-XO\ - Pontiac

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-XO\ - Pontiac
Wisner Stadium gets face lift, four new tenants
INSIDE:
Economic recovery plan is focused on citizens and education – see page 2
BY SHAQELA CHAPMAN
Also playing at Wisner is the Rival Professional Football League’s Pontiac Wisner Memorial Stadium is aging well. Generals and Oakland County Racers, whose season began in May and runs until Almost 70 years old, Wisner has never August.
looked more beautiful than it does today.
For more information on the Stars, visit Located at 441 Cesar E. Chavez Avenue http://michiganstarsfc.com.
just north of downtown Pontiac, historic For more information on the Motor City Wisner has undergone more than $1 mil-­
Football Club, visit http://www.mc-­fc.
lion in renovations since 2013. com.
Lee Industrial Contracting, a Ponti-­
For information about Rivals Football ac-­based business, has a 10-­year lease with the Pontiac School District to manage League, visit http://www.rivalsnation.com
“We are very excited about what is the historic, 6,600-­seat stadium. happening here,” Michigan Stars Football Lee started by rehabilitating the stadi-­
Club President Shereef Akeel told The um’s plumbing and then moved to the Oakland Press. “We are here to stay … We ¿HOG6RIDUWKHSDUNLQJORWKDVEHHQUH-­
paved and the turf has been realigned. Lee aren’t just here for one year and then we pack up and leave. We are committed to also cleaned up the grounds and repaired being part of the resurgence of the city of the concession stand, sound system and Pontiac.”
scoreboard. More updates are planned.
Akeel told The Oakland Press that the The driving force for this major reno-­
team signed a nine-­year contract. This vation was simple. Through the decades, Wisner has hosted professional, semi-­pro, season runs through July.
“There is a resurgence in the city of amateur and interscholastic sports events. Detroit and we saw an opportunity in the Today, two soccer teams and two football city of Pontiac to revitalize it,” Akeel teams call Wisner their home turf. The soccer teams are the men’s Michigan Stars said. “Wisner Stadium is a diamond in the rough. It has been reconditioned with a and women’s Motor City Football Club. See page 4
6800(5‡&20081,7<1(:6/(77(52)7+(&,7<2)3217,$&‡INAUGURAL EDITION
Michigan Stars call Wisner home
QHZVRXQGV\VWHPQHZOLJKWVDQGWKH¿HOG
looks amazing. It is going to bring back entertainment to the city of Pontiac to those that are looking for something to do on a Friday night or Sunday afternoon.”
Pontiac Mayor Deirdre Waterman per-­
formed the opening kickoff for the soccer teams in May. She received a soccer ball autographed by all of the players. 1st -­ Ours + School of Rock Concert, The Crofoot (7 pm)
3rd -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N. Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
3rd -­ MOTI Concert, Elektricity, 15 S. Saginaw (9:30 pm)
9th -­ Motor City Bass Music Showcase, The Crofoot (7:30 pm)
10th -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
10th -­ 0D]H5XQQHUOutdoor Movie, Public Library (7 pm)
12th -­ The Good Son + Young Flood Concert, The Crofoot (5 pm)
13th -­ Arts Commission Meeting, Pontiac City Hall (5:30 pm)
13th-­16th -­ Confetti Camp for Kids, Pontiac Creative Arts Center
15th -­ Book Bingo, Pontiac Public Library (12:30-­1:30 pm)
16th -­ Jen Kirkman Concert, The Crofoot, 1 S. Saginaw (8 pm)
17th -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
20th -­ Garden Club Meeting, Goldner Walsh (6 pm)
20th-­23rd -­ Confetti Camp for Kids, Pontiac Creative Arts Center
24th -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
24th -­ ,QWHUVWHOODUOutdoor Movie, Pontiac Public Library (7 pm)
25th -­ Art Workshop with Tara Wilkinson, Public Library (1 pm)
31st -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
Ongoing -­ Classes at The Art Experience, 175 S. Saginaw
Ongoing -­ Canvas Pontiac Art Pieces Displayed Downtown
Have an arts-­related event, or questions about listings? Contact Arts Commission
Chair Mike McGuinness at (248) 410-­0702 or: [email protected]
PAGE 4 SPIRIT of PONTIAC SUMMER 2015
1330832-Newsletter.indd 1
See page 2
SPIRIT PONTIAC
1st-­2nd -­ Oakland Community College Faculty & Student Artists
Exhibit, Pontiac Creative Arts Center, 47 Williams (10 am-­4 pm)
The arts are part of the Pontiac scene throughout the summer
Wisner
Stadium
gets a redo
of
-XO\
Speaking of art
Automaker
commits
to Pontiac
Budget surplus
allows leaders
to implement
strategic plan
INSPIRING CIVIC INVOLVEMENT
BY PAIGE BROCKWAY
P
ontiac residents can expect to see positive changes kicking in with the 2015-­2016 budget, according to Mayor Deirdre Waterman.
The new budget’s funds will be allocated to key areas including:
‡3XEOLFVDIHW\
‡5RDGDQGEULGJHPDLQWHQDQFH
‡(VWDEOLVKPHQWRIDEOLJKWFRXUWWR
strengthen neighborhoods. The new budget “takes us away from crisis management, where we were, and puts us in a place where we can actually go to strategic planning,” the mayor said.
Pontiac has successfully stayed out of the red for the past two years. The city’s ¿VFDO\HDUHQGHGZLWKDVXUSOXV
RIPLOOLRQZKLOHWKH¿VFDO
year is projected to end June 30 with a sur-­
plus of $2.5 million to $3 million.
“We are trying to set aside the bulk amount of this surplus for a rainy day, in other words, to be prepared for any unex-­
pected bumps on the road,” said Nevrus 1D]DUNR3RQWLDF¶V¿QDQFHGLUHFWRU
³6RPHRIWKDWPRQH\IRUWKH¿UVWWLPH
in a while, will be transferred to the street funds to pay for much-­needed repairs of our roads.” The mayor collaborates with Pontiac’s Canvas Pontiac revives downtown Pontiac in beauty and spirit – SEE PAGE 2
¿QDQFHGLUHFWRUFLW\DGPLQLVWUDWRUFLW\
council and department heads to prepare the city’s budget two years in advance. An advisory board appointed by Gov. 5LFN6Q\GHUUHYLHZVWKH¿QDQFLDOSODQ
$VWKH¿VFDO\HDUFRPHVWR
a close, preparations for the 2016-­2017 budget are already under way. In the next few years, residents can expect to see development of Downtown Pontiac and enhancement of the local community through increased funding for recreational activities and movements like the city’s new arts commission. 5HVLGHQWVFDQDOVRDQWLFLSDWHLQFUHDVHG
activity from new and expanding busi-­
nesses – including development of the M1 Concourse car enthusiast center. “We are seeing a lot of economic development now, a lot of interest in our properties … Pontiac is on the precipice of a revitalization, and many people want to be a part of that,” Mayor Waterman said.
6/22/15 4:10:54 PM
ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN
Emphasis is education, quality of life for residents
BY PAIGE BROCKWAY
tion of workers by matching education and training efforts to currently-­existing jobs, in addition to exploring ways to provide A strategic economic recovery plan for education and training at all age and skill WKH&LW\RI3RQWLDFLV¿QLVKHGDQGLVPDN-­
levels. This begins from the ground up, ing its way through the approval process.
starting with the image and operations of The plan is titled “Pontiac Moving Pontiac’s public schools. Forward: An Economic Development Another key focus is building up Strategy.” Downtown Pontiac to strengthen the city’s It is backed by an $80,000 grant from cultural identity, springing off the existing the U.S. Department of Commence Eco-­
arts community. Other areas of interest nomic Development Administration and include addressing transportation limita-­
a $35,000 in-­kind match from Oakland County, as reported by the Oakland Press. tions, supporting entrepreneurship and creating new housing options. 7KHSODQIRFXVHVVSHFL¿FDOO\RQVL[
The plan was developed through a pillars, which were determined based on partnership with OHM Advisors. It was market analysis and resident feedback submitted to the Economic Development through meetings and a survey: Administration on May 31, but will not re-­
‡(GXFDWLQJDQGGHYHORSLQJWKH
FHLYH¿QDODSSURYDOXQWLODGGLWLRQDOJUDQW
workforce.
reporting documentation is submitted. ‡$GYDQFLQJVWUDWHJLFJURZWKDUHDV
The next step is for “Pontiac Moving ‡(QKDQFLQJWKHORFDOEUDQGDQGLPDJH
Forward” to be reviewed by the Pontiac ‡,PSURYLQJWKHORFDOTXDOLW\RIOLIH
City Council, which will be asked to sup-­
‡3URPRWLQJSULRULW\DUHDV
port the plan through formal resolution. ‡$OLJQLQJDQGHPSRZHULQJWKH City budgets for the upcoming years are implementers.
aligned with the six pillars of the plan.
“Throughout the planning process, we “Not everything can happen overnight,” clearly heard the priorities of the residents. Rasegan said. “It will take time for Pontiac Two examples are that neighborhood re-­
vitalization is a priority, as well as having WRIXOO\UHFRYHU¿QDQFLDOO\EXWGXULQJWKH
plan development process, we found many access to the necessary training and skills people who believe in Pontiac’s future.” to compete in the workforce,” said Bret Rasegan, planning supervisor of Oakland For more information on “Pontiac County economic development and com-­
Moving Forward,” visit http://pontiac.
munity affairs.
engagingplans.org/.
The plan aims to boost hiring and reten-­
GM commits to Pontiac's future
7 p.m. Monday through Friday at spe-­
FL¿FORFDWLRQVVXFKDVSDUNVDSDUWPHQW
Mayor Deirdre Waterman hosted a Block complexes, playgrounds, churches and schools. The trucks will make 10 to 14 Party Saturday, June 27, at Aaron Perry Park on Edison Street and East Rundell, to designated stops, and stay at the locations for 20 minutes. Play Teams will arrive 20 launch the “Meet Up and Eat Up” Pro-­
minutes before the truck’s arrival and stay gram.
Meet Up and Eat Up is a statewide effort 20 minutes after its departure. Those interested can text “foodMI” to to help children become engaged and WR¿QGRXWDWUXFN¶VORFDWLRQ7KH
have fun while enjoying nutritious meals. V\VWHPLGHQWL¿HVWKHFORVHVWWUXFNVLWHE\
Entertaining, supervised activities will be offered at each location. This program will ZIP code. Additionally, a hot line number is supplied. It is possible to dial 211 for a EHSURYLGLQJOXQFK¿YHGD\VDZHHNDWD
number of sites across the City of Pontiac. recorded listing of the sites. Pontiac residents age 18 and under can Food trucks will be parked 11 a.m. to PAGE 2 SPIRIT of PONTIAC SUMMER 2015
1330832-Newsletter.indd 2
Arts contest restores downtown vibe
BY PAIGE BROCKWAY
BY ANTHONY SPAK
General Motors this spring made a groundbreaking announcement at Pontiac Metal Center: The company will be invest-­
ing $5.4 billion in U.S. facilities over the next three years. Of that investment, $783.5 million will go directly to plants in Pontiac, Lansing, and Warren: $124 million will be invested in the Pontiac Metal Center, which stamps body panels for Chevrolet, Buick, GMC and Cadillac models. “General Motors is investing in Mich-­
igan – and Michiganders,” Gov. Rick Snyder said in a statement released by GM. “Our state’s automotive heritage and expertise is known around the globe, and GM and its workforce are a major part of that.” At the Pontiac Metal Center, the $124 million investment will be spent on an expansion and a new stamping press to test extra-­large dies, plant manager Doug Hanly told The Oakland Press. An addi-­
WLRQDOVTXDUHIHHWZLOOEHDGGHGWR
WKHPLOOLRQVTXDUHIRRWSODQW
The investment “ensures Pontiac’s future as an important hub for all of GM’s U.S. stamping operations,” Hanly said.
“These investments are evidence of a company on the move, strategically invest-­
LQJLQWKHSHRSOHWRROVDQGHTXLSPHQWWR
produce cars, trucks and crossovers that are built to win in the marketplace, with VWXQQLQJGHVLJQTXDOLW\DQGEUHDNWKURXJK
technologies,” said Alan Batey, president of GM North America.
After three months of deliberation by three distinguished art critics, the votes are in and the winners for Canvas Pontiac 2015 have been announced.
‡First Place Award: Nathon Foster for his piece “She Keeps Him Young.”
‡Second Place Award: David Birdsong with his piece “The Painted Lady.”
‡Third Place Award: Stephanie Chisholm with “Pursuit of Happiness.”
‡Community Choice Award: Steve Bindle with “An Angel’s Nightmare.”
The winners received their prizes at the Canvas Pontiac 2015 Awards, Thursday, June 11, at Elektricity Nightclub down-­
town. Guests were asked to donate $5 with the proceeds going towards next year’s contest.
The ceremony featured an eclectic blend of entertainment including opera singers, bag pipers and magicians. An arts contest three years running, Can-­
vas Pontiac is an initiative organized by local artists with help from the Downtown Business Association and the Detroit In-­
stitute of Arts. Submissions for this year’s contest were due March 22. As part of the contest, artists submit photos, T-­shirt designs and poster designs for evaluation by a panel of art experts from the community. The artwork chosen is reproduced on 8-­by-­10-­foot canvases and hung downtown on the walls of local businesses.
Walk through Pontiac’s downtown district and you will notice these canvases hanging on the sides of buildings. ‡2QHIHDWXUHVDIDLU\LQWKHIRUHVW
‡$QRWKHUVKRZVDZLQWHUODQGVFDSH
‡$QGWKHUHLVDWDWWRRHGEXOOVNXOO
The Judge William Waterman Hall of Justice features a canvas of three vintage Mayor hosts Block Party to introduce meet & eat program
BY SHAQELA CHAPMAN
CANVAS PONTIAC
come to the trucks and get a free meal. Residents with disabilities up to 26 years of age can get a meal as well. Young UHVLGHQWVDUHUHTXLUHGWRHDWWKHIRRGDWRU
close to the truck. Special mention goes to Oakland Livingston Human Service Agency, a ORFDOQRQSUR¿WRUJDQL]DWLRQ2/+6$
sponsored two mobile food trucks. Also VSHFLDOUHFRJQLWLRQJRHVWR8QLTXH)RRG
Management, a local food-­restaurant company, for supplying the food. One of the sponsored trucks was on display at the June 27 Block Party — a day full of fun, games, bounce houses and free food. The 50th District Court is one of many venues for a unique outdoor art exhibit
FDUVUHÀHFWLQJRQWKHFLW\¶VVWURQJDXWR-­
motive background.
In recent years, the city has lacked the vibrant color and culture that it was once NQRZQIRU1RZWKHFDQYDVHVDGGÀDUHVRI
energy and creativity into the downtown district. “We’re looking forward to creating a new buzz downtown,” Michael Boettcher, downtown manager of Pontiac’s Down-­
WRZQ%XVLQHVV$VVRFLDWLRQWROGWKH28
News Bureau in February during the contest’s submission period.
“The Canvas Pontiac program has continued to imbed notable art productions throughout our downtown community,” said Dr. Deirdre Waterman, mayor of Pon-­
tiac. “This is one of the arts initiatives that enriches our community.”
As part of this year’s contest, 56 works were submitted. The canvases were SPIRIT of PONTIAC
2DNODQG8QLYHUVLW\MRXUQDOLVPDQGSXEOLFUHODWLRQVVWXGHQWV
Paige Brockway, Shaqela Chapman and Anthony Spak wrote the stories for this newsletter. They are working as interns in &LW\+DOODVSDUWRIDQ2DNODQG3RQWLDFSDUWQHUVKLS
(GLWLQJDQGSDJHGHVLJQE\28MRXUQDOLVPIDFXOW\PHPEHUV
Kaniqua Daniel Welch, Holly Gilbert and Garry Gilbert.
then evaluated by a panel of three judg-­
es: Senghor Reid, an arts teacher from Cranbrook Academy of Art, Barbara Heller from the Detroit Institute of Arts and Patricia David, a local Pontiac artist who owns Gallery on the Boulevard in the city’s Franklin district.
Since being evaluated, 25 of the submit-­
ted works have been hung around the city.
“Pontiac seems ready to take off again,” said Lisa Mohler, co-­chair of Canvas Pon-­
tiac. “This project has been fun.”
Robert Karazim, also a co-­chair of Canvas Pontiac, hopes the contest will encourage more people to spend time in Pontiac.
“We’re trying to bring art back to a city that used to be an arts city,” Karazim said. For more information on the contest, visit CanvasPontiac.com.
State of the City
Mayor Deirdre Waterman will deliver her second annual State of the City ad-­
dress Monday, June 29, at The Lafayette Grand in Pontiac.
The event will begin with a reception at 6 p.m. and be followed by the pro-­
gram at 7. An afterglow will take place at the end of the address.
Mayor Waterman
PAGE 3 SPIRIT of PONTIAC SUMMER 2015
6/22/15 4:10:56 PM
ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN
Emphasis is education, quality of life for residents
BY PAIGE BROCKWAY
tion of workers by matching education and training efforts to currently-­existing jobs, in addition to exploring ways to provide A strategic economic recovery plan for education and training at all age and skill WKH&LW\RI3RQWLDFLV¿QLVKHGDQGLVPDN-­
levels. This begins from the ground up, ing its way through the approval process.
starting with the image and operations of The plan is titled “Pontiac Moving Pontiac’s public schools. Forward: An Economic Development Another key focus is building up Strategy.” Downtown Pontiac to strengthen the city’s It is backed by an $80,000 grant from cultural identity, springing off the existing the U.S. Department of Commence Eco-­
arts community. Other areas of interest nomic Development Administration and include addressing transportation limita-­
a $35,000 in-­kind match from Oakland County, as reported by the Oakland Press. tions, supporting entrepreneurship and creating new housing options. 7KHSODQIRFXVHVVSHFL¿FDOO\RQVL[
The plan was developed through a pillars, which were determined based on partnership with OHM Advisors. It was market analysis and resident feedback submitted to the Economic Development through meetings and a survey: Administration on May 31, but will not re-­
‡(GXFDWLQJDQGGHYHORSLQJWKH
FHLYH¿QDODSSURYDOXQWLODGGLWLRQDOJUDQW
workforce.
reporting documentation is submitted. ‡$GYDQFLQJVWUDWHJLFJURZWKDUHDV
The next step is for “Pontiac Moving ‡(QKDQFLQJWKHORFDOEUDQGDQGLPDJH
Forward” to be reviewed by the Pontiac ‡,PSURYLQJWKHORFDOTXDOLW\RIOLIH
City Council, which will be asked to sup-­
‡3URPRWLQJSULRULW\DUHDV
port the plan through formal resolution. ‡$OLJQLQJDQGHPSRZHULQJWKH City budgets for the upcoming years are implementers.
aligned with the six pillars of the plan.
“Throughout the planning process, we “Not everything can happen overnight,” clearly heard the priorities of the residents. Rasegan said. “It will take time for Pontiac Two examples are that neighborhood re-­
vitalization is a priority, as well as having WRIXOO\UHFRYHU¿QDQFLDOO\EXWGXULQJWKH
plan development process, we found many access to the necessary training and skills people who believe in Pontiac’s future.” to compete in the workforce,” said Bret Rasegan, planning supervisor of Oakland For more information on “Pontiac County economic development and com-­
Moving Forward,” visit http://pontiac.
munity affairs.
engagingplans.org/.
The plan aims to boost hiring and reten-­
GM commits to Pontiac's future
7 p.m. Monday through Friday at spe-­
FL¿FORFDWLRQVVXFKDVSDUNVDSDUWPHQW
Mayor Deirdre Waterman hosted a Block complexes, playgrounds, churches and schools. The trucks will make 10 to 14 Party Saturday, June 27, at Aaron Perry Park on Edison Street and East Rundell, to designated stops, and stay at the locations for 20 minutes. Play Teams will arrive 20 launch the “Meet Up and Eat Up” Pro-­
minutes before the truck’s arrival and stay gram.
Meet Up and Eat Up is a statewide effort 20 minutes after its departure. Those interested can text “foodMI” to to help children become engaged and WR¿QGRXWDWUXFN¶VORFDWLRQ7KH
have fun while enjoying nutritious meals. V\VWHPLGHQWL¿HVWKHFORVHVWWUXFNVLWHE\
Entertaining, supervised activities will be offered at each location. This program will ZIP code. Additionally, a hot line number is supplied. It is possible to dial 211 for a EHSURYLGLQJOXQFK¿YHGD\VDZHHNDWD
number of sites across the City of Pontiac. recorded listing of the sites. Pontiac residents age 18 and under can Food trucks will be parked 11 a.m. to PAGE 2 SPIRIT of PONTIAC SUMMER 2015
1330832-Newsletter.indd 2
Arts contest restores downtown vibe
BY PAIGE BROCKWAY
BY ANTHONY SPAK
General Motors this spring made a groundbreaking announcement at Pontiac Metal Center: The company will be invest-­
ing $5.4 billion in U.S. facilities over the next three years. Of that investment, $783.5 million will go directly to plants in Pontiac, Lansing, and Warren: $124 million will be invested in the Pontiac Metal Center, which stamps body panels for Chevrolet, Buick, GMC and Cadillac models. “General Motors is investing in Mich-­
igan – and Michiganders,” Gov. Rick Snyder said in a statement released by GM. “Our state’s automotive heritage and expertise is known around the globe, and GM and its workforce are a major part of that.” At the Pontiac Metal Center, the $124 million investment will be spent on an expansion and a new stamping press to test extra-­large dies, plant manager Doug Hanly told The Oakland Press. An addi-­
WLRQDOVTXDUHIHHWZLOOEHDGGHGWR
WKHPLOOLRQVTXDUHIRRWSODQW
The investment “ensures Pontiac’s future as an important hub for all of GM’s U.S. stamping operations,” Hanly said.
“These investments are evidence of a company on the move, strategically invest-­
LQJLQWKHSHRSOHWRROVDQGHTXLSPHQWWR
produce cars, trucks and crossovers that are built to win in the marketplace, with VWXQQLQJGHVLJQTXDOLW\DQGEUHDNWKURXJK
technologies,” said Alan Batey, president of GM North America.
After three months of deliberation by three distinguished art critics, the votes are in and the winners for Canvas Pontiac 2015 have been announced.
‡First Place Award: Nathon Foster for his piece “She Keeps Him Young.”
‡Second Place Award: David Birdsong with his piece “The Painted Lady.”
‡Third Place Award: Stephanie Chisholm with “Pursuit of Happiness.”
‡Community Choice Award: Steve Bindle with “An Angel’s Nightmare.”
The winners received their prizes at the Canvas Pontiac 2015 Awards, Thursday, June 11, at Elektricity Nightclub down-­
town. Guests were asked to donate $5 with the proceeds going towards next year’s contest.
The ceremony featured an eclectic blend of entertainment including opera singers, bag pipers and magicians. An arts contest three years running, Can-­
vas Pontiac is an initiative organized by local artists with help from the Downtown Business Association and the Detroit In-­
stitute of Arts. Submissions for this year’s contest were due March 22. As part of the contest, artists submit photos, T-­shirt designs and poster designs for evaluation by a panel of art experts from the community. The artwork chosen is reproduced on 8-­by-­10-­foot canvases and hung downtown on the walls of local businesses.
Walk through Pontiac’s downtown district and you will notice these canvases hanging on the sides of buildings. ‡2QHIHDWXUHVDIDLU\LQWKHIRUHVW
‡$QRWKHUVKRZVDZLQWHUODQGVFDSH
‡$QGWKHUHLVDWDWWRRHGEXOOVNXOO
The Judge William Waterman Hall of Justice features a canvas of three vintage Mayor hosts Block Party to introduce meet & eat program
BY SHAQELA CHAPMAN
CANVAS PONTIAC
come to the trucks and get a free meal. Residents with disabilities up to 26 years of age can get a meal as well. Young UHVLGHQWVDUHUHTXLUHGWRHDWWKHIRRGDWRU
close to the truck. Special mention goes to Oakland Livingston Human Service Agency, a ORFDOQRQSUR¿WRUJDQL]DWLRQ2/+6$
sponsored two mobile food trucks. Also VSHFLDOUHFRJQLWLRQJRHVWR8QLTXH)RRG
Management, a local food-­restaurant company, for supplying the food. One of the sponsored trucks was on display at the June 27 Block Party — a day full of fun, games, bounce houses and free food. The 50th District Court is one of many venues for a unique outdoor art exhibit
FDUVUHÀHFWLQJRQWKHFLW\¶VVWURQJDXWR-­
motive background.
In recent years, the city has lacked the vibrant color and culture that it was once NQRZQIRU1RZWKHFDQYDVHVDGGÀDUHVRI
energy and creativity into the downtown district. “We’re looking forward to creating a new buzz downtown,” Michael Boettcher, downtown manager of Pontiac’s Down-­
WRZQ%XVLQHVV$VVRFLDWLRQWROGWKH28
News Bureau in February during the contest’s submission period.
“The Canvas Pontiac program has continued to imbed notable art productions throughout our downtown community,” said Dr. Deirdre Waterman, mayor of Pon-­
tiac. “This is one of the arts initiatives that enriches our community.”
As part of this year’s contest, 56 works were submitted. The canvases were SPIRIT of PONTIAC
2DNODQG8QLYHUVLW\MRXUQDOLVPDQGSXEOLFUHODWLRQVVWXGHQWV
Paige Brockway, Shaqela Chapman and Anthony Spak wrote the stories for this newsletter. They are working as interns in &LW\+DOODVSDUWRIDQ2DNODQG3RQWLDFSDUWQHUVKLS
(GLWLQJDQGSDJHGHVLJQE\28MRXUQDOLVPIDFXOW\PHPEHUV
Kaniqua Daniel Welch, Holly Gilbert and Garry Gilbert.
then evaluated by a panel of three judg-­
es: Senghor Reid, an arts teacher from Cranbrook Academy of Art, Barbara Heller from the Detroit Institute of Arts and Patricia David, a local Pontiac artist who owns Gallery on the Boulevard in the city’s Franklin district.
Since being evaluated, 25 of the submit-­
ted works have been hung around the city.
“Pontiac seems ready to take off again,” said Lisa Mohler, co-­chair of Canvas Pon-­
tiac. “This project has been fun.”
Robert Karazim, also a co-­chair of Canvas Pontiac, hopes the contest will encourage more people to spend time in Pontiac.
“We’re trying to bring art back to a city that used to be an arts city,” Karazim said. For more information on the contest, visit CanvasPontiac.com.
State of the City
Mayor Deirdre Waterman will deliver her second annual State of the City ad-­
dress Monday, June 29, at The Lafayette Grand in Pontiac.
The event will begin with a reception at 6 p.m. and be followed by the pro-­
gram at 7. An afterglow will take place at the end of the address.
Mayor Waterman
PAGE 3 SPIRIT of PONTIAC SUMMER 2015
6/22/15 4:10:56 PM
Wisner Stadium gets face lift, four new tenants
INSIDE:
Economic recovery plan is focused on citizens and education – see page 2
BY SHAQELA CHAPMAN
Also playing at Wisner is the Rival Professional Football League’s Pontiac Wisner Memorial Stadium is aging well. Generals and Oakland County Racers, whose season began in May and runs until Almost 70 years old, Wisner has never August.
looked more beautiful than it does today.
For more information on the Stars, visit Located at 441 Cesar E. Chavez Avenue http://michiganstarsfc.com.
just north of downtown Pontiac, historic For more information on the Motor City Wisner has undergone more than $1 mil-­
Football Club, visit http://www.mc-­fc.
lion in renovations since 2013. com.
Lee Industrial Contracting, a Ponti-­
For information about Rivals Football ac-­based business, has a 10-­year lease with the Pontiac School District to manage League, visit http://www.rivalsnation.com
“We are very excited about what is the historic, 6,600-­seat stadium. happening here,” Michigan Stars Football Lee started by rehabilitating the stadi-­
Club President Shereef Akeel told The um’s plumbing and then moved to the Oakland Press. “We are here to stay … We ¿HOG6RIDUWKHSDUNLQJORWKDVEHHQUH-­
paved and the turf has been realigned. Lee aren’t just here for one year and then we pack up and leave. We are committed to also cleaned up the grounds and repaired being part of the resurgence of the city of the concession stand, sound system and Pontiac.”
scoreboard. More updates are planned.
Akeel told The Oakland Press that the The driving force for this major reno-­
team signed a nine-­year contract. This vation was simple. Through the decades, Wisner has hosted professional, semi-­pro, season runs through July.
“There is a resurgence in the city of amateur and interscholastic sports events. Detroit and we saw an opportunity in the Today, two soccer teams and two football city of Pontiac to revitalize it,” Akeel teams call Wisner their home turf. The soccer teams are the men’s Michigan Stars said. “Wisner Stadium is a diamond in the rough. It has been reconditioned with a and women’s Motor City Football Club. See page 4
6800(5‡&20081,7<1(:6/(77(52)7+(&,7<2)3217,$&‡INAUGURAL EDITION
Michigan Stars call Wisner home
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looks amazing. It is going to bring back entertainment to the city of Pontiac to those that are looking for something to do on a Friday night or Sunday afternoon.”
Pontiac Mayor Deirdre Waterman per-­
formed the opening kickoff for the soccer teams in May. She received a soccer ball autographed by all of the players. 1st -­ Ours + School of Rock Concert, The Crofoot (7 pm)
3rd -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N. Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
3rd -­ MOTI Concert, Elektricity, 15 S. Saginaw (9:30 pm)
9th -­ Motor City Bass Music Showcase, The Crofoot (7:30 pm)
10th -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
10th -­ 0D]H5XQQHUOutdoor Movie, Public Library (7 pm)
12th -­ The Good Son + Young Flood Concert, The Crofoot (5 pm)
13th -­ Arts Commission Meeting, Pontiac City Hall (5:30 pm)
13th-­16th -­ Confetti Camp for Kids, Pontiac Creative Arts Center
15th -­ Book Bingo, Pontiac Public Library (12:30-­1:30 pm)
16th -­ Jen Kirkman Concert, The Crofoot, 1 S. Saginaw (8 pm)
17th -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
20th -­ Garden Club Meeting, Goldner Walsh (6 pm)
20th-­23rd -­ Confetti Camp for Kids, Pontiac Creative Arts Center
24th -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
24th -­ ,QWHUVWHOODUOutdoor Movie, Pontiac Public Library (7 pm)
25th -­ Art Workshop with Tara Wilkinson, Public Library (1 pm)
31st -­ Patio Concert, Lafayette Market, 154 N Saginaw (5-­10 pm)
Ongoing -­ Classes at The Art Experience, 175 S. Saginaw
Ongoing -­ Canvas Pontiac Art Pieces Displayed Downtown
Have an arts-­related event, or questions about listings? Contact Arts Commission
Chair Mike McGuinness at (248) 410-­0702 or: [email protected]
PAGE 4 SPIRIT of PONTIAC SUMMER 2015
1330832-Newsletter.indd 1
See page 2
SPIRIT PONTIAC
1st-­2nd -­ Oakland Community College Faculty & Student Artists
Exhibit, Pontiac Creative Arts Center, 47 Williams (10 am-­4 pm)
The arts are part of the Pontiac scene throughout the summer
Wisner
Stadium
gets a redo
of
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Speaking of art
Automaker
commits
to Pontiac
Budget surplus
allows leaders
to implement
strategic plan
INSPIRING CIVIC INVOLVEMENT
BY PAIGE BROCKWAY
P
ontiac residents can expect to see positive changes kicking in with the 2015-­2016 budget, according to Mayor Deirdre Waterman.
The new budget’s funds will be allocated to key areas including:
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strengthen neighborhoods. The new budget “takes us away from crisis management, where we were, and puts us in a place where we can actually go to strategic planning,” the mayor said.
Pontiac has successfully stayed out of the red for the past two years. The city’s ¿VFDO\HDUHQGHGZLWKDVXUSOXV
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year is projected to end June 30 with a sur-­
plus of $2.5 million to $3 million.
“We are trying to set aside the bulk amount of this surplus for a rainy day, in other words, to be prepared for any unex-­
pected bumps on the road,” said Nevrus 1D]DUNR3RQWLDF¶V¿QDQFHGLUHFWRU
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in a while, will be transferred to the street funds to pay for much-­needed repairs of our roads.” The mayor collaborates with Pontiac’s Canvas Pontiac revives downtown Pontiac in beauty and spirit – SEE PAGE 2
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council and department heads to prepare the city’s budget two years in advance. An advisory board appointed by Gov. 5LFN6Q\GHUUHYLHZVWKH¿QDQFLDOSODQ
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a close, preparations for the 2016-­2017 budget are already under way. In the next few years, residents can expect to see development of Downtown Pontiac and enhancement of the local community through increased funding for recreational activities and movements like the city’s new arts commission. 5HVLGHQWVFDQDOVRDQWLFLSDWHLQFUHDVHG
activity from new and expanding busi-­
nesses – including development of the M1 Concourse car enthusiast center. “We are seeing a lot of economic development now, a lot of interest in our properties … Pontiac is on the precipice of a revitalization, and many people want to be a part of that,” Mayor Waterman said.
6/22/15 4:10:54 PM

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