Finding pets a permanent place to call home

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Finding pets a permanent place to call home
SERVING THE COMMUNITIES OF CHESTERFIELD COUNTY
04.15.10
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY || ONLINE EVERY DAY
EXPLAIN
EXPLORE
EXERCISE
EXTRA
EXPECT
•P2_YMCA program focuses on
childhood obesity.
•P6_Easterling to appear in concert
for National Library Week.
•P7_Volleyball club sports new
home.
•P10_Students recognized for
research.
•P11_Ware attends Tea Party event
in Powhatan.
Weekend conditions
ripe for wildland fire
additional restrictions. Check
with your local fire department
With all the snow and rain
before starting a fire.
of the past few months being
For more information, visit
replaced with above-average
the VDOF Web site at www.dof.
temperatures, low humidity lev- virginia.gov.
els and elevated winds, the next
four days will likely prove busy
for Virginia’s wildland firefighters, according to officials with
the Virginia Department of
Forestry (VDOF).
The National Weather
• Contact your local
Service has issued a special
weather statement regarding the fire department beincreased fire danger threat for
fore starting the fire.
the next several days.
• Do not burn when
“Conditions are ripe for
wildfires,” said John Miller,
winds are up. (If you
VDOF’s director of resource
flags are flapping or
protection. “We advise all citizens to remain aware of these
your wind chimes are
conditions and take extra care
playing their tune,
this weekend. Fire crews across
the Commonwealth are on high it’s probably not a
alert.”
good time to burn.)
The sunshine and warm
• Keep your pile
temperatures are sure to entice
small – less than 10
people outside and many will
want to clean up their yards
feet in diameter and
and fields. Some will turn to
3 feet in height. Add
burning the debris they’ve accumulated over the past several material to your fire
months. The burning of debris as the pile burns
and trash is the No. 1 cause of
down. Don’t add any
wildfires in Virginia, so VDOF
officials recommend alternamaterial to your fire
tives to burning, especially
after midnight.
under the conditions expected
• Clear the area
this weekend.
“Take the debris to an aparound the pile down
proved dump or recycling facilto bare soil.
ity,” said Miller. “If that’s not
• Keep water, rakes
an option, consider building a
brush pile that will help support and shovels handy.
wildlife on your property.”
• Stay with your
If someone must burn,
fire until it’s combe aware of state and local
laws that are in place for your
pletely out and you
protection and the safety of
your family and neighbors. The have doused the hot
state’s 4 PM Burning Law is in
ashes with water.
effect through the end of April. • Have a fully
Outdoor burning is allowed becharged cell phone
tween 4 p.m. and midnight every day. Burning is prohibited
with you and call 911
at all other times. Violations of
as soon as the fire
the law are Class 3 misdemeangets out of your conors which carry a fine of up to
$500. In addition, anyone who
trol. (Let the trained
lets a fire escape is liable for the
firefighters suppress
cost of suppressing the fire as
well as any damage to someone the blaze.)
else’s property. Certain localities across the state also have
by John Campbell on behalf of Virginia Department of Forestry
Tips for
burning safely:
Finding pets a permanent
place to call home
BY ELIZABETH FARINA
[email protected]
O
rbit gave all the puppy love he could
possibly muster on why he would make
a good pet during Metro Richmond Pet
Savers’ first monthly Adopt-A-Thon on
Saturday, April 10, at the PetSmart Store on CarMia
Way. The Cocker Spaniel mix relished the many
“Good dog” and “What a sweetie” moments from
potential owners who came to the event. The event,
a collaborative effort among several animal rescue
groups, including Metro Richmond Pet Savers’
founders Richmond Animal League, Ring Dog Rescue and Chesterfield County Humane Society, was
a way for the public to meet cats and dogs available
for adoption.
Carol Betzler, director of the Hopewell Humane
Society, was pleased to see the turnout from the
public. She cautioned that, “pet adoptions should
not be spur of the moment. It is a lifelong commitment.”
Penny and John Hilton were at the Adopt-AThon for that reason – to make a commitment.
Penny Hilton explained that they had recently lost
two of their three Golden Retrievers to age and she
felt it was important that her retired husband find a
routine with a puppy. A two-month-old mix named
“Finnegan” or “Finn” seemed to be a match. “This
is the first one he saw and he really likes him,” she
said. “I hope he’s tolerant with children.”
At another tent, Judy Van Fossen, who has
volunteered with Richmond Animal League since
1998, held Orbit’s leash as he continued to greet
passer-bys with his puppy-brown eyes. “Look at
that personality,” she said.
Cristina Johnson of Richmond agreed Orbit had
a great personality that may be a possible match
for her Shepherd-mix named Mattie that she had
adopted from RAL in July 2008. She had received
an e-mail from the organization about the event. “I
have been thinking for awhile about a second dog
and wanted to see who is who,” Johnson said.
RAL’s adoption process requires three references,
including one from a veterinarian. All the cats and
dogs receive up-to-date vaccinations and are spayed
or neutered. The adopting owner is also given a bag
of pet food, “so you can go straight on home and
start,” Van Fossen said.
For the volunteers, fostering is part of the adoption process. Wendy Reardon is fostering Little
Grey, a little mix of everything, until he’s adopted.
PHOTOS BY ELIZABETH FARINA
Above: John
Hilton finds
a two-month
old mix to
keep him
young and
for the family
to love at the
first Metro
Richmond
Pet Savers'
Adopt a Thon
on Saturday,
April 10.
Left: Jason
Celli, a
volunteer
with
Hopewell
Humane
Society,
holds
Checkers,
who is
available for
adoption.
PET SAVERS P3
Student artists recognized for their work
Office pool wins
$10,000
courtesy of the VA Lottery
A law office is a quiet, serious place. That is, as long as
11 employees don’t win a big
Mega Millions prize. When that
happens, the quiet and serious atmosphere flies out the
window.
That was the case when
Myra Rich-Smith of Richmond
checked the Mega Millions
tickets she bought on behalf of
her office pool for the March
30 drawing. One of the eleven
tickets matched four numbers
plus the Mega Ball number to
win $10,000.
“I ran down the hall,” she
said. “I couldn’t wait until
everyone got in to tell them. We
had a good time that morning!”
She bought the winning
ticket at Styles Bi-Rite, at 11300
Hull Street Road in Midlothian.
Since the prize was divided
11 ways, each member of the
pool received $909. Along
with Ms. Rich-Smith, the pool
members are: Lisa Tuck of
Richmond, Mary Romeo of
Midlothian, Sharon Guidice
of Midlothian, Mary Ellis of
Midlothian, Susan Shearin of
Richmond, Patsy DeBlasio of
Midlothian, Luanne Kolleda of
Chesterfield, Michael Bowen
of Midlothian, Albert Fray of
Richmond and David Clements
of Midlothian. Each group
member contributed $1 per
OVERHEARD
We had a
good time
that morning!
- Myra
Rich-Smith
drawing to be part of the pool.
Nearly 95 cents of each
dollar spent on the Virginia
Lottery by players goes back to
the Commonwealth in the form
of contributions to education,
prizes and retailer commissions.
Since 1999, all Virginia Lottery
profits have been designated
solely to K-12 public school
education in the Commonwealth. In that time, the Lottery
has turned over more than $4
billion for Virginia’s public
schools. The latest annual
profits of $439.1 million currently represent about 7 percent
of state funding for public
education in Virginia. In 21
years, the Lottery has sold more
than $21.1 billion in tickets,
awarded more than $1.1 billion
in retailer commissions and
paid more than $11.6 billion in
prizes to players.
PHOTO COURTESY OF JTCC
Mary Auerbach of Chesterfield received the Karen Gammon Award for her artwork "Cars in Rain."
Courtesy of John Tyler Community College
The many talents of John
Tyler Community College’s art
students are now on display at the
Midlothian Campus as part of the
2010 Juried Student Art Show.
The show, which opened on
April 2 with a reception and awards
ceremony, features a wide array of
mediums from painting and photography to digital art and sculpture.
The show was juried by Jack Glover,
a noted local artist and educator.
Plaza Art Award
Ryan Whisler of Midlothian
Artwork – Self-Portrait ala
Schiele
Ben Franklin Crafts Award
Emily Nicolaides of Midlothian
Artwork – Portrait of Dora Maar
Campbell’s Ceramics Award
Mary Beth Ols of Richmond
Artwork – Whimsical Tea Pot
Richmond Camera Award
Vicki Barron of Henrico
The winners are as follows:
Artwork – I See You
Main Art Awards
Ian Glass of Chester
Jonathan R. Burnley Graphic
Artwork – Self-Portrait with Blue
Design Award
Edge
Khiem Tran of Midlothian
Artwork – Kumquat Logo Suite
Robert Wynne of Richmond
Artwork – Stones #3, Isle of Iona
Karen Gammon Award
Mary Auerbach of Chesterfield
Artwork – Cars in Rain
Honorable Mentions
Richard Phelps of Midlothian
Artwork –Lidded Jar
Mara Lee Landrum of Petersburg
Artwork – Roots
Michael Allen of Midlothian
Artwork – Friendship
Ilona Strunk of Richmond
Artwork – Fisher Girl
The student artwork will remain
on display on the second floor of the
Academic Building through April
30. The public is invited to stop by
the college, and enjoy the exhibit.
BON AIR || BRANDERMILL || GENITO || MIDLOTHIAN || ROBIOUS || SALISBURY || WOODLAKE
EXPLAIN
2 || APRIL 15, 2010
QUESTION OF
THE WEEK
April 17 is full
of local events
- what is on
your calendar
that day?
Elizabeth Farina
EDITOR
[email protected]
“Decisions, decisions; I’ll be the
one with the camera heading out
to Fool for Art and then off to the
Celebration of the Vine with a few
stops in between. Say ‘hello’ if
you see me."
Sara Page
SPORTS EDITOR
[email protected]
“So much to choose from!
From wrestling to Special
Olympics, I could be just
about anywhere."
Sara Snyder
SALES
[email protected]
“I know I will be at the
Celebration of the Vine for
a while working. After that I
don’t know."
Sara Carter
SALES
[email protected]
"I know I will be working
at the Chesterfield Wine
festival and hopefully make
it to the Chili Cook Off."
YMCA Healthy Kids
Day focuses on
childhood obesity
Courtesy of John Wallace/YMCA of Greater Richmond
F
Childhood Obesity Facts:
or the first time in our nation’s history, the
current generation of adults has a longer life
expectancy than their children, as obesityrelated illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes and asthma become more prevalent. In an effort
to combat America’s health crisis, the Midlothian
Family YMCA is reaching out to the community
to show families that leading healthy lifestyles can
be fun, rewarding and accessible to all at YMCA
Healthy Kids Day on Saturday, April 17 from 10
a.m.-2 p.m.
With over 1,500 YMCAs participating nationally, YMCA Healthy Kids Day is the nation’s largest
health and wellness day for children and families.
The Y has been a longtime proponent of youth
fitness. Now, as First Lady Michelle Obama shines
a spotlight on the issue, more people are becoming
aware of the epidemic proportions and dangers of
childhood obesity.
“We’ve been battling childhood obesity through
our youth programming for years,” says Nancy
Melzer, child care director for the Midlothian Family YMCA. “This event is about giving families the
resources and guidance to lead healthy lifestyles that
include regular physical activity and healthy eating.
It’s about small steps. The YMCA will always be a
community resource, but the commitment begins at
home.”
The Midlothian Family YMCA is one of four
YMCA of Greater Richmond branch locations that
will host the event. Participants will enjoy rock
climbing walls, pony rides, obstacle courses, family
group exercise classes and pool activities. In addition
to the physical activity, nutrition and healthy eating will be front and center. Healthy snack stations
staffed by Y staff and volunteers will offer nutrition
education and guidance. Other attractions include
local fire and EMS volunteers, child ID stations,
dental and skin cancer screenings and more.
“The YMCA continuously works to improve the
quality of life for everyone in our communities,
regardless of their financial situation. No other organization has our health and wellness expertise, network of partners and geographical reach to successfully combat America’s health crisis,” says YMCA of
Greater Richmond President and CEO Barry Taylor.
“Whether they are in our YMCA facilities, out in the
community or in their own homes, we want families
to know that we are here to help them find a way to
start developing new, healthy habits.”
• According to the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 25 percent
of our region’s children are
considered obese.
• One-third of all children
born in 2000 or later will suffer
from diabetes at some point
in their lives; many others will
face chronic obesity-related
health problems like heart
disease, high blood pressure,
cancer, and asthma. A recent
study put the health care
costs of obesity-related diseases at $147 billion per year.
• This epidemic also impacts the nation’s security,
as obesity is now one of the
most common disqualifiers for
military service.
• Children should receive
at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day, yet the
average child spends more
than 7.5 hours each day in
sedentary activities such as
watching television or playing
video games.
• According to the White
House, The American Academy of Pediatrics, in collaboration with the broader medical
community, plans to educate
doctors and nurses across the
country about obesity, ensure
they regularly monitor children’s BMI, provide counseling for healthy eating early on,
and, for the first time ever, will
even write a prescription for
parents, laying out the simple
things they can do to increase
healthy eating and active play.
• Given the reality of a
shortfall in state funding that
threatens healthy food choices in schools and a reduction
of physical education, more
children in the U.S. are at risk.
Chesterfield
Historical Society to
present World War II
V-E Day 65th Commemoration
Program in May & June
During May and June 2010, the Chesterfield Historical Society of Virginia will
present several community events to commemorate the 65th anniversary of Victory
in Europe (V-E) Day. It was on May 8,
1945 that the World War II Allies formally
accepted the unconditional surrender of
the armed forces of Nazi Germany.
An exhibit will open on Saturday,
May 8, in the County Museum featuring memorabilia of Chesterfield County
residents who served in World War II. In
addition, there will be a reception from
2-4:00pm to honor our veterans. There is
no entry fee. This event will be sponsored
by Bon Secours Richmond Health System.
The Museum is located at 6813 Mimms
Loop in Chesterfield.
On Wednesday, May 5, at 2:00pm a tea
+0)/ 5:-&3 $0..6/*5: $0--&(&
& $)&45&3'*&-% $06/5:Present
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
NEWS || FEATURES
with the theme “Women in World War
II” will be held at the historic Magnolia
Grange house museum, 10020 Iron Bridge
Road, Chesterfield. Pre-paid reservations
of $25/person are required; please call
(804)796-1479.
Magnolia Grange will also serve as the
location for two free lectures on topics
related to World War II. The first lecture will be presented by Peter Wrenn at
11:00am on Saturday, May 15, entitled,
“World War II, the USS Indianapolis Tragedy.” The second lecture, “World War II
on the Home Front,” will be presented by
Glen Harrington at 11:00am on Saturday,
June 5th. Both lectures are presented in
participation
CRIME REPORT
All data are based on the publicly available Chesterfield
County Police Department daily arrest and crime releases
and are reported according to Federal Incident Based
Reporting rules.
23112
April 8
12200 block of King
Cotton Ct.
Victim returned home to
find items missing from
her residence.
2800 block of Bayfront
Wy.
Heat pumps removed from
the yard of a house under
construction.
10700 block of
Blossomwood Rd.
Property reported stolen
from victim’s green 1993
Ford Econoline, which was
parked in his driveway.
April 7
10600 block of Hull
Street Rd.
Bottom right storefront
window broken out of
business. Property removed.
23113
April 7
1200 block of Alverser
Pz.
Complainant reported
property was removed
from the store’s unlocked
delivery van.
23114
April 5
13800 block of Village
Place Dr.
Purse reported stolen from
vctim’s unlocked tan 2005
Ford Escape.
10400 block of Crumpets
Ln.
Property reported stolen
from victim’s silver 2000
Acura. No signs of forced
entry were noted.
April 7
10100 block of Cutter Dr.
Property reported
stolen from an unlocked
white Mazda, which
was parked at the
complainant’s residence.
April 6
1600 block of Winding
Wy.
Property reported stolen
from victim’s gray Subaru.
10700 block of
Midlothian Tk.
Vehicle found on fire at
listed location. Additionally, a note, implying a
bomb threat, was found
on another vehicle parked
nearby.
4700 block of Hickory
Rd.
Unknown suspect(s) attempted to steal victim’s
black Polaris Ranger.
23236
April 8
9100 block of N Arch
Village Ct.
State inspection sticker reported stolen from victim’s
unlocked 1999 Chevrolet
Monte Carlo.
23832
April 7
23120
23400 block of
Skinquarter Rd.
Victim reported unknown
suspect(s) attempted to
steal his unlocked green
1997 Audi A4.
23235
April 8
1400 block of Calander Ct.
Victim advised she saw
the suspect in her room.
Upon being observed, the
suspect left. The complainant advised she possibly left the rear sliding
glass door unlocked.
14500 block of Shipborne
Rd.
Copper tubing removed
from heat pump system of
house under construction.
14500 block of Hancock
Village St.
Currency stolen from
photo booth.
13300 block of
Beachcrest Rd.
Complainant advised,
while checking on the
vacant house for sale, he
found the water had been
cut off and the copper
lines removed from the
crawlspace.
Police need public’s
help identifying bank
robbery suspect
courtesy Chesterfield County Police
Department
Police need the
public’s help to identify
a man who robbed the
Gateway Bank branch
at 2730 Buford Road
at about 12:18 p.m. on
Friday, April 9. No one
was injured during the
robbery.
Police said a man
approached a teller and
presented a note that
demanded money. The
suspect did not display a
weapon and was seen getting into a gold mini van
headed toward Huguenot
Road.
The suspect is a white
male, 19-25 years old,
5 feet 1 inch to 5 feet 5
inches tall and 100-115
pounds. He wore a blue
baseball hat, blue T-shirt
with an emblem on the
left side and blue jeans.
The courses you need
The schedule you want
All at
COURTESY PHOTO
Anyone with information should contact the
Chesterfield County Police
Department at (804) 7481251 or Crime Solvers at
(804) 748-0660 or text the
code tip699 and send to
274637 (CRIMES).
For full arrests and
crime reports, visit online
at midlothianexchange.
com.
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MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
PET SAVERS from P1
EXPLAIN
“He just wants attention like any other
dog,” said fellow volunteer Nancy Brown.
Hopewell Humane Society volunteer
Jason Celli added that volunteering to
help in animal
rescue has been Photo Gallery ONLINE
a positive expe- midlothianexchange.com
rience. He, with
girlfriend Joyce Preston, focuses on the
cats that come through the shelter, including socialization, until the animal is ready
for adoption. The Chesterfield resident
transports the cats to the local PetSmart
Store for adoption as well as being “something of a handyman” at the shelter. “I
have a compassion for cats. Mainly cats are
our favorite pets,” Celli said.
Other organizations in attendance
focused on breeds or causes. Jan Velez,
board member of Ring Dog Rescue, explained that the organization focuses on
the brindle breed rescue. “Anything with
the ‘bull’ name in it,” Velez said.
Velez, who kept an eye on
Above: One
Chunk, a 4-month-old Pit Bull,
puppy is eager
to check out
explained that the group advothe event that
cates for the breed and educates
was filled
the public about appropriate dog
with dogs and
ownership, which can be applied
cats ready for
to almost any breed. The organizaadoption.
tion, which currently has 30 foster
Left: Cristina
homes in the Greater Richmond
Johnson of
area, nurtures each dog in a
Richmond
thriving and loving environment.
meets Orbit.
“They’re nanny dogs,” she said.
Johnson was
Velez added that a pet owner,
at the event
especially an owner of a pit bull,
to seek a
second dog for
must be a strong leader, provide
adoption.
structure for the pet, spay and neuter the animal, provide socialization and obedience and know the
dog’s personality. “Be responsible
and make the dog an ambassador for that breed. These
dogs have strong personalities
with higher energy and need
to be active members of the
family. They thrive in that
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Animal League, other animal
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Pet Savers include: AARF,
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Society, Petersburg Animal
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Shelter, Powhatan Animal
• The Dept. of Energy recommends at least 18 inches
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of Chained K9s. The events
Landscaping Services
will take place on the second
Prepare beds, deliver mulch, mulch, edging, leaf removal, prune/trim
Saturday each month. The
shrubs & trees, cut & trim lawns- as needed or contract.
next Adopt-A-Thon will
take place at the Short Pump
Call for a free estimate 804-994-7391
PetSmart on Saturday, May
8, beginning at 10 a.m. For
Flexible hours – we work around your schedule. – not just 9 to 5
more information, link online
John Mitchell • [email protected]
at midlothianexchange.com.
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EXPLAIN
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
4 || APRIL 15, 2010
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
NEWS || FEATURES
Mid-life identity
crisis for Earth Day?
BY ELIZABETH FARINA
[email protected]
N
ext Thursday will mark the 40th anniversary of
Earth Day celebrations, and the event is suffering from a mid-life identity crisis. Celebrating
environmental quality and conservation is
really not the ilk that pollutes the day. We all support and
have concern for our planet that has served humanity for
eons – it’s not like we can really move out of the global
neighborhood.
Let’s face it. Nobody wants to live next to an industrial site that has contaminated drinking water. We
all enjoy healthy trees that provide shade. We all like
to think we’re deeply inhaling fresh clean air. We’re
becoming smarter about supporting smart packaging
in our stores and we’ve grown to appreciate independent local farmers through markets, grocery stores
that carry their products, co-ops and online ordering.
We’ve also have been increasing the steady supply of
tote bags for shopping (in our household we use four
totes to keep the grocery bill in budget). It’s okay to
like nature – yes, in our daily lives, we’re getting really
peachy with Mother Nature.
However, there are major problematic issues when
it comes to the politics of Earth Day. It appears that
we’ve been fed some garbage with data on Global
Warming/Climate Change/Darth Vader’s Death Star.
If the truth has been massaged to fit an agenda, then
there needs to be an open, rhetoric-free discussion
and investigation about what we truly need to do to
protect our habitat rather than throwing money at a
so-called solution that gets everyone quickly nowhere.
There have been several developments over the last
few decades that have left a question mark on whether
we’re heading in the appropriate direction in protecting our environment. One “energy-saver” example
that has been introduced as an environmentallyfriendly alternative to the incandescent bulb has been
these curly-shaped blinding bulbs that leave the dining
room table looking like a police interrogation room
on a b-list film set. The blinding low-watts are just as
nice as the other “energy-saver” bulbs that are on par
with candlelight. Hopefully, the brain trusts at private
companies are studiously working under better lights
in developing a vision-friendly bulb too.
Another issue is ethanol-blend fuel. According to
the U.S. Department of Energy, “it is produced from
starch- and sugar-based feedstocks.” It’s not a new
concept, but one that has picked up in popularity
due to regulation since the invention of the automobile assembly line. The folks note that Henry T. Ford
supported putting ethyl alcohol in the engine rather
than the workers drinking grain alcohol. Yet, corn and
wheat are not just fuels for our cars. These are plants
that are fuels for humanity. Tapping into any food supply is a bad idea. It’s good to know that there are several industries that are seeking out using different plants
such as algae as a source of renewable energy – hopefully, financial support will shift in that direction so
food can return to its primary role on the planet.
Also, growing capital is grand. It’s great to see businesses thrive in the market and even better when private industry can generate jobs and profits (I bet you
thought you wouldn’t see that sentence in 2010). Good
practices have developed over the last few decades
with better energy efficient building plans and HVAC
maintenance. Major kudos go to both The Fresh Market and Kroger at IvyMont Square for taking vacated
buildings and revitalizing its purpose in the community. There are several other local businesses that
have jumped into reusing and reinvesting in existing
structures. Yet, development has an underlying issue
especially when it comes to wetlands that are impacted
through development.
The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
regulates the impact of wetlands through compensatory mitigation, which is about as confusing as regulatory guidelines can possibly be. Under the Virginia Water
Protection Program a ratio of two acres is compensated for one acre of impact in a banking system. The
heart of the issue is where are the two acres located for
the one local acre being impacted? The system seems
flawed if the two acres are located a couple of hundred
miles away. Where is the benefit for the locality losing
a piece of its natural filtration system?
However, an even bigger issue is recycling. There
should be some way for the East Coast to develop a
recycling center to handle all the pudding and yogurt
cups, milk cartons, and a slew of other items that
are placed in a recycling bin must now be discarded
because there isn’t an economically feasible way to recycle certain food containers. (See a list of “acceptable
and unacceptable items” at www.cvwma.com). It’s a bit
deflating to get into a habit of recycling items only to
find out that they’re not on the accepted list.
So, Earth Day will arrive with thoughts of voluntarily recycling, reusing, and reducing our monstrous
footprint that can be seen from the International
Space Station. We’ll think green – financially and environmentally – on many ways to preserve or restore the
natural beauty of our little corner of the planet. We’ll
celebrate with planting trees, picking up litter on the
river banks and roadsides, and learn new earth-friendly tips. And we’ll know we will need to sit down at our
brightly-lit kitchen tables and have a heart-to-heart
about what we really want to achieve in conservation.
You’re invited to share your thoughts and suggestions. E-mail [email protected] or mail
to PO Box 420, Midlothian, Va. 23113.
COURTESY OF MEDIA GENERAL NEWS SERVICE
THE WORLD FROM MY VIEW
Together we can feed more
Courtesy of Fay Lohr, President and CEO of
FeedMore
While it’s true that hunger
tends to plague underserved
communities, today a phenomenon is growing like never before. Hunger’s net has widened
and its numbers have escalated to critical levels. In 2010,
hunger and food insecurity
are prevalent across America
and throughout Central Virginia—among all walks of life,
across socio-economic factors,
in Midlothian and beyond. It’s
the consequence of a turbulent
economy where unexpected
layoffs, reduced incomes, home
foreclosures and rising healthcare costs are taking their toll.
Families, senior adults, singleparent households, disabled
individuals, military families,
and yes, the working poor are
now experiencing hunger in
their daily lives.
Hunger and food insecurity
have become a challenge for too
many Americans – one that’s
neither desired nor deserved.
Who’s responding to the
need?
The FeedMore organizations
– Meals on Wheels Serving
Central Virginia, Central Virginia Food Bank, and the Community Kitchen – are working
together to fight hunger in our
community. They provide food
PHOTO COURTESY OF FEEDMORE
and grocery products to an
Fay Lohr, President and CEO of FeedMore and Richard Schultz, Vice President of
extensive network of partner
FeedMore, work to feed the hungry.
agencies; hot, healthy meals to
at-risk children in summer/
palate-pleasing taste. The staff and volunteers demonstrate
afterschool programs; backpacks filled with weekend meal that superb quality and high quantity can go hand in hand
items for school children in need; and daily, nutritious
for those who need it most.
meals to homebound neighbors who cannot shop or cook
What can you do?
for themselves.
FeedMore strives to fill hunger gaps, but we cannot do it
Meals on Wheels Serving Central Virginia, one of the
alone. Hunger relief requires the help of our community:
FeedMore organizations, provides the only home-delivered individuals, companies, civic organizations, virtually anymeal service to more than 1,500 homebound elderly and
one who cares. You can help by donating funds, for even
disabled adults in Central Virginia. Most clients require
$1 provides one pound of food or five meals. Other ways to
financial assistance from many Meals on Wheels supportmake a difference range from hosting food drives to delivers to meet their nutritional needs. Meals on Wheels strives ering meals to the homebound to prepping and packaging
to improve the physical and mental health of its clients by
in our Community Kitchen.
delivering nutritious, appealing meals customized to indiYour gift supports neighbors like Alice.*
vidual dietary restrictions. Meals on Wheels also provides
Alice is a 79-year-old widow who lives with her daughter
additional life necessities and daily contact from caring
in Midlothian. She retired several years ago and moved
volunteers. With a rising elderly population and the trend
from her own home when a degenerative bone disease
toward shorter hospital stays, the need for Meals on Wheels made it difficult for her to walk or to stand for long periods
services continues to substantially increase.
of time. Her daughter works during the day, and for the
Central Virginia Food Bank, another organization
past two years Alice has relied on Meals on Wheels to
under the FeedMore umbrella, provides food and grocery
provide a nutritious hot lunch and a friendly visitor every
products to an extensive network of partner agencies that
day. She says, “I worry less about eating and I also feel safer
serve individuals and families in need. Last year alone, the
knowing a volunteer comes to my home daily to check on
Food Bank distributed almost 13 million pounds of food
me.”
through 435 feeding partners to more than 100,000 people
Together we can effectively and efficiently fight hunger
each month. In addition, local children received more than and enhance lives in our community. Visit feedmore.org to
363,000 hot meals and 19,000 weekend meals as a healthy
learn more about helping your neighbors in need.
foundation for mental development and physical growth.
*Name changed to protect the client’s identity.
The Community Kitchen produces meals for both
FeedMore organizations, combining good nutrition and
CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS
The official report total for Chesterfield County Police Department for March 2010 is 103 DUI
arrests, 29 more than was reported in the April 8 edition.
M
I
D
L
O
T
H
I
A
N
EXCHANGE
EX
COM
Publisher
Editor
Sports Editor
Sales Manager
MultiMedia Sales
MultiMedia Sales
Classifieds
Subscriptions
Joy Monopoli
Elizabeth Farina
Sara Page
Pam Sanders
Sara Carter
Sara Snyder
Cindy Grant
Michelle Wall
13702 Village Mill Drive, Suite 203
Midlothian, Va 23114
Office: (804) 379-6451
Fax: (804) 379-6215
Mail: PO Box 420 Midlothian, VA 23113
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
(804) 562-0626 x14
(804) 381-8071
(804) 814-7519
(804) 746-1235 x18
(804) 201-6071
(804) 908-6086
(804) 746-1235 x16
(804) 746-1235 x10
WE WANT TO
PUBLISH YOUR ISSUEDRIVEN LETTERS
Vol. IV, _11th edition
© 2010 by Richmond Suburban
News, a Media General Company.
All advertising and editorial
matter is fully protected and may
not be reproduced without the
permission of the publisher.
All correspondence submitted
for publication must include
first and last name, and for
verification purposes only, a
street address, and phone
number. Letters may be edited
for clarity, grammar & space.
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
EXPLORE
APRIL 15, 2010 || 5
YOUR WORLD || TRAVEL
STUFF TO DO
E-mail your event to [email protected] Subject line: EVENT
APRIL 16 & 17
Dance is a Journey, this
year’s Spring Dance Showcase, will grace the stage
April 16 & 17 at 7 pm in the
Thomas Dale High School
Auditorium in Chester.
Tickets, available at the door,
cost $6 for general admission, $4 for students, and
are free for senior citizens
and children 5 & under. For
more information about the
Specialty Center for the Arts,
visit www.SpecialtyCenterArts.com.
FRIDAY, APRIL 16
Midlothian High School
Theatre Department’s
Broadway Night will be held
Friday, April 16, at 7:30
p.m. with NO ADMISSION
at the school’s auditorium,
located at 401 Charter
Colony Parkway, Midlothian.
Come sample delectable bits
of The Music Man, West Side
Story, You're a Good Man,
Charlie Brown, The Pirates
of Penzance and Les Mis.
Choreographed by Ingrid
Pettus and Krystal Harper.
Performed by all of the Advanced Theatre classes.
SATURDAY, APRIL 17
Fool for Art will be held from
10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at John
Tyler Community College
– Midlothian Campus, 800
Charter Colony Pkwy.,
Midlothian. John Tyler Community College in partnership with Chesterfield
County presents Fool for Art.
The festival will feature art
and craft vendors, hands-on
activities, free educational
sessions, information on
how to go green, food,
music and much more. Free
document shredding is also
being offered from 10 a.m.
– 1 p.m. Free and open to the
community. For a complete
list of vendors and a look at
all the educational sessions
and activities being offered,
visit www.jtcc.edu/foolforart.
Questions may be directed
to [email protected] or
(804)594-1527.
by Casper and Rippleshot.
There will also be a variety
of food and artisans. The
Celebration of the Vine will
be at the Chesterfield County
Government Complex, 9901
Lori Road, Chesterfield, Virginia 23832. Taster tickets are
$15 in advance or $20 at the
event. Visit www.ChesterfieldChamber.com for more
information on ticket sales
and locations. Rain or Shine.
Come swing into spring and
join the fun when Trinity
Episcopal School hosts its
fifth annual Jazz Titans of
Tomorrow Festival. Performances will be provided by
professional and student jazz
ensembles running continuously from 12:30-7:30 p.m.
on Trinity S field hockey/lacrosse field. Funny Bone, a
professional jazz quintet, will
headline the performance
schedule offering a variety
of traditional jazz standards
from the 1920’s through
the 1970’s. co-led by Trinity
Headmaster Tom Aycock
on trombone and Funny
Bone’s own Dave Pillsbury
on trumpet, the quintet will
take the main stage at 3 p.m.
Student musicians will perform throught the day and the
grand finale featuring Antonio
Garcia with the VCU Greater
Richmond High School Band
will begin at 6:30 p.m. Admission is open to the public and
free.
A Walk for Children's Health
at Maymont Park Children’s
Farm from 1-4 p.m. Bon
Secours Medical Group, in
conjunction with Children's
Services and the Good Life
Center, present a Walk for
Children's Health to combat
childhood obesity and build a
healthier future for Richmond's children. The walk is
from 1-4pm at the Maymont
Park Children's Farm. There
will be activity stations, free
health screenings, prizes,
giveaways and Bonnie the
Bon Secours mascot. To register, visit www.bonsecours.
com or call 359-WELL (9355).
Walk up registration begins at
1 pm, activities run from 1-4
pm, with the walk at 3 pm and
prizes at 3:30 pm.
Little Sisters of the Poor
French Food Festival featuring Chef Paul Elbling will be
held from 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. at
1503 Michaels Rd. French
foods and desserts, pastries,
chocolates, breads, beer and
wine. Marie’s Boutique with
cookbooks, preserves and
other French merchandise.
Activities and games for
children and live entertainment. Proceeds to benefit
the elderly poor. Contact
(804) 288-6245 for additional
information.
SUNDAY, APRIL 18
St. Matthias’ Fine Arts Series
presents “The James River
Ringers” Program featuring
Richmond’s Premier Community Handbell Group at 4
p.m. in the Church, located
at 11300 West Huguenot
Rd., Midlothian. Performing
on five octaves of Malmark
English handbells, the James
River Ringers will present a
program that includes classical works, original compositions, hymns and popular
favorites - something for
everyone in the audience. Accompanying performance will
be a reception and a display of
the works of local artist Cathyann Burgess. A donation of $5
per person or $10 per family is
appreciated.
Richard “Rick” Burk of St.
Louis, former organist at
Christ The King Lutheran
Church (CTK), will return to
Richmond to present an organ
recital at 4 p.m. at CTK. The
public is invited and there will
be a reception afterward. Rick
was on the team that located
and arranged for the purchase
of the Casavant pipe organ
that was installed last fall at
CTK. The church is located at
9800 W. Huguenot Road.
TUESDAY, APRIL 20
Earth Week – “Liquid Assets”
Community Event will be held
from 5:30 – 9 p.m. at the Byrd
Theater, located at 2908 W.
Cary St. The Liquid Assets
documentary tells the story
of essential infrastructure
systems: water, wastewater, and stormwater. These
systems are critical to public
health and development, but
the aging infrastructure is out
of sight and out of mind and
slowly degrading. This free
community event at the Byrd
Theater includes a reception
sponsored by water, sewer,
and stormwater societies,
the documentary, and a
brief discussion of the state
of Virginia's infrastructure.
Admission: Free for all ages.
More information is available
at www.ascevirginia.org
WASABI THE SUDOKU GAME WITH A KICK!
The Chesterfield Chamber of
Commerce and Flagstop Car
Wash present Celebration of
the Vine Wine Festival will be
held from 11 am to 6 pm for a
day of tasting award winning
Virginia wines. Bring a chair
or blanket and enjoy music
Opening Soon!
Turn your closets into cash!
We are now accepting consignments for
Women’s designer (casual, career and formal)
clothes, bridal gowns, shoes, handbags, accesǦ
sories, and jewelry. We are also accepting girls
and boys clothing from infant to teen.
For more information please call us or visit us
at
www.itschicagain.com
Serving the greater Richmond area since 1975
Don’t let termites destroy your
greatest investment.
Call us today for a FREE inspection!
(804) 266-4608
www.richpropm.com
Mention this ad and receive
15% off the initial service.
We take care of termites,
mosquitoes, ants, rodents and
other nuisance pests.
14TH ANNUAL
POWHATAN SPRING
ANTIQUE POWER SHOW
APRIL 24 – 25, 2010
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
THE NELSON BLANTON ANTIQUE
TRACTOR PULL & SWAP MEET
(Including Classes “A”, “B”, “C”, Modifieds & Swap Meet)
ANTIQUE GAS ENGINES AND TRACTOR
DISPLAY Home Place Tractor Parts - New
Parts for Old Tractors
ANTIQUE CARS & TRUCKS BY THE
POWHATAN CRUIZERS
CRAFT SHOW AND FLEA MARKET (spaces available)
SILENT AUCTION: (donations needed or
will sell items for you at 20%)
CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES: Jonathan the
Juggler, Barrel Car Rides, Corn Crib, and
SO MUCH MORE!
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
SUNDAY CHURCH SERVICE @ 3:00 by
the Pleasant Grove Inspirational Choir Gospel Hour.
LOTS OF GREAT FOOD & BAKED GOODS
Nelson Blanton
Sponsored by the Coalition of
Powhatan Churches
Location: 2455 Academy Road, Powhatan
Admission: $6.00/Children 4-12 $3.00
FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL:
804-598-4464 or 804-598-4913
NO
ALCOHOL
ALLOWED
www.coalitionofpowhatanchurches.com
Prevent medication abuse. Prevent poisonings.
Protect the environment.
Saturday, April 17
10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Chesterfield County Fairgrounds
Corner of Courthouse & Krause Rds.
» Drive through & Drop off »
Chesterf ield & Metr
o Residents
County Fairground
s
4-17 -10
• Brin g your expire
d or unneeded
prescriptions & overthe-counter
medications.
• Leave medications
in th
theeir
ir
original containers.
• Put medications
in clear plastic
bags, if possible.
Dr. Clean M. Out
1225 Sycamore Square
Midlothian VA 23113
804Ǧ873ǦCHIC (2442)
[email protected]
Where Thrifty is the New Envy!
We cannot accept medications
brought from hospitals, nursing
homes, clinics, doctor’s offices or
other businesses that distribute
medications.
Sponsored by
Chesterfield County, SAFE and
the Virginia Poison Center
For additional information call 796-7100 or visit chesterfieldSAFE.org
Virginia Poison Center
EXPLORE
6 || APRIL 15, 2010
YOUR WORLD || TRAVEL
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
Chesterfield
libraries to
celebrate
National
Library Week
Courtesy of Chesterfield County Public Library
PHOTO COURTESY BY COKE WHITWORTH
Angela Easterling will perform at a concert hosted by the Chesterfield County Public Library on April 16.
BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY
A1 Chimney Sweep & Masonry
(804) 859-5761
EARLY SPRING SPECIAL $5495
Wood stoves extra. normally $9995
Cannot be combined w/any other offer.
10% OFF ANY MASONRY WORK
CALL 746-1235 X3 OR EMAIL: [email protected]
TO PROMOTE YOUR SERVICES IN THIS DIRECTORY.
Standard Roofing
Dampers • Chimney Caps
Masonry Repair Work • Animal Removal
FREE ESTIMATES • Locally Owned & Operated
Licensed / Insured • 10% Senior Citizen Discount
We now accept credit cards!
Knowledgeable in all types of roofing.
• Copper • Tin & Cedar • Shingle • Slate
We appreciate all your support.
Proudly Serving Chesterfield & Powhatan.
FREE
ESTIMATES
ON ALL GUTTER
CLEANING
Need Extra Ca$h?
We buy junk, wrecked and abandoned cars.
We pay $100
and up for vehicles.
and Friendly Service
J.B. Used Auto Parts
(804) 279-0600 • (804) 307-2475
(804) 763-9920
Scott’s Lawn
Care Service
Complete Lawn and Landscape Service
DESIGINING AND
PLANTING
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
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(804) 794-9740 Home
(804) 514-9097 Cell Phone
(804) 794-9745 Fax
Licensed & Insured
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Call for a Free Estimate
10% OFF
Selected Lot
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The Chesterfield County Public Library will
celebrate National Library Week with a concert by
country/folk musician Angela Easterling, Friday,
April 16, 7-9 p.m. at the Central Library, 9501 Lori
Road.
The concert, “A Songwriter’s Journey through
American Music,” will include original songs plus
selections of classic folk, roots, country and rock
tunes that have influenced Easterling. Admission is
free, but advance registration is required. Register
online at library.chesterfield.gov or by calling the library at 804-748-1774. For more information about
Easterling, visit angelaeasterling.com. The concert is
being hosted by the library in partnership with the
Friends of the Chesterfield County Public Library.
Serving the area since 1927!
FREE
INSPECTION
& Telephone
Estimates
(804) 706-1070
check us out at:
www.permatreat.com
for your money-saving coupon!
BUGGY TOP BARNS
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PHONE 492-4444
“No Terms” divorce: separated one year & cooperate.
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804.598.7300
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Backyard Buildings and More
Roof Fungus Removal
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• Sheds and Play Systems
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Since 1968
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Zac Bragg
Move-In / Out Punch Lists
Home Repair &
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Construction, L.L.C.
◄ Major credit cards accepted ►
804-651-3830
at 804-639-0700
Licensed & Insured • Est. 1998
www.Virginiapowerwash.com
8502 Brook Road, Glen
Allen, VA 23060
804-266-2996
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598-3389
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Specializing in re-mulching, cleaning beds,
trimming shrubs & hedges, re-edging, light brush
hauling & clean up. Spreading gravel for driveways.
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Delivery also available.
Lic/Ins
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804-794-1474
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MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
EXERCISE
SPORTS || FITNESS
APRIL 15, 2010 || 7
Titans win offensive battle
C
BY SARA PAGE
[email protected]
razy would be a
good way to describe Thursday’s
baseball game between Midlothian and Trinity
Episcopal high schools.
Awe-inspiring might be
another.
The game was the sort that
makes fans of high school
sports. Fans were chatting
amiably about getting an
early jump on post-game
traffic. Others had mostly
stopped paying attention
and were taking out their
keys. A bubble of privacy put
even the batboy a respectful
distance from the visiting
dugout.
Then it all changed.
Each crack of the bat
brought a disbelieving smile.
Each foot across the plate
brought out another cell
phone to call early abandoners back.
Down 11 runs two different times in the first four
innings, Trinity Episcopal
erased a 14-3 deficit to win
21-17.
One might say the Titans
had their backs against the
wall.
Entering the fifth inning,
Trinity was three outs away
from going home with a 10run-rule loss on their record.
COMEBACK P8
Photo Gallery ONLINE
midlothianexchange.com
PHOTO BY E-YAGE RAMIL
Midlothian pitcher Scott Poe, left, came off the mound to assist in a run down as Trinity's Jordan Tarsovich got caught off the bag in Thursday's marathon
baseball game. Trinity pulled out a come-from-behind 21-17 victory.
Lancers edge
Knights in
extra innings
kis reached on a walk and
the Lancers intentionally
The Manchester varloaded the bases with a
sity baseball team just
walk to Cullen.
wouldn’t go away in last
With one out, ManchesTuesday’s game against
ter pitcher Ryan Spangler,
Thomas Dale.
who had entered the game
The Lancers came back in the fourth inning, got
from deficits twice in the
out of the jam, going high
game and sent it to nine
in the zone and forcing a
innings before pulling out fly ball to right field and
a 7-6 win over the Knights. another to center for the
“It was a hard-fought
final two outs.
ballgame,” Manchester
“[Spangler] came in in
head coach Ricky Saunders the fourth inning, and he
said. “We knew we were
had a great day,” Saunders
going to get their best. Bill said. “He did what we
Cullen is a very special
needed him to do.”
pitcher, probably one of
Spangler struck out
the best in the region.”
seven in four and twoCullen struck out 10
thirds innings.
and had the Knights in
The Lancers got the gogood position to win with ahead, and what would be
a 3-2 lead going into the
a needed cushion, in the
seventh inning.
top of the ninth inning.
Wearing the visiting
Shortstop Augie Ayers
uniforms in their own
reached on a walk, took
tournament, Manchester
second on a wild pitch and
went to work first in each came around to score on
inning. Down to their
an errant throw to first
final three outs, the Lanc- base to give Manchester
ers benefited from a big,
the lead. The Lancers got
one-out hit by Joey Cujas. back-to-back home runs
He sent a solo shot – his
from Ryan Morrison and
second of the day – over
Michael Pegram for a 7-3
the fence in left field to tie lead.
the game.
But the Knights came
The Knights got a run- up with a rally of their
ner in scoring position in own.
the bottom of the seventh
With two out, Pappawhen Jake Wisener reached dakis got things started
on a walk, stole second
with a single to right field.
and took third on a wild
pitch. Emanuel PappadaTOURNAMENT P8
BY SARA PAGE
[email protected]
PHOTO BY SARA PAGE
Kelly Layne, left, and Alexandra Olivero work together during a recent MidAtlantic Volleyball practice. The pair and their
teammates are helping to break in the club's new floors and new building.
MAVC serves up new digs
at 7508 Whitepine Road,
within spitting distance of
There’s no beating
the Chesterfield County
around the bush with the
Airport. The new facility
MidAtlantic Volleyball
features 25-foot ceilings,
Club.
42 gym-standard light
The non-profit organi- bulbs, and enough floor
zation has grown from a
space for four courts, a
girls-only organization of workout room and three
50 high school level playlarge offices.
ers to over 300 boy and
But the best part is
girl players in both rec“this facility is ours 24/7,”
reation and competition
Parham said. “It was just
leagues and encompassa matter of scheduling to
ing ages from elementary
get the kids running in
school up to adult. And
and out of here. We have
they’ve gotten there in just extra practice time that we
three years. But if you ask didn’t have before.”
co-director Steve Paraham
The first seeds for the
if he thought it would
move were planted a year
grow this quickly, he’s as
ago when the club more
honest as if he’s coaching
than doubled in size from
one of the teams.
its original 52 players to
“Yes,” he said without
130. When that number
hesitation. “It’s even bigger more than doubled again,
than where we are right
organizers knew it was
now.”
time to move.
Where they are right
“We visited here over a
now is putting the finishyear ago and actually got a
ing touches on a facility
quote to move here; but at
that they can call home.
that time, we just weren’t
The club, which forbig enough,” Parham said.
merly operated out of U“So when the numbers
Turn Sports Academy, has started to come around, it
moved to its own facilities just really made sense.”
BY SARA PAGE
[email protected]
The club started in
2008 to fill the void left by
another organization that
had offered a competition
league for girls. Parents of
area volleyball players said
at the time they thought
the demand was there.
When the girls’ program
took off, organizers added
a boys’ program in the second year and the numbers
more than doubled again.
“We wanted a larger
base for Chesterfield,”
co-director Tim Holt said.
“We want to offer more to
Chesterfield County and
that was the problem. All
of a sudden, everybody
realized, ‘Hey, we don’t
have to go across the river
anymore.’”
MAVC now serves over
300 athletes of all ages
and abilities. They have
competitive boys’ and
girls’ travel teams for ages
12 and up and recreation
teams for the same ages.
They are starting an adult
league and a “mini league”
for kids ages 7-9 this year.
They even offer educational programs for parents.
“We encourage the parents to participate,” Holt
said. “We’ve done parent
clinics where we are trying
to train the parents about
everything in volleyball so
when the kids go home,
they can talk about their
success and how well they
did, and their parents can
really compliment them
and say, ‘Hey you did a
great job,’ actually knowing why they did a great
job.”
The move showed
exactly how much the
comprehensive family
approach had worked because families, coaches and
current and former players
turned out in droves to get
the facility up and running
when it became the new
official home of MAVC on
Jan. 4.
“This court was shipped
here from California,”
Parham said. “We had parents come in to help put
it down. There’s 14,000
square feet of flooring. We
PHOTO BY SARA PAGE
put it down in a day. It was
Manchester's
Ryan
Morrison
is
congratulated
in the dugout
a military attack.”
MAVC P8
after a two-run homerun in the ninth inning that helped
propel the Lancers to a 7-6 win over Thomas Dale.
8 || APRIL 15, 2010
EXERCISE
SPORTS || FITNESS
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
MAVC from P7
MAVC is hoping to add
beach and quad volleyball
to its repertoire soon, and
joke that maybe someday
they’ll be big enough to
need that airstrip they can
see from the loading-dock
doors lining court four.
Through the expansions
and additions, they add
that the original mission is
still in everyone’s minds.
“What we’re trying to
do for the kids and the
families is to give them
every opportunity to have
that physical training, that
physical education and to
have fun,” Holt said. “It’s
a sport and we have to
always remember, no matter how hard you work, it’s
a sport. It has to stay fun,
and that’s our objective
– to make sure that it stays
fun for the [players].”
MAVC will have a grand
opening for their new
facility on Sunday, May
23 from 1-4 p.m. More
information is available on
their web site at midatlanticvolleyball.com.
PHOTO BY SARA PAGE
The new MAVC home overlooks the Chesterfield County Airport from the loading doors pictured. Officials hope the doors will also overlook sand volleyball
courts. MAVC moved into the facility Jan. 4 and will host a grand opening on May 23.
TOURNAMENT from P7
Photo Gallery ONLINE
midlothianexchange.com
PHOTO BY SARA PAGE
Manchester's Ryan Thorpe successfully slides around the tag at second base.
He went to third on a double
by Cullen and came around
to score on a single up the
middle by Ryan Moore. Two
more came around to score
on a single down the left field
line, which forced Saunders to
call Morrison to the mound.
Morrison, who was supposed to be on rest, took just
two pitches to get the final
out. Pegram fielded a ground
ball to second and flipped to
first for the out.
Morrison was the winning
pitcher in the final game of
the tournament – a 4-2 win
over J.R. Tucker – and got a
save in Monday’s game against
Kellam – a 6-2 win for the
Lancers.
The Lancers also benefited
from fantastic defense.
Though they got off to
a slow start and picked up
their one error of the game in
the first inning, Manchester
bounced back with a clas-
sic diving catch on the edge
of the infield by Pegram to
save a hit in the early innings
and another diving catch by
centerfielder DaShawn Amos
late in the game at the fence,
which saved a run.
This is the third year that
Manchester has hosted their
Spring Break Tournament.
“We’re really excited about
the teams that came out this
year,” Saunders said. “Thomas
Dale is one of the top in their
district and in the region;
Kellam, from the beach, is a
great team; and J.R. Tucker,
certainly with their history, is
a great team.
“We used to go away to
tournaments,” Saunders
continued, “but I said, ‘Let’s
get our field in shape and
do it right here. It’s a lot of
work, but I have great assistant coaches and a very hard
working J.V. team, and all the
parents come out to help. It’s
a lot of fun.”
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PHOTO BY E-YAGE-RAMIL
Sam Lamere rounds third after a two-run blast that closed the gap to four in the seventh
inning.
COMEBACK from P7
A solo shot to left by Berkley
Hawkins to start the inning
put a few smiles on the
Titans’ faces but only got the
team within 10 and brought
out the Midlothian closer.
Facing Jim Cain, Trinity’s
day appeared over. A sinking
fast ball just over the outside
edge of the plate got the first
out. Another beautiful pitch
got the second.
But Trinity right fielder Peter
Petras started a rally that would
last three innings. He reached
on a walk and scored on a double by pitcher Matt D’Allessio
to ensure a sixth inning.
By the end of the fifth, the
Titans had closed the gap
to six, thanks to a three-run
blast by Michael Gibbons.
Though the Midlothian
defense picked up the third
out, shoulders squared up
and heads lifted on the Trinity bench, and seats refilled.
Even the bat-boy came back.
“None of us thought we
were going to lose,” Hawkins
said. “We always thought we
had a chance with our bats.”
Connor Bradley’s third
home run of the day got the
Titans started in the sixth
inning. Three hits later, jaws
dropped again as the goahead run walked to the plate
in the form of Hawkins. He
took the third pitch on a ride
over the left field fence for
Trinity’s first lead of the day.
“We’ve been working on
[hitting] a lot, especially
hitting opposite field when
we’re seeing outside pitches,”
Bradley said.
The Titans would get
seven more runs including four on a grand slam by
Bradley – his fourth homerun in the game. And Trinity
would need all the cushion
they could get.
With rain threatening an
early end, Midlothian rallied
in the final inning.
Trojan third baseman
Robert Jones reached on a
single to shallow center field
and came around to score on
a homerun by Sam Lamere.
The rally ended on a
one-hop hit back to Petras
– Trinity’s closer – and a
strikeout.
Midlothian’s offense got
off to a fast start in the first.
Connor Bastaich singled
to center, stole second on a
wild pitch and came around
to score on an infield hit
by Lamere that took a bad
bounce off the mound and
went to third base.
A double by Scott Poe
brought in two more and the
Trojans took advantage of
three errors as they jumped
out to a 9-0 lead.
“We had an opportunity
to close the door and, with
a young team, that’s where
we’re struggling right now,”
said Midlothian first-year
head coach Chris Roarty.
“Trinity did an outstanding
job. Both teams hit the ball
very, very well; and it was a
beautiful afternoon. We came
out on the short end of the
stick on this one but hopefully
we’ll be able to turn it around
and get these young guys to
mature a little bit. As long as
we keep competing, that’s all
I’m looking for right now.”
The teams combined for
38 runs on 40 hits and 11
homeruns. Bradley broke a
school record with 19 career
homeruns. Hawkins – now
with 15 – ranks second.
The game pitted two relatively unfamiliar foes from
different divisions, a common thread for Midlothian’s
spring break week. The Trojans also met Powhatan and
Deep Run earlier in the week,
teams they don’t normally
face in the regular season.
“We wanted to play good
competition over the spring
break. We wanted to see as
much live pitching as we
possibly could,” Roarty said.
“Especially with the young
group, these guys need to see
good pitching and good solid
programs that have reached
… where we want to be.
They’ve seen that and they’ve
seen what it takes and where
our shortfalls are right now,
so it’s a growing process.”
• Family & Cosmetic
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(804) 320-7147
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Conveniently located across from Chippenham Hospital
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FOR OVER 30 YEARS
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
EXERCISE
APRIL 15, 2010 || 9
SPORTS || FITNESS
SPORTS ON YOUR TIME
SOUTHCREEK PROPERTIES
(send your sports news to [email protected])
VA Funk independent
wrestling teams will host an
Courtesy of Tina Andes/Special
All-Star Tri-Meet and clinic
Olympics
on Saturday, April 17 at
The Special Olympics
Deep Run High School.
James River Regional
The afternoon begins
Swim Meet will take place
at 3 p.m. with a wrestling
Saturday, April 17 at ACAC clinic featuring Virginia
beginning at 1 p.m.
Tech head coach Kevin
Swimmers will compete Desser. The clinic is folfor slots in the Special
lowed by a tri-meet featurOlympics Virginia Summer ing the three host teams at
Games slated for June.
5 p.m.
Nearly 100 swimmers
The cost for the clinic,
are expected to hit the pool which includes admission
in Saturday’s regional meet. to the meet, is $25. AdmisCome be a fan!
sion for the meet only is $5.
For more information
All money raised will help
about getting involved
the host teams defer costs
with Special Olympics,
as they travel to regional
contact Tina Andes at (804) wrestling events this sum726-3032 or via email at
mer.
[email protected]
For advanced clinic regorg.
istration or more information contact Austin Akins
Area teams host
at [email protected]
Special Olympians compete for Summer Games
wrestling clinic
Courtesy of Curt Jones
Chalkley ES hosts 5K
The VA Badboys, Team
Prestige Worldwide and
Courtesy of Patricia Bishop
Chalkley Elementary
School will host a school/
community 5K run/walk
on Saturday, May 15. Registration forms must be received by Friday, May 7 and
are available at the Chalkley
Elementary School web
site. For more information
contact Lauren Lattimer at
(804) 647-1300 or Lauren_
[email protected]
First Dragon Boat Festival slated for area
Courtesy of Sports Backers
Sports Backers is
partnering with Great
White North Dragon Boat
to host the first annual
Richmond International
Dragon Boat Festival on
July 31 on the James River.
This ancient Chinese sport
has been gaining popularity in North America over
the past 20 years and has
become the world’s fastestgrowing water sport.
Dragon boats are 40foot, human-powered ca-
noes decorated with ornate
Chinese dragon heads. Led
by the rhythmic beat of
a drum, teams consisting
of 20 synchronized paddlers, one drummer, and
one steersperson race the
canoes 500 meters down
the river.
The Richmond International Dragon Boat Festival
will be the third event of
the Major League Dragon
Boat Series. Not only is
the event expected to draw
experienced participants
from across the continent
and overseas, but it should
also attract first-time racers
from Richmond.
The Virginia Breast
Cancer Foundation is
the official charity of the
Richmond International
Dragon Boat Festival. For
more information or to
register a team, visit gwndragonboat.com.
Friday, April 23rd
Casper
Admission $5
with 50% donated to
Powhatan Rotary Club
4th Fridays – Friday Park
2088 Carter Gallier Blvd., Powhatan, VA 23139
http://powhatan4thfridays.com
Sponsored By
Powhatan’s 4th Fridays events
will run April through September
the 4th Friday of each month.
Gate opens at 5:30 p.m.,
event closes at 8:30 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL SCOREBOARD
Don’t wait! Get up-to-date sports scores at midlothianexchange.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 6
Golf
Midlothian 6, Brunswick
Academy 4
Midlothian 2, Frank Cox 1
St. Catherine’s 10, Trinity
Episcopal 2
THURSDAY, APRIL 8
Trinity Episcopal 184,
Christchurch 212
TUESDAY, APRIL 6
Trinity Episcopal 164,
Woodberry Forest 165
Baseball
THURSDAY, APRIL 8
Girls Track
Trinity Episcopal 21, Midlothian
17
Colonial Heights Tournament
Clover Hill 10, Colonial Heights 4
Monacan 3, Henrico 0
Mingo Bay Classic (N.C.)
High Point 4, James River 3
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7
St. Catherine’s 70, Collegiate
66, Trinity Episcopal 41
Boys Track
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7
Collegiate 70, St. Christopher’s
69.5, Trinity Episcopal 34.5
Softball
THURSDAY, APRIL 8
St. Margaret’s 5, Trinity
Episcopal 0
Manchester Spring Break
Tournament
Manchester 7, Thomas Dale 6
(9 inn.)
Manchester 4, J.R. Tucker 2
Mingo Bay Classic (N.C.)
James River 9, Williamsport
(Pa.) 4
James River 12, Winfield (W.V.) 2
Deep Run Tournament
L.C. Bird 14, Midlothian 4
Colonial Heights Tournament
Monacan 16, Varina 14
Clover Hill 10, Hopewell 3
Southern Women’s Show
April 16-18
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Girls Lacrosse
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7
THURSDAY, APRIL 8
Mingo Bay Classic (N.C.)
Louisa 10, James River 0
Trinity Episcopal 11, Norfolk
Collegiate 5
TUESDAY, APRIL 6
TUESDAY, APRIL 6
Trinity Episcopal 13,
Woodberry Forest 3
Steward 11, CVHS 9
St. Catherine’s 15, Trinity
Episcopal 13
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Call Sara Snyder at (804) 908-6086
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3730 Winterfield Rd. Midlothian, VA 23113
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10 || APRIL 15, 2010
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
CELEBRATIONS || LIFE
Chesterfield County students recognized
FBLA awards
Students from Meadowbrook, Matoaca and Thomas
Dale high schools competed
in a Future Business Leaders
of America regional event at
Dinwiddie High. Chesterfield
students won a total of 34
awards, and Matoaca High
was recognized as the largest
local FBLA chapter. Here are
Chesterfield’s first-place winners
and their categories:
Banking and financial
systems — Stacey Tisdale of
Meadowbrook; business calculations — Mathis Seal of Thomas
Dale; business communications
— Gabriel Harris of Matoaca;
business math — Mallory Seal
of Thomas Dale; business plan
— Nolan Overby, Amanda
Troidle and Nia Wilson of Matoaca; computer problem solving
— Spencer Franklin of Thomas
Dale; cyber security — Bilal
Sayar of Matoaca; database design and application — Anthony Reid of Matoaca; digital video
production — Briana Gracia
and Briana Green of Matoaca;
economics — Johnny Partin of
Thomas Dale; entrepreneurship
— Mason Foster, Monique Gachet and Brice Gibbs-Wilson of
Thomas Dale; FBLA principles
and procedures — Brea Gilliam
of Matoaca; global business
— Ashley Yelverton and Justin
Burkett of Matoaca; impromptu
speaking — Wad Khalafalla of
Meadowbrook; introduction
to business — Rakee Rogers of
Meadowbrook; introduction
to business communication
— Allison Partin of Thomas
Dale; job interview — Naomi
Figueroa of Meadowbrook;
management decision making— Alyssa Robinson and
Aislinn Padgett of Matoaca; network design — Brian Simoni
and John Everhart of Matoaca;
networking concepts — Jeff
Willis of Matoaca; personal
finance — Kieran Wilkinson of
Matoaca; spreadsheet applications — Corey Green of Meadowbrook; technology concepts
— Daniel Cribb of Thomas
Dale; and Web site development
— Joshua Frary and Brandon
Whitlock of Matoaca
The statewide FBLA competition will take place April 16-17
in Reston.
Research awards
Only 40 students were
chosen from throughout Virginia to present at the Virginia
Junior Science and Humanities
Symposium at James Madison
University. Five of those 40
students attend the Math and
Science High School at Clover
Hill High: Thomas Delgado,
Connor Spangler, Aakash
Sheth, Amanda Schanz and
Melanie Wu. Schanz earned an
Outstanding Research Award,
a Gold Medal Award and third
place overall. She advances to
the National Junior Science and
Humanities Symposium in
Bethesda, Md., where she will
PHOTO COURTESY OF CHESTERFIELD COUNTY SCHOOLS
Five Clover Hill Math and Science High School students were chosen to present at the Virginia Junior Science and
Humanities Symposium at James Madison University. Pictured are, from left, Amanda Schanz, Melanie Wu, Connor
Spangler, Thomas Delgado, Aakash Sheth and biology teacher Ryan Templeton.
present her research into removing estrogen pollution from
drinking water. Delgado also
earned an Outstanding Research
Award.
Biology achievement
Eric Stahl, a junior at the
Math and Science High School
at Clover Hill High, qualified
for the USA Biology Olympiad.
More than 6,000 students across
the country took the qualifying
exam, with only the top 10 percent advancing to the semifinal
exam. Stahl took the semifinal
exam at the end of March and is
waiting to hear if he will advance
to the finals, which are held at
Purdue University.
The International Health,
Racquet & Sportsclub Association (IHRSA) recently presented Phil Wendel, owner
of ACAC Fitness & Wellness
Centers, the John McCarthy
Industry Visionary of the
Year Award for pioneering
the development of medical
fitness and wellness programs
that address the needs of
people with chronic disease
or special health concerns.
ACAC’s physician referral program, also known as
PREP, is widely regarded as
an unprecedented partnership between medical providers and the fitness and wellness community. The PREP
program allows any patient
with a physician referral to
begin a personalized exercise program based on the
physician’s recommendations
under the supervision of
ACAC’s team of medical fitness experts, which includes
nurses, physical therapists
and exercise physiologists.
Wendel and Dr. Edward
Phillips, founder and director
of Harvard Medical School’s
Institute of Lifestyle Medicine in the Department of
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, recently presented
a seminar together that
highlighted ACAC’s PREP
program as an innovative
medical fitness initiative.
“Medical professionals
and fitness professionals
know how powerful exercise
can be in preventing and
treating an array of medical
conditions,” says Wendel. “If
we can collaborate to create a
new continuum of care, from
prevention to treatment, we
can positively impact countless lives.”
ACAC’s physician referral
program has been very well
received in its clubs’ communities, which include
West Chester, Pennsylvania,
and Charlottesville and
Richmond, Virginia. To date,
more than 9,000 community
members have participated
in ACAC’s physician referral
program. In Charlottesville,
65% of area physicians have
referred patients to the PREP
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Wendel indicates that his
ACAC clubs will continue to
benchmark programs and
services against standards
and guidelines widely recognized by health professionals. He mentions that ACAC
clubs are either certified or
are working towards becoming certified by the Medical
Fitness Association, an affiliate of the American Hospital
Association. ACAC is one of
eleven clubs nationwide to
have achieved this certification.
“It is important for clubs
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qualified partners in providing active and regular medical oversight for members
who desire these services,”
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patients to feel comfortable
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Mon. - Sat. 9 am - 6 pm
Sunday 1 pm - 5 pm
• Maternal-fetal specialists and 24/7 on-site neonatology/NICU
for high-risk care
17210 Genito Road • 739-2037
www.swiftcreekberryfarm.com
U-Pick Blueberries:
July - August
• Comprehensive prenatal and parenting classes with
our Love & Learn program
• The best-known physicians and nurse-midwives
in Central Virginia
At St. Francis, you’re not a number. You are a wonderful,
new and very unique family.
g
n
i
w
o
B
Walls?
Free Back to Work
Consultation
($30 Value)
804-545-1665
With any breast pump purchase over $200
Valid through April 30, 2010
Visit Any of Our Affiliated Healthcare Providers
Cracks in Brick? Bowed Walls? Cracks in Drywall?
Walls Dropping? Doors & Windows Sticking?
Avoid Further Damage to Your Home!
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Any Job Over $3000
Financing Available!
J. Colman Feore, MD Glenna Hendricks, MD
Richmond
OB-Gyn Associates
320-2483
The Woman’s Center
St. Francis Family
Medicine Center
739-6142
Christopher
Paoloni, MD
Bonnie
Makdad, MD
Virginia Physicians
for Women
594-3120
Bon Secours
Neonatology Services
*Must show coupon upon inspection appointment.
Not to be combined with any other offer. Expires in 10 days.
www.jeswork.com
&2%% (OME )NSPECTION %STIMATE
www.jeswork.com
877
877-937-9968
968
340-BABY (2229)
www.bonsecoursforwomen.com
BON SECOURS
ST. FRANCIS MEDICAL CENTER
EXPECT
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
APRIL 15, 2010 || 11
LAST WORD
Ware attends Tea Party event in Powhatan
Photo Gallery ONLINE
midlothianexchange.com
PHOTOS BY PATRICK DOBBS
Virginia Delegate Lee
Ware (R-65th)
stands beside "George
Washington" at a Tea
Party event
held in Powhatan over the
weekend. To
see an audio
photo gallery
visit the link at
midlothianexchange.com.
over 27,000
midlominute »
JOBS, Reach
readers weekly.
CARS, To Place a Classified ad call:
ext. 3
HOMES, 804-746-1235
or fax us:
AND 804-379-6215
us online:
GREAT Visit
www.midlothianexchange.com
STUFF or email us:
[email protected]
TO BUY [email protected]
Credit cards accepted:
AND SELL.
SUBMIT PHOTOS OF COMMUNITY
PHOTO BY E-YAGE RAMIL
The Midlothian baseball team gets ready for the next inning.
s
r
r
TM
Published every Thursday. Online every day.
business & service
Tree Service
merchandise
LIMB & TREE
REMOVAL
Reasonable rates. Lic.
& ins. Family business
35 + years with
Bob’s Tree Service
30% off Spring rates.
804-382-0371
Child Care
financial
CAREGIVER, Companion, CNA to care for
your special needs
child. Flexible hrs. Reasonable rates. Transportation, Light housekeeping. 804-350-0864
Computer Services,
Repairs, Upgrades, etc.
Nerdy Know-How Co.
In-home computer
repair & networking.
Need a nerd with
Know-how? Call
804-955-5302. A+Cert.
Roofing
FOR an AFFORDABLE
Price on Roofing or
Siding, call Donna
387-8474. Lic. & Ins.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
WORKS! EMAIL [email protected]
Furniture
BED MATTRESS SET
Full size, 10 yr. warranty, brand name, new in
plastic, sell $169. Can
deliver. 804-639-3827
www.eastcoastmattress.com
Business
Opportunities
NATIONAL RETAILER
LOOKING FOR
AMBITIOUS OWNER/
OPERATOR
No Franchise Fees,
Royalty Fees and no
Inventory Cost. Low
Initial Investment
Call Ed Sosniak 763-442-2925
searshometownstores.com
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
WORKS! EMAIL [email protected]
BED MATTRESS SET
King Size, 10 yr. warranty. Brand name,
never used, still in
plastic. Sell for $299.
Can deliver. Store
price $500.
804-739-6373
www.eastcoastmattress.com
BED MATTRESS SET
Queen Size, 10 yr.
warranty, new in plas tic. Sell $189 , Retail
$400+. Can deliver.
804-639-2135 .
www.eastcoastmattress.com
BED - New Mattress
Set in Plastic w/
warr.
Full
$99,
Queen $109, King
$189. Delivery/Lay A-Way. 218-0680
Furniture
Yard/Estate Sales
Millenmium Black
Lacquer Dining Room
MOVING Sale! It won’t
last long...... Beautiful
Millenmium black lacquer Dining Room set.
Tabel with 6 matching
chairs, 64" buffet and
china hutch with touch
on lights and
tempeured glass.
$399.00 USD. 639-2957
23112 - Multi-family,
Sat. 4/17, 8-1, clothing,
infant-teen, toys, baby
equip. + estate sale
with furn. 6324 Mockingbird Ln. (across
from Harbour Point)
MOVING SALE!
Millenmium Lacquer
Dining Room Set, Table
w/6 matching chairs,
64" Buffett and China
Hutch w/touch lighting. $399. 804-639-2957
Health Products
Electric wheelchair Jazzy, new batteries
with charger-276-5993.
leave message
Electric wheelchair Pronto, with charger
276-5993 leave message
You read this...
So will thousands of
others.
Call 746-1235 x3
23113 - Powderham
Sub. (off Robious)
4/17 7-12. Look for
Red balloons.
23832 - Deerfield
Neighborhood Yard
Sale, Sat. 4/17, 8 to 1.
Church Yard Sale
(inside)
St. Mark’s UMC
Sat., April 17, 8-2 pm
11551 Lucks Ln.
Midlothian 23114
HUGE MEGA YARD
SALE Sat., April 17,
8AM to Noon, 11am
Half Price!
30+
families.
Clothing,
furniture, children’s
items, housewares,
decorations, books,
electronics, etc. Redeemer
Church,
2341
Winterfield
Rd.,
Midlothian
(corner
of
Winterfield & Salisbury in Salisbury
Sub.). Rain or shine.
pets & animals
Dogs
employment
LABRADOR Retriever
CHOC. lab puppies.
Big, healthy litter of 9.
Two males avail. 5/1.
$350. (804)564-2940
Dogs
Bernese Mountain
Dog puppy 12 wks,
female. $1500.
(540)483-5851
[email protected]
hotmail.com
LAB PUPS - AKC,
CHOCOLATE, BORN
1/28/10, 3M LEFT OUT
OF 9 PUPS. MOTHER,
FATHER OFA EYE CERT
PUPS. EXC. PEDIGREE.
HIPS AND EYE GUARANTEED. ALL SHOTS/
WORMED. READY TO
GO! $500 804-598-5192
OR CELL 804-357-3197.
WWW.BELLAMYSQUALITY
LABRADORS.COM
LABRADOODLE
Chocolate, female
$300 (434)392-5694
[email protected]
embarqmail.com
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
WORKS! EMAIL [email protected]LOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
To Advertise
Email Us At
[email protected]
Exchange.com
PUBLISHED
THURSDAYS
ONLINE
EVERY DAY!
www.midlothian
exchange.com
Visit us today!
General
Lab/Field Technician
CTI Consultants, Inc.,
a service provider to
the construction
industry, is seeking a
lab/field tech to
conduct soils and
concrete field testing. Applicant must
have a valid driver’s
license, capable of
lifting 30 lbs and be
available for off shift
hours incl. weekends.
Good oral and written skills are a must.
Applicant must also
be ACI level 1 and
nuke certified.
For excellent pay and
benefits contact
Andy 571-273-2054
or email [email protected]
cti-consultants.com
EOE
Landscaper Must have
exp. Must have valid
VA DMV. Good driving
record. (804) 794-0011
General
Now Hiring:
companies
desperately need employees to assemble
products at home.
No
selling,
any
hours. $500 wkly potential.
1-985-6461700 , Dept. VA-2713
real estate
residential for rent
Houses Unfurnished
Urgent! Owner
P O W H A T A N - For
Operators Needed!
Sale or Lease 3Stepdeck/Flatbed/Dry
bdrm, 3-bath, 2-car
Vans. Local/Regional/
garage 1950sq. ft.
OTR. Paid WEEKLY!
Avail. 5/1. Call Ron
85% of gross; 40% ad 239-2476.
vance. 866-JRC-PAYS
(572-7297)
transportation
Restaurant/
Food Service
RESTAURANT - All Positions! Experience
preferred. Must have
resume. Apply in person at Stratford Grill,
no phone calls please.
Forest Hill Ave. &
Hathaway Rd.
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
WORKS!
EMAIL
[email protected]
EXCHANGE.COM
Automobiles Wanted
ûFREE TOWINGû
$250-$700 Cash Paid
for all Junk Cars/Trucks
Call CARF 804-247-8640
ûWANTED û
Abandoned junk cars
Pay $200 & UP Cash
No title needed.
804-677-0156
12 || APRIL 15, 2010
MIDLOTHIANEXCHANGE.COM
4th Annual
Wine Festival
Join
the Chesterfield Chamber of
Commerce and Flagstop Car Wash
Saturday
April 17, 2010
11 am – 6 pm
at the Chesterfield County
Government Complex
9901 Lori Rd.
Chesterfield, VA 23832
(804) 748-6364 ext. 2
SERVING THE COMMUNITIES OF CHESTERFIELD COUNTY
BON AIR | BRANDERMILL | GENITO | MIDLOTHIAN | ROBIOUS | SALISBURY | WOODLAKE
17 Wineries, 50 Crafters, Live music by
Casper and Rippleshot
Over 4,000 people attended last year
www.chesterfieldchamber.com
TRINITY
EPISCOPAL SCHOOL
Fifth Annual
Jazz Titans of
Tomorrow Festival
Trinity Episcopal School Campus
Saturday, April 17, 2010
12:30 - 7:30 p.m.
3850 Pittaway Drive
Richmond, VA 23235
(804) 272-5864 • www.trinityes.org
Free Admission
®
Richmond’s First Baccalaureate
World School
Featuring:
• Funny Bone
• VCU Greater Richmond High School Jazz Band led by nationally
acclaimed director Antonio Garcia
• Continuous performances by student jazz ensembles from the schools of
St. Christopher’s, Collegiate, Maggie Walker Governor’s, Steward, Clover Hill, Monacan,
James River and Trinity Episcopal
Rain or shine –
tent provided
Bring your lawn chair
and Fido, too!

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