CinéArts Film Guide - Winter 2015

Comments

Transcription

CinéArts Film Guide - Winter 2015
FILM GUIDE
FALL 2015
in this issue
HOLLYWOOD DURING THE BLACKLIST IN TRUMBO
Jay Roach Talks Directing & Bringing a Controversial Show Business Story To Life pg 6
THE BEAUTY WITHIN THE STORY
The Danish Girl Screenwriter Lucinda Coxon Unveils the Right Story at the Right Time pg 14
WORKING TOWARDS PROGRESS
Director Sara Gavron and Screenwriter Abi Morgan Discuss Suffragette pg 18
THE TORONTO REPORT
A Look at the Big Surprises From This Year’s Festival pg 26
CINÉARTS FILM GUIDE | FALL 2015 | 1
writer, family man and socialite, he was also a man who had
specific ideals and as Roach would say, was “a communistic
capitalist, and a capitalistic communist!”
During a recent CinéArts interview, Roach elaborated on
the duality of Dalton Trumbo, and how capturing this
man’s story was a perfect match for his skill set. “This movie
completely reflects the persona of Dalton Trumbo.
“He was an incredibly serious and driven man, a sometimes
passionate and zealous person. Yet he was extremely witty
and he barely let a moment go by where he wasn’t saying
something serious then undercutting it with a quip of some
sort. He was a great orator and debater. He did a lot of public
speaking so he knew that you could never let your message
get too serious, too precious or too strident. I tried to have
the film reflect his philosophy of communication because
that’s who he was.”
To get an idea of the man who was Trumbo, there’s a telling
scene between Trumbo (Bryan Cranston) and Arlen Hird
(Louis C.K.). While watching his family play on his ranch,
clearly reveling in the spoils that success has brought him,
Trumbo dissects his pragmatism in being both a radical
and capitalist. When Hird admonishes him for this duality,
Trumbo revels even further by pointing out that “a radical
will fight with the purity of Jesus, but the rich guy wins with
the cunning of Satan!” That fact wasn’t lost on Roach.
HOLLYWOOD DURING THE
BLACKLIST IN TRUMBO
Director Jay Roach Brings a Controversial Show Business Story to Life
By Frank Gonzales
D
irector Jay Roach’s resume is filled with some of the most entertaining
comedies of the past twenty years. Films like the Austin Powers trilogy and
the Meet The Fockers movies have indelibly placed his talent among the
best working in the comedy field. So it’s with more than a little surprise that one of
this fall’s highly touted historical films, Trumbo, is being directed by someone who
would not be on everyone’s short list of awards season directors. But comedy and
Roach’s ties to it isn’t all of the story, just like the tale of Dalton Trumbo wasn’t all
black and white.
For those unfamiliar with the story of Dalton Trumbo and the Hollywood
blacklisting scandal of the 1940s and ‘50s, it would serve to have some perspective
on the man and the times. It was a time of unprecedented paranoia in the United
States: The House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) was brought about
to root out supposed subversive Communist sympathizers from all walks of life.
Many Americans were brought to the committee and were faced with a terrible
predicament: admit to being a Communist and be outright blacklisted from work,
society and the pursuit of your livelihood; or deny your past and name names of
those who were. Truly, it was a black time indeed.
With that backdrop Hollywood was targeted with a scrutinizing eye. Many felt that
subversives were using the cover of Hollywood to inject their Communist beliefs
on the nation. A group of ten writers, directors and producers, the most vocal of
whom was Trumbo, would be labelled as “The Hollywood Ten,” blacklisted for
not acquiescing to HUAC’s interrogation, thrown in jail, and refused work by the
studios.
Dalton Trumbo was Hollywood’s golden writer. A man who was renowned for
his ability to write some of the industry’s best and well known films, some written
while sitting in the bath tub. But at the same time he was super successful as a
6 | CINEARTS.COM
“He was not consistent and he was not dogmatic either. Being
dogmatic was the stereotype of anyone who got caught up
in the Communist party during those times. In those days
they were seen as humorless, a person who is an anti-snob
and ironically, would turn their nose up at any visible wealth.
But he was not that.
“Trumbo’s membership with the communist party was
complicated because he joined during the war when we
were allies with the Soviet Union. He was very pro-workers’
rights, and very anti-Fascist, so a lot of what he did, along
with his peers, was done because of pressure from those
peers. It was either ‘put up or shut up. If you mean it,
then get involved.’ So Trumbo had a complicated choice
because his predicament was not a particularly pure form
of commitment in either direction. That made him really
interesting.”
The director then worked with his screenwriter John
McNamara to show not just the conflict that Trumbo was
faced with in life, but to do it in a way that would seem
out of norm for telling a dramatic story. So humor was
introduced to really make the point of how all of these
lives were affected, negatively and positively. Through this
masterstroke, this duality again played itself out onscreen.
“Trumbo and the Hollywood Ten all had complexities; and
they were real people too. So I thought it would be fake to
tell a story like this and not include humor because that
was how they treated each other, that’s how said that he was ‘one of the absolute greatest years, all this money spent…subversive plots
they looked at life, and how they coped! working actors we have,’ so that’s why she uncovered? None. Subversive movies revealed?
None.’ And he lists all of those things that were
When you were under the pressure they were came in.
under once they chose to take on HUAC and “Bryan set such a tone with his performance that done to make people stop working, and even
be rebellious and uncooperative, their lives people like Helen, John Goodman, Michael that didn’t work. Then ‘Academy Awards?
became extremely stressful in ways we cannot Stuhlbarg, Elle Fanning and Diane Lane all Two!’ which shows how he won awards even
even imagine.
wanted to step up and be at the level Bryan during the blacklist and you cut to her: she’s
“So dealing with stress through humor was established. It’s exciting when you’re part of a standing around with all of her socialite
a way that those people coped. I thought it story that everybody comes to thinking ‘Oh friends and she just is completely humiliated.
was really important to stay true to that. And my God, I didn’t know any of this!’ So they A wordless moment that says everything about
Trumbo, in many ways, was the least stressed dig into their own individual characters and her side of things were all about. It was an
and others had it far worse. So for instance, bring new ideas to us. We’re trying to stay amazing thing that Helen did.”
John and I added the idea of turning up the on top of the whole thing, but they go even But for Jay Roach, the story and the crisis on
strident quality of the Arlen Hird character deeper because they have time to focus on the the moment, and how it impacted all of those
caught in its whirlwind, was what he always
to take on Trumbo and give him a hard time one character.
about that.
“Stuhlbarg was incredible in that way. He went back to, especially in how he handled
“That was consistent with the other writers and found so much about Edward G. Robinson’s these diverse characters coming from both
members of the Hollywood Ten too. Arlen is predicament and brought ideas that we then sides of a political wall. Trumbo was just one
kind of a composite of a few of the other guys layered in to finesse the horrible, sort of of the many diverse set of personalities he was
and they were funny even at the darkest times. Faustian deal he was facing. I loved that ‘soul anxious to develop. “For me it always starts
I heard Trumbo’s memorial where they got all at stakes’ story there. So Michael was amazing with character.
of the recordings of all the eulogies. And they that way. And that’s the joy of working with “For instance, I really cared to portray
Hedda Hopper, and John Wayne differently.
were all very tough on Trumbo in a funny way, amazing character actors.”
and yet they loved him like a brother and as
Credit: Hilary Bronwyn Gayle
one family.”
With the characters and the words down on
page, the filmmakers had the task of finding
an actor who could match the iconoclast’s
persona word for word. Bryan Cranston
was the perfect man for the job. “I watched
interviews Trumbo did and the way he kind
of performed his ideas would be something
I knew Bryan would be interested in as well.
Bryan is like that too. He’s so smart and such a
good communicator, but he’s also a prankster
and a jokester. So that was a perfect overlay
with the character of Trumbo.”
Cranston had impressed the director years
before with his range of talent. “In preproduction, we had talked about a lot of people
and I was in the middle of binge-watching
Breaking Bad and I had known him as the
father from Malcom in the Middle and loved
his comedic chops. But I didn’t know he had
the range that he does.
Bryan Cranston (left) stars as Dalton Trumbo and Diane Lane (right) stars as Cleo Trumbo
“Then while we were prepping for this film I
in Jay Roach’s TRUMBO, a Bleecker Street Release.
saw him on Broadway as LBJ (in All The Way,
Especially Wayne, who is a fascinating
which Cranston and Roach are currently But watching Helen Mirren was really the
character in himself. I’m a huge fan of his films
icing
on
the
cake.
“She
is
a
treasure
to
watch.
filming for HBO), and even though we had
and his work, and a huge fan of a lot of the
already decided to cast him as Trumbo, from In the scene at the end when she’s watching
philanthropic work he did later on in life.
John
Kennedy’s
response
to
the
premiere
of
then on there was no one else who could have
“It
is true that he was one of the people who
Spartacus
and
he
says
‘it’ll
be
a
hit’
it
was
the
overlapped themselves with the dynamic
would
condemn a person just because of
first
time
in
thirteen
years
that
any
blacklisted
range of this character. Bryan took the idea
his
political
affiliations. He definitely was
writer
had
their
name
come
up
on
the
big
of performing ideas, as well as performing
emotions, which he does beautifully, as screen. And Hopper watching Kennedy’s opinionated and unapologetic about it. But
Trumbo and wasn’t against the idea of reaction meant that this dark period was over. he had a heart and a soul about it and was
preaching a little, and performing a persuasive There was no way the studios could sustain a willing to be more tolerant as long as he could
idea. And there’s a LOT of Bryan in that; I blacklist once such a commercially successful determine someone was loyal to America and
and important film was made with a former wasn’t trying to commit some truly subversive
can’t imagine anyone else taking it on.”
Communist screenwriter based on a former activity. So once he had that feeling about
For his other characters, especially that of
Communist’s novel. (Howard Fast, who wrote someone he would help them get back to
Hedda Hopper, Roach was surprised by the
work. So that’s why we portrayed him helping
the novel, was a former Communist.)
amount of actors willing to work on the film,
Edward G. Robinson once he named a few
“So
she
just
has
to
sit
there
and
take
it.
And
and their reasons for doing so. “Helen Mirren
people who had already been named.”
came in to work with us mostly because of you can see the awareness of her own downfall
“Yet,
it was important to distinguish his
in
one
fifteen-second
shot
as
the
camera
wraps
Bryan Cranston. She had seen him in the play
character
from that of Hedda Hopper, who
around
her.
It
was
sort
of
a
culmination
of
on Broadway, and seen Breaking Bad, and
an earlier scene when Trumbo says ‘all these was much more zealous, even to her deathbed.
CINÉARTS FILM GUIDE | FALL 2015 | 7
Credit: Hilary Bronwyn Gayle
Helen Mirren (Left) stars as Hedda Hopper and Bryan Cranston (Right) stars as Dalton Trumbo in Jay Roach’s TRUMBO, a Bleecker Street Release.
Two weeks before she died she was quoted as humorous way is something you hope would
saying ‘Just don’t let Charlie Chaplin back happen more often in movies today.
in the country!’ ‘Once a Commie, always a In this tumultuous time of Hollywood and
Commie,’ was the way she and many others American history, the free speech accorded
looked at these people. It was driven by fear.”
in the First Amendment, which was the
Roach had to walk a fine line to not make basis of defense for The Hollywood Ten, was
those who staunchly held up the American both their judge and jury. The man Dalton
way as someone you sympathized for, and not Trumbo symbolized the essence of this right,
with. “It’s hard to understand now, but people and the need to stand up for it in the face of
were understandably and completely afraid overwhelming odds. The film Trumbo rightly
of totalitarianism, especially of Totalitarian mirrors this fight and can serve as a lesson for
Communism, which became the horrors of the struggles of today. Does the director see
Stalinist Russia. So to use that fear to paint the need for Trumbo or men like him today?
left wing people who had been part of the “Absolutely! I wish Trumbo was around,
labor movement, and the Motion Picture because he was so passionate. The skill with
Association of America had started as kind which he could convey ideas, not just his
of a counter to the people who had been own, but those which his characters speak,
advocating strike activity around the studios, was incredible. Look at Spartacus and how
was just a pattern that had been started to powerful it was as a message for injustice, the
smear somebody.
power of the human spirit, and the power
“You called them ‘subversive communists.’ And for getting people together into a ‘one for all’
in this case they were, but none of them were mentality. That was an amazing conveyance of
trying to overthrow the government. Hopper that notion.
believed that people were using mainstream “It’s very fragile, the protections we have in
movies to hypnotize Americans to get the Constitution. Trumbo was willing to go
behind the Communist manifesto. That was to jail for those, but more importantly he was
the extreme mutated form which she really amazing at articulating why it mattered so
believed because of her patriotism. I wanted much. So it’s relevant today in every way.”
to be sure people could understand her point
In the 1940s, Dalton Trumbo (Bryan Cranston)
of view as well.”
is one of the highest paid screenwriters in the
Duality. It’s written all over Trumbo the man
and Trumbo the movie. Jay Roach has worked world, penning movie classics including the
a minor miracle in creating humor and pathos Oscar-nominated Kitty Foyle and Thirty Seconds
in this film. That he can get the message of Over Tokyo. A fixture on the Hollywood social
protecting our freedoms and rights stated scene, and a political activist supporting labor
in such an engagingly dramatic and slyly unions, equal pay and civil rights, Trumbo and
8 | CINEARTS.COM
his colleagues are subpoenaed to testify in front
of the House Un-American Activities Committee
(HUAC) as part of its sweeping probe into
communist activity in the U.S. Trumbo’s refusal
to answer the congressmen’s questions lands him
in a federal prison and earns him the eternal
enmity of powerful anti-communist gossip
columnist Hedda Hopper (Helen Mirren).
For the next 13 years, all of the major Hollywood
studios refuse to hire Trumbo for fear of being
associated with his perceived radical political
views. Forced to sell his home and ostracized
by friends, colleagues and neighbors, Trumbo
struggles to feed his family by writing mostly
low-budget movies under assumed names. But
he never gives up fighting for what he believes in.
An astonishing portrait of an often forgotten
chapter of American history, Trumbo is directed
by Jay Roach (“Game Change,” Meet the
Parents) from a script by John McNamara
(“Aquarius,” “Prime Suspect”), based on the
book Dalton Trumbo by Bruce Cook. The
film stars Bryan Cranston (“Breaking Bad,”
Argo), Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (G.I. Joe:
The Rise of the Cobra, Suicide Squad), Louis
C.K. (“Louie,” American Hustle), David James
Elliott (“JAG,” The Stranger I Married), Elle
Fanning (Maleficent, We Bought a Zoo), John
Goodman (The Gambler, Argo), Diane Lane
(Man of Steel, Unfaithful), Michael Stuhlbarg
(A Serious Man, Blue Jasmine), Alan Tudyk
(42, Frozen), and Helen Mirren (The Queen,
Woman in Gold).
Kennedy Goes to the Movies:
The History Behind Trumbo
By Peter Bowen
O
n February 5, 1961, a headline in
The New York Times announced,
“Kennedy Attends Movie in
Capital.” For most readers, this rather
innocuous item might have gone unnoticed.
The story tells how the President of the United
States, on the recommendation of his brother,
Robert F. Kennedy, made an unexpected trip
to Washington, D.C.’s Warner Theater to catch
an evening screening of the Hollywood epic
Spartacus. But to more attentive readers, this
event marked a seismic shift in the politics that
had ruled Hollywood for over a decade. Spartacus
was one of the first films to defy the Hollywood
blacklist by listing screenwriter Dalton Trumbo
in its film credits. And President Kennedy, by
going to the movies, had stood up to the tyranny
of those who wanted the blacklist to continue.
Kennedy’s trip to see Spartacus is just
one of the many extraordinary moments in
Jay Roach’s historical drama Trumbo. In 1947,
Dalton Trumbo (played by Bryan Cranston)
went from being one of the highest-paid
screenwriters in Hollywood to an outcast
when he refused to name names before the
House Un-American Activities Committee
(HUAC). As part of the Hollywood Ten, a
group of film professionals who stood up to
HUAC’s proceedings on First Amendment
grounds, Trumbo was found guilty of contempt
of Congress and sentenced to a year in a federal
penitentiary. After Trumbo’s conviction, things
went from bad to worse. In 1947, the heads of
Hollywood’s major studios signed the Waldorf
Statement, agreeing that not only would they
fire the Hollywood Ten, but would not hire
anyone who did not declare “under oath that he
is not a Communist.”
By the end of the Fifties, as the Cold War
warmed up a few degrees, a few filmmakers
and studios were willing to push back against
the blacklist. After secretly hiring Trumbo
to adapt Howard Fast’s best-selling novel
of ancient Rome, “Spartacus,” into a film,
the film’s producer and star, Kirk Douglas
(Dean O’Gorman) officially listed Dalton
Trumbo in the credits. The film industry, which
had lived in the shadow of the blacklist for
over a decade, stood back to see what would
happen next. Reaction was swift. The American
Legion rallied its forces, sending out notices to
its 17,000 posts asking war veterans to protest
Spartacus because of Trumbo’s participation.
The American Legion Magazine asked, “Will
Communists regain their former foothold in the
American motion-picture industry?” Trumbo’s
most vitriolic opponent, Hedda Hopper, told
her readers, “the screen script was written by
a Commie, so don’t go see it.” But despite the
threat of a boycott and the existence of picketing
protestors in Los Angeles and Washington,
D.C., people came out in droves to see
Spartacus. Indeed, there were reports from New
York and Los Angeles that audiences burst into
spontaneous applause when Dalton Trumbo’s
name appeared during Spartacus’ opening
credits. But perhaps the final nail in the coffin
was President Kennedy’s appearance at a public
screening of Spartacus. When he told reporters
on his way out that he found the movie “fine,”
it was a comment that was heard in offices of
studio heads around the film world.
CINÉARTS FILM GUIDE | FALL 2015 | 9
THE BEAUTY WITHIN THE STORY
A CinéArts Interview with Lucinda Coxon, Screenwriter of The Danish Girl
By Frank Gonzales
A
s the fall approaches, we begin to turn
our attention to movies that will be
considered for end-of-the-year awards.
Some films will come out of nowhere and
demand our attention. Some will come in a
flurry of publicity. Some may appear straight
out of the film festival circuit and ride a wave
of interest into theatres.
I believe that The Danish Girl fits somewhere
among all three scenarios. The story of one
of the first people ever to undergo gender
confirmation surgery, it stars Academy Award
winner Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander,
as well as Ben Whishaw, Sebastian Koch,
Amber Heard, and Matthias Schoenaerts,
and is directed by Tom Hooper, an Academy
Award winner for The King’s Speech.
hype, The Danish Girl could be on ‘Best Of’
lists at year’s end.
It’s a testament to screenwriter Lucinda “But in retrospect while it was often painful, I
Coxon’s ability to create a challenging, think we were very lucky. Now is the correct
thought-provoking script from a story that was moment for the film to appear. We were
almost forgotten by time and history. In her always trying to make a mainstream film. It’s
words, The Danish Girl became a ‘chamber- a beautiful and accessible movie.”
epic’; a large story with intimate details.
She notes, “I think all writers are looking
Ten years ago Coxon was given David for new ways to tell stories. This is not your
Ebershoff’s book The Danish Girl to read by usual story. This is not an average marriage.
producers Gail Mutrux and Anne Harrison. But what I immediately was drawn to was the
The project was far from being greenlighted, as universality of the story. And strangely enough,
it eventually was by Working Title Films. In this was something I uniquely identified with.
fact, it was probably fortuitous that the film There’s a lot in here about becoming the person
was on a slow track. It now definitely arrives you need to be, which really, really resonates
at a time when a key element to the story is so with a lot of people.”
much on the public’s mind.
In 1926 in Copenhagen, artist Einar Wegener
The film will certainly demand our attention,
what with the pedigree of its actors, director, “I don’t think anyone could have imagined that,”
and screenwriter Lucinda Coxon. It will Coxon said in a recent CinéArts interview.
certainly arrive amid publicity about its “You know, ten years ago the subject matter
reception at the Toronto Film Festival. And led to a huge problem in terms of raising
there is no larger wave of interest out there this finances to make the film. We would have
year than the one created by a famous athlete great responses to the script and no problem
who has undertaken her own transition. So getting the talent, directorial and acting, but
while not specifically attaching itself to the the subject matter was really a challenge. We’d
14 | CINEARTS.COM
almost get the film going and it would fall
apart again.
is married to Gerda Wegener. She is also an
artist, and one day her husband fills in as a
model – and the experience is transformative.
It is a role that Eddie Redmayne brings as
much internal change to his character as
he did with the external change of Stephen
Hawking in his Oscar-winning performance
in The Theory of Everything.
To Coxon, the performance by Redmayne
was impressive. “We had talked about Eddie
very early on. He was even cast before he did
The Theory of Everything. In a sense his role in
The Danish Girl is the opposite of what he did
in Theory; it’s the inverse of Hawking.
that brought out the simple beauty of a
love story. “I think Eddie and Alicia were
passionately committed to the characters they
were playing. And they’re both very smart.
“To me the story is essentially a love
story between two artists. Obviously the
“I think his role here is also about a physical transgender element is very much in the
transformation, but it’s really more about story but for me as a writer it was really about
someone blossoming from the inside out. It’s this love story between two persons of rare
a very profoundly interior role in one way, courage and imagination, who were devoted
although it also manifests itself in an exterior to one another. This was during a period of
way. I think we were all excited by the fact time when women were claiming roles which
that Eddie could show what’s inside, besides were previously only inhabited by men.”
what’s happening with the body.
Coxon emphasizes, “The man she married is
She reveals, “Eddie worked very hard in terms now living life as a woman, Lili, and that is
of researching and talking to the transgender the person she loves.
community. He also worked with the same “In a way it’s a story about how much change
movement coach as he worked with in Theory any marriage can go through. It’s about how
to really see how a woman moved. He’s a very we grow and while this question may be
observant person. Eddie’s a great male icon, posed in an extreme sort of way, it’s still a
but he has a very strong feminine element to universal question. And the actors were able
him.”
to tap into that from very early on.”
Coxon was equally excited about the work This love story between Lili and Gerda broke
of Vikander, who brought a mirror to her new ground in so many ways. For Coxon the
character, reflecting off of Redmayne’s goal was to not lose the simplicity of their
progression into his feminine side. “Alicia is a relationship among the historical significance
tremendous beauty, but she also has a sort of of the situation. She adds, “It’s interesting
masculinity about her. I think that was very that really, you’re talking about two people
fascinating in that they already embodied who did not themselves know the word
some of those qualities and brought them to ‘transgender’. So they had no vocabulary for
their characters.
the situation and they found an extraordinary
“Her character is very emblematic of the solution.
type of woman at the time; she’s tough and “So the challenge for me was to take an
independent and opinionated and fearless. audience on that journey. In the beginning of
She’s competing in a very hard and male- the film you could imagine that this couple
dominated art world. But at the same time was settled, comfortable and extremely happy.
she is devoted entirely to the person she When there were changes in the marriage,
loves and how they present themselves in the there was an opportunity for Gerda to
world.”
destroy, but instead she stepped forward to
Together the actors made a formidable duo help Lili to self-actualize. That seemed to me
a remarkable story to take to an audience.”
Coxon muses, “The idea that a story like this
has been swept away by the turbulent tide of
20th-century history and could be brought to
light was fascinating to me. It seems to me
like we had a great opportunity to keep it in
front of people.”
The screenwriter is glad to place this story on
a wider platform and is eager to tell the world
about this couple. “They were really kind of
pioneers. We’re in a different place now and I
think the younger generation takes this stuff
for granted. But I think there are still many
people who might be familiar with the idea
and may be more open to the idea – and this
will probably be the first drama which they
will see that tackles the subject.”
Does Coxon fear that all of the talk about
gender confirmation surgery in 2015 will
discourage moviegoers from revisiting a story
from nearly ninety years ago? She says, “I
know that this movie is not just about that.
And I think people are smart enough to see
beyond that.
“We are incredibly fortunate to be bringing
this story to audiences at a time when there is
an appetite for it. Especially for a great story
told in an interesting way.”
Written by Lucinda Coxon, and based on the
book by David Ebershoff, The Danish Girl is
the remarkable love story inspired by the lives
of Lili Elbe and Gerda Wegener (portrayed
by Academy Award winner Eddie Redmayne
[The Theory of Everything] and Alicia Vikander
[Ex Machina]), directed by Academy Award
winner Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech, Les
Misérables). Lili and Gerda’s marriage and
work evolve as they navigate Lili’s journey as
a transgender woman.
CINÉARTS FILM GUIDE | FALL 2015 | 15
WORKING TOWARDS PROGRESS
A CinéArts Interview with Director Sarah Gavron and Screenwriter Abi Morgan of the film Suffragette
By Frank Gonzales
A
ny film enthusiast or movie lover can was taught in our own history at school. fascinated them, but the width and breadth
probably name at least a dozen great There was a television series called Shoulder of all of the archival footage, photos and
movies showing immense struggle to Shoulder which covered the movement. Yet newspaper accounts available from the time.
against overwhelming odds to upend an there is so much that hasn’t been told. It is Gavron adds, “Initially we looked at lots
unjust system. And I would safely venture that amazing that these stories haven’t come to the of unpublished memoirs and diaries and
of those dozen movies less than three would movies.”
accounts. But there were also lots of great
be told from the point of view of a woman. Producers Alison Owen and Faye Ward, who photographs and footage from the time, so it
And that number is really on the high side.
had teamed with the writer and director prior, all drove the idea.
So it comes as no surprise then that the moved the project into active development. “Additionally, one thing we did was to
disparity of great roles for women versus men, And as they quickly found out there was so enlist a group of academics who have spent
or the gap between Hollywood’s salaries of much information on the suffrage movement their lives researching this. They came on
men and women, would serve as an example out there it was a daunting task to determine as consultants and steered us in the right
of the long way the struggle for equality really how to focus the story. “We went down lots of direction. We also had Helen Pankhurst, the
has to go. It’s a struggle that is given a unique routes,” Gavron remembers.
great-granddaughter of Emmeline Pankhurst,
historical context in the new Focus Features “We spent six years really engaged in the who has a really balanced and interesting view
release Suffragette.
material trying to work out the right direction of the movement. She’s an expert in her own
Directed by Sarah Gavron and written by Abi to take it in. It felt exciting to tell the story right and came on to consult.
Morgan, Suffragette is an epic account of the of an ordinary woman. A woman with no Then there are the archives. Gavron adds,
early 1900s suffrage movement in England, platform or entitlement. There were many “The Suffragette Fellowship Collection in
told through the eyes of a working class such women like this who sacrificed a lot for the Museum of London and The Women’s
woman caught between her life as a mother, the movement and the cause. So rather that Library in the LSE have such totemic objects,
worker and submissive member of society, do a biopic, which there was plenty of room like Emily Davison’s purse which was found
and her unfolding role as an active participant to do that, we decided to capture a moment at the race track with her return ticket in it,
in a group working towards equality and the in time when things were really changing, embroidered banners used at the rallies, and
right of women to vote. It’s a vivid portrayal of seen through the eyes of one of these working scrolls and fragments of postcards women
a time and place that is incredibly important, women.”
wrote from prison. We even found a reel of
yet virtually unknown by most people. For Morgan, it was the process of writing a film, which no one had ever developed, taken
Gavron and Morgan hope to change that.
draft everyone could be behind one hundred at the time! And we developed it revealing
“I actually wanted to make a movie about this percent. “They say good writing is rewriting some footage from the funeral of Emily
subject for about 10 years,” stated Gavron in so it took us a while to find the story. We got Wilding Davison.
a recent CinéArts interview. “I hadn’t been very bound up with going in one direction as I “Abi found accounts from a laundry, so that
taught this in school; it wasn’t even on the was initially focused on the character of Alice, became a great metaphor for women being
curriculum when I was growing up. It wasn’t played by Romola Garai, and her relationship oppressed: having to clean, working long
widely known, at least the aspects of the story with her maid, who was a template for the hours and not being paid much. Then we
that we were told. The lengths these women character of Maud.
found amazing archive footage of the events
went to, the state and police brutality they “Then as a result of reading these incredibly the Suffragettes were involved in. They were
faced, were incredible. I became passionate personal accounts of working-class women very strategic about getting photographed so
about it. It hadn’t really been told on screen of the time it became exciting to me to write they would make the press. So there was a lot
and I felt it was long overdue.”
about the everyday. I imagined what it would of photographic evidence of the movement.”
Screenwriter Abi Morgan also felt the be like to go from one place of being apolitical One thing that the director faced in bringing
same way about this disparity between the and not involved in any way, to being drawn this story to the screen was a misconception
importance of the subject and its lack of in and go on a journey to become a militant of the women who fought in the struggle. For
many of us the idea of “Votes for Women”
visibility in history. Something had to be Suffragist. So that was what got me excited.”
done to rectify the situation. “So little of it Yet it just wasn’t written accounts that was something we vaguely remembered from
18 | CINEARTS.COM
the movie Mary Poppins and the Mrs. Banks
character. Gavron had work to do to change
minds. “That stereotype is very much in many
people’s heads whether they realize it or not.
“Beyond a few iconic images, not much is
really known by the majority of people except
what they remember from Mary Poppins. So
we wanted to challenge that and reveal the
true extent of the movement.
“What the movement did was bring together
all of these women from all walks of life. So
aristocrats were going side by side into prison
with working women. That was rather unique,
this cross-class combination in a society that
was so class-driven at the time.”
Morgan had the unenviable task of making
this struggle by women of all classes one
that could be identified with by the modern
woman, and men, of today. “You want an
audience to come in and go ‘It could have
been me;’ to understand what it took our
grandmothers to fight.
“In a way, at the beginning it felt like trying
to squeeze a very curvy lady into a very
skinny dress. But it became a process of
really wanting to try and work out the most
distinctive way to tell this story. I wanted to
try to make it as accessible and direct, and as
vital and contemporary as possible, taking
the actual accounts of these women, which
inspired me the most.”
Once the film moved into production they
set about making the period come alive. But
recreating early 20th century London proved
to be another challenge. The director and her
production staff scoured any likely or unlikely
spot to place a set. “Locations were a big
challenge,” Gavron remembered.
“We started early on because the London
of 1912 had largely disappeared. Sadly the
East London tenements were bombed in the
blitzkrieg, so they gentrified what was left
but still, we had to work with visual effects to
make it look authentic.
“The laundry which you see in the film was
actually an old basketball court that had
been deserted. Our Production Designer
Alice Normington, much credit goes to her,
managed to create the laundry. Where we
did the window smashing on that central
London street we had to close it down, dress
it in a night, film it in a day, then get out! So
creating period London is not easy!”
An unprecedented piece of luck did come
their way, as Gavron excitedly recalled. “We
also had access to the Houses of Parliament!
“We were the first crew ever allowed in, which
was really a dream come true, because this
was the epicenter of lots of battles for the
women. We were able to stage a riot in New
Palace Yard, and bring in horses and period
cars and lots of artists and stunts. To do that
in the very place that barred women for so
long was quite an achievement.”
Then a list of top-shelf actresses were needed
to inhabit these characters. Morgan and
Gavron were excited to have Carey Mulligan
step into the pivotal role of Maud, alongside
Garai, Helena Bonham Carter, AnneMarie Duff, and Meryl Streep. Morgan,
who previously worked with many of these
actresses, loved the collaborative process they
brought to the project. “I don’t mind actresses
who have input into their characters as they was going on at the time. These were trained
become a navigational point for me. Good detectives who watched and approached these
collaboration happens when you listen to women like they were soldiers or terrorists. So
your actors because they are the keeper of the as Steed says ‘It doesn’t matter what I think, I
have to uphold the law.’ I liked the fact that
character.
“You’re responsible for creating the ensemble you could see a man who was so committed to
of characters, but they are solely responsible his job, who didn’t always agree with his role,
for their one character. So what is compelling but agreed that this was what he had to do.”
for me is working with women so experienced, Morgan added that it all came down to the
who adopted and kept charge of and loved source material to show her how to keep her
their characters. They felt comfortable male characters from becoming caricatures. “I
enough with them to come to me and say ‘I think the writer’s job is to show the complexity
don’t think that quite works’ or ‘I don’t think of character. I think nobody is one thing. So
she’d say that.’ So that relationship is exciting.” in the end we came back to personal accounts.
For Gavron the heart of the movie started and “There is an incredible body of research so by
ended with Carey Mulligan. “We focused in going to old stories and photos and accounts
on her very early. Once we identified Maud you could see the hostile acts and you could
as the center of the story we got to thinking also see the voices of the Men’s League. There
about who could play that role and very was real conflict there. So I was always trying
quickly we knew we wanted Carey, even to find the real minds of those men to make
before we approached her. We thought that them as complex as possible. They were
conflicted, and that was the point, that there
she was someone who could convey so much.
“Carey had to carry this incredible journey, plus was never one thing. It was about showing
she’s so watchable and so incredibly truthful. this conflict that they were all going through.”
She was brilliant to work with because It’s a conflict that still resonates today, a
everything with her was a conversation. She century later. In the United States it’s only
came on board after responding immediately been ninety-five years that women have the
to the script. So once she was in place we built right to vote. In other places, some which may
be surprising, the vote has only happened in
the cast around her.”
The director then complemented Mulligan the last decade or less. For the director this
with a vast group of actors. “What we wanted realization that “there is a long way to go,” is
to do was get a selection of women around her visualized profoundly at the conclusion of
who would reflect the wide array of women her film. A scroll of countries and the year
involved in the movement. Different ages, in which the right to vote for women was
types, physical builds, and energies were all ratified runs across the screen and as it does
one realizes how short the list is.
needed to round out the cast.
Gavron
and Morgan realize the importance
“The role of Emmeline Pankhurst was
conceived as a small role with only one and urgency of this final message. “We can
sequence, but we wanted an icon to play an mark with these anniversaries how far we’ve
icon, someone who could carry that charisma come, especially in the US and the UK,”
in a short amount of time. So we approached Gavron says. “There’s legislation in place,
Meryl and she agreed quite quickly to women can sit on juries, have parental rights,
control over their own money, all of these
participate.”
Helena Bonham Carter’s presence added things that women were denied are now rights
a different perspective on the struggle, as they’ve earned on so many levels.
Gavron adds, “It’s extraordinary that Helena “On the other hand there are so many
is the great-granddaughter of the Prime countries across the world where even basic
Minister at the time, Lord Asquith, who was fundamental rights, basic human rights, are
so opposed to female suffrage. He was the still being struggled for. Women cannot
enemy of the Suffragettes. So for Helena to drive in Saudi Arabia, for instance. Sixty-two
play this woman who was actually fighting million girls are denied an education across
this battle was wonderful. For her to embrace the world. There are so many issues that we
need to tackle so I’m glad that the final crawl
this character and be up for it was exciting.”
Screenwriter Morgan, in addition to writing at the end of the film makes people think
such memorable women’s roles, had to walk about this on-going fight.
a fine line to make sure the men in the movie For Morgan, the importance of the message
did not come off as one-dimensional brutes. hits closer to home. “It’s profoundly moving
Working with first-class talent like Ben at the end. I have a thirteen-year-old son and
Whishaw and Brendan Gleeson made the task an eleven-year-old daughter and it’s just as
easier. “What was exciting about working important to me that my son sees this as my
with actors of the caliber of Brendan and Ben daughter. There is a new generation becoming
is that they would embody the gamut of men’s empowered and engaged with their activism
because of the power of social media and the
perspectives at the time.
“A character like Sonny, who is played by Ben, fact that we can see such appalling images
is really a character born out of his time. He’s like those levelled against women in the
conflicted. He deeply loves Maud but the Middle East, or the brothels of India, to sexexpectations of the time didn’t allow him to trafficking in Eastern Europe.
“We are aware of these abuses so much more
break out and support her.
“Then there’s someone like Brendan’s now than ever. So again the most important
character, Inspector Steed, who is based thing to this movie is that it works and is
on a composite of men at the time. What I compelling and a vivid portrayal of the time.
found extraordinary was the idea of the whole And it keeps the discourse going. We are lucky
surveillance aspect, the whole operation that to have our vote and we must use it!”
TOM
ELIZABETH BRADLEY CHERRY
HIDDLESTON
OLSEN
WHITFORD JONES
WRENN
SCHMIDT
ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN
A TRIP TO
NASHVILLE!
AND YOUR VERY OWN
HANK WILLIAMS DELUXE HAT
Contest begins this December
Visit Cinemark.com for Details
I SAW THE LIGHT
THE STORY OF HANK WILLIAMS
SONY PICTURES CLASSICS AND RATPAC ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT IN ASSOCIAWITIOTNH CW MEDIA FINANCE A BRON STUDIOS AND RATPAC ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION TOM HIDDLESTON ELIZABETH OLSEN
DIRECTOR OF
DANTE SPINOTTI, ASC AIC
“I SAW THE LIGHT” CHERRY JONES BRADLEY WHITFORD MADDIE HASSON WRENN SCHMIDT CASTINBYG DENISE CHAMIAN, CSA DESICOSTUMEGNER LAHLY POORE-ERICSON PHOTOGRAPHY
CO-EXECUTIVE
EXECUTIVE
MUSIC
MUSIC
PRODUCTION
EXECUTIVE MUSIC
EDITOR ALAN HEIM, ACE DESIGNER MERIDETH BOSWELL
PRODUCER RODNEY CROWELL SUPERVISOR CARTER LITTLE BY AARON ZIGMAN PRODUCERS MARGOT HAND BRENDA GILBERT PRODUCERS PATTY LONG JASON CLOTH
JOHN RAYMONDS JAMES PACKER PRODUCEDBY BRETT RATNER, p.g.a. AARON L. GILBERT, p.g.a. MARC ABRAHAM, p.g.a. G. MARQ ROSWELL, p.g.a. BASEDTHE BOOKON “HANK WILLIAMS: THE BIOGRAPHY” BY COLIN ESCOTT
WRITTEN AND
WITH GEORGE MERRITT AND WILLIAM MACEWEN DIRECTED BY MARC ABRAHAM
THIS MOVIE IS
NOT YET RATED
COPYRIGHT © 2015 RATPAC ISTL LLC AND I SAW THE LIGHT MOVIE, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
SOUNDTRACK
AVAILABLE ON
LEGACY RECORDINGS
OPENS NOVEMBER 27TH IN NEW YORK & LOS ANGELES!
WWW.ISAWTHELIGHTFILM.COM
FROM THE DIRECTOR OF HERO AND
RAISE THE RED LANTERN
“EMOTIONALLY POWERFUL.
RICHLY NUANCED.”
-Didi Kirsten Tatlow, THE NEW YORK TIMES
“POWERFULLY DOCUMENTED, CAREFULLY WRITTEN,
FORCEFULLY DIRECTED AND SKILLFULLY ACTED.
A DEVASTATING CHAPTER IN THE HISTORY
OF JUSTICE, MORE RELEVANT
TODAY THAN EVER.”
-Rex Reed, THE NEW YORK OBSERVER
GONG LI
Coming
Home
A FILM BY ZHANG YIMOU
In Germany, 15 years
after World War II, one
young man forces an entire
country to face its past.
OFFICIAL SELECTION
OFFICIAL SELECTION
TORONTO
CANNES
INTERNATIONAL FILM
FESTIVAL
FILM FESTIVAL
OFFICIAL SELECTION
HAMPTONS
A fIlm by GIULIO RICCIARELLI
INTERNATIONAL FILM
FESTIVAL
WWW.COMINGHOMEMOVIE.COM
NOW PLAYING
Cate
Robert
BLANCHETT REDFORD
TORONTO
FILM FESTIVAL
Topher
GRACE
WWW.LABYRINTHOFLIESMOVIE.COM
OPENS SEPTEMBER 25TH
Elisabeth and Dennis
QUAID
MOSS
Based On
The
Story
Behind
The
Story
WINNER
GRAND PRIX
CANNES
FILM FESTIVAL
TELLURIDE
Truth
a film by
JAMES VANDERBILT
TORONTO
NEW YORK
“POWERFUL.
A REMARKABLE FEATURE FILMMAKING DEBUT.”
-Michael Phillips, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
★★★★★
HIGHEST RATING
-Peter Bradshaw, THE GUARDIAN
SONY PICTURES CLASSICS AND RATPAC ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT IN ASSOCIATION WITH ECHO LAKE ENTERTAINMENT AND BLUE LAKE MEDIA FUND A MYTHOLOGY ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH DIRTY FILMS
CASTING
A JAMES VANDERBILT FILM CATE BLANCHETT ROBERT REDFORD “TRUTH” TOPHER GRACE ELISABETH MOSS BRUCE GREENWOOD STACY KEACH AND DENNIS QUAID BY JOHN PAPSIDERA, CSA AND NIKKI BARRETT, CSA
COSTUME
MUSIC
EDITED
PRODUCTION
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR OF
DESIGNER AMANDA NEALE BY BRIAN TYLER BY RICHARD FRANCIS-BRUCE, ACE DESIGNER FIONA CROMBIE PHOTOGRAPHY MANDY WALKER, ASC, ACS PRODUCERS MIKKEL BONDESEN JAMES PACKER NEIL TABATZNIK STEVEN SILVER
BASED ON
PRODUCED
BY BRADLEY J. FISCHER WILLIAM SHERAK JAMES VANDERBILT BRETT RATNER DOUG MANKOFF ANDREW SPAULDING THE BOOK “TRUTH AND DUTY: THE PRESS, THE PRESIDENT, AND THE PRIVILEGE OF POWER” BY MARY MAPES
SCREENPLAY
DIRECTED
BY JAMES VANDERBILT BY JAMES VANDERBILT
THIS MOVIE IS
© 2015 RATPAC TRUTH LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
NOT YET RATED
WWW.TRUTH-FILM.COM
OPENS OCTOBER 16
TH
SON OF SAUL
A film by László Nemes
WWW.SONOFSAULMOVIE.COM
OPENS DECEMBER 18TH
LIKE US ON
facebook.com/sonyclassics
FOLLOW US ON
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
@sonyclassics
FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES WITH BBC FILMS TELEFILM CANADA BORD SCANNÁN NA hÉIREANN/THE IRISH FILM BOARD SODEC AND BFI PRESENT A WILDGAZE FILMS/FINOLA DWYER PRODUCTIONS PARALLEL FILMS ITEM 7 CO-PRODUCTION PRODUCED IN ASSOCIATION WITH INGENIOUS IN ASSOCIATION WITH BAI RTE AND HANWAY FILMS A FILM BY JOHN CROWLEY SAOIRSE RONAN
MUSIC
DIRECTOR OF
PRODUCTION
EXECUTIVE
DOMHNALL GLEESON EMORY COHEN WITH JIM BROADBENT AND JULIE WALTERS “BROOKLYN” CASTINBYG FIONA WEIR PRODUCERLINE CAROLINE LEVY SUPERVISSOUNDING SOUNDDESIGEDINER/TOR GLENN FREEMANTLE SUPERVIMUSISORC KLE SAVIDGE COSTUME
DESIGNER ODILE DICKS-MIREAUX BY MICHAEL BROOK EDITOR JAKE ROBERTS DESIGNER FRANCOIS SÉGUIN PHOTOGRAPHY YVES BÉLANGER C.S.C. PRODUCERS CHRISTINE LANGAN BETH PA
PATTINSON
THORSTEN SCHUMACHER ZYGI KAMASA HUSSAIN AMARSHI ALAN MOLONEY PRODUCERSCO- PIERRE EVEN MARIE-CLAUDE POULIN BASEDNOVELON THEBY COLM TÓIBÍN SCREENPLAYBY NICK HORNBY PRODUCEDBY FINOLA DWYER & AMANDA POSEY DIRECTEDBY JOHN CROWLEY
NOVEMBER 2015
A SCENE OF SEXUALITY
AND BRIEF
STRONG LANGUAGE.
BROOKLYN-THEMOVIE.COM
Copyright © 2015 Twentieth Century Fox
YOUTH
A FILM BY PAOLO
SORRENTINO
MICHAEL CAINE HARVEY KEITEL RACHEL WEISZ PAUL DANO
YOUTHTHEMOVIE.COM
IN SELECT THEATRES
AND
JANE FONDA
DECEMBER 2015
HENAMEDMEMALALA.COM
FOR GROUP SALES EMAIL [email protected] OR CALL (310) 488-6003
HENAMEDMEMALALA.COM
THE TORONTO REPORT
A Look at the Big Surprises From This Year’s Festival
By Cara Lyon
Oh, the spectacular festivities of film. It may seem odd to the casual fan, but the metropolis of Toronto, Canada has become a
thriving haven for the film industry. Both film enthusiasts and those in the industry flock to the Toronto International Film
Festival each year to find the newest and freshest voices in cinema. Our CinéArts team has been hard at work viewing films
small and large in Toronto to show in our theatres. The following films are very likely to receive critical and commercial
success in the future, so take notes!
Trumbo
Director: Jay Roach
Starring: Bryan Cranston, Helen Mirren, Diane Lane
Synopsis: Bryan Cranston (Breaking Bad) stars as the
famous screenwriter and Hollywood blacklist victim Dalton
Trumbo, in this engrossing biopic co-starring Helen Mirren,
Elle Fanning, Diane Lane and John Goodman about the
famous Hollywood Communist witch hunt.
Review: With a cast led by Bryan Cranston, Diane Lane
and Helen Mirren, the true story of Dalton Trumbo will
please both art and commercial audiences alike in this 60’s
piece on the House of Un-American Activities Committee
proceedings. Cranston is intriguing as the maverick writer
who defies the witch hunting times.
The Danish Girl
Director: Tom Hooper
Starring: Eddie Redmayne, Alicia Vikander, Amber Heard
Synopsis: Academy Award winner Eddie Redmayne (The
Theory of Everything) stars as Lili Elbe, the 1920s Danish artist
who was one of the first recipients of sexual reassignment
surgery, in this biopic directed by Oscar winner Tom Hooper
(The King’s Speech).
Review: Eddie Redmayne’s performance is unsurprisingly
strong coming off of his Academy Award win for The Theory
of Everything. It would be no surprise to see him nominated
again this year for this 1920s transgender period piece. He is
extremely stylish and endearing as his alter ego Lily.
Demolition
Director: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Jake Gyllenhaal, Naomi Watts, Heather Lind
Synopsis: Grief-stricken after a family tragedy, a New
York investment banker (Jake Gyllenhaal) engages in
random acts of destruction, in the highly anticipated
new film by Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club,
Wild).
Review: Another strong film from Jean-Marc Vallée
to follow up Wild and Dallas Buyers Club. Like those
films, Demolition has a way of dealing with difficult
subject matters without ever feeling melodramatic
or unrealistic. Following in the steps of Nightcrawler,
Jake Gyllenhaal is cast as a profoundly out-of-step
protagonist with the culture around him. One of the
better films at the Toronto Film Festival.
Spotlight
Director: Tom McCarthy
Starring: Mark Ruffalo, Live Schreiber, Rachel
McAdams, Michael Keaton
Synopsis: The true story of how the Boston Globe
uncovered the massive scandal of child molestation
and cover-up within the local Catholic Archdiocese,
shaking the entire Catholic Church to its core.
Review: This fact-based drama featuring an ensemble
full of A-list names is sure to strike up conversation
and leave you thinking. It is a dense but ultimately
satisfying drama. The viewer must participate in some
heavy lifting to follow the complex narrative, but it is
well worth the effort.
Where to Invade Next
Director: Michael Moore
Synopsis: Academy Award-winning director Michael
Moore returns with what may be his most provocative
and hilarious film yet: Moore tells the Pentagon to
“stand down” — he will do the invading for America
from now on.
Review: Despite the title of the film, it is not about
war but rather cultures from around the world and how
they take care of their citizenry. Depending on your
affection for Michael Moore you will either love it or
loathe it.
MOVIE
THEATRES
AREN’T
JUST FOR
MOVIES
ANYMORE
// arts & entertainment
// classics
// concerts
// originals
// premieres
// sports
// tv & radio specials
FathomEvents.com
Theatre Spotlight:
CinéArts Santana Row
By Andy Anderson
I
sn’t film great? Here within the CinéArts team, we certainly
think so. Some pictures simply capture what it means to be
a “one in a kind film”. Something like The Grand Budapest
Hotel was considered an instant classic once it premiered, and the
film lovers who got to see it first knew they were in a special “in
the know” group. The CinéArts Santana Row in San Jose, CA is a
haven for these types of fans.
This unique cinema is the first place to witness future Oscar
contenders like The Imitation Game, Her, and Blue Jasmine in
the area. When you hear about the “buzz” that is film is getting,
it originates at a place like the CinéArts Santana Row.
The theatre is located in one of the finest shopping centers
in Northern California, providing a great opportunity for
audiences to enjoy their evening. There are literally dozens of
high end restaurants and retail shops within walking distance of
the theatre. CinéArts Santana Row is one of the key destinations
in this trendy lifestyle center.
As a film junkie, you know you’re at home walking through the
doors of the theater at Santana Row. The floor to ceiling glass
windows and giant classic movie posters are inviting you inside.
32 | CINEARTS.COM
Whether you are there for an event like the San Jose International
Short Film Festival or there to see an art film like Carol, you know
you’re in good hands.
CinéArts Santana Row: 3088 Olsen Drive, San Jose, CA 95128.
Visit cinemark.com for tickets and showtimes.
CINÉARTS FILM GUIDE | FALL 2015 | 33
34 | CINEARTS.COM

Similar documents