Academic Program Needs Assessment of the Rio

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Academic Program Needs Assessment of the Rio
Academic Program Needs Assessment of
the Rio Grande Valley of Texas
Submitted to:
Dr. Robert S. Nelsen
President
The University of Texas-Pan American
Submitted by:
Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness
The University of Texas-Pan American
Edinburg, TX
April 2010
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Table of Contents
I.
Introduction ...............................................................................................................................1
A. Study Area .....................................................................................................................1
B. Purpose of the Report...................................................................................................1
C. Report Outline .............................................................................................................2
II. Market Analysis .........................................................................................................................3
A. Population Characteristics ............................................................................................4
i. Trends and Projections
B. Employment Characteristics .........................................................................................6
i. Unemployment Trends
ii. Employment by Major Industry Sector
iii. Industry and Occupational Projections
C. Income and Poverty Characteristics ...........................................................................13
D. Educational Profile ......................................................................................................14
i. Educational Attainment Status
ii. High School Data
iii. Postsecondary Data
E. Summary and Conclusions ..........................................................................................23
III. Local Higher Education Providers ............................................................................................25
A. Postsecondary Education Providers in the Rio Grande Valley....................................25
B. Description of Major Postsecondary Providers ..........................................................26
C. Degrees Awarded by Local Education Providers ........................................................29
D. Programs Offered at UTPA..........................................................................................47
E. Enrollment Trends at UTPA.........................................................................................49
IV. Program Areas at UTPA and Local Demand in the Rio Grande Valley .....................................55
A. Occupational Demand by Preferred Education ..........................................................55
B. Crosswalk of Program Areas and Associated Demand for Occupations ....................60
C. Analysis of Program Areas for which there is Associated Occupational Demand ......64
D. Summary and Conclusions ..........................................................................................66
V. Current and Future Educational Needs of the Rio Grande Valley ...........................................67
A. Highlights from Existing Surveys and Other Published Material ................................67
B. Summary and Conclusions ..........................................................................................81
VI. Conclusions and Recommendations ........................................................................................83
A. Market Situation .........................................................................................................83
B. Program Demand and Gaps ........................................................................................86
C. Other Issues for Consideration ...................................................................................89
D. Recommendations ......................................................................................................91
Glossary .........................................................................................................................................93
References ....................................................................................................................................103
I.
INTRODUCTION The University of Texas‐Pan American (UTPA) serves the higher education needs of a rapidly growing, international, multicultural population in the South Texas Region. The University preserves, transmits and creates knowledge to serve the cultural, civic, and economic advancement of the region and the state. The University provides students advanced instruction in academic programs offered through innovative delivery systems that lead to professional certification, and baccalaureate, master's and doctoral degrees. Through teaching, research, creative activity and public service, UTPA prepares students for lifelong learning and leadership roles in the state, nation and world community. With this mission at its core and with a new President, Dr. Robert S. Nelsen, at its helm, UTPA believes it is important to take stock of the various program offerings at the University and to look at educational program needs that are underserved or not being met by existing programs. This study also supports the University of Texas System’s Rio Grande Valley Initiative to improve educational participation in South Texas. And it will help form future Closing the Gaps targets to help Rio Grande contribute to the State’s goal to increase participation of underrepresented minorities in higher education. To these ends, the report “Academic Program Needs Assessment of the Rio Grande Valley of Texas” was prepared by UTPA’s Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness to guide the university in its future plans. A. Study Area UTPA’s primary service area is the Rio Grande Valley of Texas which is comprised of Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr and Willacy counties. Over 93% of students enrolled at UTPA come from this region. Of the remaining 7%, 3% come from other Texas counties, less than 1% from other states in the U.S., 2% from Mexico, and almost 1% from other foreign countries. Most of the graduates settle down in this area and are gainfully employed in the Valley. For this reason the Rio Grande Valley was designated as the service area for this report. B. Purpose of the Report This report was prepared to: 
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Identify the current status of the Rio Grande Valley in terms of its population, their educational attainment and employment. Recognize the academic needs existing in the Rio Grande Valley region and determine which ones are not being met by existing programs. Identify the program areas that need to be expanded, developed or considered in the coming years. This report serves as a guide for UTPA to help refine its academic programs and services to best meet local and regional needs of the future. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 1 C. Report Outline This report details the findings of the Academic Program Needs Assessment of the Rio Grande Valley region as outlined below: I. Introduction A. Study Area B. Purpose of the Report C. Report Outline II. Market Analysis A. Population Characteristics i. Trends and Projections B. Employment Characteristics i. Unemployment Trends ii. Employment by Major Industry Sector iii. Industry and Occupational Projections C. Income and Poverty Characteristics D. Educational Profile i. Educational Attainment Status ii. High School Data iii. Postsecondary Data E. Summary and Conclusions III. Local Higher Education Providers A. Postsecondary Education Providers in the Rio Grande Valley B. Description of Major Postsecondary Providers C. Degrees awarded by Local Education Providers D. Programs Offered at UTPA E. Enrollment Trends at UTPA IV. Program Areas at UTPA and Local Demand in the Rio Grande Valley A. Occupational Demand by Preferred Education B. Crosswalk of Program Areas and Associated Demand for Occupations C. Analysis of Program Areas for which there is Associated Occupational Demand D. Summary and Conclusions V. Current and Future Educational Needs of the Rio Grande Valley A. Highlights from Existing Surveys and Other Published Material B. Summary and Conclusions VI. Conclusions and Recommendations A. Market Situation B. Program Demand and Gaps C. Other Issues for Consideration D. Recommendations 2 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
II.
MARKET ANALYSIS
This chapter presents the population, employment, income and poverty characteristics of the Rio Grande Valley region. It also provides an educational profile of the region highlighting educational attainment levels, and enrollment and graduation data for high schools and postsecondary institutions. Information in this chapter will be beneficial in understanding the demographic and economic makeup of this region. The geographic area for this report is the Rio Grande Valley (RGV) of Texas which is comprised of Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr and Willacy counties. The RGV lies on the southmost tip of Texas. Three of the four counties (Cameron, Hidalgo and Starr) lie along the U.S.‐Mexico border. The total land area of this region is 4,866 square miles (slightly larger than the State of Connecticut) with a population density of 258 residents per square mile compared to a statewide density of 92. Exhibit 1 shows the location of the Rio Grande Valley in relation to Texas and Mexico. It also shows the location of the five public postsecondary educational institutions in the region: The University of Texas‐
Pan American (UTPA), South Texas College (STC), Texas State Technical College (TSTC), The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Texas Southmost College (TSC). There are two metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in the RGV: McAllen‐Edinburg‐Mission MSA which is comprised of Hidalgo County, and Brownsville‐Harlingen‐San Benito MSA which is comprised of Cameron County. Exhibit 1: The Rio Grande Valley of Texas UTPA STC TSTC UTB/TSC Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 3 A. Population Characteristics i. Trends and Projections An important demographic variable influencing a region is its population. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, from 1990 to 2000 the population of RGV grew by 39.4%. From 2000 to 2009 it grew from 978,369 to 1.2 million, a 23% increase as compared to a 17.7% increase for Texas during the same period. In the next 20 years, the population of RGV is expected to grow by 2.6% annually reaching 1.89 million by 2030. Currently the Hispanic population is 90% and is expected to increase to 94% by 2030 (Exhibit 2). Exhibit 2: Population Projections from 2010 to 2030 by Race/Ethnicity Rio Grande Valley 2,000,000
1,800,000
1,600,000
1,400,000
1,200,000
1,000,000
800,000
600,000
400,000
1,898,535
1%
1,727,014 5%
1%
1,563,966 6%
1%
1,407,495 7%
1%
1,256,550 8%
1%
1,113,438 9%
1%
978,369 10%
1%
12%
94% 93%
92%
91%
90%
89%
87%
200,000
0
2000
2005
Hispanic
2010
2015
2020
White (not‐Hispanic)
2025
Other
Source: Texas State Data Center, The University of Texas at San Antonio, TX. 2030
Exhibit 3 illustrates population projections for the four counties of the RGV. Hidalgo County has the highest population among all four counties, accounting for 60% of the total population of the RGV, followed by Cameron (33%), Starr (5%) and Willacy (2%) counties respectively. 4 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 3: Population Projections from 2010 to 2030 by County Rio Grande Valley 1,200,000
Growth 2025‐2030
Growth 2020‐2025
Growth 2015‐2020
Growth 2010‐2015
2010 Projection
1,000,000
800,000
600,000
400,000
200,000
0
HIDALGO
CAMERON
STARR
WILLACY
Source: Texas State Data Center, The University of Texas at San Antonio, TX. The Rio Grande Valley is growing at a tremendous pace: 20 year projections show that: 
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Hidalgo County which has a total population of 750,714, will cross the 1 million mark by 2025, reaching 1.18 million by 2030. Cameron County, which is at 415,304, will increase to 587,063 by 2030. Starr County is expected to grow by 30,000 to reach 97,327 by 2030, and Willacy County is expected to grow by 5,000 to reach 28,450 by 2030. In the next 20 years the population of RGV is expected to increase by over 600,000 people. Exhibit 4 illustrates the growth share for each county with Hidalgo and Cameron counties accounting for 95% of the growth. Exhibit 4: Share of Population Growth from 2010 to 2030 by County Rio Grande Valley STARR
4%
WILLACY
1%
CAMERON
27%
HIDALGO
68%
Source: Texas State Data Center, The University of Texas at San Antonio, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 5 B. Employment Characteristics i. Unemployment Trends In the past two years, overall economic activity has continued to weaken throughout the country. A look at employment patterns shows significantly higher unemployment rates in the RGV as compared to the State of Texas and the U.S. This pattern of higher unemployment in the RGV has always existed; but, now with the recession, the rate is in double digits (Exhibit 5). Exhibit 5: Unemployment Rates in U.S., Texas and RGV 2000 to 2009 11.4%
12%
9.4%
10%
8.8%
7.9%
7.4%
8%
6.6%
5.8%
6%
4.6%
4.0%
4.9%
4.4% 4.4%
4%
2%
0%
U.S.
Texas
2000
2007
RGV
2008
Nov‐09
Source: Labor Market Information, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. ii. Employment by Major Industry Sector: Total employment in the Rio Grande Valley in the second quarter of 2009 was 359,951 with the highest number of people employed in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry, followed by Educational Services at second place and the Trade sector with the third highest employment (Exhibit 6). The Health Services industry accounts for 24% of the employment, followed by Educational Services at 18% and the Trade sector at 16%. Other industry sectors account for less than 10% each (Exhibit 7). 6 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 6: Employment by Industry in the Rio Grande Valley Second Quarter 2009 86,306
Health Care and Social Assistance
63,132
Educational Services
59,324
Trade (Wholesale and Retail)
33,760
Leisure and Hospitality
23,309
Professional and Business Services
19,840
Public Administration
14,578
Transportation and Utilities
Financial Activities
13,346
Construction
12,993
12,598
Manufacturing
8,701
Natural Resources and Mining
7,354
Other Services
4,588
Information
122
Unclassified
0
10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000
Source: Labor Market Information, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. Exhibit 7: Share of Employment by Industry in the Rio Grande Valley Second Quarter 2009 4%
4%
3% 2% 2% 1%
4%
0%
Health Care, 24%
6%
Educational Services, 18%
6%
9%
Trade 16%
Health Care and Social Assistance
Trade (Wholesale and Retail)
Professional and Business Services
Transportation and Utilities
Construction
Natural Resources and Mining
Information
Educational Services
Leisure and Hospitality
Public Administration
Financial Activities
Manufacturing
Other Services
Unclassified
Source: Labor Market Information, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 7 iii. Industry and Occupational Projections Based on Texas Workforce Commission’s 2006‐2016 Industry and Occupational Projections, the top three industries that will add the largest number of jobs by 2016 are Health Care and Social Assistance, Educational Services, and Retail Trade (Exhibit 8). The Health Care Industry will grow by over 33,000 jobs in the 10 year period followed by Educational Services adding almost 20,000 jobs and Retail Trade adding 10,000 jobs. Exhibit 8: Projected Growth by Industry in the Rio Grande Valley 2006 to 2016 24,150
Government
15,150
Admin & Support, Waste Mgmt & Remediation …
28,300
Self‐Employed & Unpaid Family Workers
Other Services (Exc. Government)
8,400
5,750
27,750
Accommodation & Food Services
Finance & Insurance
10,000
47,750
Retail Trade
Construction
19,600
59,950
Educational Services
Transportation & Warehousing
33,600
74,550
Health Care & Social Assistance
5,150
3,450
2,700
13,700
2,200
9,150 2,000
11,450
1,850
1,600
10,150 1,050
1,000
15,900
9,750
Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services 6,500
Wholesale Trade
Manufacturing
Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation
2,500 700
Real Estate & Rental & Leasing
3,850 650
Mining 2,100
650
Information
4,600 400
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting
6,650 250
Utilities
1,100 200
Management of Companies & Enterprises
450
0
50
20,000
2006 Estimate
40,000
60,000
80,000
100,000
120,000
Change through 2016
Source: Industry Projections 2006‐2016, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. 8 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
The top three occupational categories that will add the largest number of jobs by 2016 are Personal Care and Service; Education, Training, & Library; and Office & Administrative Support (Exhibit 9). Exhibit 9: Projected Growth by Occupational Categories* in the Rio Grande Valley 2006 to 2016 Personal Care & Service 30,850
Education, Training, & Library 39,350
Office & Administrative Support 55,250
15,150
13,850
11,150
9,500
Food Preparation & Serving Related 29,550
Healthcare Practitioners & Technical 22,300
8,500
40,900
Sales & Related Healthcare Support 13,850
Transportation & Material Moving 24,050
Management
19,450
Protective Service 10,500
Construction & Extraction 14,600
Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance 10,500
Installation, Maintenance, & Repair 11,800
Business & Financial Operations 10,500
6,150
4,250
3,300
3,050
2,800
2,700
2,450
2,400
2,200
6,750
Community & Social Services 2,100
15,800
Production 7,550
Computer & Mathematical 3,550 1,150
Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, & Media 3,650
800
Architecture & Engineering 2,700
650
Farming, Fishing, & Forestry
5,300 550
Life, Physical, & Social Science 2,100 550
Legal 2,250 450
0
10,000
2006 Estimate
20,000
30,000
40,000
50,000
60,000
70,000
Change through 2016
* The Glossary in the back of this document gives an explanation for each of these major occupational categories. Source: Occupational Projections 2006‐2016, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. According to projections from the Texas Workforce Commission, jobs for personal & home care aides will grow the most with an average of 1,275 jobs per year followed by 400 jobs per year for Elementary School Teachers. Exhibit 10 shows the top 25 occupations adding the largest number of jobs in the Rio Grande Valley. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 9 Exhibit 10: Top 25 Occupations Projected in the Rio Grande Valley ‐ 2006 to 2016 Occupations Personal & Home Care Aides Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education
Retail Salespersons Combined Food Prep & Serving Workers, Including Fast Food
Registered Nurses Home Health Aides Customer Service Representatives Secondary School Teachers, Except Special & Vocational Ed
Middle School Teachers, Except Special & Vocational Ed
Waiters & Waitresses Office Clerks, General Teacher Assistants Nursing Aides, Orderlies, & Attendants Cashiers Janitors & Cleaners, Except Maids & Housekeeping Cleaners
Child Care Workers Truck Drivers, Heavy & Tractor‐Trailer Licensed Practical & Licensed Vocational Nurses
Executive Secretaries & Administrative Assistants
Receptionists & Information Clerks First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Retail Sales Workers
Medical Assistants Bookkeeping, Accounting, & Auditing Clerks
Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, & Executive
First‐Line Supervisors/Mgrs. of Food Prep & Serving Workers
Annual Average Employment 2006 2016 22,050
9,750
13,900
10,600
7,650
5,800
6,250
6,350
5,000
5,500
6,200
5,400
4,200
10,950
5,150
4,450
5,550
3,700
4,150
2,950
5,850
1,700
4,050
4,250
1,850
34,800 13,750 17,700 14,350 10,850 8,550 8,300 8,300 6,900 7,250 7,900 7,100 5,750 12,400 6,550 5,800 6,750 4,800 5,200 4,000 6,850 2,700 4,950 4,900 2,500 Number Change (10 yrs.) Growth Rate 12,750 4,000 3,800 3,750 3,200 2,750 2,050 1,950 1,900 1,750 1,700 1,700 1,550 1,450 1,400 1,350 1,200 1,100 1,050 1,050 1,000 1,000 900 650 650 57.8%
41.0%
27.3%
35.4%
41.8%
47.4%
32.8%
30.7%
38.0%
31.8%
27.4%
31.5%
36.9%
13.2%
27.2%
30.3%
21.6%
29.7%
25.3%
35.6%
17.1%
58.8%
22.2%
15.3%
35.1%
Source: Occupational Projections 2006‐2016, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. The list below shows the education level needed for occupations that have at least 10 job openings per year in the Rio Grande Valley. Jobs requiring a First Professional or Doctoral degree (# of average annual job openings, 10 or more) 

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
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Physicians and Surgeons, various specialties (85) Lawyers (50) Pharmacists (40) Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists (20) Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists (10) 10 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Jobs requiring a Master’s degree (# of average annual job openings, 10 or more) 
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Educational, Vocational, and School Counselors (60) Clergy (45) Physical Therapists (40) Instructional Coordinators (35) Speech‐Language Pathologists (35) Librarians (30) Counselors, all Other (20) Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary (20) Occupational Therapists (20) Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Workers (15) Physician Assistants (10) Jobs requiring a Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience (# of average annual job openings, 10 or more) 
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General and Operations Managers (165) Education Administrators, Elementary and Secondary School (80) Medical and Health Services Managers (50) Administrative Services Managers (30) Management Analysts (30) Vocational Education Teachers, Secondary School (30) Chief Executives (25) Financial Managers (25) Training and Development Specialists (25) Sales Managers (20) Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary (20) Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers (15) Education Administrators, Preschool and Child Care Center/Program (10) Jobs requiring a Bachelor’s degree (# of average annual job openings, 20 or more) (Note: this list was too long to incorporate all jobs with 10 or more openings hence it shows jobs with 20 or more job openings). 
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Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education (610) Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education (390) Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education (300) Teachers and Instructors, all Other (115) Accountants and Auditors (100) Business Operations Specialists, all Other (70) Special Education Teachers, Preschool, Kindergarten, and Elementary School (65) Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education (55) Construction Managers (45) Child, Family, and School Social Workers (45) Computer Systems Analysts (40) Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 11 
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Medical and Public Health Social Workers (35) Special Education Teachers, Middle School (30) Social and Community Service Managers (25) Network and Computer Systems Administrators (25) Special Education Teachers, Secondary School (25) Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents (25) Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers (20) Employment, Recruitment, and Placement Specialists (20) Loan Officers (20) Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts (20) Civil Engineers (20) Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists (20) Insurance Sales Agents (20) Jobs requiring an Associate’s degree (# of average annual job openings, 10 or more) 
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Registered Nurses (440) Computer Support Specialists (50) Radiologic Technologists and Technicians (30) Medical Records and Health Information Technicians (30) Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians (25) Paralegals and Legal Assistants (20) Respiratory Therapists (20) Dental Hygienists (15) Physical Therapist Assistants (15) Civil Engineering Technicians (10) Legal Secretaries (10) Jobs requiring a Postsecondary Vocational Training (# of average annual job openings, 10 or more) 
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Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses (215) Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants (195) Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics (80) Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education (75) Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers (50) Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics (35) Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists (30) Surgical Technologists (25) Hairdressers, Hairstylists, and Cosmetologists (25) Real Estate Sales Agents (25) Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors (20) Library Technicians (15) Health Technologists and Technicians, all Other (10) Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine Repairers (10) 12 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
C. Income and Poverty Characteristics To add to Rio Grande Valley’s economic struggle, the region has high poverty and low per capita income as compared to the state of Texas and U.S. (Exhibits 11 and 12). The percentage of people living in poverty in the RGV is more than double that of the state of Texas and two and a half times more than in the U.S. Per Capita Income is almost half that of Texas and less than half of U.S. Exhibit 11: Percent of Population in Poverty – U.S., Texas and RGV 34%
35%
30%
25%
16%
20%
13%
15%
10%
5%
0%
United States
Texas
RGV
Source: 2008 Estimates of Income and Poverty, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC. Exhibit 12: Per Capita Income – U.S., Texas and RGV $27,466 $30,000 $24,709 $25,000 $20,000 $13,154 $15,000 $10,000 $5,000 $‐
United States
Texas
RGV
Source: 2006‐2008 American Community Survey, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 13 D. Educational Profile i. Educational Attainment Status A major contributor to unemployment and high poverty is the vast difference in the levels of educational attainment among the adult population. Exhibit 13a shows that the percentages of high school graduates and college graduates (with a bachelor’s degree or higher) in the Rio Grande Valley (and its individual counties) are distinctly lower than that of high school and college graduates (with a bachelor’s degree or higher) in Texas and the U.S. Exhibit 13a: Percent of High School and College Graduates (with a BACHELOR’s Degree or Higher) U.S., Texas, RGV and RGV Counties (all persons 25 years and over) 90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
85%
79%
63%
60%
59%
53%
49%
27%
25%
15%
U.S.
Texas
RGV
15%
15%
Cameron Hidalgo
High school graduates
10%
Starr
11%
Willacy
Bachelor's degree or higher
Source: 2006‐08 American Community Survey, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC. If college graduates with an associate’s degree are added to the mix, then the picture changes slightly but RGV and its individual counties still remain considerably lower in educational attainment levels as compared to Texas and the U.S. (Exhibit 13b). Exhibit 13b: Percent of High School and College Graduates (with an ASSOCIATE’s Degree or Higher) U.S., Texas, RGV and RGV Counties (all persons 25 years and over) 90%
85%
79%
80%
70%
63%
60%
59%
60%
53%
49%
50%
40%
30%
35%
31%
19%
20%
21%
19%
13%
15%
10%
0%
High school graduates
Associate's degree or higher
Source: 2006‐08 American Community Survey, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC. 14 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
A further breakdown of educational attainment depicting level of college degree obtained (associate’s, bachelor’s or higher) is shown in Exhibit 14. Rio Grande Valley lags behind both Texas and the U.S. at all levels of college degree attainment. Although the percentage of the population (25 years and over) in the RGV with an associate’s degree (4.7%) is not much lower than Texas (6.3%) and U.S. (7.4%), the gap increases substantially when looking at the percentage of people with a bachelor’s degree. Only 9.9% of the RGV population has a bachelor’s degree as compared to 16.9% in Texas and 17.3% in the U.S. Similarly a much smaller percentage (4.6%) of the RGV population has a graduate or professional degree as compared to that in Texas (8.2%) and the U.S. (10.1%). Exhibit 14: Educational Attainment by level of College Degree U.S., Texas, RGV and RGV Counties (all persons 25 years and over) 105%
100%
95%
10.1% 8.2%
90%
85%
80%
65%
Graduate/professional degree
6.2% 6.9%
10.3%
9.9% 10.0%
2.9%
3.9%
Bachelor's degree
16.9% 4.7%
6.0% 4.2%
17.3%
75%
70%
4.6% 5.0% 4.5% 3.8% 3.8%
6.3%
80.7% 79.0%
7.4%
65.1%
81.0%
Associate's degree
No college degree
87.0% 85.3%
68.6%
60%
Source: 2006‐08 American Community Survey, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 15 Exhibit 15 below shows the enrollment status of the population 3 years of age and over in different grade levels and in college. This data was obtained from the 2006‐08 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The percentage of the population (3+ years) enrolled in college is 17.1% for the Rio Grande Valley as compared to 23% for Texas and 26% for the U.S. A closer look at the individual counties of the RGV shows that the college going population for Cameron and Hidalgo counties is at 17.8% and 17.1% respectively whereas that for Starr and Willacy counties is much lower. This could be attributed to the presence of UTB‐TSC and TSTC in Cameron County and to the presence of UTPA and STC in Hidalgo County. Both STC and UTPA also have a presence in Starr County where the college going population is 14%. Willacy County has 9.7% of its population going to college. Exhibit 15: Percentage of Population Enrolled in School – U.S., Texas, RGV and RGV Counties (all persons 3 years of age and over) 100%
26.3%
90%
Enrolled in College or graduate school
22.9%
17.1%
17.8%
9.7%
17.1% 14.0%
80%
29.3%
70%
21.8% 21.6% 21.8% 22.6% 21.1% 23.3%
Enrolled in High school (grades 9‐12)
60%
50%
40%
30%
40.5%
43.2%
46.8% 45.2% 47.7% 46.3%
48.9%
Enrolled in Elementary school (grades 1‐8)
20%
10%
16.4%
12.1%
11.4% 12.3% 14.2% 14.3% 14.1%
Enrolled below Elementary school
0%
Source: 2006‐08 American Community Survey, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC. 16 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Focusing on college enrollment and looking at the various age groups enrolled in college reveals that Rio Grande Valley lags behind Texas and the U.S. in all three age groups: traditional (18‐24 years), nontraditional (25 to 34 years) and older nontraditional (35 and over). A higher percentage of students (specially in the traditional age group) are enrolled in college in Cameron and Hidalgo due to the presence of institutions of higher education in these counties. No data is available for Willacy County as the college going population in this area is rather small (Exhibit 16). Exhibit 16: Enrollment in College by Age Group – U.S., Texas, RGV and RGV Counties 45.0%
40.7%
40.0%
35.6%
35.0%
32.1%
31.0%
31.2%
30.0%
22.9%
25.0%
20.0%
15.0%
11.6%
10.3%
10.7%
9.4%
10.0%
2.5%
5.0%
2.4%
1.9%
2.0%
8.7%
1.9%
10.8%
No Data
1.6% Available
0.0%
U.S.
Texas
18 to 24 years
RGV
Cameron County
25 to 34 years
Hidalgo County
Starr County
Willacy County
35 years and over
Note: Data for Willacy County is not available because the number of sample cases is too small. Source: 2006‐08 American Community Survey, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 17 ii. High School Data This section presents data on high school enrollment and graduation trends in all public high schools in the four counties of the Rio Grande Valley. Exhibits 17a and 17b show in tabular and graphical form the rising student enrollment in all the counties except Willacy, which has seen a slight decrease in school enrollment over the past five years. Overall public school enrollment in the RGV has increased by 9% in the last 5 years. Exhibit 17a: Public SCHOOL Enrollment in RGV Counties and RGV 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Area 2004‐05 Cameron County Hidalgo County 2006‐07 2007‐08 94,001 96,645 97,768 99,544 99,712 6% 170,180 175,393 180,713 186,654 190,598 12% 16,061 16,365 16,585 16,451 16,671 4% Starr County Willacy County Total Rio Grande Valley Change 04‐05 to 08‐09 2005‐06 2008‐09 4,561 4,574 4,474 4,486 4,445 ‐3% 284,803 292,977 299,540 307,135 311,426 9% Source: 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Academic Excellence Indicator System Reports, Texas Education Agency, Austin, TX. Exhibit 17b: Public SCHOOL Enrollment in RGV Counties 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 200,000
180,000
160,000
190,598
4,445
16,671
4,486
16,451
99,712
99,544
4,474
16,585
4,574
16,365
97,768
96,645
4,561
20,000
16,061
40,000
170,180
60,000
94,001
100,000
80,000
180,713
175,393
120,000
186,654
140,000
0
2004‐05
2005‐06
Cameron County
2006‐07
Hidalgo County
2007‐08
Starr County
2008‐09
Willacy County
Source: 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Academic Excellence Indicator System Reports, Texas Education Agency, Austin, TX. 18 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
High school enrollment in public schools has also been rising. Overall enrollment in public high schools has gone up by 15% in the last five years (Exhibits 18a and 18b). Exhibit 18a: Public HIGH SCHOOL Enrollment in RGV Counties and RGV 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Area 2004‐05 2005‐06 2006‐07 2007‐08 2008‐09 Change 04‐05 to 08‐09 Cameron County 25,046 26,425 27,071 27,730 27,853 11% Hidalgo County 41,696 43,655 45,654 47,694 48,850 17% Starr County 3,920 4,164 4,301 4,424 4,475 14% Willacy County 1,160 1,184 1,165 1,191 1,185 2% 71,822 75,428 78,191 81,039 82,363 15% Total Rio Grande Valley Source: 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Academic Excellence Indicator System Reports, Texas Education Agency, Austin, TX. 1,185 4,475 27,853 1,191 4,424 27,730 4,301 27,071 1,165 5,000
1,184 10,000
1,160 15,000
3,920 20,000
25,046 25,000
4,164 30,000
26,425 41,696 35,000
43,655 40,000
45,654 45,000
47,694 50,000
48,850 Exhibit 18b: Public HIGH SCHOOL Enrollment in RGV Counties 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 0
2004‐05
2005‐06
Cameron County
2006‐07
Hidalgo County
2007‐08
Starr County
2008‐09
Willacy County
Source: 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Academic Excellence Indicator System Reports, Texas Education Agency, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 19 A closer look at high school data by focusing on enrollment in 12th grade and also looking at students graduating from high school reveals that although the number of high school graduates has been increasing over the years, it is not keeping pace with the increase in enrollment of students in 12th grade. For example, 12th grade students in the last 4 years increased by 17% in RGV but the increase in the number of students graduating is only 12% (Exhibits 19 and 20). The only county showing an increase in graduating students as compared to the increase in 12th grade enrollments is Starr County. Exhibit 19: Enrollment in 12th Grade in RGV ‐ 2004‐05 to 2007‐08 Area Cameron County Hidalgo County Starr County Willacy County Total Rio Grande Valley Region One Texas 04‐05 4,410 7,639 814 250 13,113 16,275 246,863 05‐06 4,816 8,104 808 254 13,982 17,603 256,329 06‐07 4,864 8,403 818 248 14,333 18,017 259,506 07‐08 5,228 8,987 896 254 15,365 19,182 268,130 Change 04‐05 to 07‐08 19%
18%
10%
2%
17%
18%
9%
Source: 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Academic Excellence Indicator System Reports, Texas Education Agency, Austin, TX. Exhibit 20: Students Graduating from Public High Schools in RGV ‐ Class of 2005 to 2008 Area Cameron County Hidalgo County Starr County Willacy County Total Rio Grande Valley Region One Texas 2005 4,238 7,505 715 242 12,700 15,987 239,716 2006 4,474 7,433 698 234 12,839 16,351 240,485 2007 4,590 7,516 670 240 13,016 16,423 241,193 2008 4,952 8,172 818 226 14,168 17,734 252,121 Change 2005 to 2008 17%
9%
14%
‐7%
12%
11%
5%
Source: 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Academic Excellence Indicator System Reports, Texas Education Agency, Austin, TX. The percentage of 12 graders graduating from high school was 92% for the Class of 2008 in the RGV as compared to 94% graduating from the state of Texas (Exhibit 21). An alarming observation is that the percentage of students graduating from 12th grade has been decreasing over the years, not only in the Rio Grande Valley and Region One but even in the state of Texas as a whole. It has decreased from 97% to 92% in the RGV and from 97% to 94% in Texas. th
Exhibit 21: Students Graduating from Public High Schools in RGV ‐ Class of 2005 to 2008 Area Cameron County Hidalgo County Starr County Willacy County Total Rio Grande Valley Region One Texas 2005 96%
98%
88%
97%
97%
98%
97%
2006 93%
92%
86%
92%
92%
93%
94%
2007 94%
89%
82%
97%
91%
91%
93%
2008 95% 91% 91% 89% 92% 92% 94% Change 2005 to 2008 ‐1%
‐7%
4%
‐8%
‐5%
‐6%
‐3%
Source: 2004‐05 to 2008‐09 Academic Excellence Indicator System Reports, Texas Education Agency, Austin, TX. 20 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
iii. Postsecondary Data This section presents enrollment and graduation data for the five public postsecondary providers that serve the RGV. These providers are: The University of Texas‐Pan American (UTPA) in Edinburg, The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB), South Texas College (STC) in McAllen, Texas Southmost College (TSC) in Brownsville and Texas State Technical College (TSTC) in Harlingen. Since the year 2000 each of these institutions of higher education has seen a growth in enrollment (Exhibit 22). Exhibit 22: Total Fall Enrollment by Education Provider Fall 2000 and Fall 2009 30,000
26,334
25,000
20,000
5,988
3,266
13,195
8,314
6,743
3,157
5,000
10,725
18,337
10,000
12,760
15,000
0
The University of Texas‐Pan American
The University of Texas at Brownsville
South Texas College
Fall 2000
Texas Southmost College
Texas State Technical College‐Harlingen
Fall 2009
Source: Accountability System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. The total headcount enrollment in these 5 institutions combined has increased by 85% since 2000. The greatest numeric increase in enrollment was experienced by STC followed by UTPA, TSC, UTB and TSTC respectively (Exhibit 23). Exhibit 23: Change in Fall Enrollment by Education Provider Fall 2000 to Fall 2009 Education Provider The University of Texas‐Pan American The University of Texas at Brownsville South Texas College Texas Southmost College Texas State Technical College‐Harlingen Total Rio Grande Valley Fall 2000 Fall 2009 12,760 3,157 10,725 8,314 3,266 18,337 6,743 26,334 13,195 5,988 38,222 70,597 Numeric Change 2000‐09 5,577 3,586 15,609 4,881 2,722 32,375 Percent Change 2000‐09 44% 114% 146% 59% 83% 85% Source: Accountability System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 21 The number of graduates, from 4 of the 5 postsecondary education providers in the Rio Grande Valley, has been increasing steadily (Exhibit 24). However, there was a 19% decrease in graduates at TSTC between FY 2000 and FY 2009. Exhibit 24: Total Graduates by Education Provider FY 2000 and FY 2009 3,500
3,000
473
587
1,135
593
500
819
1,208
1,000
626
1,500
1,780
2,000
2,256
3,468
2,500
0
The University of Texas‐Pan American
The University of Texas at Brownsville
South Texas College‐McAllen
FY 2000
Texas Southmost Texas State College‐Brownsville Technical College‐
Harlingen
FY 2009
Source: Accountability System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. The total number of graduates from the 5 institutions of higher education has grown by 94% since 2000. The greatest numeric increase was experienced by UTPA followed by STC, UTB and TSC (Exhibit 25). Exhibit 25: Change in Number of Graduates by Education Provider FY 2000 to FY 2009 Numeric Change 2000‐09 1,780
3,468 1,688 626
1,208 582 819
2,256 1,437 593
1,135 542 587
473 ‐114 4,405
8,540 4,135 Source: Accountability System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Education Provider The University of Texas‐Pan American The University of Texas at Brownsville South Texas College‐McAllen Texas Southmost College‐Brownsville Texas State Technical College‐Harlingen Total Rio Grande Valley FY 2000 FY 2009 Percent Change 2000‐09 95% 93% 175% 91% ‐19% 94% 22 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
E. Summary and Conclusions In this chapter population, employment, income and poverty characteristics of the Rio Grande Valley were analyzed. The educational profile which included educational attainment status, high school and postsecondary data was also examined. Some key findings drawn from these analyses are as follows: 
The current population of the Rio Grande Valley is 1.25 million and is expected to grow by more than 600,000 people to reach 1.89 million in the next 20 years. 
Most of the population growth will occur in Hidalgo County followed by Cameron County. These two counties will account for 95% of the growth. Starr and Willacy counties will see very little growth in the next two decades. 
The unemployment rate of RGV is currently in double digits due to the recession. Before 2009, the unemployment rate, although higher than the U.S. and Texas unemployment rates, has been in single digits since 2000. 
The three industries with the highest employment are Health Care, Educational Services and Trade. Heath Care accounts for 24% of the employment, Educational Services account for 18% and Trade accounts for 16%. Employment in all other industries is below 10%. It is projected that the growth in these top three industries will continue to soar in the coming years. 
Occupations with the highest growth are in the areas of personal and home care, education, food services, health care, and sales. 
The percentage of people living in poverty in the RGV (34%) is more than double than in the state of Texas and U.S. The per capita income ($13,154) is almost half that of Texas and less than half of U.S. 
A major contributor to unemployment and high poverty is the vast difference in the levels of educational attainment among the adult population. Only 60% of the RGV population (25 years and older) has a high school diploma or higher degree as compared to 79% in Texas and 85% in the U.S.; and only 15% of the RGV population (25 years and older) has a bachelor’s degree or higher in comparison to 25% in Texas and 27% in the U.S. 
In the last five years public school enrollment has grown by 9%, with all counties showing an increase in enrollment except Willacy County. Enrollment in public high schools has grown by 15% in the same period. 
The percentage of students graduating from public high schools in the RGV as a whole has increased by 12% since 2005 but when looking at individual counties, Willacy County is the only county showing a decline (‐7%) in the percentage of students graduating from high school. 
Just as in local public schools, enrollment is growing at local postsecondary educational institutions. 
There are five institutions of higher education in the RGV. They are The University of Texas‐Pan American (UTPA), The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB), South Texas College (STC), Texas Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 23 Southmost College (TSC) and Texas State Technical College (TSTC). From Fall 2000 to Fall 2009 there has been an 85% increase in combined headcount enrollment at these colleges/universities. 
The greatest numeric increase in enrollment was experienced by STC followed by UTPA, TSC, UTB, and TSTC respectively. 
Number of graduates from these five institutions of higher education has gone up by 94% between 2000 and 2009 with all but one institution showing positive growth during this time period. TSTC had a decline of 19% in the number of graduates since 2000. 
The greatest numeric increase in the number of graduates between FY 2000 and FY 2009 was experienced by UTPA followed by STC, UTB and TSC respectively. In conclusion, the Rio Grande Valley is a growing region with many challenges in terms of high unemployment rates, high poverty, low income levels and low educational attainment. Although enrollment at both public schools and institutions of higher education is growing steadily it is not keeping pace with the educational attainment levels of the state or the nation. A few years ago the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) started the P‐16 initiative in the state. All school districts and higher education institutions of the RGV are actively involved in this initiative which is designed to improve curriculum alignment, course redesign, college readiness, and graduation rates as part of the state’s focus on closing the gaps in educational attainment. It will take a few more years to see the results of the several partnerships forged among the institutions in this area. Building on the demographic and economic climate of the RGV in this chapter, successive chapters will focus on the educational markets in the region and look at existing academic program offerings and discuss the need for those program offerings which are lacking but greatly needed in this region. 24 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
III. LOCAL HIGHER EDUCATION PROVIDERS This chapter lists all postsecondary education and career training providers in the Rio Grande Valley, followed by a brief description of each of the major postsecondary provides. Then, this chapter presents data on graduates from each of the major postsecondary providers, and then an in‐depth look at program offerings and enrollment trends by program areas at UTPA. A. Postsecondary Education Providers in the Rio Grande Valley There are five major postsecondary education providers in the Rio Grande Valley. They are: 




The University of Texas‐Pan American in Edinburg The University of Texas at Brownsville South Texas College in McAllen Texas Southmost College in Brownsville Texas State Technical College in Harlingen In addition to these postsecondary institutions there are several licensed career schools and colleges in both Hidalgo and Cameron counties. These schools provide training from truck driving to welding to medical assistant instruction. All such schools registered with the Texas Workforce Commission are listed below. Schools in Hidalgo County
 Action Career Training II ‐ Alamo  Career Heights Centers of Education ‐ Edinburg  Imaging Skills Institute ‐ Pharr  Kaplan College ‐ McAllen  LHCT Training Center ‐ Alamo  McAllen Careers Institute ‐ McAllen  The New Start School ‐ McAllen  RGV Careers Institute for Higher Learning ‐ Pharr  South Texas Nursing Academy ‐ Pharr  South Texas School of Bartending ‐ Weslaco  South Texas Training Center ‐ Pharr Schools in Cameron County  Allied Skills Training Center ‐ Brownsville  Border Tech School ‐ Brownsville  Career Centers of Texas ‐ Brownsville  DATS/Rio Grande Valley ‐ Harlingen  Inter‐Tech Technical School ‐ Brownsville  La Familia Nurse Aide School ‐ Brownsville  South Texas Training Center ‐ San Benito 









South Texas Vocational Technical Institute ‐ McAllen South Texas Vocational Technical Institute ‐ Weslaco Southern Careers Institute‐South Texas, Incorporated ‐ Pharr Southwest School of Business & Technical Careers‐South Texas ‐ McAllen St. Michael’s School Of Nursing And Technology ‐ Weslaco Texas School of Bartenders ‐ Pharr Valley Grande Institute for Academic Studies ‐ Weslaco South Texas Vocational Technical Institute ‐ Brownsville Southern Careers Institute, Inc. ‐ Harlingen Southern Careers Institute, Inc. ‐ Brownsville
Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 25 B. Description of Major Postsecondary Providers Exhibit 26 shows the location of each of the following postsecondary education providers which is then followed by a brief description on each. 




The University of Texas‐Pan American in Edinburg The University of Texas at Brownsville South Texas College in McAllen Texas Southmost College in Brownsville Texas State Technical College in Harlingen Exhibit 26: Location of Major Postsecondary Education Providers in the Rio Grande Valley UTPA STC TSTC UTB/TSC The University of Texas‐Pan American 
Mission: The University of Texas‐Pan American (UTPA) serves the higher education needs of a rapidly growing, international, multicultural population in the South Texas Region. The University preserves, transmits and creates knowledge to serve the cultural, civic, and economic advancement of the region and the state. The University provides students advanced instruction in academic programs offered through innovative delivery systems that lead to professional certification, and baccalaureate, master's and doctoral degrees. Through teaching, research, creative activity and public service, UTPA prepares students for lifelong learning and leadership roles in the state, nation and world community. 26 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American

Vision: The University of Texas‐Pan American is the premier learner‐centered research institution in the State of Texas. We actively engage businesses, communities, cultural organizations, educational organizations, health providers and industry to find solutions to civic, economic, environmental and social challenges through inquiry and innovation. 
UTPA is the state’s tenth largest public university. It was established in 1927 and has gone through six name changes and numerous changes in status, affiliation and mission to meet the educational needs of the area. The main campus is located in Edinburg with satellite locations in Starr County and McAllen. 
The Fall 2009 enrollment was 18,337 with 87.7% students of Hispanic origin. 
UTPA offers 57 Bachelor’s, 57 Master’s, 3 Doctoral and 2 Cooperative Doctoral programs. 
UTPA’s Carnegie classification is: Master’s Colleges and Universities – Larger Program. 
For more information on UTPA visit their website at: www.utpa.edu The University of Texas at Brownsville/Texas Southmost College As UTB and TSC exist in partnership with each other, they are being discussed together in this section. 
The mission of The University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College (UTB/TSC) Partnership is to provide accessible, affordable, postsecondary education of high quality, to conduct research which expands knowledge, and to present programs of workforce training and continuing education, public service, and cultural value. The partnership combines the strengths of the community college and those of a university by increasing student access and eliminating inter‐institutional barriers while fulfilling the distinctive responsibilities of each type of institution. 
UTB/TSC was founded in 1926 and in 1991 was established as an autonomous university named The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB). Concurrently, the Legislature passed legislation permitting UTB and TSC to enter into a partnership that provides a seamless transition for students as they pursue degrees at the one‐ and two‐year, four‐year and graduate levels. 
The Fall 2009 enrollment for UTB was 6,743 with 86.1% Hispanic students, and that for TSC was 13,195 with 92.8% Hispanic students. 
UTB/TSC offers 130 undergraduate programs (certificate, associate’s, bachelor’s) and 23 graduate programs (master’s and doctoral). 
UTB’s Carnegie classification is: Master’s Colleges and Universities – Medium Programs, and TSC’s Carnegie Classification is: Associate’s – Public Rural‐Serving Large. 
For more information on UTB/TSC visit their website at: www.utbtsc.edu Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 27 South Texas College 
Mission: South Texas College is a world‐class comprehensive institution of higher learning providing premier educational and workforce programs and services in response to the needs of the region. 
South Texas College was founded in 1993, by Texas Senate Bill 251 to serve Hidalgo and Starr Counties. It is the only community college in Texas to be established by the Texas Legislature. The main campus is located in McAllen, with four satellite campuses: two in McAllen and one each in Weslaco and Starr County. 
The Fall 2009 enrollment was 26,334 with 93.2% students of Hispanic origin. 
STC offers 42 Certificate, 53 Associate’s and 2 Bachelor’s programs. 
STC’s Carnegie classification is: Associate’s – Public Urban‐Serving Single Campus. 
For more information on STC visit their website at: www.southtexascollege.edu Texas State Technical College 
Mission: Texas State Technical College Harlingen is an independently accredited institution offering affordable educational opportunities in a residential setting. The College promotes access to higher education through open admissions to the institution, as well as basic skills studies that equip students to succeed in college courses. Located in a culturally diverse area of the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, the College is certified as a Hispanic‐Serving Institution. 
Texas State Technical College (TSTC) was established in 1965 as the James Connally Technical Institute (JCTI) of Texas A&M University to meet the state’s evolving workforce needs. This College was located in Central Texas at the former James Connally Air Force Base in Waco. At the time, Governor John Connally predicted that it would be “the most sophisticated technical‐
vocational institute in the country.” In 1967, JCTI expanded to include a South Texas campus in Harlingen. In 1969, the Colleges separated from Texas A&M University and became an independent state system, with the name Texas State Technical Institute (TSTI). In 1991 TSTI was renamed Texas State Technical College. 
The Fall 2009 enrollment was 5,988 with 82.3% students of Hispanic origin. 
TSTC offers training in over 40 technical careers. 
TSTC’s Carnegie classification is: Associate’s – Public Rural‐Serving Large. 
For more information on TSTC visit their website at: www.harlingen.tstc.edu 28 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
C. Degrees Awarded by Local Education Providers This section focuses on the degrees/certificates awarded by the five major local postsecondary education providers. This data will give a clear picture of the number of graduates being produced each year and the field of their specialization. It will later help contribute in identifying gaps in the demand for jobs in the RGV that are not being met by the graduates from local postsecondary institutions. It will also help in identifying programs that should be enhanced or developed (either individually or in partnership with other institutions of higher education) to meet the needs of the area. Over 7,700 degrees and certificates were awarded by the five major postsecondary education providers in the RGV in FY 20008. Exhibit 27 provides a breakdown of level of degree by education provider. Exhibit 27: Breakdown of Awards by Level for Education Providers in the Rio Grande Valley – FY 2008 Degree Level
Certificate
Associate's
Bachelor's
Master's
Doctoral
Total
UTPA
2,420
654
24
3,098
UTB
2
1
900
149
1,052
STC
518
1,441
39
1,998
TSC
263
850
1,113
TSTC
153
316
469
Grand Total
936
2,608
3,359
803
24
7,730
%
12.1%
33.7%
43.5%
10.4%
0.3%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX.  The largest number of degrees/certificates was awarded at the Bachelor’s level (43.5%), followed by Associate’s (33.7%), Certificates (12.1%), Master’s (10.4%) and Doctoral (0.3%).  In FY 2008, The University of Texas‐Pan American awarded the most degrees followed by STC, TSC, UTB and TSTC respectively.  The areas of study with over 100 Bachelor’s degrees awarded by UTPA and UTB combined were Interdisciplinary Studies (491), Biology/Biological Sciences (230), Business Administration and Management (204), English Language and Literature (201), Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration (180), Psychology (151), Spanish Language and Literature (137), and Accounting (106).  In the area of registered nurses, a high demand occupation, only 95 Bachelor’s degrees were awarded by UTPA and UTB combined.  The top three study areas producing graduates with Master’s degrees awarded by UTPA and UTB combined were Educational Leadership and Administration (122), Counselor Education (97) and Business Administration and Management (78).  The top three study areas producing Associate’s graduates at STC, TSC and TSTC were General Studies (580), Interdisciplinary Studies (339), and Business/Commerce (212).  The only area awarding over 100 Certificates among STC, TSC and TSTC combined was Licensed Practical Vocational Nurse Training (158). The following pages provide a breakdown of degrees by program area and CIP code for each of the five major postsecondary education providers in the Rio Grande Valley. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 29 The University of Texas‐Pan American UTPA awarded 3,098 degrees in FY 2007‐08. These included 2,420 Bachelor’s degrees in 55 programs,
654 Master’s degrees in 53 programs and 24 Doctoral degrees in educational leadership and business
doctoral programs.
Exhibit 28: Summary of Programs and Awards by Level The University of Texas‐Pan American – FY 2008 Degree Level Bachelor's Master's Doctoral Total Programs* 55 53 2+2** 119 Awards 2,420 654 24 3,098 % of Total 78% 21% 1% 100% * The number of programs is as of FY 2008. ** In FY 2008 UTPA offered 2 doctoral programs and 2 cooperative doctoral programs. Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibits 29 to 31 present the number of degrees awarded by level and by program. These tables are sorted to show the programs awarding the highest to lowest number of degrees in FY 2007‐08. 
The area of study with the largest number of Bachelor’s degrees awarded in FY 2008 was Interdisciplinary Studies with 305 degrees. Interdisciplinary Studies encompasses several teacher training programs. 
Other areas of study with over 100 graduates with Bachelor’s degrees in FY 2008 were Biology/Biological Sciences (177), English Language and Literature (167), Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration (142), Business Administration and Management (129), Spanish Language and Literature (112) and Psychology (109). 
In addition to the demand for teachers in this region, registered nurses are another high demand occupation. UTPA awarded 68 Bachelor’s degrees in this area. 
The area of study with the largest number of Master’s degrees awarded in FY 2008 was Educational Leadership and Administration with 107 degrees. Other areas with over 50 Master’s degrees awarded were Counselor Education/School Counseling (78) and Business Administration and Management (60).

UTPA awarded 24 doctoral degrees in FY 2008, 17 in International Business and 7 in Educational Leadership and Administration. A 3rd doctoral program (in Rehabilitative Counseling) began in FY 2009. 
UTPA does not get credit for the students who graduate from the 2 cooperative programs (Pharmacy in cooperation with UT Austin, and Spanish in cooperation with the University of Houston). The Pharmacy coop program at UTPA began in 2001; so far 30 students have graduated from this program. The coop program in Spanish began in FY 2009 and will be graduating students in the next few years.
30 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 29: Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded by Program The University of Texas‐Pan American – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Biology/Biological Sciences, General
English Language & Literature, General
Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration
Business Administration & Management
Spanish Language & Literature Psychology, General Journalism Finance, General Accounting Audiology/Audiologist & Speech‐Language
Marketing/Marketing Management, General
Rehabilitation Science, General Nursing ‐ Registered Nurse Training (RN)
Mechanical Engineering Social Work Fine/Studio Arts, General Fitness & Sports International Business/Trade/Commerce
Electrical, Electronics & Communication
History, General Political Science & Government, General
Communication Studies/Speech Communication
Social Sciences, General General Studies Physician Assistant Sociology Mathematics, General Management Information Systems, General
Computer Science Drama & Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General
Industrial Engineering Music, General Dietetics/Dietitian (RD) Anthropology Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Tech
Chemistry, General Philosophy Economics, General Health Studies Dance, General Interamerican Studies Hispanic‐American, Puerto Rican, & Mexican
Physics, General French Language & Literature Total CIP Code
30999901
26010100
23010100
43010300
52020100
16090500
42010100
09040100
52080100
52030100
51020400
52140100
51239910
51160100
14190100
44070100
50070200
31050110
52110100
14100100
54010100
45100100
09010100
45010100
24010200
51091200
45110100
27010100
52120100
11070100
50050100
14350100
50090100
51310100
45020100
51100500
40050100
38010100
45060100
51000001
50030100
05010201
05020300
40080100
16090100
Awards 305 177 167 142 129 112 109 95 77 73 73 71 71 68 62 60 59 55 50 39 38 38 35 34 31 30 29 24 23 21 19 17 16 12 11 11 10 8 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 2,420 % of Total
12.6%
7.3%
6.9%
5.9%
5.3%
4.6%
4.5%
3.9%
3.2%
3.0%
3.0%
2.9%
2.9%
2.8%
2.6%
2.5%
2.4%
2.3%
2.1%
1.6%
1.6%
1.6%
1.4%
1.4%
1.3%
1.2%
1.2%
1.0%
1.0%
0.9%
0.8%
0.7%
0.7%
0.5%
0.5%
0.5%
0.4%
0.3%
0.2%
0.2%
0.1%
0.1%
0.1%
0.1%
0.04%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 31 Exhibit 30: Master’s Degrees Awarded by Program The University of Texas‐Pan American – FY 2008 Curriculum Area Educational Leadership & Administration
Counselor Education/School Counseling Business Administration & Management
Social Work Audiology/Audiologist & Speech‐Language
Bilingual & Multilingual Education
Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling
Spanish Language & Literature Occupational Therapy/Therapist
Fitness & Sports Electrical, Electronics & Communication
Special Education & Teaching, General
Educational Diagnostician Reading Teacher Education Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration
Family Practice Nurse/Nurse Practitioner
Accounting English Language & Literature, General
Information Science/Studies Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Computer Science Mathematics, General Counseling Psychology Mechanical Engineering Sociology Fine/Studio Arts, General Communication Studies/Speech Communication
Secondary Education & Teaching
Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language
Biology/Biological Sciences, General
Early Childhood Education & Teaching
Education/Teaching of the Gifted & Talented
Public Administration Elementary Education & Teaching
Manufacturing Engineering Music, General Clinical Psychology Engineering Management (Texas)
Chemistry, General History, General Mathematics Teacher Education
Experimental Psychology Drama & Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General
Total CIP Code 13040100
13110100
52020100
44070100
51020400
13020100
51231000
16090500
51230600
31050110
14100100
13100100
13100101
13131500
43010300
51160500
52030100
23010100
11040100
30999901
11070100
27010100
42060100
14190100
45110100
50070200
09010100
13120500
13140100
26010100
13121000
13100400
44040100
13120200
14360100
50090100
42020100
14999901
40050100
54010100
13131100
42080100
50050100
Awards 107 78 60 41 27 24 22 16 16 15 14 13 13 13 13 13 13 12 11 11 10 10 10 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 6 5 5 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 654 % of Total 16.4%
11.9%
9.2%
6.3%
4.1%
3.7%
3.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.3%
2.1%
2.0%
2.0%
2.0%
2.0%
2.0%
2.0%
1.8%
1.7%
1.7%
1.5%
1.5%
1.5%
1.2%
1.2%
1.2%
1.1%
1.1%
1.1%
1.1%
0.9%
0.8%
0.8%
0.6%
0.6%
0.6%
0.5%
0.3%
0.3%
0.3%
0.2%
0.2%
0.2%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 32 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 31: Doctoral Degrees Awarded by Program The University of Texas‐Pan American – FY 2008 Curriculum Area International Business/Trade/Commerce Educational Leadership & Administration Total CIP Code 52110100 13040100 Awards 17 7 24 % of Total 70.8% 29.2% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 33 The University of Texas at Brownsville UTB awarded 1,052 degrees in FY 2007‐08. These included 1 Associate’s degree, 2 graduate level
Certificates, 900 Bachelor’s degrees and 149 Master’s degrees (Exhibit 32).
Exhibit 32: Summary of Programs and Awards by Level The University of Texas at Brownsville – FY 2008 Degree Level Associate’s Certificate – Graduate Level Bachelor's Master's Total Awards 1 2 900 149 1,052 % of Total 0.1% 0.2% 85.6% 14.2% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibits 33 to 36 show the number of degrees awarded by level and by program. These tables are sorted to show the programs awarding the highest to lowest number of degrees in FY 2008. 
The area of study with the largest number of Bachelor’s degrees awarded was Interdisciplinary Studies with 186 degrees. Interdisciplinary Studies encompasses several teacher training programs. 
Other areas of study with over 50 graduates with Bachelor’s degrees were Business Administration and Management (75), Biology/Biological Sciences (53), and Applied Arts and Sciences (53). 
In addition to the demand for teachers in this region, registered nurses are another high demand occupation. UTB awarded 27 Bachelor’s degrees in this area. 
The area of study with the largest number of Master’s degrees awarded was Educational/Instructional Media Design with 24 degrees. Other areas with over 10 Master’s degrees awarded were Counselor Education/School Counseling (19), Business Administration and Management (18), Educational Leadership and Administration (15), Curriculum and Instruction (14), and Public Administration (12).
Exhibit 33: Associate’s Degrees Awarded by Program The University of Texas at Brownsville – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Computer & Information Sciences, General
Total CIP Code
11010100
Awards
1
1
% of Total 100% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 34 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 34: Graduate Level Certificates Awarded by Program The University of Texas at Brownsville – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Nursing Education Total CIP Code
51169960
Awards
2
2
% of Total 100% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 35: Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded by Program The University of Texas at Brownsville – FY 2008 Curriculum Area Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Business Administration & Management
Biology/Biological Sciences, General
Applied Arts & Sciences Fitness & Sports Psychology, General Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration
English Language & Literature, General
Accounting History, General Corrections Nursing ‐ Registered Nurse Training (RN)
Communication Studies/Speech Communication
Spanish Language & Literature
Sociology Mathematics, General Art/Art Studies, General Finance, General Health Services/Allied Health/Health Sciences
Political Science & Government, General
Marketing/Marketing Management, General
Information Science/Studies Music, General Business/Commerce, General
Computer & Information Sciences, General
Environmental Science Electrical, Electronic & Communication
Chemistry, General Industrial Technology/Technician
International Business/Trade/Commerce
Engineering Physics Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology
Criminal Justice/Safety Studies
Manufacturing Technology/Technician
Total CIP Code 30999901
52020100
26010100
30999940
31050110
42010100
43010300
23010100
52030100
54010100
43010200
51160100
09010100
16090500
45110100
27010100
50070100
52080100
51000000
45100100
52140100
11040100
50090100
52010100
11010100
03010400
15030300
40050100
15061200
52110100
14120100
15080500
43010400
15061300
Awards 186 75 53 53 48 42 38 34 33 32 30 27 26 25 24 19 17 17 16 14 14 13 12 11 9 7 6 5 4 3 2 2 2 1 900 % of Total 20.7% 8.3% 5.9% 5.9% 5.3% 4.7% 4.2% 3.8% 3.7% 3.6% 3.3% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.1% 1.9% 1.9% 1.8% 1.6% 1.6% 1.4% 1.3% 1.2% 1.0% 0.8% 0.7% 0.6% 0.4% 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 35 Exhibit 36: Master’s Degrees Awarded by Program The University of Texas at Brownsville – FY 2008 Curriculum Area Educational/Instructional Media Design Counselor Education/School Counseling Business Administration & Management Educational Leadership & Administration Curriculum & Instruction Public Administration Special Education & Teaching, General Interdisciplinary Studies, General Physics, General Public Health/Community Nurse/Nursing (post‐RN) Bilingual & Multilingual Education Spanish Language & Literature Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language English Language & Literature, General Mathematics, General Early Childhood Education & Teaching Music Teacher Education Biology/Biological Sciences, General Total CIP Code Awards 13050100 24 13110100 19 52020100 18 13040100 15 13030100 14 44040100 12 13100100 9 30999901 7 40080100 7 51161100 7 13020100 5 16090500 3 13140100 2 23010100 2 27010100 2 13121000 1 13131200 1 26010100 1 149 % of Total 16.1% 12.8% 12.1% 10.1% 9.4% 8.1% 6.0% 4.7% 4.7% 4.7% 3.4% 2.0% 1.3% 1.3% 1.3% 0.7% 0.7% 0.7% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 36 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
South Texas College STC awarded 1,998 degrees/certificates in FY 2007‐08. These included 518 Certificates, 1,441
Associate’s degrees and 39 Bachelor’s degrees (Exhibit 37).
Certificates fall under two categories, Tech-Prep and Technical, and Associate’s degrees fall under three
categories, Academic, Tech-Prep and Technical.
Exhibit 37: Summary of Programs and Awards by Level South Texas College – FY 2008 Degree Level Certificate, Tech‐Prep Certificate, Technical Associate’s, Academic Associate’s, Tech‐Prep Associate’s, Technical Bachelor's Total Awards 186 332 1,067 141 233 39 1,998 % of Total 9% 17% 53% 7% 12% 2% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibits 38 and 39 present data on Certificates awarded and Exhibits 40 to 42 present data on Associate’s degrees awarded. Exhibit 43 presents data on Bachelor’s degrees awarded by STC in FY 2008. All exhibits are sorted to show the programs awarding the highest to lowest number of awards. 
Areas with over 30 Certificates‐Tech Prep awarded to its graduates were Business/Commerce (46) and Child Development (34). 
Areas with over 30 Certificates‐Technical awarded to its graduates were Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (93), Licensed Practical/Vocational Nursing (LPVN) (84), Nurse/Nursing Assistant (45), and Heating, Air Conditioning and Ventilation (31). 
Areas of study with over 100 Associate’s‐Academic degrees awarded in FY 2008 were Interdisciplinary Studies (270), General Studies (213) and Business/Commerce (144). 
Areas of study with over 30 Associate’s‐Tech Prep degrees awarded were Business/Commerce, General (39) and Child Care Provider/Assistant (30). 
The area of study where over 100 Associate’s‐Technical degrees were awarded was Nursing – Registered Nurse (RN) Training with 150 degrees. 
STC awarded 39 Bachelor’s degrees in Business Administration and Management. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 37 Exhibit 38: Certificate‐Tech Prep Awards by Program South Texas College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Business/Commerce, General Child Development Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician
Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology
Computer & Information Sciences, General
Tool & Die Technology/Technician
Computer Technology/Computer Systems Tech
Computer Engineering Technology/Technician
Medical Insurance Coding Specialist
Child Care Provider/Assistant Total CIP Code
52010100
19070600
47060500
47060400
11010100
48050700
15120200
15120100
51071300
19070900
Awards 46 34 25 21 20 12 11 10 5 2 186 % of Total
24.7%
18.3%
13.4%
11.3%
10.8%
6.5%
5.9%
5.4%
2.7%
1.1%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 39: Certificate‐Technical Awards by Program South Texas College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Emergency Medical Technology/Technician
Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training
Nurse/Nursing Assistant/Aide Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation
Drafting & Design Technology/Technician
Administrative Assistant & Secretarial
Medical/Clinical Assistant Electrical & Power Transmission Installation
Culinary Arts/Chef Training Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary
Health Information/Medical Records Technician
Pharmacy Technician/Assistant Medical Transcription/Transcriptionist
Total CIP Code
51090400
51161300
51161400
47020100
15130100
52040100
51080100
46030100
12050300
22030100
51070700
51080500
51070800
Awards 93 84 45 31 20 14 10 9 7 6 6 4 3 332 % of Total
28.0%
25.3%
13.6%
9.3%
6.0%
4.2%
3.0%
2.7%
2.1%
1.8%
1.8%
1.2%
0.9%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 38 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 40: Associate’s‐Academic Degrees Awarded by Program South Texas College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Interdisciplinary Studies, General General Studies Business/Commerce, General Criminal Justice/Safety Studies Social Sciences, General Biology/Biological Sciences, General
Engineering, General Foreign Language & Literature, General
Mathematics, General Chemistry, General Health & Physical Education, General
Computer & Information Sciences, General
Computer Science
Fine/Studio Arts, General English Language & Literature, General
History, General Political Science & Government, General
Philosophy Music, General Total CIP Code
30999901
24010200
52010100
43010400
45010100
26010100
14010100
16010100
27010100
40050100
31050100
11010100
11070100
50070200
23010100
54010100
45100100
38010100
50090100
Awards 270 213 144 95 91 70 43 32 20 20 18 11 10 10 8 7 3 1 1 1,067 % of Total
25.3%
20.0%
13.5%
8.9%
8.5%
6.6%
4.0%
3.0%
1.9%
1.9%
1.7%
1.0%
0.9%
0.9%
0.7%
0.7%
0.3%
0.1%
0.1%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 41: Associate’s‐Tech‐Prep Degrees Awarded by Program South Texas College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Business/Commerce, General Child Care Provider/Assistant Computer & Information Sciences, General
Computer Engineering Technology/Technical
Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology
Health Information/Medical Records Technical
Tool & Die Technology/Technician
Administrative Assistant & Secretarial
Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician
Total CIP Code
52010100
19070900
11010100
15120100
47060400
51070700
48050700
52040100
47060500
Awards 39 30 28 18 8 8 4 4 2 141 % of Total
27.7%
21.3%
19.9%
12.8%
5.7%
5.7%
2.8%
2.8%
1.4%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 39 Exhibit 42: Associate’s‐Technical Degrees Awarded by Program The South Texas College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Nursing ‐ Registered Nurse (RN) Training Drafting & Design Technology/Technician
Occupational Therapist Assistant Culinary Arts/Chef Training Legal Assistant/Paralegal Medical/Clinical Assistant Radiologic Technology/Science Physical Therapist Assistant Social Work Pharmacy Technician/Assistant Emergency Medical Technology/Technician
Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation
Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary
Total CIP Code
51160100
15130100
51080300
12050300
22030200
51080100
51091100
51080600
44070100
51080500
51090400
47020100
22030100
Awards 150 14 13 9 8 8 7 6 5 5 4 3 1 233 % of Total
64.4%
6.0%
5.6%
3.9%
3.4%
3.4%
3.0%
2.6%
2.1%
2.1%
1.7%
1.3%
0.4%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 43: Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded by Program The South Texas College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Business Administration & Management
Total CIP Code
52020100
Awards 39 39 % of Total
100%
100%
Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 40 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Texas Southmost College TSC awarded 1,113 degrees/certificates in FY 2007‐08. These included 263 Certificates and 850 Associate’s degrees (Exhibit 44). Certificates fall under two categories, Tech‐Prep and Technical, and Associate’s degrees fall under three categories, Academic, Tech‐Prep and Technical. Exhibit 44: Summary of Programs and Awards by Level Texas Southmost College – FY 2008 Degree Level Certificate, Tech‐Prep Certificate, Technical Associate’s, Academic Associate’s, Tech‐Prep Associate’s, Technical Total Awards
20 243 612 153 85 1,113 % of Total 2% 22% 55% 14% 8% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibits 45 and 46 present data on Certificates awarded by TSC. Exhibits 47 to 49 present data on Associate’s degrees awarded. All exhibits are sorted to show programs awarding the highest to lowest number of awards. 
The only area where Certificates‐Tech Prep were awarded was Drafting and Design Technology (20). 
Areas with over 30 Certificates‐Technical awarded to its graduates were in Licensed Practical /Vocational Nurse (LPVN) Training (74) and Building/Construction Site Management (36). 
The area of study with over 100 Associate’s‐Academic degrees awarded in FY 2008 was General Studies with 367 degrees. 
The highest number of Associate’s‐Tech Prep degrees were awarded in Criminal Justice/Safety Studies (30). 
The highest number of Associate’s‐Technical degrees were awarded in Licensed Practical /Vocational Nurse (LPVN) Training (74). Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 41 Exhibit 45: Certificate‐Tech Prep Awards by Program Texas Southmost College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Drafting & Design Technology/Technician
Total CIP Code
15130100
Awards
20
20
% of Total 100% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 46: Certificate‐Technical Awards by Program Texas Southmost College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training
Building/Construction Site Management
Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Tech
Autobody/Collision & Repair Technology
Heating, Air Conditioning & Ventilation
General Office Occupations & Clerical
Child Care Provider/Assistant Medical Administrative/Executive Assistant
Accounting Technology/Technician
Computer & Information Sciences, General
International Marketing Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary
Total CIP Code
51161300
46041200
47060400
47060300
47020100
52040800
19070900
51071600
52030200
11010100
52140300
22030100
Awards
74
36
24
22
20
20
19
12
7
4
3
2
243
% of Total 30.5% 14.8% 9.9% 9.1% 8.2% 8.2% 7.8% 4.9% 2.9% 1.6% 1.2% 0.8% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 47: Associate’s‐Academic Degrees Awarded by Program Texas Southmost College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area General Studies Social Work Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Business/Commerce, General
Industrial Technology/Technician
Spanish Language & Literature
Art/Art Studies, General Music, General Total CIP Code
24010200
44070100
30999901
52010100
15061200
16090500
50070100
50090100
Awards
367
76
69
68
18
12
1
1
612
% of Total 60.0% 12.4% 11.3% 11.1% 2.9% 2.0% 0.2% 0.2% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 42 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 48: Associate’s‐Tech‐Prep Degrees Awarded by Program Texas Southmost College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Criminal Justice/Safety Studies
Child Care Provider/Assistant Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist
Radiologic Technology/Science Accounting Drafting & Design Technology/Technician
General Office Occupations & Clerical
Diagnostic Medical Sonography/Sonographer
Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician
International Marketing Computer & Information Sciences, General
Emergency Medical Technology/Technician
Industrial Technology/Technician
Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary
Total CIP Code
43010400
19070900
51090800
51091100
52030100
15130100
52040800
51091000
51100400
52140300
11010100
51090400
15061200
22030100
Awards
30 23 16 13 12 11 10 8 7 7 6 6 2 2 153 % of Total 19.6% 15.0% 10.5% 8.5% 7.8% 7.2% 6.5% 5.2% 4.6% 4.6% 3.9% 3.9% 1.3% 1.3% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 49: Associate’s‐Technical Degrees Awarded by Program Texas Southmost College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Nursing ‐ Registered Nurse Training (RN)
Legal Assistant/Paralegal Medical Administrative/Executive Assistant
Total CIP Code
51160100
22030200
51071600
Awards
74
6
5
85
% of Total 87.1% 7.1% 5.9% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 43 Texas State Technical College TSTC awarded 469 degrees/certificates in FY 2007‐08. These included 153 Certificates and 316 Associate’s degrees (Exhibit 50). Certificates and Associate’s degrees awarded by TSTC fall under two categories, Tech‐Prep and Technical. Exhibit 50: Summary of Programs and Awards by Level Texas State Technical College – FY 2008 Degree Level
Certificate, Tech‐Prep Certificate, Technical Associate’s, Tech‐Prep Associate’s, Technical Total
Awards
57 96 210 106 469 % of Total 12% 20% 45% 23% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibits 51 and 52 present data on Certificates awarded, and Exhibits 53 and 54 present data on Associate’s degrees awarded by TSTC. All exhibits are sorted to show the programs awarding the highest to lowest number of awards. 
The areas of study with over 10 Certificates‐Tech Prep awarded were Machine Tool Technology/Machinist (12) and Medical/Clinical Assistant (10). 
The area of study with over 30 Certificates‐Technical awarded to its graduates was Welding Technology/Welder (32). 
The areas of study with over 20 Associate’s‐Tech Prep degrees awarded in FY 2008 were Commercial and Advertising Art (27), Drafting and Design Technology (24), and Health Information/Medical Records Technician (21). 
The areas of study with over 20 Associate’s‐Technical degrees awarded were Teacher Assistant/Aide (39) and Dental Hygiene/Hygienist (27). 44 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 51: Certificate‐Tech Prep Awarded by Program Texas State Technical College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Machine Tool Technology/Machinist
Medical/Clinical Assistant Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation Autobody/Collision & Repair Technology
Telecommunications Technology/Technician
Computer Technology/Computer Systems Tech.
Administrative Assistant & Secretarial
Construction Engineering Technology/Technician
Institutional Food Workers Commercial & Advertising Art
Total CIP Code
48050100
51080100
47020100
47060300
15030500
15120200
52040100
15100100
12050800
50040200
Awards
% of Total 12 21.1% 10 17.5% 9 15.8% 7 12.3% 4 7.0% 4 7.0% 4 7.0% 3 5.3% 2 3.5% 2 3.5% 57 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 52: Certificate‐Technical Awarded by Program Texas State Technical College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Welding Technology/Welder Dental Assisting/Assistant Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technologist
Medical Transcription/Transcriptionist
Airframe Mechanics & Aircraft Maintenance
Accounting Technology/Technician Dental Laboratory Technology/Technician
Teacher Assistant/Aide Total CIP Code
48050800
51060100
47060400
51070800
47060700
52030200
51060300
13150100
Awards
32 21 18 14 4 4 2 1 96 % of Total 33.3% 21.9% 18.8% 14.6% 4.2% 4.2% 2.1% 1.0% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 45 Exhibit 53: Associate’s‐Tech Prep Degrees Awarded by Program Texas State Technical College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Commercial & Advertising Art
Drafting & Design Technology/Technician
Health Information/Medical Records Technician
Biomedical Technology/Technician
Information Technology Institutional Food Workers Chemical Technology/Technician
Construction Engineering Technology/Tech.
Computer Technology/Computer Systems Tech.
Administrative Assistant & Secretarial
Electromechanical Technology
Medical/Clinical Assistant Telecommunications Technology/Technician
Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary
Computer Programming/Programmer, General
Autobody/Collision & Repair Technology
Agricultural Business Technology
Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation
Business/Office Automation/Technology
Total CIP Code
50040200
15130100
51070700
15040100
11010300
12050800
41030100
15100100
15120200
52040100
15040300
51080100
15030500
22030100
11020100
47060300
01010600
47020100
52040700
Awards
27
24
21
19
14
12
12
11
11
11
9
9
8
6
5
4
3
3
1
210
% of Total 12.9% 11.4% 10.0% 9.0% 6.7% 5.7% 5.7% 5.2% 5.2% 5.2% 4.3% 4.3% 3.8% 2.9% 2.4% 1.9% 1.4% 1.4% 0.5% 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Exhibit 54: Associate’s‐Technical Degrees Awarded by Program Texas State Technical College – FY 2008 Curriculum Area
Teacher Assistant/Aide Dental Hygiene/Hygienist Surgical Technology/Technologist
Computer Systems Networking & Telecomm.
Dental Laboratory Technology/Technician
Airframe Mechanics & Aircraft Maintenance
Emergency Medical Technology/Technician
Welding Technology/Welder Total CIP Code
13150100
51060200
51090900
11090100
51060300
47060700
51090400
48050800
Awards % of Total 39 36.8% 27 25.5% 15 14.2% 9 8.5% 6 5.7% 5 4.7% 3 2.8% 2 1.9% 106 100% Source: PREP System, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 46 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
D. Programs Offered at UTPA UTPA offers 57 programs at the Bachelor’s level, 57 at the Master’s level, 3 Doctoral programs and 2 Cooperative Doctoral programs. The program listing by level is presented in Exhibit 55. Exhibit 55: List of Programs Offered at UTPA Program Name ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES INTERAMERICAN STUDIES MEXICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE COMMUNICATION COMMUNICATIONS‐COMM STUDIES COMMUNICATIONS‐JOURNALISM COMPUTER SCIENCE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCS, GENERAL
BILINGUAL/BICULTURAL EDUCATION EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP SPECIAL EDUCATION EDUCATIONAL DIAGNOSTICIAN GIFTED & TALENTED EDUCATION COUNSELING & GUIDANCE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION SECONDARY EDUCATION EARLY CHILDHOOD MATH‐MATHEMATICS TEACHING READING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE COMPUTER ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING MECHANICAL ENGINEERING MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT FRENCH STUDIES SPANISH ENGLISH CREATIVE WRITING GENERAL STUDIES BIOLOGY MATHEMATICS MATH‐MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES APPLIED ARTS & SCIENCES‐LIBERAL ARTS KINESIOLOGY PHILOSOPHY CHEMISTRY PHYSICS CIP Code
03.0104.0000
05.0102.0100
05.0203.0020
09.0101.0020
09.0101.0021
09.0401.0020
11.0101.0011
11.0401.0001
11.0701.0001
13.0201.0010
13.0401.0012
13.0401.0013
13.1001.0000
13.1001.0110
13.1004.0010
13.1101.0010
13.1202.0010
13.1205.0010
13.1210.0025
13.1311.0010
13.1315.0010
13.1401.0020
14.0901.0000
14.1001.0011
14.1901.0011
14.3501.0026
14.3601.0016
14.9999.0100
16.0901.0000
16.0905.0020
23.0101.0020
23.0501.0000
24.0102.0020
26.0101.0010
27.0101.0010
27.0101.0020
30.9999.0100
30.9999.4021
31.0501.1010
38.0101.0020
40.0501.0010
40.0801.0010
Bachelor's
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
Master's Doctoral*
M M M M M D
M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M (Continued on next page) Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 47 Exhibit 55: List of Programs Offered at UTPA (Continued) Program Name PSYCHOLOGY PSYCHOLOGY‐CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PSYCHOLOGY‐EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
CRIMINAL JUSTICE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION SOCIAL WORK SOCIAL STUDIES COMPOSITE ANTHROPOLOGY ECONOMICS POLITICAL SCIENCE SOCIOLOGY DANCE THEATRE COMMUNICATIONS‐THEATRE ART MUSIC PERFORMANCE HEALTH COMMUNICATION SCIENCES & DISORDERS PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES REHAB SERVICES‐ADDICTIONS STUDIES NURSING (REGISTERED NURSE TRAINING)
NURSING‐PRACTITIONER NURSING‐CLINICAL SPECIALIST OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY REHABILITATION COUNSELING REHABILITATION SERVICES REHABILITATION SERVICES‐DEAF STUDIES DIETETICS APPLIED ARTS & SCS‐APPLIED BUSINESS TECH.
MANAGEMENT BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNTING FINANCE LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS BUSINESS ADMIN‐INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS MARKETING HISTORY CIP Code
42.0101.0010
42.0201.0010
42.0601.0010
42.0801.0010
43.0103.0011
44.0401.0010
44.0701.0010
45.0101.0020
45.0201.0010
45.0601.0011
45.1001.0010
45.1101.0010
50.0301.0001
50.0501.0030
50.0501.0031
50.0702.0020
50.0901.0021
50.0903.0001
51.0000.0125
51.0204.0012
51.0912.0036
51.1005.0021
51.1501.0002
51.1601.0040
51.1605.0035
51.1616.0015
51.2306.0003
51.2310.0002
51.2399.1022
51.2399.1023
51.3101.0036
52.0201.0020
52.0201.0025
52.0201.0030
52.0301.0010
52.0801.0011
52.1101.0000
52.1101.0030
52.1101.0040
52.1201.0011
52.1401.0010
54.0101.0035
Bachelor's
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B 2
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
Master's Doctoral*
M M M M 1 M M M M M M M M M M M M D
M M D
M 1
In Cooperation with UT Brownsville – Degree Granting Role Being Phased Out *UTPA also offers a Cooperative Pharmacy Program in affiliation with UT Austin and a Cooperative PhD program in Spanish in collaboration with the University of Houston Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 2
48 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
E. Enrollment Trends at UTPA UTPA was established in 1927 as a Junior College with 196 students. Since its inception 83 years ago UTPA has undergone several changes before it became a 4 year institution of higher education. In Fall 2009 the enrollment at UTPA was 18,337, well over its “Closing the Gaps” target of 18,000 for Fall 2010. UTPA enrolls 93% of its students from the Rio Grande Valley (82% from Hidalgo County and 11% from Cameron, Starr and Willacy counties combined). A little over 3% come from the remaining 250 counties of Texas, less than 1% are from other states of U.S., 2% are from Mexico and less than 1% from other foreign countries. Exhibit 56 depicts the enrollment trends in the last 10 years and shows the share of students from the 4 Valley counties, Texas, U.S., Mexico and other foreign countries. Exhibit 56: Total Enrollment at UTPA by Residence Status Fall Residence Total Total Enrollment Cameron Hidalgo Starr Willacy RGV TX U.S. Mexico Foreign 2000 12,760 6% 82% 5% 1% 94% 2.8% 0.6% 1.5% 0.8% 2001 13,640 7% 81% 4% 1% 93% 3.5% 0.6% 1.5% 0.9% 2002 14,392 6% 81% 5% 1% 94% 3.3% 0.7% 1.4% 0.9% 2003 15,915 6% 82% 5% 1% 94% 2.9% 0.7% 1.4% 0.8% 2004 17,030 7% 82% 4% 1% 94% 2.9% 0.6% 1.6% 0.7% 2005 17,048 7% 81% 4% 1% 93% 3.1% 0.5% 1.9% 0.6% 2006 17,337 7% 81% 4% 1% 93% 3.0% 0.6% 2.7% 0.5% 2007 17,435 6% 81% 4% 1% 93% 3.2% 0.6% 2.5% 0.4% 2008 17,534 6% 82% 4% 1% 93% 2.9% 0.5% 2.5% 0.9% 2009 18,337 7% 82% 4% 1% 93% 3.4% 0.5% 2.0% 0.9% Note: The total percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding. Students who had not reported their residency status were less than 1% and are not shown on this table. Source: CBM001 Fall 2000 to Fall 2009, OIRE, UTPA, Edinburg, TX. Exhibits 57 to 60 show a breakdown of enrollment by major area of study for students in the Bachelor’s, Post‐baccalaureate, Master’s and Doctoral Programs from 2004 to 2008. 
The top five areas of study with the highest enrollment in the bachelor’s programs are Interdisciplinary Studies, Nursing, Criminal Justice, Psychology, and Business Administration and Management. The area that has shown the highest growth between 2004 and 2008 is Rehabilitation Science (268%). 
Declared majors in bachelor’s programs have seen an increase of 11% between 2004 and 2008. This exceeds the increase in undergraduate students due to successful efforts to have students declare majors earlier in their careers. 
Enrollment in post‐baccalaureate programs has seen a decrease of 11% in enrollment over the same period largely due to the decrease in number of students in alternative certification programs. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 49 
The top three areas of study with the highest enrollment in the Master’s programs are Educational Leadership and Administration, Counselor Education/School Counseling, and Business Administration and Management. The Master’s program in Occupational Therapy has seen the highest growth between 2004 and 2008 (843%). 
In Fall of 2008, the doctoral program in Educational Leadership and Administration had 63 students and the International Business program had 49 students. 50 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 57: Declared Majors by Curriculum Area ‐ UG Programs at UTPA (2004‐08) Curriculum Area
Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Nursing ‐ Registered Nurse Training (RN)
Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Admin*
Psychology, General
Business Admin, & Management
Pre‐Medicine/Pre‐Medical Studies
Biology/Biological Sciences, General
Mechanical Engineering
Accounting
Fitness and Sports
Int Business/Trade/Commerce
Rehabilitation Science, General
English Language and Literature, General
Fine/Studio Arts, General
Audiology/Audiologist & Speech‐Language
Marketing/Marketing Mgmt, General
Finance, General
Journalism
Computer Science
Social Work
Music, General
Pre‐Pharmacy Studies
Spanish Language and Literature
Electrical, Electronics & Comm. Engineering
Computer Engineering, General
Mathematics, General
Political Science and Government, General
History, General
Mgmt Information Systems, General
Social Sciences, General
Dietetics/ Dietitian (RD)
Drama & Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General
Communication Studies/Speech Comm.
Pre‐Law Studies
General Studies
Pre‐Dentistry Studies
Clinical Laboratory Sc/Medical Technology
Physician Assistant
Industrial Engineering
Sociology
Chemistry, General
Anthropology
Economics, General
Dance, General
Philosophy
Health Studies
Physics, General
Interamerican Studies
French Language and Literature
Applied Arts & Sciences
Occupational Therapy/Therapist**
Hisp‐American, Puerto Rican, & Mex. Studies
Science Teacher Education/General Science
Social Studies Teacher Education
Engineering, General
Speech and Rhetorical Studies
Illustration
TOTAL Undergraduate
CIP Code
30999901
51160100
43010300
42010100
52020100
51110200
26010100
14190100
52030100
31050110
52110100
51239910
23010100
50070200
51020400
52140100
52080100
09040100
11070100
44070100
50090100
51110300
16090500
14100100
14090100
27010100
45100100
54010100
52120100
45010100
51310100
50050100
09010100
22000100
24010200
51110100
51100500
51091200
14350100
45110100
40050100
45020100
45060100
50030100
38010100
51000001
40080100
05010201
16090100
30999940
51230600
05020300
13131600
13131800
14010100
23100100
50041000
Declared Majors (Fall Semester)
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
1,670
1,687
1,576
1,505
1,452
835
834
988
969
1,056
772
762
792
788
792
532
531
591
635
719
638
668
696
730
693
484
535
597
603
688
493
514
575
643
578
374
392
472
494
535
470
453
476
497
512
562
618
479
436
475
509
467
463
459
467
123
194
264
368
453
337
410
452
463
432
274
286
291
361
383
295
381
400
386
368
275
279
319
354
350
263
301
321
295
311
234
245
279
315
298
327
313
330
296
242
206
210
197
243
232
210
206
211
205
222
222
223
253
221
218
222
233
250
240
214
271
233
256
239
212
105
201
142
170
165
163
176
150
164
177
176
165
180
183
166
144
163
239
223
206
162
161
80
94
109
144
142
118
137
149
122
132
129
116
119
135
130
45
73
137
154
122
160
168
152
120
122
46
54
78
115
120
115
112
119
103
113
67
67
86
85
101
147
98
52
84
97
131
125
124
91
93
88
109
110
75
84
83
87
72
65
72
37
42
47
51
50
39
26
41
45
49
39
36
41
33
28
39
44
40
31
27
26
36
37
22
21
30
32
28
11
7
8
11
7
6
6
7
5
6
5
4
85
49
20
6
2
3
2
4
3
29
41
3
7
5
6
3
1
110
111
72
1
2
12,935 13,324 13,889 14,063 14,360
* Formerly Corrections
** Program being phased out
Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 04‐08 Change
#
%
‐218
‐13%
221
26%
20
3%
187
35%
55
9%
204
42%
85
17%
161
43%
42
9%
‐87
‐15%
‐42
‐8%
330
268%
95
28%
109
40%
73
25%
75
27%
48
18%
64
27%
‐85
‐26%
26
13%
12
6%
‐4
‐2%
‐8
‐4%
‐59
‐22%
201
34
24%
15
10%
‐17
‐9%
‐78
‐33%
62
78%
14
12%
1
1%
77
171%
‐38
‐24%
74
161%
‐2
‐2%
34
51%
‐50
‐34%
‐38
‐29%
‐4
‐5%
‐11
‐13%
13
35%
10
26%
41
7
21%
6
19%
6
27%
‐4
‐36%
‐3
‐83
‐43%
‐98%
1,425
11%
51 Exhibit 58: Declared Majors by Curriculum Area ‐ Post‐Bacc Programs at UTPA (2004‐08) Curriculum Area
Physician Assistant
Nursing ‐ Registered Nurse Training (RN)
Biology/Biological Sciences, General
Mechanical Engineering
Audiology/Audiologist & Speech‐Language
Rehabilitation Science, General
Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Tech.
Chemistry, General
English Language and Literature, General
Fitness and Sports
Psychology, General
Fine/Studio Arts, General
Mathematics, General
Accounting
Spanish Language and Literature
Health Studies
Pre‐Medicine/Pre‐Medical Studies
Pre‐Pharmacy Studies
Finance, General
History, General
Journalism
Philosophy
Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Admin.
Sociology
Dance, General
Dietetics/ Dietitian (RD)
Business Administration & Mgmt.
Management Information Systems, General
Hisp‐American, Puerto Rican, & Mex. Studies
Communication Studies/Speech Comm.
Computer Science
Computer Engineering, General
Electrical, Electronics & Communication
French Language and Literature
Social Work
Social Sciences, General
Economics, General
Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General
International Business/Trade/Commerce
Speech and Rhetorical Studies
General Studies
Physics, General
Corrections
Political Science and Government, General
Music, General
Pre‐Dentistry Studies
Occupational Therapy/Therapist
Marketing/Marketing Management, General
TOTAL Post‐Baccalaureate
CIP Code
51091200
51160100
26010100
14190100
51020400
51239910
30999901
51100500
40050100
23010100
31050110
42010100
50070200
27010100
52030100
16090500
51000001
51110200
51110300
52080100
54010100
09040100
38010100
43010300
45110100
50030100
51310100
52020100
52120100
05020300
09010100
11070100
14090100
14100100
16090100
44070100
45010100
45060100
50050100
52110100
23100100
24010200
40080100
43010200
45100100
50090100
51110100
51230600
52140100
Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. 2004
Declared Majors (Fall Semester)
2005
2006
2007
2008
42
51
65
75
48
29
36
33
33
37
9
14
12
8
11
3
1
6
7
9
10
11
18
19
9
2
2
3
4
9
32
13
25
44
8
7
6
5
6
8
3
1
3
3
7
11
7
5
5
6
17
5
2
9
6
4
14
14
9
6
4
5
4
4
6
8
6
2
5
5
9
11
5
9
4
3
4
7
7
3
2
1
2
3
2
4
5
2
3
1
1
4
3
3
7
2
6
3
3
5
2
2
4
3
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
2
4
2
1
1
1
4
2
2
4
3
3
2
2
4
3
4
2
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
4
3
4
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
5
1
2
4
4
1
2
3
1
4
251
223
258
307
224
04‐08 Change
#
%
6
14%
8
28%
2
22%
6
200%
‐1
‐10%
7
350%
‐24
‐75%
1
14%
4
133%
‐5
‐45%
‐11
‐65%
2
50%
2
50%
‐3
‐38%
‐5
‐56%
0
0%
1
50%
1
50%
2
200%
‐4
‐57%
‐2
‐40%
1
100%
0
0%
1
100%
‐2
‐2
1
‐50%
‐50%
100%
‐2
‐67%
‐1
‐50%
‐1
‐1
‐1
‐50%
‐50%
‐50%
‐2
‐67%
‐27
‐11% 52 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 59: Declared Majors by Curriculum Area ‐ Master’s Programs at UTPA (2004‐08) Curriculum Area
CIP Code
Educational Leadership and Administration
Counselor Education/School Counseling Business Administration & Mgmt.
Social Work
Physician Assistant
Family Practice Nurse/Nurse Practitioner
Public Administration
Occupational Therapy/Therapist
English Language & Literature, General
Bilingual and Multilingual Education
Interdisciplinary Studies, General
Vocational Rehab Counseling
Accounting
Counseling Psychology
Spanish Language and Literature
History, General
Mechanical Engineering
Clinical Psychology
Creative Writing
Mathematics, General
Audiology/Audiologist and Speech‐Language
Electrical, Electronics and Communication
Communication Studies/Speech Comm.
Reading Teacher Education
Biology/Biological Sciences, General
Information Science/Studies
Elementary Education and Teaching
Chemistry, General
Computer Science
Fitness and Sports
Manufacturing Engineering
Special Education and Teaching, General
Early Childhood Education and Teaching
Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Admin.
Fine/Studio Arts, General
Music, General
Educational Diagnostician
Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Lang.
Secondary Education and Teaching
Sociology
Engineering Management (Texas)
Education/Teaching of the Gifted & Talented
Mathematics Teacher Education
Experimental Psychology
Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General
Educational, Instructional, and Curriculum
Physical Education Teaching and Coaching
Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Tech.
TOTAL Master's
13040100
13110100
52020100
44070100
51091200
51160500
44040100
51230600
23010100
13020100
30999901
51231000
52030100
42060100
16090500
54010100
14190100
42020100
23050100
27010100
51020400
14100100
09010100
13131500
26010100
11040100
13120200
40050100
11070100
31050110
14360100
13100100
13121000
43010300
50070200
50090100
13100101
13140100
13120500
45110100
14999901
13100400
13131100
42080100
50050100
13040400
13131400
51100500
Declared Majors (Fall Semester)
2005
2006
2007
2008
283
319
310
230
226
275
286
321
260
225
150
143
211
241
183
41
68
83
85
72
71
65
70
58
63
68
43
37
43
43
66
7
34
68
71
66
36
42
59
68
64
50
69
60
64
61
27
27
39
41
53
56
49
43
50
53
22
37
46
47
52
44
48
45
49
51
33
45
43
48
46
23
29
32
31
46
20
20
27
44
45
44
40
52
50
45
19
34
14
30
36
45
34
111
84
52
49
34
30
23
27
32
33
28
32
30
28
32
45
49
40
48
32
34
38
38
28
32
19
24
28
26
29
31
24
22
20
27
16
21
27
37
37
32
42
25
37
23
35
31
24
31
28
33
19
23
13
16
14
18
22
11
11
10
17
19
25
28
27
31
19
14
15
14
26
19
7
10
11
19
19
65
61
44
28
18
11
12
13
15
18
31
33
33
17
16
27
27
33
23
15
10
14
7
10
15
12
8
16
10
6
7
8
3
1
2
6
11
8
4
5
6
4
4
3
2
1
1
1,879
2,003
2,158
2,125
2,086
2004
Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX.
04‐08 Change
#
%
‐57
‐20%
‐50
‐18%
33
22%
31
76%
3
23
59
28
11
26
‐3
30
7
13
23
25
1
5%
53%
843%
78%
22%
96%
‐5%
136%
16%
39%
100%
125%
2%
20
‐77
3
4
‐13
‐2
10
‐4
143%
‐69%
10%
14%
‐29%
‐6%
53%
‐13%
‐12
‐13
‐8
9
8
‐6
5
12
‐47
7
‐15
‐12
‐32%
‐35%
‐26%
69%
73%
‐24%
36%
171%
‐72%
64%
‐48%
‐44%
1
‐8
14%
‐50%
‐5
‐45%
0%
0%
207
11% Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 53 Exhibit 60: Declared Majors by Curriculum Area ‐ Doctoral Programs at UTPA (2004‐08) Curriculum Area
Educational Leadership and Administration
International Business/Trade/Commerce
TOTAL Doctoral
CIP Code
13040100
52110100
All
Source: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin, TX. Declared Majors (Fall Semester)
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
52
56
51
60
63
48
47
52
63
49
100
103
103
123
112
04‐08 Change
#
%
11
21%
1
2%
12
12% 54 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
IV. PROGRAM AREAS AT UTPA AND LOCAL DEMAND IN THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY This chapter builds upon the employment and occupation data presented in the “Market Analysis” section of this report. First, annual average job openings in the Rio Grande Valley by preferred education are presented. This is followed by data on occupations, annual average job openings and preferred education. Lastly, a cross‐walk is developed between program majors at UTPA and associated demand by occupational sector to give a clear picture of the occupational demand that is not being met by UTPA’s educational programs. A. Occupational Demand by Preferred Education According to Texas Workforce Commission’s 2006‐2016 Occupational Projections, over 17,500 job openings will be available in the Rio Grande Valley every year. Twenty percent, or 3,485, of these jobs will require a Bachelor’s degree or higher. Exhibit 61 shows a breakdown of these job openings by preferred education. Exhibit 61: Annual Average Job Openings by Preferred Education in the Rio Grande Valley ‐ 2006‐2016 Preferred Education Doctoral degree First professional degree Master's degree Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience Bachelor's degree Associate’s degree Postsecondary vocational training Long‐term on‐the‐job training Moderate‐term on‐the‐job training Short‐term on‐the‐job training Work experience in a related occupation Total # of Annual Avg. Job Openings 35 180 360 540 2,370 700 835 820 2,295 8,150 1,275 17,560 % of Total 0.2% 1.0% 2.1% 3.1% 13.5% 4.0% 4.8% 4.7% 13.1% 46.4% 7.3% 100% Source: 2006‐2016 Occupational Projections, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. A further breakdown for the following “Preferred Education” categories: Doctoral, First Professional, Master’s, Bachelor’s or Higher, and Bachelor’s is provided in Exhibits 62 to 66. Each of these exhibits shows the annual average job openings in the Rio Grande Valley by occupation and preferred education requirement. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 55 Exhibit 62 shows that, on average, 35 annual job openings exist for professionals such as Psychologists, Medical Scientists and Nursing Teachers but no doctoral degrees are being provided at UTPA to address these needs. Exhibit 62: Occupations Requiring Doctoral Degree by Annual Average Job Openings in the Rio Grande Valley ‐ 2006‐2016 SOC Code 19‐3031 19‐1042 25‐1072 Occupational Title Preferred Education Clinical, Counseling, & School Psychologists
Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists
Nursing Instructors & Teachers, Postsecondary
Total Doctoral degree Doctoral degree Doctoral degree Doctoral degree Total Annual Avg Job Openings 20
10
5
35
Source: 2006‐2016 Occupational Projections, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. Exhibit 63 shows that, on average, there are a total of 180 openings for Lawyers, Pharmacists, Doctors, Surgeons and Chiropractors in the Rio Grande Valley. Again, none of these professionals are being trained in the Rio Grande Valley. UTPA has a cooperative Pharmacy program in collaboration with UT Austin but it is not the same as having a dedicated program in the RGV for this purpose. Exhibit 63: Occupations Requiring First Professional Degree by Annual Average Job Openings in the Rio Grande Valley ‐ 2006‐2016 SOC Code 23‐1011 29‐1051 29‐1062 29‐1069 29‐1061 29‐1067 29‐1011 29‐1063 29‐1064 29‐1065 Occupational Title Lawyers Pharmacists Family & General Practitioners
Physicians & Surgeons, all Other
Anesthesiologists Surgeons Chiropractors Internists, General Obstetricians & Gynecologists Pediatricians, General Total Preferred Education First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree First professional degree Total Annual Avg Job Openings 50
40
25
20
15
10
5
5
5
5
180
Source: 2006‐2016 Occupational Projections, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. Exhibits 64 to 66 show the annual average job openings for occupations requiring Master’s degrees, Bachelor’s or higher, and Bachelor’s degrees. Some of the demand for these occupations is being met by the educational programs at UTPA and some is not being met. 56 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 64: Occupations Requiring Master’s Degree by Annual Average Job Openings in the Rio Grande Valley ‐ 2006‐2016 SOC Code 21‐1012 21‐2011 29‐1123 25‐9031 29‐1127 25‐4021 21‐1019 25‐1071 29‐1122 21‐1023 29‐1071 21‐1014 21‐1015 25‐1011 25‐1022 25‐1121 25‐1123 Occupational Title Educational, Vocational, & School Counselors
Clergy Physical Therapists Instructional Coordinators Speech‐Language Pathologists Librarians Counselors, all Other Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary
Occupational Therapists Mental Health & Substance Abuse Social Workers
Physician Assistants Mental Health Counselors Rehabilitation Counselors Business Teachers, Postsecondary
Mathematical Science Teachers, Postsecondary
Art, Drama, & Music Teachers, Postsecondary
English Language & Lit Teachers, Postsecondary
Total Preferred Education Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Master's degree Total Annual Avg Job Openings 60
45
40
35
35
30
20
20
20
15
10
5
5
5
5
5
5
360
Source: 2006‐2016 Occupational Projections, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. Exhibit 65: Occupations Requiring Bachelor’s Degree or Higher Plus Work Experience by Annual Average Job Openings in the Rio Grande Valley ‐ 2006‐2016 SOC Code 11‐1021 11‐9032 11‐9111 11‐3011 13‐1111 25‐2032 11‐1011 11‐3031 13‐1073 11‐2022 25‐1194 11‐9011 11‐9031 11‐2021 11‐3021 27‐2012 Occupational Title Preferred Education General & Operations Managers
Education Admin., Elementary & Secondary School
Medical & Health Services Managers
Administrative Services Managers
Management Analysts Vocational Education Teachers, Secondary School
Chief Executives Financial Managers Training & Development Specialists
Sales Managers Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary
Farm, Ranch, & Other Agricultural Managers
Education Admin., Preschool & Child Care Program
Marketing Managers Computer & Information Systems Managers
Producers & Directors Total Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Bach or higher + wk exp Total Annual Avg Job Openings 165
80
50
30
30
30
25
25
25
20
20
15
10
5
5
5
540
Source: 2006‐2016 Occupational Projections, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 57 Exhibit 66: Occupations Requiring Bachelor’s Degree by Annual Average Job Openings in the Rio Grande Valley ‐ 2006‐2016 SOC Code 25‐2021 25‐2031 25‐2022 25‐3099 13‐2011 13‐1199 25‐2041 25‐2012 11‐9021 21‐1021 15‐1051 21‐1022 25‐2042 11‐9151 15‐1071 25‐2043 41‐3031 11‐9141 13‐1071 13‐2072 15‐1081 17‐2051 25‐1191 29‐2011 41‐3021 13‐1079 15‐1031 21‐1091 27‐3031 13‐1051 13‐1072 13‐2021 13‐2051 15‐1032 19‐3021 21‐1011 27‐1024 13‐2041 13‐2052 15‐1021 15‐1061 17‐2141 19‐4021 Total Annual Avg Job Openings Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Ed.
Bachelor's degree 610
Secondary School Teachers, Ex. Special & Voc. Ed.
Bachelor's degree 390
Middle School Teachers, Except Special & Voc. Ed.
Bachelor's degree 300
Teachers & Instructors, all Other
Bachelor's degree 115
Accountants & Auditors Bachelor's degree 100
Business Operations Specialists, all Other
Bachelor's degree 70
Special Ed. Teachers, Pre, Kinder, & Elementary
Bachelor's degree 65
Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education
Bachelor's degree 55
Construction Managers Bachelor's degree 45
Child, Family, & School Social Workers
Bachelor's degree 45
Computer Systems Analysts Bachelor's degree 40
Medical & Public Health Social Workers
Bachelor's degree 35
Special Education Teachers, Middle School
Bachelor's degree 30
Social & Community Service Managers
Bachelor's degree 25
Network & Computer Systems Administrators
Bachelor's degree 25
Special Education Teachers, Secondary School
Bachelor's degree 25
Securities, Commodities, & Fin. Svs. Sales Agents
Bachelor's degree 25
Property, Real Estate, & Community Assocn. Mgrs.
Bachelor's degree 20
Employment, Recruitment, & Placement Specialists
Bachelor's degree 20
Loan Officers Bachelor's degree 20
Network Systems & Data Comm. Analysts
Bachelor's degree 20
Civil Engineers Bachelor's degree 20
Graduate Teaching Assistants Bachelor's degree 20
Medical & Clinical Laboratory Technologists
Bachelor's degree 20
Insurance Sales Agents Bachelor's degree 20
HR, Training, & Labor Relation Specialists, all Other
Bachelor's degree 15
Computer Software Engineers, Applications
Bachelor's degree 15
Health Educators Bachelor's degree 15
Public Relations Specialists Bachelor's degree 15
Cost Estimators Bachelor's degree 10
Comp, Benefits, & Job Analysis Specialists
Bachelor's degree 10
Appraisers & Assessors of Real Estate
Bachelor's degree 10
Financial Analysts Bachelor's degree 10
Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software
Bachelor's degree 10
Market Research Analysts Bachelor's degree 10
Substance Abuse & Beh. Disorder Counselors
Bachelor's degree 10
Graphic Designers Bachelor's degree 10
Credit Analysts
Bachelor's degree 5
Personal Financial Advisors Bachelor's degree 5
Computer Programmers Bachelor's degree 5
Database Administrators Bachelor's degree 5
Mechanical Engineers Bachelor's degree 5
Biological Technicians Bachelor's degree 5
Source: 2006‐2016 Occupational Projections, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. (Continued on next page) Occupational Title Preferred Education 58 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 66: Occupations Requiring Bachelor’s Degree by Annual Average Job Openings in the Rio Grande Valley ‐ 2006‐2016 (CONTINUED) SOC Code 21‐1029 21‐1092 21‐1099 25‐3011 27‐1014 29‐1031 29‐1199 29‐9099 Occupational Title Social Workers, all Other Probation Offcrs. & Correction Trtmnt. Specialists
Community & Social Service Specialists, all Other
Adult Literacy, Remedial Ed., & GED Teachers Multi‐Media Artists & Animators
Dietitians & Nutritionists Hlth. Diagnosing & Treating Practitioner, all Other
Healthcare Practitioner & Tech Wkrs., all Other
Total Preferred Education Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Total Annual Avg Job Openings 5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
2,370
Source: 2006‐2016 Occupational Projections, Texas Workforce Commission, Austin, TX. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 59 B. Crosswalk of Program Areas and Associated Demand for Occupations This section presents a crosswalk between program areas at UTPA and associated professions for which occupational demand exists in the Rio Grande Valley. Only those program areas for which occupational demand exists are shown in this section. This crosswalk is followed by an analysis which will give a clear picture of what educational needs are being met by UTPA, which need more attention, and which programs need to be looked into for development in the future. Exhibit 67 depicts the following: program area, level of education available at UTPA, graduates in FY 2009 from UTPA, associated profession/s, preferred education and average annual job openings. Programs that are not offered at UTPA but for which a demand exists for associated occupations in that area are shown in RED font. Analysis of this data is presented in the next section after Exhibit 67. Exhibit 67: Crosswalk of Program Areas at UTPA and Associated Demand for Occupations Program N am e
UG
G
UTPA Doct Graduate s FY 2 0 0 9
Agri c ul ture & Ag. Sci enc es
Pre fe rre d Education
A vg. A nnual Job O pe nings
Ba c h. or hi gher
15
Publ i c Rel a ti ons Spec i a l i s ts
Ba c hel or's
15
A ssociate d Profe ssion/s
0
Fa rm, Ra nc h, & O ther Agri c ul tura l M a na gers
Communi c a ti on, Journa l i s m & Rel a ted Progra ms
Communi c a ti on M
Communi c a ti ons ‐Comm. Studi es B
33
Communi c a ti ons ‐Journa l i s m B
89
Computer & Informa ti on Sc i enc es & Support Servi c es
Computer & Informa ti on Sc s ., Genera l B
Informa ti on Tec hnol ogy Computer Sc i enc e B
M
6
M
35
Computer Sys tems Ana l ys ts
Ba c hel or's
40
Network & Computer Sys tems Admi ni s tra tors
Ba c hel or's
25
20
Network Sys tems & Da ta Comm. Ana l ys ts
Ba c hel or's
Computer P rogra mmers
Ba c hel or's
5
Da ta ba s e Admi ni s tra tors
Ba c hel or's
5
Ba c hel or's
610
Ba c h. or hi gher
80
Educ a ti on
El ementa ry Educ a ti on M
7
El ementa ry Sc hool Tea c hers , Exc ept Spec i a l Ed.
Educ a ti ona l Admi ni s tra ti on M
97
Ed. Admi ni s tra tors , El ementa ry & Sec . Sc hool
Ins truc ti ona l Coordi na tors
Educ a ti ona l Lea ders hi p Spec i a l Educ a ti on Couns el i ng & Gui da nc e D
13
M
M
M a th‐M a thema ti c s Tea c hi ng M
Bi l i ngua l /Bi cul tura l M
102
Ed. Admi ni s tra tors , P res c hool & Chi l d Ca re Progra m
M a s ter's
35
Ba c h. or hi gher
10
Spec i a l Ed. Tea c hers , Pres c hool , K i nder, & El em.
Ba c hel or's
65
Spec i a l Educa ti on Tea c hers , M i ddl e Sc hool
Ba c hel or's
30
Spec i a l Educa ti on Tea c hers , Sec onda ry Sc hool
Ba c hel or's
25
Educ a ti ona l , Voc a ti ona l , & Sc hool Couns el ors
M a s ter's
60
Couns el ors , a l l O ther
M a s ter's
20
M a thema ti c a l Sc i enc e Tea c hers , Pos ts ec onda ry
M a s ter's
5
34
Sec onda ry Educ a ti on M
5
Ea rl y Chi l dhood M
11
Rea di ng M
13
Educ a ti ona l Di a gnos ti c i a n M
4
Gi fted Educ a ti on M
4
Engl i s h a s a Sec ond La ngua ge
M
3
Note: RED Font depicts that the program is not offered at UTPA but a demand exists for associated occupations in that area. 60 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 67: Crosswalk of Program Areas at UTPA and Associated Demand for Occupations (Continued) Program N am e
UG
UTPA Doct Graduate s FY 2 0 0 9
G
Engi neeri ng
Computer Engi neeri ng
B
El ec tri c a l Engi neeri ng B
M
33
M ec ha ni c a l Engi neeri ng B
M
70
M a nufa c turi ng Engi neeri ng B
M
15
M
2
Engi neeri ng M a na gement
3
Pre fe rre d Education
A vg. A nnual Job O pe nings
Computer Softwa re Engi neers , Appl i c a ti ons
Ba c hel or's
15
M ec ha ni c a l Engi neers
Ba c hel or's
5
Ba c hel or's degree
20
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
50
Engl i s h La ngua ge & Li t. Tea c hers , Pos ts ec onda ry
M a s ter's
5
Li bra ri a ns
M a s ter's
30
A ssociate d Profe ssion/s
Ci vi l Engi neers
Lega l Profes s i ons & Studi es
La wyers
Engl i s h La ngua ge & Li tera ture/Letters
Engl i s h B
Crea ti ve W ri ti ng
M
182
M
5
0
Li bra ry Sc i enc e
Bi ol ogi c a l & Bi omedi c a l Sci enc es
Bi ol ogy B
M a thema ti c s & Sta ti s ti c s
M a thema ti c s B
M a th‐M a thema ti c a l Sc i ences M ul ti /Interdi s c i pl i na ry Studi es
Interdi s c i pl i na ry Studi es Appl i ed Arts & Sc i enc es ‐Li bera l Arts B
M
199
M
18
M
392
34
Doc tora l
10
Ba c hel or's
5
Cos t Es ti ma tors
Ba c hel or's
10
Sec onda ry Sc hool Tea c hers , Exc ept Spec i a l & Voc . Ed.
Ba c hel or's
390
M i ddl e Sc hool Tea c hers , Exc ept Spec i a l & Voc. Ed.
Ba c hel or's
300
Tea c hers & Ins truc tors , a l l O ther
Ba c hel or's
115
Ki nderga rten Tea c hers , Exc ept Spec i a l Educ a ti on
Ba c hel or's
55
Voc a ti ona l Educ a ti on Tea c hers , Sec onda ry School
Ba c h. or hi gher
30
Voc a ti ona l Educ a ti on Tea c hers , P os ts ec onda ry
Ba c h. or hi gher
20
Adul t Li tera cy, Remedi a l Ed., & GED Tea c hers
Ba c hel or's
5
Cl ergy
M a s ter's
45
Doc tora l degree
20
Ba c hel or's
5
B
0
Theol ogy & Rel i gi ous Voc a ti ons
P s yc hol ogy
P s yc hol ogy M edi ca l Sc i enti s ts , Exc ept Epi demi ol ogi s ts
Bi ol ogi c a l Tec hni c i a ns
B
146
P s yc hol ogy‐Cl i ni c a l Ps yc hol ogy M
Sc hool Ps yc hol ogy M
3
P s yc hol ogy‐Experi menta l Ps yc hol ogy
M
1
Cl i ni ca l , Couns el i ng, & Sc hool Ps yc hol ogi s ts
10
Sec uri ty & P rotec ti ve Servi c es
Cri mi na l Jus ti c e B
M P ubl i c Admi ni s tra ti on & Soc i a l Servi c e Profes s i ons
P ubl i c Admi ni s tra ti on M
Soc i a l W ork B
M
1
160
Proba ti on O ffc rs . & Correc ti ona l Trtment. Spec i a l i s ts
11
117
Chi l d, Fa mi l y, & Sc hool Soc i a l W orkers
Ba c hel or's
45
M edi ca l & Publ i c Hea l th Soc i a l W orkers
Ba c hel or's
35
Ba c hel or's
25
M enta l Hea l th & Subs ta nce Abus e Soc i a l W orkers
Soc i a l & Communi ty Servi c e M a na gers
Ba c h. or hi gher
15
M enta l Hea l th Couns el ors
Ba c h. or hi gher
5
Communi ty & Soc i a l Servi c e Spec i a l i s ts , a l l O ther
Ba c hel or's
5
Soc i a l W orkers , a l l O ther
Ba c hel or's
5
Cons truc ti on M a na gers
Ba c hel or's
45
0
Cons truc ti on Tra des
Vi s ua l & Performi ng Arts
Da nc e
B
Communi c a ti ons ‐Thea tre B
M
15
M ul ti ‐M edi a Arti s ts & Ani ma tors
Ba c hel or's
5
Art B
M
44
Gra phi c Des i gners
Ba c hel or's
10
Art, Dra ma , & M us i c Tea chers , Pos ts ec onda ry
M a s ter's
5
Ba c h. or hi gher
5
M us i c
B
P erforma nc e
B
4
M
29
Produc ers & Di rec tors
Note: RED Font depicts that the program is not offered at UTPA but a demand exists for associated occupations in that area. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 61 Exhibit 67: Crosswalk of Program Areas at UTPA and Associated Demand for Occupations (Continued) Program N am e
UG
G
UTPA Doct Graduate s FY 2 0 0 9
Hea l th P rofes s i ons & Rel a ted Cl i ni c a l Sc i enc es
Hea l th B
4
Communi c a ti on Sc i enc es & Di s orders B
M
75
P hys i c i a n As s i s ta nt Studi es
B
M
108
Cl i ni c a l La bora tory Sc i ences B
Reha b Servi c es ‐Addi c ti ons Studi es B
12
A ssociate d Profe ssion/s
M edi ca l & Hea l th Servi c es M a na gers
Pre fe rre d Education
A vg. A nnual Job O pe nings
Ba c h. or hi gher
50
Hea l th Spec i a l ti es Tea c hers , P os ts ec onda ry
M a s ter's
20
Hea l th Educ a tors
Ba c hel or's
15
Speec h‐La ngua ge Pa thol ogi s ts
M a s ter's
35
Phys i c i a n As s i s ta nts
M a s ter's
10
M edi ca l & Cl i ni c a l La bora tory Tec hnol ogi s ts
Ba c hel or's
20
Subs ta nc e Abus e & Beh. Di s order Couns el ors
Ba c hel or's
10
83
Regi s tered Nurs es
As s oc i a te's
440
17
Hea l thc a re Pra c ti ti oners & Tec h. W orkers , a l l O ther
Ba c hel or's
5
Hl th. Di a gnos i ng & Trea ti ng Pra c ti ti oners , a l l O ther
Ba c hel or's
5
Nurs i ng Educa ti on Nurs i ng (RN)
B
Nurs i ng‐P ra cti ti oner M
Nurs i ng‐Cl i ni c a l Spec i a l i s t M
O c c upa ti ona l Thera py M
Reha bi l i ta ti on Couns el i ng M
Reha bi l i ta ti on Servi c es B
Reha bi l i ta ti on Servi c es ‐Dea f Studi es B
Di eteti c s B
D
17
21
Nurs i ng Ins truc tors & Tea c hers , Pos ts ec onda ry
Doc tora l
5
O c c upa ti ona l Thera pi s ts
M a s ter's
20
Reha bi l i ta ti on Couns el ors
M a s ter's
5
122
16
Di eti ti a ns & Nutri ti oni s ts
Pha rma c i s ts
Phys i c a l Thera pi s ts
Ba c hel or's
5
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
40
M a s ter's
40
Bus i nes s , M gmt., M ktg., & Rel a ted Support Servi c es
Appl i ed Arts & Sc s .‐Appl i ed Bus . Tec h.
B
M a na gement B
Bus i nes s Admi ni s tra ti on 136
M
48
M a na gement Ana l ys ts
Ba c h. or hi gher
30
Genera l & O pera ti ons M a na gers
Ba c h. or hi gher
165
Bus i nes s O pera ti ons Spec i a l i s ts , a l l O ther
Ba c hel or's
70
Admi ni s tra ti ve Servi c es M a na gers
Ba c h. or hi gher
30
Tra i ni ng & Devel opment Spec i a l i s ts
Ba c h. or hi gher
25
Chi ef Exec uti ves
Ba c h. or hi gher
25
Sa l es M a na gers
Ba c h. or hi gher
20
Ba c hel or's
20
Empl oyment, Rec rui tment, & P l a c ement Spec i a l i s ts
Ac c ounti ng B
Fi na nce B
La ti n Ameri c a n Bus i nes s M
Ba c hel or's
15
Ba c hel or's
10
Bus i nes s Tea c hers , Pos ts ec onda ry
M a s ter's
5
102
Ac c ounta nts & Audi tors
Ba c hel or's
100
110
Fi na nc i a l M a na gers
Ba c h. or hi gher
25
Sec uri ti es , Commodi ti es , & Fi n. Svs . Sa l es Agents
Ba c hel or's
25
Loa n O ffi c ers
Ba c hel or's
20
Ins ura nc e Sa l es Agents
Ba c hel or's
20
Fi na nc i a l Ana l ys ts
Ba c hel or's
10
Credi t Ana l ys ts
Ba c hel or's
5
Pers ona l Fi na nc i a l Advi s ors
Ba c hel or's
5
B
Bus i nes s Admi n.‐Interna ti ona l Bus i nes s
Interna ti ona l Bus i nes s M a na gement
HR, Tra i ni ng, & La bor Rel a ti ons Spec i a l i s ts , a l l O ther
Compens a ti on, Benefi ts , & Job Ana l ys i s Spec i a l i s ts
D
8
B
63
Computer Informa ti on Sys tems B
20
Computer & Informa ti on Sys tems M a na gers
M a rketi ng B
84
M a rket Res ea rc h Ana l ys ts
M a rketi ng M a na gers
Ba c h. or hi gher
5
Ba c hel or's
10
Ba c h. or hi gher
5
Property, Rea l Es ta te, & Communi ty As s oc i a ti on M grs .
Ba c hel or's
20
Appra i s ers & As s es s ors of Rea l Es ta te
Ba c hel or's
10
Note: RED Font depicts that the program is not offered at UTPA but a demand exists for associated occupations in that area. 62 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 67: Crosswalk of Program Areas at UTPA and Associated Demand for Occupations (Continued) Program N am e
UG
G
Denta l , M edi ca l & Veteri na ry Res i denc y P rogra ms
UTPA Doct Graduate s FY 2 0 0 9
0
A ssociate d Profe ssion/s
Pre fe rre d Education
A vg. A nnual Job O pe nings
Fa mi l y & Genera l Pra c ti ti oners
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
25
Phys i c i a ns & Surgeons , a l l O ther
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
20
Anes thes i ol ogi s ts
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
15
Surgeons
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
10
Chi ropra c tors
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
5
Interni s ts , Genera l
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
5
O bs tetri c i a ns & Gynec ol ogi s ts
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
5
Pedi a tri c i a ns , Genera l
Fi rs t profes s i ona l degree
5
Note: RED Font depicts that the program is not offered at UTPA but a demand exists for associated occupations in that area. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 63 C. Analysis of Program Areas for which there is Associated Occupational Demand This analysis highlights the following regarding the program areas depicted in Exhibit 67 above. Although UTPA offers educational programs to prepare its graduates for existing occupations in most areas, it is important to revisit the curriculum for these programs to make sure it aligns with the current occupational requirements by employers in the Rio Grande Valley. 
Agriculture and Agricultural Sciences – UTPA does not have any programs in Agriculture. On average there is a minimal demand for 15 farm, ranch and other agricultural managers each year in the Rio Grande Valley. 
Communication, Journalism and Related Programs – UTPA offers several programs and the limited demand that exists is being met. 
Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services – There is a high demand for this field and UTPA offers several programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels to meet this demand. 
Education – There is a very high demand for teachers in all areas, elementary, middle school, secondary and special education. UTPA offers a wide array of programs at the bachelor’s and master’s level in both Education and Interdisciplinary Studies that prepare graduates to be teachers. UTPA also offers a doctoral degree in Educational Leadership which is also a high demand area. 
Engineering – There is a demand for computer software engineers and UTPA offers a computer engineering program. It is important to revisit the program and curriculum to make sure the curriculum aligns to the current occupational requirements in the area. There is a demand for Civil Engineers and Construction Managers (both requiring a Civil Engineering degree) and UTPA is in the process of starting a Civil Engineering program on their campus very soon. 
Legal Professions and Studies – There is a demand for Lawyers, 50 average openings per year. UTPA only offers Pre‐Law courses. 
English Language and Literature/Letters – Limited demand exists and UTPA offers courses in this area. Even though there isn’t an explicit demand in this field, English Language and Literature provides soft‐skills training (such as written communication or English as a Second Language). 
Library Science – There is an annual average demand for 30 librarians but UTPA does not offer any courses in Library Science. 
Biological and Biomedical Sciences – There is a great demand for training in medical‐related fields which require a degree in Biology and Biomedical Sciences. UTPA offers related programs at both the undergraduate and graduate level, but none at the doctoral level. 
Mathematics and Statistics – Some demand exists in this area and UTPA offers both undergraduate and graduate level degrees in this area to meet the existing demand. 64 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American

Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies – Interdisciplinary Studies prepares students to become teachers. UTPA offers education at both the undergraduate and graduate levels to meet the existing demand for teachers in the Rio Grande Valley. 
Theology and Religious Vocations – There is a demand for Clergy (with an average of 45 job openings each year) but no related programs are offered at UTPA. 
Psychology – There is a demand for Clinical, Counseling and School Psychologists requiring a doctoral degree. UTPA does not offer a doctoral degree in Psychology at this point. 
Security and Protective Services – The undergraduate and graduate programs in Criminal Justice at UTPA are preparing its graduates to fulfill the existing demand for probation officers and correctional treatment specialists. 
Public Administration and Social Service Professions – There is a substantial demand for Social Work graduates and UTPA offers programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels to prepare its students. 
Construction Trades – There is a demand for Construction Managers (with an average of 45 job openings each year) but no programs are offered at UTPA at this time. The Civil Engineering program which will be starting soon at UTPA is expected to fulfill the demand for Construction Managers in the coming years. 
Visual and Performing Arts – Several programs in Visual and Performing Arts are available at UTPA and these cater to the existing demand for occupations in this area. 
Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences – UTPA offers several undergraduate and graduate programs in health professions and related clinical sciences but the demand for Registered Nurses and Nursing Instructors/Postsecondary Teachers is not being met. On average there is a demand for 40 Pharmacists each year in the Rio Grande Valley. UTPA offers a cooperative Pharmacy program in collaboration with UT Austin but this area needs to be looked into, to analyze whether this cooperative arrangement is enough to meet the existing demand. There is a demand for an average of 40 Physical Therapists in this area but UTPA does not offer any courses to prepare such therapists. 
Business, Management, Marketing and Related Support Services – UTPA offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in Business to meet the high demand of occupations that exist in this area. 
Dental, Medical and Veterinary Residency Programs – There is an average annual demand for over 80 medical doctors, with specialization in various fields, which is not being met. UTPA is currently offering pre‐medical and pre‐dental courses only. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 65 D. Summary and Conclusions This chapter provided information on occupations that are in demand in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas and the educational qualifications needed for each of these occupations. A crosswalk between program areas offered at UTPA and demand occupations reveals that the programs offered at UTPA are helping meet the requirements for most of the job openings. However, there are certain program areas which need to be strengthened and still others that need to be developed to meet the local occupational demands. Program areas that are fulfilling the local occupational demand are: 













Biological and biomedical sciences (except medical scientists requiring a doctoral degree) Business, management, marketing and related support services Communication, journalism and related programs Computer and information sciences and support services Education Electrical, mechanical and manufacturing engineering English language and literature Health professions and related clinical sciences (except nursing, medical doctors, pharmacists and physical therapists) Mathematics and statistics Multi/Interdisciplinary studies Psychology (occupations requiring bachelor’s or master’s degree) Public administration and social service professions Security and protective services Visual and performing arts Program areas that need to be strengthened are: 



Civil engineering Construction trades (construction managers) Education (school teachers at all levels) Nursing (RNs) Program areas that need to be looked into are: 








Agriculture and agriculture sciences (agriculture managers) Biological and biomedical sciences (doctoral degree) Clinical psychology (occupations requiring doctoral degree) Legal professions and studies Library Science Medical program Pharmacy Physical therapy Theology and religious vocations 66 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
V. CURRENT AND FUTURE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY One of the best ways to determine the needs of an area is to administer surveys to different population groups, such as, students, community members, employers, employees, etc., and get their feedback. Focus groups can also be very beneficial for getting input in such matters. For this reason, local, regional and national organizations are constantly administering surveys on specific groups and conducting research, to gain in‐depth knowledge about different aspects of interest to the organization/ researcher. Survey results and research studies carried out by such institutions can be very beneficial for someone with limited time and resources. For this report it was decided to rely on secondary sources to get a grasp on the current and future educational needs of the Rio Grande Valley. Several studies and surveys have been conducted in the local area to find out about the educational program needs of students entering or enrolled in higher education, and workforce requirements of local companies. This chapter presents a synthesis of these existing survey results and other published material. A. Highlights from Existing Surveys and Other Published Material Pertinent results from the following surveys, reports and articles are presents in this section: 
UTPA GEAR UP’s Spring 2009 Survey of High School Students 
South Texas College’s 2008 Graduate Follow‐Up Survey 
“Targeting the Future: A Report About the Evolving Labor Market in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley” 
“Industry Sector Analysis for the Lower Rio Grande Valley” 
“Hidalgo County Asset Map 2010” 
“Rio South Texas 2009 Asset Mapping Report” 
“Building Future Talent: Consolidated Results of the Workforce Public Forum” 
“Paperless Medicine: Training the eWorkforce” 
“Benchmarking the Success of Latina and Latino Students in STEM to Achieve National Graduation Goals” 
“Current and Potential Green Jobs in the U.S. Economy” Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 67 Highlights from UTPA GEAR UP’s Spring 2009 Survey of High School Students In Spring 2009 UTPA GEAR UP conducted a survey on 7,027 10th graders from across the RGV who were part of the GEAR UP program. These students represented 27 high schools in Cameron, Hidalgo and Willacy counties. The survey results are included here. When asked, “What is the highest level of education that you expect to obtain?” 


77% of the students who completed the survey expected to obtain a 4‐year college degree or higher after graduating from high school. 19% said that they expected to obtain some college education but less than a 4‐year college degree. Only 2% said that they expected to obtain a high school diploma or less (Exhibit 68). Exhibit 68: Higher Education Aspirations of Spring 2009 High School Students in the UTPA GEAR UP Program High School or Less, 2%
Some College but less than 4‐year degree, 19%
No Response, 2%
4‐year College or Higher, 77%
68 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
When asked, “Do you think you could afford to attend a public 4 year college using financial aid, scholarships, and your family’s resources?” 


74% indicated that they could “definitely” or “probably” afford to attend a public 4‐year college using financial aid, scholarships and their family’s resources. 20% were not sure. 4% said “probably not” or “definitely not” (Exhibit 69). Exhibit 69: Opinion of Spring 2009 High School Students in the UTPA GEAR UP Program Regarding Affordability of 4‐year College Definitely Not, 1%
No Response, 2%
Probably Not, 3%
Not Sure, 20%
Definitely, 31%
Probably, 43%
Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 69 When asked, “The career field you are most likely to pursue?” 

The career fields with more than a 5% response rate were: o Health Sciences (25.1%) o Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security (16.5%) o Technology, Engineering and Math (13.4%) o Education and Training (10%) o Human Services (6.3%) o Architecture and Construction (5.6%) 19.5% of the students selected other fields which included AV Technology and Communication (3.8%), Marketing, Sales and Service (3.6%), Administration and Management (2.8%), Hospitality and Tourism (2.7%), Food and Natural Resources (2.7%), Information and Technology (1.7), Finance (1%), Manufacturing (0.7%), and Transportation, Distribution and Logistics (0.6%) (Exhibit 70). Exhibit 70: Career Field Most Likely to be Pursued by Spring 2009 High School Students in the UTPA GEAR UP Program No Response, 3.6%
Health Sciences, 25.1%
Other, 19.5%
Architecture & Construction, 5.6%
Education & Training, 10.0%
Human Services, 6.3%
Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security, 16.5%
Technology, Engineering & Math, 13.4%
70 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
When asked where they would like to attend college or university. 



34% of the students picked one of the RGV colleges/universities o 23% indicated UTPA o 5% chose STC o 5% picked UTB, and o 1% selected TSTC 28% said “Other Texas College or University”. 15% said “Other U.S. College or University”. 21% said they were “not sure” (Exhibit 71). Exhibit 71: College or University Preferred by Spring 2009 High School Students in the UTPA GEAR UP Program No Response, 2%
STC, 5%
TSTC, 1%
UTB/TSC, 5%
Other U.S. College/Univ., 15%
Not Sure/Don't Know, 21%
Other TX College/Univ., 28%
UTPA, 23%
Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 71 Highlights from South Texas College’s 2008 Graduate Follow‐Up Survey In Summer 2009, South Texas College conducted a Follow‐Up Survey of its 2008 Graduates to gauge their opinions about the education they had received at STC and their current educational/employment status. The survey results are included here. 


56% of the respondents indicated that they were either currently enrolled or had been enrolled at an institution of higher education since graduating from STC. 28% said that they were not enrolled but were planning to enroll in a college or university in the near future. Of the graduates who had indicated that they were either currently enrolled or had been enrolled at a college/university since their graduation from STC in 2008, 48% said that they were enrolled at UTPA, 45% were at STC and 7% were at some other institution of higher education (Exhibit 72 and 73). Exhibit 72: Educational Status of 2008 STC Graduates in Summer 2009 No plans of further education, 16%
Planning to Enroll, 28%
Enrolled in College/Univ. since graduating from STC, 56%
72 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 73: Institution of Enrollment of 2008 STC Graduates Who Went Back to College/University for Further Education by Summer 2009 Enrolled at other college/Univ., 7%
Enrolled at STC, 45%
Enrolled at UTPA, 48%
Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 73 Highlights from “Targeting the Future: A Report About the Evolving Labor Market in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley” Since 1996, Tech Prep of the Rio Grande Valley has assumed responsibility of publishing this labor market information report for the Rio Grande Valley. Based on data analysis and input from regional employers, workforce development boards and economic development agencies, this report identifies the most likely current and emerging‐demand jobs in the RGV. These are also called target occupations. This list of targeted occupations helps to guide education and training providers in setting curriculum development, recruitment and enrollment management priorities. Out of the 55 targeted occupations (Exhibit 74a and 74b) listed in this report, 30 or 55% are directly or indirectly related to the Health Care Industry, and 22 or 40% are directly or indirectly related to the manufacturing industry. Occupations such as Secretaries, Accountants and Auditors, Computer Support Specialists, etc. are common to most industries and have been counted in both the Health Care and Manufacturing sector. Twenty‐four percent or 13 of the 55 targeted occupations require 4 or more years of college education. The list of targeted occupations is broken down by education/training required. Exhibit 74a shows the targeted occupations requiring a 4 years degree or higher and Exhibit 74b shows the targeted occupations requiring less than 4 years of college education. Exhibit 74a: Tech Prep RGV 2009 Targeted Occupations (requiring 4 or more years of college education) Occupation
Counselors—School/Substance Abuse/Behavioral/Mental Health
Accountants & Auditors Architects Computer Systems Analysts Engineers Occupational Therapists Physician Assistants Social Workers Teachers—Various Areas Chemists Computer Programmers Construction Managers & Superintendents
Registered Nurses Education/Training Required*
Master’s degree 4 yrs
4 yrs
4 yrs
4 yrs
4 yrs+ 4 yrs+ 4 yrs
4 yrs
4 yrs (or 2 years in some cases)
4 yrs (or 2 years in some cases)
4 yrs (or 2 years in some cases)
4 yrs (or 2 years in some cases)
* 2 yrs. = Associate’s degree; 4 yrs. = Bachelor’s degree. Health Care Industry (directly related jobs) Manufacturing Industry (directly related jobs) Health & Manufacturing (indirectly related jobs) 74 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 74b: Tech Prep RGV 2009 Targeted Occupations (requiring 2 or less years of college) Occupation
Admin. Support Clerks—Various Types (esp. in Hospitality Ind.)
Automotive Body & Related Repairers Automotive Service Technicians/Mechanics/Related Specialties
Biomedical Engineering Technicians Cardiovascular Technologists & Technicians
Carpenters Chefs & Head Cooks Chemical & Environmental Technicians Computer Support Specialists Construction Cost Estimators Correctional Officers, Jailers Dental Assistants Dental Hygienists Dental Lab Technologists Diagnostic Medical Sonographers Digital Imaging Technicians/Graphic Designers
Drafters Electricians Emergency Medical Technicians & Paramedics
Engineering Technicians (Various Areas—also see Mechatronics)
Heating, Air Conditioning/Refrigeration Mechanics & Installers
Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses Machinists Mechatronics Technicians (also see Engineering Technicians)
Medical Assistants Medical Records & Health Information Technicians
Medical Transcriptionists Medical/Clinical Laboratory Technicians Occupational Therapy Assistants Paralegals & Legal Assistants Pharmacy Technicians Physical Therapy Assistants Plumbers, Pipefitters, & Steamers Police/Sheriff Patrol Officers Radiologic Technologists/Technicians Respiratory Therapists Secretaries: Executive/Administrative/Legal/Medical
Surgical Technologists Teacher Assistants Tool & Die Makers Veterinary Technologists & Technicians Welders/Cutters/Solderers/Brazers Education/Training Required*
HS
2 yrs or HS+OJT 2 yrs 2 yrs
2 yrs
Long‐term OJT 2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs HS + OJT
HS + OJT
2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs + OJT or APP HS + OJT or APP 1‐2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs or OJT 1 yr
2 yrs or OJT or APP 2 yrs.
HS+OJT 2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs
2 yrs
HS+OJT 2 yrs
HS + OJT or APP HS + OJT
2 yrs
2 yrs
HS to 2 yrs + OJT 1 yr to 2 yrs 2 yrs 2 yrs + OJT or APP 2 yrs
1 yr to 2 yrs * HS = High School diploma or GED; OJT = On the Job Training; APP = Apprenticeship; 1 yr. = Postsecondary Certificate; 2 yrs. = Associate’s degree. Health Care Industry (directly related jobs) Manufacturing Industry (directly related jobs) Health & Manufacturing (indirectly related jobs) Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 75 Highlights from “Industry Sector Analysis for the Lower Rio Grande Valley” The report titled, Industry Sector Analysis for the Lower Rio Grande Valley was prepared for Workforce Solutions, Inc. by T.I.P Strategies in 2005. This report presents industry clusters and targeted occupations for Hidalgo, Starr and Willacy counties. It also presents training and skills analysis, and human resource challenges. The industry clusters identified in this report are – manufacturing and related activities, healthcare, retail and hospitality, business services, homeland security and law enforcement, and construction. The targeted occupations are similar to the ones mentioned earlier in Exhibit 74a and 74b. The top ten soft skills that employers are looking for in their employees are – active listening, reading comprehension, speaking to convey information effectively, critical thinking, writing, mathematics, coordination, monitoring, judgment and decision making, and active learning. The top 10 areas of knowledge required by employers in their employees are – English language, customer and personal service, mathematics, clerical, administration and management, computers and electronics, public safety and security, law and government, education and training, and mechanical. The key challenges facing human resource development in the region are – a young workforce (the challenge being high dropout rates and a lack of basic skills even for entry‐level jobs), lack of employability skills, lack of leadership and supervisory skills, lack of advanced technical skills, lack of knowledge of skill levels of local work force, and professional labor skills shortages. Highlights from “Hidalgo County Asset Map 2010” Based on the Hidalgo County asset map prepared by The University of Texas‐Pan American’s Division of Community Engagement as part of the Ignite Hidalgo County Project, the health care industry is one of the leading and fastest growing sectors of Hidalgo County’s economy. The development of new hospitals and related facilities with cutting‐edge technology offers many specialties. This allows the local population to seek treatment in their immediate area rather than seeking healthcare in San Antonio, Houston or Dallas. The population groups driving the growth of the health industry are Winter Texans, rapid population growth and a large Medicare and Medicaid population. Hidalgo County is developing a niche in cardiology and thoracic surgery. Areas in the health care industry that need attention include the lack of a local medical school, environmental testing labs or a radiology school. The need for nurses is still high and health care providers still have to recruit nurses from outside the Rio Grande Valley indeed, outside the U.S. According to Economic Modeling Specialists Incorporated, 4th quarter, 2009, Hidalgo County is a medically underserved area with 164 physicians per 100,000 residents as compared to 264 in Texas and 290 in the U.S. Two targeted industries identified in The Asset Map for recruitment purposes were pharmaceutical testing and research companies. 76 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Highlights from “Rio South Texas 2009 Asset Mapping Report” The North American Advanced Manufacturing Research & Education Initiative (NAAMREI) is devoted to developing a world‐class advanced manufacturing cluster in the Rio South Texas Region (Cameron, Hidalgo, Jim Hogg, Starr, Webb, Willacy and Zapata counties). NAAMREI combines the innovation, talents and strategy of more than 60 partners in business, education, economic development, industry, finance and government to offer manufacturers across North America, and the globe, access to proprietary, world‐class advanced manufacturing and rapid response manufacturing. The NAAMREI Consortium spearheaded the Rio South Texas Asset Mapping project so that they could identify advanced manufacturing employment opportunities, advanced manufacturing talent, industry profiles and clusters, and infrastructure resources available in this region. According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA), “advanced manufacturing” is the use of technology or other productivity‐enhancing business processes in the manufacturing enterprise and/or value‐added supply chain. In addition to the actual production and assembly activities, this definition includes product design, process engineering, quality control, and software support, as well as product packaging, shipping (though not the actual transportation), inventory management, and maintenance of capital equipment. Here are some findings from the Asset Mapping Report focused on promoting the advanced manufacturing industry in the Rio South Texas region. 
To promote advanced manufacturing one needs to have a talent pipeline that will feed the workforce. Critical to this talent pipeline are T‐STEM academies (Texas Science, Technology, Engineering and Math academies) and early college high school programs. T‐STEM academies increase student achievement by engaging and exposing students to innovative science and math instruction, and early college high school programs transform the traditional curriculum sequence and modes of instruction to allow for a closer alignment between high school and college. Both these programs prepare students for college and focus on science and math knowledge which is essential for all advanced manufacturing occupations. Cameron, Hidalgo and Webb counties have both T‐STEM and early college high school programs with Hidalgo County having the largest number of both. Jim Hogg, Starr and Willacy counties do not have any of these programs in place. 
The areas of study critical for advanced manufacturing are: o Computer and information sciences and support services o Engineering o Engineering technologies o Social sciences o Construction trades o Mechanical and repair technologies o Precision production o Business, management, marketing, and related support service programs These educational options not only help people find stable, high‐wage employment but they also provide industry with a secure source of workers far into the future. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 77 
Nine industry clusters important for future development are: aerospace, automotive, communication, consumer products, electronics, defense, industrial, logistics and medical. 
The location of the Rio South Texas Region is very strategic for both national and international trade and transportation. This region has easy access to shipping via ground, rail, air and water, and it is in a pivotal location to connect the Midwest, Northeast and the South to Mexico and Central America. It can even serve as a connecting point for products going to or coming from the Pacific Rim shipped through ports along the western Mexico coast. Sixteen international ports of entry offer commercial and non‐commercial crossings in Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, Webb and Zapata counties. Five of these ports are in Webb County. 
The top career choices that are available in the Rio South Texas region in advanced manufacturing are shown in Exhibit 75 on the next page. This exhibit shows the annual average job openings from 2006 to 2016 broken down by openings in the “Rio Grande Valley” (Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr and Willacy counties) and “Rest of Rio South Texas” (Jim Hogg, Webb and Zapata counties). The preferred education for each of these occupations is also shown in the last column of the exhibit. 78 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Exhibit 75: Top Career Choices in the Rio South Texas Region by Annual Average Job Openings and Preferred Education O ccupational Classification Code
O ccupational Title
Annual Av erag e Job O penings, 2006‐2016
R G V*
Pre fe rre d Education
Re st of Rio South Te xas**
55
Ba c hel or’s pl us ex peri enc e
1 1 ‐1 0 2 1
Genera l & O pera ti ons M a na gers
165
1 7 ‐2 0 5 1
Ci vi l Engi neers
15
1 7 ‐2 1 1 2
Indus tri a l Engi neers
5
1 7 ‐2 1 4 1
M ec ha ni c a l Engi neers
5
1 7 ‐3 0 2 2
Ci vi l Engi neeri ng Tec h n i c i a ns
1 7 ‐3 0 2 3
El ec tri c a l & El ec troni c Engi neeri ng Tec hni c i a ns
4 9 ‐2 0 9 4
El ec tri c a l & El ec troni c s Repa i rers , Comm erc i a l & Indus tri a l Equi pment
4 9 ‐3 0 2 3
Automoti ve Servi c e Tec hni c i a ns & M ec ha ni c s
80
25
5 1 ‐4 1 2 1
W el ders , Cutters , Sol derers , & Bra zers
50
10
P os ts ec onda ry Voc . tra i ni ng
1 1 ‐3 0 7 1
Tra ns porta ti on, Stora ge, & Di s tri buti on M a na gers
5
10
W ork ex peri enc e i n rel a ted fi el d
1 1 ‐9 1 9 9
M a na gers , Al l other
25
15
W ork ex peri enc e i n rel a ted fi el d
4 9 ‐1 0 1 1
Fi rs t‐l i ne Supervi s ors /M a na gers of M ec ha ni c s , Ins ta l l ers , & Repa i rers
30
5 1 ‐1 0 1 1
Fi rs t‐Li ne Supervi s ors /M a na gers of P roducti on & O pera ti ng W orkers
20
5 3 ‐1 0 2 1
Fi rs t‐Li ne Supervi s ors /M a na gers of Hel pers , La borers , & M a teri a l m overs
20
5 3 ‐1 0 3 1
Fi rs t‐Li ne Sup./M grs . of Tra ns port & M a teri a l ‐movi ng M a c hi ne & Vehi c l e O pera tors
1 3 ‐1 0 2 3
P urc ha s i ng Agents , Ex c ept W hol es a l e, Reta i l , & Fa rm Produc ts
10
4 9 ‐9 0 4 1
Indus tri a l M a c hi nery M ec ha ni c s
20
5 1 ‐7 0 1 1
Ca bi netma kers , & Benc h Ca rpenters
10
4 9 ‐9 0 4 2
M a i ntena nc e & Repa i r W orkers , Genera l
80
5 1 ‐7 0 4 2
W oodworki ng M a c hi ne Setters , O pera tors , & Tenders , ex c ept Sewi ng
5 3 ‐3 0 3 2
Truc k D ri vers , Hea vy & Tra c tor‐Tra i l er
215
190
M odera te‐Term O JT
5 3 ‐7 0 5 1
Indus tri a l Truc k & Tra c tor O pera tors
45
25
Short‐Term on‐the‐j ob tra i ni ng
5 3 ‐7 0 6 2
La borers & Frei ght, Stoc k, & M a teri a l M overs
235
100
Short‐Term on‐the‐j ob tra i ni ng
5
Ba c hel or’s D egree
Ba c hel or’s D egree
Ba c hel or’s D egree
5
5
As s oc i a te's Degree
As s oc i a te's Degree
5
P os ts ec onda ry Voc . tra i ni ng
P os ts ec onda ry Voc . tra i ni ng
W ork ex peri enc e i n rel a ted fi el d
W ork ex peri enc e i n rel a ted fi el d
10
W ork ex peri enc e i n rel a ted fi el d
10
W ork ex peri enc e i n rel a ted fi el d
Long‐Term on‐the‐j ob tra i ni ng
5
Long‐Term on‐the‐j ob tra i ni ng
Long‐Term on‐the‐j ob tra i ni ng
15
5
M odera te‐Term O JT
M odera te‐Term O JT
*RGV includes Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr and Willacy counties. ** Rest of Rio South Texas includes Jim Hogg, Webb and Zapata counties. Source: Rio South Texas 2009 Asset Mapping Report, Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center, UTPA, Edinburg, TX. Highlights from “Building Future Talent: Consolidated Results of the Workforce Public Forum” In early 2007, the Office of the Hidalgo County Judge J.D. Salinas III met on an ongoing basis with regional economic development officials to discuss issues that impact the local economy. Throughout the discussions, workforce development was identified as the single most important concern. To address this issue of “how to build a talented workforce for the future”, Hidalgo County, Workforce Solutions, The University of Texas‐Pan American, South Texas College and the Region One Education Service Center teamed up to gather input from the business community, educators, economic development and workforce leaders. These are the common themes that emerged at the Workforce Public Forum held in July 2007: 


The current workforce must hone its “soft skills”, i.e., basic literacy, language and critical thinking skills, in addition to more advanced technical skills. Some of the elements cited as major barriers to workforce readiness were: lack of parental involvement, mentors and role models, motivation and career mindset of the students. The key strengths of the local workforce are its youthfulness and the fact that they are mostly bilingual in English and Spanish. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 79 


Participants at the public forum reported a “disconnect” between K‐12 and higher education, and then again between higher education and employers about expectations from recent graduates. It is important for educators, community organizations, economic development and workforce professionals to take a collaborative approach to overcome workforce challenges. Regional branding by launching an “education first” marketing campaign, leveraging resources more effectively and following best practices from others are important elements to any strategy for building future talent. Highlights from “Paperless Medicine: Training the eWorkforce” According to this article in the Texas Tribune (by Andrew Kreighbaum, January 29, 2010) the need for Health Information Management personnel (those who manage electronic medical records for medical practitioners) is expected to grow by as much as 5,000 new jobs in Texas over the next five years. In this article, Susan Fenton, an assistant professor at Texas State University‐San Marcos, adds that this demand will be especially high in rural Texas communities. Texas State University in San Marcos, UT‐
Austin, UT‐School of Health Information in Houston and Austin Community College are already moving in the direction of training their students in this technology. Enrollment in Texas State University’s undergraduate Health Information Management program jumped 25% in Fall 2009, to approximately 100 students. Highlights from “Benchmarking the Success of Latina and Latino Students in STEM to Achieve National Graduation Goals” This study was conducted by Alicia Dowd, Lindsey Malcom and Estela Bensimon at the University of Southern California. In this study the authors point out that although the participation of Latinos in higher education has more than doubled in the last 2 decades, Latino participation in STEM majors has not experienced similar growth. They studied Latino participation and graduation in STEM fields in 25 Hispanic Serving Institutions. They call these institutions “potential exemplars of effective practice in providing STEM education for Latinos”. The University of Texas‐Pan American was one of these 25 potential exemplar institutions based on the Hispanic enrollment and degrees awarded to Hispanics. Two comparisons were made to benchmark the current state of equity in Hispanic STEM degrees awarded among these 25 potential exemplar institutions. o
The first comparison was the proportion of Hispanics enrolled in STEM fields with the overall Hispanic enrollment. This difference provided an equity indicator of Hispanic STEM participation. This equity factor ranged from +11% to ‐17%. The score for UTPA was ‐4.9% which means that the share of Hispanics in STEM fields is lower than the Hispanic share of the institution’s Hispanic enrollment. o
The second comparison was the proportion of STEM degrees awarded to Hispanics with the Hispanics enrolled in STEM fields. This difference provided an equity indicator of STEM degrees awarded to Hispanics. This equity factor ranged from +12% to ‐11%. The 80 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
score for UTPA was ‐4.2% which means that the share of Hispanics earning STEM degrees is less than the Hispanic share of STEM enrollment. Highlights from “Current and Potential Green Jobs in the U.S. Economy” According to this 2008 report prepared by Global Insight for the United States Conference of Mayors and the Mayors Climate Protection Center, the U.S. economy will see a five‐fold growth in green jobs from 0.75 million in 2008 to 4.2 million by 2038. This report shows the location of current and projected green jobs for all metro areas in the nation. McAllen‐Edinburg‐Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and Brownsville‐Harlingen MSA had 716 green jobs in 2008. These are projected to grow to 5,601 jobs by 2038 averaging 163 jobs each year. The authors suggest caution in using these projections, which are based on the assumption that the current distribution of green jobs will not change in the future. According to this report, “The vast majority of Green jobs are not location dependent, so future Green Jobs will be located in cities and metropolitan areas that are currently the most attractive for investment, or in areas that actively increase their attractiveness relative to competing areas.” B. Summary and Conclusions In this chapter several reports from local agencies and other regional and national publications were highlighted to get an idea of the needs of students and employers and the changing economy. Some key conclusions drawn from these highlights are as follows: 
There is a keen interest among high school students in the UTPA GEAR UP program to attend college. Ninety‐six percent of these students want to join a college or university. 
The program areas of greatest interest to the UTPA GEAR UP students are health sciences, law enforcement and public safety, technology, engineering and math, and education and training. 
Almost 25% of UTPA GEAR UP students selected UTPA as their choice for higher education. 
Eighty‐four percent of STC graduates enroll or plan to enroll at a college/university for furthering their education with 48% choosing UTPA. 
Most of the targeted occupations in the Rio Grande Valley are either in the Health Services field or in Manufacturing. Teachers, Counselors and Teaching Assistants are also a big part of this targeted occupations list. 
Local employers want the workforce to hone its “soft skills”, i.e., active listening, reading comprehension, speaking to convey information effectively, critical thinking, writing, mathematics, coordination, monitoring, judgment and decision making, and active learning. 
The top 10 areas of knowledge required by employers in their employees are – English language, customer and personal service, mathematics, clerical, administration and management, computers and electronics, public safety and security, law and government, education and training, and mechanical. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 81 
The key challenges facing human resource development in the region are – a young workforce (the challenge being high dropout rates and a lack of basic skills even for entry‐level jobs), lack of employability skills, lack of leadership and supervisory skills, lack of advanced technical skills, lack of knowledge of skill levels of local work force, and professional labor skills shortages. 
Unmet needs in the health care industry include the need for a medical school in the Rio Grande Valley, more well‐trained nurses, health information management personnel and recruitment of pharmaceutical testing and research companies. 
Advanced Manufacturing is being promoted in the Rio Grande Valley and the program areas most critical for advanced manufacturing are computer and information sciences and support services, engineering, engineering technologies, social sciences, construction trades, mechanical and repair technologies, precision production, and business, management, marketing and related support service programs. 
A disconnect exists between K‐12 and higher education, and between higher education and expectations of employers from college graduates. 
Major barriers to workforce readiness are the lack of parental involvement, mentors and role models, and motivation and career mindset of the students. 
Workforce challenges can be addressed when there is collaboration among educators, community organizations, economic development, and workforce professionals. 
Green technology is an upcoming field and trained personnel are needed in this area. Green jobs are expected to be in great demand for many future generations irrespective of economic boom or bust. 
STEM majors are of growing importance for establishing a well‐trained and well‐educated workforce to meet the demands of the 21st century. 82 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
VI. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS This report has been compiled with data and information to assist leaders of The University of Texas‐Pan American make well‐informed decisions for the course this institution needs to take in the near future. This chapter sums up the key findings of this report and presents those along with some issues for consideration and recommendations. The first section of this chapter, “Market Situation”, summarizes the market in which the University operates. The second section, “Program Demand and Gaps”, reiterates what program needs are being met or not‐met and what programs are emerging and might need to be considered. The third section, touches upon some “Other Issues for Consideration”, and the fourth and final section presents some “Recommendations”. A. Market Situation This section gives an overview of the population, employment and industry, income and poverty, and educational characteristics of the study area. Population Characteristics 
Ninety‐three percent of the students that attend The University of Texas‐Pan American (UTPA) are from the four southernmost counties of Texas, namely, Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr and Willacy counties. This area is also called the Rio Grande Valley (RGV) of Texas. The 2009 population of RGV is 1.2 million and is expected to grow to 1.89 million by 2030. Employment and Industry Characteristics 
In the 2nd quarter of 2009, the total employment in RGV was 359,951 with the highest number of people employed in the following three industries: Health Care and Social Assistance Industry (24%), Educational Services (18%) and Trade (16%). These same three industries are expected to see the largest growth in employment in the coming years. In addition to these industries, local and regional economic development initiatives point toward the growth of more manufacturing and entertainment industries. 
A look at demand occupations by their educational requirements gives a clear picture of areas that institutions of higher education might want to focus on. Here is a listing of occupations that are and will be in demand in the RGV in the coming years. o
Occupations requiring a First Professional or Doctorate Degree which have, and will continue to have, more than 10 annual job openings in the RGV are: . Physicians and Surgeons, various specialties (85) . Lawyers (50) . Pharmacists (40) . Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists (20) . Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists (10) Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 83 o
Occupations requiring a Master’s Degree which have, and will continue to have, more than 10 annual openings in the RGV are: . Educational, Vocational, and School Counselors (60) . Clergy (45) . Physical Therapists (40) . Instructional Coordinators (35) . Speech‐Language Pathologists (35) . Librarians (30) . Counselors, all Other (20) . Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary (20) . Occupational Therapists (20) . Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Workers (15) . Physician Assistants (10) o
Occupations requiring a Bachelor’s or higher degree, plus work experience which have, and will continue to have, more than 10 annual openings in the RGV are: . General and Operations Managers (165) . Education Administrators, Elementary and Secondary School (80) . Medical and Health Services Managers (50) . Administrative Services Managers (30) . Management Analysts (30) . Vocational Education Teachers, Secondary School (30) . Chief Executives (25) . Financial Managers (25) . Training and Development Specialists (25) . Sales Managers (20) . Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary (20) . Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers (15) . Education Administrators, Preschool and Child Care Center/Program (10) o
Occupations requiring a Bachelor’s degree which have, and will continue to have, more than 50 annual openings in the RGV are (Note: this list was too long to incorporate all jobs with 10 or more openings hence it only shows jobs with 50 or more job openings): . Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education (610) . Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education (390) . Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education (300) . Teachers and Instructors, all Other (115) . Accountants and Auditors (100) . Business Operations Specialists, all Other (70) . Special Education Teachers, Preschool, Kindergarten, and Elementary School (65) . Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education (55) 84 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Income and Poverty Characteristics 
The RGV has high poverty and low per capita income as compared to the state of Texas and U.S. The percent of people living in poverty in the RGV is more than double that of the state of Texas and two and a half times more than in the U.S. Per Capita Income is almost half that of Texas and less than half of U.S. One way out of poverty for this region is to improve the educational attainment levels of the population. Educational Characteristics 
From 2000 to 2008 the public school enrollment in RGV went up from 284,803 to 311,426, a 9% increase, and that at postsecondary institutions in the RGV went up from 41,114 to 67,699, a 65% increase. In spite of this growth the enrollment in educational institutions is not keeping pace with the educational attainment levels of the state or the nation. The percentage of high school graduates and college graduates in the RGV is distinctly lower than that of high school and college graduates in Texas and the U.S. In RGV, only 60% of the population, 25 years and over, has a high school diploma as compared to 79% in Texas and 85% in the U.S. Similarly, only 15% of the RGV population, 25 years and over, has a bachelor’s degree or higher as compared to 25% in Texas and 27% in the U.S. 

There are five institutions of higher education in the RGV. They are The University of Texas‐Pan American (UTPA), The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB), South Texas College (STC), Texas Southmost College (TSC) and Texas State Technical College (TSTC). From Fall 2000 to Fall 2009 there has been an 85% increase in combined headcount enrollment at these colleges/universities. o
The greatest numeric increase in enrollment from Fall 2000 to Fall 2009 was experienced by STC (from 10,725 to 26,334), followed by UTPA (from 12,760 to 18,337), TSC (from 8,314 to 13,195), UTB (from 3,157 to 6,743), and TSTC (from 3,266 to 5,988) respectively. o
Number of graduates from these five institutions of higher education has gone up by 94% between 2000 and 2009 (from 4,405 to 8,540) with all but one institution showing positive growth during this time period. TSTC had a decline of 19% in the number of graduates since 2000 (from 587 to 473). o
The greatest numeric increase in the number of graduates between FY 2000 and FY 2009 was experienced by UTPA (from 1,780 to 3,468) followed by STC (from 819 to 2,256), UTB (from 626 to 1,208) and TSC (from 593 to 1,135) respectively. Two major initiatives being pursued currently at UTPA are likely to have positive returns in the future. These initiatives are: o
Focus on transfer opportunities for students from STC to UTPA: The creation of a UTPA transfer center close to the STC campus is helping provide timely advisement to STC students who are looking at transferring to UTPA for a four year degree. This initiative is expected to play an important role in continuing the pipeline of students working toward 4‐
Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 85 year and higher degrees and consequently helping improve the educational attainment levels of the regional population. o
Collaboration between higher education and high schools: The recently created P‐16 councils in the RGV as part of a statewide initiative are expected to have an impact in motivating students in pursuing post‐secondary education after graduating from high school. The collaborations being created between local institutions of higher education and high schools to align curriculum with each other will play a significant role in making the educational foundation of high school students stronger and prepare them for college. B. Program Demand and Gaps This section includes summaries on: i.
i.
Program areas that are in high demand in the Rio Grande Valley and the occupational demand is being met or investigated by UTPA ii.
Program areas that are in demand but the need is not being met iii.
Emerging program areas that need to be looked into, to stay current with the needs of the region Program areas that are in high demand and their demand is being met or investigated Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services: There is a high demand for computer and information sciences across a range of industrial sectors. Occupations such as Computer and Information Systems Managers, Computer Programmers, Computer Software Engineers (Applications), Computer Software Engineers (Systems Software), Computer Systems Analysts, Database Administrators, Network and Computer Systems Administrators, and Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts fall under this category. UTPA offers both undergraduate and graduate programs to prepare students for these occupations. There are approximately 120 projected openings per year in these fields and UTPA graduates an average of 68 students with a degree in computer science or computer information systems. The other postsecondary institutions in the Valley make up the difference to meet the existing demand. Counseling Related Areas: There is a high demand for a variety of counseling‐related jobs, such as, educational, vocational and school counselors, mental health counselors, rehabilitation counselors, social workers in medical, school, family and childcare areas. All these occupations require preparation in Psychology, Counseling, Social Work and Rehabilitative Counseling. UTPA prepares over 100 graduates for these counseling and social work related occupations. There are approximately 110 projected positions for these graduates in the RGV. The other postsecondary institutions in the Valley make up the difference to meet the existing demand. 86 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
A recently instituted Ph.D. in Rehabilitation Counseling that started in Fall 2009 will help meet the demand for rehabilitation educators, administrators and qualified rehabilitation counselors not only in the Rio Grande Valley but across the nation. There is some demand for Clinical, Counseling and School Psychologists requiring a doctoral degree. UTPA is looking into satisfying part of this unmet need by submitting a final proposal this year to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) for the approval of a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Health Professions: The health professions field covers many different areas. The areas for which demand is either being met or investigated by UTPA are discussed here. The areas for which the demand is not being met are discussed later in this chapter. 
Occupational Therapists – On average UTPA’s master’s program in occupational therapy graduates 16 students and the projected demand for such therapists is 20 per year. UTPA is expected to graduate more occupational therapists in coming years, hence, helping keep up with their demand in the Valley. 
Physicians Assistants – With an average of over 40 graduates per year from the now well established physician assistant studies program, the need for physicians assistants (10 annually) is being met not only in the Rio Grande Valley but also in other parts of the state and nation. 
Medical and Health Service Managers – On average 50 job openings exist for managers in the medical field. Although UTPA does not prepare students in this area, a proposal for an M.S. in Health Science is under development for submission to the THECB in AY2010‐2011. Education Administration: Nearly 80 openings are available each year for administrators in elementary and secondary schools. This need is being met by graduates from UTPA’s educational leadership program with over 100 graduates each year. Engineering: UTPA has a very strong engineering program, specializing in Electrical, Mechanical, Manufacturing and Computer Engineering, and the newly added Civil Engineering department. Although the demand for engineers in the Electrical, Mechanical and Manufacturing engineering is currently limited in the Rio Grande Valley, the strong initiative in promoting this region as an “Advanced Manufacturing” Mecca will make the demand for engineers grow tremendously. UTPA is submitting its final proposal to the THECB this year for the development of a Ph.D. program in Manufacturing Engineering, just in time to provide a strong push to the “Advanced Manufacturing” initiative. There is a substantial demand (65 openings per year) for Civil Engineers and Construction Managers (both requiring a civil engineering degree) in the RGV. UTPA has been granted permission by UT System to teach a Bachelor of Science with a major in Civil Engineering. The institution is now awaiting approval from the THECB. Once the program is in place, the demand for Civil Engineers and Construction Managers is expected to be met in the future. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 87 Social Work: The demand for school, medical, public health and other social workers is over 100 job openings each year. UTPA is meeting this demand by graduating a little over 100 social workers on an annual basis. Business Management, Marketing, Finance, Accounting and Related Programs: There is a very high demand (projected 540 openings each year) for professions requiring a bachelor’s or master’s degree in business management and related program areas. On average, 545 students graduate with business related degrees each year contributing sufficiently to meet the local demand for occupations requiring these degrees. Criminal Justice: There is a demand for approximately 145 police officers, probation officers, and correctional officers requiring a degree in Criminal Justice. On average, UTPA graduates 149 students with a Criminal Justice degree, hence, meeting the local demand. ii.
Program areas that are in high demand but the need is NOT being met Health Professions: The health professions field covers many different areas. The areas for which demand is not being met are discussed here. 
Registered Nurses – There is a very high demand for registered nurses in the RGV. On average there are 440 job openings for nurses each year. UTPA produces an average of 90 registered nurses annually. STC, UTB and TSC contribute to the pool by producing an additional 250 registered nurses. All the post secondary institutions put together are unable to meet this big demand for nurses. 
Physicians and Surgeons – With the tremendous growth of the medical industry in the region, the demand for physicians and surgeons with all specialties is growing. RGV is a medically underserved area with a little over 150 physicians for every 100,000 people, as compared to 264 in Texas and 290 in the U.S. There are 85 annual job openings for physicians and surgeons with various specialties in the Valley. This substantial demand needs to be investigated by UTPA. 
Pharmacists – Neither UTPA nor any of the other postsecondary institutions in the Valley are preparing their students for an average of 40 job openings in the field of pharmacy. UTPA has a cooperative pharmacy program in collaboration with UT Austin and data shows that, on average, less than 10 students graduate as pharmacists from each cohort. 
Physical Therapists – There are 40 annual job openings for physical therapists in the RGV; neither UTPA nor any of the other postsecondary institutions in the Valley offer any program to meet this need. Education: The demand for public school teachers from elementary to high school and from vocational to special education is very high not only in the Rio Grande Valley but also in the entire state. These teaching jobs require a bachelor’s degree at the minimum. The only two institutions providing bachelor’s degrees in education are UTPA and UTB. Even though UTPA has a very strong 88 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Education program, the high need for over 1,500 teachers each year in the RGV is not being met by the 400+ graduates from UTPA and an additional 200+ from UTB. Law: On average there are 50 annual job openings for lawyers in the RGV. UTPA has an excellent pre‐law program; over 90% of students in the UTPA Law School Preparation Institute who apply to law school get accepted to at least one across the nation. Due to the high demand for lawyers, and with none of the regional postsecondary education institutions offering a degree in this area, UTPA could look at developing a law school in the RGV. Human Resource Management: Annually, over 50 job openings exist in the field of Human Resources and Labor Relations (occupations such as, employment, recruitment and placement specialists, human resources training and labor relations specialists, and compensation, benefits and job analysis specialists). No specific program at UTPA is geared toward this occupational demand in the RGV. Emerging Program Areas iii.
Green Jobs: Global warming/climate change and ecosystem degradation due to human activity have prompted the creation of green technologies and green jobs. This is an emerging area and the sooner institutions of higher education get on the band wagon, better chances they have of establishing themselves as leaders in educating for the future jobs in this nation. Information Technology in Health Care: To keep up with technological advancements the health care industry needs to manage all its records electronically. This has led to the need for training employees to create and manage electronic records. This is an emerging field, the need for which could be addressed by both 2‐year and 4‐year institutions of higher education. These and other not‐yet identified emerging fields will drive the economy of the future. It is important to maintain contact and partnerships with local employers, economic development entities and government agencies to keep oneself abreast of the changing economic environment and needs so that appropriate steps can be taken to train the workforce of the future. C. Other Issues for Consideration The following are some key areas that UTPA’s leadership might consider as they plan for the future. 
The population of the Rio Grande Valley is expected to grow by 600,000 people in the next 20 years; 68% of this growth will occur in Hidalgo County. UTPA must be ready with programs and services to meet the needs of the growing population. 
Data shows that there is a strong desire among high school students to attend college. The strong P‐16 initiative in the RGV will strengthen the desire of these high school students by not only motivating them, but also preparing them for college. Concurrently, the competition among various institutions of higher education to get these students to attend their college/university is, and will continue to be, fierce. Initiatives like the newly formed UTPA transfer center near the South Texas College campus will help in attracting the transfer Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 89 population. Other partnerships and initiatives need to be forged to reach out to potential students. 
Technological advancements require that more students be trained in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields. Being a Hispanic Serving Institution, UTPA has this unique opportunity to educate Hispanic students in all fields, especially STEM fields. Right now UTPA does not have equitable participation by Hispanic students in these areas. UTPA might want to set performance benchmarks for increasing the proportion of Hispanic STEM enrollment and graduation rates. It is important to look at strategies such as learning communities, peer tutoring, supplemental instruction or other innovative strategies to make improvements in this area. 
This fast growing technological age has made it necessary for employers to keep their workforce trained to stay competitive in the global market. Providing continuing education courses to the local workforce is an area that could be developed by UTPA. 
Employers in the region mention the need for good soft skills in their employees. Integrating soft skill training in all disciplines would benefit students by not only giving them the hard skills that help them get an interview, but also soft skills which will help them get and keep the job. A recent study, “Raising the Bar – Employers’ View on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn”, conducted by the Hart Research Association on behalf of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, reiterates the importance of soft skills. According to this study, employers all across the nation say that they want their employees to have a broad set of skills and higher levels of learning and knowledge than before. Sixty‐eight percent of the employers say that 2‐year and 4‐year institutions are not preparing their students for the challenges of the global economy. The top 5 learning outcomes that employers perceive as requiring more emphasis than before are: o
The ability to effectively communicate orally and in writing o
Critical thinking and analytical reasoning o
The ability to apply knowledge and skills to real‐world settings through internships or other hands‐on experiences o
The ability to analyze and solve complex problems o
The ability to connect choices and actions to ethical decisions 90 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
D. Recommendations Exhibit 76 presents the recommendations for “Current Programs to Expand”, “New Programs to Develop”, and “Emerging Areas to Consider”. These recommendations are based on research presented in this report and on the occupational demand versus the graduates being produced by UTPA and other Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) in the Rio Grande Valley. Exhibit 76: Recommended Areas for Expansion, Development and Consideration CURREN T P RO GRA M S TO EXP A N D
Education ‐ School Te ache rs for all grade s
N ursing ‐ Re giste re d N urse s
Civil Engine e ring/Construction Trade s
N EW P RO GRA M S TO DEVELO P
Me dical ‐ Physicians, Surge ons w ith varie d spe cialtie s
Me dical ‐ Me dical and He alth Se rvice Manage rs
Busine ss A dm inistration ‐ Hum an Re source s re late d profe ssions
Law ‐ Law ye rs
Pharm acy ‐ P harm acists
Physical The rapy ‐ Physical The rapists
Library Scie nce ‐ Librarians
EM ERGIN G A REA S TO CO N SIDER
Gre e n Jobs
Inform ation Te chnology in He alth Care
A verage A n n u al Jo b O p en in gs
Grad u ates in FY 2009
550 (364 from UTPA and 186 from UTB)
340 (90 from UTPA and 250 440
from othe r RGV IHEs)
The Civil Engine e ring program at UTPA is bare ly 20 Civil Engine e rs and ge tting off the ground . It 45 Construction also ne e ds to focus on the Manage rs
de m and for Construction Manage rs.
1,640
A verage A n n u al Jo b O p en in gs
Grad u ates in FY 2009
85
50
50
50
40
40
30
‐
‐
‐
‐
‐
‐
‐
A verage A n n u al Jo b O p en in gs
Grad u ates in FY 2009
Concre te data is not available for the se Em e rging A re as.
Other Recommendations: 
Develop a STEM Pipeline: To keep up with technological advancements, it is important to graduate more students in STEM majors. To accomplish this, it is essential to develop a pipeline from the high schools feeding students into postsecondary education. It is recommended that partnerships be strengthened with local high schools and other postsecondary institutions to promote the benefits of STEM majors among students from kindergarten to high school. 
Return to an Old Idea by Developing a Teachers College: A separate college for teacher training with the primary focus on graduating high quality and well trained teachers would help meet the teacher demand not only in the Rio Grande Valley but in the entire state. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 91 This page intentionally left blank. 92 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
GLOSSARY This glossary gives a listing of occupations that fall under each of the major occupational categories shown in Exhibit 9 on page 11 of this document. Architecture and Engineering Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Architects, Except Landscape and Naval; Landscape Architects; Cartographers and Photogrammetrists; Surveyors; Aerospace Engineers; Agricultural Engineers; Biomedical Engineers; Chemical Engineers; Civil Engineers; Computer Hardware Engineers; Electrical Engineers; Electronics Engineers, Except Computer; Environmental Engineers; Health and Safety Engineers, Except Mining Safety Engineers and Inspectors; Industrial Engineers; Marine Engineers and Naval Architects; Materials Engineers; Mechanical Engineers; Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers; Nuclear Engineers; Petroleum Engineers; Engineers, all Other; Architectural and Civil Drafters; Electrical and Electronics Drafters; Mechanical Drafters; Drafters, all Other; Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technicians; Civil Engineering Technicians; Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technicians; Electro‐Mechanical Technicians; Environmental Engineering Technicians; Industrial Engineering Technicians; Mechanical Engineering Technicians; Engineering Technicians, Except Drafters, all Other; Surveying and Mapping Technicians. Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Art Directors; Craft Artists; Fine Artists, Including Painters, Sculptors, and Illustrators; Multi‐Media Artists and Animators; Artists and Related Workers, all Other; Commercial and Industrial Designers; Fashion Designers; Floral Designers; Graphic Designers; Interior Designers; Merchandise Displayers and Window Trimmers; Set and Exhibit Designers; Designers, all Other; Actors; Producers and Directors; Athletes and Sports Competitors; Coaches and Scouts; Umpires, Referees, and Other Sports Officials; Dancers; Choreographers; Music Directors and Composers; Musicians and Singers; Entertainers and Performers, Sports and Related Workers, all Other; Radio and Television Announcers; Public Address System and Other Announcers; Broadcast News Analysts; Reporters and Correspondents; Public Relations Specialists; Editors; Technical Writers; Writers and Authors; Interpreters and Translators; Media and Communication Workers, all Other; Audio and Video Equipment Technicians; Broadcast Technicians; Radio Operators; Sound Engineering Technicians; Photographers; Camera Operators, Television, Video, and Motion Picture; Film and Video Editors; Media and Communication Equipment Workers, all Other. Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Housekeeping and Janitorial Workers; First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Landscaping, Lawn Service, and Grounds keeping Workers; Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 93 Cleaners; Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners; Building Cleaning Workers, all Other; Pest Control Workers; Landscaping and Grounds keeping Workers; Pesticide Handlers, Sprayers, and Applicators, Vegetation; Tree Trimmers and Pruners; Grounds Maintenance Workers, all Other. Business and Financial Operations Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Agents and Business Managers of Artists, Performers, and Athletes; Purchasing Agents and Buyers, Farm Products; Wholesale and Retail Buyers, Except Farm Products; Purchasing Agents, Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products; Claims Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators; Insurance Appraisers, Auto Damage; Compliance Officers, Except Agriculture, Construction, Health and Safety, and Transportation; Cost Estimators; Emergency Management Specialists; Employment, Recruitment, and Placement Specialists; Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists; Training and Development Specialists; Human Resources, Training, and Labor Relations Specialists, all Other; Logisticians; Management Analysts; Meeting and Convention Planners; Business Operations Specialists, all Other; Accountants and Auditors; Appraisers and Assessors of Real Estate; Budget Analysts; Credit Analysts; Financial Analysts; Personal Financial Advisors; Insurance Underwriters; Financial Examiners; Loan Counselors; Loan Officers; Tax Examiners, Collectors, and Revenue Agents; Tax Preparers; Financial Specialists, all Other. Community and Social Services Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Substance Abuse and Behavioral Disorder Counselors; Educational, Vocational, and School Counselors; Marriage and Family Therapists; Mental Health Counselors; Rehabilitation Counselors; Counselors, all Other; Child, Family, and School Social Workers; Medical and Public Health Social Workers; Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Workers; Social Workers, all Other; Health Educators; Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists; Social and Human Service Assistants; Community and Social Service Specialists, all Other; Clergy; Directors, Religious Activities and Education; Religious Workers, all Other. Computer and Mathematical Science Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Computer and Information Scientists, Research; Computer Programmers; Computer Software Engineers, Applications; Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software; Computer Support Specialists; Computer Systems Analysts; Database Administrators; Network and Computer Systems Administrators; Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts; Computer Specialists, all Other; Actuaries; Mathematicians; Operations Research Analysts; Statisticians; Mathematical Technicians; Mathematical Science Occupations, all Other. Construction and Extraction Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers; Boilermakers; Brick masons and Block masons; 94 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Stonemasons; Carpenters; Carpet Installers; Floor Layers, Except Carpet, Wood, and Hard Tiles; Floor Sanders and Finishers; Tile and Marble Setters; Cement Masons and Concrete Finishers; Terrazzo Workers and Finishers; Construction Laborers; Paving, Surfacing, and Tamping Equipment Operators; Pile‐Driver Operators; Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators; Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers; Tapers; Electricians; Glaziers; Insulation Workers, Floor, Ceiling, and Wall; Insulation Workers, Mechanical; Painters, Construction and Maintenance; Paperhangers; Pipe layers; Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters; Plasterers and Stucco Masons; Reinforcing Iron and Rebar Workers; Roofers; Sheet Metal Workers; Structural Iron and Steel Workers; Helpers—Brick masons, Block masons, Stonemasons, and Tile and Marble Setters; Helpers—Carpenters; Helpers—Electricians; Helpers—Painters, Paperhangers, Plasterers, and Stucco Masons; Helpers—Pipe layers, Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters; Helpers—Roofers; Helpers, Construction Trades, all Other; Construction and Building Inspectors; Elevator Installers and Repairers; Fence Erectors; Hazardous Materials Removal Workers; Highway Maintenance Workers; Rail‐Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators; Septic Tank Servicers and Sewer Pipe Cleaners; Segmental Pavers; Construction and Related Workers, all Other; Derrick Operators, Oil and Gas; Rotary Drill Operators, Oil and Gas; Service Unit Operators, Oil, Gas, and Mining; Earth Drillers, Except Oil and Gas; Explosives Workers, Ordnance Handling Experts, and Blasters; Continuous Mining Machine Operators; Mine Cutting and Channeling Machine Operators; Mining Machine Operators, all Other; Rock Splitters, Quarry; Roof Bolters, Mining; Roustabouts, Oil and Gas; Helpers—Extraction Workers; Extraction Workers, all Other. Education, Training, and Library Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Business Teachers, Postsecondary; Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary; Mathematical Science Teachers, Postsecondary; Architecture Teachers, Postsecondary; Engineering Teachers, Postsecondary; Agricultural Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary; Biological Science Teachers, Postsecondary; Forestry and Conservation Science Teachers, Postsecondary; Atmospheric, Earth, Marine, and Space Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary; Chemistry Teachers, Postsecondary; Environmental Science Teachers, Postsecondary; Physics Teachers, Postsecondary; Anthropology and Archeology Teachers, Postsecondary; Area, Ethnic, and Cultural Studies Teachers, Postsecondary; Economics Teachers, Postsecondary; Geography Teachers, Postsecondary; Political Science Teachers, Postsecondary; Psychology Teachers, Postsecondary; Sociology Teachers, Postsecondary; Social Sciences Teachers, Postsecondary, all Other; Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary; Nursing Instructors and Teachers, Postsecondary; Education Teachers, Postsecondary; Library Science Teachers, Postsecondary; Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Teachers, Postsecondary; Law Teachers, Postsecondary; Social Work Teachers, Postsecondary; Art, Drama, and Music Teachers, Postsecondary; Communications Teachers, Postsecondary; English Language and Literature Teachers, Postsecondary; Foreign Language and Literature Teachers, Postsecondary; History Teachers, Postsecondary; Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary; Graduate Teaching Assistants; Home Economics Teachers, Postsecondary; Recreation and Fitness Studies Teachers, Postsecondary; Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary; Postsecondary Teachers, all Other; Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education; Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 95 Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education; Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education; Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education; Vocational Education Teachers, Middle School; Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education; Vocational Education Teachers, Secondary School; Special Education Teachers, Preschool, Kindergarten, and Elementary School; Special Education Teachers, Middle School; Special Education Teachers, Secondary School; Adult Literacy, Remedial Education, and GED Teachers and Instructors; Self‐Enrichment Education Teachers; Teachers and Instructors, all Other; Archivists; Curators; Museum Technicians and Conservators; Librarians; Library Technicians; Audio‐Visual Collections Specialists; Farm and Home Management Advisors; Instructional Coordinators; Teacher Assistants; Education, Training, and Library Workers, all Other. Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Workers; Farm Labor Contractors; Agricultural Inspectors; Animal Breeders; Graders and Sorters, Agricultural Products; Agricultural Equipment Operators; Farm workers and Laborers, Crop, Nursery, and Greenhouse; Farm workers, Farm and Ranch Animals; Agricultural Workers, all Other; Fishers and Related Fishing Workers; Forest and Conservation Workers; Fallers; Logging Equipment Operators; Log Graders and Scalers; Logging Workers, all Other. Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Chefs and Head Cooks; First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Food Preparation and Serving Workers; Cooks, Fast Food; Cooks, Institution and Cafeteria; Cooks, Private Household; Cooks, Restaurant; Cooks, Short Order; Cooks, all Other; Food Preparation Workers; Bartenders; Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food; Counter Attendants, Cafeteria, Food Concession, and Coffee Shop; Waiters and Waitresses; Food Servers, Non‐restaurant; Dining Room and Cafeteria Attendants and Bartender Helpers; Dishwashers; Hosts and Hostesses, Restaurant, Lounge, and Coffee Shop; Food Preparation and Serving Related Workers, all Other. Healthcare Practitioner and Technical Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Chiropractors; Dentists, General; Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons; Orthodontists; Prosthodontists; Dentists, all Other Specialists; Dietitians and Nutritionists; Optometrists; Pharmacists; Anesthesiologists; Family and General Practitioners; Internists, General; Obstetricians and Gynecologists; Pediatricians, General; Psychiatrists; Surgeons; Physicians and Surgeons, all Other; Physician Assistants; Podiatrists; Registered Nurses; Audiologists; Occupational Therapists; Physical Therapists; Radiation Therapists; Recreational Therapists; Respiratory Therapists; Speech‐Language Pathologists; Therapists, all Other; Veterinarians; Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners, all Other; Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists; Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians; Dental Hygienists; Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians; Diagnostic Medical Sonographers; Nuclear Medicine Technologists; Radiologic 96 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Technologists and Technicians; Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics; Dietetic Technicians; Pharmacy Technicians; Psychiatric Technicians; Respiratory Therapy Technicians; Surgical Technologists; Veterinary Technologists and Technicians; Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses; Medical Records and Health Information Technicians; Opticians, Dispensing; Orthotists and Prosthetists; Health Technologists and Technicians, all Other; Occupational Health and Safety Specialists; Occupational Health and Safety Technicians; Athletic Trainers; Healthcare Practitioner and Technical Workers, all Other. Healthcare Support Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Home Health Aides; Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants; Psychiatric Aides; Occupational Therapist Assistants; Occupational Therapist Aides; Physical Therapist Assistants; Physical Therapist Aides; Massage Therapists; Dental Assistants; Medical Assistants; Medical Equipment Preparers; Medical Transcriptionists; Pharmacy Aides; Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretakers; Healthcare Support Workers, all Other. Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Mechanics, Installers, and Repairers; Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine Repairers; Radio Mechanics; Telecommunications Equipment Installers and Repairers, Except Line Installers; Avionics Technicians; Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers; Electrical and Electronics Installers and Repairers, Transportation Equipment; Electrical and Electronics Repairers, Commercial and Industrial Equipment; Electrical and Electronics Repairers, Powerhouse, Substation, and Relay; Electronic Equipment Installers and Repairers, Motor Vehicles; Electronic Home Entertainment Equipment Installers and Repairers; Security and Fire Alarm Systems Installers; Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians; Automotive Body and Related Repairers; Automotive Glass Installers and Repairers; Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics; Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists; Farm Equipment Mechanics; Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines; Rail Car Repairers; Motorboat Mechanics; Motorcycle Mechanics; Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics; Bicycle Repairers; Recreational Vehicle Service Technicians; Tire Repairers and Changers; Mechanical Door Repairers; Control and Valve Installers and Repairers, Except Mechanical Door; Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers; Home Appliance Repairers; Industrial Machinery Mechanics; Maintenance and Repair Workers, General; Maintenance Workers, Machinery; Millwrights; Refractory Materials Repairers, Except Brick masons; Electrical Power‐Line Installers and Repairers; Telecommunications Line Installers and Repairers; Camera and Photographic Equipment Repairers; Medical Equipment Repairers; Musical Instrument Repairers and Tuners; Watch Repairers; Precision Instrument and Equipment Repairers, all Other; Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers; Commercial Divers; Fabric Menders, Except Garment; Locksmiths and Safe Repairers; Manufactured Building and Mobile Home Installers; Riggers; Signal and Track Switch Repairers; Helpers—
Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers; Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers, all Other. Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 97 Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Animal Scientists; Food Scientists and Technologists; Soil and Plant Scientists; Biochemists and Biophysicists; Microbiologists; Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists; Biological Scientists, all Other; Conservation Scientists; Foresters; Epidemiologists; Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists; Life Scientists, all Other; Astronomers; Physicists; Atmospheric and Space Scientists; Chemists; Materials Scientists; Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health; Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers; Hydrologists; Physical Scientists, all Other; Economists; Market Research Analysts; Survey Researchers; Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists; Industrial‐Organizational Psychologists; Psychologists, all Other; Sociologists; Urban and Regional Planners; Anthropologists and Archeologists; Geographers; Historians; Political Scientists; Social Scientists and Related Workers, all Other; Agricultural and Food Science Technicians; Biological Technicians; Chemical Technicians; Geological and Petroleum Technicians; Nuclear Technicians; Social Science Research Assistants; Environmental Science and Protection Technicians, Including Health; Forensic Science Technicians; Forest and Conservation Technicians; Life, Physical, and Social Science Technicians, all Other. Management Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Chief Executives; General and Operations Managers; Legislators; Advertising and Promotions Managers; Marketing Managers; Sales Managers; Public Relations Managers; Administrative Services Managers; Computer and Information Systems Managers; Financial Managers; Compensation and Benefits Managers; Training and Development Managers; Human Resources Managers, all Other; Industrial Production Managers; Purchasing Managers; Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers; Farm, Ranch, and Other Agricultural Managers; Farmers and Ranchers; Construction Managers; Education Administrators, Preschool and Child Care Center/Program; Education Administrators, Elementary and Secondary School; Education Administrators, Postsecondary; Education Administrators, all Other; Engineering Managers; Food Service Managers; Funeral Directors; Gaming Managers; Lodging Managers; Medical and Health Services Managers; Natural Sciences Managers; Postmasters and Mail Superintendents; Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers; Social and Community Service Managers; Managers, all Other. Office and Administrative Support Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers; Switchboard Operators, Including Answering Service; Telephone Operators; Communications Equipment Operators, all Other; Bill and Account Collectors; Billing and Posting Clerks and Machine Operators; Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks; Gaming Cage Workers; Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks; Procurement Clerks; Tellers; Brokerage Clerks; Correspondence Clerks; Court, Municipal, and License Clerks; Credit Authorizers, Checkers, and Clerks; Customer Service Representatives; Eligibility Interviewers, Government Programs; File Clerks; Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks; Interviewers, Except Eligibility and Loan; Library 98 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Assistants, Clerical; Loan Interviewers and Clerks; New Accounts Clerks; Order Clerks; Human Resources Assistants, Except Payroll and Timekeeping; Receptionists and Information Clerks; Reservation and Transportation Ticket Agents and Travel Clerks; Information and Record Clerks, all Other; Cargo and Freight Agents; Couriers and Messengers; Police, Fire, and Ambulance Dispatchers; Dispatchers, Except Police, Fire, and Ambulance; Meter Readers, Utilities; Postal Service Clerks; Postal Service Mail Carriers; Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators; Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks; Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks; Stock Clerks and Order Fillers; Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping; Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants; Legal Secretaries; Medical Secretaries; Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive; Computer Operators; Data Entry Keyers; Word Processors and Typists; Desktop Publishers; Insurance Claims and Policy Processing Clerks; Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service; Office Clerks, General; Office Machine Operators, Except Computer; Proofreaders and Copy Markers; Statistical Assistants; Office and Administrative Support Workers, all Other. Personal Care and Service Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Gaming Supervisors; Slot Key Persons; First‐
Line Supervisors/Managers of Personal Service Workers; Animal Trainers; Nonfarm Animal Caretakers; Gaming Dealers; Gaming and Sports Book Writers and Runners; Gaming Service Workers, all Other; Motion Picture Projectionists; Ushers, Lobby Attendants, and Ticket Takers; Amusement and Recreation Attendants; Costume Attendants; Locker Room, Coatroom, and Dressing Room Attendants; Entertainment Attendants and Related Workers, all Other; Embalmers; Funeral Attendants; Barbers; Hairdressers, Hairstylists, and Cosmetologists; Makeup Artists, Theatrical and Performance; Manicurists and Pedicurists; Shampooers; Skin Care Specialists; Baggage Porters and Bellhops; Concierges; Tour Guides and Escorts; Travel Guides; Flight Attendants; Transportation Attendants, Except Flight Attendants and Baggage Porters; Child Care Workers; Personal and Home Care Aides; Fitness Trainers and Aerobics Instructors; Recreation Workers; Residential Advisors; Personal Care and Service Workers, all Other. Production Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Production and Operating Workers; Aircraft Structure, Surfaces, Rigging, and Systems Assemblers; Coil Winders, Tapers, and Finishers; Electrical and Electronic Equipment Assemblers; Electromechanical Equipment Assemblers; Engine and Other Machine Assemblers; Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters; Fiberglass Laminators and Fabricators; Team Assemblers; Timing Device Assemblers, Adjusters, and Calibrators; Assemblers and Fabricators, all Other; Bakers; Butchers and Meat Cutters; Meat, Poultry, and Fish Cutters and Trimmers; Slaughterers and Meat Packers; Food and Tobacco Roasting, Baking, and Drying Machine Operators and Tenders; Food Batch makers; Food Cooking Machine Operators and Tenders; Computer‐Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic; Numerical Tool and Process Control Programmers; Extruding and Drawing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Forging Machine Setters, Operators, Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 99 and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Rolling Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Drilling and Boring Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Grinding, Lapping, Polishing, and Buffing Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Lathe and Turning Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Milling and Planing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Machinists; Metal‐Refining Furnace Operators and Tenders; Pourers and Casters, Metal; Model Makers, Metal and Plastic; Patternmakers, Metal and Plastic; Foundry Mold and Core makers; Molding, Core making, and Casting Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Multiple Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Tool and Die Makers; Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers; Welding, Soldering, and Brazing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Heat Treating Equipment Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Lay‐Out Workers, Metal and Plastic; Plating and Coating Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic; Tool Grinders, Filers, and Sharpeners; Metal Workers and Plastic Workers, all Other; Bindery Workers; Bookbinders; Job Printers; Prepress Technicians and Workers; Printing Machine Operators; Laundry and Dry‐Cleaning Workers; Pressers, Textile, Garment, and Related Materials; Sewing Machine Operators; Shoe and Leather Workers and Repairers; Shoe Machine Operators and Tenders; Sewers, Hand; Tailors, Dressmakers, and Custom Sewers; Textile Bleaching and Dyeing Machine Operators and Tenders; Textile Cutting Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Textile Knitting and Weaving Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Textile Winding, Twisting, and Drawing Out Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Extruding and Forming Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Synthetic and Glass Fibers; Fabric and Apparel Patternmakers; Upholsterers; Textile, Apparel, and Furnishings Workers, all Other; Cabinetmakers and Bench Carpenters; Furniture Finishers; Model Makers, Wood; Patternmakers, Wood; Sawing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Wood; Woodworking Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Except Sawing; Woodworkers, all Other; Nuclear Power Reactor Operators; Power Distributors and Dispatchers; Power Plant Operators; Stationary Engineers and Boiler Operators; Water and Liquid Waste Treatment Plant and System Operators; Chemical Plant and System Operators; Gas Plant Operators; Petroleum Pump System Operators, Refinery Operators, and Gaugers; Plant and System Operators, all Other; Chemical Equipment Operators and Tenders; Separating, Filtering, Clarifying, Precipitating, and Still Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Crushing, Grinding, and Polishing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Grinding and Polishing Workers, Hand; Mixing and Blending Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Cutters and Trimmers, Hand; Cutting and Slicing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Extruding, Forming, Pressing, and Compacting Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Furnace, Kiln, Oven, Drier, and Kettle Operators and Tenders; Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers; Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers; Dental Laboratory Technicians; Medical Appliance Technicians; Ophthalmic Laboratory Technicians; Packaging and Filling Machine Operators and Tenders; Coating, Painting, and Spraying Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Painters, Transportation Equipment; Painting, Coating, and Decorating Workers; Photographic Process Workers; Photographic Processing Machine Operators; Semiconductor Processors; Cementing and Gluing Machine Operators and Tenders; Cleaning, Washing, and Metal Pickling 100 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
Equipment Operators and Tenders; Cooling and Freezing Equipment Operators and Tenders; Etchers and Engravers; Molders, Shapers, and Casters, Except Metal and Plastic; Paper Goods Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders; Tire Builders; Helpers—Production Workers; Production Workers, all Other. Protective Service Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Correctional Officers; First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Police and Detectives; First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Fire Fighting and Prevention Workers; First‐Line Supervisors/Managers, Protective Service Workers, all Other; Fire Fighters; Fire Inspectors and Investigators; Forest Fire Inspectors and Prevention Specialists; Bailiffs; Correctional Officers and Jailers; Detectives and Criminal Investigators; Fish and Game Wardens; Parking Enforcement Workers; Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers; Transit and Railroad Police; Animal Control Workers; Private Detectives and Investigators; Gaming Surveillance Officers and Gaming Investigators; Security Guards; Crossing Guards; Lifeguards, Ski Patrol, and Other Recreational Protective Service Workers; Protective Service Workers, all Other. Sales and Related Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Retail Sales Workers; First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Non‐Retail Sales Workers; Cashiers; Gaming Change Persons and Booth Cashiers; Counter and Rental Clerks; Parts Salespersons; Retail Salespersons; Advertising Sales Agents; Insurance Sales Agents; Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents; Travel Agents; Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific Products; Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Except Technical and Scientific Products; Demonstrators and Product Promoters; Models; Real Estate Brokers; Real Estate Sales Agents; Sales Engineers; Telemarketers; Door‐To‐Door Sales Workers, News and Street Vendors, and Related Workers; and residual, "all Other", occupations in this major group. Transportation and Material Moving Occupations This major group comprises the following occupations: Aircraft Cargo Handling Supervisors; First‐
Line Supervisors/Managers of Helpers, Laborers, and Material Movers, Hand; First‐Line Supervisors/Managers of Transportation and Material‐Moving Machine and Vehicle Operators; Airline Pilots, Copilots, and Flight Engineers; Commercial Pilots; Air Traffic Controllers; Airfield Operations Specialists; Ambulance Drivers and Attendants, Except Emergency Medical Technicians; Bus Drivers, Transit and Intercity; Bus Drivers, School; Driver/Sales Workers; Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor‐Trailer; Truck Drivers, Light Or Delivery Services; Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs; Locomotive Engineers; Locomotive Firers; Rail Yard Engineers, Dinkey Operators, and Hostlers; Railroad Brake, Signal, and Switch Operators; Railroad Conductors and Yardmasters; Subway and Streetcar Operators; Sailors and Marine Oilers; Captains, Mates, and Pilots of Water Vessels; Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 101 Motorboat Operators; Ship Engineers; Bridge and Lock Tenders; Parking Lot Attendants; Service Station Attendants; Traffic Technicians; Transportation Inspectors; Conveyor Operators and Tenders; Crane and Tower Operators; Dredge Operators; Excavating and Loading Machine and Dragline Operators; Loading Machine Operators, Underground Mining; Hoist and Winch Operators; Industrial Truck and Tractor Operators; Cleaners of Vehicles and Equipment; Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand; Machine Feeders and Offbearers; Packers and Packagers, Hand; Gas Compressor and Gas Pumping Station Operators; Pump Operators, Except Wellhead Pumpers; Wellhead Pumpers; Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors; Shuttle Car Operators; Tank Car, Truck, and Ship Loaders; and residual, "all Other", occupations in this major group. 102 Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American
REFERENCES Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. (2010‐11 Edition). Occupational Outlook Handbook. Retrieved March 2010 from http://www.bls.gov/oco/. Division of Community Engagement. (2010). Hidalgo county asset map 2010. Unpublished report. Edinburg, TX: The University of Texas‐Pan American. Dowd, A.C., Malcom, L.E., & Bensimon, E.M. (2009). Benchmarking the success of Latina and Latino students in STEM to achieve national graduation goals. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California. Global Insight, Inc. (2008, October). Current and potential green jobs in the U.S. economy. Washington, D.C: The United States Conference of Mayors. Hart Research Associates. (2010). Raising the bar: Employers’ views on college learning in the wake of the economic downturn. Washington, DC: Author. Kreighbaum, A. (2010, January 29). Paperless Medicine: Training the eWorkforce. The Texas Tribune. Retrieved February 2010 from http://www.texastribune.org/stories/2010/jan/29/paperless‐
medicine‐ii‐training‐eworkforce/. Office of the Hidalgo County Judge J.D. Salinas. Building future talent: Consolidated results of the workforce public forum. Report. Edinburg, TX: Author. Research and Analytical Services. (Summer 2009). An analysis of the status and opinions of South Texas college graduates ‐ The 2008 graduate follow‐up survey. Research brief. Vol. 17, Issue 1. McAllen, TX: South Texas College. T.I.P. Strategies. (2005, February). Industry sector analysis for the lower Rio Grande Valley. Austin, TX: Workforce Solutions, Inc. Tech Prep of the Rio Grande Valley, Inc. (2009). Targeting the future – A report about the evolving labor market in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley. Harlingen, TX: Author. Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center. (2010). Rio South Texas 2009 asset mapping report. Unpublished report. Edinburg, TX: The University of Texas‐Pan American and The North American Advanced Manufacturing Research & Education Initiative (NAAMREI). Office of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, The University of Texas‐Pan American 103 This page intentionally left blank.
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