7 MB 2016 January - The Charlotte Jewish News

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7 MB 2016 January - The Charlotte Jewish News
An Affiliate of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Charlotte
Vol. 38, No. 1
Tevet-Shevat 5776
January 2016
2016 Campaign Leadership Team
2016 Campaign Leaders:
“Do Good Everywhere. From
Anywhere”
What’s the mark of a great campaign chair? Alison Lerner’s entire
2015 campaign team has re-upped for a second year. As Campaign
Chair, Alison’s inspirational leadership and her passion for Federation
motivated the Federation’s Campaign Leadership, solicitors and
donors to meet the highest campaign goal in Federation’s history …
$3,700,000.
The theme of this year’s campaign is “Do Good Everywhere. From
Anywhere” because through Federation, at any hour of the day, you
can be virtually anywhere on the globe making a difference in the lives
of Jews at home, in Israel, and in 70 countries around the world.
The 2016 Annual Campaign officially kicked-off at the Federation’s
Main Event on December 17. Please mark your calendars for our
upcoming 2016 Campaign Events:
* Solicitor University, Thursday, January 7
* Lion of Judah and Pomegranate Society Luncheon,
Tuesday, January 12
* Super Sunday, January 24
* Women’s Annual Spring Lecture, Thursday, April 7
* Super Sunday, The Sequel, April 17
To make your pledge, please visit our website at www.jewishcharlotte.org. And if you’d like to get involved, please contact Sue Littauer,
Director of Development, at [email protected] Y
Alison Lerner, Federation Campaign Chair for 2016, reminds us of
this year’s theme.
See You at the Movies!
The Charlotte Jewish Film Festival is pleased to announce the
lineup for its exciting 12th season
that will be taking place February
20–March 13.
A big thank you to Screening
Chair Jeff Turk and Screening
Committee members Shari Baum,
Bunny Bramson, Jena Coen, Bob
Ecker, Jackie Fishman, Michael
Lieberman, Gale Osborne, Mason
Sklut, and Marcia Stern for putting together another diverse and
great CJFF slate.
The Early Bird Special All Festival Pass will be available for $90
($145 value) until January 10.
The price for a regular All Festival
Pass will be $115 starting on January 11.
Tickets and information on this
year’s value added programming
can be found at charlottejewishfilm.com. CJFF representatives
will also be in the lobby of the
Levine JCC on Sunday, January
“Dough”
10 and Sunday, February 7 from
10 AM–1 PM.
DOUGH / Opening Night
Celebration - $25
Saturday, February 20 7:15 PM - Temple Israel
Award-winning actor Jonathan
Pryce stars in this warmhearted
and gently humorous story about
a recently widowed Jewish baker
whose faltering business is
suddenly rejuvenated after
he hires a young Muslim
apprentice.
ROCK IN THE RED
ZONE - $10
Sunday, February 21 7:15 PM - Temple Israel
An intimate portrayal of
life in the war-torn city of
Sderot, Israel, where a diverse music scene has de-
Alison Lerner
Annual Campaign Chair
Tracy Brown and Steve Cohen
Major Gifts Co-Chairs
Rich Osborne
Create a Jewish Legacy Chair
Gail Baron
Women’s Philanthropy Chair
Dale Polsky and Adrienne Gossett
Lion of Judah Co-Chairs
Jill Halverstam and Stacey Schanzlin
Pomegranate Society Co-Chairs
George Cronson, Risa Miller, and Jeff Turk
Team Captains
Marcie Jacobs and Jeff Turk
Super Sunday Co-Chairs
Larry Schwartz
Main Event Chair
Sara Kulbersh and Mallory Miller
Spring Lecture Co-Chairs
Zach Schwartz
Impact365 Chair
Stacy Gorelick
Community Campaign Chair
veloped out of the
trauma endured by
its citizens during
years of rocket attacks from Gaza.
SURVIVING
SKOKIE - $10
Wednesday, February 24 7:15 PM - Temple
Israel
Filmmaker
Eli
Adler’s deeply personal documentary
tells the story of his
father Jack who survived the
Holocaust and started a new
life in Skokie, IL, where he
and many other survivors had
to unexpectedly face the
nightmares they thought they
had left behind.
APPLES FROM THE
DESERT - $10
Saturday, February 27 7:15 PM - Regal Ballantyne
The rebellious teenage daughter of ultra-Orthodox Jewish parents journeys into the secular
world in the adaptation of the
award-winning Israeli play.
BREAKFAST AT INA’S - $15
Sunday, February 28 - 11 AM -
“Mr. Kaplan”
“Rock in the Red Zone”
Regal Ballantyne
Ina Pinkney, the “Breakfast
Queen,” is a living legend in
Chicago who overcame disability
and prejudice to run a restaurant
that became a local institution.
MR. KAPLAN - $10
Wednesday, March 2 7:15 PM - Regal Ballantyne
76-year old Jacob Kaplan looks
back on his life and questions its
worth. When he hears a rumor
about a local resident, he sees his
chance for redemption and embarks on a crazy mission with the
help of his equally dispirited partner.
WEDDING DOLL - $10
Saturday, March 5 7:15 PM - Regal Ballantyne
Hagit, a beautiful young
woman with a mild mental
deficiency, dreams of independence and love while her
overprotective mother sacrifices her own life to watch
over her.
(Continued on page 31)
5007 Providence Road, Suite #112
Charlotte, NC 28226
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The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 2
JEWISH FEDERATION NEWS
New Year New Start
By Inbal Ozeri, Community
Shlicha
Since I arrived here in Charlotte at the end of August, I have
experienced the most extreme
change in my life. I decided to
leave Israel and everything I
know and love and move to a different side of the planet for at least
one whole year.
Serving as the community
Shlicha solidifies my belief in
World Jewry, and the importance
of the connection between Israeli
Jews and the Diaspora Jews. In
the role of Shlicha, I can help advance the connection of the holyland from our Bible as well as our
joint history and legacy with Jews
from all around the globe (including Israelis!).
Since I started my journey to
the U.S, I have experienced amazing experiences such as my first
Jewish holidays out of Israel,
away from my family and friends,
but celebrating and enjoying the
holidays with such an amazing
and warm Jewish community. I
have had the opportunity to pray
for the first time in an American
Jewish synagogue and get to
Inbal Ozeri
know wonderful, genuine families
that had opened their homes and
hearts for me and let me in to their
lives. I am and continue to be
amazed by all the friendly people
I meet and I know that I will continue to meet. I never thought I
would be so very fortunate to arrive to such a superb community
in Charlotte.
I am happy to announce a
monthly Café Ivrit (Hebrew) that
I started last month. We will meet
up every third Monday of the
month at 6:30 PM at Starbucks on
Morrison Blvd. We will meet for
six sessions and our next meet up
will be on January 18. I hope to
introduce folks - in a casual and
entertaining way - to learn a few
words in Hebrew while getting to
know each other and just basically
having fun.
Also I am beginning to plan
our Jewish Federation annual
Yom Hazikaron and Yom Ha’atzmaut event on Wednesday
evening, May 11, and I’m looking
for a few volunteers that may
want to help me plan the most interesting, creative and entertaining community event that
Charlotte has ever seen.
If you are interested in joining
my Café Ivrit, participating in
planning our Yom HaZikaron/
Yom Ha’aztmaut celebration or
simply want to reach out to me,
feel free to email me at at [email protected] or 704944-6784.
I look forward to hearing from
you. Y
SHABBAT CANDLE LIGHTING FOR
JANUARY 2016
Friday, January 1, 5:04 PM
Friday, January 8, 5:10 PM
Friday, January 15, 5:16PM
Friday, January 22, 5:23 PM
Friday, January 29, 5:30 PM
The Charlotte Jewish
News
5007 Providence Road, Suite 112
Charlotte, NC 28226
Phone
(voice mail after office hours)
Office 704-944-6765
FAX 704-365-4507
email: [email protected]
An Affiliate of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Charlotte
Amy Krakovitz - Editor
Advertising Sales Reps:
Jodi Valenstein, 704-609-0950 or
Scott Moskowitz, 704-906-2474
Art Director, Erin Bronkar
[email protected]
CJN Editorial Board
Chair - Bob Davis
Members: Bob Abel, Sara Abadi,
David Delfiner, Ann Langman, Linda Levy, Elaine Millen
The CJN does not assume responsibility for the quality or kasruth of any
product or service advertised. Publishing of a paid political advertisement does not constitute an endorsement of any candidate, political
party or position by this newspaper, the Federation or any employees.
Published monthly except July
An affliate of:
The Jewish Community Relations
Council of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Charlotte Presents Distinguished
Speaker Dr. Ronen Hoffman
The Tail Wagging the
Dog, Israel Style:
Challenges in Israeli
Foreign Policy Israel
Tuesday February 2 in Sam
Lerner Center for Cultural Arts
at 7 PM
Dr. Hoffman has an extensive
history as a politician and war expert in Israel. He is
the co-founder of the
International Policy
Institute for counterterrorism, served as
personal assistant to
Prime
Minister
Yitzchak Rabin during his political
campaigns and coordinated the Israeli
delegation that negotiated peace with
Syria. He also
served as senior advisor to the Minister
of Defense and advised the Health
Minister on international economic cooperation.
Dr. Hoffman is
also a former member of Knesset, having served on
Israel’s defense and foreign affairs committees in the 19th
Knesset, eventually chairing the
sub-committee on foreign affairs
and public diplomacy.
With a Ph.D. in war studies
from King’s College in London,
Dr. Hoffman is an expert in political psychology. He specializes in
psychological and cultural barriers in conflict and resolution and
in political negotiations.
More recently, Dr. Hoffman
was a lecturer and researches at
the school of government at the
Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya.
Dr. Ronen Hoffman
Dr. Hoffman will discuss the
challenges that Israel faces in foreign policy and how one of the
world’s best militaries and a spectacular intelligence system fails
and stumbles when it comes to
foreign policy. Why? What
causes Israel’s leaders to act
courageously in the martial-security battlefield while at the same
time be driven by fear in the po(Continued on page 4)
CONTENTS
Jewish Community Center .........pp. 16, 17
Federation News ...............................pp. 1-4
Mazel Tov..............................................p. 19
Youth Visions..........................................p. 5
Schools...........................................pp. 20-24
Synagogues/Congregations..............pp. 6-9
Women’s News.................................p. 24
Jewish Family Services................pp. 10, 11
Tu biShevat..........................pp. 25, 26, 28-30
Levine-Sklut Judaic Library ..............p. 12
Dining Out ............................................p. 27
Community News .........................pp. 13-15
Op-Ed: Special to CJN.........................p. 31
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The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 3
Partnership 2Gether 2016 Summer
Israel Teen Trip – A Life-Changing
Experience
They rode camels in the Judean
desert, floated in the salty water of
the Dead Sea, hiked to the top of
a mountain in the Negev, watched
the sun rise from the top of
Masada, walked through the narrow streets of Jerusalem’s Old
City, danced and prayed at the
Kotel, and perhaps most important, spent five nights in the
homes of Israeli families in
Hadera.
As much fun as it was, the five
Charlotte teens who travelled to
Israel on the 2013 P2G Summer
Teen Exchange trip will tell you
that it was more than just a great
adventure. It was a transformative
experience that created enduring
connections to the land and people
of Israel – and to their own Jewish
heritage. This summer, the Jewish
Federation is again sponsoring the
2016 Summer Teen Trip to Israel.
Jewish teens will have a chance to
personally experience getting to
know Israeli teens in our HaderaEiron Partnership city as well as
tour the land through meaningful
moments in Israel.
The Jewish Federation asked
teens from the 2014 P2G trip to
talk about their experiences and
how it affected them. Read to find
out first- hand accounts from Joey
Kelso, Katy Smith, David Rabinovich, Ari Rabinovich and Jessica Soto about what they learned
on this vital journey.
“I had such an amazing experience. I loved experiencing the culture of the Israeli teens and seeing
how they live their life and showing them how we live ours.” -Jessica Soto
“I had an amazing experience
with the Tikkun Olam program. It
was my first time in Israel, and I
had a warm welcome from my
host Dolev, and his entire extended family. They said I was
like their American son. The food
was delicious and there was always plenty of it. We hung out
like normal teenagers, shopping,
going to movies, everything we
do in Charlotte. Israel is small
enough that we got to see just
about everything, from Masada to
Jerusalem to Masada. I felt a renewed sense of my Judaism when
I saw how it’s observed in another
country.” – Joey Kelso
“My experience in Israel
started the moment I met my new
friends at Ben Gurion Airport. At
first it was a little awkward but as
we began to bond at the Bedouin
tents, we grew more comfortable
with each other. We started the
bonding experience with camel
rides. They were bumpy and wild
but fun at the same time. That
night we all slept in the same tent,
which was awesome, we all got to
know each other better, I even
found out more about the Americans I was with. After only a few
hours of sleep we woke up to
climb Masada. The sunrise on top
of Masada was like nothing I had
ever seen before, it was priceless.
This exchange program has
changed my vision of Israel and
Judaism because I am now really
connected to our Homeland, to the
people there, we are very different, our cultures and way of living
but at the same time we are so
alike, it is cool to discover that.”Ari Rabinovich
“Wow, just wow, people always come back
from Israel and say ‘It
was so amazing!’ and ‘I
can’t wait to go there
again!’ Clichés that are
not only true but fall
short of the feelings and
emotions that surge forward after spending time
in the Holy Land. Israel
is all the more endearing to me
knowing that I have now a personal connection to it. I know that
I will always have friends there
and I know more about the places
and history of Jews and Israel. It
is my belief that, given the opportunity, all Jews should visit Israel
Local teens visit Israel and host Israeli teens on the
2014 P2G Summer Israel Teen Trip.
on programs like this one so that
they can experience the beauty of
Israel’s land and people.” – David
Rabinovich
“Participating in this teen exchange program was one of the
best decisions of my life. Not only
did I get to travel to Israel for two
weeks, I got to stay with an Israeli
host family and truly experience
Israeli culture. Swimming in the
Dead Sea, watching the sunrise on
Masada, and visiting many other
amazing sites in Israel was just incredible. But, eating a Shabbat
dinner with a family of over 20
people was an extraordinary experience that not everyone gets on
their trip to Israel. I also got the
chance to see America through the
eyes of Israelis my age.” – Katy
Smith
Summer travel dates are: June
28-June 13 to Israel; July 18-July
31 to Charlotte. The Jewish Federation offers subsidies for travel.
For more information or to sign
up, please contact Tal Stein, Director of Community Relations
and Israel Affairs at The Jewish
Federation of Greater Charlotte at
[email protected] or at
704-944-6751.Y
Participants are still eligible
for Taglit Birthright Israel Experiences.
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 4
See Israel with Pride, May 26-June 2
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Charlotte and the Jewish
Federations of North America
(JFNA) invite you on a unique and
historic mission to Israel.
See Israel with Pride offers a
unique opportunity to join members of the Jewish LGBTQ community to experience Israel like
never before and give you a
chance to connect with the land
and people of Israel. You will also
learn about the successes and the
challenges they are facing, and to
feel a part of the Jewish collective.
The mission also serves as an
amazing opportunity to see firsthand Federation and its partner’s
work that is changing lives not
only in Israel but around the
world. Israel is considered highly
progressive when it comes to
LGBTQ rights, and by far is the
Tributes to the Jewish
Federation Annual
Campaign
The Jewish Federation of Greater Charlotte thanks and acknowledges
the following tributes made August 1, 2015 – December 4, 2015.
most progressive in the region.
On this mission, you will have
an opportunity join Reuven
Rivlin, President of the State of Israel, for a festive opening dinner.
This once-in-a-lifetime opportunity will focus on work he is doing
to help progress LGBTQ rights in
Israel.
The mission takes place from
May 26–June 2, and will include
a visit to Jerusalem’s Old City, a
Larry Horowitz, CLU, ChFC
L2 Financial
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chance to relax on Tel Aviv’s
world famous beaches, opportunities to meet activists, politicians,
LGBTQ community leaders, and
a chance to have dinner with IDF
soldiers and officers. As a bonus,
there will be a special opportunity
to dance the night away with Israeli pop star Ivri Lider, best-selling artist and the host of The X
Factor Israel.
Whether this is your first trip to
Israel or you are returning as a
seasoned traveler, this is an experience will never forget.
Tel Aviv’s Gay Pride Festival,
one of the largest in the world with
hundreds of thousands of participants will take place on June 3,
and options are available for those
participants who wish to stay and
enjoy the festivities.
To learn more about See Israel
with PRIDE, visit the www.jewishcharlotte.org. Y
In honor of Amy Augustine
By: Alison Lerner
In memory of Leslie Bernstein
By: Jon and Stephanie Simon
In honor of Amy Augustine
By: Stacey Slomka
In memory of Leslie Bernstein
By: Diana Warth
In honor of Claire Krusch
By: Marianne London
In memory of Leslie Bernstein
By: Stephanie Haynes
In honor of Marty and Elaine
Schefflin
By: Barry and Michelle
Goodman
In memory of Leslie Bernstein
By: David and Risa Miller
In honor of Shana Suris
By: Alison Lerner
In honor of Shana Suris
By: Stacey Slomka
In memory of Irma Mayer
By: Pearl Rosenthal
If you would like to make a
Tribute to the Jewish Federation,
please contact the Federation office at 704-944-6761.Y
In memory of Sam Applebaum
By: Howard and Merridith
Glazer
Dr. Ronen Hoffman to Speak
(Continued from page 2)
litical and international arena?
How is it that Israel - the only liberal democracy in the Middle
East, a nation on the cutting edge
of entrepreneurship, innovation
and technology - finds itself increasingly isolated and outcast politically and diplomatically? Is
this simply a reaction to the political stances of particular parties,
or does it stem from a deeper cultural and psychological failure?
Dr. Hoffman will serve as the
first speaker in an ongoing
Jewish Community Relations
Council/Jewish Federation discussion on Israel.
Space is limited. To RSVP
please call or email Tal Stein,
Director of Community Relations
and Israel Affairs at [email protected]
jewishcharlotte.org or 704-9446751.Y
Join us January 3Oth
Book your 2016 vacation
at the show and receive
e
exclusive gifts and offers!
CHARLOTTE CONVENTION CENTER • 11AM-4PM
call 8ì-343-6266 or visit
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SAVE THE
DATE
Annual
Spring
Lecture
April 7
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 5
Youth Visions
Discover Yourself at Hebrew High’s “Portrait of
An Artist”
Taking the ordinary and making it extraordinary was the goal of Hebrew High’s
art class “Portrait of An Artist.” By studying
the work of Israeli artist Hanoch Piven, students set out to create collage characters
made from food, random objects and scraps
of materials. We talked a lot about the things
Piven used to create his caricatures, such as
feathers for eyebrows, buttons for eyes, and
spaghetti for hair. We focused on how we
see our Jewish and secular selves and set out
to find objects that would portray those images in a self-portrait?
Once we gathered our materials, the fun
and playfulness started as we reinvented the
meaning of the objects we used to tell our
story. Each portrait gives insight to who that
person is, how they see themselves, and how
they want the rest of us to see them. It was a
journey of discovery as the portraits came to
life.
See if you can guess who some of the students are by studying their selfies. Y
PRECISION
IS MY INSPIRATION
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 6
SYNAGOGUES
&
CONGREGATIONS
Josh Rubin’s Plumbing, LLC
LICENSED - BONDED - INSURED
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
Tree New Year Observed
Layouts for slabs - Rough-in and Finish
Water Heater Repairs and Replacement
Kitchen/Bath Remodeling
Toilets, Tubs, Faucets, Sink, and Disposal
Repairs/Replacement
Havurat Tikvah will host a Tu
biShevat Seder on January 24, 4
PM, at an undisclosed location.
The event is a revival of ones
that have been held in the past and
will feature a sit-down meal and
service with a focus on the first
fruits of the season and the renewal of life after winter. The
service will bring in some elements of Kabbalistic thought regarding the seasons of growth.
During the event, attendees will
have the opportunity to view two
mono prints which were created in
early 2015 by a small number of
congregational members. Those
who wish to do so can bid on the
one-of-a-kind works of art.
Space is limited and the event
is only open to members and their
guests. Havurat Tikvah will cover
all costs for the Seder.
The congregation will hold
community Shabbat services on
January 9, 10 AM, at Avondale
Presbyterian Church, Aitken
Classroom, 2821 Park Rd. The
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Free Physical Exam for all new clients
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8408 Park Road, Charlotte, NC 28210
704-278-8000
community is welcome to attend.
Havurat Tikvah is a warm, supportive and nurturing Jewish Reconstructionist congregation with
Shabbat services and a full spectrum of holiday observances, as
well as religious educational options for both adults and children.
We are a diverse group of families, singles, and Jewish and interfaith couples who participate in
projects that promote social justice.
We value and depend upon
member participation and leadership for our religious services,
spiritual growth and governance.
Havurat Tikvah is an affiliate of
the Jewish Reconstructionist
Communities, in association with
the Reconstructionist Rabbinical
College.
For more information on upcoming services, programs, membership or other queries, call
980-225-5330, write to Havurat
Tikvah, P.O. Box 12684, Charlotte, NC 28220, email [email protected] or visit
havurattikvah.org. Havurat Tikvah
is also on Facebook at
facebook.com/groups/havurattikvah/.Y
Temple Kol Ami Awarded Federation
Impact Fund Grant
Temple Kol Ami of Fort Mill is
thrilled to announce that we have
been awarded a 2016 Impact and
Innovation Fund Grant by the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Charlotte. Temple Kol Ami intends to use this grant to bring
more access to rabbinic leadership
and Jewish educational and cultural programming to the Greater
York County area, specifically by
utilizing the Rabbi on the Road
program sponsored by the Institute of Southern Jewish Life.
There will be a quarterly Shabbaton sponsored by Temple Kol
Ami, each of which will consist of
Shabbat service, Torah study, cultural programming and religious
school education. We are pleased
to announce that our first Shabbaton will be the weekend of January 22-24 and will be led by Rabbi
Bruce Aft from Congregation
Rabbi Bruce Aft
Adat Reyim in Springfield, VA.
Rabbi Aft was with us last year for
a Shabbaton, and we found him to
be a wonderful and engaging spiritual leader. We are so excited to
welcome Rabbi Aft and his lovely
wife Sue back to York County,
and we hope you will join us to
partake of what will be an enriching and educational weekend. All
events associated with the Shabbaton are free and open to the
public. For more information,
please see our website www.templekolamisc.org or contact us at
[email protected]
Temple Kol Ami is very thankful to the Federation for this opportunity to carry out their
mission of bringing “impactful
programs and services that support and enrich the greater Charlotte Jewish community.” We look
forward to building stronger relationships with the Charlotte community and helping to continue to
contribute to the growth and sustenance of the York County Jewish community. Y
Reverend Barbee, Pastor of Statesville
Avenue Presbyterian Church to Deliver
MLK Shabbat Sermon at Temple Beth El
Each January, Temple Beth El
partners with a local and vibrant
African American Church for
their celebration of the Shabbat
kicking off the Martin Luther
King Weekend. On January 15 at
7 PM, Reverend Amantha Barbee
will deliver the MLK sermon.
Rev. Amantha L Barbee is the pastor at Statesville Avenue Presbyterian Church (USA). She was a
Vocal Performance major at Appalachian State University and
University of North CarolinaCharlotte.
Her love of music led her to 20
years of service as a church musician prior to seminary studies at
Union Presbyterian Seminary
where she earned the E.T. George
Award for excellence in Homiletics and Worship and received her
Master’s Degree in Theology/
Theological Studies. As part of the
exchange, Rabbi Schindler will be
preaching at Statesville Avenue
Presbyterian Church at 11 AM on
Sunday, January 17. Y
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 7
Temple Beth El Presents its 19th Annual Comparative
Religion Series
Politics and Religion: Where is the Line?
Tuesday Evenings January 26 March 1, 7-9 PM, Temple Beth
El
Temple Beth El’s Comparative
Religion Committee invites the
entire Charlotte community to attend the 19th Annual Comparative
Religion Series, “Politics and Religion: Where is the Line?” From
January through March, the series
will examine current and historical perspectives regarding religious beliefs and political
activities and whether religious
viewpoints have any role in our
political debate. Religious leaders
representing several Charlotte
area faiths; politicians sharing
conservative, moderate, and liberal viewpoints; and legal counselors providing various legal
perspectives on religion and politics will discuss how religious institutions have approached
political issues within their congregations, what key judicial decisions have set the boundaries for
that political involvement, and
how the legal lines have changed
across the decades. Our guest lecturers will provide compelling answers to such questions as: How
can religious institutions be effective in creating political and social
change within the confines of the
law? What judicial decisions
have had the most impact on religious institutions? Should per-
sonal religious beliefs of elected
officials influence their behavior
in carrying out their duties?
Rabbi Judith Schindler, Senior
Rabbi of Temple Beth El, will
provide an introduction to the Series on January 26 which will
deepen our understanding of the
course of study, and will encourage us to engage in thought-provoking discussions with our guest
lecturers.
The series will take place at
Temple Beth El (5101 Providence
Road, Charlotte, NC 28226). Sessions will run from 7-9 PM on six
consecutive Tuesday evenings,
beginning January 26. Educators
and religious leaders representing
Judaism, Buddhism, Conservative
Protestantism, Liberal Protestantism, Roman Catholicism,
Islam, and Baptist faiths will offer
their points of view. Throughout
the course of the six week series,
they will be joined by panels of
guests who will add journalistic,
political, and academic assessments in response to your questions on the topic “Politics and
Religion: Where is the Line?”
For a full schedule of speakers,
visit
http://templebethel.org/
events/comparative-religionseries/
The series is offered at no cost
to the public by the Temple Beth
El Comparative Religion Com-
mittee through the Ted and M.E.
Hessberg Endowment which supports community outreach programs and the Sandra Gold
Weinstein Hospitality Fund which
provides refreshments for community-wide programs.
The annual Comparative Religion Series was established 19
years ago with the intent to educate our community, promote understanding and respect for all
faiths, and reveal the commonalities in our differences. For more
information,
please
visit
www.templebethel.org or call
Temple Beth El at 704-3661948.Y
Summer 2016 - Four
Weeks of CGI Ballantyne
A Jewish Summer Camp Conveniently Located
Right Near You in Ballantyne
With the help of the
Jewish Federation of
Greater Charlotte, our
third summer season is
off to a great start.
Our camp is part of
the fastest growing network of Jewish day
camps in the world.
Camp Gan Israel enjoys a wellearned reputation as a trend setter
in Jewish camping with innovative ideas and creative programs
being introduced continuously.
Your child will wait all year to
come back to camp. Campers
enjoy a wide range of exciting activities and field trips in a warm,
caring environment, cultivating
pride and love for the Jewish heritage.
The mission of CGI is to instill
Jewish values in children of all
Jewish backgrounds and all levels
of observance. Our camp program
and activities are imbued with
Jewish ambiance and culture.
Challah baking, stories, Israeli dance,
drama, Jewish and Hebrew songs, group discussions, and beautiful
Jewish crafts, combine
to create an atmosphere of joy, fun and
spirit in each child that
attends. This is all part of the
unique Gan Israel experience. We
have brought it all here. Allow
your child to experience the
magic. This summer, enroll your
child in Camp Gan Israel.
Four weeks of non-stop fun: June
27 - July 22
Sign up for single weeks or all
four and save.
Mini CGI (Preschool) Ages 2-5
Junior CGI Rising K - Rising
3rd Grade
Senior CGI Rising 4th - Rising
6th Grade
Visit www.CGIBallantyne.com
for more details and
information. Y
Your extraordinary child deserves an extraordinary
education. Visit us today to see how Charlotte’s #1 LD
and ADHD school can create opportunities from
challenges and success from frustration.
Admissions Mini-Tours:
Mini-T
M
Tours
o :
Admissions
Adm
issions Open Houses:
Hou ses:
RSVP:
Friday, September 11, 8:30 - 9:30 am
Monday, September 21, 8:30 - 9:30 am
Wednesday, October 14, 8:30 – 10:30 am
Thursday, November 12, 8:30 – 10:30 am
704.365.5490 or
[email protected]
5146 Parkway Plaza Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28217 | 704.365.5490
/JohnCroslandSchool | JohnCroslandSchool.org
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 8
Jewish Learning Institute Introduces a Fascinating New Course This February
The Jewish Course of Why
Jews always have questions
and Judaism offers many traditions and customs that leave us
with the question of “Why?” Why
do we place a pebble on a headstone? Why do we say Mazal
Tov? Why are Jews singled out
for persecution?
The Jewish Course of Why
spans a diverse range of topics,
from fun, light, and off-thebeaten-track questions, to more
complex and controversial issues.
Enjoy a fun and dynamic learning
experience, encounter rational insights into the most intriguing aspects of Judaism, and give your
Jewish knowledge a boost. Sign
up today for an unusually enlightening experience. Please visit
chabadnc.org or myjli.com to register.
The six week course begins on
February 9 with the evening
course and February 10 with the
morning course. The evening
course will meet six consecutive
Does someone important in your life:
w Appear to listen but not hear?
w Have difficulty understanding with
background noise?
w Have difficulty following
conversations in a group?
w Speak louder than necessary?
w Experience an annoying
ringing in the ears?
If you answered “Yes,” WE CAN HELP!
Offering hearing evaluations for children and adults, hearing
aid sales and service, auditory processing disorder evaluation
and treatment.
Dr. Melissa Karp, Au.D, FAAA
Board certified audiologist
1040 Edgewater Corporate Parkway, Indian Land, SC 29707
803-323-8909
(5 minutes from Ballantyne)
www.hearlistenlearn.com
Tuesdays at 7:30 PM and will be
led by Rabbi Yossi Groner. The
morning class will meet on six
consecutive Wednesdays at 11 and
will be led by Rabbi Shlomo
Cohen.
Participants will be provided
with artful text books and useful
tools to continue their quest for
knowledge. Fees for the JLI: $99
per person, $180 per couple. You
can call our office for more information 704-366-3984.
Most Frequently Asked Questions
To develop the course and to
select the most frequently wondered-about
questions,
JLI
reached out to its student base and
asked them to submit their most
perplexing questions about Jewish
culture and religion.
In a style that allows for easy
conversation and in-depth discussion, the highly acclaimed course
endeavors to tackle fifty “why”
questions about Judaism. The
course is not about the “what?”
and “how?” It is about exploring
the scholarly and sophisticated rationale behind mysterious Jewish
beliefs and practices. Debunking
common misconceptions and introducing little known but vital
facts, the course will surprise, intrigue, and equip students with an
arsenal of ideas about the richness, relevance, and scope of their
heritage.
Starting a Deeper Discussion
There are few questions about
Judaism whose answer can be
packaged neatly in a nutshell and
declared the answer. The course
therefore strives to a different
goal: to share perspectives, spark
curiosity, deepen the conversation,
shed light on oft-wondered-about
beliefs and practices, and let participants decide on the answers for
themselves. The goal is for students to walk away from The Jewish Course of Why with an
understanding that Judaism contains a vastness of knowledge and
that it is waiting for them to discover its deep mysteries.
Some of the fifty questions in
the course:
Why have the Jews outlasted so
many other groups of people
throughout history? Why were
there tribes that were “lost”? And
why were they never found? Why
is the Star of David a Jewish symbol? Why do some Jews say they
are the “chosen people”? Is this
not chauvinistic? Why is the Land
of Israel important to the Jews?
Why would anyone want to remain Jewish after so much suffering throughout the ages? Why
doesn’t Jewish law have provisions for someone who desires to
convert out of Judaism? Why
doesn’t Judaism seek converts?
Why are eggs pareve, when the
chickens that make the eggs are
not? Why aren’t vegan foods automatically kosher? Why is Judaism caught up with details?
Why does the Talmud prescribe
different requirements for men
and women? Why does Judaism
place emphasis on praying with a
congregation? Shouldn’t prayer be
a personal experience? Why do
we pray? Doesn’t God know what
He is doing? Do we think we can
change His mind? Why am I responsible for my actions if God
knows what I will do in advance?
Why are we born with inclinations
that we are forbidden to act upon?
Why don’t Jews accept Jesus?
Why does the Bible instruct us to
“fear” God? Isn’t fear a negative
emotion? Why did Moses have a
stutter? Why does the Bible call
for animal sacrifice? Isn’t it inhumane and violent? Why is slavery
sanctioned by the Torah? Why do
Jews follow a lunar calendar?
Why do some Jews eat gefilte fish
and cholent? Why do we place
pebbles on a headstone? Why do
we light candles on a yahrtzeit?
Why do some people hold up a
little finger when the Torah is
lifted? Why do Jews toast with
“L’chaim”? Y
Pre-Tu BiShevat
Shabbaton Dinner on
Friday, January 22
A LIFETIME OF LEARNING BEGINS
WITH A WALK THROUGH OUR DOORS.
Charlotte Prep understands children are inherently
hungry to learn. Our child-centered focus and
innovative approach to education ensures that each
one of our children reaches their full potential.
Visit us today : charlotteprep.org | 704-366-5994
Congregation Ohr HaTorah invites all within the Charlotte Jewish community to an inspirational
Friday night dinner honoring Tu
biShevat – New Year for trees
which falls this year on Monday
January 22.
Tu biShevat is one of the exciting holidays observed in Israel
each winter as the Talmud designated it as the Rosh Hashanah for
trees. In Israel new trees are
planted on this day and many Jewish communities in Diaspora celebrate by eating from the five
fruits with which Israel is praised
in the Torah.
Ohr HaTorah will host is midwinter Shabbaton on Friday, January 22 at 5:20 PM with a
fabulous Shabbaton dinner and
exciting program for children and
adults.
Join friends and family for an
uplifting evening with delicious
Shabbat cuisine, featuring an
array of delightful Israeli wines as
we explore the deeper meaning of
the Tu biShevat holiday. Learn
about the significance of this exciting holiday and its rich rituals
and why we people celebrate a
New Year for trees.
The Shabbaton will begin with
candle lighting at 5:23 PM. Followed by a Shabbat service at
5:30 and Shabbat Dinner at 6:30
PM. Cost of Shabbaton is $20 per
person - $54 per family. To reserve, visit the payment page at
www.chabadnc.org or mail a
check to 6619 Sardis Road, Charlotte, NC 28270. For more information, please call 704-366-3984
or email: [email protected]
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 9
First Ever Public Menorah Lighting in
Union County
BBQ for
your next
event?
Absolutely
yes!
w B’nai Mitzvah
w Beef, Lamb, Poultry
w Holidays & Parties
w Exotic Game & Seafood
w Kosher & non-Kosher
w Vegetarian
We
We Teach
Teach BBQ
BBQ and
and Outdoor
Outdoor
Cooking
Cooking Classes
Classes
Call Charlotte’s Jewish grilling expert for details
Steve Maher, the new Mayor of Waxhaw was honored with
lighting the Shamash. He is seen above with Rabbi Yisroel
Levin. At right, over 150 people attended.
At Stonecrest, a
unique balloon
menorah was
erected and lit.
“Integrity
simply means
a willingness
not to
violate one’s
identity.”
–Erich Fromm
Robert “Ernie” Adler, Smokemaster
704-577-1777 [email protected]
“If it was living or growing I’ll grill it”
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 10
Jewish Family Services
Community Celebrates Our Seniors at the 12th Annual Senior
Chanukah Party
JFS extends a special thanks to
our sponsors SouthState Bank and
Norman Steinberger, and to all of
our volunteers for this event, in-
cluding Monty Bennett, Ruth
Brandt, Bill Cassell, Andrea Cronson, Terry and Jaryd Dubin, Laura
Milgrim, Jennifer Collman, Carol
Connors, Myra Diuguid, Rob
Friedman, Gail Halverson, Matt
Luftglass, Dale Polsky, Harry
Sparks, Marcia Stern, Robin
Taback, Kelly Markiewitz, Allison Winshel, Lisa Wielunski,
Moishe House staff (Jason, Jena,
Jen, Laura, Rachel).
Thank you for making
Chanukah special.
Jewish Family Services wishes
to thank all of you who made this
year so special for our families.
We know we can always count on
our community members to bring
the joy of Chanukah to the people
in our community who need a little help over the holidays.
Thank you to the families from
Charlotte Jewish Preschool,
Hadassah of Lake Norman,
Levine JCC, Moishe House, Temple Beth El, Temple Israel; employees of Hilton Charlotte Center
City; the Pickett and Wernicoff
families, who donated over 200
gifts for JFS clients for Chanukah.
*Please note, this article was
written 12/1/2015 in order to meet
the CJN deadline. If you were not
mentioned in this article, please
accept our apologies. We will acknowledge your generosity in the
February issue. Y
Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 11
JFS Online Auction a Success
Thank you to everybody who
participated in Jewish Family
Services annual online auction.
All of our auction items were
donated by businesses and members in our community and 100%
of the proceeds benefit our agency.
The auction results were amazing,
raising almost $3,000 to benefit
Jewish Family Services. Please
visit the following businesses that
donated items for the auction and
thank them for their support.
Action Plus; Blumenthal Per-
forming Arts Center; Charlotte
Parenting Solutions; Charlotte
Running Company; College Admission Strategies; James Corey,
CPA; CVS/Pharmacy; Dick’s
Sporting Goods; Disney; Dresslers;
Garrity & Gossage; Harris Teeter;
HomeGoods; J-Force at Levine
JCC; Maid Brigade; Midas Fabrics; Perry’s; Publix; Riverbank
Zoo and Garden; Gary Rosenthal;
S&D Coffee; Start 2 Finish;
TCBY; TinyPrints.com; Window
Genie Y
WORK WITH A LEADER IN
CHARLOTTE REAL ESTATE
EXECUTIVE REALTY
JFS Donations in October 2016
Jewish Family Services received the following donations for
Tribute Cards in October 2015.
Thank you for allowing JFS to
honor your friends and loved
ones.
IN MEMORY OF
Your mother, Miriam Aizemman, to Ben Aizenman from Marvin Barman and Sharon Taubman,
Bill Cassell and Ruth Brandt,
Alan and Ruth Goldberg, Samuel
and Linda Levy
Your loving husband, Marc, to
Ruth Ben-Joseph from Keith
Greenspon
Your daughter Leslie Bernstein, to Bobbi and Donald Bernstein from Colin and Elaine
Cigler, Carol Gorelick, Annette
and Richard Gross, David Kronovet, Michael and Heidi Rotberg
Dotty Girard, to Maxine Dewhurst from Myron and Lynn
Slutsky
Rose Weisman to Elaine Dinerman from Abe and Bette Bober,
Carol Gorelick, Myron and Lynn
Slutsky
Your husband, Stan, to Anita
Grey from Celia Mandel
Sandra Lynn Kornstein from
David Kronovet
Irma Mayer to Dale Sklow and
the Mayer family from Jon and
Teri Karlin, Eleanor Goldman
Your mother and sister, Judy
Nicholson, to Ellise and Sandy
Nicholson and Sam and Ollie
Polk from Jack and Vera Mendel,
Edwin and Jill Newman, Larry
and Dale Polsky, Marvin and
Anita Shapiro, Leonard and Judi
Strause, Sandra Weinstein, David
Kronovet, Diane Peery
Alan Shanen to Billy and Fran
Schwartz from Gary and Janie
Levinson
Leonard Slesinger to M.L.
Slesinger from Abe and Bette
Bober
Your Mother to Ken Stern from
Barry and Laura Reich
Ian Michael Stutts to Terry and
Jackie Stutts from Swooz Brazzell
HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO
Rosalyn Mann from Abe and
Bette Bober
Elise Menaker from Gloria
Goldberg
Gideon Ze’ev’s to Gabe and
Nancy Kaunitz from Chris and
Tair Giudice
IN HONOR OF
Jerome Olinger from Marvin
Barman
MAZEL TOV ON
Your granddaughter’s Bat
Mitzvah to Sam and Ollie Polk on
your from Edwin and Jill New-
man
Your Bar Mitzvah to Sam
Schulman from Janet Baldinger,
David Banks, Bob and Pat
Berman, Bennett and Sara Cardwell, John and Judy Cedarholm,
Jeffrey and Betsy Cohen, Femi
Cole, Arnold and Jean Dobbins,
Christopher Dobbins, Jennifer
Dobbins, Charles and Kelly Ferguson, Charlene Galanti, David
Gilbert, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Gordon, Andrew and Cynthia
Horwitz, Cole Jessey and Family,
James Kirwan, Jena Krieger,
Adam and Kim Levy, Christina
Litterello, Sherry Makenson, Angelo Manna, David and Risa
Miller, David and Judy Miller,
Sally Nussman, Lowndes and
Cynthia Quinlan, Nicola Rivera,
Marc Rosenthal, Eugene and
Dorothy Sangmuah, Todd and
Stacey Schanzlin, Bob and Harriet
Selverstone, Melissa Sicard,
David and Shelly Spiegel, Jeanne
Tappy, Jessica S. Tornek,
Lawrence Tornek, David and
Debra Van Glish, Lisa Harris
Zalis
Your marriage, to Jeff Addy
and Joel Blady from Herman and
Barbara Ziegler
Gladys Cherny, Aleen Epstein,
June Hirschmann, Fran Kaplan,
Judy Kaufmann, Penny Krieger,
Shelley Leibman, Andrea McCleary, Phyllis Romaine
Food Pantry Donations: Temple Israel and Temple Beth El
Congregants, Sheryl Effren, Judy
Kaufmann, Fern Sanderson, Talmud Torah, Gideon Zev Kaunitz
Food Drives: JCC Tennis
Team, JCC Soccer Leagues, CJDS
4th grade, Havurat Tikvah congregants, Mitzvah Munchkins at CJP
[email protected]
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HAPPY ANNIVERSARY TO
Simon and Mary Wojnowich
from Gloria Goldberg Y
Thank you to the following people who contributed their
time to Jewish Family Services in October.
Volunteers: Jennifer Collman,
Andrea Cronson, Sheryl Effren,
Mel & Caren Frank, Robert Friedman, Gail Halverson, Becca
Horner, Tara Hubara, Bob Jacobson, Karen Knoble, Frada Mozenter, Margaret Musa, Barbara Rein,
Jenny Rosenthal, Janice Shubin,
Harry Sparks, Jeff & Stacy
Strauch, Amalia Warshenbrot,
Mike Weinberg
Hadassah Cooks: Barbara
Abrams, Bonnie Berman, Ilene
Cantor, Sharon Cavanaugh,
704-975-8500
& Jewish Preschool on Sardis
Special Recognition: Thank
you Abby Adams and Jillian
Arena for helping assemble Mitzvah Munchkins materials; thank
you Moishe House staff for sorting food drive donations.
Simcha Centerpieces: In
honor of Marcus Kirschner’s Bar
Mitzvah, Alex Sherr’s Bar Mitzvah, Annie Le Baron’s Bat Mitzvah, Sammy Baumstein’s Bar
Mitzvah, Hannah Strauss’ Bat
Mitzvah Y
“If you want people to think you are wise,
agree with them.”
–Yiddish Folk Saying
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The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 12
Levine-Sklut Judaic Library
and Resource Center
Kids Can Make a Difference
By Debby Block, director,
Levine-Sklut Judaic Library and
Resource Center
Recently, a parent came into
the library and said that her children had collected their tzedakah
money over several months and
would like to donate their
tzedakah to the Library. As the Director of the library, I was very
touched by the thoughtful gesture
- and even more touched that
these children thought of donating
to the Library — but honestly, I
was expecting the children to
bring in a handful of coins. A few
weeks later I received a plastic
bag with the tzedakah money
from Natan, Alex, Ben, and
Naomi Bixen. When I opened it, I
found $60! To say that I was astonished is an understatement.
A big thank you to the Bixen
the library. We hope other children that enjoy the Library will be
inspired by the Bixens and understand that even kids can make a
difference. Y
The Bixen kids.
children. Your generous donation
will provide the Library with at
least five new children’s books for
Social-Media Challenged: Join our Class
Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, oh my! There is a wide variety of ways to communicate
through social media and, for
many of us, the options and the
technology seem confusing, scary
or just off-putting. But social
media is here to stay and even our
presidential candidates are turning
to social media more and more. So
now is the time to hop on board
and learn how you too can get
comfortable with social media.
With the guidance of skilled
expert, Tamar Raucher, we will
Tamar Raucher
explore the types of social media
and how to safely join and participate in several forms of social
media.
Date: Monday, Februray 1
Time: 7:30 PM
Where: Levine-Sklut Judaic
Library, 5007 Providence Road,
Suite 107
Cost: Free, but space is limited.
Reservations:
Required,
please contact Debby Block 704944-6780 or [email protected]
“Love the Library” Donors
The Levine-Sklut Judaic Library and Resource Center would
like to thank the following individuals and families for their
generous support during the last
month.
Publisher - $500 and up
Barbara and Jerry Levin
Charitable Foundation
Editor - $250-$499
Daniel and Janice Bernstein
Ross and Nance Levin
Richard Osborne
Ed and Debora Pizer
Author - $100-$249
Robert Haber and Shannon
Crystal
David and Debby Block
Stuart and Lynne Cojac
Seth and Carrie Feit
Lewis and Janice Fisher
Leonard and Shelley Friedman
Edie Gelber-Beechler
Chuck and Dale Glick
Burt and Donna Greenspon
Michael and Beverly Grey
Richard and Paula Klein
Jaime and Elise Kosofsky
Steven and Polly Menaker
Adrian and Andrea Mesoznik
Ed and Jill Newman
Ilya and Chantal Rubin
Dan and Toby Ruda
Edwin and Leslie Rusgo
Robert and Stacey Selkin
Paul and Marcia Simon
Marc and Shari Sokolowicz
Norman Steinberger
Kenneth and Marcia Stern
Mark and Amy Vitner
Poet - $50-$99
Michele Barer
Michael and Elaine Denenberg
Robert and Leigh Jacobson
Edward and Sue Kanterman
Janet Levy
David and Risa Miller
Allan and Marcelle Oxman
Steven and Melissa Raphael
Leon and Mary Rutman
Susan Stafford
Robert and Marsha Stickler
Robert and Anne Yudell
Book Enthusiast – up to $49
Keith and Debbie Agisim
Anonymous (2)
David and Bonnie Bornstein
Julie Bradlow
Bernice Bramson
Richard and Susan Brophy
Loren Gelber
Phil and Marci Goldberg
Andrew and Dana Kapustin
Eugene and Ali Kavadlo
Nancy Kerstein
Cheri Martin
Gregory and Margaret Musa
Lee and Wendy Pake
Shelley Pawlyk
Gerald and Barbara Schapiro
Morris and Lynne Sheffer
Richard and Janis Silverman
Ruth Silverman
Robert Solow
Harry and Laurie Sparks
Michael and Tal Stein
Ron and Janice Weiner
Barnet and Harriett Weinstock
The February issue The Charlotte Jewish News will feature the
complete list of the “Friends of
the Library” donors.Y
Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 13
Community News
duce the carbon footprint of your
A Tu biShevat Confession
Shalom Park agency or institution.
By Lisa Garfinkle
Let me share a guilty secret.
Despite my commitment to environmentalism and my position as
Shalom Green project manager, I
have always found it difficult to
muster enthusiasm for Tu biShevat, the “New Year for the Trees,”
which falls this year on January
25. As a Southern girl with a deep
aversion to cold, the thought of
celebrating trees and nature at a
time of year when days are short
and typically freezing, and, let’s
face it, nature is not at its most
beautiful, has never been incredibly appealing. The timing of the
holiday seems better suited for
warmer climates, say, that of Israel, while the secular Earth Day,
which falls on April 22 is more
suited to my internal thermostat
and seasonal preference.
However, my experience over
the past year working on Shalom
Green has led to an attitude adjustment. The knowledge I’ve
gained about Judaism’s profound
connection to the natural world,
combined with a renewed appreciation for the dedication of those
who make Jewish environmentalism a priority in their lives, and a
humbling awareness of just how
little I know about natural cycles
and the effect of our human activities on them has convinced me
that every day should be a day for
celebrating nature. Thus, any holiday dedicated to such a celebration is worthwhile.
Our Jewish ancestors were way
ahead of me on this, perhaps because in their time, living in harmony with nature was a more
immediate matter of life or death
than it is today. Knowing when to
plant, what to plant, when to harvest, and how to keep the land fertile meant the difference between
eating and starving. And from the
beginning, Judaism has appreciated trees as important symbols of
the essential role of nature in sustaining life. In Deuteronomy, for
instance, the Torah forbids us
from cutting down fruit trees,
even during wartime. According
to the Midrash, the Jewish people’s first act upon entering the
Holy Land was to plant trees. And
the Torah, itself, is known as “the
tree of life.”
In modern times, our connection to the earth is more remote.
The results of actions that impact
the environment may take years or
even decades to become evident.
However, Jews in Israel continue
to plant trees on Tu biShevat, and
throughout the year, supported by
donations from Jews across the
world, in an effort to renew the
land. As a result, Israel was one of
the only countries in the world to
enter the 21st century with a net
gain in the number of trees. This
continued dedication to preserving the earth is critical, because
while the effects of living out of
harmony with nature — cancer,
lung disease, contaminated water,
soil and air — may become evident more slowly today than they
did in ancient times, they are no
less devastating.
Over the past year, Shalom
Green has worked to make the environment and sustainable living
a priority for the Shalom Park
Community. We have obtained
energy audits on all Shalom Park
buildings and put in motion plans
for reducing our community’s car-
You’re Never Too Young to
Garden!
J-Tots, Charlotte Jewish Preschool, and Charlotte Jewish Day School 3rd Graders Enjoy the Shalom Park
Community Garden
* Help plan environmental forums and educational activities for
the Shalom Park Community.
bon footprint. We built and
planted the Shalom Park Community Garden, which will serve as
an environmental learning hub for
all ages, allowing community
members to experience directly
planting, nurturing and harvesting
crops. The Shalom Green Challenge has enrolled more than sixty
families in an effort to promote
sustainable living at home, and
Shalom Green continues to work
to raise awareness about environmental issues across Shalom Park.
As we enter our second year,
Shalom Green needs your help to
continue and expand these efforts.
So on this Tu biShevat, plant a
tree in Israel or at home, host or
attend a Tu biShevat Seder, eat the
fruits mentioned in the Torah pomegranates, figs, grapes, olives,
and dates, start seeds for your
spring garden, but most importantly, join Shalom Green and
commit to caring about the earth
every day - not just on environmentally themed holidays. Here
are ways for you to get involved:
* Volunteer to help in the
Shalom Park Community Garden
or join the Garden Committee
* Join the Shalom Green Steering Committee to help move the
Environmental Initiative forward
in year two.
* Get involved in efforts to re-
* Participate in the Shalom
Green Challenge and work to live
more sustainably at home.
For information, email [email protected]
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The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 14
Berger Family Ner Tamid Finds Permanent Home
By Jonathan Berger with Kelly
Reed Keeling
Many services now have been
held at the Mindy Ellen Levine
Memorial Chapel in the Memorial
Building at the Hebrew Cemetery.
Visitors are enveloped in the
Chapel’s warmth and beauty.
Light bounces off the wooden
clad columns and the creamy marble. The Memorial Wall is filled
with names of loved ones, remembered, regardless of where they
are buried. The atmosphere is intimate and peaceful. At the far end
of the Chapel stands the former
Temple Beth El ark, made of
veined white marble, complete
with its resplendent golden lions.
Suspended above the Ark is a
beautiful bronze Ner Tamid, an
everlasting light.
But how did the Hebrew
Cemetery come to have such a
beautiful lamp in its chapel? Its
presence is thanks to the family of
Jonathan Berger of Temple Israel,
who donated this family heirloom.
Jonathan shares the lamp’s history
and how it came to grace Charlotte’s Hebrew Cemetery:
The Ner Tamid was purchased
in the late 1800s by Baruch and
Rebecca Neu, my great grandparents. They lived in Lengfeld IM
Odenwald Germany. Baruch and
Rebecca had three children: Jennie, Hugo, and my grandfather,
Alfred. Rebecca died in 1926. Alfred married Carola Berberich,
and they had one child, my
mother – Renate (b. 11/23/1930).
In 1928, two of the
three siblings, Jennie and
Hugo, immigrated to the
United States. Jewish
families were persecuted
in Lengfeld, however,
Alfred and his family
managed to move to
Frankfurt, and then immigrate with Baruch to
the US in 1939. Baruch
brought the lamp with
him. The family lived together in New York City.
In 1942, Baruch died,
and shortly thereafter, Alfred, Carola, and Renate
moved to Vineland, NJ,
where they purchased a
chicken farm. The family
inherited the lamp and
displayed it in a very special place in their home.
Renate Neu married
my father, Stefan Berger
in 1953. They had two
children, Michael and
The Berger family with the ner tamid.
me. My mother’s parents
passed in close succession. Carola died in 1969; Alfred and its history. It brought back
died in 1970. My mother inherited fond memories of her parents,
the lamp, and my parents always grandparents, and life in Vineland
displayed it in a special place in and Germany. Her goal was to
find a special place for the lamp to
their homes in Erie, PA.
In 2006, my parents, Stefan and be where many people could apRenate, moved to Charlotte to be preciate its beauty and history forcloser to my family. They lived at ever. She approached a couple of
Sunrise across the street from museums and synagogues, but
Shalom Park. The lamp, once was unable to find the special
again, found a special place in place for which she was looking.
My father, Stefan, died in
their home.
My mother cherished the lamp Charlotte on April 27, 2013, and
my mother, Renate, died in
Charlotte on August 6, 2013.
They were soul mates, very
much in love and very dependent on one another.
They are buried side by side
in the Hebrew Cemetery in
Charlotte, very close to the
meaningful artifact and is caring
new Cemetery building.
I inherited the lamp and for it the way my mother wished.
The continual care of the
continued the journey to find
a permanent home for it Cemetery is the responsibility of
where people could enjoy its our Jewish community. To make a
beauty and history. As the meaningful financial gift, to purnew cemetery building was chase a memorial plaque ($1000
being constructed with its each) or to preplan a funeral,
beautiful ark, I noticed that thereby saving your family thouthere was no Ner Tamid sands of dollars and making the
(everlasting light) in front of transition easier, please contact
the ark. I approached the Director Sandra Goldman at 704team that was designing 576-1859 or [email protected] building the building, cemetery.org. Y
showed them the beautiful lamp, and told them
its story. They felt it
would be a great addition. Today my mother’s
shabbat lamp is being
utilized as the Ner
Tamid for everyone to enjoy
in the building, hanging in
front to the Ark.
I can see my parent’ graves
from the entrance of the
Cemetery Building. It brings
a smile to my face and a tear
to my eye, having the lamp
on display in a special place
so close to where my parents
have been laid to rest. I am
grateful that the Hebrew
Cemetery has adopted this Michael Berger at his parents’ graveside.
Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 15
JCC Legacy Donors and
Distinctive Members
Honored in a Private
Reception
This year’s Annual Meeting
was immediately preceded by a
reception for Levine JCC Legacy
Donors and Distinctive members.
The Lerner Courtyard was completely transformed with beautiful
lights and seating to thank these
members for their generosity to
the Sandra and Leon Levine Jewish Community Center. The
evening was also an opportunity
for our new CEO, Peter Blair, to
meet these committed members of
the LJCC Family and introduce
them to his beautiful family.
Everyone was charmed by Peter
and his lovely wife Traci, as well
as their sons Hudson and Cohen.
Peter spoke briefly at the reception, thanking the attendees for
welcoming his family so warmly
and for their generosity and dedication to the LJCC. He shared his
belief that the relationships built
upon the support of our J community are the foundational strength
of our Charlotte Jewish community. He recognized that the financial contributions made by so
many of our LJCC members have
been the key to our success and
will ensure the continued success
of our organization’s mission.
As a part of our LJCC Distinctive Member Circle, you ensure
that we are able to provide membership and camp scholarships for
those in our community who are
less fortunate. Our Distinctive
members also support the LJCC’s
Senior and Social action programming. If you would like more information about The Levine
Jewish Community Center Distinctive Member Circle, please
contact Susan Lerner, Membership Manager at 704-944-6741 or
[email protected]
When you create a Jewish
Legacy and designate the LJCC as
a sole or partner recipient, you
help to ensure that the LJCC continues to flourish, allowing our
children and their children to have
the vibrant and nurturing community that exists today. For more information about the Create Your
Jewish Legacy program, please
contact Shellie Barer at 704-9446744 or [email protected]
The evening, catered by Plate
Perfect, began with passed and
plated hors d’oeuvres along with
selected wine and beer. It was the
perfect opportunity for our guests
- long standing members, new
members, new and seasoned
members of the 2015/2016 LJCC
Board – to mingle. Y
Michael Sinsheimer, Scott Menaker, Pam Menaker,
Roni Fishkin
Annie Lord, Michelle Perlmutter, George Cronson, Jack
Levinson, Staci Mond, Glenda Bernhardt
Michael Van Glish, Mark Lerner, Susan Lerner, Lynn Edelstein, Eric Lerner, Paul Edelstein
David Krusch, Claire Krusch, David Cohen, Traci
Walker Blair, Peter Blair
L’dor V’ Dor, three generations of the VanGlish/Perlin family enjoy the Distinctive Member event: Debra
Van Glish, Jordan Van Glish, Mark Perlin
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 18
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ΨϮ͕ϳϬϬ
ϳϬϬ
^ĞƌǀĞƐĂƐƌĞƉƌĞƐĞŶƚĂƟǀĞǀŽŝĐĞŽĨƚŚĞŵĞƌŝĐĂŶ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
^Ğƌ
ǀĞƐĂƐƌĞƉƌĞƐĞŶƚĂƟǀĞ ǀŽŝĐĞŽĨƚŚĞŵĞƌŝĐĂŶ :ĞǁŝƐŚ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚƚLJ
:ĞǁŝƐŚŽƵŶĐŝůŽĨ>ĂŬĞEŽƌŵĂŶ
:ĞǁŝƐŚ ŽƵŶĐŝů ŽĨ >ĂŬĞ EŽƌŵĂĂŶ
Ψϭϱ͕ϬϬϬ
Ψϭϱ͕ϬϬϬ
ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŵŝŶŐƚŽĞŶƌŝĐŚĂŶĚƐƚƌĞŶŐƚŚĞŶ:ĞǁŝƐŚůŝĨĞŝŶƚŚĞ>ĂŬĞEŽƌŵĂŶĂƌĞĂ
ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŵŝŶŐƚ
Ž ĞŶ
ŶƌŝĐŚ ĂŶĚ ƐƚƌĞŶŐƚŚĞŶ:ĞǁŝƐŚůŝĨĨĞ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ >ĂŬĞ EŽƌŵĂŶ ĂƌĞĂ
:Ğ
ǁŝƐŚĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂů>ŽĂŶ&ƵŶĚ
Ě
:ĞǁŝƐŚĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂů>ŽĂŶ&ƵŶĚ
Ψϲ͕
Ψϲ͕ϬϬϬ
ϬϬϬ
WƌŽǀŝĚĞƐŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚͲĨƌĞĞůŽĂŶƐƚŽŚĂƌůŽƩĞĂƌĞĂĐŽůůĞŐĞƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐ͘
WƌŽ
ǀŝĚĞƐŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚͲĨƌĞĞůŽĂŶƐƚŽŚĂƌůŽƩĞĂƌĞĂĐŽůůĞŐĞƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐ͘
ΨϭϬ͕ϬϬϬ
ΨϭϬ͕ϬϬϬ
:ĞǁŝƐŚdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ&ƵŶĚ
:Ğ
ǁŝƐŚdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ&ƵŶĚ
^ƵďƐŝĚŝĞƐĨŽƌƐƵŵŵĞƌĐĂŵƉƐĂŶĚŽƚŚĞƌ:ĞǁŝƐŚĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƟĞƐ
^Ƶď
ƐŝĚŝĞƐĨĨŽƌ
Ž ƐƵŵŵĞƌ ĐĂŵƉƐ ĂŶ
ŶĚ ŽƚŚĞƌ :ĞǁŝƐŚ ĞdždžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞŽƉƉŽƌƚƚƵŶŝƟĞƐ
:ĞǁŝƐŚ&ĂŵŝůLJ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ
:Ğ
ǁŝƐŚ &ĂŵŝůLJ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ
ϬϬϬ
ΨϮϲϬ͕
ΨϮϲϬ͕ϬϬϬ
WƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂůĐŽƵŶƐĞůŝŶŐ͕ĨĂŵŝůLJĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ͕ĂŶĚƐŽĐŝĂůƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ
WƌŽĨ
ĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂů
Ğ
ĐŽƵŶƐĞůŝŶŐ͕ĨĨĂŵŝůLJ
Ă LJĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ͕ĂŶĚƐŽĐŝĂůƐƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ
:ĞǁŝƐŚ&ĂŵŝůLJ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞƐdnjĞĚĂŬĂŚ&ƵŶĚ
:Ğ
ǁŝƐŚ&ĂŵŝůLJ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞƐdnjĞĚĂŬŬĂŚ&ƵŶĚ
Ψϭϱ͕ϬϬϬ
Ψϭϱ͕ϬϬϬ
Ψϴϳϰ͕
Ψϴϳϰ͕ϯϲϵ
ϯϲϵ
&&ĞĚĞƌĂƟŽŶ͛ƐĐĂŵƉĂŝŐŶ͕ŽƉĞƌĂƟŽŶĂů͕ŽƵƚƌĞĂĐŚ͕ĂŶĚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJƌĞůĂƟŽŶƐĞdžƉĞŶƐĞƐ
ĞĚĞƌĂƟŽŶ͛͛Ɛ ĐĂŵƉĂŝŐŶ͕ŽƉĞƌĂƟ
ƟŽŶĂů͕ŽƵƚƌĞĂĐŚ͕ĂŶĚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJƌĞĞůĂƟŽŶƐĞdžƉĞŶƐĞƐ
Jewish
Je
wish Pr
Preschool
eschool on Sar
Sardis
dis
ΨϭϬ
ΨϭϬ͕
ΨϭϬ͕ϬϬϬ
ϬϬϬ
,ŽůŽĐĂƵƐƚĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂůǁŽƌŬƐŚŽƉƐĂŶĚĚŝƐƉůĂLJƐĨŽƌƉƵďůŝĐĂŶĚƉƌŝǀĂƚĞƐĐŚŽŽůƚĞĂĐŚĞƌƐ
,ŽůŽĐ
ĂƵƐƚ ĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂů ǁŽƌŬƐŚŽ
ŽƉƐĂŶĚĚŝƐƉůĂLJƐĨĨŽƌƉƵďůŝĐĂŶĚƉƌŝ
Ž
ǀĂƚĞ ƐĐŚŽŽů ƚĞĂĐŚĞƌƐ
Ψϯϵ͕
Ψϯϵ͕ϬϬϬ
ϬϬϬ
WƌŽŵŽƚĞƐ:ĞǁŝƐŚůŝĨĞŽŶĐŽůůĞŐĞĐĂŵƉƵƐĞƐĂĐƌŽƐƐEŽƌƚŚĂƌŽůŝŶĂ
WƌŽŵŽƚ
ĞƐ :ĞǁŝƐŚůŝĨĨĞ ŽŶ ĐŽůůĞŐĞĞĐĂŵƉƵƐĞƐĂĐƌŽƐƐEŽƌƚŚĂƌŽůŝŶĂ
Ψϭϱ͕
Ψϭϱ͕ϬϬϬ
ϬϬϬ
^ƚƌĞŶŐƚŚĞŶƚŚĞŝĚĞŶƟƟĞƐŽĨ:ĞǁŝƐŚĨ
^ƚƌĞŶŐƚŚĞŶƚŚĞŝĚĞŶƟƟĞƐŽĨ:ĞǁŝƐŚĨĂŵŝůŝĞƐĂŶĚƚŚĞŝƌƌĞůĂƟŽŶƐŚŝƉƐƚŽƚŚĞ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
ǁ ĨĂ
ĂŵŝůŝĞƐĂŶĚƚŚĞŝƌƌĞůĂƟŽŶƐŚŝƉ
ƉƐƚŽƚŚĞ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
ďLJŽīĞƌŝŶŐĨƌĞĞ͕ŚŝŐŚƋƵĂůŝƚLJ:ĞǁŝƐŚďŽŽŬƐĂŶĚŵƵƐŝĐƚŽĨĂŵŝůŝĞƐƌĂŝƐŝŶŐ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶĂŐĞƐ
ď
LJŽī
īĞƌŝŶŐĨƌĞĞ͕ŚŝŐŚƋƵĂůŝƚLJ:Ğ
Ğ
ĞǁŝƐŚďŽŽŬƐĂŶĚŵƵƐŝĐƚŽĨĨĂ
ĂŵŝůŝĞƐƌĂŝƐŝŶŐ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶĂŐĞƐ
ƐŝdžŵŽŶƚŚƐƚŚƌŽƵŐŚĞŝŐŚƚLJĞĂƌƐ
Ɛŝdž
ŵŽŶƚŚƐƚŚƌŽƵŐŚĞŝŐŚƚLJĞĂƌƐƐ
^ĂŶĚƌĂĂŶĚ>ĞŽŶ>ĞǀŝŶĞ:ĞǁŝƐŚŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJĞŶƚĞƌ
^ĂŶĚƌ
Ă ĂŶĚ >ĞŽŶ >ĞǀŝŶĞ :ĞǁŝƐƐŚŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJĞŶƚĞƌ
ϬϬϬ
ΨϯϮϬ͕
ΨϯϮϬ͕ϬϬϬ
ΨϭϮ͕ϱϬϬ
ΨϭϮ͕ϱϬϬ
ŵďƌĂĐĞƐ:ĞǁŝƐŚǀĂůƵĞƐĂŶĚďƵŝůĚƐ:ĞǁŝƐŚ/ĚĞŶƟƚLJďLJƉƌŽǀŝĚŝŶŐĂƐƵŵŵĞƌĞŶƌŝĐŚŵĞŶƚ
ŵďƌĂ ĞƐ:Ğ
ŵďƌĂĐ
ĞƐ :ĞǁŝƐŚǀĂůƵĞƐĂŶĚďƵ
ŝƐŚ Ăů ĞƐ ĂŶĚ ďƵŝůĚƐ:Ğ
ŝůĚƐ :ĞǁŝƐŚ/ĚĞŶ
ŝƐŚ /ĚĞŶƟƚLJď
Ɵƚ ďLJƉƌŽǀŝĚŝŶŐĂ
ŝĚŝŶŐ ĂƐƵŵŵĞƌĞŶƌŝĐŚŵĞŶ
Ă Ɛ ŵŵĞƌ ĞŶƌŝ ŚŵĞŶƚ
ƚ
ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵĨŽƌĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶŽĨƉŽǀĞƌƚLJŝŶD^ƐĐŚŽŽůƐ
ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵĨ
ĨŽƌĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶŽĨƉŽ
Ž
ǀĞƌƚƚLJŝŶD^ƐĐŚŽŽůƐ
ΨϮϯϴ͕
ΨϮϯϴ͕ϯϯϴ
ϯϯϴ
WƌŽǀŝĚĞƐ ĐƵƐƚŽŵŝnjĞĚŐŝǀŝŶŐŽƉƉ
WƌŽǀŝĚĞƐĐƵƐƚŽŵŝnjĞĚŐŝǀŝŶŐŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƟĞƐŽǀĞƌĂŶĚĂďŽǀĞŶŶƵĂůĂŵƉĂŝŐŶŐŝŌƐ͕
ƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƟĞƐŽǀĞƌ ĂŶĚ ĂďŽǀĞŶŶƵĂůůĂŵƉĂŝŐŶŐŝŌƐ͕
ĞŶĂďůŝŶŐĚŽŶŽƌƐƚŽŵĂdžŝŵŝnjĞƚŚĞŝƌŐŝǀŝŶŐƉŽƚĞŶƟĂůĂŶĚĨƵůĮůůƚŚĞŝƌƉŚŝůĂŶƚŚƌŽƉŝĐŐŽĂůƐ͘
ĞŶĂďůŝŶŐĚŽŶŽƌƐƚ
Ž ŵĂdžŝŵŝnjĞƚŚ
ŚĞŝƌŐŝǀŝŶŐƉŽƚĞŶƟĂůĂŶĚĨƵůĮůůƚŚĞŝƌƉŚŝůĂŶƚŚƌŽƉŝĐŐŽĂůƐ͘
/ŶĐůƵĚĞƐĞƌŶƐƚĞŝŶ>ĞĂĚĞƌƐŚŝƉ͕ŝƌƚŚƌŝŐŚƚ/ƐƌĂĞů͕ĂŵƉĂŝŐŶǀĞŶƚ^ƉŽŶƐŽƌƐŚŝƉƐ͕ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
/ŶĐůƵĚĞƐĞƌŶƐ
ƚĞŝŶ>ĞĂĚĞƌƐŚŝƉ͕ŝƌƚŚƌŝŐŚƚ/ƐƌĂĞů͕ĂŵƉĂŝŐŶǀĞŶƚ^ƉŽŶƐŽƌƐŚŝƉƐ͕ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
ƵŝůĚŝŶŐ/ŶŝƟĂƟǀĞ͕ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ>ĞĂĚĞƌƐŚŝƉWƌŽŐƌĂŵ͕ƌĞĂƚĞzŽƵƌ:ĞǁŝƐŚ>ĞŐĂĐLJ'ƌĂŶƚ͕,ŽůŽĐĂƵƐƚ
ƵŝůĚŝŶŐ/ŶŝƟĂƟǀĞ͕ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
>ĞĂĚĞƌƐŚŝƉWƌŽŐƌĂŵ͕ƌĞĂƚĞzzŽ
ŽƵƌ::ĞǁŝƐŚ>ĞŐĂĐLJ'ƌĂŶƚ͕,ŽůŽĐĂƵƐƚ
džƉůŽƌĂƚŽƌLJ'ƌĂŶƚ͕'ŽƌĞůŝĐŬdĞĞŶƐƚŽ/ƐƌĂĞů͕W:>ŝďƌĂƌLJ͕DŝƐƐŝŽŶ^ƵďƐŝĚŝĞƐĂŶĚ^ƉĞĐŝĂů&ƵŶĚ
džƉůŽƌĂƚ
ŽƌƌLJ'ƌĂŶ
LJ
ƚ͕'ŽƌĞůŝĐŬddĞĞĞĞŶƐƚŽ/ƐƌĂĞů͕W
W:>ŝďƌĂƌ
:
ƌLJ͕͕DŝƐƐŝŽŶ^Ƶ
ƵďƐŝĚŝĞƐĂŶĚ^ƉĞĐŝĂů&ƵŶĚ
:ĞǁŝƐŚĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĨŽƌĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶǁŝƚŚƐƉĞĐŝĂůŶĞĞĚƐ
:Ğ
ǁŝƐŚ ĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĨĨŽ
ŽƌĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶǁŝƚŚƐƉĞĐŝĂůŶĞĞĚƐ
ŚĂƌůŽƩĞdŽƌĂŚĞŶƚĞƌ:
ŚĂƌůŽƩ
ĞddŽ
ŽƌĂŚĞŶƚĞƌ: džƉŽƐŝŶŐĐ
džƉŽƐŝŶŐĐŽůůĞŐĞƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐƚŽĐƵƫŶŐĞĚŐĞ:ĞǁŝƐŚ
ŽůůĞŐĞƐ
ĞƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐƚŽĐƵƫ
ƫŶŐĞĚŐĞ :ĞǁŝƐŚ
ĞŶŐĂŐĞŵĞŶƚĂŶĚĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂůƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŵŝŶŐ
ĞŶŐĂŐĞŵĞŶƚĂŶĚĞĚƵĐĂƟŽ
ŽŶĂůƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŵŝ
ŵŵŝŶŐ
Ψ
Ψϰ͕ϬϬϬ
ůŽŶ:ĞǁŝƐŚ^ƚƵĚŝĞƐWƌŽŐƌĂŵ:
ůŽŶ:ĞǁŝƐŚ^ƚƵĚŝĞƐWƌŽŐƌ
ŽŐ Ăŵ:
ŵ ŶŐĂŐŝŶŐƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐƚŽĨŽƐƚĞƌŵĞĂŶŝŶŐĨƵů
ŶŐĂŐŝŶŐƐƚƵĚĞŶ
ƵĚĞŶƚƐƚŽĨĨŽ
ŽƐƚĞƌŵĞĂŶŝŶŐĨƵů
:ĞǁŝƐŚͲŚƌŝƐƟĂŶĚŝĂůŽŐƵĞĂďŽƵƚ/ƐƌĂĞů
:ĞǁŝƐŚͲŚƌŝƐƟĂŶĚŝĂůŽŐƵĞĂďŽƵƚ/ƐƌĂĞů
Ăď
ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬ
Friendship
p Cir
Circle/ZAB’S
cle/Z
/ AB
AB’SS Place:: WƌŽ
WƌŽǀŝĚĞǁŽƌŬƉůĂĐĞƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐĂŶĚĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ
ǀŝĚĞǁŽƌŬƉ
ǁŽƌŬƉůĂĐĞƚƌĂŝŶŝŝŶŐĂŶĚĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ
ĨŽƌ:ĞǁŝƐŚLJŽƵŶŐĂĚƵůƚƐǁŝƚŚƐƉĞĐŝĂůŶĞĞĚƐ
ĨŽ
Žƌ :ĞǁŝƐŚLJŽƵŶŐĂĚƵ
ĚƵůƚƐǁ
ǁŝƚŚƐƉĞ
ƐƉĞĐŝĂůŶĞĞĚƐ
ĞĚƐ
ΨϭϬ͕ϬϬϬ
Ψ
'ůŽďĂůĂLJŽĨ:ĞǁŝƐŚ>ĞĂƌŶŝŶŐ:
'ůŽďĂů
ĂLJŽĨ:Ğ
LJ :ĞǁŝƐŚ>Ğ
ĞĂƌŶŝŶŐ:
ĞĂ
Ő ŽůůĂďŽƌĂƟǀĞ
ŽůůĂďŽƌĂƟǀĞĐĞůĞďƌĂƟŽŶŽĨĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJͲǁŝĚĞ
ĐĐĞůĞďƌĂƟŽ
ŽŶŽĨĐ
ŶŽ ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJͲǁŝĚĞ
ǁŝĚĞ ΨϭϬ͕ϬϬϬ
:ĞǁŝƐŚůĞĂƌŶŝŶŐĂŶĚĐƵůƚƵƌĂůĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞƐ
:Ğ
ǁŝƐŚ ůĞĂƌŶŝŶŐ
ǁŝƐŚůĞĂƌŶŝŶŐĂŶĚĐƵůƚƵƌ
ŐĂŶĚĐƵůƚƵ
ĂŶĚ ĐƵůƚƵ
ĐƵůƚƵƌƌĂůĞ
ƌĂů ĞdždžƉĞ
džƉĞƌ
ƉĞƌŝĞŶĐ
ĞƌŝĞŶĐĞƐ
/ƐƌĂĞů/ŶĚĞƉĞŶĚĞŶĐĞĂLJĞůĞďƌĂƟŽŶ:
/Ɛƌ
ĂĞů/ŶĚĞƉĞŶĚĞŶĐĞĂ
Ɖ
ƉĞŶĚĞŶĐĞ
ĂLJĞ
LJ ĞůĞďƌĂƟŽŶ
ƟŽ : ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJͲǁŝĚ
ŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJͲǁŝĚĞĐĞůĞďƌĂƟŽŶŽĨ
ĚĞ ĐĞůĞ
Ğ ďƌĂƟ
ĂƟŽŶŽĨ
Ψϭϭ͕ϯϬ
Ψϭϭ͕ϯϬϬ
ϯϬϬ
zŽŵ,Ă͛ĂƚnjŵĂƵƚ͕/ƐƌĂĞů/ŶĚĞƉĞŶĚĞŶĐĞĂLJ
zŽ
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ar V
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ŶƌŝĐŚĞƐ :ĞǁŝƐŚůŝǀĞƐƚŚƌŽƵŐŚĐĐƵůƚƵƌĂů͕ĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂů ĂŶĚ ĂƚŚůĞƟĐƉ
ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŵŝŶŐ
dŝŬǀĂŚŚĂƌůŽƩĞ
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ĂŚ ŚĂƌůŽƩĞ Ψϲ͕ϱϬϬ
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ĂƌƚƚͲͲƟŵĞ ƐƚĂīƉĞƌƐŽŶ
ƐŽŶƚŽŵĂŶĂŐĞŽƉĞƌĂ
ĞŽƉĞƌĂƟŽ
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Ž ƚŚ
ŚĞ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
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WƌŽǀŝĚĞƐŵĞĂŶŝŶŐĨƵů:ĞǁŝƐŚ ĞdžƉ
WƌŽǀŝĚĞƐŵĞĂŶŝŶŐĨƵů:ĞǁŝƐŚĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞƐĨŽƌLJŽƵŶŐĂĚƵůƚƐŝŶƚŚĞŝƌϮϬ͛ƐĂƐƚŚĞLJĐƌĞĂƚĞ
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ŽƌLJŽƵŶŐĂĚƵůƚƐŝŶƚŚĞŝƌƌϮϬ͛͛Ɛ ĂƐ ƚŚĞLJĐƌĞĂƚĞ
ĂǀŝďƌĂŶƚŚŽŵĞͲďĂƐĞĚ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
Ă
ǀŝďƌĂŶƚ ŚŽŵĞͲďĂƐĞĚ :ĞǁŝƐŚ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ
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ƚĂů'ŝŌƐĂŶĚ^ƉĞĐŝŝĂůŝƐƚƌŝďƵƟŽŶƐ
ŚĂƌůŽƩĞ:ĞǁŝƐŚdĞĞŶŽĂůŝƟŽŶ:
ŚĂƌůŽƩ
Ğ:ĞǁŝƐŚddĞĞŶ
Ğ ŽĂůŝƟŽŶ: ŽůůĂďŽƌĂƟǀĞ
ŽůůĂďŽƌĂƟǀĞƐĞƌŝĞƐƚŽĞĚƵĐĂƚĞ͕ĞŶŐĂŐĞ͕
ƐĞƌŝĞƐƚŽĞĚƵĐĂƚĞ͕ĞŶŐĂŐĞ͕
Ő Ő ͕
Ψϳϱ͕
Ψϳϱ͕ϬϬϬ
ϬϬϬ
ΨϮϬ͕
ΨϮϬ͕ϬϬϬ
ϬϬϬ
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ĂƌŬ&ƌĞĞĚŽŵ^ĐŚŽŽůů
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ĨĨŽƌĞĚƵĐĂƚŽƌƐĂŶĚǀŝƐŝƚŽƌƐ
Ž
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ǀŝƌŽŶŵ
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LJ ŽũĞĐƚ
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ŽǀĞĚ ǁĞďƐŝƚĞ ƚŽ ĞŶŚĂŶĐĞŝŶĨĨŽƌŵĂƟ
Ž
ƟŽŶ ĂŶĚ ƌĞƐŽƵƌĐĞƐ
North Car
Carolina
olina
ina Hillel
Hillel:: WWĂƌƚͲƟŵĞƐƚĂīƉĞƌƐŽŶƚŽƐĞƌǀĞ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŽůůĞŐĞĂŶĚ
ĂƌƚͲƟ
ƟŵĞ ƐƚĂīƉĞ
ƉĞƌƐŽŶƚŽ ƐĞƌǀĞ :ĞǁŝƐŚ
ǁ ĐŽůůĞŐĞĂŶĚ
Ě
ƵŶŝǀĞƌƐŝƚLJƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐŝŶƚŚĞŚĂƌůŽƩĞĂƌĞĂ
ƵŶŝǀĞƌƐŝƚLJƐƚƵĚĞĞŶƚƐ ŝŶ ƚŚĞĞ ŚĂƌůŽƩ
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WƌŽŵŽƚĞƐƚŚĞĂĚǀĂŶĐĞŵĞŶƚŽĨůŝĨĞůŽŶŐ:ĞǁŝƐŚĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶ͕ůĞĂƌŶŝŶŐĂŶĚůŝƚĞƌĂĐLJ
WƌŽŵŽƚ
ĞƐƚŚĞĂĚǀĂŶĐĞŵĞŶƚŽĨ
Ĩ ůŝĨĨĞůŽŶŐ:Ğ
Ğ
ǁŝƐŚĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶ͕ůĞĂƌŶŝŶŐ
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Carolina
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ϱϬϬ
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ĂƟŽŶĂůƉƌŽŐƌĂŵ
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>Ğ
ǀŝŶĞͲ^ŬůƵƚ:ƵĚĂŝĐ>ŝďƌĂƌLJĂŶ
ŶĚZĞƐŽƵƌĐĞĞŶƚĞƌ
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E
EŽƌƚŚĂƌ
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ŚĞ,ŽůŽĐ
, ů ĂƵƐƚ
ĂůůĂŶƚLJŶĞ:ĞǁŝƐŚĞŶƚĞƌ:
ĂůůĂŶ
ƚLJŶĞ:Ğ
LJ
ǁŝƐŚ ĞŶƚĞƌ: WƌŽ
WƌŽǀŝĚĞŽŶĞǁĞĞŬŽĨ:ĞǁŝƐŚǁŝŶƚĞƌĐĂŵƉĂŶĚ
ǀŝĚĞ ŽŶĞ ǁĞĞŬŽĨ:ĞǁŝƐŚ ǁŝŶ
ǁ ƚĞƌ ĐĂŵƉĂŶĚ
ƚŚƌĞĞǁĞĞŬƐŽĨ:ĞǁŝƐŚƐƵŵŵĞƌĐĂŵƉƚŽĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶŝŶƚŚĞĂůůĂŶƚLJŶĞĂƌĞĂ
ƚŚƌĞĞ ǁĞĞŬƐŽĨ:ĞǁŝƐŚ ƐƵŵ
ŵŵĞƌ ĐĂŵƉƚŽ ĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ĂůůĂŶ
ŶƚLJŶĞĂƌĞĂ
ǀĞƚĞƌĂŶƐ
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ƚĞƌĂŶƐ
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ŵĞƌŐĞŶĐLJĮŶĂŶĐŝĂůĂƐƐŝƐƚĂŶĐĞĂŶĚůŽĂŶƐƚ
Ğ
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dŚĞ
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Ğ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŽŵŵ
ŵƵŶŝƚLJ͘
ŚĂƌůŽƩĞ:ĞǁŝƐŚĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ͘
ĂŶĚĞdžĐŝƚĞƚĞĞŶƐĂďŽƵƚ/ƐƌĂĞů
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ŶĞŶƌŝĐŚĞĚ:ƵĚĂŝĐƉƌŽŐƌĂŵĨŽƌŚĂƌůŽƩĞͲĂƌĞĂƚĞĞŶƐ
ŶĞŶƌŝĐŚĞĚ:ƵĚĂŝĐƉƌŽŐƌĂŵĨ
ĨŽƌŚĂƌůŽƩ
Ž
ĞͲĂƌĞĂƚĞĞŶƐ
&ůŽƌ
ĞŶĐĞ DĞůƚŽŶ ^ĐŚŽŽů ŽĨ Ě
ĚƵůƚ :ĞǁŝƐŚ>ĞĂƌŶŝŶŐ
&ůŽƌĞŶĐĞDĞůƚŽŶ^ĐŚŽŽůŽĨĚƵůƚ:ĞǁŝƐŚ>ĞĂƌŶŝŶŐ
Zack SSchwartz
chwartz
David
David Sheffer
Sheff
ffe
er
Ron
Ron Townsend
Townsend
urk
Jeff TTurk
n
Bill Zimmer
Zimmern
ΨϵϭϬ͕ϲϱϵ
Meets the needs of Jews
Meets
Jews
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The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 19
Mazel Tov & Congratulations
Mike Littauer Wins 2015
5-Star Award
Sharon Lachow-Blumberg Honored by
Make-A-Wish Foundation
Mike Littauer has again been
named a 5-Star Professional by
Charlotte Magazine. Mike is part
of a select group representing less
than 1% of insurance professionals in the Charlotte area. 5-Star
professionals satisfy objective
criteria that are associated with
providing quality services to
clients. Award recipients are identified through nominations received by consumers. To receive
the Five Star Home/Auto Insur-
Each year, Make-A-Wish®
Central and Western North Carolina’s W.I.S.H. Society honors an
elite selection of local women for
the inspiring professional and
philanthropic roles they play. Utilizing their talents, compassion
and leadership qualities, honorees
in the Charlotte and Triad communities join forces with MakeA-Wish® to raise funds to grant
the wishes of local children with
life-threatening medical conditions. Among the honorees, the
woman who raises the most,
granting additional wishes, is
named the W.I.S.H. Society
Woman of the Year.
This year Sharon LachowBlumberg was chosen to be one of
the 2015 W.I.S.H Society honorees. The W.I.S.H. Society celebrates local women, recognizing
ance Professional award, a
home/auto insurance professional
must satisfy objective eligibility
and evaluation criteria that are associated with home/auto insurance professionals who provide
quality services to their clients,
and hold required North Carolina
insurance licenses in good standing. You can view the award in
the December issue of Charlotte
Magazine.Y
Chai 2016!
Event for Jewish Singles 20s and 30s
Wednesday, January 20
The Bulldog Wine and Bar
(new location)
1434 Winnifred Street,
Southend
No fee
Sponsored by Chai Expectationsmatchmaking for Jewish singles.
www.chaiexpectations.com
to RSVP
“If you are
going to do
something
wrong, at least
enjoy it.”
–Yiddish Folk
Saying
Sharon Lachow-Blumberg
them for their career success, significant contributions to the community and their personal
commitment to philanthropy.
The first time she volunteered
for Make-A-Wish® America was
back in the early 90s right after
she moved back to NYC from
LA. She was given the privilege
of granting a wish for a young girl
suffering the ravages of terminal
cancer. Her wish was to meet her
musical idol, Bobby Brown, who
at the time was with Bell Biv
Devoe.
She has been supporter ever
since, and her husband Mark is
also a contributor.
Make-A-Wish® grants the
wishes of children with lifethreatening medical conditions to
enrich the human experience with
hope, strength and joy. Our local
Charlotte chapter grants more
than 260 wishes each year at an
average cost of $6,000 per wish.
As a W.I.S.H. Society Honoree,
Sharon is collaborating with
Make-A-Wish® to adopt a local
child’s wish. See more at:
http://ncwishsociety.kintera.org/fa
f/donorReg/donorPledge.asp?ieve
nt=1135662&supid=425118431#s
thash.rqRTirwJ.dpuf. Y
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 20
School
Happy First Anniversary to JPS’ Infant
Room
They say time flies when
you’re having fun. It is hard to believe that a year has gone by.
We’ve welcomed 12 families into
the JPS infant room over the past
year and look forward to many
more in the coming years. The
room is welcoming and cozy, the
staff is fun and knowledgeable,
and the kids are delicious and
growing so quickly.
Know someone expecting a
baby? Send them to tour the infant
room at the Jewish Preschool on
Sardis; it really is a home away
from home. Many thanks to the
many people who helped to make
this dream a successful reality.
For a tour or more information
call Dedee at 704-364-8395 or
email [email protected] We
are now enrolling for Winter
2017. Y
Scarlett is happy playing with her toys.
The infant posse.
Emma with a picture of her mishpacha.
When I grow up,
I’m gonna be an engineer!
Registration Begins* for
Summer & Fall 2016:
January 13th
Contact us for
your personal tour!
NC Licensed Five Star
ers
*Toddl
to
s
5 year
Limited Openings!
Half & Full Day - Summer & Fall
704.364.8395|[email protected]
Home of the 1st Jewish Infant Care in Charlotte | Call for more info.
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 21
Learn from, Grow with … and Connect
to Our Curriculum
By Brooke Amo, Director of Education
How does one go about finding
an all-in-one curriculum that is so
dynamic that it fits their school,
teachers, students, philosophy,
and mission statement? How do
you take the beautiful moments
that the children experience in
each day and fit them into a little
box or teacher manual? The truth
is you can’t. In early childhood
education, curriculum involves
and integrates each aspect of the
child’s day. Each experience,
whether it is completely organic
or purposely designed by a
teacher, can be used to achieve
learning goals. Although so much
of what children learn can sometimes “just happen,” it is essential
to have an educational framework
to use as a guide. This will help
each child construct knowledge
and lead them towards reaching
their potential.
Curriculum development is a
process that is ever changing.
Staying up on current research,
trends, and practices is important
to ensure children receive a quality balanced education. The
process to create and implement
effective curriculum begins with
theory, then planning, followed by
implementing/execution,
and
lastly assessment and reflection.
The theoretical aspect of curriculum mostly examines intelligence, theory, and curricular
content (Hirsh, 5). Intelligence
has been defined by many, however Howard Gardner best explains it as “a biopsychological
potential to process information
that can be activated in a cultural
setting to solve problems or create
products that are of value in a culture.” (Gardner, 1999, p. 34)
Gardner sees intelligence as various entities: social, linguistic,
kinesthetic, artistic, mathematical,
body, and musical. At CJP, we
embrace this theory as well as
many others to create a well-balanced environment that fosters the
growth of the whole child. We
know that children not only learn
differently, but at different schedules. We base a lot of our daily
structure around Gardner’s theory.
Our teachers know the importance
of providing an environment that
facilitates all of the students’ intelligences. Areas in our classroom are designed to facilitate the
multiple intelligence experience.
Each day children experience centers that are artistic, cognitive,
kinesthetic, mathematical, etc.
These areas are student-centered
and provide children with learning opportunities that are engaging and multi-disciplinary to
reach the whole child.
Our content is organized into
nine domains: social, emotional,
physical, literacy, language, mathematics, science, cognition, and
Judaica. Within each of these
learning domains, there are specific learning goals that help
teachers guide their students and
set them up for learning.
How do we get there? Creativity, hard work, careful planning,
and engaging execution is what it
takes. Every teaching team at CJP
has a planning session once a
month with our Director of Education. We come together with all
of our knowledge and ideas to
share best practices and marry
them to developmentally appropriate and stimulating activities.
This kind of regular planning promotes consistency and teamwork
throughout the school. Teachers
take the goals and skills that they
need to teach and weave those
skills into our themes.
CJP uses thematic units for
many reasons. A common theme
keeps student learning focused on
a broader concept while touching
on specific goals and skills
throughout. Teaching thematically
is motivational for both children
and teachers. A common theme
allows both teachers and children
to delve into a content area, making it more exciting for teachers to
teach and students to learn. Our
delivery through themes integrates content areas in ways that
make sense to children. This in
turn provides them with a more
MEG D. GOLDSTEIN
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
rich understanding of a subject
and has more meaning. Furthermore, teaching thematically hits a
student’s multiple intelligences,
linguistic, logical-mathematical,
naturalist, spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, musical, and interpersonal.
Teachers are given the opportunity to showcase their natural ability to differentiate their instruction
for the class. This approach ensures we provide an optimal way
to help all children reach their potential and have a meaningful impact on their learning.
(Continued on page 24)
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TEL: 704.523.2202 w FAX: 704.496.2716
[email protected] w WWW.MGOLDLAW.COM
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 22
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 23
Student Government at Charlotte Jewish Day School
By Mariashi Groner, director
Charlotte Jewish Day School
Speaking to the candidates who
didn’t receive enough votes to win
in our Student Council election is
one my least favorite things to do.
It is so hard to see the disappointment register on their face, and the
surprise that after so much work,
and so much effort, it still did not
yield the hoped-for results. In fact,
each year, I have a weak moment
where I decide that we are not
doing this anymore. It’s so hard to
see the kids hurt so much.
Then, I change my mind because the children show me that
they are stronger than we know,
that they learn from tough times
even better than from the good
times. They learn what behaviors,
comments, and actions are hurtful
or supportive. I also see kindness,
generosity of spirit, and humility
from the students that did get the
votes they needed. The students in
the school use the cheers and applause to congratulate but also to
comfort. Some of the winning
candidates turn to their counterparts to be their “campaign managers.” Others, appoint them to be
their “advisors.” The mitzvah in
the Torah of “Loving your fellow
as yourself” is not an easy one,
and yet the students keep trying to
fulfill its requirement. This is
where we see the lessons that are
taught playing themselves out in
real life.
The speeches, campaign
posters, campaign giveaways,
demonstrate thought, creativity,
like to be a class rep.
… I think if I become
vice president I can talk to
Rabbi Vorst to get different foods for lunch.
… I have a reputation
for getting along with
everyone even when we
might disagree, which
makes me a great candidate. I will always be open
A first grader seeking represenation.
to ideas and will treat
everyone with courtesy
and respect.
and marketing savvy. Some slo… Maybe if the Panthers win
gans on the posters were:
we can have a surprise dessert
day. My main idea is to get more
Vote for Em and you will be a
people involved. I look forward to
gem!
hearing your great suggestions
I’m not ice, so vote me for vice!
and ideas.
Don’t think twice, vote Laya for
… These are a few of the reavice!
sons you should make me your
“… and so I mustache you to
VP. As Albert Einstein once said,
vote for Matthew!
“We cannot solve our problems
Our students are serious when with the same thinking we caused
thinking about their platform. them with.”
… Everyone loves no homeSome of the following excerpts of
speeches are just a taste of what
they hoped their constituents
(Kindergarten through Fifth
Grade) would care about:
… I have had a lot of experience with leadership. I am on a
soccer and swim team. On my
soccer team I am one of the leaders. I play middle defender so I
can basically see the whole field.
This means I often help my teammates out where they need to be.
I am also one of the oldest on my
team so a lot of people look up to
me. I have also been on Student
Lined up at the voting booth.
Council before. I know what it is
work so that’s where I come in. I
feel that on Rosh Chodesh and on
your birthday we should have no
homework because it is a day of
rejoicing.
… This is our last year at CJDS
together. In a year, I
won’t see the same front
doors open every day
[or] everyone’s smile at
the beginning of the day.
Those days go by so fast
and this is our last year
together. We need to
have as much fun as we
can before time runs out.
This little microcosm
of elections that happens
at CJDS is truly inspiring
because we know that
this life experience is what prepares the children for the real
“elections,”
“competition,”
“losses,” and “wins” that they will
experience throughout life.
This year, one of our first grade
students took it a step further. She
was disappointed that
kindergarten and first
grade do not have a
class representative.
This was a decision
made years ago. I tried
to explain to her that
students in kindergarten and first grade
were possibly too
young to take on the
challenge of running
and winning or losing
an election. And, we
were also not sure if
they could sustain their
position on the Student Council
with all of the meetings and responsibilities. I wasn’t persuasive
enough. Because the next day, she
presented me with a petition that
had four pages of signatures from
Eden’s campaign poster.
students and teachers requesting
that first grade should have a class
representative. She won. We
worked on a compromise and allowed the students to vote on a
monthly representative to the Student Council.
The students at CJDS experience all that life has to offer, the
difficult and the easy, and we are
there to hold their hand as they
figure it all out. Y
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 24
Mindfulness and SelfRegulation
Joined in Education Two-Day
Symposium
JIE tickets are on sale now, and
they won’t last long!
At the event, you’ll learn:
1) One of the top keys to supporting your children to become
successful adults
2) Powerful tools for helping
your kids (and yourself) be happier and healthier
3) Easy tips you can use right
away for decreasing drama and
meltdowns
The topic of this year’s Joined
in Education is Mindfulness and
Self-Regulation. It’s a topic every
parent, teacher, and human being
needs to know about because
mindfulness is at the heart of
knowing how to navigate life
without worry and anxiety. We
want your children to not only
know how to be successful but
also (just as important, if not
more), we want them to know
how to be happy.
Don’t wait to save your spot for
this informative and transformational event. Get your tickets
@www.joinedineducation.org. Y
Like us on Facebook:
Charlotte Jewish
News
Charlotte Jewish
Preschool
Curriculum
Development
(Continued from page 21)
How do we measure the
growth and developmental
progress of our children? We use
various methods of informal assessments and portfolios to help
the teachers gauge learning styles,
strengths and weaknesses of each
student. Portfolios are performance based, and are an instructionally appropriate method of
documenting and exhibiting student progress, achievement, and
development in one or more areas
over time. Our teachers can utilize
this tool to communicate student
progress to parents in an organized manner touching on content
knowledge, skill, and overall development. When students are
involved in their portfolio development they are taking ownership
for their learning, reflection and
thinking.
As previously stated, the
process to create and implement a
meaningful curriculum begins
with theory, then planning, followed by implementing/execution, and lastly assessment and
reflection. Curriculum is a piece
of what it takes to educate and
raise a child. Our parents, teachers
and members of our community
together provide our children with
opportunities to learn, grow, and
connect. Y
Women’s News
Second Annual Hadassah
Israeli Products Fair Was
a Huge Success
The Charlotte Chapter of
Hadassah presented the 2nd Annual Israeli Products Fair on Sunday, November 22. The event was
co-sponsored by the Greater Charlotte Jewish Federation, the
Levine JCC, and Ayelet Travel.
Hadassah also wishes to extend a
huge thank you to the Foundation
of Shalom Park. Hadassah is
pleased to report that the event
raised over $10,000 for the Sarah
Wetsman Davidson Hospital
Tower at Hadassah Hospital in Israel. We had over 25 vendors, including Sababa Israeli Jewelry
(from Baltimore), Sabra Style
(from Alabama), Limor (from Israel), as well as participation from
our local Temple gift shops. The
event also featured a large variety
of Israeli made products that
Hadassah was able to purchase directly from Israel and Israeli vendors.
An extra toda raba to our
speaker, Jeff Epstein, Chief Operating Officer, NC Department of
Revenue, who gave a great talk on
“The Impact of North Carolina or
Israel’s Economy.” The event also
included a raffle featuring over 15
raffle prizes donated by a variety
of local vendors, Israeli food by
Izzy’s Catering, an Israeli travel
toom, children’s programming,
and our highlight, a raffle for a
Hadassah mission to Israel. We
are pleased to announce that the
winner of our Hadassah Mission
to Israel is Cary Shookoff of Charlotte, NC. Congratulations, Cary!
A huge thank you to the committee who worked so hard in putting this together, to all our
community partners and sponsors,
and to all of you who attended and
supported this fantastic community event. Don’t forget to save the
date, next year’s event will be November 20, 2016, and promises to
be even better.
Thank you to our sponsors –
see ad on page 31.Y
Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 25
Bringing It All Back Home: Tu biShevat in Israel
By Deborah Fineblum/JNS.org
Israelis know that each and
every tree is precious. When the
pioneers of the Jewish state first
cast their eyes on the Promised
Land, it was barren. There were
no natural forests to be had. And
now, just consider: Israel is the
only country in the world that
ended the 20th century with more
trees than it started with. In just
six decades, Israelis have literally
sunk down roots.
Of course, Israel did not accomplish this alone. Diaspora
Jews have grown up dropping
coins into little blue-and-white
pushkes (tin cans), coins earmarked for planting trees in Israel.
Many lucky enough to travel to Israel in their youth recall sticking
slippery little saplings into the
ground, knowing that each one
made the fledgling Jewish state
that much stronger.
Each sapling and coin has done
its part to “green” the Jewish state.
Since 1901, the Jewish National
Fund (JNF) has planted more than
240 million trees indigenous to
the Middle East, such as native
oaks, carob, redbud, almond, pear,
hawthorn, cypress, and the exotic
Atlantic cedar. JNF has also developed more than 250,000 acres
of land and 1,000 parks.
Tu biShevat—the Jewish New
Year for trees, celebrated January
25 this year—grew out of the
tithes (the amount Jewish law requires to be donated) that Jews
take from the produce grown in
Israel. The date when new fruits
are officially assigned to the New
Year is the 15th of the Hebrew
calendar month Shevat, hence the
holiday’s timing.
Today, Jews around the world
mark Tu biShevat by eating fruit,
particularly the kinds mentioned
in the Torah as Israel’s natural
gifts: grapes, figs, pomegranates,
olives, and dates.
But in Israel, where trees are
nothing less than a relatively recent miracle, Tu biShevat isn’t
just a passing nod to our leafyboughed friends. It’s a real live
holiday marked by countless treeplanting ceremonies, ecological
consciousness-raising programs in
schools and communities, and
Seders for young and old alike—
minus the matzah. It is in many
ways a holiday ahead of its time,
says one Israeli rabbi.
“Tu biShevat is really the celebration of spring time, yet it is in
the middle of the winter, because
it’s really the festival of faith, and
particularly faith in the land of Israel,” Rabbi Binny Freedman,
Rosh Yeshiva of Orayta Yeshiva
in Jerusalem’s Old City, tells
JNS.org.
After all, it was in Israel that
17th-century Kabbalistic master
Rabbi Yitzchak Luria of Tzfat and
his disciples instituted the Tu biShevat Seder, modeled after the
Passover Seder. Here, each of the
fruits and trees of the Land of Is-
rael were given symbolic meaning, including fruits with hard
shells, inedible pits, and those that
are completely edible.
In addition, four cups of wine
(or grape juice) are drunk in a specific order and in varying shades
of red, pink, and white, representing the cycle of life and seasons.
For many years, the Tu biShevat seder was an important event
for the children in the elementary
school in Kfar Saba, where Israel
Lenchner was principal. They
were among Israel’s poorest kids,
the majority of them from
Ethiopian families. “Five hundred
years ago, the rabbis of [Safed]
would eat 34 fruits and vegetables
that night, telling their stories and
speaking of their love for Eretz
Yisrael (the land of Israel),”
Lenchner, who is now retired, tells
JNS.org. “That’s why, for all the
years I was the principal, we always had the Seder of Tu biShevat.”
But Lenchner didn’t do it for
the children alone. “As important
for them to know the stories, the
wisdom and the traditions that
have been handed down to us
about the land, it’s just as important for us that they know it, that
they truly love this land and this
people,” he says. “That’s why
every year we made sure they
heard it, so they could grow up appreciating what they—and we—
have been given here.”
The tree planting was an Israeli
tradition even before JNF got in
on the act. On Tu biShevat in
1890, Rabbi Ze’ev Yavetz led his
students on a first planting outing
to Zichron Yaakov. The tradition
was embraced in 1903 by the JNF
and taken up in 1908 by the Jewish Teachers Union. A few years
later, JNF devoted the holiday to
planting eucalyptus trees in an effort to drain the swamps and halt
the malaria that had attacked the
communities in the Hula Valley.
In honor of the tradition of this
holiday of new beginnings, the
laying of the cornerstone at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
took place on Tu biShevat in
1918, as did those of the Technion
- Israel Institute of Technology in
1925 and the Knesset in 1949.
These days, more than a million people each year attend JNF’s
Tu biShevat planting ceremonies
in Israel’s largest forests. But trees
have proven not to be immune to
violence. In 2006, after the destruction of 10,000 acres of forest
by Katyusha rockets, JNF
launched Operation Northern Renewal to begin replacing much of
the topsoil that had been burned
away and replant the forest.
“Through 2,000 years of exile
we never stopped believing that
one day, we would come home,”
says Rabbi Freedman. “Which is
why this Jewish festival is being
rediscovered in Israel, because
anywhere else in the world it is by
necessity missing something. A
celebration of coming home
makes the most sense… when you
are home.” Y
Two-year-old Hagai, and his parents Ofra and Eyal, choose plants in a
nursery in Eshtaol, Israel, in celebration of Tu biShevat on Jan. 19, 2011.
Credit: Nati Shohat/Flash90.
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 26
Sparkle Up Your Tu
biShevat Seder
Pre-planning your funeral expenses is ...
a gift to your loved ones.
Membership is an affordable $72 annually.
···
Contact Sandra Goldman, Director,
for information on plot availability
and pricing.
[email protected]
704.576.1859
By Mollie Katzen/JNS.org
Winter fruit might seem less
spectacular than the much more
time-valued offerings of summer,
but oranges and pears in particular,
while quiet and “common,” can be
the unexpected stars of simple savory dishes.
This is perfect for Tu biShevat,
the Jewish New Year for trees,
which is a relatively unsung holiday. Sparkle up your Tu biShevat
Seder with an easy but surprising
sweet potato-pear soup, which
goes perfectly with a winter salad
featuring crunchy, colorful leaves
refreshingly coated with orange
sections and a yogurty-orange
vinaigrette, and exuberantly dotted
with pistachios (also from trees).
Finish the meal with an old-fashioned cake brimming with apples
and walnuts, and studded with
cranberries.
Cranapple Walnut Cake
Servings: about 8
Back by popular demand from
the original “Moosewood Cookbook,” this recipe now appears,
adapted slightly, in “The Heart of
the Plate.” You will likely want to
serve this a la mode with some excellent vanilla ice cream. If you
anticipate this need, be sure to
have the ice cream on hand before
you begin. The cake is quite sweet
as is. If you are going to serve it
with the ice cream, you might
want to reduce the sugar a notch or
Mollie Katzen
two—maybe to 1½ cups. If you
buy extra-fresh whole cranberries
in season and freeze some, you
can enjoy them year-round. No defrosting necessary. Use nonstick
spray.
Ingredients:
1-¾ c. (packed) light brown
sugar
½ c. grapeseed or canola oil
2 lg. eggs
1 t. vanilla extract
2 c. whole wheat pastry flour
(also called “white whole
wheat”)
1 t. baking powder
1 t. cinnamon
½ t. nutmeg
½ t. salt
2 med. apples (about ½ lb.),
peeled and thinly sliced
½ c. chopped walnuts (chopped
(Continued on page 30)
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 27
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The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 28
Originating in Kabbalah, Tu biShevat Seder Transforms into Conduit
for Environmental Activism
By Diana Burmistrovich/JNS.org
A simple way to celebrate Tu
biShevat, the Jewish New Year for
trees, is to grow a plant or eat
some fruit. But those seeking a
deeper experience with the holiday may choose to take part in a
“Tu biShevat Seder” — not to be
confused with the Passover version.
“Tu biShevat needed a major
ritual, and the Seder provides us
with that,” entrepreneur, educator,
and blogger Rabbi Jason Miller
told JNS.org. “Based on the Seder
of Passover, this is an educational
forum and symposium in which
we can discuss and also recommit
ourselves to the environment.”
Kabbalists from the northern
Israeli city of Safed in northern Israel created the ritual of the Tu biShevat Seder to celebrate the idea
that even God’s smallest creations—be they tree, pomegranate, or date—are all equal within
nature’s grand web. The initial ritual was outlined in “Peri Etz
Hadar” (Fruit of the Goodly Tree),
part of an anthology of Kabbalistic customs called the “Heindat
Yamun.”
While Tu biShevat is widely
celebrated in the Jewish world as
the religion’s counterpart to Arbor
Day, fewer Jews employ the Seder
ritual on this occasion. Many Jews
are troubled by the Seder’s apparent roots in the texts written by
followers of the 17th-century false
messiah known as Shabbatai Zvi.
Like the Passover Seder, the Tu
biShevat version relies on the
recitation of blessings and the
drinking of wine, with a greater
emphasis on fruit. Each group of
fruit eaten at the Tu biShevat
Seder represents different ways
that trees provide for us. Before
eating each kind of fruit, a blessing is said and a spiritual question
related to that kind of fruit is
asked.
To fully appreciate nature’s
bounty, Kabbalists matched up Israel’s regional fruit to symbolize
the four physical elements: air,
earth, water, and fire.
* Assiyah, or earth, is symbolized by fruits or nuts with an outer
shell and fruit within. This includes walnuts, pomegranates,
pistachios, and coconuts.
* Yetzirah, or water, is symbolized by fruits with edible outer
flesh and inedible cores. This includes cherries, apricots, olives,
and plums.
* Briyah, or air, is symbolized
by fruit that is entirely edible. This
includes apples, pears, figs, and
raisins.
* Atzilut, or fire, is not symbolized by fruit but by things that
represent God’s presence all
around us. This can include
smelling something natural like
pine, cedar, or spices.
It is no coincidence that the
fruits included in the Seder don’t
Dried fruit and nuts on a platter, traditionally eaten on Tu
biShevat. Credit: Gilabrand via Wikimedia Commons.
fall far from the tree. The constant
imagery of trees is intended to invoke our connection to the earth
and our Jewish responsibility as
its stewards. Looking from the
roots at the bottom to the fruits
among the leaves acts as a reminder that when everything is
connected, each small action by a
human reverberates throughout
the universe.
“Trees are so important in Jewish thought that the Torah itself is
called ‘a tree of life.’ Perhaps this
Torah wisdom can help us think
more wisely about using these resources carefully and living in a
more sustainable way,” write Dr.
Akiva Wolff and Rabbi Yonatan
Neri in their article “Trees, Torah,
and Caring for the Earth” as part
of Jewcology’s “Year of Jewish
Learning on the Environment.”
Though the origins of the Tu
biShevat Seder may be hazy, the
intention to deepen our connection with nature and assure the
preservation of its bounty has lead
to environmental activism’s increased relevance within the context of celebrating the Tu biShevat
holiday.
“We are living in God’s creation, which makes us equal to
one another and makes us all
equal in what we need and what
we share equitably,” Sybil
Sanchez, director of the Coalition
on the Environment and Jewish
Life (COEJL), told JNS.org. “The
Seder is an important time to ritually recognize our values, but it is
also a time to take action.”
For Tu biShevat last year,
COEJL called for Jewish community leaders to sign its “Jewish Environmental
and
Energy
Imperative,” which asked Jews to
reduce their energy use by 14%.
More than 50 Jewish leaders
signed the pledge.
Honoring the theoretical foundations of Tu biShevat, the Israeli
company SodaStream developed
CO2-infusing products to create
soda and sparkling water at home,
in an effort to help the public reduce waste from bottles and cans
purchased at stores. According to
statistics from the U.S. Recycling
Institute, more than 80% of bottles
in the U.S. do not get recycled and
end up in landfills.
Incorporating environmental
mindfulness can easily become
part of Tu biShevat, according to
Sanchez, who suggests checking
whether your family is using locally sourced fruit, ecologically
minded dishes and dining ware,
installing energy-efficient light
bulbs, and turning off appliances
when not in use. Y
ADVERTISEMENT
The Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 30
Mollie Katzen’s Tu biShevat Seder
(Continued from page 26)
batter into the prepared pan (take
your time spreading it in place)
and bake in the center of the oven
for 40-45 min., or till the cake
pulls away from the sides of the
pan, and the top surface is springy
to the touch.
Cranapple Walnut Cake
to the size of peanuts)
½ lb. fresh (or frozen) whole
cranberries
Directions:
Lightly spray a 9” X 13” pan
with nonstick spray. Heat the oven
to 375 degrees. In a med.-lg. bowl,
beat together the sugar, oil, and
vanilla. Add the eggs, one at a
time, beating well after each. In a
2nd bowl, combine the flour with
the other dry ingredients till thoroughly blended. Add the dry mixture to the wet, stirring till
combined, folding in the fruit and
nuts as you go. The batter will be
very thick. Patiently spread the
Winter Salad with Radicchio,
Oranges, Pistachios, and Yogurty-Orange Vinaigrette
Servings: 4
Romaine and arugula join
forces with radicchio and fresh orange sections, and an orange-laced
yogurt dressing coats the leaves,
allowing a scattering of pistachios
to adhere at random. If you choose
to form a bed of couscous or extra
yogurt underneath each serving,
you will be rewarded with an extra
layer that both absorbs the delicious trickle-down juices and also
boosts the volume of the dish,
herding it into light main-dish terrain. You can wash and spin the
salad leaves (keeping them cold
and very dry), prepare the vinaigrette, and section the oranges
well ahead of time. Dress and fin-
Winter Salad with Radicchio, Oranges, Pistachios, and Yogurty-Orange Vinaigrette
ish the salad immediately before
serving. The tangy vinaigrette,
free-standing, will keep very
well—for weeks—in a tightly covered container in the refrigerator.
Shake well, or stir from the bottom, before using.
Vinaigrette ingredients:
1 heaping T. finely minced
shallot
1 t. agave nectar or honey
3 T. orange juice
1 T. cider vinegar
¼ t. salt (rounded measure)
¼ c. extra-virgin olive oil
¼ c. plain yogurt (regular or
Greek)
Salad ingredients
½ lb. very fresh radicchio
A handful of small arugula
leaves
About 6 perfect, crisp romaine
leaves
2 oranges, sectioned
1/2 c. lightly toasted pistachios
Optional Enhancement: Spread a
bed of yogurt and/or couscous on
the plate underneath the salad, as
a bed to catch the dressing (and
to make this more of a light main
course).
Vinaigrette Directions:
Combine the shallot, agave or
honey, orange juice, vinegar, and
salt in a small bowl, and whisk to
thoroughly blend. Keep whisking
as you drizzle in the olive oil,
keeping up the action till it is completely incorporated. Stir/ whisk in
the yogurt and mix till uniform.
Cover and refrigerate till use.
Salad Directions:
Have the cleaned, dried salad
leaves in a large-enough bowl.
Break them into bite-sized pieces
as desired. Add about 6 T. of the
vinaigrette, tossing as you go, to
thoroughly coat all the leaves. Add
the orange sections toward the
end, mixing them in gently so they
don’t break. Sprinkle in the pista-
chios with the final toss, and serve
pronto.
Sweet Potato-Pear Soup
Servings: 5-6
Fresh pears and sweet potatoes
are puréed together and finished
off with touches of cinnamon and
white wine. This unusual combination is slightly sweet, slightly
tart, and deeply soothing. My original version (published in “Still
Life with Menu”) included milk or
cream. This version is veganfriendly, using oil instead of butter.
Use any wine that you enjoy
drinking. And perhaps serve the
rest of the bottle with the soup. Be
sure to use the moist, orange variety of sweet potato (not the drier,
starchier white type).
Ingredients:
2 med.-sized sweet potatoes
(1 lb.)
4 c. water
1 3” stick cinnamon
1-½ t. salt
3 lg. ripe pears (any kind but
Bosc, which are too grainy)
1 T. unsalted butter or grapeseed
or canola oil
¼ c. crisp white wine
1 to 2 T. fresh lemon or lime
juice
Cayenne or white pepper
(optional)
Sweet Potato-Pear Soup
Directions:
Peel sweet potatoes, and cut
into sm. (about ¾”) pieces. Place
in a lg. saucepan with water, cinnamon stick, and salt. Bring to a
boil, cover, and simmer till tender
(about 10 min.). Remove the cover
and let it simmer an additional 5
min. over med. heat. Remove and
discard the cinnamon stick, and let
the sweet potatoes rest in their
cooking water while you fix the
pears. Peel and core the pears, and
cut them into thin slices (about
¼”). Melt the butter (or heat the
oil) in a heavy skillet over med.
heat, and swirl to coat the pan. Add
the pears, and cook, stirring often,
for about 5 min., or till quite soft.
Add the wine, cover, and simmer
about 10 min. longer over lowest
possible heat. Transfer the pear
mixture to the sweet potatoes-aujus, then purée everything together
till smooth with an immersion
blender. You can also use a stand
blender in batches, and then return
it to the pot. Add lemon or lime
juice to taste, plus a touch of
cayenne or white pepper, if desired, and serve the soup hot. (It
reheats well, if necessary.) Y
With more than 6 million books
in print, Mollie Katzen is listed by
the New York Times as one of the
best-selling cookbook authors of
all time and has been named
by Health Magazine as one
of “The Five Women Who
Changed the Way We Eat.” Her
new book, The Heart of the Plate:
Vegetarian Recipes for a New
Generation, was published in September 2013 by Houghton Mifflin
Harcourt.
Charlotte Jewish News - January 2016 - Page 31
Charlotte Jewish Film Festival 2016 Schedule
(Continued from page 1)
SABENA HIJACKING - MY
VERSION - $10
Sunday, March 6 - 7:15 PM Regal Ballantyne
The riveting, untold story of
what took place throughout 30
hours of nerve-racking captivity
aboard Sabena Flight 571 after it
was hijacked by terrorists in 1972.
THE MIDNIGHT ORCHESTRA - $10
Wednesday, March 9 - 7:15
PM - Regal Ballantyne
The estranged son of a famous
musician returns home and unexpectedly finds his life transformed
by the members of his father’s
former band and his eccentric
local guide.
ONCE IN A LIFETIME - $10
Saturday, March 12 - 7:15 PM
- Regal Ballantyne
Based on the inspirational true
story about a diverse group of rebellious students whose lives are
transformed when their no-nonsense teacher enters them into a
national competition.
A TALE OF LOVE AND
DARKNESS - $10
Sunday, March 13 - 3 PM Regal Ballantyne
Academy Award-winning actress Natalie Portman makes her
To receive the online version in place of your mailed copy,
contact us at [email protected]
“Wedding Doll”
directorial debut in this extraordinary adaption of Amos Oz’s celebrated memoir set during the birth
of the state of Israel.
SERIAL (BAD) WEDDINGS Closing Night - $15
Sunday, March 13 - 7:15 PM Regal Ballantyne
A French couple has their lives
turned upside down when their
four daughters marry men from
different races and religions.
Additional Programming (not
part of Early Bird or Regular
All Festival Pass)
Sundays at Lake Norman
Presented in collaboration with
the Jewish Council of Lake Norman. All films will screen 4 PM at
Our Town Cinemas in Davidson.
SABENA HIJACKING - MY
VERSION - $10
Sunday, February 21
MR. KAPLAN - $10
Sunday, February 28
SERIAL (BAD) WEDDINGS $10
Sunday, March 13
For more information, please
see our ad on the previous
page. Y
The Charlotte Chapter of Hadassah
wishes to thank the following
organizations and individuals
for their contributions that helped
the 2nd Annual Hadassah Israeli
Products raise over $10,000.
“A Tale of Love and Darkness”
Op-Ed: Is the Real Problem Middle
Eastern Refugees?
Editor’s Note: The opinions expressed are those of the author.
By Lloyd Scher
What is happening in America
when people who are fleeing a
war torn country and are prevented from seeking safety for
their family? My grandparents
told me how several of our relatives tried to flee Germany in the
1930s only to die in concentration
camps in Europe. All they wanted
to do was to take care and protect
their family. Even here during
World War II we locked up Japanese Americans but let Germans
and Italians roam the streets of the
country. My mom taught the
Holocaust for 31 years at Temple
Israel and the Hebrew High and
she reminded us of the problems
Jews had in seeking a safe place.
It is the same today as it was
then.
I believe in an America that is
a beacon of freedom to the world.
I believe that the American people
will do what is right. I believe in
the Constitution of the United
States. These are the things that
make America great but what is
happening now is scary.
We have people running for
President who want to only let
Christians into the country. So my
Available Online
at www.charlottejewishnews.org
or search issuu.com for the latest edition
question is: which ones? Do we
let just let in Protestants or
Methodists or Baptist? Do we do
it by numbers? Does the country
say we are only letting in 21
Methodists, 12 Catholics, 22 Baptists? What happens to those who
have no faith or are Jewish?
I listen to the talking heads on
televsion that tell us we must go
in with our military to take out
ISIS? Then what? I would like to
know how many of those young
reporters and commentators ever
served in the United States Military. Do they know what war is really like? I do not think so. When
World War I ended we walked
away, which allowed for the rise
of the Nazi Party.
So their question is do we leave
their country and let the people
fight it out for control? That has
been tried already in Iraq and we
have seen what the results of that
were. Everyone says we shouldn’t
have ever left Iraq but they forget
we were asked to leave by the
President of Iraq as part of an
agreement.
I applaud the first President
Bush for not going into Iraq during the Gulf War. He knew what
would happen if Saddam was
taken out and he was right. Just
because we as Americans do not
like a leader does not mean we
have to destroy the world. It is not
our responsibility to change governments in other countries.
Now, I watch as these governors claim they are protecting
their citizens by keeping the
refugees out of their states. But in
several of those states they already have terrorists living there
and they do nothing about the
KKK, Skinheads, and the neoNazis. They bury their heads in
the sand and because of that hate
flourishes in those states. If Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, and of
course North Carolina want to
protect all the citizens of their
states, I suggest that they do
something about those hate
groups.
I remember several years ago
driving through Smithfield, NC
and a Klan rally was being held
right off of the Interstate. They
burned their cross and were circled around it and although I
could not hear the hatred I could
feel it.
If that is what the governors believe is America then we have a
bigger problem than refugees. Y
Sponsor Donors
Levine JCC
Jewish Federation of Greater Charlotte
Ayelet Travel
Special Thanks to the Foundation of
Shalom Park
Friend Donors
Stacy and Allen Baum
Bonnie and David Bornstein
Meg Goldstein, Atty
Debra and Ed Pizer
Hilary and Dan Rosenbaum
Nancy and Steve Schreier
We couldn’t have done this without
the following:
- Our vendors for donating 18% of sales
- Our generous raffle prize donors
- The Israeli Products Fair Planning Committee and Event
Volunteers
- The Charlotte Chapter of Hadassah
- The Temple Israel Gift Shop for donating wrapping paper
- Harris Teeter at Stonecrest and Colony Place
for donating plastic bags
Congratulations to our Mission to Israel Raffle
Winner, Cary Shookoff, of Charlotte, NC.
Don’t forget to save the date for next year’s event,
November 20, 2016.