said plowing and sanding is done
thoroughly.
Thirty-six percent of the respondents said they had direct contact
with Wyoming Highway Patrol personnel during the last two years. Of
those respondents, 84 percent said
Patrol personnel are courteous, 79 percent believe Highway Patrol responds
in a timely manner and 78 percent
said the state patrol meets their
expectation.
AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Stephen King says Maine
Gov. Paul LePage should “man up and apologize” after
the governor claimed the author has moved away and
doesn’t pay income taxes in Maine.
LePage used his radio address this week to make his
case for eliminating Maine’s income tax. He said states
without an income tax, such as Florida, have lured away
Maine residents, including King.
King spends winters in Florida but told the Portland
Press Herald on Friday that he and his wife paid about
$1.4 million in Maine state taxes in 2013 and figured it
was about the same for 2014.
King says his foundation also gives $3 to $5 million
grants annually, mostly in Maine.
A revised version of LePage’s address released
Thursday no longer mentions the author. LePage’s
spokesman did not immediately respond to an email
requesting comment.
Tracy Morgan not emotionally ready to
watch ‘SNL’ tribute
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — Actor-comedian Tracy Morgan
still hasn’t watched the tribute performed for him on
last month’s “Saturday Night Live” 40th anniversary
show after he was badly injured in a car accident.
An attorney for Morgan tells The Associated Press on
Friday that the former “SNL” star isn’t emotionally
ready yet to watch the segment.
Morgan’s “30 Rock” co-stars Tina Fey and Alec
Baldwin did a short piece sending him their support.
Attorney Benedict Morelli says Morgan was “incredibly moved” by the gesture but hasn’t watched the segment.
Get your Press on the Web at
www.thesheridanpress.co m
A6
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories that
will be talked about today:
1. PLANE CRASHES IN
FRENCH ALPS WITH 148
PEOPLE ABOARD
The Germanwings passenger jet was traveling
from Barcelona to
Dusseldorf, and president
Francois Hollande says no
survivors are likely.
2. U.S., AFGHAN
PRESIDENTS TO FINALIZE
PLAN FOR AMERICAN
TROOP PULLOUT
Ashraf Ghani represents
Obama’s last, best hope to
make good on his promise
to end America’s longest
war before leaving office,
but the time frame may be
slower than first hoped.
3. AL-QAIDA AFFILIATE
QUIETLY RISES IN SYRIA
As Islamic State militants get most of the attention with gruesome acts,
the Nusra Front becomes a
key player in the four-year
civil war, compromising
other rebel groups the
West may try to work with.
4. LAW ALLOWS UTAH TO
USE FIRING SQUADS
The governor, in signing
the bill, says the state
needs a backup execution
method in case a shortage
of lethal drugs persists.
5. WHERE U.S.
COUNTERTERRORISM
STRATEGY COLLAPSES
As Yemen descends into
chaos and operations
against militants are
scaled back, an Islamic
State offshoot finds a safe
haven.
6. WHAT ECONOMIC CRISIS
REVIVES IN VENEZUELA
The battered economy
brings back a medical
practice rarely seen in
developed countries since
the 1970s: the radical mastectomy.
7. WHY COMMUTES ARE
TURNING NASTY
Finding a job near home
is getting harder for millions of American workers. And commuting is
especially tough on the
poor, blacks and Hispanics.
8. TROUBLE AT AMEX
Changing consumer
habits, aggressive competition and increased pushback from its merchants
are putting heavy pressure
on American Express.
9. ANGELINA JOLIE HAS
OVARIES, FALLOPIAN
TUBES REMOVED
The actress and filmmaker says in an op-ed in The
New York Times that a
blood test showed a mutation in the BRCA1 gene,
which gave her an 87 percent risk of breast cancer
and a 50 percent risk of
ovarian cancer.
10. GEORGE R.R. MARTIN
WON’T LET PRESSURE
RUSH HIS WRITING
“Fifty years from now
nobody is going to care
how frequently the books
came out,” says the author
of the best-selling series,
“A Song of Ice and Fire.”
Proving he’s ‘Gavin Strong’
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Students Annamae Hoopes, center, and Maddy Martinec tape principal Scott Cleland, left, to a wall in the gym at Highland
Park Elementary School Friday morning. The stunt was used to raise money to support Gavin Maxwell, a fourth-grader at
Highland Park who was diagnosed with Alpha 1 Antitrypsin deficiency at age 1. Maxwell had a successful liver transplant earlier
this month. The Sheridan community and Highland Park students have rallied to raise support for the Maxwell family’s medical and travel expenses through various fundraising efforts.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Sagebrush Community Art Center
seeking submissions for juried
photo show
SHERIDAN — The Sagebrush Community Art
Center will host a juried photography show May 428 and is currently seeking submissions for the
show.
The cost to submit photographs is $30 for up to
three entries that are due by April 1.
The Best of Show photographer will be awarded
$500, while first- and second-place photographers
will be given $200 apiece. Third place and People’s
Choice winners will receive $100 each.
For more information about the show, see artinsheridan.com or contact Kate Harrington at 6741970 or [email protected]
The Sagebrush Community Art Center is located
at 201 E. Fifth St.
WWA asking artists
to submit mini art
SHERIDAN — The Wyoming Wilderness
Association is soliciting donations from artists for
its ninth annual Miniature Art and Music Auction:
Celebrating our Wild Earth, to be exhibited and
juried April 13-24 at Davis Gallery.
The WWA is asking local and regional artists
and musicians to contribute miniature works of
art (no larger than 6-by-8 inches) and “mini-concerts” (up to 90 minutes) in support of protecting
some of the most special places in Wyoming.
Artists are asked to deliver finished and framed
miniature art pieces to the Davis Gallery on or
before April 10.
Prizes from local businesses will be awarded for
work in the following categories: best earth land-
scape, best use of natural materials, best use of
recycled materials and best of show.
All musicians will be recognized as well.
Details and donation forms are available at
www.wildwyo.org.
A free Grand Finale Gala at Davis Gallery will be
held from 5-7 p.m. April 24. The public is welcome
to submit final bids and enjoy free music, food and
beverages.
Proceeds from the silent auction will benefit the
WWA.
For additional information, contact Kate
Seymour at 672-2751 and visit www.wildwyo.org.
Davis Gallery is located at 645 Broadway St.
First Christian Church to host
‘Preparing for Resurrection’
SHERIDAN — First Christian Church and the
Wyoming Association of Churches will host a biblically-grounded workshop, “Preparing for
Resurrection,” on Friday.
The workshop, running from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
will be led by author and coach Rev. Rebekah
Simon-Peter.
The workshop will take a deep look at how participants can prepare for resurrection by re-writing and renewing their own life stories.
Participants will look at the memories, relationships and feelings that are disempowering them
instead of empowering them. They’ll turn negative self-talk to positive renewal and action. They’ll
also take a look at how they can let go of the attitudes and beliefs that are holding their spirits
down and celebrate spiritual release.
The workshop is free, but advanced registration
is recommended.
For additional information or to register call
First Christian Church at 674-6795.
First Christian Church is located at 102 S.
Connor St.
WEDNESDAY EVENTS |
• All day, Food for Fines amnesty week, Sheridan County public libraries
• 12:10 p.m., After Hours seminar on self care, Downtown Sheridan Association, 150 S. Main St.
TIPPED OVER |
Ellen Conford, popular children’s
author, dead at 73
NEW YORK (AP) — Ellen Conford, an awardwinning children’s writer whose comic tales about
everything from the travails of high school to a
girl’s summer camp crush made her a favorite for
at least one generation of readers, has died.
Conford died at home in Great Neck, New York,
last Friday, on her 73rd birthday, her husband told
The Associated Press. David Conford said Monday
that his wife had been in poor health and died of
heart failure.
Conford’s more than 40 books — for age groups
ranging from small children to young adults —
included the “Jenny Archer” and “Annabel the
Actress” series and the novel “This is Laura.” Her
husband said that a personal favorite was “The
Alfred G. Graebner Memorial High School
Handbook of Rules and Regulations,” published in
1976 and inspired by the guidelines that their son,
Michael, received while in high school.
“Ellen found some of the rules so hilarious that
she started working on a book about them,” David
Conford said.
Honors received by Ellen Conford included a
Book of the Year citation from the American
Library Association for “Alfred G. Graebner.”
‘’This is Laura,” ‘’Alfred G. Graebner” and several
other books were adapted for television specials.
“Ellen is one of the authors that created the kind
of John Green YA as we know it today — the kind
of witty works that also take their readers seriously,” said Lizzie Skurnick, who has been reissuing
Conford’s work through her eponymous imprint.
“Whether she was writing about a girl fleeing foster homes in the 1950s (‘To All My Fans, With Love,
From Sylvie’) or the consummate novel of summer
camp (‘Hail, Hail Camp Timberwood’), her books
are plotted so well, and her writing is so smart and
fabulous. Readers have been sending me pictures
of all the old books they’ve held onto since they
were teenagers.”
A native of New York City who edited her high
school’s humor magazine and attended Hofstra
University (Hofstra College at the time), Conford
had been writing poems and short stories when a
trip to the library inspired her to try a different
kind of book.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On March 24, 1765, Britain
enacted the Quartering Act,
requiring American colonists
to provide temporary housing
to British soldiers.
On this date:
In 1832, a mob in Hiram,
Ohio, attacked, tarred and
feathered Mormon leaders
Joseph Smith Jr. and Sidney
Rigdon.
In 1913, New York’s Palace
Theatre, the legendary home
of vaudeville, opened on
Broadway.
In 1944, in occupied Rome,
the Nazis executed more than
300 civilians in reprisal for an
attack by Italian partisans the
day before that had killed 32
German soldiers.
In 1955, the Tennessee
Williams play “Cat on a Hot
Tin Roof ” opened on
Broadway.
In 1958, rock-and-roll singer
Elvis Presley was inducted
into the Army in Memphis,
Tennessee.
In 1975, Muhammad Ali
defeated Chuck Wepner with a
technical knockout in the 15th
round of a fight in Richfield,
Ohio. (Wepner, a journeyman
known as the “Bayonne
Bleeder,” inspired Sly Stallone
to make his “Rocky” films.)
In 1980, one of El Salvador’s
most respected Roman
Catholic Church leaders,
Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo
Romero, was shot to death by a
sniper as he celebrated Mass
in San Salvador.
In 1989, the supertanker
Exxon Valdez ran aground on
a reef in Alaska’s Prince
William Sound and began leaking an estimated 11 million
gallons of crude oil.
In 1995, after 20 years,
British soldiers stopped routine patrols in Belfast,
Northern Ireland.
In 1999, NATO launched
airstrikes against Yugoslavia,
marking the first time in its 50year existence that it had ever
attacked a sovereign country.
Thirty-nine people were killed
when fire erupted in the Mont
Blanc tunnel in France and
burned for two days.
Ten years ago: The U.S.
Supreme Court denied an
appeal from the parents of
Terri Schiavo to have a feeding
tube reinserted into the severely brain-damaged woman. The
president of Kyrgyzstan,
Askar Akayev, fled the country
after opposition activists
stormed his headquarters,
seized control of state television and rampaged through
government offices. Chess legend Bobby Fischer was freed
after being detained nine
months in Japan for trying to
leave the country with an
invalid U.S. passport; he boarded a flight to his new home,
Iceland.
Five years ago: Keeping a
promise he’d made to antiabortion Democratic lawmakers to assure passage of his
historic health care legislation, President Barack Obama
signed an executive order
against using federal funds to
pay for elective abortions covered by private insurance.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama began a week
of international travel as he
arrived in the Netherlands
with Russia’s Crimean incursion at the top of his agenda.
An Egyptian court sentenced
to death nearly 530 suspected
backers of ousted President
Mohammed Morsi over a deadly attack on a police station,
capping a swift, two-day mass
trial in which defense attorneys were not allowed to present their case. Five former
employees of imprisoned financier Bernard Madoff were
convicted at the end of a sixmonth trial in New York that
cast them as the long arms of
their boss.
Thought for Today: “If
merely ‘feeling good’ could
decide, drunkenness would be
the supremely valid human
experience.” — William James,
American psychologist (18421910).
A07 Almanac 0324.qxp_A Section Template 3/24/15 10:48 AM Page 1
ALMANAC
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
REPORTS |
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Monday
• Medical, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 9:52 a.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Fort
Road, 11:05 a.m
• Medical, 100 block West
11th Street, 12:14 p.m.
• Trauma, 500 block North
Main Street, 1:22 p.m.
• Trauma, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 6:18 p.m.
• Trauma, 2500 block
North Main Street, 7:58 p.m.
• Medical, 100 block
Hosburg, Story, 8:41 p.m.
SHERIDAN MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Monday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Monday
• Driving under suspension, East Fifth Street, 5:32
a.m.
• Dog at large, East Burkitt
Street, 7:31 a.m.
• Littering, Grove Drive,
9:44 a.m.
• VIN inspection, West
12th Street, 9:51 a.m.
• Drug activity, Long
Drive, 10:14 a.m.
• VIN inspection, West
12th Street, 10:30 a.m.
• VIN inspection, West
12th Street, 10:43 a.m.
• Filthy premises,
Florence Avenue, 10:55
a.m.
• Dog at large, East
Brundage Lane, 12:11 p.m.
• Custody dispute,
Coffeen Avenue, 12:21
p.m.
• Barking dog,
Cheyenne Street, 12:34
p.m.
• Harassment, Fleming
Boulevard, 1:26 p.m.
• Agency assist, Coffeen
Avenue, 1:45 p.m.
• Domestic, East
Seventh Street, 1:53 p.m.
• Skateboarding, West
Works Street, 2:43 p.m.
• Welfare check,
Sheridan area, 3:11 p.m.
• Filthy premises, South
Main Street, 3:26 p.m.
• Civil standby, North
Gould Street, 3:26 p.m.
• Animal trap,
Huntington Street, 3:58
p.m.
• Found property, Avoca
Place, 4:20 p.m.
• Civil dispute, Long
Drive, 5:13 p.m.
• Fraud, Edwards Drive,
6:01 p.m.
• Alarm, Coffeen
Avenue, 6:12 p.m.
• Threats (cold),
Gladstone Street, 6:55
p.m.
• Suspicious person,
Remington Court, 7:06
p.m.
• Parking complaint,
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Quarter
Pounder
Here are the results
of Monday’s
Cowboy Draw
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
5-8-14-18-21
Estimated jackpot:
$325,000
WEDNESDAY
East Heald Street, 8:01 p.m.
• DUI, West Dow Street,
10:48 p.m.
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Monday
• Burglar alarm, North
Piney Road, 8:44 a.m.
• Removal of subject,
Coffeen Avenue, 10:31 a.m.
• Agency assist, West 13th
Street, 10:32 a.m.
• Warrant service, West
13th Street, 11:26 a.m.
• Theft (cold), Wild Horse
Road, Arvada, 2:16 p.m.
• Malicious destruction,
Fish Hatchery Road, Banner,
2:44 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance,
North Piney Road, Banner,
4:45 p.m.
• Odor investigation, Lower
Prairie Dog Road, 6:53 p.m.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
30
48
Rain and snow
showers
32
56
Almanac
37
67
Daniel A. Cook, 47, of Shawnee Kansas,
died in Laramie, WY on March 20, 2015 at
Ivinson Memorial Hospital. Dan was
born on January 6, 1968 in Sheridan, WY
to Larry and Nancy Cook. He graduated
from Sheridan High School in 1986,
moved to Laramie WY to attend the
Daniel A. Cook University of Wyoming, College of
Engineering and graduated in 1994 with
a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. Dan worked as a
Civil Engineer for the Wyoming Department of
Transportation as a Project Engineer at Rock Springs and
Green River. In 1996 Dan moved to Kansas and worked as a
Civil Engineer for several companies until he joined Payne &
Brockway in Olathe, Kansas; where he met his future partners of Level 4 Engineering, LLC. His passion for engineering led him to his position as Vice President and Project
Manager at Renaissance Infrastructure Consulting in
Riverside, Missouri. His professional memberships included
the International Association of Civil Engineering and the
American Society of Civil Engineers.
Dan married Jamie Anderson on May 27, 2000 at the top of
Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan surrounded by family
and friends. They enjoyed traveling, sailing and motorcycling. Happy memories were created while building their
homes together. Dan’s dedication to his community led to his
involvement in Rotary International where he was the
President of the Shawnee, KS chapter and worked with the
local Meals on Wheels program. Dan’s favorite sport season,
is well known to be March Madness. Go Hawks! Go Pokes! He
was often times found in the kitchen cooking for all who loved
him. He was quickly becoming a master of smoked meat and
barbequing. He especially enjoyed all the latest technology
and how it enhanced his love of music. Dan loved to dirt bike;
ride snowmobiles and attend the annual Sturgis rally. Best of
all, Dan loved people and seized each day, Carpe Diem.
Dan Cook was preceded in death by his; maternal and paternal grandparents, his father, Larry Cook. Surviving him are
his; wife, Jamie Anderson; daughter, Rachel Cook (Caleb);
grand-daughter, Phoenix, mother, Nancy Cook, sister, Kellie
Gardner, brother, Steve Cook and his nieces and nephews;
Stephanie, Casey, Josh, Cyndi and Erica.
Wyoming services will be on Tuesday, March 24th, 2:30pm at
the Montgomery-Stryker Funeral Home, 2133 Rainbow
Avenue, Laramie, WY. A Reception will follow at the Elks
Lodge, 103 S. 2nd St, Laramie, WY.
Kansas service and reception will be on Sunday, March 29th
from 2:00-4:00pm at Shawnee Town Hall, 11600 Johnson Drive,
Shawnee KS, 66203.
In lieu of flowers the family has requested donations be
made to the Rotary Club of Shawnee Foundation, c/o Doug
Gibb, 8200 Acuff Lane, Lenexa, KS 66215.
Services are under the direction of Montgomery-Stryker
Funeral Home. To send condolences or to sign the online
guest book go to www.montgomerystryker.com
74
Temperature
High/low .........................................................66/27
Normal high/low ............................................51/24
Record high .............................................76 in 2012
Record low ............................................. -16 in 1965
Precipitation (in inches)
Monday........................................................... 0.06"
Month to date................................................. 0.34"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.67"
Year to date .................................................... 2.07"
Normal year to date ....................................... 1.77"
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
7:04 a.m.
7:03 a.m.
7:01 a.m.
7:25 p.m.
7:26 p.m.
7:27 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
9:55 a.m.
10:42 a.m.
11:33 a.m.
none
12:47 a.m.
1:44 a.m.
First
Full
Last
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Parkman
31/47
Dayton
31/48
Lovell
31/49
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
30/48
Ranchester
30/48
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
33/52
Basin
33/52
30/48
Mar 27
Apr 4
Apr 11
Apr 18
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Clearmont
29/47
Story
27/42
Gillette
27/46
Buffalo
29/45
Worland
33/53
Wright
28/43
Kaycee
28/42
Thermopolis
32/49
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
Hardin
30/51
New
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Monday ..................... 0.06"
Shown is Wednesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Wednesday's highs.
Broadus
27/48
41
The Sun
Get your Press on the Web at
www.thesheridanpress.com
Donald Dee Kaufmann
Regional Cities
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
52/38/sf
42/29/sn
41/26/sn
48/33/sh
44/28/s
46/31/pc
49/28/pc
37/19/sf
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
61/44/sn
55/35/c
53/37/pc
58/42/sh
54/32/pc
50/36/sn
57/31/pc
44/21/c
March 24, 1933 - March 14, 2015
The wings of an eagle took flight with the
soul of Donald Dee Kaufmann, on March
14, 2015, and delivered him to the splendor
of Heaven. Donald was 10 days shy of his
82nd birthday. He was born March 24th,
1933, in Sheridan, Wyo., to Fred and Nellie
Kaufmann (McConnaughey).
Donald Dee
Don was raised on a ranch and learned
Kaufmann
the meaning of hard work and developed a
strong work ethic at an early age. He met the love of his life,
Barbara Elisabeth Crain, at a country dance, and they were
married on Sept. 20, 1953, in Buffalo, Wyo. They were blessed
with two children, Mark Regan and Deborah Lynn.
Don was the County Extension Agent in Natrona County
(Casper, Wyo.) and then in 1965 they moved to Fort Collins, CO,
where Don earned his Master’s Degree. He enjoyed a lengthy
career as the Larimer County Extension Agent, becoming
actively involved in 4-H, and culminated his career at Colorado
State University as Larimer County Extension Director.
Don continued working and teaching his grandchildren the
lessons of life, by starting a landscaping business and showing
them the ins and outs of the business.
Don and Barbara also enjoyed taking their grandchildren on
many trips over the years, to California, Arizona and Alaska.
He remained an active part of the landscaping business and
continued to serve as the treasurer of the Larimer County 4-H
Foundation until his death.
Don was a shining example of honesty and endless giving. He
quietly touched many lives in his 81 years and he served as a
loyal caregiver to his wife, Barbara, as she suffered with
Alzheimer’s. He showed us all the meaning of love, commitment and compassion, as he cared for her at home until his
passing. We will forever be grateful to “our soaring eagle” for
the many years of joy he gave us and will look to the skies every
day for his guidance.
He is survived by his wife, Barbara Kaufmann; brother, Jerry
(Amanda) Kaufmann; son, Mark (Connie) Kaufmann; daughter,
Deb Burdick; grandchildren, Jon (Jess) Burdick, Danny
Burdick, Dustin (Anna) Kaufmann, and Jayme (Chris)
Kaufmann-Tong; great-grandchildren, Kylee, Molly, Callaway,
Ayden and Lynzie.
A Celebration of Life will be held Monday, March 30, 2015, at
Cornerstone Baptist Church, 1200 Cornerstone Drive, Windsor,
CO, 80550, at 3 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Larimer
County 4-H Foundation, P.O. Box 270371, Fort Collins, CO 80527,
in memory of Donald D. Kaufmann.
See these and
past obituaries online at
www.thesheridanpress.com
National Weather for Wednesday, March 25
Warmer
38
Margaret “Peg” Kepford, 100, of Sheridan passed away
Monday, March 23, 2015 at Westview Health Care Center.
Services are pending. Champion Funeral Home has
been entrusted with arrangements.
January 6, 1968 - March 20, 2015
SATURDAY
Pleasant and
warmer
Margaret “Peg” Kepford
Daniel A. Cook
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Monday
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 64
Female inmate count: 16
Inmates at treatment facilities (not counted in daily
inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other
facilities (not counted in
daily inmate count): 5
Number of book-ins for the
previous day: 2
Number of releases for the
previous day: 6
Jack D. Landon
Jack D. Landon, 89, of Sheridan, passed away on
Monday, March 23, 2015, at the Sheridan Manor.
Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March
28, 2015, at Kane Funeral Home with Pastor Doug
Goodwin officiating. Interment will be in the Sheridan
Municipal Cemetery with a Reception to follow in the
Kane Reception Hall.
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
OBITUARIES |
Billings
30/52
Cooler with a
snow shower
not be released until those
individuals have appeared in
court.
Monday
• Priscilla Rose Nomee, 30,
Lodge Grass, Montana, probation violation, circuit
court, arrested by SCSO
• Charla Kay Wright, 59,
Sheridan, probation violation, revocation, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
• Beau Tyrel Peterson, 34,
Sheridan, DWUI, circuit
court, arrested by SPD
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
Mostly cloudy
A7
DEATH NOTICES |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Monday
• Activated alarm, 400
block North Jefferson
Street, midnight
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, West 11th
Street, 12:15 p.m.
TONIGHT
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
72/48/pc
67/40/c
62/40/c
68/42/pc
62/36/s
63/45/c
65/34/s
51/25/pc
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
37/22/sn
43/24/pc
41/25/sn
46/32/pc
45/28/pc
51/26/pc
40/24/c
37/17/sf
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
48/32/pc
45/29/sn
54/30/pc
57/36/pc
55/31/c
57/32/c
42/32/sn
44/21/c
Fri.
Hi/Lo/W
58/34/c
59/35/pc
64/37/pc
65/39/pc
63/35/s
67/33/pc
58/37/c
49/19/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Shown are
Wednesday's
noon positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
A8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
Women’s media group to honor photographer Heidi Levine
WASHINGTON (AP) — A women’s media group will
honor freelance photographer Heidi Levine as the inaugural winner of an award for courage named for Associated
Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus, who was killed on
assignment in Afghanistan.
The International Women’s Media Foundation in
Washington announced Tuesday that Levine will be
awarded the Anja Niedringhaus Courage in
Photojournalism Award. Levine is an
American and is based in Jerusalem.
The award jury, which includes accomplished
photographers and photo editors, said Levine
stands out for her courage and compassion in
capturing images in the Middle East.
“Her courage and commitment to the story in
Levine
Gaza is unwavering,” the jury wrote. “She documents tragic events under dire circumstances
while displaying a depth of compassion for the people she
encounters.”
The award will be presented to Levine at a ceremony
June 25 in Berlin. The Howard G. Buffett Foundation provided funding for the $20,000 prize.
“It is encouraging to see Anja’s legacy honored through
the amazing and courageous work of Heidi Levine, this
year’s inaugural winner,” said Santiago Lyon, director of
photography for the AP. “Heidi thoroughly embodies
Anja’s spirit and courage.”
Levine is originally from Boston and moved to Israel in
1983. She began her career with the AP and is now represented by the Sipa Press photo agency. Her photographs
have appeared in publications around the world, often as
cover stories. Levine has made a career of working in conflict and post-conflict areas, according to the media foundation. She has covered the revolutions in Egypt, Libya
and Syria, and the stories of Iraqi refugees living in
Jordan, Syria and Sweden. She has also worked in
Afghanistan, Georgia and India.
Two additional photojournalists received an honorable
mention from the jury. Photographer Anastasia Vlasova
was recognized for her courage and dedication in covering
the conflicts in Eastern Ukraine. Associated Press photographer Rebecca Blackwell also was recognized for her
courage in working under difficult conditions in the
Central African Republic.
The prize will be awarded annually to a woman photojournalist who reflects the courage and dedication of
Niedringhaus.
Niedringhaus started her career as a freelance photographer when she was 16 in her native Germany and went on
to cover the conflict in the former Yugoslavia. She joined
the AP in 2002 and worked throughout the Middle East, as
well as in Afghanistan and Pakistan. She was part of an
AP team that won the 2005 Pulitzer Price for Breaking
News Photography for coverage of Iraq.
Niedringhaus was killed in April 2014 when an Afghan
police commander walked up to the car she was in and
opened fire.
Fire danger high in Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas
DENVER (AP) — Dry weather and
winds forecast to gust to around 45 mph
are expected to raise the risk of wildfires
across the eastern half of Colorado as
well as parts of Wyoming, Nebraska and
Kansas.
The National Weather Service has posted red flag warnings Tuesday for areas
including southeastern Wyoming, the
Nebraska Panhandle and western
Kansas. In Colorado, the warning area
extends up and down the Front Range
and south to Trinidad and east to the border as well as the San Luis Valley.
New fires can quickly spread out of
control in the forecast conditions and the
weather service is warning against any
outdoor burning.
Bears end hibernation at
Grand Teton National Park
MOOSE (AP) — Visitors to Grand Teton National
Park and the surrounding area are being cautioned
that bears are out of hibernation and are hungry after
their long rest.
Park officials are asking visitors to make noise and
travel in groups of three or more. They should carry
bear spray and know how to use it and always stay at
least 100 yards from bears.
Typically, about half of adult male bears are out of
their dens by mid-March, and females with their yearlings emerge shortly after that.
When bears leave their winter dens, they can become
aggressive and protective of any food source that will
help restore fat reserves lost during hibernation.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Paint and laughter
Ben Lang laughs as he brushes paint onto his canvas during a painting class Saturday evening at The
Paint Post.
VA says it will relax 40-mile rule for private medical care
WASHINGTON (AP) — Responding to pressure from Congress and veterans groups, the
Department of Veterans Affairs is relaxing a
rule that makes it hard for some veterans in
rural areas to prove they live at least 40 miles
from a VA health site.
‘We’ve determined that changing the
distance calculation will help ensure more
veterans have access to care when and where
they want it.’
Robert McDonald
Veterans Affairs secretary
The change comes amid complaints from lawmakers and advocates who say the VA’s current
policy has prevented thousands of veterans
from taking advantage of a new law intended to
allow veterans in remote areas to gain access to
federally paid medical care from local doctors.
The VA said it will now measure the 40-mile
trip by driving miles as calculated by Google
maps or other sites, rather than as the crow
flies, as currently interpreted. The rule change
is expected to roughly double the number of eligible veterans.
“We’ve determined that changing the distance
calculation will help ensure more veterans have
access to care when and where they want it,”
Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald
said in a statement. The change will be unveiled
at a hearing Tuesday before the Senate Veterans
Affairs Committee.
The committee’s chairman, Sen. Johnny
Isakson, R-Ga., and other lawmakers have criticized the VA for what they call an overly strict
interpretation of a landmark law adopted last
year to overhaul the VA and make it easier for
veterans to get private care paid for by the government. The law was passed in response to a
scandal over long wait times for veterans seeking health care and falsified records covering up
the delays.
“Given the clear intent of Congress to reduce
barriers to care, it is perplexing that the VA is
not using its authority to allow non-VA care for
those who face a geographic challenge in accessing care, including long drive times or health
conditions that make travel difficult,” 42 senators from both parties wrote last month in a letter to McDonald.
McDonald told senators last month that he
was open to changes in the way the 40-mile rule
is interpreted, but he and other VA officials
stressed that relaxing the rule’s requirements
was likely to result in higher costs for the program.
Under the new interpretation, the distance veterans must travel will be calculated through
commercial products such as Google maps or
other websites, rather than a straight line.
“We appreciate the constructive feedback
shared by veterans and our partners to help us
improve service to veterans,” McDonald said.
More than 45,000 medical appointments with
private providers have been scheduled since the
department’s “Choice Program” went into effect
in early November, McDonald said.
House Dems say new abortion language helps Medicare doc deal
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Language has been added
to an emerging bipartisan
deal on Medicare clarifying
that the agreement’s abortion restrictions on community health centers are temporary and won’t be
inscribed into permanent
law, House Democrats said
Monday.
The Democrats said they
believe the new provisions
will ease concerns that
have threatened Democratic
support for the overall
package, which is mostly
aimed at protecting doctors
who treat Medicare patients
from imminent deep cuts.
Democrats, especially in
the Senate, had complained
that the tentative deal
between House Minority
Leader Nancy Pelosi, DCalif., and Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, would give
three-decade-old legal curbs
on abortions the force of
permanent law. Congress
has always enacted those
restrictions — called the
Hyde amendment — every
year, which gives
Democrats hope that someday they might have the
votes to repeal them.
“It won’t be a codifying of
Hyde,” said Rep. Janice
Schakowsky, D-Ill.
Physicians’ face a 21 percent cut in Medicare reimbursements starting April 1
unless lawmakers block it.
The agreement would
extend the Children’s
Health Insurance Program
for two more years. It would
also provide $7.2 billion
over two years to give community health centers the
same, higher amounts
they’ve received since
President Barack Obama’s
health care law was enacted
in 2010.
Delivery as low as $108 a year!
Call The Sheridan Press TODAY!!
– 672-2431 –
BUSINESS
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Landon’s
to host
pruning
workshop
Saturday
High nursing
home bills
squeeze
insurers
NEW YORK (AP) — Thirty
years ago, insurance companies had the answer to the
soaring cost of caring for the
elderly. Plan ahead and buy a
policy that will cover your
expenses.
Now, there’s a new problem:
Even insurers think it’s unaffordable.
Life insurance firms pitched
long-term care policies as the
prudent way for Americans to
shoulder the cost of staying in
nursing homes. But those
same companies have found
that long-term-care policies
are squeezing their profits.
Earnings for life insurers slid
11 percent in the most recent
quarter, according to Moody’s
Investors Service, and longterm care was the chief culprit.
“Insurers that sell these
products lose money on
them,” says Vincent Lui, a
life-insurance analyst at
Morningstar. “So they’re raising prices and also trying to
get out of the business right
and left.”
Four of the five largest
providers — including
Manulife and MetLife — have
either scaled back their business or stopped selling new
policies, according to Moody’s.
The largest provider,
Genworth Financial, continues to offer them, yet has
struggled under the weight of
rising costs.
The trends behind the industry’s troubles sound like good
news outside the world of
insurance. Older Americans
are healthier and living
longer. But that makes it difficult for the industry to turn a
profit.
B1
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Landon’s
Greenhouse and Nursery will
host a pruning workshop
Saturday at 11 a.m.
Kelly Norris, an ISA certified arborist will share her
expertise on the ins and outs
of pruning trees and shrubs.
Organizers recommend
attendees dress appropriately
for the weather as parts of the
workshop will be held outside
and include hands-on demonstrations.
The workshop is free and
open to the public.
A prize drawing will be held
directly after the workshop for
those who call and preregister.
To register, call 672-8340 or
stop by the greenhouse.
In addition to the workshop,
Landon’s will host its weekly
farmers market from 9-11 a.m.
For more information about
Landon’s spring workshops,
see landonsgreenhouse.com.
Landon’s Greenhouse and
Nursery is located at 505
College Meadows Drive.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Explaining history at Tidbit Saturday
Seven-year-old Riley Rankin takes a closer look at his artifact during Tidbit Saturday at the Sheridan County Museum. The
youth were assigned various artifacts and were tasked with identifying the artifact and explaining its purpose, which is similar
to what museum curators would do when receiving new artifacts. The museum is scheduled to open for the season on May 1.
New-home sales surge in Feb. in otherwise dormant market
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new U.S.
homes in February climbed to their fastest
pace in seven years, as an otherwise dormant
housing market showed fresh signs of life.
The Commerce Department said Tuesday
that new-home sales shot up 7.8 percent last
month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of
539,000, the strongest performance since
February 2008. January sales were revised up
nearly 4 percent to a rate of 500,000.
Other parts of the housing market have
struggled since 2015 got off to a frigid start,
despite historically low mortgage rates and a
sharp, yearlong upswing in hiring. The shift
upward in purchases of newly built homes
may suggest that the job growth is spilling
over to other parts of the economy.
“The housing market remains in recovery
mode and that activity for the rest of the year
is likely to improve at a modest, albeit choppy, pace,” said Blerina Uruçi, an analyst at
the bank Barclays.
The strong increase came from the South
and, surprisingly, the Northeast, which was
hammered by snowstorms last month.
Buying fell in the Midwest and West last
month. The median sales price rose 2.6 percent since February 2014 to $275,500.
Still, fierce winter weather has led builders
to pull back on the pace of single-family
housing starts and shutter construction sites.
And sales of existing homes in the first two
months of 2015 are running behind the
already weak pace set last year, according to
the National Association of Realtors.
Housing starts plummeted a seasonally
adjusted 17 percent last month from January,
with the biggest drops coming in the snowbound Northeast and Midwest, the Commerce
Department reported last week.
Builders have also been more focused on
the rental market, as high prices have cut
into the pool of potential buyers. Approved
permits in February to start construction on
single-family houses fell to their lower annual rate in eight months, while permits for
apartments surged to a 10-month high.
But the increase in sales of newly built
homes indicates that construction may need
to ramp up. Just 4.7 months’ supply of new
homes are on the market, a sign that inventories are unusually tight before the start of
the spring buying season when open houses
become more crowded and sales increase.
Google hires
Morgan
Stanley’s Ruth
Porat as CFO
NEW YORK (AP) — Morgan
Stanley’s chief financial officer, Ruth Porat, is leaving the
New York investment bank for
the same job at Google.
Porat, 58, will be the
Internet search company’s top
female executive when she
joins Google on May 26. She
will report to CEO and cofounder Larry Page.
“I’m delighted to be returning to my California roots and
joining Google,” Porat said in
a written statement Tuesday.
Morgan Stanley said that
Porat’s last day will be April
30.
Porat is one of the highestranking women executives on
Wall Street. A 28-year veteran
of Morgan Stanley, she joined
the firm in 1987 and worked
her way up to being named
executive vice president and
chief financial officer in 2010.
B2
SPORTS
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
Rockies’ Gray seizes chance, impresses in win over Brewers
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Jon Gray allowed two singles in four scoreless innings, helping his chances of making Colorado’s rotation and leading the Rockies to a 5-1
win over the Milwaukee Brewers on Monday.
Gray is one of four young pitchers competing to replace
Jhoulys Chacin, released in a surprise move Sunday amid
a rough spring.
The 23-year-old Gray, Colorado’s top prospect, has not
pitched above Double-A. But manager Walt Weiss said the
right-hander is in the mix for the rotation.
“It’s something I thought about,” Gray said, “but I didn’t
let it eat me up.”
Gray’s fastball hit 97 mph and he struck out two, including Ryan Braun. Carlos Gomez singled in the first before
Duke, UNC, NC
State point
guards drive
teams into
Sweet 16
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) —
Triangle neighbors Duke,
North Carolina and North
Carolina State are getting
top-notch play at the point.
It’s a big reason why they’re
headed to the NCAA
Tournament’s Sweet 16
together for the first time in
a decade.
The freshman-senior duo
of Tyus Jones and Quinn
Cook gives the Blue Devils a
pair of proven playmaking
scorers. For the Tar Heels, a
healthier Marcus Paige is
back to knocking down big
shots. And the Wolfpack’s
Anthony “Cat” Barber
keeps sprinting by defenders in the open court.
They’re battle-tested,
including against one another.
“They’re all very competitive — you’re going against
the best and you want to
perform against the best,”
said Jeff Capel, Duke’s associate head coach who played
some point for the Blue
Devils in the 1990s. “I think
it’s helped make them all
better.
“I’m sure our guys are
looking at, ‘What did Barber
do? What did Paige do?’
Paige is looking at, ‘What
did Barber do?’ They’re all
looking. That’s what competitors do.”
North Carolina’s Triangle
region features three
Atlantic Coast Conference
programs — Duke in
Durham, UNC in Chapel
Hill, N.C. State in Raleigh —
with about a 30-minute drive
between any of the three
campuses.
They’ve combined for 11
NCAA titles, but this is only
the fourth time they’ve all
gone to the Sweet 16 in the
same year, the others were
1986, 1989 and 2005, according to STATS.
Duke (31-4) was expected
to get there as the No. 1 seed
in the NCAA’s South Region.
So was North Carolina (2611), the West’s No. 4 seed
which survived the opening
weekend for the first time
since 2012.
But N.C. State (22-13) is
one of the tournament’s top
stories after rallying from 16
down to beat LSU on a lastsecond shot and then stunning top-seeded Villanova.
Also in the Sweet 16 for
the first time since 2012, the
East’s No. 8 seed earned its
first win against a No. 1
seed since coach Jim
Valvano led that memorable
“Cardiac Pack” championship run in 1983.
Guard play has been huge
for all three teams.
SEE SWEET 16, PAGE B8
Gray picked him off. Braun had another single in the
fourth.
“We faced a tough pitcher,” Milwaukee manager Ron
Roenicke said.
Nolan Arenado hit a leadoff drive in the second against
Brewers starter Tyler Thornburg. It was his fourth homer
of the spring.
Gerardo Parra, a two-time Gold Glove outfielder, started
at first base for Milwaukee.
“There wasn’t enough there, but he looked comfortable,”
Roenicke said.
STARTING TIME
Brewers: Thornburg gave up only one more hit in four
innings, striking out four in his second spring start. The
right-hander is being stretched out in case he’s needed as
a starter, but could end up in a long-relief role.
Rockies: Gray was helped by his defense, as Carlos
Gonzalez made a diving catch in right field, and Troy
Tulowitzki and Rafael Ynoa made nice plays in the
infield.
RISKY MOVE
Weiss knows what many were thinking following
Chacin’s release.
“It is a risk,” Weiss said. “We’ve cut ties with a major
league pitcher. There’s risk in that. We’re willing — I
don’t know if I want to say roll the dice — but we’re willing to make the move because we feel like there’s talent
that’s on the brink.”
College rodeo kicks off spring season
COURTESY PHOTO | TIM GOESSMAN/GILLETTE NEWS RECORD
Sheridan's Kane Butcher scores a time of 23.3 seconds in the steer wrestling event during the Gillette College Rodeo Friday at Cam-plex East Pavilion.
SC rodeo team hits the dirt
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Sheridan College’s first spring rodeo held over the
weekend didn’t quite go as coach Marc Gilkerson had hoped.
The Generals traveled to Gillette for their first of five rodeos this
spring but weren’t able to bring home many points. Only four athletes
made it to Sunday’s championship round but ended up on the wrong
end of some penalties.
For the women, Katy Miller ended the goat tying long go with a time
of 7.8 seconds, which tied her for third, but the goat kicked free in the
short go to give her no time. Kaylee Reimler’s 14.68-second run in barrel racing earned her another run, but two knocked over barrels cost
her in the short go.
For the men, Cody Trainor’s 11.5 seconds put him fourth in calf roping before a barrier break added 10 seconds to his time in the short go.
Dayton Johnston started things off with a bang in bull riding, scoring
72 points to win the long go. He drew another good bull in the short go
but didn’t make it eight seconds for a qualified ride.
The Generals will look to bounce back this weekend when they travel
to Torrington. Including the Torrington rodeo, Sheridan has four more Sheridan's Blaze Cress rides in the saddle bronc event during the Gillette College
Rodeo Friday at Cam-plex East Pavilion.
college rodeos left this spring.
Not the smoothest road to the Masters for McIlroy
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Rory McIlroy’s road
to the Masters was memorable for reasons not
many would have imagined.
He missed the cut at the Honda Classic. He
was missing a club at the Cadillac
Championship when he flung his 3-iron into a
lake. And his highlight at the Arnold Palmer
Invitational was eating a banana split after
dinner with the King.
“He went into it like it was the last supper,”
Palmer said.
It wasn’t pretty, but there was no reason for
McIlroy to panic.
He finished off the Florida swing with two
birdies on the last three holes for a 2-under 70,
eight shots behind Matt Every at Bay Hill. He
tied for ninth at Doral, though he was still
eight shots behind Dustin Johnson and never
really featured on the weekend.
In 10 rounds over three tournaments, he
broke 70 only once.
Before heading home to South Florida for
two weeks of work before the Masters, he was
asked if he should be the favorite at Augusta
National.
‘Given how I’ve been playing, I guess
if you go on form, then probably no. But it
depends how far you take that for back, and
you’ve got to look at previous results...’
Rory McIlroy
Professional golfer
“Given how I’ve been playing, I guess if you
go on form, then probably no,” McIlroy said.
“But it depends how far you take that for back,
and you’ve got to look at previous results
there and all sorts of stuff.”
There was no right way to answer the question, so he made an artful escape by adding,
“I’m not a bookie.”
But he is the favorite.
And there will be loads of pressure on
McIlroy. The opportunity is too great.
Not since Lee Trevino in 1991 has a player
gone to the Masters with a chance to complete
the Grand Slam. Trevino never cared for
Augusta National, never seriously contended
there and besides, he was 51. McIlroy had a
four-shot lead going into the final round in
2011 and shot 80.
He knows he can play there. He’s only 25.
And he’s No. 1 in the world.
SEE MASTERS, PAGE B8
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
Proposal to owners: order unstable player off field
PHOENIX (AP) — The NFL might be giving more power
to its in-game medical observers.
One of two dozen proposals the owners are considering
at this week’s meetings would stop the action to remove a
wobbly player from the field. That would be the call of the
medical advisers upstairs if they sense a player is disoriented.
On a busy Monday when the league announced it would
drop local TV blackouts for the 2015 season, player safety
and catches vs. no catches also were prime topics.
Millions of viewers and thousands of fans saw a wobbly
Julian Edelman remain in the Super Bowl. After looking
at video of that situation and several similar ones, the
NFL’s powerful competition committee is proposing a
change.
“We’ve got the (medical) spotters,” said Rich McKay,
president of the Atlanta Falcons and co-chairman of the
committee. “They’ve got a really good vantage point,
they’ve got technology in their booth, they’re communicating pretty well with our trainers and doctors and we’ve got
a pretty good rhythm going there.
“And maybe this becomes the fail-safe. We do not expect
this to be a rule that gets used a lot. We expect it to be a
fail-safe when people just don’t see this player and the distress the player may have had, the spotter does and stops
the game.”
‘And maybe this becomes the fail-safe. We do
not expect this to be a rule that gets used a lot.’
Rich McKay
President, Atlanta Falcons and co-chair of committee
The player would be removed from the game and undergo an examination on the sideline at the very least.
The player’s team would be allowed to substitute for him,
and the opposite team also would be given a chance to
change personnel.
Several other proposals have to do with player safety,
with a few also involving instant replay. Indeed, video
replay suggestions from the teams make up 13 of the suggested alterations.
Other proposed changes include using replay for reviewing all penalties called by game officials — yes, pass interference and holding calls, too; all personal fouls; penalties
against defenseless players; any foul that results in an
automatic first down; and clock issues.
New England even proposed that everything except scoring plays or turnovers be challengeable, and Washington
suggested increasing the number of coach’s challenges
from two to three, regardless of whether he is successful
on an early challenge.
Owners will vote on some of the proposals in the next
two days, with several likely being tabled until the next
major meetings in May.
The competition committee does not endorse using
replay for penalties.
SEE RULE, PAGE B8
SCOREBOARD |
PRO RODEO LEADERS |
Pro Rodeo Leaders
By The Associated Press
Through March 22
All-around
1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas $43,822
2. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb., $20,032
3. Clint Robinson, Spanish Fork, Utah, $18,144
4. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo., $17,001
5. Clayton Hass, Terrell, Texas, $12,786
6. Eli Lord, Sturgis, S.D., $12,757
7. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas, $11,510
8. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah, $11,258
9. Wesley Brunson, Terry, Miss. $10,442
10. Trenten Montero, Winnemucca, Nev. $6,581
Bareback Riding
1. Kaycee Feild, Spanish Fork, Utah $34,432
2. Austin Foss, Terrebonne, Ore., $32,303
3. Tim O’Connell, Zwingle, Iowa $29,570
4. Seth Hardwick, Laramie, Wyo. $29,317
5. Evan Jayne, Marseille, France $26,626
6. Caleb Bennett, Tremonton, Utah $24,544
7. Bobby Mote, Stephenville, Texas $23,330
8. David Peebles, Redmond, Ore. $22,864
9. Luke Creasy, Lovington, N.M. $22,132
10. Ryan Gray, Cheney, Wash. $21,708
11. Tanner Aus, Granite Falls, Minn. $18,119
12. Tyler Nelson, Victor, Idaho $17,843
13. Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas $14,445
14. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. $13,319
15. Winn Ratliff, Leesville, La. $12,549
16. George Gillespie IV, Hamilton, Mont. $12,530
17. Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas $11,828
18. Kash Wilson, Gooding, Idaho $11,823
19. Orin Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba $11,478
20. Bill Tutor, Huntsville, Texas $9,848
Steer Wrestling
1. Seth Brockman, Wheatland, Wyo. $27,044
2. Hunter Cure, Holliday, Texas, $25,599
3. Ty Erickson, Helena, Mont., $23,215
4. Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho, $23,006
5. Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif., $22,554
6. Beau Clark, Belgrade, Mont., $18,972
7. K.C. Jones, Decatur, Texas, $18,797
8. Dirk Tavenner, Rigby, Idaho, $18,460
9. Tyler Pearson, Louisville, Miss. $17,945
10. Adam Strahan, McKinney, Texas $17,248
11. Baylor Roche, Tremonton, Utah $16,978
12. Kyle Irwin, Robertsdale, Ala. $16,579
13. Cody Cabral, Hilo, Hawaii $16,058
14. Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis. $15,903
15. Matthew Mousseau, Hensall, Ontario $13,779
16. Casey Martin, Sulphur, La. $12,972
17. Blake Knowles, Heppner, Ore. $11,790
18. Darrell Petry, Cheek, Texas $11,371
19. Rhett Kennedy, Chowchilla, Calif. $9,990
20. Jason Thomas, Benton, Ark. $9,738
Team Roping (header)
1. Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont. $32,091
2. Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, Ariz., $24,470
3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas, $23,504
4. Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga., $21,034
5. Tyler Wade, Terrell, Texas, $21,013
6. Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz., $19,842
7. Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore., $18,253
8. Jesse Stipes, Salina, Okla., $16,440
9. Nick Sartain, Dover, Okla., $16,279
10. Jake Barnes, Scottsdale, Ariz., $14,465
11. Bubba Buckaloo, Caddo, Okla., $14,292
12. Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M., $14,130
13. Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash., $14,124
14. Doyle Hoskins, Chualar, Calif., $13,637
15. Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn. $13,341
16. Jake Orman, Prairie, Miss. $12,615
17. Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz. $12,510
18. Coleman Proctor, Pryor, Okla. $12,105
19. Cale Markham, Vinita, Okla. $11,536
20. Ty Blasingame, Ramah, Colo. $11,259
Team Roping (heeler)
1. Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev. $32,091
2. Travis Woodard, Stockton, Calif., $26,605
3. Clay O’Brien Cooper, Gardnerville, Nev., $26,550
4. Patrick Smith, Lipan, Texas, $23,504
5. Kinney Harrell, Marshall, Texas, $22,133
6. Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz., $19,842
7. Shay Carroll, La Junta, Colo., $18,253
8. Rich Skelton, Llano, Texas, $16,279
9. Buddy Hawkins II, Columbus, Kan., $15,838
10. Billie Jack Saebens, Nowata, Okla., $15,340
11. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore., $15,104
12. Junior Nogueira, Scottsdale, Ariz., $14,465
13. Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash., $14,124
14. Quinn Kesler, Holden, Utah, $12,510
15. Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan., $12,105
16. Tyler Domingue, Dekalb, Texas, $11,383
17. J.W. Borrego, Weston, Colo., $11,259
18. Jeremy Buhler, Abbotsford, British Columbia,
$10,639
19. Travis Graves, Jay, Okla. $10,301
20. Brad Culpepper, Sylvester, Ga. $9,096
Saddle Bronc Riding
1. Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La. $55,068
2. Spencer Wright, Milford, Utah, $41,251
3. Rusty Wright, Milford, Utah, $30,806
4. Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M., $24,792
5. Joe Lufkin, Sallisaw, Okla., $23,948
6. Wade Sundell, Colman, Okla., $20,786
7. Jake Wright, Milford, Utah, $18,273
8. Clay Elliott, Nanton, Alberta, $16,988
9. Bradley Harter, Loranger, La. $15,736
10. Chad Ferley, Oelrichs, S.D. $15,529
11. Allen Boore, Axtell, Utah $12,824
12. Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb. $12,731
13. Sterling Crawley, Stephenville, Texas $12,416
14. Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah $12,245
15. Zeke Thurston, Big Valley, Alberta $11,990
16. Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D. $11,041
17. Jesse Bail, Camp Crook, S.D. $10,435
18. Tyrel Larsen, Inglis, Manitoba $9,860
19. Jacobs Crawley, Stephenville, Texas $9,700
20. Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La. $9,678
Tie-down Roping
1. Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas $39,012
2. Monty Lewis, Hereford, Texas, $31,895
3. Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas, $28,850
4. Marty Yates, Stephenville, Texas, $23,639
5. Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla., $22,726
6. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas, $21,074
7. Chase Williams, Stephenville, Texas, $20,731
8. Sterling Smith, Stephenville, Texas $19,924
9. Blair Burk, Hermiston, Ore. $19,054
10. Adam Gray, Seymour, Texas $16,900
11. Bart Brunson, Terry, Miss. $16,469
12. Clint Robinson, Spanish Fork, Utah $14,582
13. Jordan Ketscher, Squaw Valley, Calif. $13,146
14. Ace Slone, Cuero, Texas $13,018
15. Dane Kissack, Spearfish, S.D. $12,444
16. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas $12,367
17. J.C. Malone, Roy, Utah $12,352
18. Michael Otero, Lowndesboro, Ala. $11,003
19. Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas $10,855
20. Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho $10,595
Steer Roping
1. Neal Wood, Needville, Texas $34,785
2. Mike Chase, McAlester, Okla. $27,429
3. Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas $26,027
4. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas $21,206
5. Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas $19,357
6. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, S.D. $17,044
7. Shay Good, Midland, Texas $16,567
8. Jarrett Blessing, Paradise, Texas $14,742
9. Scott Snedecor, Fredericksburg, Texas $13,708
10. Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan. $11,246
11. Troy Tillard, Douglas, Wyo. $10,961
12. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas $9,564
13. Ralph Williams, Skiatook, Okla. $8,694
14. Lawson Plemons, Axtell, Texas $8,226
15. Brady Garten, Claremore, Okla. $7,735
16. Jason Evans, Huntsville, Texas $7,301
17. Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla. $7,177
18. J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla. $6,858
19. Chance Kelton, Mayer, Ariz. $6,846
20. Guy Allen, Santa Anna, Texas $6,292
Bull Riding
1. Sage Kimzey, Strong City, Okla. $45,555
2. Tanner Learmont, Cleburne, Texas $33,403
3. Chandler Bownds, Lubbock, Texas $32,654
4. Wesley Silcox, Santaquin, Utah $30,547
5. Parker Breding, Edgar, Mont. $28,078
6. Brennon Eldred, Sulphur, Okla. $27,923
7. Joe Frost, Randlett, Utah $27,339
8. Reid Barker, Comfort, Texas $25,013
9. Cody Teel, Kountze, Texas $22,888
10. Trevor Kastner, Ardmore, Okla. $20,998
11. Brett Stall, Detroit Lakes, Minn. $20,773
12. Caleb Sanderson, Kissimmee, Fla. $17,230
13. Zeb Lanham, Sweet, Idaho $16,975
14. Ardie Maier, Timber Lake, S.D. $16,609
15. Zack Oakes, Tonasket, Wash. $16,419
16. Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah $16,225
17. Nile Lebaron, Weatherford, Texas $14,872
18. Bobby Welsh, Gillette, Wyo. $14,034
19. Clayton Foltyn, Winnie, Texas $13,997
20. Clayton Savage, Yoder, Wyo. $13,889
Barrel Racing
1. Nancy Hunter, Neola, Utah $55,900
2. Sarah Rose McDonald, Brunswick, Ga. $53,374
3. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D. $44,211
4. Alexa Lake, Richmond, Texas $38,783
5. Callie Duperier, Boerne, Texas $37,665
6. Fallon Taylor, Collinsville, Texas $36,256
7. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz. $32,630
9. Meghan Johnson, Deming, N.M. $26,001
8. Victoria Williams, Kiln, Miss. $25,808
10. Layna Kight, Ocala, Fla. $24,333
11. Jana Bean, Fort Hancock, Texas $23,748
12. Kaley Bass, Kissimmee, Fla. $23,055
13. Cassidy Kruse, Gillette, Texas $22,152
14. Kelly Tovar, Rockdale, Texas $20,997
15. Shelly Anzick, Livingston, Texas $20,356
16. Kenna Squires, Fredonia, Texas $18,110
17. Shelby Janssen, Coleman, Okla. $17,341
18. Megan Swint, Lithia, Texas $16,344
19. Britany Diaz, Solen, N.D. $16,002
20. Shelby Herrmann, Stephenville, Texas $15,362
NHL |
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
Montreal
73
46
20
Tampa Bay
73
45
21
Detroit
71
39
21
Ottawa
72
37
24
Boston
73
36
25
Florida
72
33
25
Toronto
74
27
41
Buffalo
73
20
46
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
L
N.Y. Rangers 71
46
18
N.Y. Islanders 73
44
25
Pittsburgh
72
40
22
Washington
73
39
24
Philadelphia
74
29
29
New Jersey
73
31
31
Columbus
72
33
35
Carolina
72
26
36
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
St. Louis
73
45
21
Nashville
73
44
21
Chicago
72
44
22
Minnesota
73
41
25
Winnipeg
73
38
23
Dallas
73
35
28
Colorado
72
33
27
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
Anaheim
74
46
21
Vancouver
72
42
26
Calgary
73
40
27
Los Angeles 72
35
23
San Jose
73
35
30
Edmonton
73
20
40
Arizona
73
21
44
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
loss.
Monday’s Games
Los Angeles 3, New Jersey 1
Chicago 3, Carolina 1
Minnesota 2, Toronto 1
Ottawa 5, San Jose 2
Dallas 4, Buffalo 3
Calgary 3, Colorado 2
Winnipeg 4, Edmonton 1
Tuesday’s Games
Minnesota at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Arizona at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Nashville, 8 p.m.
COURTESY PHOTO | TIM GOESSMAN/GILLETTE NEWS RECORD
Roping, riding in Gillette rodeo
Sheridan's Cash Hetzel, left, and Gillette's Matt Peters, right, compete in the team roping event during the Gillette College
Rodeo Friday at Cam-plex East Pavilion.
Winnipeg at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Anaheim at Boston, 7 p.m.
Arizona at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Florida at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
SPRING TRAINING |
OT
7
7
11
11
12
14
6
7
Pts
99
97
89
85
84
80
60
47
OT
7
4
10
10
16
11
4
10
Pts
99
92
90
88
74
73
70
62
OT
7
8
6
7
12
10
12
Pts
97
96
94
89
88
80
78
OT Pts
7 99
4 88
6 86
14 84
8 78
13 53
8 50
for overtime
Spring Training Glance
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W
L
Pct
Kansas City
13
8
.619
Los Angeles 11
7
.611
Toronto
12
8
.600
Oakland
13
9
.591
New York
12
9
.571
Boston
10
8
.556
Houston
8
8
.500
Seattle
9
9
.500
Tampa Bay
9
9
.500
Cleveland
9
11
.450
Minnesota
8
10
.444
Chicago
7
10
.412
Texas
7
10
.412
Baltimore
8
13
.381
Detroit
7
14
.333
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W
L
Pct
Los Angeles 11
6
.647
Arizona
12
9
.571
New York
12
9
.571
St. Louis
9
7
.563
Pittsburgh
10
8
.556
Colorado
11
9
.550
Miami
10
9
.526
Cincinnati
9
9
.500
Philadelphia
10
10
.500
San Diego
10
10
.500
Washington
9
9
.500
Chicago
9
11
.450
Atlanta
9
12
.429
Milwaukee
8
11
.421
San Francisco 6
16
.273
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings;
games against non-major league teams do not.
___
Monday’s Games
Pittsburgh 7, Tampa Bay 6
Atlanta 14, Houston 10
N.Y. Mets 12, Miami 3
Philadelphia 3, Minnesota 0
Washington 7, N.Y. Yankees 6
St. Louis vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., ccd.,
Unplayable conditions
L.A. Dodgers 7, Arizona 4
San Diego 10, Chicago White Sox 4
San Francisco 8, Kansas City 3
Cleveland 8, Oakland 3
L.A. Angels 5, Seattle 0
Colorado 5, Milwaukee 1
Texas 6, Cincinnati 6, tie, 10 innings
Tuesday’s Games
Toronto vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Boston vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 1:10
p.m.
Colorado vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Oakland at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 9:40
p.m.
San Francisco vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Washington vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Miami vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Oakland vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Kansas City at Surprise,
Ariz., 9:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 10:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 10:05
p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Atlanta vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:07 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Kansas City vs. Seattle (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Seattle (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10
p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 5:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 7:05
p.m.
Colorado vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EDT
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
Toronto
42
28
.600
Boston
31
39
.443
Brooklyn
29
40
.420
Philadelphia
17
53
.243
New York
14
57
.197
Southeast Division
GB
—
11
12½
25
28½
W
L
Pct
GB
y-Atlanta
53
17
.757
—
Washington
40
31
.563
13½
Miami
32
37
.464
20½
Charlotte
30
39
.435
22½
Orlando
22
50
.306
32
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
x-Cleveland
46
26
.639
—
x-Chicago
43
29
.597
3
Milwaukee
34
36
.486
11
Indiana
30
40
.429
15
Detroit
26
44
.371
19
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
x-Memphis
50
21
.704
—
Houston
47
23
.671
2½
San Antonio
44
25
.638
5
Dallas
44
27
.620
6
New Orleans 37
33
.529
12½
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Portland
44
24
.647
—
Oklahoma City 40
30
.571
5
Utah
31
39
.443
14
Denver
27
44
.380
18½
Minnesota
16
54
.229
29
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
GB
x-Golden State 57
13
.814
—
L.A. Clippers 46
25
.648
11½
Phoenix
38
33
.535
19½
Sacramento
24
45
.348
32½
L.A. Lakers
18
50
.265
38
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
___
Sunday’s Games
Oklahoma City 93, Miami 75
Cleveland 108, Milwaukee 90
San Antonio 114, Atlanta 95
L.A. Clippers 107, New Orleans 100
Toronto 106, New York 89
Sacramento 109, Washington 86
Denver 119, Orlando 100
Detroit 105, Boston 97, OT
Charlotte 109, Minnesota 98
Phoenix 98, Dallas 92
L.A. Lakers 101, Philadelphia 87
Monday’s Games
Houston 110, Indiana 100
Boston 110, Brooklyn 91
Memphis 103, New York 82
Chicago 98, Charlotte 86
Minnesota 106, Utah 104, OT
Golden State 107, Washington 76
Tuesday’s Games
Toronto at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Golden State at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Indiana at Washington, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at New York, 7 p.m.
Miami at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Memphis, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 9 p.m.
Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
0324_A Section Template 3/24/15 8:19 AM Page 1
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
HAND-WASHING DISHES
IS GOOD FOR YOUR
IMMUNE SYSTEM
Iron Chef Masaharu
Morimoto, a superstar on
"Iron Chef America," once
said: "Japanese chefs believe
our soul goes into our knives
once we start using them.
You wouldn't put your soul in
a dishwasher!"
He's right; that modern utility isn't very soulful, but for a
newly discovered and surprising reason. A Swedish
study found that kids who
grow up in households using
dishwashers are more likely
to develop allergies, eczema
and asthma than kids in
households where dishes are
hand-washed. (In the same
vein, another study found
that if parents clean off their
kid's pacifier by sucking on
it, the children develop fewer
allergies.)
The researchers followed
over 1,000 7- and 8-year-olds.
They found that 38 percent of
kids whose parents had dishwashers reported eczema,
while only 23 percent of
hand-washers did. And in
dishwasher families, 7.3 percent of the kids developed
asthma, while only 1.7 per-
cent of kids in hand-washing
families did.
Why? Well, it could be
another vote for the hygiene
hypothesis. That theory says
our lack of exposure to
microbes makes us susceptible to autoimmune disease,
allergies, etc. Perhaps a dishwasher's wash-and-dry cycles
don't leave any immune-system-strengthening germs on
dishes for us to ingest.
But we're not saying you
should give up your dishwasher (it may be soulless,
but it sure is convenient);
just don't get oversanitized.
Lose the antibacterial soaps
and household cleaners; they
trigger antibiotic resistance,
and their chemicals often
include hormone disruptors!
Trust your immune system.
Soap, water and elbow grease
to do a fine job.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: The letter you
printed from "Gun-Shy in
South Carolina" (March 5),
about the antics of her guntoting, alcoholic father-in-law,
caught my attention. I'm a
former mental health clinician and program inspector. I
discussed that letter with a
friend who is a psychiatrist.
"Grandpa" has probably
already violated a municipal
ordinance regarding discharging a firearm in corpo-
rate limits. I agree with you
that he has endangered his
grandchildren. My friend
advised that, according to the
local interpretation of mental health statutes, Grandpa
might be eligible for involuntary commitment and evaluation in a psychiatric facility.
He could be disarmed by the
police, if necessary.
"Gun-Shy" should heed her
motherly instincts, stay home
and refuse to visit Grandpa
until he enters treatment.
Otherwise there's a high
probability that she will
mourn the loss of one or
more dead children.
Grandpa seems to think
that booze and guns make
him brave. A brave person is
a military medic, a member
of the U.S. Coast Guard and
the thousands of first responders who demonstrate their
bravery by saving human
lives, not threatening them.
In fact, many Medal of Honor
recipients earn the award not
by the number of enemies
killed, but lives saved. -RESPONSIBLE GUN OWNER
IN PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR RESPONSIBLE: I
agree. Some readers felt I
should have been tougher in
my response, and that GunShy and her children should
not visit Grandpa at all.
Failure to act on her fears is
called child endangerment
and could result in the children being taken away.
Readers let me have it with
both barrels:
DEAR ABBY: Your answer
to "Gun-Shy" was off the
mark! As a vet and former
law enforcement officer, I
think the whole family is in
"wimp" mode. For adults to
watch a drunk adult fire a
gun in the air around his
family and not call 911 was
ignorant and dangerous. ALL
states have laws about firing
guns in the air (illegal), firing guns while drunk (illegal), unsecured loaded
weapons (illegal), and firing
guns around children in a
home environment (illegal).
That jerk should have been
arrested! -- SMOKEY IN
FLORIDA
DEAR ABBY: Thank you
for reminding your readers
that when someone shoots a
gun into the air, the bullet
comes down somewhere. A
child near my hometown
died last New Year's Eve
when she stepped outside
with her grandmother to
watch the fireworks and a
bullet fell to earth and lodged
in her brain. The police
believe the gun may have
been fired from a few miles
away. -- CHRISTINA IN
MARYLAND
DEAR ABBY: Why didn't
you suggest a family intervention for the grandfather's
alcoholism? The family could
be helped by going to AlAnon to learn how to detach
with love from his disease.
Alcoholics need to understand how their drinking
affects them and others.
Possible estrangement from
his grandchildren might be a
way to break through his
denial. -- STEVE C. IN SAN
FRANCISCO
DEAR ABBY: My friend
Michelle died last July
Fourth. She was killed
because someone fired a gun
into the air. She was beautiful, talented and left behind a
fiance, a mother, a sister and
many friends. She was
receiving her Ph.D., was a
brilliant researcher for the
CDC and had just picked up
her wedding gown. She was
the victim of a senseless act
caused by someone's carelessness. -- MARSHA IN
MICHIGAN
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
Fax: (307) 672-7950
www.thesheridanpress.com
TO PLACE YOUR AD
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DEADLINES
B5
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Adoption
LOVING, SECURE life
awaits 1st baby.
Expenses pd. Penny &
Kevin. 1-888-772-0068.
Household Goods
FUTON SOLID WOOD
frame, new cover, full
size. Exc. cond. Free
delivery in Sheridan
area. $225. 752-3065.
USED DRYER. $25.
Call 307-660-4966.
Miscellaneous for Sale
MARY KAY products
for sale. Call for
details.
307-660-4966.
Lawn & Garden Eq.
18" TORO SELFPROPELLED MOWER.
Extra blade & gas can.
$200. 673-1329.
Musical Instruments
BASIC
TECHNIQUES of
Singing. AMAZE
Your Friends at
Karaoke! SHINE in
Your Church Choir!
ROCK Your Metal
Band! Call Kristi at
307-763-3412.
For Lease
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Broadway Apts.
2 bdrm, 1 bath
townhouse
Available in
Dayton, WY.
NEWLY REMODELED
1BR. Garage w/
opener. Central A/C.
W/D. Storage area. No
smoking. $600 + util.
307-751-5815.
Rent based on
income.
Please call
307-751-1752 or
1-888-387-7368
Toll-Free for application
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Furnished Apts for Rent
1BR. NO smk/pets.
$575 + elec + dep.
Coin-Op W/D.
307-674-5838.
STAGE STOP MOTEL
CLEAN. Weekly &
Monthly rates. Internet,
cable & utilities incl.
307-672-2477.
WKLY FR $210.
Monthly fr $630.
Americas Best Value
aInn. 307-672-9757.
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
CLEAN/QUIET 1BR.
732 W. Burkitt.
$625mo. incl. h/w/s.
Garage. No smk/pets.
307-752-4066.
2 BR/1 BA. dwnstrs.
apt. C/A & heat. Pets
approve w/ dep. W/D.
Fncd. yd. $750 + util. +
sec. dep. Avail. immed.
Call 307-674-7894
2
B
R
.
WASHER/DRYER.
$600 + Dep + Elec. No
smkg/pets. Lease. Call
for appt. 307-752-4735.
LARGE LOFT
overlooking Main St.
1400+/- SF. W/D.
Cable, internet, utilities
included. $975/mo.
307-751-3401.
RANCHESTER
STUDIO apt.,
$450/mo.+ heat & dep.,
util. pd. No smk. Pets?
Laundry rm. incl.
307-751-4060.
EXTRA LG. 2 BR. Low
utils. $625/mo. + $500
dep. 1 yr. lease. Ref's
req'd. 307-751-2445.
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
SHERIDAN 2BR house.
Att. garage, patio, nice
yard. W/D. A/C. No
smk/pets. Ref. req.
$800+dep.+util. 6559350 leave msg.
Duplexes, Unfurn. for
Rent
Storage Space
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
WOODLANDPARK
STORAGE.COM
5211 Coffeen
Call 674-7355
New Spaces
Available!
CIELO STORAGE
307-752-3904
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd.
307-752-6111.
SPACIOUS
2BR/1.5
Ba. $1045. 752-3665.
$150/MO. 13' x 31'
room. Dock. Overhead
Mobile Hm. Space for
Rent
door. 307-256-6170.
RV SPACE, Big Horn.
Child Care
By day, month or year.
ENERGETIC
AND
674-7718.
OUTGOING
NANNY
Office Space for Rent
needed for 3 children
2500 SQ FT Office (ages 5, 5 & 8) for
Retail space w/ parking. 8hr/day M-F for months
1415 N. Main. 752-4662 of June, July & Aug.
Previous exp. needed
CORNER SUITE w/
Must
MTN VIEWS. 1,000 sq. w/references.
have own transportation
ft. 2 private offices,
conference & reception w/valid DL. CPR cert
areas. Utilities included. preferred. Must pass
background check. $10672-8700.
$12hr depending on
Storage Space
exp. Send reply to Box
DOWNER ADDITION
225, c/o The Sheridan
STORAGE 674-1792
Press, PO Box 2006,
E L D O R A D O Sheridan, WY 82801.
STORAGE Helping you
Work Wanted
conquer space. 3856
Coffeen. 672-7297.
HOUSE
PAINTING,
general labor, cleaning
& cleanup. New Ref's.
683-7814 (cell).
Help Wanted
ROOFING LABORERS
NEEDED
Call 307-278-0314
NOW TAKING
applications for Kitchen
Manager, Assistant
General Manager, Line
Cooks, Servers w/ exp.
& Host/ Hostesses. AM
& PM shifts avail. Apply
in person at 1373
Coffeen Ave or online at
www.
pleaseapplyonline.com/
sugarlandenterprises.
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
Help Wanted
THE CITY of
SHERIDAN is actively
recruiting an energetic
and dynamic
individual with
excellent skills in
customer service and
multitasking for the
Full Time position of
Administrative
Assistant for the
Utilities Division.
This position is
responsible for
performing
administrative and
secretarial duties in
support of department
operations, including
but not limited to,
maintaining
department files,
answering phones and
walk-in customer
inquiries, and
preparing
correspondence. This
is a fully benefited
position including
health, dental, vision,
and life insurance,
state pension
retirement, tuition
reimbursement, paid
time off and a
wellness program.
The hiring range is
$17.17- $18.97/hour
DOE. Candidates
must pass a
comprehensive
background check.
Qualified applicants
should submit a
completed City of
Sheridan job
application to City
Hall, 55 Grinnell Plaza
by 4/3/15. Full job
description, required
minimum
qualifications and
application
can be found at
www.sheridanwy.net.
The City of Sheridan
is a drug-free work
place.
LOCAL SUBWAY NOW
HIRING all shifts &
positions: Management
& Sandwich Artists.
Call 307-217-1998
for interviews.
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
MULLINAX
CONCRETE is now
hiring CDL Drivers –
Class A & B. Full Time
Benefited positions.
Please apply in
person at 615 Fort
Road.
Drug Free & EOE.
Now Hiring
Overnight
Security
Maintenance
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the
Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
VACUTECH/CAD
MECHANICAL Drafter /
Auto CAD / Autodesk
Inventor
Vacutech a Sheridan,
WY manufacturer of
central vacuum systems
is looking for a person
with 3 to 5 yrs
experience working with
design teams to create
manufacturing
drawings. Tripling sales
in the last 3 years we
are expanding our CAD
Dept. Send your
resume to
[email protected]
for consideration.
SCSD #1 has the
following extra duty
positions available.
*BHHS Volleyball
Head Coach
*TRHS Volleyball
Head Coach
Please complete the
extra-duty application
(found on district
website) and return it
to Brandi Miller [email protected]
sheridan.k12.wy.us
If you have position
specific questions
please call the
perspective HS
Principal.
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us. Positions are open
until filled. E.O.E.
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.thesheridanpress.com
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
TRUCKS AND SUV’S
‘14 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 LTZ
‘14 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT
‘14 CHEVY TRAVERSE
‘12 INFINITY FX AWD
‘11 FORD F-150
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO LTZ
‘12 CHEVY 1500 CREW LT
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500 HD
‘14 FORD EDGE
‘10 FORD EXPEDITION
‘12 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘06 GMC SIERRA 2500 HD
‘12 CHEVY SILVERADO
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
49,995
42,495
38,495
34,495
31,995
31,995
29,995
29,995
29,995
29,495
28,995
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$
$
$
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$
27,995
27,495
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25,495
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14,995
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11,995
$ 8,995
‘11 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘09 CHEVY SILVERADO
‘12 FORD F-150
‘09 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500
‘06 CHEVY 2500 DUALLY
‘14 JEEP COMPASS
‘14 CHEVY CAPTIVA
‘08 DODGE DAKOTA
‘05 DODGE RAM 1500
‘11 CHEVY EQUINOX
‘05 FORD F-150
‘05 HONDA PILOT
‘15 BUICK LACROSSE
$ 28,495
‘14 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
$ 17,495
‘14 CHEVY IMPALA
$ 23,495
‘10 VOLKSWAGON JETTA
$ 15,495
‘12 INFINITY G25X
$ 22,995
‘13 NISSAN SENTRA
$ 14,995
‘11 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-L
$ 21,495
‘12 FORD FUSION SE
$ 14,495
‘09 CADILLAC CTS
$ 20,495
‘13 CHEVY CRUZE
$ 13,995
‘14 TOYOTA COROLLA S
$ 18,995
‘09 TOYOTA CAMRY
$ 12,995
Foerars!
78 y
107 E. ALGER
307.674.6419
OPEN SATURDAYS UNTIL 4PM
23,495
28,495
$
$
Sheridan’s only full service dealership
2014 Chevy Impala
2015 Buick Lacrosse
on facebook at www.facebook.com/hammerchevy
www.hammerchevy.com
Hints from Heloise
Shut It Down, or Let It Sleep?
Dear Readers: With so many
ELECTRONIC DEVICES in
homes today, it's important to
save energy when possible. But
which is better when it comes
to personal computers -- placing the computer in sleep
mode, or turning off the power
completely?
When you purchase a new
computer, immediately activate the power-management
feature, which sets up the sleep
mode (it's not automatically set
up). After a period of inactivity,
the sleep-mode feature will
make the computer "go to
sleep" and start saving energy.
Just setting up this feature will
save hundreds of dollars over
time, and is considered more
important, long term, than
shutting off the computer each
time you walk away from it.
If you don't plan to use your
computer for at least two
hours, though, it is recommended that you turn it off
completely. At the very least,
try to remember to turn the
computer completely off at the
end of each day. A power strip
helps, since it's an easy, onebutton method for shutting
Heloise
down for the night
all electronics that
are plugged into it. - Heloise
SAMPLE OVERLOAD
Dear Heloise: Recently, I noticed that gifts and
little sample bottles of lotions,
cosmetics and so forth had
taken over my medicine cabinet and were making inroads
into my linen closet. So, here's
my three-part plan:
First, I got rid of everything
that had expired.
Second, I put items that were
good but really didn't interest
me into a box for a women's
shelter that my workplace supports.
That left a more reasonable
amount, and now I choose a
"goodie of the week" to try. It's
really fun! To keep from getting
another backlog, if another gift
or sample comes in, I give it or
an old one away. -- Susie, via
email
I.C.E. NUMBERS
Dear Heloise: As a service
technician who travels up to
800 miles a week on the road, I
worry about my dog being
home alone. I've always used
Help Wanted
Help Wanted, Medical
Autos-Accessories
TAKING
APPLICATIONS for a
Big Horn High School
Principal. Must have a
Master’s in school
administration. Must
have eligibility for a
Standard
Administrative
Certificate with
endorsement of
Principal K-12 as
issued by the WY
Professional Teaching
Standards Board.
Beginning date: 20152016 contract year –
approximately July 30,
2015. Please visit
district website,
www.sheridan.k12.wy.
us for more
information and
application.
For consideration,
please submit your
resume to 1524 W. 5th
Street, Sheridan, WY
82801, Attention: Lori
Tamburo or email
[email protected]
PRIME RATE
MOTORS is buying
clean, preowned
vehicles of all ages.
We also install B&W
GN hitches, 5th Wheel
Hitches, Pickup
Flatbeds, Krogman
Bale Beds. Stop by
2305 Coffeen Ave. or
call 674-6677.
Help Wanted, Medical
CARS
CARS
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
the I.C.E. (in case of emergency) system for contacts on
my cellphone in the event of an
emergency. I recently added a
photo of my dog with the words
"home alone" and a contact
number of a trusted relative as
an I.C.E. entry so my best pup
is tended to promptly in case
I'm incapacitated. -- K.M., Waterbury, Conn.
A good hint and reminder for
keeping our furry family members safe and taken care of in
case of an emergency! -- Heloise
BAG LINER
Dear Heloise: Tired of throwing out those pretty little
makeup bags? Use a plastic baggie as a liner. It works perfectly, and can be replaced
when messy. -- A Reader, via
email
SAVE CARTONS
Dear Heloise: I read your column in the Reading (Pa.) Eagle.
Here is my hint:
Save two or three of those
white cartons made of plastic
foam that frozen steaks come
in. Use them to save your refrigerator items in case the
power goes out. I used them
many times, and it worked
well. -- Francis D., Reading, Pa.
NURSES NEEDED.
Sheridan Surgical
Center is seeking
Registered Nurses to fill
several
positions. We are a
multi-specialty
outpatient surgery
center located in
Sheridan, WY. OR
experience is preferred.
Requires a valid WY
license. ACLS & PALS
certification is desirable.
Please submit your
resume to 1524 W. 5th
Street, Sheridan, WY
82801. Attention: Lori
Tamburo or email
[email protected]
SHERIDAN SURGICAL
CENTER, a multispecialty outpatient
surgery center, is
seeking experienced
candidates with a
strong clinical and
management
background to fill the
Director of Nursing
position.
A valid Wyoming
nursing license as well
as ACLS & PALS
certification is required.
Help Wanted,
Professional
K-8 ELEMENTARY
Teacher at Spring
Creek School in
Decker, MT.
406-757-2215 or email:
[email protected]
Lost & Found
FOUND ON Coffeen
Ave.: Reading glasses.
Lavender Purple. 150
strength. 672-9391.
time.
TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20):
Go through the motions.
You need only do what's
asked of you to impress
those in power. While you
may have big plans brewing. it will be your ability to
follow orders and be a part
of the team that draw notice.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Keep it professional. Being
too informal in the workplace could rub a few people
the wrong way. Choose
your words and deeds carefully. The top brass admire
those who follow the rules.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Strive for perfection.
You could feel dissatisfied if
everything isn't just the
way you expected it to be.
Setting the bar at a high
level may mean more work,
but the reward will be that
much greater.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't be too content with
past achievements. Sure,
you've done good work but
that doesn't mean you can
stop. Roll up your sleeves
and set your sights on your
next rousing triumph.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Anticipate the unexpected.
Stay on top of finances and
expenses so future bills and
debts come as no surprise.
Keep a back-up plan handy
just in case unexpected
events derail your latest
project.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22.):
Live up to responsibilities.
Personal leisure time may
have to suffer as many people are depending on you to
2005 HONDA
SHADOW 1100.
Custom Paint. Loaded
with extras. 23K miles.
$4400. Call Sheridan
307-680-3220.
Real Estate
FSBO - 3BR/2Ba. 1792
sq ft. 2 car attached
garage on .33 acres
plus a 14x28 shop.
Granite countertops, tile
& wood flooring. New
siding, new deck, new
roof. 1908 Ash Ave.
$245,000. Call
Elizabeth at
(307)351_2244.
FSBO
1742 Edwards Dr.
Colony South
Subdivision.
2400 Sq. Ft. 4BR/2Ba
Call 307-674-7031.
Photos available on
request.
Autos-Accessories
2002 CHEVY IMPALA.
Runs Great.
35 MPG. Cruise.
A/C. OnStar.
Remote Entry.
$4500.
Call 307-752-3325
2006 HONDA CRV.
AWD. Heated Leather
Seats. CD & Cassette
stereo. $10750. Call
Sheridan
307-680-3220.
Bridge
2011 SOFTTAIL
DELUXE
5,800 Miles
Two-Tone Brown
$12,500
307-752-7131
Campers, Trailers
2004 PALAMINO 1500
slide-in pop up pickup
camper w/ bathroom.
Exc. Cond. $5900.
307-752-3065.
LOST
PET?
Place an ad in
The Press!
Call 672-2431
Phillip Alder
MOVING ONE CARD
HAS A SURPRISING EFFECT
Dawn Olivieri, an actress and model, said, "I
have a sweet tooth for
reading, so books migrate to my zip code en
masse."
Wouldn't it be great if
everyone had a sweet
tooth for reading?
Today, though, Olivieri's
key word is "migrate."
This deal is the same as
yesterday's except that
the spade ace has migrated into the dummy.
How does that affect
South's line of play in
three no-trump after
West leads the heart
queen?
South should rebid one
spade, despite the weakness of the suit. North's
three-diamond rebid is
game-invitational, guaranteeing at least a sixcard suit. South, with
two heart stoppers and
some diamond fit, takes
a shot at three no-trump.
South starts with
seven top tricks: one
spade, two
hearts, two diamonds and
two clubs. He
can get two
extra winners
from either
minor. Maybe diamonds
will divide 3-2 or clubs
will split 3-3. Yesterday,
declarer had to choose
immediately, so
went with diamonds because a 32 break is much
more likely than 33 (67.8 percent versus 35.53 percent).
Now, though,
South can try both
suits.
After winning
the first trick, declarer should cash
dummy's two top
diamonds.
If the suit is
splitting 3-2, South
concedes a diamond trick. With
the spade ace in
the dummy, declarer can reach
those three established winners
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Actress
Aly Michalka was born in
Torrance, Calif., on this
date in 1989. This birthday
gal starred as Keely Teslow
on "Phil of the Future" and
Marti Perkins on "Hellcats."
She played the recurring
role of Brooke on "Two and
a Half Men" and has appeared on episodes of
"Anger Management,"
"Breaking In" and "CSI:
NY." Her film resume includes "The Roommate,"
"Easy A" and "Bandslam."
ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19):
Focus on what you can do
rather than what you can't.
Future projects may be alluring but not be feasible
right now. Put your lofty
ambitions to work on other
objectives that keep your
skills honed in the mean-
Motorcycles
and bring home an overtrick.
Here, though, when diamonds divide 4-1, South
must hope for 3-3 clubs.
This line produces a
79.2 percent probability
of success.
Break A plus
Break B is better than
Break A or Break B.
Jeraldine Saunders
come through. You may feel
as if you're carrying the
whole world on your shoulders, but only for a day or
two.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Talk the talk and walk
the walk. Demonstrate your
knowledge and expertise
firsthand to those who question your abilities. Don't
shy away from lauding your
own talents; it's not bragging if it's true.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Show results. You
can make promises and
offer assurances, but you'll
only make progress if you
demonstrate that you can
follow through. Enlist volunteers to help you meet
deadlines and complete assignments.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Keep your batting eye
sharp. No matter how good
you are, there's nothing like
practice and diligence to
strengthen your skills. Take
advantage of free time by
remaining busy and productive until the next project
comes your way.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Praise is not given, but
earned. You can expect a
pat on the back if you've
diligent. Remember, no
matter how great your
achievements may be,
there's always room for improvement.
PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20):
Rise to the challenge. When
adversity blocks your path,
heightened intuitions can
help you attack the problem. Everything and anything will go your way if
you're direct and get to the
heart of the matter.
IF MARCH 25 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: Practice makes
perfect in more than one
way throughout the next 4-5
weeks. You can achieve
your ambitions, as well as
your dreams by remaining
calm, cool and collected no
matter what challenges you
face. New friendships may
be formed in June if you
participate in group outings
or meetings. Late July
through early August is a
good time to reassess your
financial condition, as
you'll be more adept at
worldly matters. Remain
alert as a beneficial opportunity for advancement
may arrive in late August
or early September.
032415Legals_Layout 1 3/24/15 8:20 AM Page 1
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-674-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
BEFORE THE OIL AND GAS CONSERVATION
COMMISSION
OF THE STATE OF WYOMING
The following matter(s) will come before this
Commission on TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2015, AT 9:00 A.M.,
or as soon thereafter as the matter(s) may be heard, or
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on any of
the subsequent days during which the Commission
remains in session at the office of the State Oil and Gas
Supervisor, 2211 King Boulevard, Casper, Wyoming.
Docket No / Applicant / Matter / S-T-R /
Field / County
• 984-2013 / WOGCC / APPEAL – Show
Cause, Patriot Energy, Campbell.
Sheridan
• 913-2014 / WOGCC / APPEAL – Show
Cause, High Plains Gas Inc., Campbell.Sheridan
Applications may be inspected in the office of the
undersigned, 2211 King Boulevard, Casper, Wyoming, or
on the Wyoming Oil & Gas Conservation Commission
website at http://wogcc.state.wy.us under the
“Hearings” category.
Any interested party is entitled to appear and be heard
by the Commission at the time and date listed above.
Protests to applications shall be in writing and filed
with the State Oil and Gas Supervisor at least ten (10)
days before the hearing. Pursuant to Chapter 5, Section
12 of the Wyoming Oil & Gas Conservation Commission
Rules & Regulations, the written protest must state the
grounds of the protest and include information and
evidence to demonstrate that: (a) the protestant is a
party entitled to notice or relief under Wyo. Stat. Ann §§
30-5-101 through 30-5-410; (b) the protestant seeks a
remedy that is within the jurisdiction and authority of
the Commission. No action shall be taken on an
objection or protest that is not timely filed.
Dated this 19th day of March 2015.
Wyoming Oil & Gas
Conservation Commission
/s/ Mark Watson,
Supervisor/Secretary
Publish: March 24, 2015.
CITY OF SHERIDAN, WYOMING MINUTES OF REGULAR
COUNCIL MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBERS 7:00 P.M.
February 2, 2015 The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag
was led by Mayor Heath. Invocation was given by
Councilor Lee. The meeting was called to order with a
quorum as follows: Mayor John Heath presiding with
Councilors Gooch, Kelly, Lee Rios, Smith and Shafer. Also
present were, Human Resources Director Doke, Public
Works Director Bateson, Fire and Emergency Services
Director Lenhart, Deputy City Clerk Williams, City
Attorney Von Krosigk and various other City staff. Mayor
Heath then read aloud the consent items: a) Agenda; b)
Minutes of Regular Council Meeting 01/19/2015; c)
Claims; d) Approval job description for Financial and
Administrative Services Director. REGULAR PAYROLL
1/20/2015: 497-874-NCPERS Wyoming, 328.00, Aflac,
496.17, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Wyoming, 62,025.36
CITCO FCU 6,812.13 Colonial Supplemental Insurance
21.78 First Federal Savings Bank 6,449.08 First
Interstate Bank 3,704.23 ICMA Retirement Trust
300698 6,602.64 IRS 941 66,482.09 LOCAL 276, IAFF
800.00 Orchard Trust 1,249.37 Security State Bank
568.34 Sunlight Federal Credit Union 726.25 US Bank
62.08 VSP 904.08 Wells Fargo Bank-CC 1,230.87
Workers' Safety & 7,057.25 WY Child Support
Enforcement 375.00 Wyoming Retirement System
8,307.89 Wyoming Retirement System 12,319.06
Wyoming Retirement System 31,835.20; TOTAL
REGULAR PAYROLL: $218,356.87. CLAIMS: A & M
Service & Supply Inc., Changing Chip for Signer Machine,
277.50 A Plus Plumbers, Inc, Misc Repairs, 208.40 ABC
Signs & Specialties, Customer Service Center sign,
440.00 Ace Hardware-Newkirk, Misc Supplies, 353.44
Advocacy & Resource Ctr, One Cent Funds Distribution
2nd Qtr, 1,875.00 Alan Eckstein, Reimburse Moving
Expenses, 4,000.00 Amanda Derosa, Reimbursement
Overpayment of Fines, 109.00 American Welding & Gas,
Inc., 2" x 2" Slugger Cutter, 437.99 B&B Leasing
Company, Copy Charges for Building Department,
216.35 Big Horn Design, Uniform shirts, 145.50 Big Horn
Health Network, LLC, Annual Medical Exam for Lenhart,
166.00 Bloedorn Lumber, Lumber-Cabinets in Sign
Shop, 281.25 Botten Law Office, Municipal Court Judge
Fees Dec 2014, 2,678.00 Brian James, End of 2014
Season 5%, 11,078.04 C & K Equipment, Equipment
Repair, 25.52 Carolina Software, WW software support
Qtr Ending 3/31/15, 550.00 Carquest Auto Parts, Amber
Rev Light/Reman Alternator/Credits, 1,754.32 Cary F
Sampson, Illinois St. Reconstruction Misc - #4726,
5,202.00 Casper College, OSHA Hazardous Waste Site
Worker, 450.00 CED Inc, White stranded
wire/replacement
lights,
255.47
CenturyLink
Communications, LLC, Municipal Court Jury Line
Monthly Bill, 48.74 CH Diagnostics and Consulting,
Services January 2015, 2,040.00 Child Advocacy
Services- Big Horns, One Cent Funds Distribution 2nd
Qtr, 1,875.00 Collection Professionals Inc., CPI Acct
#1885 December 2014, 450.62 COP Wyoming, LLC,
Illinois St. Reconstruction/Retainage #4726, 89,343.48
Cowboys & Indians Magazine, Publications, Advertising,
2,228.00 Craftco Metals Services, Inc, Tree Grate
Repairs, 1,068.00 Crows Cleaning Connection, City Hall
Carpet Cleaning and Floor Waxing, 2,255.60 Dana
Kepner Company, Cemetery Pump Station Repair,
494.00 David Todd, Pre-Algebra Arithmetic Class,
324.00 Desert Mountain Corp, Ice Slicer chemical,
21,932.16 Dog and Cat Shelter, One Cent Funds
Distribution 2nd Qtr, 14,950.00 Doormen Overhead
LLC., Misc Repairs, 191.74 Downtown Sheridan Assoc,
One Cent Funds Distribution 2nd Qtr, 7,500.00 ECS
Engineers, Professional Services , 412.00 Ed Hammer
Inc, Misc Parts, 260.40 Employers Council, Employment
Law Posters, 198.50 Energy Laboratories, Inc, SWTP &
BGWTP TOCs, 160.00 Excalibur Construction, Inc,
Installation -White Board and Cork Board, 8,214.81
Farmers Co-op Oil Co., LP Delivery, 17,885.28 Fastenal
Industrial Supplies, Couplers and Fittings for PRV repair,
306.30 Fedex Freight West Inc, Mailing of Dispatch Test
Scores, 18.91 Fiberpipe Internet Services, Virtual
Domain, 46.50 First Interstate Bank, UM Service Center
- Retainage, 32,402.60 Fletcher Construction Co, WTP
Conventional Upgrades, 35,401.50 Flood Marketing,
LLC, City Facebook Page Management, 2,702.50
Forward Sheridan, Economic Development, 6,000.00
Galls, LLC, Uniform Pants Patrol New Officer, 65.00
Grainger, Inc., High Temp Food Grade Antisieze, 705.06
Habitat for Humanity, One Cent Funds Distribution 2nd
Qtr, 2,500.00 Hach Company, Lab Supplies, 198.00
Hawkins Inc, Fluoride, 4,273.37 HDR Engineering, Inc,
WTP Conventional Upgrades #4716, 18,464.77 Health
Education Design Solutions, Inc, First Aid-CPR Classes
for January 2015, 63.00 Heartland Kubota, LLC, Misc
Parts, 483.87 Hub Int'l Mountain States LTD, WatkinsAsst Treas Bond 2-1-2014-2015, 263.00 I/O Solutions,
Pre-Employement Testing Communications, 18.00 Ideal
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Mfg. Inc., Remotes for gate to CSC, 137.13 InfoSend, Inc,
Services Dec. 2014, 5,848.21 Inter-Mountain
Laboratories Inc, E-coli and Total Coliform (Bacteria)
Tests, 560.00 International Institute Municipal Clerks,
Renewal 3/1/15-16- Williams, 120.00 Interstate Power
Systems, Trans Filter, 28.51 Jack's Truck & Equipment,
Misc Parts/Repair, 3,003.39 JB Storage Containers, Inc,
Storage container for Signs Dept., 6,650.00 John Deere
Financial #1111308145, Misc Maintenance, 649.58 John
H Kane, Pasture hay, 1,400.00 Kilpatrick Creations Inc.,
Shirts and Sweatshirt for New Employee, 271.98 Kisling
Law LLC, Court Appointed Atty Fees Muni Court, 100.00
Kois Brothers Equipment, Co., Misc Parts, 1,983.65 KXK
Construction, Household Hazard Waste Constr #4551,
20,665.00 Lannan's Supply, Shipping for locator repair,
15.46 Laurie L Schwabauer, Cleaning services CSC (Jan),
400.00 Lewis Holding Co Inc, Truck rentl (haul snow) SR, 18,706.25 Local Govt Liability Pool, Settlement
Payment Eppe Claim 6-20-2014, 5,000.00 Loco
Printing ,Typesetting & Graphics, Municipal Court Judge
Business Cards, 30.00 Luke A Goddard, Med Doctor
Coverage for February 2015, 500.00 Madden Media,
Publications, Advertising, 625.00 Master Clean / J.A.S.
Const, Cleaning Service , 600.00 MC2 Engineering,
Cemetery Facility Planning, 2,470.00 McAfee, Inc, City
Internet Security monthly charges, 270.00 Megan Jane
Ahrens, Contractual Services, 1,999.67 Mountain States
Lighting, Replacement Light Fixtures and Bases,
7,695.00 Mountain View Building, Inc, Truck rental (haul
snow) - SR, 7,012.50 Mullinax Concrete Service &
Irrigation, Slurry for Martin Leak, 888.00 MWH
Americas, Inc, Professional Services for Nov. 2014,
9,483.26 Napa Auto Parts, Equipment Supplies,
1,754.93 Norco, Inc, Supplies for City Hall, 510.29
Normont Equipment Co., Misc Supplies, 1,025.00
Northern Underground LLC, Truck Rental (haul snow),
14,790.00 O'Dell Construction Inc., Mat`l in Storage SP
Elev Boardwalk, 127,902.92 One-Call of Wyoming,
Tickets for Dec. 2014, 69.00 Pallet Creations, Office
Supplies, 593.40 Pat Burke Trucking, Trucking Services
Recycling, 1,200.00 Paul M Juergens, Reimb Travel
Expenses, 228.40 Plains Tire & Battery, Misc Repairs,
7,517.47 Post and Associates, Pre-Employment
Screening Patrol, 900.00 Powder River Power Co, Misc
Supplies, 615.14 Prestfeldt Surveying LLC, W. 5th Park
Survey, 563.80 Public Safety Center, Inc., Lab supplies,
1,073.69 Renew, Park Up Keep Nov - Dec 2014, 3,451.00
RMA Service LLC, Ambulance service February 2015,
10,000.00 Ruby Construction Co. LLC, Reclamation
Work on Goose Creek, 10,000.00 Schoeny Inc, Truck
Rental (haul snow), 8,670.00 Senior Citizens Council,
One Cent Funds Distribution 2nd Qtr, 22,500.00 Servall
Uniform and Linen, Inc, Rug Cleaning, 375.74 Shawn
Buckley, Contractual Services, 2,875.00 Shelly Lattin,
Money Return From Evidence Account, 9.02 Sheridan
College Booster Club, Economic Development, 4,500.00
Sheridan Commercial Co., Misc Supplies/Parts, 1,336.23
Sheridan Community Land Trust, Economic
Development, 871.36 Sheridan Computer Inc,
Replacement keyboard/mouse, 89.94 SC Chamber of
Commerce, Economic Development, 6,500.00 Sheridan
County Clerk, 2014 Primary and General Elections Exp,
39,658.98 Sheridan County Historical Society, One Cent
Funds Distribution 2nd Qtr, 5,500.00 Sheridan County
Juvenile Justice, One Cent Funds Distribution 2nd Qtr,
32,500.00 Sheridan County, One Cent Funds
Distribution 2nd Qtr, 1,250.00 Sheridan Econ-O-Wash,
Laundry, 38.25 Sheridan Electronics LLC, Blue Tooth Car
Kit (B.Schwabauer), 101.93 Sheridan Health Center, One
Cent Funds Distribution 2nd Qtr, 1,000.00 Sheridan
High School, Economic Development, 1,200.00
Sheridan Lock & Key, Keys for New Sign Shop, 28.00
Sheridan Motor Inc, Misc Service/Repairs, 1,937.34
Sheridan Newspapers Inc, Legal Ads-December,
3,850.23 Sheridan Printing Inc, Municipal Court
Letterhead, 108.00 Sheridan Recreation, Quarterly
Payment, 30,125.00 Sheridan Swim Team, Economic
Development, 500.00 Sheridan Transportation Taxi,
November 2014 Tipsy Taxi, 2,983.00 Source Office
Products, Office Supplies, 1,321.42 Stephanie Babione,
Water Depost Refund, 25.00 Steve's Truck Service Inc,
Misc Repairs , 7,582.94 The Lamar Companies,
Publications, Advertising, 2,375.00 Thyssenkrupp
Elevator, Instalation Electronic Door Edge, 6,251.26 Tire
Rama, Misc Service/Repairs, 1,053.00 Tony Pelesky,
Resitution Due, 250.00 Top Office Products Inc, Jan
2015 Copy Count Charge, 511.84 Tri-State Truck &
Equipment , Inc, Complete Exhaust System/Rubber
Springs, 2,454.70 TSP, Inc, Senior Center Day Break
Facility, 3,078.00 Turn-Key Technologies, LLC, Misc
Repairs/Service, 310.24 Uline Shipping Supplies, Tags
for Recycling Bales, 243.79 UW Office of Sponsored
Programs, First Year Services Incubator, 42,500.00
Valley Motor Honda, Carburetor/Choke Lever, 76.13
Verizon Wireless, City Monthly Bill, 649.77 Visionary
Communications, Internet -Different Depts/T1 Point to
Point, 878.78 Volunteers of America, One Cent Funds
Distribution 2nd Qtr, 1,250.00 W5 LLC, Rent/Utilities 775 East 8th St, 2,590.54 Water Products, Inc, Office
Supplies, 7.00 Way Oil Inc, Oil - 55 gallons, 5,569.64
Wenck Associates, Inc., Leopard St Waterline
Replacement, 4,079.16 Wilson Bros. Construction, Inc.,
UM Service Center - #4702, 341,332.19 Wood Group PSN,
Inc., SCADA/IT Services 11/30-12/31/2014, 17,885.48
WWC Engineering Corp, WY-Park Phase III CA , 8,593.20
Wyoming Dept of Agriculture, Annual Scale Certification
Landfill/Recycling, 50.00 Wyoming Electric, Misc
Service/Repairs, 1,466.00 WY First Aid & Safety Supply,
LLC, First Aid supplies, 118.77 Wyoming Machinery Co,
Misc Parts, 2,279.00 Wyoming Travel Industry Coalition,
Membership Dues-Shawn Buckley, 500.00 Wyoming
Water Association, 2015 Membership dues, 500.00
Wyoming Water Quality, Membership Dues for Mike
Peacock, 30.00 Xerox Corporation, Contractual Services,
157.84 Zonar Systems, Inc, GPS units (Sts); Training &
Expenses, 7,915.56; TOTAL CLAIMS: $1,217,950.39.
PREPAID CLAIMS: CenturyLink Communications, LLC,
Scada Lines and Extensions, 309.37 Montana Dakota
Utilities, Numerous Electrick Bills, 6,702.85 Pitney
Bowes Inc, Lease for Postage Machine City hall, 746.52
Azteca Systems, Inc., Cityworks on site workflow reviewlost chk, 5,625.00 Montana Dakota Utilities, electricity
for pumping water/cathodic protection, 1,584.62;
TOTAL PREPAID CLAIMS: $14,968.36. Councilor Gooch
moved, seconded by Councilor Kelly. Councilor Shafer
moved, seconded by Councilor Gooch to remove item D,
Financial and Administrative Services Director, from the
consent agenda for discussion, Council approved
motion for amendment: voice vote; unanimous. Council
approved motion to accept Consent Agenda as
amended: voice vote; unanimous. Discussion for
approval of job description for Financial and
Administrative Services Director; Councilor Shafer
suggested that the council consider postponing the
decision to add this position. Councilor Shafer's
recommendation was based on pending interest of the
governing body to add a City Administrator position.
Councilor Shafer felt that it was important to examine
all aspects of the administrative structure of the City in
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
order to avoid duplication of the roles of the two
positions. Councilor Rios suggested that Human
Resources Director Doke provide a presentation of the
Financial Administrative Services Director position so
the Council would have a better understanding of the
role the two positions. Mayor Heath introduced Human
Resources Director Doke who explained the structure of
the Financial and Administrative Services Director
position, the purpose of the position and the way in
which it was developed to encompass multiple
responsibilities and fulfill the position and
responsibilities of the clerk/treasure position. Human
Resources Director, Police Chief Adriaens and Public
Works Director Bateson explained the difference
between the duties of a City Administrator, which is just
beginning to be examined at this time and the Financial
and Administrative Services Director position which is a
department head position, is currently in the budget
replacing a recently vacated position and is needed
without delay to maintain a strong department.
Councilor Rios called the question. Council approved
motion for approval of job description for Financial
Administrative Services Director: voice vote; unanimous.
Mayor Heath introduced Mary Randolph, Director of
Wyoming Rural Development Council. Mary Randolph
presented to Council, the Kick Off of the 10 year
Celebration of Main Street and to recognized DSA for
their support and contributions to the state program.
Mary provided an overview of the history of downtown
districts and the progress and contributions of
Sheridan's Main Street program during the past 10
years. Mary congratulated the City of Sheridan and DSA
on their success and requested continued support from
local government. Junior Councilors reported that the
All State Orchestra concert was a great success, they are
very busy participating in the indoor track season and
high school musical, which Jr Councilor Berry landed a
great role in. Seniors have started their countdown to
graduation; they are making the most of their
remaining time in the 2nd semester as well as starting
the process of reviewing colleges and their programs. Jr
Councilor Lyman is keeping busy in Cheyenne as a page
for Senator Burns. Jr Councilor Jahiel will be soloing with
the Wyoming Symphony Orchestra in May. Mayor Heath
recognized the High School Government Class who were
attending the Council meeting. Councilor Lee moved,
seconded by Councilor Gooch, adoption of the updated
Parks and Recreation Master Plan; Mayor Heath
introduced Public Works Director Bateson to provide a
staff presentation. Public Works Director Bateson and
Parks Division Manager Carbert provided Council with
an update of the amended Parks and Recreation plan.
Council approved the motion: voice vote; unanimous.
Councilor Shafer moved, seconded by Councilor Rios,
consideration of Resolution 04-15 to evaluate City
Administrator Position. Mayor Heath briefed Council on
the process of considering the position of City
Administrator. Resolution 04-15 is to one step in the
process consider and evaluate the position of a City
Administrator. Mayor Heath advised that proposing a
City Administrator position was in no way going to
change the current strong Mayor/City Council form of
government. Councilors Shafer, Rios, Gooch, and Jr
Councilor Jahiel provided discussion and support of the
resolution. Council approved motion: voice vote;
unanimous. Mayor Heath explained that due to other
commitments out of town representative from IAFF
Local #276 would be unable to attend council and begin
contract negotiations. City Attorney Von Krosigk
reviewed clarification of the requirements of the
negotiation process. Council received public comment
from Ron Patterson of Holly Ponds who provided a
presentation of the history and disposition of Holly
Ponds subdivision and its benefits to the City of
Sheridan. Public comment was also received from Ann
Fuller and Audrey Wiggins regarding their concerns
about the addition of fluoride to City Water. There being
no further business Mayor Heath adjourned the meeting
at 8:50 P.M
Publish: March 24, 2015.
I
N THE DISTRICT COURT, FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT,
COUNTY OF SHERIDAN, STATE OF WYOMING
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
DUANE M. ANDERSON,
Deceased.
Probate No. PR 2015-39
NOTICE OF PROBATE
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that on the 10th day
of March, 2015, the Last Will and Testament of Duane
M. Anderson was admitted to probate by the above
named Court, and that Susan M. Malott was appointed
the Personal Representative thereof. Any action to set
aside the Will shall be filed in the Court within three (3)
months from the date of the first publication of this
notice, or thereafter be forever barred.
Notice is further given that all persons
indebted to the decedent or to his estate are requested
to make immediate payment to the undersigned at P. O.
Box 1031, La Junta, CO 81050.
Creditors having claims against the
decedent or the estate are required to file them in
duplicate with the necessary vouchers, in the office of
the Clerk of said Court, on or before three (3) months
after the date of the first publication of this notice, and
if such claims are not so filed, unless otherwise allowed
or paid, they will be forever barred.
DATED this 18th day of March,
2015.
/s/Susan M. Malott,
Personal Representative
Timothy S. Tarver
Attorney at Law
P. O. Box 6284
200 West Loucks
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Publish: March 24, 31, April 7, 2015.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
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B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015
MASTERS: 17 days
Practicing
footwork for
spring
FROM B2
Beyond the Grand Slam, he can join Tiger
Woods and Ben Hogan as the only players
with three straight majors since the Masters
began in 1934. Those opportunities don’t come
along very often, which is why Woods points
to the 2000 PGA Championship (his third
straight major) as his most clutch putting performance.
The good news for McIlroy is the buildup to
the Masters is over — at least for now.
The first three months of the year were all
about Augusta National, and the hype wasn’t
quite as strong as it could have been. He was
asked about it a fair amount, though not
enough to consume him. Either way, he was
prepared for it.
“I was expecting to get a lot of questions,”
he said. “It’s a big deal what I’m trying to
achieve over there.”
It’s difficult to measure progress over five
tournaments spread across two months,
though his win in Dubai and runner-up finish
in Abu Dhabi should not be overlooked.
McIlroy said the best golf he was playing
going into the Masters was in 2011. He didn’t
win in five events leading to the Augusta,
with a runner-up in Abu Dhabi and a tie for
10th in Dubai and Doral. By that measure,
this year has been slightly better.
There was a glimpse of impatience early in
the Florida swing, particularly at Doral when
he had trouble trusting the difficult shots,
such as the pull with a 3-iron into the lake,
and the club that soon followed the ball into
the water. McIlroy managed to turn that into
a light-hearted moment. Donald Trump managed to turn that into a three-day news event.
And then it was time to move on.
The real culprit has been his wedges and
irons. He’s simply not hitting it very close for
a reasonable chance at making birdie putts.
In a tiny sample size, but McIlroy’s average
proximity from 125 yards to 150 yards was 30
feet in the Florida swing, or about 10 feet farther away than his 2014 average on the PGA
Tour.
The good news for McIlroy is no one is talking about a slump. And there’s something to
be said about not peaking too early.
Woods was going for an unprecedented
sweep of the majors in 2001 and there were
suggestions of a slump. He went six tournaments without winning (though he was never
worse than a tie for 13th). The Masters was
approaching. The pressure was building.
And then Woods won Bay Hill, The Players
Championship and the Masters. It’s all about
peaking at the right time.
The Masters starts in 17 days.
Riley Sessions dribbles the soccer ball
during a drill last week at Scott Field.
The Sheridan boys soccer team begins
the season this Friday against
Riverton.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SWEET 16: Paige preseason pick for All-American, POY
through the first 30 games, he’s averaged 17.9 points and shot
47 percent over the past seven dating to the regular-season
It was Jones distributing and Cook burying 3-pointers
finale against Duke.
against Robert Morris and San Diego State, Paige having a big
“I’m healthy, that’s the biggest part,” said Paige, who scored
second half against Arkansas or Barber weaving his way
20 of his 22 points after halftime in Saturday’s win against the
through Villanova’s pressure.
Razorbacks. “I’m a little bit more aggressive than I have been
attacking the basket. ... I would just say confidence, health
“They’re different,” Capel said, “but they’re winners.”
and just understanding that I’ve got to be a playmaker at this
Jones is averaging 6.5 assists at the helm of a Duke offense
shooting 58 percent through two NCAA games. Cook — who
point in the year.”
moved to a combo-guard role with Jones’ arrival after playing
Then there’s Barber, a sophomore averaging 15.8 points over
mostly at the point previously — is averaging 18.5 points and
his last 13 games with improved range on his shot to go with
shooting 56 percent, including 9 for 18 on 3s.
the kind of speed that had earned him his nickname before
At UNC, Paige was a preseason pick for Associated Press all- stepping foot on campus.
American and ACC player of the year, but he had a slow start
His run has included wins at Louisville — N.C. State’s next
and then battled a troublesome foot injury for more than two
opponent — and UNC along with a 34-point night against
months.
Pittsburgh in the ACC Tournament. Barber scored 17 points
Now the smooth left-handed junior is looking more like him- against LSU, then had 13 despite foul trouble against
self again. After averaging 13.2 points and shooting 40 percent Villanova.
“For us, when Cat Barber took his game somewhat to
another level here ... it changed everything for our team,”
coach Mark Gottfried said before the win over Villanova. “I
thought he became, at times, as good as anybody in the
country.”
Playing in the ACC, which has five Sweet 16 teams, certainly helped prepare them all for the tournament. Duke,
UNC and N.C. State played each other twice, forcing Jones,
Cook, Paige and Barber to push themselves to keep up with
one another.
Now they’re leading teams still advancing in March — all
from the 919 area code.
“That just shows how good our conference is, how you’ve
got to come to play every night,” Jones said. “In each game
you’re battle-tested. You know you have no choice but to
get better.”
FROM B2
RULE: Catch requirements
FROM B3
“The committee’s position
for years has been to oppose
involving fouls in replay for
a lot of different reasons,”
said Rams coach Jeff
Fisher, the other committee
co-chairman. “We’ve looked
at a lot of tape this offseason, we looked at the fouls
particularly relating to hits
on defenseless players. We
had 27 of them this year, we
looked at them as a group.
We could not agree on a
number of them.
“That’s just the nature of
the standard in replay.”
There will be no change to
the actual catch-no catch
rule, but the language will
be clarified. It’s been a particularly hot topic since the
NFC playoff game in which
Cowboys receiver Dez
Bryant had a catch near the
Green Bay goal line late in
the fourth quarter reversed
to an incompletion.
“For years the requirements for a catch — the way
it was communicated in the
rule book — is control, both
feet (in bounds) and then,
after that, the receiver had
to have the ball long enough
to perform an act common
to the game,” vice president
of officiating Dean
Blandino said. “That was
defined as being able to
pitch it, pass it, clearly
advance the ball as a runner.”
That created confusion,
which Blandino believes
will be eliminated by changing the wording.
“So in order to complete a
catch, the receiver has to
have control, both feet on
the ground and he has to
have it after that long
enough to clearly establish
himself as a runner,” he
said.
Also Monday:
—The league eliminated
local TV blackouts of games
for next season.
There were no blackouts
last season, because the
minimum number of tickets, by NFL sellout standards, was sold for every
game, and the league had
only two blackouts in 2013.
The current blackout policy
has been in effect since
1973.
—The Oct. 25 game in
London between Buffalo
and Jacksonville will be
streamed live internationally. The experiment, which
will start at 9:30 a.m. ET,
means the game won’t be
shown on television outside
the local teams’ markets.
—Foreign sites are being
considered for the Pro Bowl.
Next year’s game will be
played in Honolulu, but
Brazil is among the possible
sites beyond that.

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