No Malaysians involved in Mina stampede

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No Malaysians involved in Mina stampede
FBM KLCI 1613.17
22.20
KLCI FUTURES 1606.50
10.50
STI 2845.74
22.73
RM/USD 4.3450
CPO RM2240.00
57.00 OIL US$47.93
0.18 GOLD US$1135.00
3.40
PP 9974/08/2013 (032820)
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.60 (INCLUSIVE OF 6% GST)
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 25, 2015 ISSUE 2012/2015
FINANCIAL
DAILY
MAKE
BETTER
DECISIONS
www.theedgemarkets.com
Nazir calls for answers to
Malaysia’s perceived junk status
PA G E 2
EVERY FRIDAY!
Get your FREE copy
of The Edge Property
pull-out inside. Read online
@ theedgeproperty.com
SEPTEMB
FRIDAY
ISSUE 2012/2015
ER 25, 2015
T EVERY
FRIDAY WITH
A PULLOU
Read this
PP 9974/08/20
copy onlin
e @ theed
gepro perty
.com
TTER
MAKE BE
D EC I S I O N
S
IMPORTED
INFLATION
13 (032820)
ME
ep8 H O
ALM
ep7 D E
e
Millionair
-Mah Sing Icon
The Edge
er picks
ra
Contest winn
Mont’Kia
Residence
WS
ep3 N E
IDEAS
Island chic
AKERS
his
Coming into
own
BANDAARRA
INR further
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set to grow
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ry strong
seen very
ng has
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shi in Sela years. More upside Ampang
ship
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sion of the
th over the
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e
is also expe Jalil and Puchong.
in the futur
t
pleted. It
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its
of
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is akin to Bukit Jalil, Kuala
Selangor
lly
r, and
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ility, especia
BANDAR ing Puchong, Selango
it popular
and affordab
zle connect easy accessibility ment, have made
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in the early
Bhd (I&P
yers.
Bandar
Group Sdn , started with Banamong homebu
Peninsular
Kinrara
d up to
Island &
er of Bandargradually expande
and
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from
(BK1) in 1991
25km away from
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away
ally located
dar KinraraKinrara is strategic Cyberjaya, 30km
and
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city centreBandar Sunway.
Expressway
Alam
from
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Shah
the
and 8km
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way (MEX),
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(Kesas), (LDP), Maju Express
g.
landed
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Puchong (NPE) and Jalan Kinrara were mostly As the
pressway
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es were inge
Early projects
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ng mid-ran
-cost ones,and Merak
homes consisti ion grew, non-lan
medium
populat
working especially low to
Apartment
n
troduced, Apartment, Sri Tanjung
Sarkuna
director
Kenanga
managing as a well-plannedIt
Apartment.Frank Malaysia
ional design.tial
Bandar Kinrara
Knight
a convent
describes
albeit with uses within residenonal
Subramaniam
township,
recreati
shopho
integrated of commercial such as schools, a comfortoffers a mixother amenities , making the area
areas and places of worship
ES ON EP4
CONTINU
parks and to live.
able place
AI LENG
BY TAN
4 HOME BUSINESS
Home ownership
only a price issue?
MAY REAR ITS
UGLY HEAD
6 HOME BUSINESS
Hidden gems among
second-liner stocks
8 HOME BUSINESS
Poly Glass eyes
overseas markets to
off
ffsett d
domestic
ti d
drop
14 H O M E
Family of murdered
d
DPP not willing
to endorse release
of body
Low
L
Lo
ow petrol
petrol prices
prices and
and weak
weak consumer
consumer spending
spending could
co ld counter it.
Ahmad
Ahmad Naqib
Naqib
b Idris
Id
d has the story on Page 4.
by
u
o
y
o
t
t
h
g
u
o
r
b
s
i
y
p
o
c
l
a
t
This digi
No Malaysians involved
in Mina stampede
PA G E 2
FBM KLCI 1613.17
22.20
KLCI FUTURES 1606.50
10.50
STI 2845.74
22.73
RM/USD 4.3450
CPO RM2240.00
57.00
OIL US$47.93
0.18
GOLD US$1135.00
3.40
PP 9974/08/2013 (032820)
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.60 (INCLUSIVE OF 6% GST)
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 25, 2015 ISSUE 2012/2015
FINANCIAL
DAILY
MAKE
BETTER
DECISIONS
www.theedgemarkets.com
Nazir calls for answers to
Malaysia’s perceived junk status
PA G E 2
EVERY FRIDAY!
Get your FREE copy
of The Edge Property
pull-out inside. Read online
@ theedgeproperty.com
SEPTEMB
FRIDAY
ISSUE 2012/2015
ER 25, 2015
T EVERY
FRIDAY WITH
A PULLOU
Read this
PP 9974/08/20
copy onlin
e @ theed
gepro perty
.com
TTER
MAKE BE
D EC I S I O N
S
IMPORTED
INFLATION
13 (032820)
ME
ep8 H O
ALM
ep7 D E
e
Millionair
-Mah Sing Icon
The Edge
er picks
ra
Contest winn
Mont’Kia
Residence
WS
ep3 N E
IDEAS
Island chic
AKERS
his
Coming into
own
BANDAARRA
INR further
K
set to grow
housing
ry strong
seen very
ng has
is expected
l ngor
shi in Sela years. More upside Ampang
ship
This town
sion of the
th over the
the
price grow when the LRT extencted to gain from
e
is also expe Jalil and Puchong.
in the futur
t
pleted. It
Line is com neighbours — Buki
its
of
growth
of puzthe piece
is akin to Bukit Jalil, Kuala
Selangor
lly
r, and
Kinrara in
ility, especia
BANDAR ing Puchong, Selango
it popular
and affordab
zle connect easy accessibility ment, have made
Its
the
Lumpur. days of its develop
Group),
in the early
Bhd (I&P
yers.
Bandar
Group Sdn , started with Banamong homebu
Peninsular
Kinrara
d up to
Island &
er of Bandargradually expande
and
master develop
from
(BK1) in 1991
25km away from
Kinrara 1 9 (BK9).
away
ally located
dar KinraraKinrara is strategic Cyberjaya, 30km
and
Bandar
way
city centreBandar Sunway.
Alam Expresssara
from
Kuala Lumpur
Shah
8km
the
and
Daman
Putrajaya accessed through
Lebuhraya Pantai ExNew
It can be
Expressway,
way (MEX),
Bukit Jalil
(Kesas), (LDP), Maju Express
g.
landed
Puchon
g
Puchon (NPE) and Jalan Kinrara were mostly As the
pressway
in Bandar 1 and 2-storey houses.
es were inge
Early projects
ded residenc including
ng mid-ran
-cost ones,and Merak
homes consisti ion grew, non-lan
medium
populat
working especially low to
Apartment
n
troduced, Apartment, Sri Tanjung
Sarkuna
director
Kenanga
ng
nned
managi
as a well-pla
It
Apartment.Frank Malaysia
ional design.tial
Bandar Kinrara
Knight
a convent
describes
albeit with uses within residenonal
Subramaniam
township,
recreati
shopho
integrated of commercial such as schools, a comfortoffers a mixother amenities , making the area
areas and places of worship
ES ON EP4
CONTINU
parks and to live.
able place
AI LENG
BY TAN
4 HOME BUSINESS
Home ownership
only a price issue?
MAY REAR ITS
UGLY HEAD
6 HOME BUSINESS
Hidden gems among
second-liner stocks
8 HOME BUSINESS
Poly Glass eyes
overseas markets to
offset domestic drop
14 H O M E
Family of murdered
DPP not willing
to endorse release
of body
Low petrol prices and weak consumer spending could counter it.
Ahmad Naqib Idris has the story on Page 4.
No Malaysians involved
in Mina stampede
PA G E 2
2
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
For breaking news updates go to
www.theedgemarkets.com
ON EDGE T V
www.theedgemarkets.com
HBA: Raise
stamp duty
on 3rd house
to 5%
Stanley Thai:
M’sia in for
recession
if ringgit
continues slide
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Nazir Razak
expresses concern
Over Malaysia’s junk status as perceived by CDS traders
KUALA LUMPUR: Worried over
Malaysia’s placing in the junk
category by credit default swap
(CDS) traders, prominent banker
Datuk Seri Nazir Razak yesterday
urged the authorities to answer
ongoing financial controversies.
Writing on his Instagram account, the CIMB Group Holding
Bhd chairman and brother of
Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib
Razak said: “This is worrying.
The market is much more negative about Malaysia than the
rating agencies, taking us into
junk category, way below our
fundamentals.
“Suspect it’s due to so much
negative coverage in WSJ (The
Wall Street Journal), FT (Financial Times) and NYT (New York
Times) — all ‘capital’ people read
at least one if not all of them.
“We have to change the current narrative about Malaysia
with answers or legal suits; can’t
just ignore them.”
Nazir did not specify what
Malaysia had to answer for, but
the country has been in the international spotlight over controversies involving government-owned investment firm
1Malaysia Development Bhd
(1MDB), which Najib oversees
Nazir did not
specify what
Malaysia had
to answer for,
but the country
has been in the
international
spotlight over
controversies
involving
governmentowned
investment firm
1MDB. Photo
by Reuters
as finance minister and chairman of the firm’s advisory board.
Najib is also under scrutiny
over a RM2.6 billion political
donation from a Middle Eastern
donor that went to his personal
bank accounts.
Bloomberg reported yesterday that two weeks after Brazil’s
credit rating was lowered, CDS
investors were punishing other
emerging markets facing similar
challenges.
The report said Moody’s Corp
rated Malaysia A3, although traders saw it six levels lower at Ba3.
South Africa, which is a Baa2,
is viewed as a B1 borrower.
The report said most developing nations were confronting
the same issues that saw Brazil
losing its investment grade rating
at Standard & Poor’s — a plunge
in commodity prices, a slumping
currency and political turmoil.
The Bloomberg report also
said that “political disputes are
a key hindrance to investors’
perception of emerging-market creditworthiness”, and noted
recent street protests calling for
Najib’s resignation over alleged
financial scandals. — The Malaysian Insider
No Malaysians in Mina
stampede, says deputy minister
MAKKAH: No Malaysians were
involved in the haj pilgrims stampede in Mina during the “stoning
of the devil” ritual yesterday, said
Deputy Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Dr Asyraf
Wajdi Dusuki.
He said the scene of the stampede did not involve the route taken by the Malaysian pilgrims to
perform the “stoning of the devil”
ritual.
“The schedule for the haj pil-
grims ‘stoning of the devil’ ritual killed and 863 injured in the stamis fixed at after 5.30pm and 8pm pede within the zone of the Arab
tonight (yesterday),” he said at a countries’ tents in Mina, he said.
media conference here.
Eight existing haj pilgrims checkpoints set up by Lembaga Tabung
See related story on Page 26
Haji in Mina will be further upgraded to control and monitor pilgrims
He said the distance between the in the country.
scene of the stampede in Mina and
More than three million pilgrims
the zone of the Malaysian pilgrims’ from around the world, including
tents was about 3km to 4km.
over 22,000 Malaysians, are now
According to the authorities in in the Holy Land to perform the
Saudi Arabia, 717 pilgrims were haj. — Bernama
IN BRIEF
S&P threatens to
downgrade Volkswagen
over pollution scandal
FRANKFURT: Standard &
Poor’s threatened yesterday to
downgrade Volkswagen’s (VW)
credit rating over a worldwide
pollution cheating scandal. A
day after fellow rating agency Fitch placed VW’s credit on
“rating watch negative”, S&P
said it had similarly put VW’s
long- and short-term corporate credit ratings on “CreditWatch with negative implications”. The decision “follows
VW’s announcement that it will
take a €6.5 billion (RM32.03
billion) charge to third-quarter results to cover the costs
of a global recall of 11 million
vehicles which show discrepancies between diesel test results
and actual road use”, S&P said.
The credit rating agency said it
expected the carmaker to incur
“substantial remediation costs
to correct the engines of the cars
affected and potentially face
material fines from regulators.
Criminal charges in the United
States may also follow”. — AFP
GE to get up to US$12b
in export financing
from Britain
NEW YORK: General Electric Co
(GE) said yesterday it reached
an agreement with Britain’s export credit agency to access export financing of up to US$12
billion (RM52.68 billion), as
the US conglomerate continues to spotlight the expiration
of the US Export-Import Bank.
In GE’s latest announcement,
the company said the financing
deal would support orders for
oil and gas and other energy
projects in Brazil, Ghana, India, Mozambique and other
markets, and will create up to
1,000 jobs in Britain should GE
win those bids. — Reuters
China to let foreign
investors participate
in SOE reforms
BEIJING: China will allow foreign investors to participate
in reforms of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in “an orderly
manner”, the cabinet said yesterday, as part of broad efforts
to shake up the inefficient sector. Foreign investment will be
introduced into state-owned
firms via restructurings and
joint ventures, as well as overseas mergers and acquisitions,
the State Council, or cabinet,
said in new guidelines on SOE
reforms. — Reuters
BMW, Daimler deny manipulating emissions tests
‘US sends convicted
woman back to China’
BERLIN: BMW said it had not manipulated emissions tests, denying
a magazine report saying some of
its diesel cars were found to exceed
emissions standards.
“There is no difference in the
treatment of exhaust emissions
whether they are on [test] rollers
or on the road,” the German luxury
carmaker said yesterday.
German trade magazine Auto
Bild said earlier yesterday that
BMW’s X3 xDrive 20d model ex-
BEIJING: A Chinese woman
convicted and jailed in the
United States for her part in a
scheme to steal nearly US$485
million (RM2.13 billion) from
a state-run Chinese bank was
sent back to China yesterday,
officials said. Beijing and Washington have no extradition treaty, but the return was the second in less than a week and
comes as Chinese President
Xi Jinping is on a state visit to
the US. — AFP
ceeded Euro 6 emissions limits
more than 11-fold in road tests
done by the International Council
on Clean Transportation (ICCT).
“No specific details of the test
have yet been provided and therefore we cannot explain these results,” BMW said. “We will contact
the ICCT and ask for clarification
of the tests they carried out.”
Meanwhile, German carmaker
Daimler said it did not manipulate
emissions data for diesel engines,
after Volkswagen admitted to having deceived US regulators about
how much its diesel cars pollute.
See related stories on Page 16 & 24
A spokesman for Daimler said
yesterday the maker of MercedesBenz cars did not use so-called defeat devices employed by Volkswagen and complied with rules on
nitrogen oxide emissions around
the world. — AFP
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
3
4 HOME BUSINESS
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
Imported inflation
may rear its ugly head
Low petrol prices and weak consumer spending could counter it
BY A H MA D NAQ I B IDR IS
KUALA LUMPUR: The low fuel prices have helped contain the inflationary pressure exerted by the implementation of the goods and services
tax. However, moving forward, the
weak ringgit could be one that causes inflation to rear its ugly head.
The latest economic data show
that the country’s inflation, measured by the consumer price index
(CPI), went up by 3.1% in August
— it came in at the higher range
of analysts’ expectations. The rate
was indeed lower compared with
3.3% in July.
The inflation was mainly driven
by the rise in prices of liquor and tobacco products, coupled with more
expensive healthcare services and
higher restaurant and hotel charges.
For the first eight months of 2015,
the CPI rose 1.9% year-on-year, and
was unchanged on a month-onmonth basis. The pace of 1.9% from
January to August does not seem to
point to any inflationary pressure.
Nonetheless, some economists
foresee the possibility of rising inflation given the more expensive
imported goods; be they food, medicine, manufacturing inputs or auto
parts, as a result of the sharp depreciation of the ringgit against other
currencies, including the Thai baht
and the Philippine peso, and not
only the US dollar.
While forecasting a lower fullyear inflation of 2.5% this year versus 3.2% in 2014, AllianceDBS Re-
search acknowledged that the soft
local currency could possibly result
in imported inflation.
“In light of the ringgit exchange
rate trend (trading above RM4 per
US dollar since early August) that
could remain weak for a while before
the various external and domestic
macro uncertainties settle, the risk
and impact of imported inflation
are near-term concerns,” it said in
a research note.
AllianceDBS noted that the historic annual trends, for the period from 1980 to 2012, between the
Malaysian import price index and
the CPI have a high positive correlation of 0.97, which means overall
price pressures move in tandem in
the long run.
The import price index’s below-trend of 0.2% growth for the
year to July was due to the slump
in global crude oil prices. Even after
excluding the mineral fuel imports’
price pressure effect, it said the index was still marginally lower than
the CPI trend, at 1.6%.
“Given the complex exchange
rate cost pass-through to the CPI, we
expect imported inflation pressure
to gradually catch up in the coming
months.
“Nevertheless, the overall subdued commodity prices and expected moderation in near-term
private consumption could mitigate
some inflationary pressures,” said
AllianceDBS.
The less robust consumer spending may put a cap on any price in-
CPI y-o-y growth since Aug 2014
3.5
3.0
y-o-y growth (%)
3.3%
3.1%
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0.0
Aug, 2014
Aug, 2015
creases on imported goods.
Citi Research, however, concluded that the latest inflation data show
imported inflation remains “manageable”; its impact has been limited by “lower commodity prices”
and “low global inflation”.
“Imported inflation was less evident in August versus July,” said Citi
Research. According to it, only two
of the categories that saw an inflation pickup in August had sizable
import content, compared with five
categories in July.
Nonetheless, the research outfit
noted Bank Negara Malaysia’s earlier estimate of a muted inflation
pass-through from a stronger ringgit, with a 10% appreciation of the
local currency reducing inflation
by just 0.05% to 0.15%. But it might
be a different pattern in the case of
the weakening ringgit.
“Policymakers have acknowledged that pass-through effects
could be asymmetric and larger in
times of ringgit depreciation versus appreciation. Moreover, passthrough effects may be non-linear,
and could be larger in times of extreme ringgit depreciation,” it wrote
in the research note.
Hong Leong Investment Bank
Bhd economist Sia Ket Ee told The
Edge Financial Daily that CPI numbers were broadly within expectations, and said that inflation was
contained by the cut in petrol pump
prices.
“The main determinant of this
would be the domestic fuel prices,
which were cut by 10 sen across all
fuel types. The lower fuel prices will
exert some downward pressure on
inflation,” he said.
Sia noted that fuel prices were
further reduced in September which
could result in lower y-o-y inflation
for the month.
“We view that global oil prices
will remain low in the near term.
In view of the low oil prices, we are
lowering our 2015 inflation target
to 2% from 2.5%, and expect the
CPI to grow 2.6% in September,”
he said.
Asked if the weakened ringgit will
pressure inflation upwards, Sia said
the ringgit seems to be stabilising,
which means imported inflation
will not be as strong.
“The lower fuel factor will probably offset the inflationary pressure
from the weakened ringgit,” he said.
Home ownership only a price issue?
BY MEENA L A KSHANA
KUALA LUMPUR: Housing affordability has been a thorny issue for the
government, and the problem becomes even more prominent after
the property boom in recent years.
Khazanah Research Institute
managing director Datuk Charon
Mokhzani warned that Malaysians
will not be able to afford properties
if escalating housing prices are not
contained.
The former banking executive said
that flooding the market with supply
would in turn pull down prices so that
people could afford to own property. Also, he believed that employing
technologies such as three-dimensional building plans and using the
industrialised building system would
help to reduce costs, hence lowering
selling prices.
However, some quarters doubt
that flooding the market with an
ample supply is the way to resolve
the housing affordability problem
in the country as the consequence
of a property market crash and its
Charon says it is unsustainable for the
government to grant subsidies and cheap
housing loans. Photo by Patrick Goh
chain effect could be a steeper price
for Malaysians to pay.
When contacted, an economist
with an investment bank, said a supply glut in the property market could
lead to a crippled financial system,
citing the example of the US subprime loan crisis.
“The danger in doing this is that,
if we look at the financial crises that
have occurred, a lot of these were
caused by a collapse in the asset price
market, including property prices,”
he said.
Speaking at a forum on “Does
Greater Prosperity Come with Less
Housing Affordability”, on Wednesday, Charon pointed out that housing prices in urbanised areas such
as Kuala Lumpur and Penang are
categorised as severely unaffordable
and other less urbanised areas risk
descending into this category if rising property prices are not curbed.
Charon commented that it was
unsustainable for the government to
grant subsidies and cheap housing
loans to the public and he stressed
that the solution was to reduce housing prices.
According to him, although median household incomes have risen
slightly more than median house
prices at 11.7% and 10.6% respectively, the median house price in
KL and Penang is 5.2 to 5.5 times
median annual household income,
marking it as severely unaffordable.
An affordable market is one where
the median house price is three times
median annual household income.
The increase in median household income is barely 1.1% extra compared with the hike in median house
prices. If the household income has
grown at a faster pace, would that also
help resolve the housing affordability issue?
An economist acknowledged that
the transformation of the economy
from one that is geared towards lowskilled, low-wage to a high-skilled,
high-wage economy is a long-term
solution to address the issue of housing affordability.
“From all the investments that
we have seen so far, the type of investments Malaysia is attracting is
moving in the right direction towards
creating high-income jobs,” he said.
“But whether it will be enough for the
country to propel to a high-income
nation status remains to be seen,”
he added.
The economist observed that the
government has not shown a strong
commitment to curtail the economy’s reliance on cheap labour and
low value-added manufacturing to
drive the economy.
NEWS IN BRIEF
RHBCap
postpones rights
issue to Nov 19
BY G H O C H E E Y UA N
KUALA LUMPUR: RHB Capital Bhd (RHBCap) is delaying
its RM2.5 billion rights issue
by nearly two months as the
banking group needs to consult
the relevant regulators with regard to the central bank’s order
to cap Aabar Investment PJS’
subscription to 15% instead of
21.9%, as per its shareholding
entitlement.
In its filing on Wednesday,
the country’s fourth-largest
banking group said the ex-date
for the rights issue of 517.7 million new shares in RHBCap at
an issue price of RM4.82 had
been rescheduled to Nov 19
from Sept 29. The entitlement
date for the rights issue had
been extended from Oct 1 to
Nov 23.
The number of rights shares
to be issued and the book closure date may also be revised
at a later date, it added.
The date for commencement of trading of the rights
has been delayed to Nov 24
from Oct 2, while the date for
acceptance and payment has
been rescheduled to 5pm on
Dec 8 from Oct 19, while the
listing date is now Dec 21 instead of Oct 30.
EcoWorld’s
RM15b township
faces land issues
BY G H O C H E E Y UA N
KUALA LUMPUR: The proposed
RM15 billion township development in Kuala Selangor by
Eco World Development Group
Bhd (EcoWorld) may have run
into some hiccups. The Selangor state government said it is
in the midst of acquiring some
of the same tracts EcoWorld is
buying for the development.
Menteri Besar Incorporated
Selangor (MBI), in a statement
on Wednesday, said the tracts,
in particular those located in
the planned township of Alam
Mutiara, are now involved in
ongoing legal proceedings in
court.
EcoWorld announced on
Tuesday that its unit Paragon
Pinnacle Sdn Bhd was acquiring 26 pieces of leasehold land
in Kuala Selangor — collectively measuring about 2,198.4
acres (889.66ha) — from four
different vendors for RM1.18
billion cash.
When contacted, MBI chief
operating officer Soffan Affendi
Aminudin said they involved
the 14 pieces of land that EcoWorld is acquiring from Mujur
Zaman Sdn Bhd.
The tracts carry a collective
land size of 1,313.81 acres, about
60% of the total size of land parcels EcoWorld is acquiring.
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
5
6 HOME BUSINESS
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
Hidden
gems among
second-liner stocks
Analysts see CBIP and Dolphin bullish until at least next year
BY GHO C H EE Y UAN
KUALA LUMPUR: The continued
weakness in crude palm oil (CPO)
prices took its toll on most plantation companies’ earnings for the
quarter ended June 30, 2015, with
some swinging to a net loss.
This raises concerns that planters
may slash capital spending this year
as they focus on preserving cash, a
move that will impact palm oil mill
equipment and parts makers —
considered as second-liner stocks.
However, analysts are bullish on
these stocks, namely CB Industrial
Product Holding Bhd (CBIP) and
Dolphin International Bhd with
their healthy order book position,
which will last until at least the end
of next year, adding that they offer
future potential that is expected to
fetch good returns once the plantation industry rebounds.
They also noted that planters
have so far showed no signs of scaling back their capital expenditure
(capex).
Kenanga Research analyst Voon
Yee Ping is optimistic about CBIP’s
mid-term outlook given its strong
pace of order book replenishment,
as well as an anticipated increase
in fresh fruit bunch production in
the coming years, which will boost
sales for palm oil mill equipment
and parts.
“Planters have consistently been
planting new trees in the last three
or four years when the CPO price
was high. As these trees mature,
they need more mills to process
these fruits,” she told The Edge Financial Daily.
“In view of this, CBIP’s contract
replenishment should remain decent, over the next two to three
years,” Voon said, adding that this
will provide good earnings visibility
for the group going forward.
AllianceDBS Research analyst
Cheah King Yoong said CBIP’s current order book for palm oil engineering (POE) segment stood at
RM550 million, which is likely to
keep it busy until the end of 2016.
He noted that CBIP has secured
RM200 million worth of contracts
for the POE segment thus far.
“On this note, order book replenishment might exceed our assumption of RM400 million for the
financial year ending Dec 31, 2015
(FY15),” he added.
However, Cheah said the order
book replenishment will also depend much on CPO prices going
forward.
“Planters would normally rein
in capex [on future high-cost projects] if CPO prices remain weak
for an extended period,” he said,
CB Industrial Product Holding Bhd
RM
Vol (mil)
6
4.8
2.3
3.6
2.1
Dolphin International Bhd
50
0.85
40
0.80
RM0.79
30
1.9
2,4
1.7
1.5
0
Sept 19, 2014
0.75
20
RM1.80
1.2
Sen
0.90
Vol (mil)
60
Sept 23, 2015
adding that this could have impacted CBIP’s order book restoration.
CPO prices slumped to RM1,806
per tonne on Aug 27, the lowest
since 2009, from its peak of RM3,927
per tonne on Feb 14, 2011. Year to
date, the CPO price has declined
12.15%.
While RHB Research analyst Hoe
Lee Leng doesn’t see plantation
companies stop spending money
on capex, the amount may be less.
“Instead of having three mills
this year, they may only get two.
There may be some cutting [in
capex] in the near term, but as long
as CPO prices do not drop further
then it should not be a problem,”
she said, expecting CBIP’s order
book replenishment to be flattish
in the near term.
Newly listed palm oil mill manufacturer Dolphin is another stock
analysts believe will offer a value
play opportunity. It has an outstanding order book of RM176 million that should last until FY16.
In a note to clients on June 9,
Kenanga Research said some 54
out of Dolphin’s current 114 customers (47%) were recurring ones.
“With a mix of new and recurring
revenue, we assume an annual order book replenishment of RM170
million,” the research firm said.
“We further understand that
Dolphin is also one of CBIP’s part
suppliers,” it added.
Kenanga Research also noted
that CBIP is currently trading on
FY15 price-earnings ratio (PER) of
11.6 times, while Dolphin’s forward
FY15 PER is 4.2 times — both trading at a lower PER than its industry
peers’ average of 15.2 times.
It is also expecting CPO to trade
at RM2,200 per tonne this year,
gradually rising to RM2,400 per
tonne in 2016.
“We believe that the CPO price
recovery is mainly due to demand
recovery and lower supply,” Kenanga Research added.
Affin Hwang Capital Research
said in a note dated June 8 that
0.70
10
0.65
0
June 8, 2015
NEWS IN BRIEF
Toyo Ink enters into US$35m
consultancy agreement
BY S A N G E E T H A A MA RT H A L IN G A M
GEORGE TOWN: Toyo Ink Group
Bhd (TIGB) (valuation: 1.40; fundamental: 0.40) has entered into
a US$35 million (RM153.65 million) consultancy service agreement with Phu My Vinh Consulting Investment and Trading
Service Company Ltd (PMV) for
the former’s venture to secure
a power generation project in
Vietnam.
The agreement facilitated
PMV’s advice on research while
supporting the negotiation on
the build-operate-transfer (BOT),
power purchase agreement (PPA)
and land lease agreement (LLA)
pertaining to the two 1,000mw
coal-fired thermal power plants
construction in the Song Hau
Power Complex with the relevant
authorities in Vietnam, according
to a filing with Bursa Malaysia
yesterday.
“[Apart from advice and negotiation] PMV [is required to]
prepare all requisite documentations for the purpose of negotiation and eventual procurement
of the requisite approvals for the
execution of the BOT contract,
PPA and LLA between TIGB and
the relevant authorities in Vietnam,” it said.
TIGB’s shareholders granted
the approval for the execution of
the US$35 million consultancy
service agreement on Tuesday.
The total fee payable for the
consultancy service of US$35 million, excluding any associated
taxes such as value-added tax,
was equivalent to 1% of the total
development cost of the power
plant project at US$3.5 billion,
according to the filing.
As of now, the ink manufacturer has already made a payment of
RM160.2 million towards the power plant project in Vietnam. The
consultancy fees would raise the
amount invested to RM310 million
before TIGB secures the power
generation project in Vietnam.
Sept 23, 2015
Dolphin intended to capitalise on
the prospects offered by oil palm
industries in Malaysia and Indonesia, which have 439 and 608 palm
oil mills respectively.
It also noted that Dolphin’s net
gearing would be reduced to 0.03
times from 0.27 times after it fully
utilised the gross proceeds raised
from its initial public offering.
CBIP (valuation: 1.8; fundamental: 3) saw its net profit drop 15.86%
year-on-year to RM17.77 million
for the second quarter ended June
30, 2015 (2QFY15), from RM21.12
million on higher taxation. Revenue for the quarter fell 7.07% to
RM115.62 million from RM124.42
million a year ago due to lower project billing by the special-purpose
vehicle segment.
For the cumulative six months
(1HFY15), the group’s net profit
came in 9.7% lower at RM233.27
million compared with RM245.46
million a year ago. Revenue fell
4.97% to RM233.27 million from
RM245.46 million in 1HFY14.
Dolphin, meanwhile, posted a
net loss of RM3.47 million on revenue of RM13.47 million in 2QFY15
due to listing expenses.
For the cumulative six months,
the company recorded a net loss of
RM363,000, while revenue came in
at RM24.09 million.
Shares in CBIP closed at RM1.80
on Wednesday with a market capitalisation of RM949.35 million.
Dolphin’s counter ended the day
at 79 sen, giving it a market cap of
RM175.38 million.
The Edge Research’s fundamental
score reflects a company’s profitability
and balance sheet strength, calculated based on historical numbers. The
valuation score determines if a stock is
attractively valued or not, also based
on historical numbers. A score of 3
suggests strong fundamentals and
attractive valuations. Go to www.
theedgemarkets.com for more details
on a company’s financial dashboard.
ManagePay to diversify into
cybersecurity business
BY G H O C H E E Y UA N
KUALA LUMPUR: ManagePay
Systems Bhd is acquiring a 29.5%
stake in cybersecurity firm Trustgate Bhd for RM1.8 million cash
to tap the online security business.
In a filing with Bursa Malaysia
on Wednesday, the electronic
payment specialist said it had
entered into a conditional share
purchase agreement with Trustgate chief executive officer Lo
Nyan Tjing to acquire 8.84 million shares (29.5%) in Trustgate.
Lo holds a 33.33% stake in
Trustgate. The remaining 66.67%
is under Sigmaview Diversified
Sdn Bhd.
Trustgate owns 94.43% of
MSC Trustgate, one of the only
three licensed certificate authorities approved by the Malaysian
Communications and Multime-
dia Commission.
MSC Trustgate has been providing cybersecurity products
and services for over 10 years,
and its clients include major financial institutions in Malaysia.
ManagePay (fundamental:
1.30; valuation: 0) said the buy
“will enable the group [to] leapfrog into the cybersecurity business supplying [such service] to
financial institutions and payee
organisations”.
Aside from being an additional revenue source, ManagePay
said the deal would let it tap a
trusted and proven platform for
securing Internet of things devices and infrastructure.
The purchase, to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2015,
will be funded through internal
funds. It expects the acquisition
to contribute positively in the
future.
Tropicana cancels RM444.3m land
buy for RM3.7b mixed project in Johor
BY S A N G E E T H A A MA RT H A L IN G A M
GEORGE TOWN: Tropicana
Corp Bhd’s special purpose vehicle (SPV) Tropicana Danga
Senibong Sdn Bhd (TDSSB) has
cancelled its acquisition of a
34.2ha leasehold land meant
for a RM3.7 billion mixed-development in Johor Baru, Johor.
In a filing with Bursa Malaysia
on Wednesday, the group said
TDSSB (formerly known as Renown Dynamics Sdn Bhd) had
exercised its right to terminate
the sale and purchase agreement
(SPA) signed on Dec 23, 2013, as
the conditions precedent were
not fulfilled in accordance with
the SPA’s provisions.
However, Tropicana (funda-
mental: 1; valuation: 1.5) did
not specify which provisions
had not been fulfilled.
Recall that Johor-based developer Tebrau Teguh Bhd, in
December 2013, proposed the
establishment of a joint venture
with Golddust United Sdn Bhd,
a wholly-owned unit of Tropicana, to jointly develop the said
land in Mukim Plentong, Johor
Baru.
The SPV, Renown Dynamics,
would acquire the land, which is
partially under water and needs
to be reclaimed, for RM444.3
million from Tebrau Teguh, and
then be developed.
Tebrau Teguh would hold
30% in the SPV, while 70% would
be taken up by Golddust United.
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
7
8 HOME BUSINESS
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
Poly Glass eyes markets
abroad to offset domestic drop
It expects higher revenue from Australia and New Zealand markets
BY SA NGEETHA AM ARTHALINGAM
GEORGE TOWN: Poly Glass Fibre
(M) Bhd, a Penang-based fibre
glass wool maker, expects higher
revenue from its Australia and New
Zealand markets to help offset a
potential drop in domestic sales as
construction projects slow down.
Its executive chairman and chief
executive officer Fong Wern Sheng
said the group is anticipating sales
in the Malaysian market to slump
10% to 20% for the current financial
year ending Feb 29, 2016 (FY16),
dragged down by fewer jobs at local
construction companies. The local
market currently generates 40% of
Poly Glass’ revenue.
To mitigate the sales drop, the
group aims to double its market
share in Australia and New Zealand by FY17. Poly Glass currently
holds less than 3% market share in
the two markets, despite the greater
demand for glass wool insulation
products there than Asian markets.
‘The demand for glass wool insulation products is bigger in the
Oceania, Australia and New Zealand markets than in Asia. As such,
we aim to double our share in these
markets from less than 3% now to
20% between three and five years,”
Fong told The Edge Financial Daily
in an interview.
He said the challenges from stiff
market competition and volatile
currency rates in Malaysia and Asia
can also be reduced through economies of scale in Australia and New
Zealand.
For FY15, Poly Glass posted a
6.9% decline in net profit to RM5.51
million from RM5.91 million a year
ago, while revenue increased 8.2%
to RM43.92 million from RM40.6
million in FY14.
Of the total revenue, RM8.34 million or 19% came from the Oceania
market, while Malaysia made up
RM19.5 million or 44%. The Asian
market including Indonesia contributed another RM15.3 million
or 34.9%.
Fong said to cope with the anticipated increase in demand, Poly
Glass invested RM23 million in new
machines to boost production, as
well as expanded its warehousing
space.
‘We aim to increase automation
and produce more in a short time.
Thus, we are also spending RM1.5
million to upgrade the machines
for the downstream sector,” he said.
Fong said Poly Glass’ plants are
running at 60% capacity, producing
about 20,000 tonnes of glass wool
insulation products every year.
‘The total market for glass wool
insulation products in Australia
where it owns a 407.5ha plot of former plantation land.
“It would be a new revenue
stream (for the group) in the next
few years. The area is suitable for a
boutique hotel. We are still studying
the eco concept,” he said.
Poly Glass (fundamental: 1.25;
valuation: 1.1) shares were untraded last Friday. The illiquid stock
last closed down 1.3% at 38 sen on
Sept 1, with a market capitalisation
of RM60.79 million.
As at Dec 2, 2013, Fong holds
a direct 6.75% stake in Poly Glass
and owns an indirect 15.2% stake
Poly Glass’ plants like this one, run at 60% capacity. Altogether they produce about
through Green Cluster Sdn Bhd.
His father Fong Wah Kai, who is
20,000 tonnes of glass wool insulation products every year.
executive director of Poly Glass,
and New Zealand is estimated to
“We are also working with the owns another direct 4.25% stake
be about 80,000 tonnes per year. building sector to incorporate the and a 48.79% indirect stake through
We aim to eventually supply 16,000 energy efficient code for industrial Equaplus Sdn Bhd.
tonnes per year to the two countries, buidings as stated in the Uniform
which would represent about 20% Building By-Laws which were gashare of the market there,” he said. zetted at the federal level. It has The Edge Research’s fundamental
The group has also embarked not been gazetted at the state level. score reflects a company’s profitabilon a campaign aimed at educating
“It would mean that builders ity and balance sheet strength, calcuthe public on the use of good qual- must abide by the minimum en- lated based on historical numbers.
ity insulation products for safety ergy-saving ratings. This could be The valuation score determines if a
reasons in its marketing strategy for roofing where insulation is re- stock is attractively valued or not,
to increase sales.
quired for buildings of a certain also based on historical numbers.
He said consumers were in- size,” he said.
A score of 3 suggests strong fundaclined to pick cheaper products
On its property development mentals and attractive valuations.
that come from China than local segment, Fong said it is exploring Go to www.theedgemarkets.com for
ones which have better quality but the idea of developing an eco-tour- more details on a company’s finanpriced higher.
ism hotel in Tanjung Malim, Perak, cial dashboard.
LED catalyst to drive IQ Group’s earnings
BY SU PRI YA SU RENDR AN
GEORGE TOWN: IQ Group Holdings Bhd will be channelling much
of its efforts in the next three years
to cultivating the growth potential
of its new product — the intelligent
light-emitting diode (LED) lighting
product that is used in the industrial sector.
The Lumiqs brand of the product
is expected to be the next growth catalyst for the Penang-based company’s future earnings, according to IQ
Group managing director and chief
executive officer Daniel Beasley.
“There has been a real momentum in terms of Lumiqs sales within this short period of time since its
launch in February. We believe it
will be a major contributor to revenue within the next three years,” he
told The Edge Financial Daily after
the company’s annual general meeting on Wednesday.
The new product combines the
company’s competency in sensor
technologies with intelligent communications applications and expertise in lighting. IQ Group manufactures sensor-controlled lighting
products.
“We have engaged a Singaporean
company called Syspex Technologies
Pte Ltd as our distributor to help us
to market our product across Southeast Asia, and so far the response has
been good, with anticipated sales
orders from a large Singaporean
company which requires a substantial quantity of units,” he said.
With 99% of sales derived from
exports, IQ Group has also established agents in New Zealand, Australia and Switzerland to market its
products. “There is also interest from
new markets which we have not
tapped into before, such as South
Africa, Kenya and Pakistan,” said
Beasley.
However, he said it is too soon to
predict Lumiqs’ contribution to the
group’s sales.
Sensor-controlled lighting products remain as IQ Group’s main revenue driver for the current financial
year ending March 31, 2016 (FY16).
“Even as our new product kicks
in, we will not neglect our original
design manufacturer business which
will be our main revenue contributor
for FY16,” said Beasley.
For its first financial quarter ended June 30, 2015 (1QFY16), IQ reported a net profit of RM6.43 million, which is 14% lower than its
1QFY15 net profit of RM7.47 million.
Quarterly revenue also dropped almost 12% to RM50.03million, from
RM56.74 million in the previous
corresponding quarter.
“Our 1QFY16 performance was
mainly brought down by lower sales
because of the type of business we
are in. There will be orders from
our customers based on activities
and promotional projects that they
may have. These, in turn, will have
implications on our business. It all
boils down to the timing of the orders,” said Beasley.
However, he added that the weak
ringgit will be a boost to the company’s financials, considering a large
bulk of its products are for exports.
“Forex, of course, will always have
implications one way or another, as
we do purchase some components
in US dollars, but generally it will be
more of a positive to us,” said Beasley.
IQ Group’s main export markets
are the United Kingdom (28%), continental Europe (28%), Japan (23%)
and other Asia-Pacific countries, as
well as the United States.
Year to date, IQ Group’s share
price gained 30.2% to close at RM2.07
on Wednesday, with a market capitalisation of RM182.13 million.
Malaysia in talks with local, foreign
firms on investments worth RM50b
JOHOR BARU: Malaysia is in
talks with several companies
on investments totalling RM50
billion, the Malaysian Investment Development Authority
(Mida) said on Wednesday.
Its chief executive officer
Datuk Azman Mahmud said
the talks were expected to be
concluded within the next few
months.
“We have a significant number of investments in the pipeline and we hope the talks can
be completed soon,” he told
reporters after a ground-breaking ceremony for the Taiwan-based Eternal Materials
Co Ltd’s RM362 million factory
at Tanjung Langsat industrial
complex here on Wednesday.
Johor Tourism, Trade and
Consumer Affairs Committee
chairman Datuk Tee Siew Kiong
officiated at the ceremony.
Azman said more foreign
investments would be brought
into Johor as it is close to Singapore.
“It can be the new investment destination as it has four
international ports,” he said.
Azman said the opening
of the new factory showed
that foreign investors had
confidence in the Malaysian
economy. “Eternal Materials
is a company known for its
specialisation of chemicals,
and we are trying to increase
their investments into chemical plating.
“This is important as one
of Mida’s strategies is to
strengthen the petrochemical industry in Pengerang,
Johor,” he said.
The 16.2ha manufacturing
factory was expected to commence operation by end-2017,
he said.
“The new factory will add to
the company’s existing [manufacturing] capacity of synthetic resins and unsaturated
polyester resins to cater to a
growing demand in Southeast
Asia,” he said.
The company’s products
are mainly used in paints and
coatings, construction chemicals, adhesives plus fibre and
non-fibre reinforcement industries. — Bernama
9
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
Looking for
diamonds in
the rough?
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is to discover undervalued stocks and
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FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
www.theedgemarkets.com
I N S I D E R A S I A’S S TO C K O F T H E D AY
MIKRO MSC BHD
(ALL FIGURES IN MYR MIL)
MIKRO MSC BHD
WE first featured Mikro (Fundamental: 3/3,
Valuation: 2.1/3) on November 5, 2014 when
its shares were priced at 25 sen. It has since
risen 34% to 33.5 sen, despite weakness in
the broader market.
Mikro is a small, relatively unknown
company listed on the ACE market with
market capitalisation of just RM93 million.
Furthermore, few would categorise its business as “exciting”.
It develops and manufactures electrical
distribution products such as overcurrent
and earth fault relays, metering solutions
and power factor regulators. These are
small but key components of a building’s
integrated electrical system. They monitor
and prevent damage to electrical equipment
by isolating and tripping a circuit breaker
when electrical fault is detected.
Nevertheless, Mikro has delivered
steady earnings growth. Revenue grew
from RM20.2 million to RM30.4 million
MIKRO MSC BHD
Note: This report is brought to you by Asia Analytica Sdn Bhd, a licensed investment adviser. Please exercise your own
judgment or seek professional advice for your specific investment needs. We are not responsible for your investment
decisions. Our shareholders, directors and employees may have positions in any of the stocks mentioned.
from FYJune2010 to FY2014 while net profit expanded from RM3.7 million to RM5.6
million. In the latest FY2015, revenue was
up 28.3% to RM39 million while net profit
increased 47.9% to RM8.3 million.
Notably, it has maintained high double-digit net margins, ranging from 14%21% in the past six years. Domestic sales
accounted for some 72% of sales, with the
balance from export, including to Vietnam,
Iran, and India.
The company has a debt-free balance
sheet, save for marginal bank overdrafts in
FY2013. As at end-June, the company had
net cash of RM8.4 million — about 9% of its
market capitalisation.
Recently, Mikro proposed to acquire
a 4,047m2 freehold industrial land in
Klang, together with attached buildings,
for RM11.7 million. The company intends
to consolidate its entire operations under
one roof.
To recap, its products are used in numerous high-profile developments, including
the KLIA 2 and Tropicana Medical Centre
as well as the MRT stations in Singapore
and Doha International Airport in Qatar.
The stock trades at a trailing 12-month
P/E of 11 times compared to growth of
47.9%. Dividends totaled 1.2 sen in FY2014,
giving a net yield of 3.6%.
Insider Asia will feature a new stock pick on every alternate day.
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t
r
a
n
p
sto
p
Income Statement
Turnover
EBITDA
Depreciation
EBIT
Associates
Interest income
Interest expense
Extraordinary gain/(loss)
Pre-tax profit
Net profit - owners of company
Balance sheet
Fixed assets - PPE
Biological assets
Intangibles & goodwill
Cash and equivalents
Total current assets
ST borrowings
Total current liabilities
Total assets
Shareholders' fund
Long term borrowings
MIKRO MSC BHD
RATIOS
DPS ($)
Net asset per share ($)
ROE (%)
Turnover growth (%)
Net profit growth (%)
Net margin (%)
ROA (%)
Current ratio (x)
Gearing (%)
Interest cover (x)
FY12
FY13
FY14
FY2015Q4
30/6/2012
30/6/2013
30/6/2014
30/6/2015
25.8
7.7
1.4
6.4
0.1
0.0
6.4
4.8
28.1
7.5
1.6
5.9
0.1
0.1
5.9
4.6
30.4
8.5
1.9
6.6
0.1
0.1
6.6
5.6
10.6
3.1
0.5
2.6
0.0
0.0
2.6
1.9
4.9
5.9
2.8
19.0
3.6
26.2
25.7
-
4.7
6.7
5.4
20.8
0.3
3.7
28.5
27.9
-
4.6
8.3
3.9
23.4
4.5
31.8
31.4
-
5.2
9.6
8.4
28.8
5.3
38.3
37.2
-
FY12
FY13
30/6/2012
30/6/2013
30/6/2014
0.02
0.14
19.11
9.69
41.51
18.62
18.64
5.35
189.65
0.02
0.16
17.25
8.68
(3.69)
16.50
16.92
5.61
114.79
0.01
0.17
18.83
8.26
20.59
18.38
18.51
5.19
120.01
L
N
O
IS
le
b
a
FY14 ROLLING 12-MTH
0.01
0.13
24.89
28.30
47.88
21.18
24.48
5.40
187.12
E
IN
http://edgy.my
B R O K E R S’ C A L L / T E C H N I C A L S 11
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
Persistent market volatility
BY LEE CHENG HOOI
U
S equity markets fell
on Wednesday as a
slump in commodity
prices reignited investor fears of slowing global growth.
Softer economic data from China and
Europe spilled over into the American
markets and the S&P 500 Index fell
3.98 points to 1,938.76, while the Dow
Jones Industrial Average declined
50.58 points to end at 16,279.89.
In Malaysia, the FBM KLCI moved
in a wider range of 52.12 points for
the week with lower volumes of 1.6
billion to 1.99 billion shares traded. The index closed at 1,613.17 on
Wednesday, down 22.2 points from
the previous day as blue-chip stocks
like Axiata Group Bhd, Genting Bhd,
Hong Leong Financial Group Bhd,
Kuala Lumpur Kepong Bhd, Public Bank Bhd and Sime Darby Bhd
caused the index to tumble on heavy
selling activities. The ringgit was much
weaker against the US dollar at 4.3440
as Brent crude remained steady at
US$47.60 (RM208.96) per barrel.
The index rose on a rally from
a 801.27 low (October 2008) to its
1,896.23 all-time high (July 2014),
and this represented an extended
Elliott Wave “flat” rebound in a “pseudo-bull” rise completed. The next few
months’ index price movements after July 2014 comprised key swings
of 1,837.28 (low), 1,879.62 (high),
1,766.22 (low), 1,858.09 (high), 1,671.82
(low), 1,810.21 (high), 1,706.18 (low),
1,831.41 (high), 1,774.3 (low), 1,867.53
(high), 1,685.03 (low), 1,744.19 (high),
1,503.68 (low) and 1,691.93 (high).
The index’s daily signals have
turned mixed, with its CCI, DMI and
Stochastic indicators showing sell
signals, but the MACD and Oscillator
are positive for now. As such, the index’s weaker support levels are seen
at the 1,503, 1,567 and 1,609 levels,
while profit-taking in the resistance
areas of 1,613, 1,661 and 1,691 will
cap the index’s advances.
The KLCI’s 18-day and 40-day simple moving averages (SMAs) depict
an emerging downtrend for its shortterm daily chart. The index’s price
bars are also below the 50-day and
200-day SMAs, and this depicts a softer phase for the medium- to longerterm moving averages.
Due to the softer tone of the KLCI,
we are recommending a chart “sell”
on UMW Holdings Bhd (UMW). A
check on the Bloomberg consensus
reveals that 18 research houses cover
the stock, with no “buy” call, 10 “hold”
calls and eight “sell” calls.
Maybank Investment Bank’s analyst has a “hold” call on UMW, with
a sum-of-parts-based target price of
RM7.80 as its first half of financial
year 2015 (FY15) earnings of RM225
million were below expectations. The
key disappointments in its second
quarter of FY15 earnings were in the
auto and oil and gas (O&G) divisions,
where higher US dollar-denominated costs hit the auto division and
underutilisation of its jack-up rigs
affected the O&G division.
UMW’s chart trends in the daily,
weekly and monthly time frames
are very firmly down. Its share price
made an obvious plunge since its major weekly Wave-5 high of RM12.23
in August 2014. Since that RM12.23
high, UMW’s share price fell to its
recent low of RM7.70 this month.
As prices broke above its recent
key critical support levels of RM9.72
and RM8.84, look to sell UMW on any
rallies to its resistance areas as the
*
Jaks secures financing for
US$1.87b Vietnam power plant
Jaks Resources Bhd
(Sept 23, RM1.09)
Maintain buy with a revised target
price (TP) of RM1.60 from RM1.20
previously: We are positive that Jaks,
together with China Power Engineering Consulting Group Co Ltd
(CPECC), has secured US$1.4 billion (RM6.15 billion) financing for
the US$1.87 billion coal-fired power
plant in Vietnam, which will be funded by 75% (US$1.4 billion) debt and
25% (US$470 million) equity.
We believe there is now a higher
likelihood to meet the project’s financial close deadline on Oct 31. CPECC,
which is supposed to inject a total of
US$7 million as security deposit, will
deposit the third and final tranche of
US$2 million this month.
We understand that Jaks can
now proceed with the relevant ap-
provals required from the relevant
authorities in respect of CPECC’s
investment in the project.
We are now more confident that
Jaks’ construction division will drive
its earnings growth, as the non-technical engineering, procurement and
construction portion of the Vietnam
project worth US$454.5 million is
now quite likely to begin as scheduled in the fourth quarter of financial
year 2015, and that the plant should
be completed by 2020.
We maintain our “buy” call with
a TP of RM1.60, based on a lower
discount of 20% to our realisable
net asset value valuation of RM2.
Unlocking value in the Vietnam
project is the key rerating catalyst
for Jaks. We make no changes to our
earnings forecasts. — Affin Hwang
Capital, Sept 23
Najib
arrives in
New York
for UN
Assembly
Page 13
moving averages depict a very firm
short- to medium-term downtrend
for this stock.
The daily, weekly and monthly
indicators (like the CCI, DMI and Oscillator) have issued clear sell signals,
and now depict firm indications of
UMW’s eventual plunge to lower levels. It would attract firm selling activities at the resistance levels of RM7.77,
RM8.84 and RM9.72. We expect UMW
to witness weak buying in its support areas of RM6.74, RM7.02 and
RM7.70. Its downside targets are located at RM5.85, RM4.55 and RM1.98.
Lee Cheng Hooi is the regional chartist
at Maybank Kim Eng. The views expressed in the article are the opinions
of the writer and should not be construed as investment advice. Please
exercise your own judgment or seek
professional advice for your investment decisions. Technical report appears every Wednesday and Friday.
12 B R O K E R S’ C A L L
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
EcoWorld to buy Puncak Alam land for RM1.18b
Eco World Development
Group Bhd
(Sept 23, RM1.50)
Maintain buy with an unchanged
target price (TP) of RM1.70: Eco
World Development Group Bhd
(EcoWorld) has proposed to acquire 2,198.4 acres (889.66ha) of
leasehold land in Puncak Alam for
RM1.18 billion, implying RM12.30
per sq ft.
The land bank has a potential
gross development value (GDV) of
RM15 billion, comprising an integrated township (Eco Gardens) and
a business park (Eco Business Park
V) which is accessible via the Kuala
Lumpur-Kuala Selangor Expressway, Guthrie Corridor Expressway
and North-South Expressway. The
proposed acquisition is expected to
be completed by the second quarter
of calendar year 2016 (2QCY16).
The price of the Puncak Alam
land stands at 8% of its GDV,
The land bank has
a potential gross
development value
of RM15 billion.
which is comparable to MKH
Bhd’s 10% for the 550-acre Hillpark Shah Alam, which directly
faces University Teknologi Mara.
The first phase of Eco Gardens
will feature landed homes priced
from RM400,000 per unit, which is
expected to receive overwhelming
response judging by the strong sales
performance for Hillpark Shah Alam.
This project will also be EcoWorld’s
signature township for the North
Western Klang Valley corridor.
Under the new business model,
large township development will
be undertaken by a special-pur-
pose vehicle and EcoWorld will Eco World Development Group Bhd
rope in up to three investors and
retain a minimum of 30% stake FYE OCT (RM MIL)
2014A
in the project. It will assume the Revenue
148
role of a development manager, Ebitda
15
enabling EcoWorld to earn a new
Pre-tax profit
12
income stream while enjoying deNet
profit
7
velopment profits.
(pre
ex)
7
Net
profit
Eco Gardens will be developed
2.8
under the new business model, EPS (sen)
though plans are still at an early EPS pre ex (sen)
2.8
stage. Assuming a 15% net margin, EPS growth (%)
(70)
a development period of 25 years EPS growth pre ex (%)
(70)
and a conservative 30% stake in
2.8
Diluted EPS (sen)
Eco Gardens, this will boost our
(sen)
128.6
BV
per
share
revalued net asset valuation esti52.9
mate (RNAV) for EcoWorld by 5%, PER (x)
52.9
PER pre ex (x)
or nine sen per share.
EcoWorld may only require P/CF (x)
192.6
a cash outlay of RM106 million, EV/Ebitda (x)
38.3
which is 70% debt financing, for P/BV (x)
1.2
the 30% stake. We maintain a buy
0.6
Net debt/Equity (x)
call and a TP of RM1.70, based on
2.2
a 20% discount to the RNAV. — Al- ROAE (%)
Source:
Company,
AllianceDBS,
Bloomberg
Finance LP
liance DBS, Sept 23
AirAsia X Bhd
FYE DEC (RM MIL)
Revenue
Ebit
Pre-tax profit
Net profit
Core net profit
Core EPS (sen)
Core EPS growth (%)
PER (x)
2013A
2014A
2015F
2016F
2,308.4
157.5
36.9
(87.3)
(138.7)
(10.5)
(496.6)
na
2,939.1
(141.1)
(326.1)
(541.4)
(541.4)
(22.8)
(117.5)
na
2,913.9
(23.4)
(177.6)
(208.0)
(208.0)
(5.0)
78.0
(3.6)
3,122.7
380.9
231.0
102.6
102.6
2.5
149.3
7.3
Source: Company, MIDFR
just be the remedy to AAX’s woes.
Taking a look at its mid- to longhaul low-cost carrier (LCC) peer in
Europe, Norwegian Air Shuttle, which
has been profitable for the most part,
we find that 10 out of its 16 long-haul
routes face no competition compared
with AAX, which only has one longhaul unique route, the Kuala Lumpur-Gold Coast route.
We believe that the beauty of running unique routes is the ability to
act as a price maker, serve untapped
demand and create a niche segment
for itself while enjoying the prestige
that comes with flying to exclusive
destinations. That said, the key hurdle
would be to identify unserved routes
that have inherent demand.
We believe that AAX’s key markets
of Australia, North Asia and South
Asia will continue to perform better
after a capacity rationalisation exercise by its major competitor, which
commenced in August this year.
In addition, we believe that travel
demand to Australia could be preferred compared with destinations
such as the United States and Eu-
2016F
2017F
2,288
332
149
105
105
4.4
4.4
209
209
4.4
138.0
33.9
33.9
nm
17.4
1.1
0.7
3.3
4,172
463
280
196
196
8.3
8.3
88
88
8.3
146.3
18.1
18.1
nm
13.1
1.0
0.7
5.8
Unimech’s compressed
margin expected to continue
Unique routes
could be remedy
to AAX’s woes
AirAsia X Bhd
(Sept 23, RM0.22)
Maintain buy with a higher target
price (TP) of RM0.26 from RM0.22
previously: Yield push driven by capacity rationalisation is coming to
fruition with average forward fares for
fourth quarter of financial year 2015
(4QFY15) up 15% year-on-year with
further upside possible, given the discount between Malaysia Airlines Bhd
and AirAsia X (AAX) has increased to
40% from close to none previously.
Load factors picked up from
2QFY15 lows back to above 80% in
4QFY15, enhanced by extensive marketing and tie-ups with travel agents
and the peak travel season kicking in.
Average aircraft utilisation is down
to 15.7 hours per day compared with
16.3 hours in FY14, but is still healthy
with at most one idle plane during
off-peak seasons as AAX takes delivery of three new fleet in FY15 and its
long-term wet lease contracts expire.
The second half is to focus on
breaking even operationally through
top-line growth and keeping expenses in check despite the strengthening
US dollar. Management noted that at
present, only 15% of routes are unprofitable from up to 70% previously.
AAX has thus far launched the
Sapporo route and announced it will
be flying to Hawaii soon. Management noted that it is looking very
closely at another two new unique
routes which they will announce in
due course.
While all new routes require upfront investments and a typical gestation period of one year to determine
its profitability, unique routes could
2015F
1,383
144
48
34
34
1.4
1.4
(50)
(50)
1.4
133.6
104.9
104.9
nm
38.5
1.1
0.6
1.9
rope. Looking into 2016, we believe
that AAX’s natural hedges through
the collection of fares in foreign currency which make up 70% of sales
will help AAX buffer itself against a
stronger US dollar/ringgit exchange
rate, as 75% of its expenses such as
jet fuel, maintenance, repairs and
operations, aircraft leases and finance costs are quoted in US dollars. Our sensitivity analysis suggests
that a 5% change in the US dollar/
ringgit exchange rate will increase
expenses by only 1.1% as a result
of the hedges.
Since our last report, AAX’s share
price has staged a slight rebound,
rising 29% to hit our TP of RM0.22.
Looking ahead, we expect 3QFY15
to continue to record a core net loss
albeit at a smaller amount of RM40
million and from 4QFY15 to break
even and eventually turn profitable in FY16.
For now, we like the initiatives
taken by management and we believe efforts to boost AAX’s resiliency are starting to show. — MIDF
Research, Sept 23
Unimech Group Bhd
(Sept 23, RM1.31)
Maintain sell with an unchanged
target price (TP) of RM1.15: Management remains “cautiously optimistic” about its outlook amid the
various challenges posed by the
slowing economy and weak currency. The sharp decline in crude
oil price and the escalating margin
pressure due to the weak ringgit
versus the US dollar are near-term
earnings risks.
The share price declined 20.2%
for the past one year. At this juncture, we do not see any rerating
catalyst for the stock and therefore,
we are maintaining our “sell” recommendation on Unimech, with
an unchanged TP of RM1.15, based
on TP earnings ratio of 10 times.
Unimech’s earnings before interest and taxes margin narrowed by
3.3 percentage points year-on-year
(y-o-y) in the first half of financial
year 2015 (1HFY15). In a meeting
with management recently, we understand that margin volatility is
caused by a weaker ringgit, which
makes the cost of unhedged raw
materials to go up.
Year to date, the ringgit has declined by more than 20% against
the greenback. The procurement
of raw materials is mostly transacted in US dollars or the yuan,
also pegged to the US dollar, but
management declined to share the
percentage of cost that is exposed
to foreign currencies.
However, we understand that
management is considering price
hikes for its products to protect the
margin, going forward. On a positive note, management reckons
that higher prices would render
the group uncompetitive, given
that the currency pressure is being
felt across the industry.
Indonesia remains the group’s
largest overseas revenue contributor. The economic slowdown in
Indonesia saw PT Arita’s 1HFY15
net profit declining by 68.2% y-o-y
in 1HFY15. Nonetheless, management has no intention to pare down
Unimech’s 70% stake in the listed
company.
We agree that the long-term upside risk to growth in Indonesia
outweighs the short-term slowdown. Moreover, the Indonesian
government has in recent weeks
announced measures to open up
the economy and boost infrastructure spending.
Domestically, management
guided that capital expenditure
(capex) will remain low for FY15
through FY17. Capex is projected
to amount to RM10 million per
annum, compared with RM26.9
million in FY14. This reflects the
prevailing market conditions.
With the capex cut back, we believe the group will be able to meet
the internal dividend target of 30%
of net profit per annum. In the past
few financial years, the group has
invested aggressively in warehousing capacity, principally to expand
product range and optimise the
delivery time.
However, in FY13 and FY14, the
growth in inventories had been tapering off. As a result, the working
capital deficit has been narrowing
and therefore, giving room to maintain the dividend payout.
Our FY15 net profit estimate
of RM16.9 million implies 12.9%
growth y-o-y. This suggests earnings
picking up in 2HFY15. We understand that there are several projects the group are bidding for. If
it is successful, it will boost earnings ahead.
However, we maintain our “sell”
recommendation on the stock underpinned by the weak demand in
the oil & gas (O&G), and plantation
sectors.
We believe the stock is fairly valued at unchanged TP of RM1.15
per share, based on 10 times calendar year 2016 diluted earnings
per share of 11.5 sen.
Two potential catalysts for the
stock are capex upcycle resuming
in the O&G and plantation sectors,
as well as a recovery in exchange
rate. — TA Securities, Sept 23
H O M E 13
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
‘Khairuddin held for
28 days under Sosma’
After conducting investigation police will refer the matter to DPP for further action
KUALA LUMPUR: Datuk Seri Khairuddin
Abu Hassan, former vice-chairman of the
Batu Kawan Umno division, is being held
under detention for 28 days under the
Security Offences (Special Measures) Act
2012 (Sosma), Deputy Inspector-General
of Police (IGP) Datuk Seri Noor Rashid
Ibrahim said yesterday.
Khairuddin was rearrested on Wednesday by police outside the Jalan Duta court
complex after he was released from remand
under the Penal Code. He had been under
remand from Saturday under Section 124C
of the Penal Code for allegedly attempting
to commit activity detrimental to parliamentary democracy.
Khairuddin was first arrested at his home
in Mont Kiara last Friday.
Noor Rashid said the police, after conducting their investigation under Sosma,
would refer the matter to the deputy public
prosecutor (DPP) for further action.
He spoke to reporters after the Hari Raya
Aidiladha prayers and sacrificial slaughter
of cows at Bukit Aman.
Khairuddin reportedly attempted to
seek the intervention of the United States
in Malaysian affairs.
IGP Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar said that
Khairuddin’s attempt to apply international
pressure on Malaysia over the 1Malaysia
Development Bhd issue was tantamount
to sabotaging the country.
The Malaysian Insider reported that
Khairuddin will challenge his detention,
his lawyer Muhammad Rafique Rashid Ali
said. The lawyer said he received this instruction yesterday after meeting Khairuddin who is being held at the Dang Wangi
police headquarters until Oct 21. “We have
specific instructions from Khairuddin, our
client, to file for an order from court declaring his detention illegal,” Muhammad
Rafique told reporters outside the police
station.
Lawyers said the preventive detention of
Khairuddin was an abuse of the law. This
was the reason members of parliament
(MP), civil society groups and lawyers have
been constantly speaking out against detention without trial, they added.
Padang Serai MP N Surendran said that
the detention of Khairuddin was an example of why the opposition had always been
against any kind of detention without trial
and the no bail provision, saying that it was
open to abuse.
Lawyers for Liberty executive director
Eric Paulsen said that the group had always
warned that the definition of “security offences” under Sosma was too broad and
unclear. Equally vague was the Penal Code
section on “activity detrimental to parliamentary democracy”, “sabotage” and other
actions as offences.
Paulsen also said that Sosma had been
put in place for the purpose of maintaining
public order and security, pursuant to Article 149 of the Federal Constitution, which
allows its exemption from constitutional
articles for the greater safety of the federation. “Article 149 envisages these measures to be temporary and operative against
subversion and dangers to public order.
“So by using Sosma against someone
like Khairuddin who has merely lodged
police reports overseas surely must be a
grave abuse of this very draconian act,” he
told The Malaysian Insider.
Lawyer New Sin Yew said that Kharuddin’s arrest under Sosma was unlawful as
it was within the law to lodge complaints
with foreign law enforcement authorities.
He added that as such, the government was
going back on its promise not to use detention without trial laws to stifle political
dissent. — Bernama/The Malaysian Insider
Najib arrives in New York for UN Assembly
NEW YORK: Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib
Razak arrived in New York on Wednesday on
a working visit to attend the 70th session of the
United Nations General Assembly.
Najib and his wife Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor were greeted on arrival by, among others,
Malaysian Foreign Minister Datuk Seri Anifah
Aman, Malaysian Ambassador to the United States Datuk Dr Awang Adek Hussin and
Malaysia’s Permanent Representative to the
United Nations (UN) Datuk Ramlan Ibrahim.
Najib is scheduled to participate in several high-level UN meetings before addressing
the general assembly at the UN headquarters
here on Oct 1.
Malaysia is currently playing a significant
role in the world body as a non-permanent
member of the UN Security Council.
Najib will also join world leaders at the
UN Peacekeeping Summit to be presided by
US President Barack Obama on Sept 28. The
meeting is expected to reaffirm the political
commitment and support of member states
to UN peacekeeping.
On the sidelines, Najib is expected to hold
talks with several world leaders here. He is also
scheduled to chair the 5th Global Science and
Innovation Advisory Council meeting here.
—Bernama
Najib (left) arriving at the Mandarin
Hotel in New York on Wednesday for
a working visit to the 70th session of
the UN General Assembly. On hand
to welcome him was Anifah (right).
Photo by Bernama
Saifuddin tarnished Umno’s image, says Tengku Adnan
BY D I YA N A I B RA H I M
PUTRAJAYA: Former deputy minister Datuk
Saifuddin Abdullah, who attended a meeting of
opposition parties on Tuesday, has tarnished
the image of Umno, of which he is a member,
a leader of the ruling Malay party said.
Umno secretary-general Datuk Seri Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor said Saifuddin may
have attended the meeting in his private capacity and not as a party member, but this still
raised questions over his motives. “There is a
perception spreading now, because he was a
former deputy minister and an Umno member,” Tengku Adnan told reporters in Putrajaya
yesterday. He said Saifuddin’s presence at the
meeting, where new opposition pact Pakatan
Harapan was unveiled, had created a negative
perception.
Saifuddin, known for his moderate stance
in contrast to some other Umno leaders and
for his collaboration with civil society groups,
is chief executive officer of non-governmental organisation (NGO) Global Movement of
Moderates. He attended the meeting in his
capacity as head of the Youth Academy (Akedemi Belia). He has been issued a show-cause
letter by Umno.
Tengku Adnan, who is also federal territories minister and secretary-general of ruling coalition Barisan Nasional (BN), said the
matter would be brought to the Umno disci-
plinary board if Saifuddin failed to respond to
the letter in 14 days. “If he doesn’t respond, I
will submit a paper to the disciplinary board
to call him in for questioning as well as to
face action,” he said. However, he declined
to comment on whether Saifuddin would be
sacked from Umno.
Tengku Adnan also said Umno members
should abide by party ethics and that Saifuddin’s actions were akin to going behind the
party’s back. He said if Saifuddin’s argument
was that he had been present in his capacity
as an NGO member, the same reasoning could
be used to justify Umno leaders’ presence at
the controversial “red shirt” rally last week. —
The Malaysian Insider
Meeting on haze
postponed twice —
due to haze
KUCHING: A meeting between Malaysia and
Indonesia on the haze has been postponed
twice — and all because of the haze!
The meeting between Minister of Natural
Resources and Environment Datuk Seri Dr
Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar and Indonesian
Minister of Environment and Forestry Dr Siti
Nurbaya Bakar scheduled yesterday in Jakarta, Indonesia was postponed. The reason Wan
Junaidi had to shelve his trip to Jakarta was due
to the worsening haze in Indonesia.
Their meeting, to discuss the contents and
terms of a memorandum of understanding
to combat the transboundary haze, was first
scheduled for Sept 18. However, it was postponed because of the haze as well.
A ministry statement said yesterday that
a new date for the meeting had yet to be set.
“The haze is getting worse and a state of
emergency had been declared in a number
of places in Indonesia.
“Dr Siti Nurbaya is now actively involved
in bringing the necessary aid to the people in
these affected places,” it said.
The MoU is to focus on the enforcement of
laws, zero burning practice for parties in Indonesia, peat soil management, and a collaboration
between the countries when haze-causing fires
break out. This MoU between the two neighbours was agreed to during the 17th Meeting of
the Sub-Regional Ministerial Steering Committee on Transboundary Haze Pollution in July.
Meanwhile, in Johor, three places were
reported to have unhealthy air quality as at
3pm yesterday.
The Department of Environment website
reported the Air Pollutant Index (API) in Pasir Gudang to be the highest at 133, followed
by Larkin Lama (126) and Kota Tinggi (104).
The API reading in Balok Baru, Pahang,
was also unhealthy at 108 from a moderate
air quality of 93 recorded yesterday morning.
Meanwhile, the air quality in Samarahan,
Sarawak, has improved to a moderate API of 93
from an unhealthy air quality of 108 recorded
yesterday morning.
Thirty-nine other places also recorded moderate air quality, including Indera Mahkota,
Pahang (100); Sarikei, Sarawak (89); Kemaman,
Terengganu (96); Banting, Selangor (86); Shah
Alam, Selangor (87); Batu Muda, Kuala Lumpur (87); Putrajaya (86) and Malacca city (83).
An API reading of 0 to 50 indicates good
air quality; 51 to 100, moderate; 101 to 200,
unhealthy; 201 to 300, very unhealthy and 300
and above, hazardous.—Bernama
14 G E N E R A L N E W S
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
Family of Morais unwilling
to endorse release of body
Animal lovers
dog Penang
CM in Ipoh to
protest against
culling strays
BY ISTA KYRA SHARMUGAM
Remains of murdered DPP still in mortuary as endorsement letter not signed
BY EL I ZA B ET H ZACHARIAH
KUALA LUMPUR: The body of murdered deputy public prosecutor
(DPP) Kevin Morais is still in the
mortuary as his family members
have refused to endorse the release
of his remains, a close relative said
yesterday.
The relative, who spoke on
condition of anonymity, said
Morais’s immediate family members had refused to sign the endorsement letter to release the
body.
“They are not willing to sign the
endorsement letter ... just leave it at
that,” he told reporters at the Nirvana Memorial Centre in Sungai
Besi here yesterday.
“The family has yet to decide on
Liow: MCA
adamant that
all mass rallies
be stopped
KUALA LUMPUR: MCA will
seek a meeting with Prime
Minister Datuk Seri Najib
Razak to urge Najib to put a
stop to street rallies as the party fears they will lead to violent
confrontations.
MCA president Datuk Seri
Liow Tiong Lai, in condemning the recent street rallies,
the Bersih 4 rally on Aug 29
and Himpunan Rakyat Bersatu
on Sept 16, said street rallies
threaten to tear apart the fabric of the nation.
In a statement issued after
chairing the party’s central
committee emergency meeting at Wisma MCA here, he
said: “MCA is adamant that all
mass rallies must be stopped.
“All this is not only putting a
strain on our unity, but it also
gives the nation a bad name
internationally.”
Referring to the Sept 16 rally, Liow, who is also transport
minister, said it was obvious
the rally participants intended
to stoke fear and create racial
tension.
He noted that singling out
the Chinese community and
the clear animosity shown towards the community were
unacceptable and could not
be condoned.
He said derogatory words
against the Chinese community made by some of the
demonstrators could not be
excused.
“The way forward is to return to the values of our founding fathers.” — Bernama
when to claim the body, but it will
be publicised.”
He declined to comment further
on the matter.
It is not known whether the
family has requested a second
post-mortem or what their next
move will be.
Morais’s younger brother Richard, who was seen at the memorial
centre, refused to speak to the media
about the family’s plans.
However, Bernama reported
Deputy Inspector-General of Police Datuk Seri Noor Rashid Ibrahim as saying that the police need
a little more time for a DNA test to
be completed before releasing the
body to the family.
He said the body had been identified from the clothing, but “we
have to adhere to procedures”, he
told reporters after the Aidiladha
sacrificial slaughter of animals and
prayers at the Bukit Aman Mosque
here.
Noor Rashid was asked to comment on the delay by the Kuala
Lumpur Hospital in releasing the
body of Morais, deputy chief of the
appellate and trial division of the
Attorney-General’s Chambers, to
the family.
No relatives of Morais were at the
hospital, but at the Nirvana Memorial Centre in Sungai Besi, Richard
declined to talk to reporters.
Reporters were also prevented
from entering the special room
where people pay their last respects to the deceased. They were
asked to wait at the lobby.
A Malaysian Insider report said
that even friends of the late DPP
were questioned by the centre’s
security before they were allowed
to enter the elevator.
Since 10am yesterday morning,
many relatives and friends had been
arriving at the centre for the memorial service, which will continue until tomorrow. Richard and another
sibling David arrived separately at
11.30am and 12 noon respectively.
The body of Morais, 55, was found
stuffed in a cement-filled oil drum in
Persiaran Subang Mewah, Subang
Jaya, near here last Wednesday.
He was reportedly missing on
Sept 4 while driving to his office in
Putrajaya from his condominium in
Menara Duta here. — The Malaysian
Insider/Bernama
Muslims nationwide celebrate
Aidiladha in moderation
KUALA LUMPUR: Muslims nationwide celebrated Aidiladha in moderation yesterday, undertaking the
sacrificial slaughter of cows and
goats as enjoined by Islam.
Fine weather in the morning enabled Muslims to undertake the
sacrificial slaughter at mosques,
surau, villages and housing estates.
Roads in the city were almost
clear of traffic as many people returned to their villages or hometowns to celebrate the festival.
At the National Mosque, about
10,000 worshippers, including foreign nationals, attended Aidiladha
prayers and listened to a sermon
delivered by grand imam Tan Sri
Syaikh Ismail Muhammad.
Syaikh Ismail said he hopes
the relatives of the pilgrims who
died in the crane collapse incident in Makkah on Sept 11
would be brave in facing the loss
of their loved ones in the tragedy.
— Bernama
Seri Paduka Baginda Raja Permaisuri Agong Tuanku Hajah Haminah greeting children
and presenting them with duit raya, following Aidiladha prayers at Masjid Zahir in
Alor Setar yesterday. Photo by Bernama photo
Police warns against Petaling Street demonstration
KUALA LUMPUR: The police
warned yesterday that action
would be taken against anyone
who intends to disrupt public order at Petaling Street tomorrow.
Deputy Inspector-General of
Police Datuk Seri Noor Rashid
Ibrahim said action would also be
taken against anyone who makes
such a threat in public places or
on social media.
“If we feel that it (such a statement) is a threat to public order
and can lead to a riot, the police
will not hesitate to act,” he told
reporters after the Aidiladha sacrificial slaughter of animals and
prayers at the Bukit Aman Mosque
here.
He said the police are empowered under Sections 143 and 105
of the Penal Code to arrest anyone
to prevent offences, including inciting people to riot.
“I will also summon the organisers of such a rally to have their
statements recorded,” he said.
He advised the people against
participating in the rally, saying
they would have to face the law
if they do.
Noor Rashid was asked to comment on an announced plan by
certain quarters to stage a rally in
Petaling Street tomorrow to protest, among other things, against
the presence of foreign traders, and
the alleged sale of counterfeit and
imitation goods there. — Bernama
IPOH: There’s no escape from
dog lovers for Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng, as a group of
animal welfare protesters turned
up with placards at a DAP event
Guan Eng was attending in Kampung Simee here yesterday.
Some 40 protesters turned
up, including prominent animal
welfare activist and veterinarian Dr Ranjit Kaur, who is also
the founder of Noah’s Ark Ipoh.
The group gathered since
9.45am to protest against Guan
Eng’s decision to cull stray dogs
in Penang as a measure to curb
a rabies outbreak in the state.
DAP Canning assemblyman
Wong Kah Woh was seen meeting with the group before Guan
Eng’s arrival, asking them not
to disrupt the launch of Wisma
Impian, DAP Canning’s community centre in the area, and
promised to arrange for a meeting with Guan Eng.
When Guan Eng arrived at
10.30am, the protesters stayed
behind a line formed by men
clad in DAP shirts, who acted
as a barrier to prevent the protesters from getting too close.
The protesters, however,
stood close behind the men and
held up placards with words
such as “stop killing, vaccination instead”, “please have mercy for strays, killing is not the
solution” and “DAP Perak saves
our strays”.
Guan Eng, when speaking
at the launch, said he did not
mind the demonstrators as long
as the protest was carried out
in a peaceful manner. He later
met with the group for a dialogue, and invited Ranjit and
other veterinary experts from
Ipoh to meet with Penang veterinary experts to discuss the
best methods of dealing with
the rabies outbreak.
He also defended his move
to sign off a recommendation
by the Penang Department of
Veterinary Services (DVS) to
order the culling of stray dogs
to prevent the rabies outbreak
from worsening.
“I am not an expert and the
department’s veterinarians are
on this issue. We welcome the
experienced Perak vets to share
their ideas in Penang,” he said.
He also suggested that the
group press the Perak government and the DVS to start rabies
vaccinations in Perak before an
outbreak occurs in the state.
“At the moment in Penang,
we have a shortage of vaccines
even for house pets and therefore the vaccination method
is not feasible to contain the
outbreak from spreading south.
“If there is an outbreak in
Perak, I am sure the same recommendation to cull strays
would be made to the menteri
besar,” he said. — The Malaysian Insider
15
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
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China’s new path
to sustained growth
Industrialisation, urbanisation, structural reforms to drive economy
BY L I WEI
C
hina’s economic
slowdown has raised
some concerns in
the past three years
— especially given
the recent volatility
in global equity markets.
Yet if one looks into the underlying fundamentals of China’s economic growth, a different picture
emerges: After a brief and inevitable period of transition, China is poised to open a new era of
sustained economic growth, one
that will continue to fuel global
prosperity.
It is true that China’s economy
is no longer growing at the almost
10% rate it sustained from 1979
to 2012. Yet even China’s current
growth rate of 7% is more than
twice the global average.
Moreover, after three decades
of breakneck growth and its emergence as the world’s second- biggest economy, with a gross domestic product of US$10 trillion
(RM43.9 trillion), China is not the
“catch-up” economy it used to be.
In many respects, it has caught
up. As a result, it must change gears
from high-speed growth featuring
quantitative expansion to mediumto high-speed growth that features
qualitative improvement. The good
news is that this process is under
way. Even while maintaining rel-
atively fast growth, the Chinese
economy is making strides in a
process of structural adjustment.
For example, consumption now
contributes as much as 60% to economic growth, almost 10 percentage points higher than in 2014. Led
by sectors such as information
services and e-commerce, China’s
service industries now account for
a larger share in the economy: In
2014, their contribution outpaced
that of China’s manufacturing industries by 5.4 percentage points.
China is also pushing forward
pilot projects that seek to blend
public-private ownership, opening
sectors such as energy and railways
to more private investment.
Moreover, it is important to remember that this new path for the
Chinese economy opens up growth
potential in other areas. For starters, given that China’s economy is
much bigger than during its first
catch-up phase, a lower growth rate
actually generates much greater
economic output.
In that regard, Chinese consumers represent a huge growth
opportunity. According to the National Bureau of Statistics of China,
from 2010 to 2013, the average disposable income of the top 40% of
earners rose more than 50%, from
US$4,753 to US$7,170. The rise of
China’s middle class will spur not
only overall demand, but also demand for new, high-end products.
As China moves ahead with industrialisation and urbanisation, it
will introduce a number of major
projects in urban and rural infrastructure, intercity rail and highways, river transportation, energy
conservation, environmental protection and ecological building.
These projects will not only stimulate greater investment demand,
but also provide more and better
public goods and expand the consumer market.
Of course, businesses are the
main players in China’s market
economy and investment. As total consumer demand grows and
consumers move upmarket in their
needs and tastes, businesses will
have to increase investment in response. At the same time, as market
reform deepens in China, competition between businesses will intensify, further increasing pressure
to invest in new technologies.
There is much room for improvement on that front. In 2013,
China’s per capita industrial value-added was just one-third that
of the United States. A majority of
Chinese industries are still in the
middle to low end of the global value chain. Yet this gap also points
to the growth potential of Chinese
industries. Generally speaking,
China has the world’s most comprehensive industrial system and
industrial supporting capacity.
New government strategies will
Filepic of employees working in Alibaba.com Ltd headquarters in Hangzhou. Alibaba is
among China’s most innovative companies and the republic is home to enterprises and
individuals, accounting for one-third of global total. Photo by Bloomberg
accelerate the upgrading of traditional industries, and expand the
space for emerging industries, including information technology,
high-end equipment, new materials and biomedicine.
China recognises that its market
reforms must be comprehensive,
which is why the government is
moving to streamline administration, delegate power, and encourage entrepreneurship and
innovation.
Already the second-largest
spender on research and development, China is home to enterprises
and individuals who were granted
825,000 patents in 2013, accounting for one-third of the global total.
Some of China’s most innovative
companies — names such as Huawei, Lenovo, Alibaba and Tencent
— need no introduction.
These structural reforms and
the transition to a new path of sustainable economic growth will not
only benefit China’s 1.35 billion
citizens, but also contribute to a
global economic recovery.
After all, in 2014, China was the
largest trading nation and generated more than a quarter of global
economic growth. The success of
these reforms will also strengthen economic ties with the US, for
whom China is already the second-largest trading partner and
third-largest export market.
The U S is also now the
third-largest destination for China’s outbound direct investment.
Our two nations have their own
comparative advantages. There
will be increasing demand from
China for high-quality services
and high-tech products, and China’s outbound investment will be
more active.
Indeed, especially in trade and
services and two-way investment,
the possibilities for strengthening cooperation between China
and the US are almost limitless.
— Bloomberg View
Li Wei is president and senior fellow
of the Development Research Center
of the State Council, the People’s
Republic of China.
Climate politics and the Volkswagen scandal
BY C L I VE CROOK
THE Volkswagen scandal is an embarrassment of riches. Seen in isolation, it’s staggering enough — that a
huge and well-respected company
with a valuable reputation to protect
should cheat its customers on this
scale, be found out, see its value shed
US$22 billion (RM96.6 billion), and
face enormous fines and damages.
But there are several scandals here,
and the remarkable malfeasance of
VW’s managers is only one of them.
The full dimensions of a second
scandal aren’t yet clear — how far
German and other European regulators were incompetent, or actually
complicit, in allowing this to happen; and, relatedly, whether other
companies have been doing what
VW was doing. Much more remains
to be learned about this.
What did Europe’s regulators
know and when did they know it?
Attention has centred on VW’s use of
a “defeat device,” as though that’s the
crime. In fact, regulators know that
engine management systems need
to be switched to a different mode
when cars are being tested: That’s
necessary to get accurate results.
(Anti-skid systems, among others,
must be disabled when the testing
equipment has the drive wheels
turning and the others stationary.)
The issue is not the deployment of
defeat devices, but the settings they
switch to when activated.
Regulators presumably understand that some supervision of
those test-mode settings is necessary. What form did this take? Was
it so lax that it constituted a tacit invitation to cheat? And if it did invite
cheating, how did other companies
respond to the invitation?
The answers to these questions
will be interesting. VW’s prospects
for recovery turn on them: Was it
an outlaw by the standards of its
industry, or just one cheat among
many while regulators looked away?
A third scandal, even more
costly than the first two, also needs
to be noticed and examined.
It concerns the economic and
environmental policies that
first set European car manufacturers and consumers on course to
this pile-up.
Remember that “clean diesel”
was a government-led initiative,
brought to you courtesy of Europe’s
taxpayers. And, by the way, the policy had proved a massively expensive
failure on its own terms even before
the VW scandal broke.
It’s this scandal that teaches the
most important lessons. Beginning in the mid-1990s, mindful of
their commitments to cut carbon
emissions, Europe’s governments
embarked on a prolonged drive to
convert their car fleet from gasoline
to diesel.
With generous use of tax preferences, they succeeded. In the European Union as a whole, diesel vehicles now account for more than
half of the market. In France, the
first country to cross that threshold,
diesel now accounts for roughly 80%
of motor-fuel consumption.
What was the reasoning? Diesel
contains more carbon than gasoline,
but diesel engines burn less fuel:
Net, switching to diesel ought to
give you lower emissions of greenhouse gases.
However, there’s a penalty in
higher emissions of other pollutants, including particulates and
nitrogen oxides, or NOx. Curbing
those emissions requires expensive modifications to cars’ exhaust
systems.
To facilitate the switch, Europe
made its emission standards for
these other pollutants less stringent
for diesel engines than for gasoline
engines. The priority, after all, was
to cut greenhouse gases.
Except that the switch to diesel
probably didn’t cut greenhouse gases. Making diesel cheaper by taxing
it at a preferential rate encouraged
people to drive more.
And emissions of greenhouse
gases higher up the fuel-supply
chain are worse for diesel than for
gasoline. (Increasing demand for
diesel drew in more supplies from
Russia; producing and moving those
supplies caused more emissions.)
Treating diesel to lower its sulphur
content adds yet another carbon
penalty.
At best, the clean-diesel strategy
lowered carbon emissions much less
than hoped, and at ridiculous cost;
at worst, as one study concludes,
the policy added to global warming.
Europe’s carmakers, flying the
banner of environmental virtue,
committed themselves to the strategy — and none more so than VW,
which even attempted to bring it to
the US. That, one might conclude,
was its biggest mistake: US regulators aren’t so understanding, and its
government hasn’t bet the industry
on diesel.
Europe, meanwhile, has an economically and environmentally
misaligned car industry; a reputational crisis of unsurpassed scale
centred on its biggest manufacturer; a NOx-induced public-health
emergency in many of its cities; and
quite possibly less than nothing to
show for the effort when it comes
to climate change.
VW may have perpetrated one of
the biggest frauds in corporate history. Europe’s clean-diesel strategy,
which set the scene for that fraud,
may be the most expensive mistake
in the history of environmental policy. As I say, an embarrassment of
riches. — Bloomberg View
Clive Crook is a Bloomberg View
columnist.
17
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What’s the message, Yellen?
With the delay in rate hike, Fed chair under growing pressure to clarify where US central bank is heading
BY JON AT HA N SP ICER
& HOWA RD SC H NEIDER
A
s the US Federal Reserve’s (Fd) chief
communicator,
chair Janet Yellen is
under building pressure among her colleagues and global investors to clarify where the world’s biggest central
bank is heading and how it is making
its decisions.
The calls have come from both
her policy opponents like St Louis
Fed president James Bullard and
more centrist sympathisers like Atlanta Fed president Dennis Lockhart, as well as market analysts and
investors who say they have been
confused about the Fed’s direction.
It is perhaps her biggest test yet
as she tries to guide a committee
currently divided between those
who feel the US economy has healed
enough for a rate hike, and those who
feel a weak global economy could
undermine the country’s growth
and recovery.
Aside from last week’s press conference, Yellen has been largely absent from the public stage in recent
weeks — focusing attention on a
speech scheduled for yesterday that
could give insight into her place in
that debate.
In the interim, analysts and investors insist the Fed has let seeming
contradictions take hold — saying
Yellen at a news
conference following
the FOMC meeting
in Washington last
Thursday. The Fed
cited risks from China
and elsewhere and
downward pressure on
US inflation as reasons
to hold off raising rates.
Photo by Reuters
that markets should not influence
monetary policy, but then reacting
to markets; declaring policy is data
dependent and then saying that a
5.1% unemployment rate still needs
to fall further.
“This will be a test and maybe the
largest one she’s faced yet,” after an
initial period of relative harmony
at the US central bank, said David
Stockton, the Fed’s former research
director.
The stakes are global. A mistimed
move by the Fed could see the US
raising rates as the world economy
slows, triggering a further global
slowdown as investors readjust to
the Fed’s move and perhaps pull
capital from emerging markets.
While careful not to personally
criticise Yellen, who in 18 months as
chair has put a premium on consensus and soliciting a wide set of views
about the economy, there appears
broad agreement that the Fed in recent months has added to the market
instability that last week prompted
a delay to a rate hike.
“I don’t think we are stuck in an
adverse loop with markets,” Lockhart
said on Monday. But “uncertainty
about the [Federal Open Market
Committee’s (FOMC)] policy intentions probably added to the overall
environment of uncertainty that precipitated the volatility in mid-August
... I am in the camp that would like
to see the committee continue to refine its communications approach,
particularly in this period.”
Though the Fed says it is data
dependent, it is not clear that each
member views the same data with
the same priority, or puts the same
weight on the Fed’s twin employment and inflation goals. That could
be fixed, Lockhart said, if the central bank developed a consensus
“reaction function” to outline the
conditions or triggers for a rate hike.
Bullard went a step further in an
unusual televised appeal on Monday
asking former US treasury secretary
Lawrence Summers and others to
effectively stop making public arguments against a rate hike, and
muddling the Fed’s discourse.
The confusion, coupled with Yellen’s cautious tone at a press conference last week, has left investors
discounting a rate hike until next
year — despite Fed forecasts that
show 13 of the Fed’s 17 policymakers expect to raise rates this year.
Yellen, scheduled to speak yesterday in Amherst, Massachusetts,
may need to reclaim the message.
“I would think she will try to clarify
things, one way or the other, because I cannot possibly think they
are unaware of the problem that they
have,” said Roberto Perli, a former
Fed official who is now partner at
Cornerstone Macro.
Last Thursday, the Fed cited
risks from China and elsewhere,
and downward pressure on US inflation from a strong dollar and weak
commodities as reasons to hold off
raising rates for the first time in nearly a decade. While the decision had
near-unanimous backing, a handful of hawkish policymakers like
Bullard did not have a formal vote
on the FOMC, and comments over
the weekend suggested a close call.
Underscoring the sometimes
fractious structure of the US central bank, seven of the 13 officials
who recommend a tightening this
year only want one rate hike, while
six want two or more hikes, according to the forecasts. — Reuters
Weary Greece gives Syriza another chance
BY MEGA N MCA RDLE
IN my trip through the central Athens polling stations on Sunday, I
met only one voter who seemed
cheerful. Alkaios Klaoudatos is
a supporter of Syriza, the leftist
government that has held power
since January, and he was confident that his party was going to
win the election.
In fairness, virtually everyone
I’ve talked to since the Friday polls
were released has said Syriza was
going to win a plurality. But Klaoudatos, a lawyer, believed his party
was going to take enough votes to
form a government with its previous coalition partner Independent
Greeks, or Anel, rather than seeking
to share power with a larger partner
such as Pasok, the old left-wing party that was pushed aside by Syriza.
At 4pm on Sunday afternoon,
that seemed a little crazy. Anel is
a small right-wing party that none
of the other parties is keen to form
a coalition with. In order to make
it work, Syriza would need a more
sizeable majority than the polls
seemed to project.
By Sunday evening, as the results poured in, it started to look
prescient. By 8.40pm local time,
Vangelis Meimarakis, the head of
the centre-right New Democracy
party had conceded, and Alexis
Tsipras, the head of Syriza, had announced his intention of forming
a government that night.
The results, in fact, look strikingly similar to the election that
brought Syriza to power, on the
back of promises to take a harder
line against the country’s creditors
and their stringent demands for
austerity and reform. Golden Dawn,
the far-right anti-immigration party, picked up a seat or two, led by
gains in the islands that have been
hardest hit by the refugee crisis.
The Syriza-Anel coalition had
their vote percentage shaved a bit.
Nonetheless, it’s pretty close, especially considering that in the
intervening months, Alexis Tsipras
led Greece into a showdown with
Greece’s creditors — a showdown
that ended not with a rousing victory for the radical left against the
heartless forces of capitalism, but
with capitulation to the creditor’s
demands, a banking crisis that is
still pinching Greeks with capital
controls, and a bailout deal that is
worse than the one on offer before
Syriza started playing hardball.
turn out to vote. “They are new, they
are clean” said Maritza Pantelakis,
a French-Greek citizen who lives in
France, but had come to Athens to
vote for Syriza. “They made errors,
but they fight.”
“We may not have won the battle, but we will win the war,” Klaoudatos told me.
In fact, Tsipras seems to be in a
somewhat better position than he
was before he called this election,
even though his percentage of the
vote looks as if it fell slightly. With
the left-wing hardliners gone from
the party, Tsipras will probably find
it easier to tackle the difficult task
of implementing the agreement.
In less than a year, Greece has
gone from electing an anti-bailout
firebrand to re-electing a pro-bailout incumbent. “It makes no sense,
does it?” Stavros Messinis, a local
entrepreneur said.
“Welcome to Greece,” said my
translator.
That said, this isn’t exactly a resounding endorsement for Syriza.
The general sentiment among all
the voters I spoke to — Klaoudatos
excepted — was that they were not
so much choosing a government as
Not out to punish Tsipras
choosing the folks who would imBut, apparently, Greek voters didn’t plement decisions made outside of
want to punish him for it — or at Greece. And that wasn’t exactly a
least, not the ones who bothered to thought that inspires fierce passion.
“We are only management,” I
was told by a Golden Dawn supporter in central Athens. “It is the
people who gave us money who
will decide what happens.” A supporter of Potami, the technocratic
centrist party, said he was finally
hopeful that things would get better
after the election — not because he
liked Syriza, but because the latest
bailout agreement is so strong that
“it can’t be avoided”.
governing effectively.
Greece has an opportunity right
now to push through tough reforms,
get some debt relief, recapitalise
the banking system, and start the
country back toward growth. But
a memorandum of understanding
with the creditors is not going to do
the job by itself.
Parliament will have to pass difficult bills that will mean pain for
large numbers of people, and then
ensure that the ministries carry out
that legislation effectively. They’ll
be facing even tougher opponents
than their troika of creditors (the
European Commission, European
Central Bank and International
Monetary Fund): a well-entrenched
clientelist system, and Greek voters angry about having pain piled
upon pain.
As he stood before his supporters to celebrate his victory on Sunday, Tsipras pledged to continue the
fight that they started seven months
ago. He is certainly going to have a
fight on his hands. Tsipras negotiated the agreement, and now will
have to implement it. The question
is whether he has that much fight
left in him. — Bloomberg View
Tough choices ahead
That doesn’t mean, however, that it
will be easy, or that the outcome is
certain. The failure of previous governments to put reforms in place
or get the country back on the path
to growth demonstrates just how
difficult it is.
Greece is out of money, and dependent on creditors who want to
see strong measures that will offend
politically sensitive groups. Syriza is
ideologically opposed to structural
reforms that involve firing public
employees, which means relying
more heavily on tax increases that
may stunt recovery.
And the last few months do not
exactly inspire wild confidence
in Tsipras’ political management
skills. His campaigning is obviously very good. But campaign- Megan McArdle is a Bloomberg View
ing is not at all the same thing as columnist.
19
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FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
FR I
PHOTOS BY BLOOMBERG
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BY H A NN A H EL L IOTT
D
id you know that
“ t a r g a” m e a n s
shield in Italian?
It happens to be
the name of a convertible Porsche
created 50 years ago as a way to get
around some potential US federal
regulations against open-top cars
in the 1960s. The original Porsche
Targa featured a steel roll bar at its
02
centre, with a removable roof panel and a removable plastic window
covering the rear. It was the car
you bought if you were cool and
a little different from the norm —
something for thinkers and creative
driving enthusiasts who wanted to
imbibe the sun and the wind, unimpeded by convention.
The quirky look of that Targa roof
was different enough to separate
it from the conventional 911s and
other, more staid, roadsters. You
could recognise it from blocks away.
It formed a literal and symbolic
shield from the mundane.
The new one, a 2016 Porsche 911
Targa 4 GTS that I drove around
New York for a week, is a little more
rounded, a little more polished
than its predecessor. But it goes
far toward capturing that 70s-era
élan, and it’s more powerful, with
better tuning, than was the first
contemporary iteration when it
came out last year.
Different from the norm
If you choose to buy this car — and
I’ll be jealous if you do — I suspect that the first thing attracting
you to it is how the exterior looks.
I don’t blame you. Let’s face it: In
certain upscale suburban neighbourhoods or fancy vacation spots,
Porsche 911s are so ubiquitous that
they’ve begun to feel clichéd. That
homogeneity equals b-o-r-i-n-g.
Predictable.
The worst part is that there is
nothing boring about driving a
911 coupé or standard convertible. Nothing.
So it’s a relief when you stumble
upon a 911 Targa. Finally, something different! The retro glass
roof, bi-xenon LED headlamps,
51cm matte black wheels, and twin
dual-sport exhaust tailpipes look
way more interesting than a runof-the-mill Carrera. For the first
03
V
BY
SO
we
nee
time in a while, the exterior of a 911 (The sensation of suede on a steeraccurately communicates how not ing wheel is new to me, but I like
normal the car is to drive.
it. It felt cooler than shiny leather
would have during the 32°C-plus
The most fun to drive
afternoons I spent tooling around
At a starting price of US$132,800 deep Manhattan, though it didn’t
(RM582,992), the 911 Targa is con- look as edgy.)
siderably more expensive than a
This model has an updated,
base-level Carrera (US$89,000) or more powerful engine than last
Cayman (US$52,600). The one I year’s, with a 3.8-litre, six-cylindrove cost even more: US$147,355, der, direct-injection system that
including such options as Bose gets 430hp and makes it to 60mph
surround sound, Sport Chrono (96.6kph) in four seconds. You can
badging, and a soft, black interi- choose PDK paddle shifter transor that covered everything from mission on a seven-speed allthe steering wheel and the seats wheel-drive transmission, but I
to the headliner and door panels. strongly suggest you opt for the
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FO CU S 21
F R I DAY S E PT E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
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manual. If there was ever a car that
really blossoms under manual shifting on a curvy road somewhere far
away from it all, this is it.
I still don’t like the auto start/
stop function that automakers,
including Porsche, use on their
new models to conserve fuel; it
feels especially jarring on a manual transmission, like you’ve killed
the engine. You can disengage this
if you don’t like it.
Tight to a fault
With the Targa, as in life, strength
is also its weakness. I’ve often told
friends that for the money, and especially with the manual version,
Porsche 911s are the most fun to
drive of any car on today’s market.
They have some unquantifiable X
factor that gives them personality,
spontaneity, aggression, and real
intuition on the road.
Part of that has to do with the
incredible balance between front
and rear axles and the magnetic contact they maintain with the
ground. The 911 Targa feels very
low — somewhere lower than, say,
a Jaguar F-Type but higher than a
Lamborghini Huracan. It means
that you sit totally enveloped in
the machine as you drive, as integrated with its every flex, every
punch, every flinch, as Mickey felt
with Rocky. Working through traffic
in the Targa becomes a diversion,
rather than a chore. The other side
of that coin is that when driving it
on cobblestones or over a construction site, you feel every bump, not
only because of that proximity to
asphalt but because the suspension
is pulled as tight as a violin string.
The brakes, fittingly, are as responsive as those in the higher
editions of the 911 Turbo models;
the direct-injection engine sounds
as eager for the track as ever.
The balance of its rewarding contact with the road and its sometimes-jarring suspension is to be
expected. Don’t buy this car hoping to sink back into some cushy room that seem more generous
mobile settee as you drive. Buy a than those of other sports coupés
Mercedes for that.
of its size. The automatic fabric top
recedes in about 20 seconds at the
Spacious but intimate
push of a button. I like the fact that
Targa’s interior matches the show- you can also pop the glass “trunk”
off way it drives. The one I tested to access rear ledge storage space
came with that aforementioned without having to deploy the ensuede lining (I’m a fan, though tire ceiling.
it will be polarising among your
I also loved the fact that I didn’t
friends), along with carmine-hued have to slouch in the seat to peer
instrument dials, auto-dimming under the top of the windshield to
mirrors, and a “back seat” that will see the colour change while waiting
comfortably fit a medium-sized at stop lights. I’ve had to do that in
Saint Laurent tote and not much most convertibles I test. Bentley,
else. I resorted to telling friends I Jaguar and Lamborghini, I’m lookcouldn’t offer them rides because ing at you.
I had a two-seater for the week. For
The Targa isn’t as grand as those,
all intents and purposes, it was true. to be sure. But if you want a convertThat said, the front cabin feels ible that is powerful and sculpted,
intimate but spacious, thanks to with real character inside and out,
the open top and leg- and head- this is the one for you. — Bloomberg
01. The 2016 Porsche 911 Targa 4
GTS starts at US$132,800.
05. The ragtop of the Targa drops
in about 20 seconds.
02. The Targa has a 3.8-litre, sixcylinder aluminium engine.
06. The interior of the car is
covered in suede.
03. The Targa can drop its top
completely, or remove just
the back glass shell, for easy
storage entry.
07. The car comes with sport
options such as the carminered centre dials.
04. The Targa cover is similar to the
steel roll bars Porsche put in
the original Targa cars 50 years
ago.
08. The rear is small, but it’s
useful for carrying totes and
weekend bags.
Vintage Rolex with anti-magnetic powers
PHOTOS BY BLOOMBERG
BY STEPHEN PULVIRENT
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SOMETIMES Rolex does something
weird, and that’s when you really
need to pay attention.
The first Milgauss was introduced in 1956 and was a very different watch from the one you see
here. It had a lightning bolt-shaped
hand, a textured black dial, and a
big black bezel marked with numbers one through six around the
edges. It might just be the strangest
watch Rolex ever made. It was designed for scientists working at the
European Organization for Nuclear
Research physics research lab in
Geneva and so had anti-magnetic
properties for accurate timekeeping around heavy magnets and machinery.
What we have here is the Milgauss reference 1019 produced
from 1960 until 1988, when the
watch was discontinued (until its
2007 revival). There are a few variations on this archetype, including
a variant with a black dial and even
a few different styles of markers on
The original Milgauss, with a lightning bolt-shaped
second hand, is a strange but awesome watch.
the dial, but the important features
are the same across the range.
The case is a larger 38mm case,
in the style of the 36mm case used
for the Datejust and Day-Date. It
doesn’t have the bevelled edges on
the lugs, and the flat, smooth bezel
gives the watch a distinct look. The
hour and minute hands are wide
and have slices of luminous paint
in the middle, while the second
hand is razor-thin with a bright red,
arrow-shaped tip. The hour markers are stick-shaped with luminous
The Milgauss sits somewhere between a sport watch
and a dress watch.
dots on the outer edges, except for
the markers at three, six and nine
o’clock, which are double-width
with luminous fill in the middle.
No other Rolex looks anything like
the Milgauss.
But what makes the watch truly
special is the anti-magnetic protection. Underneath the usual screwdown case back is a secondary cover. This so-called “dust cover” is
actually a Faraday Cage, protecting
the movement from up to 1,000
gauss of magnetism (hence Mil-
You have to remove both a screw-down case back and an
anti-magnetic cover to get to the automatic movement.
Gauss for the name). Magnetism
can destroy a watch’s ability to
keep accurate time by distorting
the metal coil that beats out the
seconds, exerting extra force on
delicate components, and more.
If you’re a scientist working with
particle accelerators, a little protection is a must.
Since 1970, when this was produced, magnets have proliferated
in our daily lives. Everything from
your computer, to your phone, to
the bag you probably keep both in
contains magnets of some kind.
We’re no longer stuck using mechanical timekeepers for critical
tasks these days, but you’d still like
your watch to be mostly accurate.
The watch industry at large has invested heavily in developing ways
to use such materials as silicium
and non-ferrous metals in watches
to eliminate altogether the dangers
presented by magnets.
This Rolex Milgauss is available
from HQ Milton and is priced at
US$19,800 (RM86,922). — Bloomberg
22 W O R L D B U S I N E S S
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
China exports record volume of diesel on domestic overcapacity
HONG KONG: Add diesel to the commodities flooding global markets
from China.
The nation exported a record
volume of the fuel last month, after
already shipping unprecedented
amounts of steel and aluminium
overseas. The weakest economic
growth since 1990 is sapping do-
Aussie vitamin
maker bought
by Guangzhoubased Biostime
BY QU ENTI N W EBB
HONG KONG: Move over iron
ore, it’s Wild Neptune Krill
Oil’s turn in Australia’s export
limelight. The A$1.67 billion
(RM5.13 billion) sale of Swisse,
maker of the antioxidant and
other health supplements, caps
a stunning run for the country’s
well-being business. Even as
the far bigger mining industry
reels, the deal underscores how
demand from the Middle Kingdom can transform a sector’s
fortunes for the better.
There was one way to quadruple your money in stocks
Down Under this year: bet on
China’s growing taste for clean
living. Bellamy’s, a purveyor of
organic baby foods, and Blackmores, a direct rival to privately-held Swisse, are the country’s best-performing shares,
up 360% and 275% respectively.
Another vitamin firm, Vitaco,
is up 21% after its initial public
offering last week.
That’s because mainland
consumers are rapidly developing a taste for vitamins and
fancier products like Swisse’s
Ultiboost Liver Detox, just the
remedy in the morning after
a night on baijiu. Australia’s
excellent reputation for food
safety — and a weak currency
— boosts its products’ allure
to Chinese buyers.
Now, Biostime, a Guangzhou-based infant formula
firm, is paying A$1.39 billion
for 83% of Swisse. That’s bold,
given the buyer’s own market value is just US$1.1 billion
or so, and its share price has
tumbled 75% in the last two
years. Still, investors perked
up — Biostime’s share price
leapt 27%.
An enterprise value of
A$1.67 billion worked out at
14.8 times earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and
amortisation (Ebitda) in the
year to June, or 5.3 times sales.
That sounds rich. Still, Blackmores trades at 4.5 times trailing sales and 27 times Ebitda,
according to Starmine. And
Goldman Sachs analysts expect
its Ebitda to grow 18.5% a year
through mid-2018. If Swisse
can follow a similar growth trajectory, helped by brand ambassador Nicole Kidman, this
could prove a healthy deal for
Biostime and for Australian
exports. — Reuters
mestic demand for commodities,
while refineries, mills and smelters
grapple with excess capacity after
years of expansion.
“A lot of it has to do with slowing
demand at a time when companies
had plans for a much better demand
environment, so capacities had been
increased,” said Ivan Szpakowski, a
commodities strategist at Citigroup
Inc in Hong Kong. “As demand slows,
that’s led to overcapacity in the domestic market and producers have
sought to export the surplus.”
Exports of Chinese raw materials
are exacerbating a global glut that
drove prices to the lowest since the
2008 financial crisis, and prompt-
ed steel and aluminium producers
around the world to protest against
the deluge.
While diesel exports are principally a risk to Asian refiners, the
additional shipments threaten to
worsen a glut that already extends
from Singapore to Europe and the
United States. — Bloomberg
Chinese art and
antique auction
sales fall to US$7.9b
Hampered by economic slowdown, fleeing speculators
BY KATYA K AZ AK I NA
HONG KONG: Auction sales of Chinese art and antiques worldwide
fell 7% to US$7.9 billion (RM34.68
billion) in 2014, hampered by the
country’s economic slowdown, government anti-corruption measures
and fleeing speculators, according
to a report.
Sales were down 31% from the
Chinese art market peak in 2011,
according to the third annual report
published on Wednesday by art researcher and database Artnet and
the China Association of Auctioneers. Auctions in mainland China
accounted for most of last year’s
decline, falling 9.3% from 2013.
China’s art market rout contributed to a drop in global art sales,
which fell 5.8% to US$8.1 billion
during the first half of this year from
the same period in 2014, New Yorkbased Artnet said in July.
“Although it is impossible to disentangle the extent of the influence
of speculative activity and graft,
most experts agree it made some
impact, the lack of which is now
keeping growth more subdued,”
Clare McAndrew, a cultural economist, wrote in the report.
Non-payment for purchased artworks by buyers escalated in 2014,
as 63% of all lots sold for more than
10 million yuan (RM6.89 million)
were either unpaid or partially paid
for, according to the report. While
some auction houses said non-payment is more of an issue for China
rather than Hong Kong, two major
ones said they had financial controls to prevent such problems.
“We have stringent policies in
place to ensure payouts,” Rebecca
Wei, managing director at Christie’s Asia, said in an email. “These
measures include due diligence
on clients’ financial background,
deposit requests prior to pedal registration as well as stringent measures to track the collection process
post auction.” — Bloomberg
Beijing to issue new rules easing
panda bond restrictions
BY M ICHELLE C HE N & I NA Z HO U
HONG KONG: China’s central bank
is drafting new rules for yuan-denominated bonds sold by foreigners
on the mainland, known as panda
bonds, and plans to let more companies issue them and ease controls
on how proceeds can be used, two
people with direct knowledge of the
matter said.
The People’s Bank of China
(PBoC) will allow both international financial and non-financial institutions to sell the bonds in its domestic
market, and proceeds can be used
within and outside of China, said
the people, both of whom were consulted by the central bank and saw
the draft rules.
Currently, only global development institutions such as International Finance Corp, the private-sector arm of World Bank Group, are
allowed to sell panda bonds, and
the proceeds must remain in China.
“The draft regulation is ready, but
has not been finalised. It is prepared
in parallel with the two issues that
A man walking
in front of the
headquarters
of the PBoC
in Beijing.
The PBoC will
allow both
international
financial and
non-financial
institutions
to sell panda
bonds in its
domestic
market. Photo
by Reuters
are in the market now and may see
tweaks from their feedback,” said
one of the sources.
HSBC and Bank of China (Hong
Kong) Ltd were approved to issue
one billion yuan (RM688.97 million) and 10 billion yuan of panda
bonds respectively, the PBoC said
in a statement on Tuesday.
It was the first time that foreign
commercial banks had been given
permission to sell bonds in the US$6
trillion interbank bond market of the
world’s second-largest economy.
China kicked off the so-called
panda bond market in 2005, but only
a handful of foreign entities have
tapped the market so far, mainly due
to strict restrictions of issuers and
proceeds use. — Reuters
IN BRIEF
Chinese firm wins bid for
New Delhi-Mumbai
high-speed rail link study
BEIJING: A consortium led by
a state-owned Chinese firm
has won a bid for a feasibility
study into a high-speed rail
link between India’s political
and financial capitals New
Delhi and Mumbai, its parent company said, in what
could lead to a major deal
among the Asian rivals. China Railway, a spin-off from
the former railway ministry,
said the line would be around
1,200km long, but provided
few other details. China has
hugely expanded its own
high-speed rail network in
recent years, and it is now
the largest in the world with
around 17,000km of track in
service, according to China
Railway. — AFP
Toshiba in white goods
deal with Skyworth
TOKYO: Toshiba Corp said it
would sell stakes of 5% each in
two white goods manufacturing
units to China’s Skyworth Digital
Holdings — a move that comes
amid a revamp of its operations
in the wake of a US$1.3 billion
(RM5.71 billion) accounting
scandal. The sale is part of a
broad agreement, in which
Toshiba will use the Chinese
electronics maker and retailer’s local distribution network
to sell refrigerators, washing
machines and vacuum cleaners, while winding down two
China sales units. Shares in Skyworth Digital jumped 7.5% by
mid-afternoon yesterday, while
the Hang Seng Index was down
0.7%. — Reuters
Fonterra’s pizza strategy
pays dividends
WELLINGTON: New Zealand
dairy processor Fonterra posted record consumer product
sales in China yesterday as it
saw rewards for its efforts to
reduce reliance on milk powder and boost its branded milk,
cheese and cream in Chinese
pizzerias and bakeries. The
world’s largest dairy exporter
posted a net profit after tax of
NZ$506 million (RM1.4 billion) in the year to July 31, a
173% rise from a year earlier.
Consumer products operating profit in China leapt more
than fivefold to a record NZ$45
million, with sales volumes up
33%. — Reuters
Taiwan cuts interest rates
for first time since 2009
TAIPEI: Taiwan’s central bank
yesterday lowered its policy
rate to 1.75% from 1.875%, the
first cut since 2009, citing the
slowdown in global economic
growth. Eight economists out
of 14 in a Reuters poll had
expected the central bank to
cut the discount rate to 1.75%
from 1.875%, following the US
Federal Reserve’s decision to
hold off on raising interest
rates. — Reuters
W O R L D B U S I N E S S 23
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
Britain opens bidding for
high-speed rail link
Osborne also announces seven
impending new contracts in China
BEIJING: British finance minister
George Osborne yesterday said
bidding would open for £11.8 billion (RM79.2 billion) in contracts
to build a high-speed rail link in
England.
The High Speed Two (HS2) project aims to create faster links between London and cities to the
north, starting with Birmingham.
Hoping to woo Chinese investment, Osborne announced the
impending opening of seven new
contracts in the south-western city
of Chengdu, at the end of a fiveday visit.
“It’s crucial that businesses and
communities from across the UK
feel the full benefit of forging closer
economic links with China,” Osborne said, according to a British
government statement.
Osborne argues that the rail link
‘Sharp poised
to miss 1H
forecast, cuts
2016 target’
BY GRAC E H UA NG
TOKYO: Sharp Corp will miss
its first-half (1H) profit forecast
and is poised to lower its target
for the full year as rising competition among suppliers of
liquid-crystal displays (LCDs)
pushes down prices, a person
familiar with the matter said.
Its shares fell the most in more
than four months.
The supplier of displays to
Apple Inc expects to fall short
of its ¥10 billion (RM366.5 million) outlook for operating income when it reports earnings
for the six months ending Sept
30, the person said. The company may report an operating
loss for 1H or break even, the
person said.
Sharp is considering selling
a stake in the LCD operation to
Hon Hai Precision Industry Co
or to Japan Display Inc owner Innovation Network Japan
Corp, people with knowledge
of discussions within the companies have said.
The declining outlook for
earnings this year has added
urgency to the talks and increased the odds of a deal with
Hon Hai, the person said.
The Taiwan-based company would not face the antitrust hurdle Japan Display
would have to clear as a rival
supplier of LCDs to Apple. —
Bloomberg
will boost economic development
in the Midlands and North of England, but critics fear the link will
destroy woodlands and countryside and turn northern cities into
commuter towns for London.
“This government is committed
to rebalancing our economy and
building a northern powerhouse,
and improving transport links and
launching HS2 is key to supporting long-term economic growth
across the North and Midlands,”
Osborne said.
HS2 is yet to be finally approved
by parliament but the eventual plan
is to extend the line into the north
of England to the cities of Manchester and Leeds.
The first stage of contracts will
cover the construction of tunnels
and the surface route between
London and Birmingham, which
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (right) with Osborne at the Zhongnanhai Leadership
Compound in Beijing, China, on Monday. Osborne said a feasibility study will look at
linking the London and Shanghai stock exchanges. Photo by Reuters
is expected to cut journey times
from one hour 20 minutes to 50
minutes.
Earlier in his trip, Osborne announced that the Chinese central
bank will issue yuan-denominated
bonds in London, and said a feasibility study will look at linking
the London and Shanghai stock
exchanges. — AFP
BoE to monitor balance of
payments risk from EU vote
BY W ILLIAM SC HO M BE RG
& DAV ID M ILLIK E N
LONDON: The Bank of England
(BoE) will monitor the risk that
Britain’s European Union membership referendum could make
it harder for the country to finance
its large current account deficit, a
top official at the central bank said.
Ben Broadbent, a deputy governor at the BoE, said it was clear
that the decision by British Prime
Minister David Cameron to hold
the in-out vote had created some
uncertainty.
“This is a political decision to
hold this, so I am not going to suggest that the effects on investment
or the uncertainty about the out-
come are reasons you should not
do it at all,” Broadbent told Reuters
in an interview late on Wednesday.
“It’s clear that in an open economy like this one, particularly one
which happens to have at the moment a large current account deficit, inflows of FDI (foreign direct
investment) and portfolio investment are an important, stable way
of financing that,” Broadbent said.
“So that would be the risk we
would be monitoring.”
Britain’s current account deficit was at its widest on record in
2014 at nearly 6% of gross domestic product, pushed up not only
by its trade deficit but also by low
returns on its foreign investments
while investments in Britain gen-
erated stronger returns for foreign
investors.
Cameron has pledged to hold
the vote on whether Britain should
remain in the EU before the end
of 2017, and is seeking to secure
reforms of the bloc before then.
Opinion polls have mostly
shown more people in Britain favour staying in the EU than leaving. But business leaders, most of
whom also support Britain’s membership, say uncertainty could hurt
investment in the run-up to the
vote.
Broadbent said the BoE would
stick to its focus on achieving 2%
inflation in order to ensure a stable environment for investors and
business. — Reuters
Boeing, China swap jet deals during Xi’s visit
BY JULIE JOHN S S O N
EVERETT (Washington): In a display of give and take, Boeing Co unveiled its largest industrial investment in China and landed US$38
billion (RM166.8 billion) worth of
jet orders and commitments from
Chinese carriers and lessors as the
country’s president visited Boeing’s
main factory.
Wednesday’s announcements,
which came during Xi Jinping’s first
state visit to the United States, underscored the intertwined interests
of the world’s largest plane-maker
and an aviation market on track to
soon become the world’s biggest.
“We are now proud to extend
our partnership with a new, mutually beneficial collaboration,” Boeing chief executive officer Dennis
Muilenburg told airline officials,
employees and reporters gathered in
a factory bay in Everett, Washington.
Boeing’s ties in China date back
to 1972, when President Richard Nixon flew there in a 707 to thaw relations with the Communist country,
Muilenburg said. China is Boeing’s
largest international market and a
critical battleground in its tussle
with Airbus Group SE to dominate
the global jetliner industry.
Details of the new agreements remain vague. The “general terms agreement” announced
on Wednesday covers orders and
commitments for 190 single-aisle
737s and 50 wide-body jetliners,
although models and customers
weren’t disclosed. Lessors ICBC
Financial Leasing Co and CDB
Leasing Co are taking another 60
737s. It’s not clear how many of the
orders already have been placed
and marked as “unidentified” in
Boeing’s order book. — Bloomberg
IN BRIEF
Kim Dotcom case
‘simple fraud’, New
Zealand court told
AUCKLAND: Prosecutors outlined their extradition case
against Kim Dotcom in a New
Zealand court yesterday, saying the core allegation against
the flamboyant Internet mogul
accused of multimillion-dollar
online piracy was fraud. The
case has already dragged on
almost four years and been described by the FBI as the biggest
copyright investigation in US
history. But barrister Christine Gordon, representing US
authorities who want Dotcom deported to stand trial in
America, said the accusations
against him were not complicated. “When distractions are
stripped away, the evidence
boils down to a simple scheme
of fraud,” Gordon told the Auckland District Court. — AFP
Ifo: German business
confidence edges
higher in September
FRANKFURT: German business confidence beat expectations by rising slightly
in September, reflecting the
continued robustness of Europe’s biggest economy amid
the current financial market
turbulence, the Ifo Institute
for Economic Research said
yesterday. Ifo’s closely watched
business climate index rose to
108.5 points this month from
108.4 points in August, beating analysts’ expectations for
a slight fall, Ifo said in a statement. “The German economy is
proving robust,” said Ifo president Hans-Werner Sinn. — AFP
Bank of England’s
Broadbent not close
to backing rate rise
LONDON: Bank of England
(BoE) deputy governor Ben
Broadbent said he has not been
on the brink of voting for higher interest rates, unlike some
of his colleagues, and labour
costs in Britain need to grow
quite a lot faster to get inflation back to the bank’s target.
Broadbent told Reuters the BoE
had to balance “fairly robust”
growth at home against a slowdown in emerging economies
and he was not surprised financial markets had pushed
back bets on when the central
bank would start to raise rates.
— Reuters
Krone slides as Norway
central bank lowers
rates, eyes more cuts
OSLO: Norway’s central bank
cut its main interest rate yesterday for the second time in
four months, sending the krone
tumbling, and said it may lower rates more than previously
anticipated in the coming year
as growth prospects have weakened. Oil and gas firms, which
generate a fifth of the Nordic
economy’s output, have been
cancelling investments and
laying off thousands of workers, preparing for an extended
period of low crude oil prices.
— Reuters
24 W O R L D B U S I N E S S
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
Monsanto to build big data business
BY P J HUFFSTUTTER & CAREY GILLAM
CHICAGO/KANSAS CITY: With its
shares trading at three-year-lows
since it abandoned a US$46 billion
(RM202 billion) bid to buy Syngenta
AG last month, Monsanto Co plans
to offer its shareholders a new corporate vision: a future in big data.
Altice CEO says
buying spree
paused after
Cablevision deal
BY SCOTT MORITZ & GERRY SMITH
LUXEMBROUG: Altice NV chief
executive officer (CEO) Dexter
Goei says the European company, which last week agreed to
buy Cablevision Systems Corp for
US$17.7 billion (RM77.78 billion),
will take a break from its buying
binge to focus on trimming costs
and integrating cable systems.
Unless, that is, closely held
Cox Communications Inc becomes available.
“We owe it to our investors,
both on the debt and equity
side, to pause on the pace of
the acquisitions, particularly
on the sizeable ones,” Goei said
in an interview on Wednesday.
Altice’s stock rose 1.5% to
€21.73 (RM106.90) in Amsterdam at 9.35am, giving the
company a market value of €22
billion. Pausing doesn’t mean
Altice is done with making deals,
Goei’s boss, Patrick Drahi said
last week — within hours of
striking the Cablevision deal
— that Altice wants to buy more
cable providers and may eventually acquire a wireless carrier.
As for the length of the
break, Goei says it could be a
few months to a couple of years.
“Six to nine months is nothing.
We may pause for two years
because we still have a huge
amount of organic growth internally,” Goei said. “The only thing
that would make us scratch our
heads is if Cox came up and
said, ‘I’m going to auction my
business.’” — Bloomberg
Monsanto executives are seeking
to reposition the company as a business built on data science and services, as well as its traditional chemicals,
seeds and genetic traits operations,
chief technology officer Robert T Fraley told Reuters in an interview.“We
transformed from industrial chemical company to a biotech company,
then to a seeds company,” Fraley said.
“Now, we’re transforming again.”
Top executives are sketching out
plans now, and briefing major shareholders ahead of a wider presentation to investors in November at the
company’s St Louis headquarters.
Fraley and others have met with at
least 195 technology start-ups in re-
cent months and identified five as
potential acquisition targets, pending Monsanto’s testing of products
it makes, company sources said.
Company officials declined to
say how big a part of the firm it expects the data science and services
arm to become, or to project sales
and profits. — Reuters
VW crisis likely the
biggest threat to
German economy
With concerns that other carmakers could also suffer fallout
BY M ICHAE L NI E NABE R
BERLIN: The Volkswagen (VW)emissions scandal has rocked Germany’s
business and political establishment
and analysts warn the crisis at the carmaker could develop into the biggest
threat to Europe’s largest economy.
Volkswagen is the biggest of Germany’s carmakers and one of the
country’s largest employers, with
more than 270,000 jobs in its home
country and even more working for
suppliers. Its chief executive Martin
Winterkorn paid the price for the
scandal over rigged emissions tests
when he resigned on Wednesday,
and economists are now assessing
its impact on a previously healthy
economy.
“All of a sudden, Volkswagen
has become a bigger downside risk
for the German economy than the
Greek debt crisis,” ING chief economist Carsten Brzeski told Reuters. “If
Volkswagen’s sales were to plunge
in North America in the coming
months, this would not only have
an impact on the company, but on
the German economy as a whole,”
he added.
Volkswagen sold nearly 600,000
File pic of Winterkorn. The VW chief
executive paid the price for the scandal
over rigged emissions tests when he
resigned on Wednesday. Photo by Reuters
cars in the United States last year,
around 6% of its 9.5 million global sales.
The US Environmental Protection Agency said the company
could face penalties of up to US$18
billion (RM79 billion), more than
its entire operating profit for last
year. Although such a fine would
be more than covered by the €21
billion (RM103 billion) the company now holds in cash, the scandal
has raised fears of major job cuts.
The broader concern for the
German government is that other
carmakers such as Daimler AG and
BMW AG could suffer fallout from
the Volkswagen disaster. There is
no indication of wrongdoing on
the part of either company and
some analysts said the wider impact would be limited.
The German government said on
Wednesday that the auto industry
would remain an “important pillar”
for the economy despite the deepening crisis surrounding Volkswagen. “It is a highly innovative and
very successful industry for Germany, with lots of jobs,” a spokeswoman for the economy ministry said.
But analysts warn that it is exactly
this dependency on the automobile
sector that could become a threat
to an economy forecast to grow at
1.8% this year. Germany is already
having to face up to the slowdown
in the Chinese economy.
“Should automobile sales go
down, this could also hit suppliers
and with them the whole economy,”
industry expert Martin Gornig from
the Berlin-based DIW think tank
told Reuters.— Reuters
Volkswagen could pass auto peers in payout hall of shame
BY A NTON Y C U R R IE
LONDON: Volkswagen AG’s cheating on United States’ clean air rules
has driven investors into a deep
funk. The German carmaker’s market capitalisation shrank by €16.6
billion (RM81.99 billion) in just over
a day, after it was caught falsifying
emissions on certain cars sold in
the US. The eventual cost could
be higher. While other carmakers
have paid less for misdeeds, the
better analogy might be oil: BP’s
2010 Deepwater Horizon fiasco.
Rival carmakers got off relatively lightly for recent US transgressions with more disastrous immediate consequences. General
Motors Co paid US$900 million
(RM3.97 billion) to settle a lawsuit
over faulty ignition switches linked
to 124 deaths. Toyota Motor Corp
shelled out US$1.2 billion last year
for malfunctioning accelerators tied
to fewer fatalities.
No death can be directly pinpointed to Volkswagen fiddling
checks on emissions — though the
“defeat devices” installed in some
vehicles hid levels of harmful nitrogen oxide up to 40 times above
permitted levels.
The environmental twist perhaps
makes BP’s disastrous Gulf of Mexico oil spill a better comparison. Initial total cost estimates by analysts
were as low as US$3.5 billion. The
final bill under the Clean Water Act
was US$5.5 billion, less than half the
maximum fine. But BP’s other costs,
including damages, ballooned. All
in, BP ended up setting aside almost
US$55 billion in fines, compensation and clean-up costs.
The Clean Air Act allows the
Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) to charge up to US$37,500
per vehicle for any breaches. With
482,000 affected cars, that’s US$18
billion. The EPA could be kinder
than that, but the company run by
Martin Winterkorn cheated government tests for six years, dissembled
when confronted, and meanwhile
lauded Volkswagen’s status as an environmentally sustainable carmaker.
Volkswagen can pay US$18 billion, over time, and retain its credit
rating. It has €21 billion in net cash,
with more coming from planned
divestments.
That, though, doesn’t factor in
other costs, from recalls to refits to
vehicle buybacks to class-action
lawsuits — or the possibility that
Volkswagen’s emissions shenanigans were more pervasive. Diesel
cars account for more than half its
sales in Europe, its largest market,
though with more lenient nitrogen oxide standards. If the scandal
undermines the business case for
Volkswagen’s diesel engines, a €16.6
billion euro drop in value will look
like a country jaunt. — Reuters
IN BRIEF
VW shares open 4.6%
higher after CEO resigns
FRANKFURT: Shares in Volkswagen AG (VW) opened 4.6% higher on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange yesterday, a day after
the German auto giant’s chief
executive officer (CEO) resigned
in the wake of the massive pollution scandal. VW shares opened
at €116.60 (RM575.94) after already bouncing back strongly the
day before as investors snapped
up cheap bargains following the
meltdown in the share price earlier this week as the extent of the
scandal became apparent. At
0720 GMT, they were showing a
gain of 5.2% at €117.30, pulling
up the overall blue-chip DAX
30 Index by 0.45%. CEO Martin
Winterkorn stepped down on
Wednesday, taking responsibility
for one of the biggest scandals
ever in the German auto sector. — AFP
Iras nets record tax
revenue of US$43.4b
SINGAPORE: The taxman raked
in record tax revenue in the last
financial year as both individuals and companies earned
more in a stable economy, The
Straits Times reported. Total tax
collected for the year to March
31 climbed to an all-time high
of US$43.4 billion (RM191.39
nillion), according to the Inland
Revenue Authority of Singapore’s (Iras) latest annual report out yesterday. It was 4.4%
higher than the US$41.6 billion collected in the previous
financial year. This was in line
with the economic showing as
Singapore grew about 3% and
the global economy hummed
along, said DBS Bank Ltd senior
economist Irvin Seah.
Philippine central bank
holds rates
MANILA: The Philippine central
bank found no reason to alter its
monetary policy settings yesterday, with growth expected
to gather pace in the second
half and inflation seen staying
benign despite the threat of a
worsening dry spell. The central
bank’s policymaking Monetary
Board voted to keep the overnight borrowing rate steady at
4%. “The benign inflation outlook and the economy’s underlying growth momentum provide
ample room to keep monetary
policy settings unchanged at this
time,” Governor Amando Tetangco told a briefing. — Reuters
S’pore inflation negative
for 10th straight month
SINGAPORE: Cheaper cars and
accommodation kept inflation
firmly in negative territory last
month, for the 10th month in a
row, The Straits Times reported. The Consumer Price Index
dropped by 0.8% compared with
August last year, with analysts
expecting inflation to stay weak
for the rest of the year. Housing and utilities led the fall, declining 3.6%, while transport
was down 2.3%. Household
durables and services, which
include items such as washing
machines, were down 2.2%.
W O R L D 25
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
Migrants keep coming as
Merkel tells EU to do more
‘Europe has to get to grips with its biggest post-war refugee crisis’
BUDAPEST: Thousands of migrants
streamed through the Balkans yesterday as German Chancellor Angela
Merkel warned after an emergency
summit that Europe still had to get
to grips with its biggest post-war refugee crisis.
French officials meanwhile said a
young African was killed by a Channel Tunnel train while trying to get to
Britain, just the latest in thousands of
deaths this year among people desperate to start a new life in Europe.
Hungarian police announced
10,046 migrants, a new daily record,
had arrived on Wednesday.
Migrants, many from war-torn
Syria, are pouring through the Balkans on a zigzag trek to Germany,
which they see as a beacon of stability and prosperity.
The previous record in Hungary
was set on Sept 14, when 9,380 migrants crossed just before the country effectively sealed its border with
Serbia with razor wire.
That closure led thousands of
migrants to enter Croatia, quickly
overwhelming authorities who then
started bussing them to the Hungarian border.
On Tuesday, almost 9,000 migrants
entered Croatia, also a new high. Over
Taiwan suffers
deadliest dengue
outbreak
‘Send me home to Iran’,
immigrant begs British police
TAIPEI: Taiwan is suffering its deadliest ever outbreak of mosquito-borne
dengue fever with a record high of
42 deaths, authorities said yesterday,
double the number that died in 2014.
Last year saw 15,732 cases, by far
the highest in nearly three decades,
with this year shaping up to overtake.
The total number of cases for 2015
has already hit 15,282, the Center
for Disease Control (CDC) said, the
majority of them in southern Tainan City.
Unusually hot weather has caused
the increase, the CDC said. High
temperatures and humidity encourage breeding of mosquitos, which is
why countries with tropical climates,
including Taiwan, tend to be plagued
by dengue fever every year.
Another 36 deaths are being examined for their connection to dengue fever.
Dengue fever, which causes high
fever, headaches, itching and joint
pains, affects two million people
across the globe annually, with the
number of cases up 30 times in the
last 50 years, according to the World
Health Organization.
The virus, for which there is no
vaccine, can lead to vomiting, bleeding, and breathing difficulty in more
severe cases.
Cases in Thailand have nearly
tripled this year, while Malaysia also
saw a surge in infections, with 219
deaths as of Sept 20, according to
the CDC.
Local media have reported the
epidemic hitting tourism in Tainan, a city with a population of 1.88
million, which draws visitors with its
historic architecture and reputation
as Taiwan’s best food destination.
Businesses have seen a 50% drop
in visitors since the outbreak, United Daily News reported earlier this
month. — AFP
LONDON: An Iranian man handed himself in to British police demanding to be deported before it
emerged he was in the country
legally and simply hoping to be
sent home as he was sick of Britain.
Arash Aria, 25, said in comments published yesterday that
he had encountered violence and
rudeness in the city of Manchester, north-west England, where he
has lived for 10 years, and cannot
find work.
Officers said a “very angry young
man who has been here illegally [for
BY PET ER MU RPH , DANNY KEM P
& L AC H L A N C A RMI CHAEL
the last week, more than 44,000 refugees have entered the country from
non-European Union (EU) Serbia.
That influx has fuelled tensions
between the two countries. In titfor-tat moves overnight, Croatia and
Serbia further restricted traffic at the
last major crossing point on their
joint border, Tanjug news agency
reported in Belgrade.
EU leaders agreed at an emergency refugee summit early yesterday
to boost aid for Syria’s neighbours,
which are housing millions of refugees fleeing years of civil war and the
ravages of Islamic State extremists.
The leaders agreed to mobilise an
additional €1 billion (RM4.91 billion)
the] last 10 years” handed himself
in on Monday.
It later emerged that Aria had indefinite leave to remain in Britain.
He was released without charge.
Police added that he “may have to
find his own way home”.
Aria told yesterday’s Daily Telegraph that he wanted to return
to the city of Shiraz in south-west
Iran, where he has relatives.
Some Britons joked that they
had sympathy for Aria wanting to
flee Manchester, which is often the
butt of ridicule for its rainy weather.
for the UN refugee agency and the
World Food Programme, as well as
more help for Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Balkan countries.
EU president Donald Tusk said
EU leaders also agreed to strengthen the bloc’s outer frontiers. He said
they also agreed to set up controversial “hotspot” reception centres
in front-line states to quickly sort
genuine conflict refugees from economic migrants.
On the eve of the summit, interior ministers decided to relocate
120,000 refugees, defying opposition from eastern states Hungary,
the Czech Republic, Romania and
Slovakia. — AFP
“10 years in Manchester? Never mind deportation — give the
man a medal!” wrote Twitter user
@FPL_simon432.
Thousands of migrants have
flocked to camps in northern France
from the Middle East and Africa in
the hope of crossing illegally into
Britain. But Prime Minister David
Cameron’s government has refused
to accept quotas for European Union
countries to accept migrants coming
to Europe which were intended to
tackle a crisis causing serious tensions in the 28-nation bloc. — AFP
‘Super blood moon’ to give stargazers a rare show
BY JOSHUA M E LV I N
PARIS: For the first time in decades,
skygazers are in for the double spectacle on Sept 28 of a swollen “supermoon” bathed in the blood-red light
of a total eclipse.
The celestial show, visible from
the Americas, Europe, Africa, west
Asia and the east Pacific, will be
the result of the sun, earth and a
larger-than-life, extra-bright moon
lining up for just over an hour from
0211 GMT.
“It will be especially dramatic,”
predicted astronomer Sam Lindsay
of the Royal Astronomical Society in
London. “It’ll be brighter than usual,
bigger than usual.”
The moon will be at its closest
orbital point to earth, called perigee,
while also in its brightest phase.
The resulting “supermoon” will
look 30% brighter and 14% larger
than when at apogee, the farthest
point, about 49,800km from perigee.
Unusually, our planet will take
position in a straight line between
IN BRIEF
China to host Asean
defence ministers amid
South China Sea tension
BEIJING: China said yesterday
it will host defence ministers
from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) next
month, amid tension between
some of its members and China
over the disputed South China
Sea. The Oct 15 to Oct 16 informal
summit will take place in Beijing
and China has invited the defence
ministers of all 10 members. Chinese Defence Minister Chang
Wanquan will have discussions
with participants. China has overlapping claims with Vietnam, the
Philippines, Malaysia, Taiwan
and Brunei in the South China
Sea, through which US$5 trillion
(RM21.95 trillion) in ship-borne
trade passes every year. — Reuters
Australia warns Chris Brown
on visa amid domestic
violence crackdown
SYDNEY: Australia yesterday
warned US rapper Chris Brown
could be denied a visa for an upcoming tour because of his criminal record, as it unveiled a A$100
million (RM307.30 million) package to end the “national disgrace”
of domestic violence. A national
debate has erupted over family
violence, which is claiming lives
at the rate of nearly two women
per week. The government is considering refusing Brown entry to
Australia over his conviction for a
2009 assault on pop diva Rihanna. — AFP
China still verifying incident
with US aircraft
BEIJING: China’s Defence Ministry said yesterday it was still
verifying what had happened in
an incident last week which the
Pentagon said involved a Chinese aircraft performing an unsafe manoeuvre during an air
intercept of a US spy plane. The
intercept occurred last Tuesday,
about 130km east of the Shandong peninsula in the Yellow Sea
and involved an American RC135 reconnaissance plane, said a
Pentagon spokesman. A Chinese
Defence Ministry spokesman
said China had always been committed to maintaining maritime
and air safety in accordance with
international laws and norms.
— Reuters
Argentina halts ‘cocaine rice’
en route to Europe
the moon and the sun, blotting
out the direct sunlight that usually makes our satellite glow whitish-yellow.
But some light will still creep
around earth’s edges and be filtered
through its atmosphere, casting an
eerie red light that creates the “blood
moon”.
The moon travels to a similar position every month, but the tilt of its
orbit means it normally passes above
or below the earth’s shadow — so
most months have a full moon minus eclipse.
The last blood moon, only the fifth
recorded since 1900, was in 1982, and
the next will not be until 2033. — AFP
BUENOS AIRES: Argentine customs agents found about 30kg
of cocaine hidden in a way they
had never seen before when
drug-sniffing dogs found the drug
had been absorbed into grains of
rice headed for Europe via Africa,
an official said on Wednesday.
The bust underscores the role
Argentina has come to play as a
shipping point for cocaine produced in Bolivia, Peru and Colombia, destined for Africa and
then smuggled north to Europe.
Drug runners soaked the rice in
water that had been mixed with
cocaine. When the water evaporated, the rice was left invisibly
infused with the addictive stimulant. — Reuters
26 WORLD
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
Israeli-Russian team to coordinate on Syria
JERUSALEM: An Israeli-Russian coordination team set up to prevent
the countries accidentally trading
fire in Syria will be headed by their
deputy armed forces chiefs and will
hold its first meeting by Oct 5, an Israeli military officer said yesterday.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu and Russian President
Vladimir Putin agreed on Monday
to set up the team as Moscow steps
up military support for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, who has been
losing ground to an Islamist-led
insurgency.
Israel is worried the Russian deployment, which US officials and
regional sources say includes advanced anti-aircraft units and warplanes, risks pitting Russian forces
against its own over Syria.
Israeli jets have occasionally
Israel defends
soldiers over
Palestinian
woman’s death
At least 717
pilgrims die in haj
stampede
JERUSALEM: Israel yesterday defended the actions of its soldiers who
shot dead an 18-year-old Palestinian
woman at a checkpoint in the West
Bank as questions swirled over the
events that led to the killing.
Hadeel al-Hashlamon was shot
by Israeli forces on Tuesday at a
checkpoint in the city of Hebron. The
military said she was attempting to
stab a soldier when they opened fire.
Activists have, however, distributed photos purporting to show the
fully veiled woman with no knife
visible at the checkpoint. The pictures, however, do not capture the
moment of the shooting.
The Israeli military yesterday
maintained its initial version of
events and provided further details
of what it said occurred. It said a preliminary review had been opened
as is standard for fatal incidents.
Israeli news media also published a photo distributed by the
military of a knife on the ground
that the woman allegedly used.
According to a military official,
the metal detector at the checkpoint sounded when the woman
walked through it and soldiers ordered her to stop.
“She didn’t stop and continued
walking,” the official said. — AFP
struck in neighbouring Syria to foil
suspected handovers of sophisticated Russian- or Iranian-supplied arms
to Assad’s guerrilla allies in Lebanon.
An Israeli military officer, who
spoke on condition of anonymity,
told Reuters the talks with Moscow
would focus on aerial operations
in Syria and “electromagnetic coordination”.
The latter appeared to refer to
the sides agreeing not to scramble
each other’s radio communications
or radar-tracking systems, and devising ways of identifying each other’s forces ahead of any unintended
confrontation in the heat of battle.
Israel and Russia will also coordinate on sea operations off Syria’s Mediterranean coast, where
Moscow has a major naval base,
the Israeli officer said. — Reuters
Around 805 injured, 4,000 rescue workers are sent to location
MINA (Saudi Arabia): At least 717
pilgrims were killed yesterday in a
crush at Mina, outside the Muslim
holy city of Makah, where some two
million people are performing the
annual haj pilgrimage, Saudi Arabia’s civil defence authority said.
At least 805 others were injured
in the crush, which took place on
Street 204 of the camp city at Mina,
a few kilometres east of Makah,
where pilgrims stay for several days
during the climax of the haj.
The pilgrimage, the world’s largest annual gathering of people, has
been the scene of deadly disasters
in the past, including stampedes,
tent fires and riots.
The last major incident in haj
took place in 2006, when at least
346 pilgrims were killed as they
attempted to perform the stoning
of the devil at Jamarat.
However, massive infrastructure
upgrades and extensive spending
on crowd control technology over
the past two decades had made
such events far less common.
Street 204 is one of the two main
arteries leading through the camp
at Mina to Jamarat, where pilgrims
ritually stone the devil by hurling
pebbles at three large pillars.
Reuters reporters in another part
of Mina said they could hear police
and ambulance sirens, but that
roads leading to the site of the disaster had been blocked to prevent
further crowds developing.
Photographs published on the civil
defence Twitter feed showed pilgrims
lying on stretchers while emergency
workers in high-visibility jackets lifted
them into an ambulance.
It said more than 220 ambulances and 4,000 rescue workers
had been sent to the stampede’s
location to help the wounded.
Saudi-owned Al-Arabiya television channel showed a convoy of
ambulances driving through the
Mina camp.
Yesterday was also Eid al-Adha,
when Muslims slaughter a sheep.
It has traditionally been the most
dangerous day of haj because vast
numbers of pilgrims attempt to
perform rituals at the same time
in a single location.
Two weeks ago 110 people died
in Makah’s Grand Mosque when
a crane working on an expansion
project collapsed during a storm
and toppled off the roof into the
main courtyard, crushing pilgrims
underneath. — Reuters
Russia announces naval drills in ‘east Mediterranean’
MOSCOW: Russia’s defence ministry yesterday said it would hold
naval drills in the “east Mediterranean” region in September and
October, as the West frets over a
military buildup by Moscow in
Syria.
The exercises include three warships from Russia’s Black Sea Fleet,
including the Saratov landing ship,
the Moskva guided missile cruiser and the Smetlivy destroyer, the
ministry said in a statement.
The drills will involve “40 combat exercises, including rocket and
artillery fire at sea and airborne
targets,” the statement said.
The ministry said that the Mediterranean drills — which were restarted in early 2013 — had been
planned since the end of last year
and did not link them to the conflict in Syria.
Russia officially alerted the airport in Cyprus earlier this month
through the international aviation
Russia’s navy destroyer Smetlivy
seen in the Bosphorus in Istanbul
on July 11, 2012. The latest naval
drills include three warships from
Russia’s Black Sea Fleet which
includes the Smetlivy destroyer,
Russia’s defence ministry said in a
statement. Photo by Reuters
authorities to divert aircraft from
the area between Syrian port of
Tartus, where Russia has a naval
facility, and Cyprus.
The United States has accused
Moscow of sending troops, tanks
and fighter jets to Syria in recent
weeks, sparking fears that Russia
could be preparing to join in fighting alongside its long-standing ally
President Bashar al-Assad.
Syrian officials said this week
that they have received new warplanes and sophisticated missiles
from Russia and some reports in
Russia alleged that Moscow has
dispatched soldiers to the wartorn country.
Russia, which has supported
the Syrian regime throughout the
four-and-half year conflict that has
claimed some 250,000 lives, says
any support is in line with existing military contracts and that
personnel have been sent to train
the Syrian forces. — AFP
IN BRIEF
Gunmen shoot dead
Pakistan prison official,
brother — police
PESHAWAR: Gunmen yesterday shot dead a prison official
and his brother in northwestern
Pakistan, a week after a Taliban attack on an air force base
which killed 29 people, police
said. Zahir Shah, the deputy
superintendent of Peshawar
prison, where hundreds of militants have been locked up, was
shot at home at Hari Chand village, some 60km northeast of
Peshawar, when he was meeting friends and relatives as part
of Eid al-Adha, the Islamic festival of sacrifice. Local residents
said that four gunmen came on
motorcycle and two went inside
the premises posing as visitors
to exchange Eid greetings with
Shah and when they were sitting in a compound adjacent
to his house, they opened fire
on him. Shah’s brother who
was nearby and rushed to the
scene with a gun was shot dead
by two assailants standing outside, they said. — AFP
Assad appears in public
for Eid prayers
DAMASCUS: Syrian President
Bashar al-Assad attended holiday prayers at a Damascus
mosque yesterday, state media reported, in a rare public
appearance for the embattled
regime head. Assad led Eid alAdha prayers at the Al-Adel
mosque with state and ruling
Baath party officials as well as
a number of Muslim religious
leaders and civilians, Syria’s
official news agency SANA reported. In a photograph published on his official Twitter
account, Assad appears standing in prayer, flanked by Prime
Minister Wael Halaqi and
Grand Mufti Ahmed Badreddin Hassoun. — AFP
Mosque bombing in
Yemen kills at least 25
SANAA: A suicide bomber struck
a mosque in Yemen’s capital yesterday in an attack targeting Shiite worshippers that killed at least
25 people and wounded dozens
during holiday prayers, medics
and witnesses said. There was no
immediate claim of responsibility but Sanaa has been shaken
by a string of bombings by the
Islamic State jihadist group in
recent months targeting Shiites.
Yesterday’s blast ripped through
the Balili mosque where Huthi
Shiite rebels who control Sanaa
go to pray, according to witnesses. — AFP
‘Palmyra citadel damaged
by Syria regime bombing’
BEIRUT: Regime bombardment
has damaged parts of the ancient
citadel in Syria’s world heritage
site of Palmyra, an archeological
expert and an activist said yesterday. At least 13 barrel bombs
have exploded on the citadel and
its surroundings since Monday,
according to Cheikhmous Ali
of the Association for the Protection of Syrian Archeology,
which monitors damage to the
country’s heritage sites. — AFP
W O R L D 27
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
Singapore air quality hits
‘very unhealthy’ levels
2,081 fire “hotspots” recorded in Kalimantan, 290 in Sumatra yesterday
BY MA RTI N A B B U GAO
SINGAPORE: Singapore’s air quality
reached “very unhealthy” levels yesterday as thick smog from forest fires
in Indonesia’s neighbouring island of
Sumatra choked the city state.
Thick grey smoke blown in by
southerly winds smothered the island, shrouding the skyline and creeping into homes, with many residents
avoiding going outdoors.
“The hazy conditions in Singapore
have further deteriorated since last
(Wednesday) night, as denser haze
from Sumatra has been blown in by
the prevailing southerly winds,” the
National Environment Agency said
in an advisory.
It showed the Pollutant Standards
Index, which measures the air quality, as reaching the “very unhealthy”
range.
The agency advised healthy persons to “avoid prolonged or strenuous outdoor physical exertion” and
urged the elderly, pregnant women
and children to minimise outdoor
exposure.
Housewife Asnah Mohamad, 62,
said she and her friend used their
headscarfs to cover their faces as they
travelled to a mosque to celebrate
Hari Raya Aidiladha.
“My husband cannot leave the
house because he has a heart condition, so I represented him to collect the
meat offerings,” she told AFP, refer-
ring to the festival in which Muslims
share the meat of animals slaughtered
as sacrifices.
“We hope it gets better soon. But
what can you do? Go over there (Indonesia) and pour water on the fire?”
The city state, which prides itself
for its clean environment, has been
cloaked in the haze in varying degrees
for about three weeks, the worst such
episode since mid-2013.
Under pressure from its neighbours to stop the annual haze, Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi”
Widodo has pledged to crack down
on companies and individuals behind
the burnings, which are a cheap but
harmful way of clearing vast tracts of
land for plantations.
During a visit to the haze-affected
islands of Borneo and Sumatra this
week, Jokowi called on local communities to do their part in helping
to contain the scourge.
“I’m taking this opportunity to ask
the community not to carry out burning, whether at the farms, in their own
yards or on the streets,” Jokowi told reporters. He said the government was
trying its best to extinguish the fires by
dropping water from helicopters and
inducing rain through cloud seeding.
Indonesia’s National Disaster Management Agency told AFP that 2,081
fire “hotspots” were recorded in the
worst-affected region of Indonesia’s
Kalimantan and 290 in Sumatra yesterday. — AFP
Indonesia nabs 18 Australia-bound migrants
SUKABUMI, West Java: Indonesian
police have arrested 18 migrants who
were stranded in the waters off Java
island after their boat ran out of fuel
as they tried to reach Australia, an
official said.
The group from Bangladesh, India and Pakistan had boarded the
wooden boat from Pameungpeuk
beach in West Java and were heading to Australia’s remote Christmas
Island, district immigration chief
Defence asks
for more time in
tourist murders
BY PRA PA N C H A NKAEW
KOH SAMUI: Lawyers for two
Myanmar migrant workers accused of killing two British tourists on a Thai island appealed for
more time yesterday to prove they
were scapegoats innocent of the
brutal, high-profile murders.
Hannah Witheridge and David Miller, both in their 20s, were
beaten to death a year ago on
the southern holiday island of
Koh Tao, causing outrage in Britain. Witheridge was also raped,
a post-mortem examination
showed.
Lawyers are trying to convince
the judge that Zaw Lin and Win
Zaw Htun were framed by police
under pressure to solve a case
that has caught international attention and hurt Thailand’s image
as a tourism haven.
The defence tentatively had
until today to wrap up its case,
but chief lawyer Nakhon Chomphupat said there were problems
convincing witnesses to testify as
some feared retribution.— Reuters
Filianto Akbar told reporters late
on Wednesday.
“They intended to go to Christmas
Island, but their boat ran out of fuel
and drifted near a beach in Cianjur district on Wednesday,” he said.
“They asked passing fishermen for
help, who then informed the police.”
Sixteen migrants were taken to
an immigration detention centre
while two others were still being
questioned by police, Akbar said,
adding that the boat’s captain and
two crew members had also been
arrested.
Australia’s conservative government introduced hardline immigration policies in 2013 allowing
authorities to prevent asylum seekers from attempting to arrive on the
mainland.
Indonesia has previously expressed disapproval of the tough
immigration policy implemented by
former prime minister Tony Abbott’s
conservative coalition.
The latest boat is reportedly the
first attempt by asylum seekers to
reach Australia by sea since Malcolm
Turnbull became prime minister
last week. On Wednesday, Turnbull
admitted he had concerns about
asylum seekers being held in Pacific
island camps, but gave no indication
of an immediate change to the government’s policy. — AFP
The pope and the little girl who braved barriers
BY DANIEL W O O LLS
WASHINGTON: As Pope Francis drew nearer and nearer in his
open-sided Popemobile and the
crowd in Washington whooped,
squealed and quivered on Wednesday, the little girl with black pigtails
spotted her chance.
Her name was Sofia Cruz, and her
story soon went around the world:
how a five-year-old had the bravado
to deliver a message to the pope on
behalf of the United States’ millions of
undocumented migrants. In a flash,
Sofia clambered over a metal barrier,
darted out onto stately Constitution
Avenue and headed straight for the
pontiff — in total disregard of Secret
Service agents.
“The police wanted to move her
aside, but the pope asked for his car
to stop,” Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi told reporters. As the
crowd roared with surprise and excitement, Sofia slipped the pontiff
her letter.
Born on US soil to Mexican parents, Sofia travelled across the country as part of a group of a dozen
faithful, her father among them,
from the Nuestra Senora Reina de
Pope Francis, making
his first visit to the
US, seen reaching
out to Sofia during
the papal parade
in Washington on
Wednesday.
Photo by Reuters
Los Angeles parish in Los Angeles.
“She handed the pope a letter
asking him to support the drive to
legalise undocumented migrants
living in the United States,” the parish said when contacted by AFP.
The spokesman was unable to
confirm whether Sofia’s parents
were undocumented.
Britain’s Guardian newspaper
later spoke to the child, who said she
had learned by heart the contents of
the letter, in Spanish and English.
“I want to tell you that my heart
is sad,” it quoted her as saying. “All
immigrants just like my dad help
feed this country. They deserve to
live with dignity. They deserve to
live with respect. They deserve an
immigration reform.”
Joseph Reblando, another
pope-greeter, happened to be standing right next to the girl and her
father and caught it all on film. “She
came back and her father was just
in tears. And the whole crowd in
my section were just going nuts,”
he told AFP afterwards.
Backers of immigration reform
were also swift to seize upon the
poignant episode in the hours that
followed. “A 5-yr-old girl shared her
story with Pope Francis today&highlighted why we need #ImmigrationReform,” tweeted Democratic
Senator Dick Durbin. — AFP
IN BRIEF
Dalai Lama visits US for
check-up as world leaders
gather for UN assembly
NEW DELHI: Tibet’s exiled
spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama,
was in the United States for a
medical check-up yesterday, and
he had no plans to meet world
leaders gathering in New York
for the annual United Nations
(UN) general assembly, officials
at his office in India said. The Nobel Peace laureate is not ill, but
was going to the Mayo Clinic in
Rochester, Minnesota, for a yearly health check-up, his secretary
Tenzin Taklha said in an email.
Who the Dalai Lama meets is a
sensitive issue for Beijing. China’s President Xi Jinping is also
in the US, where he will make his
UN debut as China’s leader. The
Dalai Lama’s trip also coincides
with the visit of Pope Francis, who
is scheduled to address the UN
today. — Reuters
New left-wing Greek
government takes office
as painful reforms loom
ATHENS: Greek Prime Minister
Alexis Tsipras’ new left-wing government took office on Wednesday with a mandate to tackle
painful economic reforms as
well as a growing migration crisis that has shaken the European
Union. Tsipras barely had time to
see his cabinet sworn into office
before flying to Brussels for an
emergency migration summit,
a day after EU ministers forced
through a controversial deal to
relocate 120,000 refugees, angering several member states in the
process. “We must share the burden,” Tsipras said in Brussels, after complaining that Europe had
failed to give adequate support to
Athens. — AFP
Tunisian student gets year
in jail for homosexuality
TUNIS: A Tunisian court has sentenced a student to a year behind
bars on charges of homosexuality,
in a judgement condemned by local rights groups, his lawyer said
yesterday. The youth had been
detained on Sept 6 in the Mediterranean resort area of Sousse
for questioning in connection
with a murder after his telephone
number was found on the victim,
lawyer Fadoua Braham said. He
denied any involvement in the
murder but admitted to having
had sexual relations with the
victim. “Another statement was
drawn up and my client had to
undergo an anal exam against
his will,” she said. — AFP
UK halts use of Silimed
silicone implants
LONDON: Britain’s health regulator has suspended sales of silicone
implants made by Brazil’s Silimed
due to contamination, and recommends none of the devices —
including breast, penile and testicular implants — be used until
further notice. The Medicines and
Healthcare Products Regulatory
Agency said it and other European regulators are testing Silimed’s
products after contamination was
detected during an audit of the
company’s manufacturing practices. — Reuters
2 8 S P O RT S
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
Button says ‘joy has gone’ as exit rumours swirl
BY A L A STA I R H I MM ER
SUZUKA: Britain’s Jenson Button
said yesterday that his sense of joy
had disappeared from Formula One
amid rumours the former world
champion is set to retire from the
sport.
Refusing to be drawn on the
speculation that he had failed
to secure a contract extension
with underperforming McLaren,
Button told reporters in Japan, “I
don’t like finishing 14th, I don’t
like finishing 10th. That’s not what
excites me.”
The 35-year-old, who captured
the world title in 2009, has endured
a hugely frustrating season because
of his car’s unreliable Honda engine, and was forced to retire in
Singapore last weekend.
“I don’t think any driver has joy
when they’re not fighting for victories,” said Button before this week’s
race in Suzuka. “That’s what we’re
here for, that’s what we love — the
challenge of fighting at the front.
“There are so many possibilities
of what could happen next year, so
many possibilities,” he added. “But
I can’t give you anything else really
since the last race. There’s no more
information to give you so you’re
going to have to wait a little longer,
I’m sorry to say.” — AFP
Cash-strapped Lotus
locked out in Japan
Puts blame on European time difference for delayed payments
Effendy Shahul: Early
commitments are always a good
indication of interest in the event.
Photo by Shahrin Yahya
Ryan Moore
to defend
CIMB Classic
golf title
KUALA LUMPUR: Defending
champion Ryan Moore of the
United States is set to return
to Malaysia to defend his title in the 2015 CIMB Classic
Golf Tournament at the Kuala
Lumpur Golf and Country Club
from Oct 29 to Nov 1.
Besides the 32-year-old
American who will be making his third appearance in
the tournament, other notable names are world No 6 Sweden’s Henrik Stenson; world No
10 Sergio Garcia of Spain; and
also another American, Adam
Scott, who is ranked 12th in
the world.
“This is the sixth edition of
the CIMB Classic and the tournament has gone from strength
to strength, evidenced by the
quality and depth of its field,”
group chief marketing and
communications officer of
CIMB Group, Effendy Shahul
Hamid, said in a statement here
on Wednesday.
“Early commitments are
always a good indication of
interest in the event; and as
always, we expect to have
a stellar tournament week
come the end of October,” he
added.
The statement added other
players who had shown early commitments for the US$7
million (RM30.73 million) tournament, included South African Branden Grace, Australian Marc Leishman, Japan’s
Hideki Matsuyama, New Zealander Danny Lee, Anirban
Lahiri from India, and also
the American duo of Patrick
Reed and Jimmy Walker. —
Bernama
SUZUKA: Lotus’ woes took an embarrassing new twist yesterday as
the cash-strapped Formula One
team were locked out of paddock
hospitality in Suzuka and left anxiously waiting for their engines in
a row over payments.
Other freight were also delayed
and instead of being interviewed
in the team’s on-site suite, French
driver Romain Grosjean was left
chatting in the rain with reporters
huddled under umbrellas.
Equipment which had arrived
for this week’s Japanese Grand
Prix were stacked up outside under a protective sheet, with team
officials blaming the time difference with Europe for delaying
payments to track authorities.
“It doesn’t mean we can’t fight
for the podium,” said Grosjean. “At
At Spa we had
bailiffs in the garage
and we ended up
on the podium
Spa we had bailiffs in the garage and
we ended up on the podium,” added
the Frenchman, who finished third
in Belgium last month.
“As long as they catch up by tomorrow (today), I’m happy. It is a
situation which is very tricky. We’re
waiting for answers but the spirit
is still there. The guys are going to
do their best as always.”
As their preparations for Japan
were badly hit, Lotus mechanics
prepared to burn the midnight oil to
set up the cars for today’s practice.
“We are here,” said Grosjean,
who is tipped to leave Lotus for the
new American-owned Haas team
next season. “The most important
thing is that we are ready to race.”
Troubled Lotus hope to be taken
over by former owners Renault but
as negotiations continue, the threat
of court cases and administration
has added to a growing sense of
uncertainty about the team’s future.
Team lawyers have a date in the
London High Court on Monday as
they fight going into administration
in a lawsuit brought by the British
tax authorities.
As Lotus’ financial plight worsened last month, bailiffs arrived at
the Spa paddock to impound the
team’s equipment as their rivals
were packing up to go home. — AFP
Beat Samoa or bust for Japan
BY P IRATE I RWI N
GLOUCESTER: Battered giant-killers Japan are now under orders
from coach Eddie Jones to beat
Samoa to keep alive their hopes
of reaching the World Cup quarter-finals.
Jones set the new target after
the “Brave Blossoms” — heroes of
a stunning 34-32 win over South Africa — came brutally back to earth
with a 45-10 hammering by Scotland on Wednesday.
Whilst Japan gave as good as
they got from the initially one-dimensional Scots, their energy
faded after an hour in the Pool
B match.
Jones, who will leave the Japan
post to take over at the South African Super Rugby franchise Western
Stormers post the World Cup, would
not use the Japan’s restricted fourday rest from the South Africa win
as an excuse.
However, he highlighted the
added significance of the Samoan
match in Milton Keynes on Oct 3 in
his bid to guide the 2019 World Cup
hosts to their first ever appearance
in the knockout stages.
“If we can knock Samoa off in 10
ca tomorrow could also be key to
Japan’s fortunes.
“The Samoans could come out
of the match with the Springboks
bruised and battered. That match
will be a bit like an Ultimate Fighting Championship fight with a fair
of bit of Springbok power coming
forward at the Samoans.
“For us, well our boys need a
break. You read the books on physiology and they say you need six
days to recover after exercise like
the boys had against the Springboks.
“Of course by that token the
games should be spread out more.
“However, because of TV they
aren’t. What to do about it? I don’t
know, I’m not an administrator,
thank goodness. I’m just a silly rugby coach.”
Jones, who guided Australia to
the 2003 World Cup final and was
an adviser to the Springboks side
that won the 2007 edition, is also
looking to the South Africans to do
him a favour.
He needs them to beat both Sadays then we have a terrific chance, moa and Scotland, ensuring the
if we don’t then we’re cooked,” said top two places remain wide open
Jones.
going into Japan’s final pool game
Samoa’s match with South Afri- against the United States. — AFP
IN BRIEF
Amos to take Cuthbert’s
place in England game
LONDON: Hallam Amos’ 21st
birthday present from coach
Warren Gatland is a place in the
starting line-up for the crunch
Rugby World Cup Pool A clash
with hosts England at Twickenham tomorrow. Amos replaces
the experienced Alex Cuthbert,
who drops to the replacements
bench after a series of disappointing performances, in a
starting XV patched together
after injuries cost Gatland several key players over the past
few weeks. There is no place for
experienced scrum half Mike
Phillips — who was called up
when first-choice Rhys Webb
was ruled out of the tournament before it got underway.
England and Wales — who both
still have two-time champions
Australia to play in their pool
of death — won their opening
matches against Fiji and Uruguay respectively. — AFP
China senior sports
official ousted from party
BEIJING: The former public
face of China’s national Olympic committee has been expelled from the ruling Communist Party after a corruption
probe, the organisation’s anti-graft body said yesterday,
weeks after the country won
the right to host the 2022 Winter Olympics. Xiao Tian was
put under investigation in June
and sacked from his government post as deputy director
of the General Administration
of Sport in mid-July, shortly
before the Olympic decision
was taken. He was also a vice
chairman of China’s national
Olympic committee, and was
regularly its main speaker at
press conferences. — AFP
Malaysia suffer second
straight Fiba Asia defeat
KUALA LUMPUR: The national
men’s basketball squad suffered
their second straight defeat after
losing 48-119 to Japan in the 2015
International Basketball Federation (Fiba) Asia Championship Group A match in Changsa,
China, yesterday. The Japanese
side took a 32-9 lead in the first
quarter before continuing their
domination with a 59-23 score
in the second quarter, reports
Fiba’s website, www.fiba.com.
Japan scored 35 points in the
third quarter before securing
their first victory of the tournament with a 119-48 final score.
— Bernama
Mexican Perez extends
deal with Force India
SUZUKA: Mexican driver Sergio
Perez will remain with Force India for the 2016 world championship, taking him into a third
season with the team. Perez,
who joined Force India in 2014
after one year at McLaren and
two seasons with Sauber, said,
“I am very happy to confirm that
I will be staying with Force India.” He added, “It means I can
simply focus on the important
stuff — driving the car and scoring points for the team.” — AFP
S P O RT S 2 9
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
Reds will be galvanised
by League Cup victory
Penalty shoot-out win may just pull team together — McAllister
LONDON: Liverpool first-team
coach Gary McAllister believes
the penalty shoot-out win over
League Two Carlisle will help galvanise Liverpool after a poor start
to the season.
Carlisle, the lowest-ranked
team in the competition, took
Liverpool to penalties at Anfield
after the game finished 1-1 following extra time, Derek Asamoah
having cancelled out Danny Ings’
23rd-minute opener.
Adam Lallana and Philippe
Coutinho both saw penalties
saved by Mark Gillespie, but
reserve goalkeeper Adam Bogdan parried the decisive spot
kick from Carlisle’s French forward Bastien Hery to earn Liverpool a 3-2 shoot-out win and
spare manager Brendan Rodgers
a humiliating exit.
“When it comes to a penalty
shoot-out, there is that coming
together of players in the middle
of the pitch and we’ve stepped forward and got through,” the Scot
said after going through 3-2 on
spot-kicks to book a fourth-round
date at home to Bournemouth.
“We’ve shown that bit of character and we’re delighted for
Adam Bogdan, making the saves
to get us through.
“Maybe this is one of those
little things that can just pull us
together as we look forward to
the weekend.”
Liverpool are languishing in
13th spot in the Premier League
with just eight points from six
games and host struggling Aston
Villa at Anfield tomorrow. — AFP
Wenger hails fighting Flamini’s staying power
BY STEVEN GRI FFI T HS
LONDON: Arsene Wenger saluted Mathieu Flamini’s decision to
fight for his place after the French
midfielder’s brilliant brace fired
Arsenal’s 2-1 League Cup triumph
at bitter rivals Tottenham.
Flamini was Arsenal’s unlikely
hero at White Hart Lane as he scored
his first goals since March in his first
appearance of the season to earn his
side a fourth round tie at second tier
Sheffield on Wednesday.
The 31-year-old, who came close
to leaving Arsenal in the last transfer
window, punished Tottenham goalkeeper Michel Vorm’s error to open
the scoring from close range in the
first half of Wednesday’s fiercely
contested third round tie.
Then Flamini stole the show by
lashing a sublime 78th-minute volley past Vorm from 18.29m after
Tottenham had equalised through
a Calum Chambers own goal.
Wenger revealed he had told
Flamini he was free to leave before
the start of the season, but he was
impressed with the way the veteran
decided to stick around and fight
for his place in his second spell at
the club.
“You do not expect Mathieu
Flamini to score two goals, but he
was certainly frustrated for a long
time, and he went for it. He scored
two good goals,” Wenger said.
“He had worked very hard recently. He was focused and I want-
Fifa ‘committed’ to working with
authorities in Valcke case
ZURICH: International Federation of Association Football
(Fifa) insisted yesterday they
were “committed” to working
with the authorities in any investigation, following the suspension of secretary-general
Jerome Valcke.
Swiss prosecutor Michael
Lauber has requested to have
access to all Valcke’s emails
while working at the football’s
governing body.
“We are committed to collaborate with the authorities,”
Fifa told AFP without giving
details because the case “is an
ongoing process.”
Valcke was put on indefinite
leave last week over accusations he agreed to let World Cup
tickets be sold at vastly inflated
prices. The Frenchman strongly
denied the allegations.
The claims were made by
Benny Alon, an American-Israeli consultant at a company
which had a deal with Fifa to
sell tickets at the 2014 World
Cup. The contract was subsequently cancelled.
His eviction has only served
Wenger reveals he had told Flamini he was
free to leave before the start of the season.
Photo by Reuters
ed him to strengthen our defensive
midfield.
“He is a fighter; he is a winner
as well. I told him at the start of the
season it might be difficult to be a
Barca outclassed by brilliant
Celta, admits Enrique
BY K I E RAN C ANNI NG
Valcke is on indefinite leave from last
week over accusations he agreed to
let World Cup tickets be sold at vastly
inflated prices. Photo by AFP
to heighten the suspicion which
is swirling around president
Sepp Blatter’s final months in
office with the election of his
successor set for Feb 26 next
year. — AFP
starter, but he decided to stay and
he has been fighting.
“I fought to keep him but he is at
an age when you always consider
it is better to let them go if they are
not focused but he wanted to stay.”
After successive defeats to Dinamo Zagreb and then Chelsea,
Wenger was pleased to see his players’ spirit remains intact.
“Overall we responded well
mentally and physically to the challenge we faced,” he said.
“We were unlucky to concede
the own goal and still found the
resources to score the winner.
“Tottenham dropped a little bit
around 70 minutes and we found
more space when Alexis Sanchez
came on.” — AFP
MADRID: Barcelona coach Luis Enrique hailed the quality displayed by
his former club Celta Vigo as they
thrashed the European champions
4-1 on Wednesday.
Enrique’s men had arrived in Galicia with a 100% record in La Liga, but
were well beaten as goals from Nolito
and John Guidetti either side of a double from former Liverpool striker Iago
Aspas sealed a famous night for Celta.
“When a team has been better than
you, there is no more to add,” said
Enrique, who took charge of Celta
during the 2013-14 season before
joining Barca.
“I prefer to be beaten by a team that
plays like Celta, without any traps and
purely on football grounds.
“I congratulate them and urge
them to continue playing like that.”
Barca have now conceded four
goals in a game three times in just
nine matches this season.
However, Javier Mascherano
claimed it was being outplayed that
concerned him more than last season’s treble winners’ defensive woes.
“It always hurts to lose at Barca. We
have a thick skin and all we can do now
is think about Saturday (tomorrow)
and remember what happened last
season,” said the Argentine.
“There can be a day when the opponent is better and beats you to every
ball. Part of it is our fault and part of it
is to their credit.
“We don’t have any excuses. They
beat us soundly and we have to keep
working. The most worrying thing is
that we feel outplayed.”
Celta also stunned Barca 1-0 at
the Camp Nou last season and their
coach Eduardo Berizzo believes the
fearlessness of their performance was
worthy of such a sensational result.
“There were special circumstances
and a bit of luck that went our way,”
he said.
“Our idea is to play the way we
did tonight, trying to take the game
to the opponent no matter who we
are playing.
“The players have delighted the
fans. Football and the people present
tonight were the winners.
“I congratulate the players because
they were perfect.” — AFP
IN BRIEF
Blatter under fresh fire
ahead of Fifa meet
ZURICH: From corruption investigations in the United States and
Switzerland to the sudden suspension of his right-hand man,
International Federation of Association Football (Fifa) chief
Sepp Blatter can expect a barrage of questions when he faces
the media today. Blatter’s press
conference, his first appearance
since the removal of Fifa secretary-general Jerome Valcke, will
follow a two-day executive committee meeting where the seemingly-endless scandals at world
football’s sleaze-tainted governing body are on the agenda. Since
the executive committee last met,
much of the news surrounding
Fifa has been less than positive.
On Wednesday, the Swiss justice ministry approved the extradition to the United States of
Rafael Esquivel, a Venezuelan
ex-Fifa official who was among
those arrested in a dawn raid in
Zurich in May. — AFP
‘Angry’ McClaren demands
Newcastle response
LONDON: Newcastle United
manager Steve McClaren challenged his players to bounce
back against Chelsea tomorrow
after they were bundled out of
the League Cup by second-tier
Sheffield on Wednesday. Lewis
McGugan’s 76th-minute goal
gave the Owls a shock 1-0 win
on Wednesday at St James’ Park
to set up a fourth-round home
game with Arsenal. Newcastle
have now won just once in eight
games this season and with a
chorus of boos having greeted
the final whistle, new manager
McClaren is under pressure to
turn things around. — AFP
Allegri fires warning as
Juve stutter again
MILAN: Juventus coach Massimiliano Allegri has fired a warning shot to the stuttering Turin
giants after another league setback left the champions 10 points
behind Serie A leaders Inter Milan. From the joy of reaching last
season’s Champions League final
and a first league and Cup double
in 20 years, the Bianconeri have
recently come back to earth with
a bump. Juve have won just one of
their five opening league games,
and endured the ignominy of becoming the first team to award
lowly Frosinone their first ever
Serie A point when the league
newcomers earned a late draw
in Turin on Wednesday. — AFP
M’sia emerge runners-up
in Futsal Championship
KUALA LUMPUR: The national women’s futsal squad have
emerged as group A runners-up
at the Asian Football Confederation Women’s Futsal Championship 2015 after losing 2-4
to Iran in the last group match
at the Nilai Indoor Stadium in
Negeri Sembilan on Wednesday
night. The defeat however did not
jeopardise the national squad’s
chance as Malaysia have qualified for the semi-final following
two consecutive wins earlier. —
Bernama
30
live it!
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
FR I
WELLBEING . THE ARTS . WINE+DINE . STYLE+DESIGN . LEISURE
WEEKEND
by numbers
25.09.15 to 27.09.15
Your quick guide to rest and relaxation. By Shalini Yeap
4 ways to celebrate the mid-autumn festival
Be at Publika Shopping Gallery from 5pm
onwards this Sunday, to watch dragon
dance performances, participate in a lantern rally or shop at the bazaar — all part
of their mid-autumn festival celebrations.
Gather family and friends for the activities
at Level G2, The Square, Solaris Dutamas,
1, Jalan Dutamas 1, Kuala Lumpur. Admission is free and the schedule of the festival can be found at www.facebook.com/
PublikaGallery.
Join in the fun at the Thousand Lantern
Parade tomorrow starting from 4pm till
late at Sungei Wang Plaza. Lanterns will
be given away for free before the parade is
flagged off from the main entrance of the
mall at Jalan Bukit Bintang, Kuala Lumpur. There will also be lion and dragon
dance troupe performances accompanying
the parade. More information is at www.
sungeiwang.com.
If you have yet to purchase any mooncakes
this season, take your pick from the classic baked and mini snow skin mooncake
options at Tao Chinese Cuisine, Intercontinental Kuala Lumpur. The handmade
mooncakes are packed in vibrant butterfly
motif gift boxes, with a 10% discount for bulk
purchases of 51 to 100 boxes and a 15% discount for over 101 boxes for orders placed
by this Sunday. Intercontinental Kuala Lumpur is located at 165 Jalan Ampang, Kuala
Lumpur and the details of the promotion
are at www.intercontinental-kl.com.my.
Hilton Kuala Lumpur is offering high tea
with an oriental twist for the mid-autumn
festival. The “Savour the Mooncake HighTea” is presented in an exotic steel birdcage,
and consists of a selection of moon cakes,
savoury spring rolls and scones with homemade durian cream in place of clotted cream
and jam. Priced at RM164 nett for two, the
high tea is available all this weekend at The
Lounge, lobby level of Hilton Kuala Lumpur,
Jalan Stesen Sentral, Kuala Lumpur. Call
(03) 2264 2596 for reservations.
2 shows to catch
Beijing Opera
Experience the traditional form of
Beijing Opera combined with techniques of modern theatre to narrate
the fleeting period of youth based on
the legend of Faust who sells his soul
to the Devil. Young Curtain follows
the story of an actress, at the prime of
her career, who meets a mysterious
man who sells her a potion promising everlasting youth. Show times are 8.30pm today and tomorrow and 3pm
and 8.30pm on Sunday at Auditorium DBKL, Menara DBKL 1, Jalan Raja
Laut, Kuala Lumpur. Tickets priced at RM60 and RM80 can be purchased at
www.diversecity.my.
Short + Sweet
Check out the biggest
little festival in the
world — Short + Sweet
— made up of original works all under
10 minutes in length.
Head over to Pentas
2, Kuala Lumpur Performing Arts Centre,
Sentul Park, Jalan Strachan (off Jalan Sultan Azlan Shah — formerly known as Jalan
Ipoh) Kuala Lumpur this weekend at 8.30pm to watch the performances in the musical genre. Tickets can be purchased from www.ticketpro.com.my at RM25 or RM35
each. Call (03) 4047 9000 or visit www.klpac.org for more.
A
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The
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Call
live it! 31
F R I DAY S E PT E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
WELLBEING . THE ARTS . WINE+DINE . STYLE+DESIGN . LEISURE
2
new pet
cafes to
check out
Cat lovers can count their felines in when making plans for the weekend. Purradise Pet Cafe allows your cat to explore the grounds or play with
other cats while you catch up with friends over a
smoothie or fresh juice. The cafe is situated on the
first floor of 24, Jalan Tun Mohd Fuad 2, Taman
Tun Dr Ismail, Kuala Lumpur. Visit www.facebook.
com/mypurradise or call (03) 2389 0976 for more.
Have a cuppa with your furry friend close by at
CuBs & CuPs, a dog-friendly cafe with a menu
catering to the needs of your pets too. Expect a
warm welcome from playful resident Huskies
and Pomeranians at the cafe. CuBs & CuPs is
located at Lot 22, Wisma Rapid, Jalan 30/70A,
Desa Sri Hartamas, Kuala Lumpur Call (016)
689 1258 or (014) 639 5023 or log on to www.
cubsncups.com for more details.
3 places to go to for pastry
Yeast Bistronomy
The next time you find yourself in
the Bangsar Baru area, pop by Yeast
Bistronomy for a meal or for a dose
of their lovely pastries. The outlet
also offers a range of freshly baked
farmer’s bread, baguettes, croissants
and brioches displayed at the entrance of the restaurant. Find them
at 24G Jalan Telawi 2, Bangsar, Kuala
Lumpur. Call (03) 2282 0118 or visit www.yeastbistronomy.com for
more details.
Bowery Petit
Choose from the ample selection of sweets and
savouries at Bowery Petit. This newly opened New
York-inspired eatery offers bagel balls, pizzas, buns
and a delicious range of Danish pastries. There are
both indoor and outdoor seating areas if you wish
to dine-in. Bowery Petit is situated at 48, Persiaran
Zaaba, Taman Tun Dr Ismail, Kuala Lumpur. Call
(03) 7710 0295 for more.
Levain Boulangerie & Pâtisserie
Make plans for weekend brunch or, if you would like to avoid
the crowd, simply drop by to stock up on pastries at Levain
Boulangerie & Pâtisserie, where you will be spoilt for choice
with the assortment of French pastries available. Levain is
located in a bungalow complete with parking space and
an al fresco dining area at 7, Jalan Delima Off Jalan Imbi,
Kuala Lumpur. Further information can be found at www.
levain.com.my or by calling (03) 2142 6611.
3 jazz acts to groove to
Az Samad
Guitarist-composer-educator Az Samad, who has
performed across the United States, Europe and Asia
for the past 19 years, will be performing at Gaslight
Cafe & Music at 8.30pm tonight. Swing by Unit 15-2,
Jalan Medan Setia 1, Plaza Damansara, Bukit Damansara, Kuala Lumpur to be serenaded by his soothing jazzy strums. Further information is available at
www.facebook.com/gaslightcafekl, or call (03) 2011
4047 for queries.
Victoria Newton
Victoria Newton will be at Alexis Bistro Ampang today
and tomorrow. She has performed at the Perth International Jazz Festival, London International Jazz Festival and Ingolstadt Jazz Festival in Germany. Mark your
calendar for dinner or drinks at Alexis Bistro Ampang,
Great Eastern Mall, 303 Jalan Ampang, Kuala Lumpur
from 10pm onwards. Visit www.alexis.com.my for further information and call (03) 4260 2288 for dinner
reservations.
John Thomas Trio
Sway to the jazzy tunes of drummer John Thomas and
friends at No Black Tie as he performs with Willy Rebano
(keys), Patrick Terbrack (saxophone) and Ken Chung (bass).
Thomas has performed at numerous jazz festivals including
Arts Alive! Jazz Fest in South Africa and Jarasum International Jazz in South Korea. The show starts at 10pm tomorrow with a cover charge of RM50. No Black Tie is situated
at 17 Jalan Mesui, off Jalan Nagasari, Kuala Lumpur. Visit
noblacktie.com.my or call (03) 2142 3737 for more details.
32
live it!
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
WELLBEING . THE ARTS . WINE+DINE . STYLE+DESIGN . LEISURE
Zen TODAY
Spassky (Schreiber) playing Fischer (Maguire) in the legendary 1972 World Chess Championship.
THE AMERICAN CHESS HERO
BY SU A N N QUA H
Director: Edward Zwick
Cast: Tobey Maguire, Peter Sarsgaard, Liev
Schreiber, Michael Stuhlbarg
Rating: 3.5 out of 5
Length: 116 minutes
Opening: Now playing
O
n March 9, 1943, a baby boy
named Robert James Fischer—better known as “Bobby”—was born in Chicago,
and the world of chess was
forever changed. From childhood, Fischer was beating chess masters
around America, and at age 20, he became
the 1963-64 US Chess Championship with
the only perfect score in the history of the
tournament. In an era when chess was dominated by Soviet players, the Americans became entranced by their very own prodigy
— the poor boy from a single-parent family
who rose to become a legend.
Pawn Sacrifice, a gripping true story set
in the height of the Cold War tells the tale
of Fischer, played by Tobey Maguire and his
struggle with being a “pawn” in the Americans’ fight against the Soviets in some of
the most dangerous decades in history. Liev
Schreiber plays Boris Spassky, the reigning
Soviet chess world champion, whom Fischer
regards as “the one to beat”.
Fischer was not only famous in his day; he
was a living legend. Crowds of photographers,
journalists and fans would stalk and follow
him around all day, and he was hailed as a
hero for taking on the Soviets all on his own.
Sadly, as is common, with genius comes
great strife — Fischer was plagued by a myriad of mental illnesses throughout his life.
The chess genius suffered from severe hallucinations and was constantly living in fear
of being spied upon.
Maguire plays his role to perfection, juxtaposing Fischer’s great intelligence and
chess brilliance with his eccentricities and
emotional outbursts. Even during scenes
where no words are being spoken and only
two people are sitting down in an intricate
game of chess, one can see a host of emotions playing through Maguire’s eyes.
Fischer’s real-life relationships were
strained at best — his mother left him as a
teenager, and he only had the company of
his mentor, William Lombardy (Peter Sarsgaard) and lawyer, Paul Marshall (Michael
Stuhlbarg) throughout most of his career.
Pawn Sacrifice’s creators decided to focus the film on the game instead of Fischer’s
relationships with those around him, which
could at certain points, bore the audience.
Long games of chess are played over and
over, and while integral to the story, they
also take away from the other plot lines that
could have been better developed.
For instance, we are never shown what
becomes of Fischer’s difficult relationship
with his mother, or if his sister ever came to
his aid in the end. The story of Fischer’s legendary win against Spassky in 1972 is the stuff
of legends — almost every American who
had a television set in 1972 was enthralled
by the matches played by the two greatest
chess masters, so the writers could have
decided to focus on Fischer’s mental state
and relationships instead of the game itself.
Pawn Sacrifice, however, still manages to
be interesting enough that viewers would
be strapped to their seats, wondering what
will happen next. Unlike A Beautiful Mind,
which gave us all a great insight into the
world of those suffering from schizophrenia, Pawn Sacrifice does no such thing. So,
we are left to wonder about the internal
struggles that the real Bobby Fischer faced
throughout his life, both when he was a
much beloved darling of the nation and
when he was a wanted man, fleeing from
the American authorities.
4.98
People are
governed with
the head; kindness
of heart is little
use in chess.
— Nicolas Chamfort
128.98
Markets 3 3
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET
Bursa Malaysia
YEAR
HIGH
Sectorial Movement
INDICES
CLOSE
+/-
%CHG
KLSE COMPOSITE
1,613.17
KLSE INDUSTRIAL
INDICES
CLOSE
+/-
%CHG
-22.20
-1.36
TECHNOLOGY
20.98
-0.08
3,098.41
-12.70
-0.41
FTSE BURSA 100
10,866.81
-140.72
CONSUMER PRODUCT
566.42
-0.16
-0.03
FTSE BURSA MID 70
12,200.86
-125.48
-1.02
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCT
135.26
-0.87
-0.64
FTSE BURSA SMALL CAP
14,739.11
-52.13
-0.35
CONSTRUCTION
263.17
-6.59
-2.44
FTSE BURSA FLEDGLING
14,683.32
-10.41
-0.07
TRADE & SERVICES
215.48
-2.30
-1.06
FTSE BURSA EMAS
11,153.03
-137.24
-1.22
14,011.56
-177.46
-1.25
FTSE BUR M’SIA ACE
5,537.48
-2.42
-0.04
KLSE FINANCIAL
-0.38
-1.28
KLSE PROPERTY
1,158.04
-0.50
-0.04
FTSE BUR EMAS SHARIAH
11,786.18
-141.12
-1.18
KLSE PLANTATION
6,932.70
-61.76
-0.88
FTSE BUR HIJRAH SHARIAH
13,444.62
-187.89
-1.38
498.50
4.05
0.82
8,100.68
-192.85
-2.33
KLSE MINING
FTSE/ASEAN 40
Bursa Malaysia Main Market
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
CONSUMER PRODUCTS
0.745 0.550
—
4.334 2.995 3.950
6.590 4.930 6.300
0.600 0.220
—
5.014 4.050 4.800
3.700 1.400
—
4.390 3.080 3.500
71.775 56.740 61.500
0.145 0.045 0.060
0.220 0.015
—
1.221 0.680 0.730
1.280 0.708 1.000
0.595 0.340 0.520
0.445 0.230
—
13.732 9.825 11.860
0.975 0.720
—
2.970 1.708 2.740
0.620 0.400 0.620
3.110 0.980 1.760
0.120 0.050 0.055
2.630 1.263 2.500
1.360 1.056 1.220
0.120 0.065 0.115
0.080 0.040 0.050
1.111 0.757
—
48.000 39.447 47.200
0.185 0.065 0.080
0.170 0.085
—
0.285 0.165 0.205
0.290 0.170 0.230
2.266 1.750
—
0.277 0.167 0.210
1.000 0.620 0.705
18.891 14.956 18.480
0.830 0.475
—
1.714 0.934
—
0.580 0.300
—
0.957 0.595
—
14.980 11.750 13.520
1.220 0.720 0.870
2.822 2.070 2.210
1.130 0.930
—
0.175 0.040 0.070
7.099 3.717 5.750
1.180 0.415 0.985
0.552 0.304 0.445
3.500 2.650 3.000
1.377 0.724 1.250
0.590 0.340 0.370
3.161 1.341 2.090
1.070 0.596 0.965
1.170 0.385 0.700
3.680 1.766 3.200
2.830 1.284
—
0.545 0.095 0.155
0.935 0.450 0.695
2.744 1.800
—
1.500 0.920 1.010
0.155 0.075
—
7.500 3.014 7.090
4.300 2.287 4.300
0.285 0.130 0.155
0.405 0.150 0.285
7.250 2.210 6.980
0.925 0.550 0.755
2.388 1.187 1.560
4.800 2.364 4.470
0.255 0.080 0.095
1.888 1.160 1.330
1.330 0.860
—
1.417 1.046 1.220
5.357 4.620
—
0.250 0.065 0.105
1.595 1.100 1.200
73.817 63.743 72.800
2.735 2.201
—
0.245 0.080 0.090
0.445 0.212 0.250
0.810 0.592 0.750
1.603 0.583 1.550
7.863 6.355 7.000
1.777 1.252 1.400
22.219 16.951 20.600
0.747 0.577
—
0.315 0.200 0.210
0.630 0.275
—
1.350 0.755
—
0.375 0.165 0.195
0.595 0.352 0.455
3.290 1.085 3.270
15.974 13.212 15.300
0.622 0.463
—
2.730 0.929 2.370
1.560 0.990 1.140
2.476 1.258 2.340
4.255 3.031 4.080
1.710 1.000
—
2.800 1.295
—
0.585 0.365 0.475
0.700 0.340
—
0.700 0.320 0.640
1.660 0.685 1.470
3.270 1.465 2.460
0.080 0.040 0.045
2.190 1.710 1.900
0.864 0.730
—
0.659 0.365 0.450
0.680 0.280 0.320
0.740 0.450 0.500
4.527 2.262 2.500
0.701 0.355 0.470
2.220 1.060 1.430
1.625 1.250
—
0.628 0.445 0.540
0.625 0.350 0.480
11.856 7.602 7.830
1.796 1.337 1.550
0.588 0.408 0.545
0.195 0.084 0.130
0.670 0.220 0.500
0.690 0.327 0.510
2.214 1.220 1.670
0.365 0.190 0.200
1.170 0.766 0.915
3.490 1.165 2.430
2.348 1.390 1.530
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS
1.260 0.717 0.995
0.210 0.110 0.130
0.640 0.324 0.530
0.650 0.240
—
1.070 0.760 0.930
2.520 1.772
—
* Volume Weighted Average Price
DAY
LOW
—
3.900
6.200
—
4.720
—
3.500
60.880
0.055
—
0.695
0.980
0.465
—
11.800
—
2.710
0.620
1.710
0.055
2.450
1.200
0.110
0.045
—
47.200
0.070
—
0.195
0.225
—
0.205
0.705
18.300
—
—
—
—
13.500
0.835
2.210
—
0.070
5.710
0.965
0.435
3.000
1.210
0.365
1.940
0.920
0.650
3.090
—
0.115
0.690
—
0.955
—
6.950
4.020
0.130
0.280
6.820
0.735
1.530
4.420
0.095
1.270
—
1.220
—
0.090
1.200
72.300
—
0.080
0.240
0.730
1.520
7.000
1.380
20.460
—
0.210
—
—
0.185
0.435
3.180
15.020
—
2.300
1.140
2.270
4.010
—
—
0.465
—
0.600
1.430
2.210
0.045
1.880
—
0.440
0.320
0.485
2.490
0.470
1.400
—
0.540
0.470
7.710
1.550
0.545
0.125
0.450
0.500
1.650
0.190
0.860
2.320
1.530
0.980
0.130
0.525
—
0.920
—
CODE
7120
7090
2658
7051
6432
7722
7129
4162
7243
7193
9288
7174
7154
7128
2836
7035
7148
9423
2828
5188
7205
7202
5214
7179
7119
3026
7198
7182
5091
9091
7149
7208
7094
3689
9776
2755
8605
9172
3255
5102
5606
5606PA
5187
3301
5160
7213
7141
5024
8478
5107
7152
8931
5247
7216
8303
6203
7062
0002
5172
7006
9385
7943
8079
7089
7126
7085
7087
5189
3662
7935
5886
5202
5150
3921
4707
7060
7139
7215
5066
7107
4006
7052
3719
5022
9407
6068
5231
4081
5080
7088
4065
7190
8966
7134
7237
7084
9946
5252
5157
7180
7165
7412
7246
8532
7103
7186
7082
7211
7071
4405
7200
7252
9369
7230
7176
4588
7757
7203
5156
7121
5155
5584
7184
5159
7178
5131
0012
7086
7061
7131
7191
9148
COUNTER
ACOSTEC
AHEALTH
AJI
AMTEK
APOLLO
ASIABRN
ASIAFLE
BAT
BIOOSMO
BIOSIS
BONIA
CAB
CAELY
CAMRES
CARLSBG
CCK
CCMDBIO
CHEEWAH
CIHLDG
CNOUHUA
COCOLND
CSCENIC
CSL
DBE
DEGEM
DLADY
DPS
EKA
EKOWOOD
EMICO
ENGKAH
EURO
EUROSP
F&N
FARMBES
FCW
FFHB
FPI
GAB
GCB
GOLDIS
GOLDIS-PA
HBGLOB
HLIND
HOMERIZ
HOVID
HUATLAI
HUPSENG
HWATAI
IQGROUP
JAYCORP
JERASIA
KAREX
KAWAN
KFM
KHEESAN
KHIND
KOTRA
KSTAR
LATITUD
LAYHONG
LCHEONG
LEESK
LIIHEN
LONBISC
LTKM
MAGNI
MAXWELL
MFLOUR
MILUX
MINTYE
MSM
MSPORTS
MWE
NESTLE
NHFATT
NICE
NIHSIN
NTPM
OFI
ORIENT
PADINI
PANAMY
PAOS
PARAGON
PCCS
PELIKAN
PMCORP
POHKONG
POHUAT
PPB
PPG
PRLEXUS
PW
PWROOT
QL
REX
SASBADI
SAUDEE
SERNKOU
SGB
SHH
SIGN
SINOTOP
SPRITZER
SWSCAP
SYF
TAFI
TAKASO
TCHONG
TEKSENG
TEOSENG
TGL
TOMEI
TPC
UMW
UPA
WANGZNG
XDL
XIANLNG
XINQUAN
YEELEE
YEN
YOCB
YSPSAH
ZHULIAN
3A
ABLEGRP
ABRIC
ACME
ADVENTA
ADVPKG
CLOSING
(RM)
0.590
3.950
6.280
0.230
4.730
1.460
3.500
61.500
0.055
0.020
0.720
1.000
0.520
0.330
11.840
0.770
2.740
0.620
1.710
0.055
2.500
1.210
0.110
0.050
0.880
47.200
0.080
0.145
0.205
0.230
1.990
0.210
0.705
18.420
0.550
1.060
0.430
0.690
13.500
0.835
2.210
0.990
0.070
5.740
0.970
0.440
3.000
1.230
0.365
2.070
0.935
0.690
3.190
2.380
0.145
0.695
2.000
1.010
0.075
7.090
4.300
0.155
0.280
6.930
0.735
1.530
4.440
0.095
1.320
0.915
1.220
4.900
0.100
1.200
72.740
2.300
0.090
0.240
0.740
1.550
7.000
1.390
20.600
0.670
0.210
0.415
0.920
0.195
0.440
3.230
15.200
0.470
2.340
1.140
2.310
4.010
1.500
2.560
0.470
0.645
0.640
1.470
2.400
0.045
1.900
0.770
0.440
0.320
0.500
2.500
0.470
1.420
1.250
0.540
0.480
7.770
1.550
0.545
0.125
0.500
0.510
1.670
0.190
0.910
2.370
1.530
0.995
0.130
0.525
0.320
0.930
1.990
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
—
—
0.050
5
0.040
33.1
—
—
-0.130
15
—
—
UNCH
6.5
0.100
275.1
-0.005
440.4
—
—
0.020 4582.2
UNCH
29
-0.010
5.2
—
—
UNCH
22.8
—
—
-0.030
19
0.005
8
-0.050
10.2
UNCH
35
-0.040
5.1
0.010
44.2
-0.005 2190.8
UNCH
35
—
—
UNCH
1.5
0.010
105.1
—
—
0.015
132.6
0.005
174.6
—
—
UNCH
286.1
UNCH
7
0.060
11.5
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
UNCH
92.6
-0.015
2.8
UNCH
120.6
—
—
UNCH
275
0.020
367.2
-0.005
617
-0.005
933.5
UNCH
5
-0.020
397.3
-0.025
25
0.110
460.4
0.020
375
0.005
108.6
0.110
991.4
—
—
0.035
851.4
-0.005
195.5
—
—
UNCH
7.7
—
—
-0.020
66.8
0.100
301.6
UNCH
1.5
-0.005
528.7
UNCH
55.1
-0.020
10
-0.030
27.5
-0.030
69.1
UNCH
200
0.070
253.6
—
—
UNCH
1.6
—
—
0.005 24300.5
0.070
5.5
0.440
2.8
—
—
UNCH
228
-0.010
529.9
-0.010
25
0.020
107
UNCH
183.7
UNCH
230.8
0.140
11.5
—
—
UNCH
11.8
—
—
—
—
0.005
823.1
0.005
68
-0.020
360
-0.020
802.2
—
—
0.050
193.1
UNCH
20
-0.030
451.5
-0.080
19.5
—
—
—
—
0.005
257.6
—
—
UNCH
130.1
0.020
26.8
0.060 1506.2
-0.005
280
-0.050
15.4
—
—
-0.010
680.6
-0.005
5
0.015
108.9
-0.080
5
-0.005
1
0.010
423.9
—
—
UNCH
30
0.010
15
0.010 2423.8
-0.040
2
0.040
8
-0.005 4047.1
0.010
188.1
0.010
817.1
-0.010
31.6
-0.010
40
0.040
812.7
-0.020
150.1
UNCH
0.6
—
0.000
4.604
—
5.640
—
4.239
62.855
0.176
—
3.399
0.575
0.433
—
12.303
—
2.599
0.000
0.000
0.080
2.192
1.110
0.199
0.070
—
48.592
0.095
—
0.245
1.000
—
0.340
0.000
18.260
—
—
—
—
16.231
1.388
1.980
—
0.166
5.229
0.567
0.340
0.000
6.066
0.390
0.544
0.585
0.000
3.250
—
0.335
0.503
—
0.850
—
1.553
0.000
0.000
0.000
1.650
0.696
2.636
2.282
0.292
1.465
—
1.388
—
0.174
1.714
68.567
—
0.135
0.156
0.704
2.311
8.629
1.769
22.684
—
0.000
—
—
0.258
0.464
0.837
14.816
—
1.000
0.711
1.828
4.165
—
—
0.229
—
0.000
0.000
1.371
0.066
1.802
—
0.000
0.300
0.268
6.522
0.000
0.600
—
0.657
0.369
12.391
1.330
0.000
0.329
0.230
0.830
1.310
0.269
0.871
1.336
4.939
310.53
14.48
12.01
—
12.30
—
12.09
19.80
—
—
12.52
9.85
13.68
9.43
18.27
13.46
14.20
9.01
22.62
—
14.48
14.86
1.74
—
7.10
23.55
22.86
—
—
5.13
29.66
53.85
—
23.58
—
107.07
14.29
36.32
19.04
—
10.67
—
—
10.22
13.16
15.88
4.62
21.10
—
8.95
16.20
5.70
33.37
18.45
—
12.21
9.14
126.25
—
8.64
11.04
—
10.04
11.25
9.14
7.69
8.35
3.41
14.46
—
22.39
12.00
4.05
18.90
30.45
12.76
—
57.14
16.93
15.27
13.37
11.41
11.62
46.53
—
—
—
51.32
13.21
10.03
17.64
12.37
11.71
8.06
14.59
26.19
555.56
22.52
—
35.83
—
11.16
7.96
75.00
11.49
—
11.86
45.71
—
31.93
16.10
8.52
11.16
—
7.91
17.87
7.66
6.31
9.40
50.00
1.12
13.07
—
7.80
13.80
15.53
—
2.78
3.18
—
5.29
0.34
4.29
5.07
—
—
1.74
—
1.92
—
6.00
2.60
5.38
—
—
—
2.00
6.61
—
—
1.70
2.12
—
—
—
—
3.27
—
—
2.99
—
4.72
—
4.35
4.78
—
0.90
—
—
5.05
4.36
2.27
—
2.85
—
3.86
3.74
—
—
0.84
—
—
5.00
—
—
—
—
—
—
2.96
—
3.81
1.80
—
4.17
—
2.46
4.90
—
1.11
3.30
4.35
—
2.08
0.99
2.26
1.71
7.19
2.43
3.73
—
—
—
—
2.27
3.41
1.58
4.26
1.18
7.02
3.03
1.06
—
1.17
—
—
—
1.36
1.67
—
2.11
1.30
—
—
—
2.00
2.13
2.35
6.00
1.85
—
5.28
5.16
4.59
—
—
3.92
1.80
—
4.40
2.74
4.58
104.9
462.7
381.8
11.5
378.4
115.5
668.0
17,560.1
27.4
2.1
580.5
150.6
41.6
64.0
3,647.6
121.4
764.3
26.1
277.0
36.7
429.0
145.8
136.7
33.7
117.9
3,020.8
47.0
45.2
34.4
22.1
140.8
51.0
31.3
6,753.6
33.6
265.0
35.6
170.7
4,078.3
399.6
1,349.2
451.2
32.8
1,882.2
291.0
346.5
259.8
984.0
27.3
182.2
128.3
56.6
2,131.7
484.6
9.9
62.0
80.1
133.6
20.0
689.2
221.1
10.2
47.0
415.8
137.1
199.1
481.7
38.0
710.5
49.8
74.2
3,444.6
51.8
277.9
17,057.5
172.9
25.1
56.8
831.2
372.0
4,342.8
914.5
1,251.4
80.9
14.7
24.9
509.0
150.8
180.6
366.2
18,019.6
47.0
271.2
86.1
701.7
5,004.6
92.5
325.1
42.3
77.4
66.9
73.5
288.0
88.9
270.1
97.4
268.9
25.6
102.8
1,680.0
117.8
426.0
50.9
74.8
38.4
9,077.6
123.4
87.2
168.5
36.4
172.4
305.5
23.8
145.6
318.8
703.8
0.893
0.142
0.280
—
1.061
—
19.66
76.47
—
10.00
33.94
14.36
1.41
—
—
—
—
5.03
391.6
34.3
73.8
69.9
142.1
40.8
UNCH
UNCH
-0.005
—
-0.005
—
264.5
320
81
—
10.1
—
# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
0.231 0.115
—
—
0.560 0.325
—
—
0.400 0.265
—
—
2.820 1.928 2.600
2.560
1.120 0.200
—
—
0.816 0.572 0.670
0.670
0.616 0.335 0.360
0.360
1.317 0.710 0.760
0.750
1.300 0.942 1.150
1.150
5.743 3.924 4.020
4.020
0.716 0.400
—
—
0.880 0.560 0.640
0.640
0.215 0.100 0.120
0.120
0.945 0.480
—
—
2.600 1.600 2.120
2.050
0.935 0.285 0.350
0.340
0.150 0.090 0.095
0.095
1.758 0.980 1.110
1.070
2.500 2.000 2.400
2.400
1.220 0.673 1.190
1.160
0.670 0.320 0.370
0.365
0.315 0.175 0.205
0.205
0.455 0.115 0.345
0.300
2.893 1.902 2.380
2.340
0.286 0.109 0.120
0.115
2.419 1.630 1.800
1.750
1.109 0.823 0.930
0.915
1.544 1.004 1.330
1.300
1.860 1.380
—
—
1.600 1.140 1.420
1.420
1.740 1.300 1.430
1.400
1.774 1.400 1.530
1.530
1.230 0.836
—
—
0.110 0.055 0.070
0.065
5.977 3.243 5.250
5.180
1.290 0.200
—
—
4.835 1.593 1.910
1.860
0.405 0.150 0.275
0.265
0.945 0.600 0.750
0.730
1.126 0.880 0.940
0.940
0.790 0.491 0.770
0.745
0.440 0.275 0.300
0.300
4.551 3.962 4.330
4.290
0.475 0.180 0.315
0.305
0.575 0.265 0.435
0.435
0.405 0.250
—
—
0.430 0.340
—
—
0.920 0.660 0.800
0.785
1.562 0.929 1.170
1.150
2.181 1.164 1.360
1.330
0.450 0.220 0.320
0.310
0.880 0.455 0.620
0.595
1.610 1.000 1.170
1.170
0.340 0.190
—
—
0.903 0.600 0.685
0.630
2.070 0.475 1.900
1.860
1.083 0.427 0.715
0.690
1.363 0.945
—
—
3.245 2.189 2.450
2.450
0.605 0.355
—
—
2.904 2.020 2.330
2.330
1.810 0.976 1.810
1.720
2.239 1.243
—
—
1.070 0.455 0.945
0.910
0.105 0.040 0.050
0.045
0.655 0.205 0.250
0.240
0.135 0.064
—
—
0.725 0.285 0.330
0.310
0.475 0.180
—
—
0.145 0.070 0.090
0.085
1.320 0.883 0.950
0.945
0.905 0.320 0.550
0.515
4.503 3.226 4.400
4.340
0.255 0.165 0.175
0.175
3.570 2.650
—
—
1.250 0.356 1.190
1.170
0.955 0.625 0.850
0.835
0.812 0.230 0.275
0.275
1.510 0.620 0.690
0.650
1.360 0.755
—
—
1.040 0.530 0.785
0.725
0.440 0.310
—
—
0.155 0.050 0.055
0.055
5.307 2.986 3.320
3.300
0.205 0.065 0.075
0.070
0.970 0.760
—
—
1.950 1.170 1.580
1.550
0.530 0.250 0.275
0.275
0.139 0.045
—
—
0.265 0.135 0.145
0.145
0.460 0.150
—
—
1.280 0.920
—
—
1.606 1.210 1.580
1.550
2.167 1.060 1.230
1.210
0.340 0.145 0.180
0.170
0.504 0.360
—
—
0.710 0.430
—
—
3.220 2.730 3.110
3.090
2.260 1.031 1.960
1.900
0.270 0.110 0.130
0.130
2.290 1.174 1.550
1.520
0.917 0.379 0.500
0.480
1.260 0.902 1.100
1.070
0.660 0.355 0.420
0.380
7.500 4.142 7.290
7.210
0.600 0.250
—
—
6.256 4.320 4.950
4.800
0.779 0.330
—
—
0.800 0.420
—
—
10.612 8.306 9.100
8.970
0.807 0.400 0.505
0.495
0.699 0.213 0.650
0.635
0.620 0.420 0.430
0.425
0.225 0.110 0.135
0.125
0.080 0.030 0.040
0.040
0.139 0.070
—
—
0.665 0.220 0.305
0.295
0.340 0.180
—
—
0.120 0.065 0.085
0.080
4.250 2.648 3.410
3.400
1.036 0.330 0.385
0.370
0.884 0.510
—
—
0.480 0.320 0.400
0.360
0.900 0.660 0.720
0.710
0.440 0.190
—
—
1.010 0.515
—
—
1.470 1.091
—
—
0.985 0.105
—
—
2.100 1.640
—
—
1.220 0.355 0.960
0.935
0.175 0.060 0.070
0.065
1.920 0.700 1.190
1.170
0.700 0.300
—
—
3.330 2.090
—
—
2.354 1.040 1.190
1.170
1.626 0.855
—
—
0.410 0.210 0.280
0.280
1.160 0.120
—
—
0.160 0.100
—
—
0.705 0.470 0.530
0.520
0.180 0.045
—
—
1.080 0.515 0.845
0.835
1.404 0.848 0.925
0.920
0.135 0.050 0.060
0.060
6.547 4.519 6.110
5.970
0.609 0.375 0.540
0.515
4.674 3.448 4.390
4.370
0.330 0.045 0.155
0.145
23.670 20.194 22.100 21.660
3.230 2.300 3.010
2.990
7.030 5.007 6.500
6.500
1.506 0.781
—
—
3.489 1.400 2.200
2.080
1.090 0.900 1.010
1.000
0.510 0.335
—
—
0.920 0.535 0.775
0.770
0.380 0.290 0.365
0.360
0.610 0.384
—
—
0.876 0.450 0.635
0.625
0.280 0.110 0.130
0.125
1.800 1.130
—
—
0.790 0.620
—
—
6.250 4.960 6.250
6.200
0.370 0.240 0.245
0.245
0.850 0.548 0.715
0.710
CODE
7146
5198
2682
7609
9954
2674
4758
6556
5568
5015
7214
7162
7070
7181
8133
7005
7187
0168
6297
5100
9938
7221
7188
5105
5229
7076
2879
7171
8435
8044
5007
5797
8052
7018
2852
7986
5071
7195
2127
5094
7157
5082
8125
8176
7114
5835
5835PA
5265
7169
1619
7233
8907
9016
7217
7773
5101
7249
2984
7229
0149
3107
5197
3611
7197
5220
7192
7096
5649
0136
7077
3247
5151
5168
9342
7105
5095
3298
5072
5199
7033
8443
5165
2739
5000
9601
9687
7222
7183
7223
8648
2747
7043
7167
4383
0054
7199
6211
3522
5371
5060
9466
7164
6971
7017
7153
7130
3476
5192
8362
3794
9326
5092
5232
8745
3581
2887
4235
9881
5068
9199
5098
7029
8095
5152
3778
5223
8192
7059
6149
5001
7219
5576
7595
5916
3883
7004
5087
7002
5025
4944
7109
7140
5065
7225
5183
9997
5436
5146
6033
3042
7095
7172
8869
6637
8117
8273
9458
9873
7168
7123
7544
7498
7765
7232
7803
COUNTER
AEM
AFUJIYA
AISB
AJIYA
AKNIGHT
ALCOM
ANCOM
ANNJOO
APB
APM
ARANK
ASTINO
ASUPREM
ATURMJU
BHIC
BIG
BKOON
BOILERM
BOXPAK
BPPLAS
BRIGHT
BSLCORP
BTM
CANONE
CAP
CBIP
CCM
CENBOND
CEPCO
CFM
CHINWEL
CHOOBEE
CICB
CME
CMSB
CNASIA
COASTAL
COMCORP
COMFORT
CSCSTEL
CYL
CYMAO
DAIBOCI
DENKO
DNONCE
DOLMITE
DOLMITE-PA
DOLPHIN
DOMINAN
DRBHCOM
DUFU
EG
EKSONS
EMETALL
EPMB
EVERGRN
EWEIN
FACBIND
FAVCO
FIBON
FIMACOR
FLBHD
GBH
GESHEN
GLOTEC
GOODWAY
GPA
GPHAROS
GREENYB
GSB
GUH
HALEX
HARTA
HARVEST
HCK
HEVEA
HEXZA
HIAPTEK
HIBISCS
HIGHTEC
HIL
HOKHENG
HUAAN
HUMEIND
HWGB
IDEALUBB
IMASPRO
IRETEX
JADI
JASKITA
JAVA
JMR
JOHOTIN
JTIASA
KARYON
KEINHIN
KIALIM
KIANJOO
KIMHIN
KINSTEL
KKB
KNM
KOBAY
KOMARK
KOSSAN
KPOWER
KSENG
KSSC
KYM
LAFMSIA
LBALUM
LCTH
LEONFB
LEWEKO
LIONCOR
LIONDIV
LIONIND
LSTEEL
LUSTER
LYSAGHT
MASTEEL
MASTER
MAYPAK
MBL
MELEWAR
MENTIGA
MERCURY
METALR
METROD
MIECO
MINETEC
MINHO
MLGLOBAL
MSC
MUDA
MULTICO
MYCRON
NAKA
NWP
NYLEX
OCTAGON
OKA
ORNA
PA
PCHEM
PENSONI
PERSTIM
PERWAJA
PETGAS
PETRONM
PIE
PMBTECH
PMETAL
PNEPCB
POLY
PPHB
PREMIER
PRESTAR
PRG
PWORTH
QUALITY
RALCO
RAPID
RESINTC
RUBEREX
CLOSING
(RM)
0.120
0.370
0.300
2.600
0.410
0.670
0.360
0.760
1.150
4.020
0.455
0.640
0.120
0.590
2.120
0.350
0.095
1.110
2.400
1.190
0.370
0.205
0.320
2.340
0.115
1.800
0.930
1.330
1.450
1.420
1.410
1.530
0.900
0.065
5.220
0.300
1.880
0.270
0.735
0.940
0.745
0.300
4.330
0.315
0.435
0.280
0.430
0.790
1.160
1.340
0.320
0.620
1.170
0.265
0.685
1.890
0.715
0.970
2.450
0.385
2.330
1.800
1.410
0.920
0.045
0.250
0.085
0.330
0.205
0.090
0.945
0.530
4.370
0.175
3.050
1.190
0.835
0.275
0.685
0.950
0.725
0.400
0.055
3.310
0.070
0.795
1.580
0.275
0.060
0.145
0.190
1.140
1.560
1.230
0.180
0.445
0.490
3.110
1.950
0.130
1.520
0.485
1.070
0.390
7.290
0.470
4.900
0.410
0.500
8.990
0.505
0.635
0.430
0.135
0.040
0.075
0.300
0.190
0.085
3.400
0.385
0.620
0.400
0.710
0.230
0.520
1.110
0.200
2.100
0.960
0.070
1.180
0.365
2.300
1.170
0.920
0.280
0.125
0.120
0.520
0.070
0.835
0.925
0.060
6.020
0.535
4.390
0.145
21.720
3.000
6.500
0.955
2.090
1.000
0.380
0.770
0.360
0.425
0.625
0.130
1.500
0.750
6.250
0.245
0.715
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.050
19
—
—
UNCH
10
UNCH
15
-0.010
92
UNCH
10
UNCH
0.5
—
—
0.015
37.1
-0.005 1019.1
—
—
0.030
64.9
UNCH
5.1
UNCH
30
0.020
84.4
-0.050
3
0.010
238.9
UNCH
124.3
UNCH
10
0.020 7706.4
-0.060
114
-0.005 10920.7
0.020
143.6
0.010
38.5
0.030
20.9
—
—
-0.080
10
-0.010
145.2
-0.030
2.8
—
—
UNCH 1021.5
0.020
539.3
—
—
-0.030
790
UNCH
540
-0.015
631.8
-0.010
60
-0.015
133
-0.010
6
0.040
47.5
-0.005
203.2
UNCH
97.5
—
—
—
—
-0.010
297
-0.010
99
0.010 1405.7
0.005
512.1
0.015
412.3
0.030
8.4
—
—
0.005
16
0.010 1156.3
0.015
192
—
—
UNCH
24
—
—
0.010
5.4
0.060 1427.5
—
—
0.010 1152.6
UNCH 2583.2
-0.020
1.5
—
—
0.010
17
—
—
-0.005
601.8
-0.005
62.5
-0.020
554.1
0.020
589.4
UNCH
3
—
—
-0.020 1539.5
-0.015
55.5
-0.010
20
UNCH 4331.5
—
—
-0.050
12.4
—
—
UNCH
0.7
UNCH
30.3
-0.005
400
—
—
UNCH
30
UNCH
10
—
—
UNCH
460
—
—
—
—
UNCH
86.5
0.010
623.2
UNCH
89
—
—
—
—
0.010
51.8
0.030
126.3
UNCH
1682
-0.020
125.3
-0.010 41382.3
-0.020
2.7
-0.045
291.9
0.050
344.5
—
—
-0.020
26.3
—
—
—
—
UNCH 2316.7
0.005
32.8
-0.005 1694.3
UNCH
126.9
0.005
194.8
-0.005
65
—
—
-0.005
376.3
—
—
0.005 2109.3
-0.020
12
0.010
349.5
—
—
0.040
10
-0.085
44
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.015 1456.8
0.005 1500.2
0.010
904.1
—
—
—
—
-0.020
21
—
—
UNCH
10
—
—
—
—
-0.005
13
—
—
-0.010
11
0.005
10
-0.005
150
-0.100
3493
0.010
622.5
0.020
15.4
-0.005
316
-0.160
946.3
-0.020
67.1
UNCH
42.5
—
—
-0.110 2408.8
-0.070
6
—
—
-0.005
31
-0.010
147.7
—
—
-0.015
253
UNCH
268
—
—
—
—
UNCH
260.5
-0.005
8
-0.020
20
—
—
—
2.206
—
1.000
0.373
1.137
0.000
5.870
—
1.193
0.185
—
2.741
0.360
0.155
2.483
2.405
0.647
1.342
0.000
0.210
3.629
0.370
3.176
1.051
1.631
—
0.900
1.354
1.600
—
0.060
5.900
—
3.192
0.000
0.414
1.299
0.000
0.371
4.042
0.300
0.000
—
—
0.000
0.951
2.568
0.195
0.336
1.267
—
0.000
0.474
1.002
—
3.009
—
6.469
1.001
—
0.240
0.055
0.000
—
0.345
—
0.090
1.002
0.000
7.383
0.219
—
0.911
0.672
0.719
2.033
—
0.000
—
0.142
1.233
0.211
—
0.000
1.655
—
0.150
—
—
1.762
2.390
0.359
—
—
3.204
1.250
0.155
2.679
0.430
0.000
0.605
3.703
—
7.467
—
—
9.834
0.530
0.221
0.474
0.175
0.095
—
0.761
—
0.091
0.000
1.078
—
0.483
1.019
—
—
—
—
—
0.335
0.165
0.000
—
—
0.911
—
0.389
—
—
0.530
—
0.912
0.747
0.145
6.740
0.558
3.869
0.127
23.904
3.040
6.873
—
2.358
0.409
—
1.000
0.368
—
0.000
0.236
—
—
3.770
0.280
0.766
41.38
30.08
—
10.10
—
—
36.73
760.00
10.23
9.41
5.85
8.71
—
—
22.41
—
—
17.08
11.76
19.10
—
—
—
4.60
2.21
11.04
—
10.58
24.13
—
8.83
11.88
—
13.83
25.45
—
5.21
29.67
25.88
93.07
12.87
—
20.23
11.71
3.14
9.52
—
3.26
8.34
15.01
5.81
1.80
4.24
—
8.10
14.18
43.07
16.44
6.03
10.29
7.95
9.40
3.48
7.87
—
—
—
—
18.47
—
13.48
24.42
32.35
—
16.74
10.31
11.93
85.94
—
5.36
9.34
34.19
—
27.91
—
—
12.63
—
—
14.50
—
178.13
7.73
34.55
10.29
11.56
3.85
10.07
10.41
1.46
9.12
13.55
6.74
—
27.90
—
10.59
11.88
—
31.46
9.51
13.57
5.22
—
—
—
—
—
—
8.33
—
7.58
—
13.47
—
9.45
8.92
—
14.97
7.20
—
8.47
1.69
—
22.37
24.40
11.24
—
—
13.58
—
8.26
7.94
—
20.57
3.95
9.44
—
19.03
10.95
12.23
11.07
12.09
769.23
12.71
6.44
138.46
7.70
17.76
23.21
—
11.40
—
5.95
15.82
—
—
—
0.77
—
7.46
—
3.95
5.65
4.85
4.95
4.55
—
—
—
—
—
1.58
—
5.04
—
—
—
2.14
—
3.33
2.69
4.51
—
—
4.14
3.92
1.94
—
1.63
—
3.09
—
—
3.19
6.71
—
3.12
—
—
—
—
—
3.56
4.48
—
—
—
—
5.84
—
0.70
2.89
4.90
2.86
4.29
5.00
10.64
—
—
—
—
—
5.37
—
5.29
—
1.49
—
—
0.95
4.79
2.18
—
3.68
2.07
—
—
0.91
—
—
2.22
—
—
2.07
—
2.63
2.24
1.22
2.22
2.25
—
—
3.08
—
2.63
—
2.80
—
1.10
—
2.04
4.88
—
3.56
3.96
0.79
6.98
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1.69
4.03
—
4.23
—
—
5.41
—
2.86
—
—
—
—
—
2.56
8.70
—
—
—
5.77
—
3.59
2.70
—
2.66
4.67
7.97
—
1.98
—
1.85
4.19
5.02
—
—
—
—
4.71
1.60
—
—
—
—
—
2.10
MKT CAP
(MIL)
21.9
66.6
39.6
180.0
23.8
90.0
78.8
397.3
129.8
810.4
54.6
175.4
35.0
36.0
526.7
16.8
26.3
572.8
144.1
223.3
60.8
20.1
39.9
449.6
133.6
968.8
425.6
159.6
64.9
58.2
422.3
168.2
41.2
28.7
5,608.2
13.6
999.4
37.8
328.1
357.2
74.5
22.5
493.0
32.9
19.6
73.8
5.3
175.4
191.4
2,590.5
56.2
47.8
192.1
45.4
113.7
969.6
150.8
82.6
536.3
37.7
571.5
185.8
263.1
73.6
242.2
27.6
83.3
44.4
68.4
39.6
262.6
56.2
7,170.6
49.1
169.1
500.1
167.3
197.6
671.9
38.6
202.1
32.0
61.7
1,585.8
42.1
55.8
126.4
36.4
56.5
65.2
32.9
144.5
145.6
1,197.7
85.6
44.1
30.3
1,381.4
303.5
136.4
391.8
951.7
72.8
48.6
4,661.7
26.5
1,771.2
39.4
74.9
7,638.8
125.5
228.6
133.3
43.5
52.6
104.4
215.4
24.3
147.2
141.4
94.1
33.9
16.8
65.3
52.2
36.4
44.6
9.6
252.0
201.6
46.6
129.6
32.7
230.0
356.9
40.9
79.4
6.9
38.4
101.1
11.9
130.0
69.6
56.8
48,160.0
69.4
435.9
81.2
42,978.1
810.0
499.3
76.4
2,714.6
65.7
60.8
84.6
121.3
77.4
90.7
62.7
86.9
31.5
546.5
33.6
163.9
34 Markets
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
FR I
BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
4.838 3.154
—
—
5.750 2.170 5.250
5.200
1.425 0.800 0.825
0.825
1.553 1.130 1.370
1.320
2.610 0.977 2.610
2.530
1.230 0.700 0.790
0.785
7.620 6.348 7.090
7.000
1.050 0.280 0.340
0.330
0.455 0.235 0.250
0.240
1.137 0.526 0.635
0.630
0.515 0.250 0.325
0.305
0.780 0.370
—
—
6.000 4.400 6.000
5.800
0.688 0.365
—
—
0.850 0.440
—
—
1.580 0.560 1.350
1.330
1.730 0.478 1.730
1.670
0.845 0.581 0.795
0.725
1.005 0.540
—
—
1.508 0.730
—
—
0.606 0.200 0.255
0.250
2.281 1.500
—
—
1.979 1.300 1.360
1.320
1.680 0.521 1.450
1.450
2.670 1.539 2.040
2.010
3.884 3.115 3.720
3.640
0.450 0.240 0.275
0.270
1.160 0.370 0.500
0.495
15.886 14.020 14.900 14.820
15.723 13.194
—
—
0.260 0.080
—
—
0.540 0.215
—
—
1.500 0.700
—
—
1.450 0.685 1.450
1.120
0.420 0.220 0.250
0.240
2.390 1.650 1.780
1.730
2.201 1.600 1.700
1.700
0.895 0.640
—
—
2.060 1.146 2.050
1.990
2.300 1.660 1.780
1.750
8.550 4.078 8.000
7.640
0.773 0.530
—
—
0.250 0.140
—
—
1.696 1.208 1.600
1.580
4.438 1.370 4.050
3.950
0.971 0.641 0.730
0.730
0.945 0.530
—
—
1.440 0.396 1.440
1.410
1.757 1.127 1.230
1.220
0.445 0.260
—
—
1.780 1.200 1.680
1.550
2.257 1.318 2.130
2.090
0.700 0.470 0.545
0.525
0.650 0.420
—
—
2.460 1.880 2.190
2.150
1.324 0.895 0.990
0.960
2.640 1.110 1.270
1.240
1.363 0.800 0.870
0.840
0.360 0.170 0.205
0.200
0.880 0.535 0.705
0.705
CONSTRUCTION
0.530 0.260
—
—
0.762 0.505 0.635
0.630
1.463 0.540 0.670
0.665
0.935 0.510 0.580
0.570
0.698 0.330 0.440
0.420
1.294 0.860 0.940
0.930
1.476 0.950 1.020
0.980
1.879 1.475
—
—
1.168 0.702 0.920
0.900
1.238 0.850 0.930
0.930
0.522 0.340 0.430
0.425
1.807 0.943
—
—
1.717 1.130 1.300
1.270
5.293 3.770 4.620
4.420
1.863 0.800 0.895
0.880
1.540 0.780 0.940
0.895
1.478 1.114
—
—
1.490 1.180
—
—
1.947 1.593 1.800
1.740
3.685 2.870 3.370
3.250
0.905 0.530
—
—
1.180 0.375 1.110
1.080
0.555 0.300
—
—
1.220 0.740 0.830
0.810
1.505 1.050 1.190
1.180
1.500 1.060
—
—
1.440 0.860 0.910
0.910
0.550 0.305
—
—
1.336 0.508 1.050
1.020
0.415 0.190
—
—
2.160 0.840 1.040
1.020
3.082 1.478 2.010
1.980
1.009 0.450 0.470
0.465
1.695 1.220
—
—
2.043 1.219 1.700
1.580
0.260 0.115 0.130
0.130
4.685 3.000 3.350
3.300
1.050 0.477 0.790
0.770
1.320 0.980 1.190
1.160
0.530 0.300 0.380
0.365
0.535 0.265 0.340
0.335
1.520 0.845 1.520
1.350
1.064 0.490 0.550
0.550
2.031 1.083 1.360
1.320
1.100 0.560 0.570
0.560
0.410 0.225 0.260
0.250
TRADING SERVICES
0.670 0.150 0.220
0.210
0.781 0.315 0.420
0.400
3.792 2.600 2.810
2.800
0.250 0.120 0.175
0.170
2.900 0.765 1.370
1.320
7.248 4.220 5.380
5.220
1.370 0.365 0.495
0.485
0.085 0.020 0.025
0.020
11.312 9.590 10.200 10.000
1.869 1.540 1.660
1.660
0.240 0.090 0.235
0.225
1.918 0.765 0.935
0.905
0.225 0.105 0.120
0.120
3.376 2.730 2.910
2.770
4.896 4.450
—
—
0.495 0.270 0.360
0.350
7.132 5.590 6.000
5.890
0.322 0.210 0.265
0.230
1.429 0.705 0.930
0.925
0.794 0.375 0.410
0.400
0.450 0.193 0.275
0.250
7.097 6.364 6.400
6.400
2.927 1.890 2.100
2.060
0.591 0.345 0.365
0.355
3.218 1.960 2.200
2.140
0.869 0.630
—
—
0.615 0.330 0.440
0.425
3.584 2.950 3.100
3.050
0.990 0.475 0.610
0.605
1.610 0.555 0.640
0.625
4.906 3.722 3.900
3.840
1.207 0.740 0.760
0.760
1.890 1.000 1.860
1.840
3.640 1.850 2.740
2.630
1.112 0.505 0.830
0.800
0.622 0.340
—
—
0.736 0.420
—
—
0.120 0.060 0.070
0.070
1.040 0.650
—
—
0.075 0.040 0.045
0.045
2.650 1.390 1.720
1.700
0.305 0.085 0.100
0.095
3.442 1.450 1.810
1.720
2.240 0.953 1.170
1.140
0.685 0.460 0.600
0.585
1.815 1.183 1.600
1.580
6.751 3.530 4.180
4.110
1.762 0.986 1.400
1.310
0.450 0.275 0.320
0.290
1.500 0.441 1.070
1.040
0.470 0.245
—
—
0.325 0.195
—
—
3.817 1.949 3.370
3.160
0.425 0.190 0.225
0.220
1.201 0.861
—
—
1.451 1.062
—
—
0.860 0.450
—
—
* Volume Weighted Average Price
CODE
COUNTER
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
YEAR
HIGH
1.413
2.430
0.960
1.735
0.340
0.450
3.375
1.840
4.655
9.774
1.570
0.568
2.555
0.070
0.460
5.620
2.980
3.879
0.050
1.670
6.450
0.910
1.630
0.430
2.775
0.670
0.450
2.103
0.476
1.944
4.389
1.741
0.575
0.505
0.585
0.285
0.970
1.380
2.909
1.879
0.215
7.144
1.684
3.457
2.112
0.882
1.180
2.678
3.140
9.296
2.754
0.670
0.125
0.355
0.480
3.070
1.160
4.520
0.140
1.007
1.003
1.876
0.220
2.990
0.501
1.030
2.735
1.443
0.335
2.918
1.827
1.320
0.300
5.950
22.800
0.250
7.372
0.270
0.430
5.116
2.713
3.345
0.200
0.405
0.921
0.732
0.660
0.225
2.311
0.415
0.885
1.240
1.470
1.810
9.599
0.933
4.150
1.860
2.527
3.500
0.460
2.642
0.225
0.610
4.060
4.500
16.839
1.729
0.585
0.850
7.526
0.750
1.390
0.560
3.056
1.321
2.943
3.893
1.718
0.750
3.753
0.505
3.243
0.550
4.610
1.460
0.130
3.455
1.052
1.790
FINANCE
15.741
3.257
4.857
13.200
13.400
6.582
1.970
4.290
8.811
7.089
1.560
1.409
14.820
13.880
18.015
2.150
1.236
0.900
0.235
2.650
0.764
15.088
0.773
3.350
9.749
2.540
4.630
2.740
1.485
19.645
0.290
9.032
0.947
4.230
5134
9822
7811
5170
7247
9237
4731
7239
7366
7073
5145
5163
4324
5181
7115
7155
7248
7132
7099
5665
7143
6904
7207
7235
7106
5012
4022
5149
4448
4448P
5178
7097
7439
9741
6378
7034
7374
7854
7285
5010
7113
7173
4359
7100
7133
7227
4995
6963
5142
7226
7111
7231
7050
7025
5009
4243
7245
5048
7020
7014
SAB
SAM
SAPIND
SCABLE
SCGM
SCIB
SCIENTX
SCNWOLF
SCOMIEN
SEACERA
SEALINK
SEB
SHELL
SIGGAS
SKBSHUT
SKPRES
SLP
SMISCOR
SMPC
SSTEEL
STONE
SUBUR
SUCCESS
SUPERLN
SUPERMX
TAANN
TADMAX
TAS
TASEK
TASEK-PA
TATGIAP
TAWIN
TECGUAN
TECNIC
TEKALA
TGUAN
TIENWAH
TIMWELL
TOMYPAK
TONGHER
TOPGLOV
TOYOINK
TURIYA
UCHITEC
ULICORP
UMSNGB
VERSATL
VS
WASEONG
WATTA
WEIDA
WELLCAL
WONG
WOODLAN
WTHORSE
WTK
WZSATU
YILAI
YKGI
YLI
3.540
5.230
0.825
1.340
2.540
0.790
7.050
0.340
0.240
0.635
0.320
0.380
5.890
0.480
0.580
1.350
1.710
0.795
0.580
0.900
0.255
1.570
1.360
1.450
2.020
3.690
0.270
0.495
14.900
15.100
0.110
0.220
0.700
1.350
0.250
1.780
1.700
0.640
2.040
1.770
7.980
0.630
0.150
1.600
4.020
0.730
0.720
1.410
1.230
0.280
1.560
2.130
0.545
0.490
2.190
0.980
1.270
0.850
0.205
0.705
—
-0.020
UNCH
-0.050
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
0.005
-0.010
-0.010
0.015
—
-0.060
—
—
0.010
-0.010
-0.005
—
—
0.005
—
0.020
UNCH
-0.020
-0.040
UNCH
-0.005
0.040
—
—
—
—
0.220
-0.010
-0.020
UNCH
—
0.040
0.020
0.290
—
—
0.020
0.020
-0.050
—
-0.020
UNCH
—
0.020
0.020
-0.005
—
-0.010
0.020
0.030
0.010
0.020
UNCH
—
112.5
5
53.5
3564.6
69.5
75.8
52
150
56.5
814.5
—
48.5
—
—
4829.2
178.9
8.2
—
—
145.8
—
35.7
19
2187.2
130.2
41
177
12.8
—
—
—
—
1456.1
57.1
78.9
10
—
380.8
24
5591.3
—
—
185
237.2
1
—
2804
80.3
—
8.2
263.8
33.1
—
10.7
1288.5
36.1
146.1
28.6
6
— 15.97
2.586
9.50
1.447 13.39
1.541
8.50
0.870 18.14
0.491
—
5.621
9.98
0.299
—
0.430 37.50
0.893 24.05
0.403 25.00
—
—
6.998
—
— 10.50
—
—
0.320 25.47
0.420 23.52
0.636 20.87
—
2.04
—
—
0.635
—
— 17.12
1.224
7.00
0.472 12.28
2.636 14.92
4.033 10.87
0.350
1.85
1.134
6.94
0.000 17.44
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
2.939
0.52
0.345
—
1.801 15.36
2.500 13.63
— 336.84
1.426 13.06
1.795 11.05
5.730 22.08
— 46.67
— 16.67
1.400 14.21
1.014 23.86
0.920
5.30
—
—
1.368 11.77
1.682
9.31
—
—
1.686
8.61
3.453 19.52
0.505
—
— 18.28
1.876
7.95
1.259 17.79
0.904 18.07
0.000 11.05
1.000
—
0.797
—
1.41
2.28
7.27
1.68
3.67
—
3.12
—
—
4.72
—
5.26
—
1.46
—
1.45
1.46
3.14
—
—
—
3.18
5.88
2.07
2.48
5.42
—
—
4.70
3.05
—
—
—
—
—
3.93
4.71
—
2.94
6.78
2.13
1.59
—
6.25
3.48
3.42
—
2.20
3.66
—
1.92
4.32
—
—
4.57
1.87
—
2.35
—
—
484.7
451.2
60.0
424.8
304.8
58.1
1,621.5
29.8
82.1
115.4
160.0
30.4
1,767.0
90.0
23.2
1,462.3
422.9
35.6
40.7
377.5
22.9
328.1
163.2
116.0
1,373.9
1,368.0
120.2
89.1
1,842.0
5.1
17.1
14.1
28.1
54.5
38.2
187.3
164.0
57.0
223.3
225.6
4,981.0
67.4
34.3
627.2
583.7
58.4
84.5
1,628.8
953.1
23.7
208.0
706.4
50.0
19.6
525.6
471.7
321.2
136.0
71.4
71.5
7007
7078
6173
5190
5932
8761
8591
7528
5253
8877
7047
7161
9261
5398
5226
5169
5169PA
5169PB
6238
3336
8834
4723
9083
3565
5171
9628
5129
5006
9571
5924
5085
5703
8311
7055
5070
7145
9598
5205
5263
9717
5054
5622
5042
9679
7028
2283
ARK
AZRB
BDB
BENALEC
BPURI
BREM
CRESBLD
DKLS
ECONBHD
EKOVEST
FAJAR
FUTUTEC
GADANG
GAMUDA
GBGAQRS
HOHUP
HOHUP-PA
HOHUP-PB
HSL
IJM
IREKA
JAKS
JETSON
KEURO
KIMLUN
LEBTECH
MELATI
MERGE
MITRA
MTDACPI
MUDAJYA
MUHIBAH
PESONA
PLB
PRTASCO
PSIPTEK
PTARAS
SENDAI
SUNCON
SYCAL
TRC
TRIPLC
TSRCAP
WCT
ZECON
ZELAN
0.310
0.635
0.670
0.575
0.430
0.940
0.990
1.740
0.910
0.930
0.430
1.550
1.300
4.420
0.890
0.920
1.360
1.290
1.770
3.280
0.635
1.090
0.330
0.815
1.190
1.440
0.910
0.360
1.040
0.220
1.030
2.000
0.470
1.220
1.670
0.130
3.350
0.770
1.170
0.380
0.340
1.360
0.550
1.350
0.570
0.255
—
0.005
-0.010
-0.005
-0.010
UNCH
UNCH
—
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
—
UNCH
-0.230
-0.010
0.015
—
—
UNCH
-0.090
—
UNCH
—
-0.015
-0.010
—
-0.035
—
-0.010
—
-0.020
-0.020
UNCH
—
0.080
-0.005
0.070
-0.005
UNCH
0.005
0.005
0.190
-0.060
-0.020
0.010
-0.005
—
71
18
445.1
339.1
41
156
—
711.3
9
147.6
—
712.2
4220.5
473
1223.7
—
—
59
4243
—
6261.5
—
42.1
33.6
—
15.9
—
610.8
—
89.7
202.2
166
—
400.5
25
11.7
326.5
2052.3
10.1
199.1
1520.7
5
1784.2
13.5
2469.6
—
0.931
0.000
0.888
0.799
1.255
1.480
—
0.000
2.720
0.603
—
1.010
4.762
1.178
1.184
—
—
1.930
5.810
—
0.522
—
1.180
1.845
—
0.996
—
0.478
—
2.783
2.322
0.460
—
1.391
0.299
6.189
1.195
0.000
0.298
0.554
1.250
0.000
2.270
0.770
0.300
17.61
16.12
4.87
57.50
13.83
7.45
6.81
7.30
10.44
44.71
—
8.74
4.79
14.04
8.74
4.20
—
—
12.44
15.46
—
29.78
—
61.74
7.49
58.30
13.75
6.27
6.74
—
—
10.50
19.34
14.14
—
13.68
10.37
11.32
11.24
3.29
20.99
12.35
10.78
13.83
—
4.18
—
3.15
5.22
—
4.65
3.19
3.79
1.72
2.75
2.15
2.91
1.94
3.08
2.71
2.12
—
1.84
1.16
1.47
2.29
—
—
—
—
3.19
—
3.02
—
3.20
—
8.74
2.00
2.13
8.20
5.39
—
5.37
1.62
—
—
0.53
—
1.82
1.45
—
—
14.2
307.0
203.6
466.8
93.6
324.7
171.0
161.3
486.9
795.6
141.9
140.8
287.6
10,634.1
347.9
317.5
11.2
27.0
1,031.3
11,719.2
108.5
477.8
62.0
817.2
357.7
196.5
109.2
24.1
667.8
51.0
569.0
940.7
298.4
111.4
562.8
41.2
545.2
596.0
1,512.7
121.7
163.4
88.4
64.0
1,620.7
67.9
215.4
5238
5166
6599
7315
5099
5014
5115
0159
6351
7083
5194
5210
1481
6399
7048
7579
6888
5021
7251
7241
6998
5032
5248
3395
5196
4219
6025
1562
7036
9474
2771
5257
5245
2925
7117
7209
7016
5104
5136
5037
5184
0091
5141
5132
7212
7277
5908
5216
2097
5259
5036
7471
1368
0064
5081
5208
7189
AAX
AEGB
AEON
AHB
AIRASIA
AIRPORT
ALAM
AMEDIA
AMWAY
ANALABS
APFT
ARMADA
ASB
ASTRO
ATLAN
AWC
AXIATA
AYS
BARAKAH
BHS
BINTAI
BIPORT
BJAUTO
BJCORP
BJFOOD
BJLAND
BJMEDIA
BJTOTO
BORNOIL
BRAHIMS
BSTEAD
CARIMIN
CARING
CCB
CENTURY
CHEETAH
CHUAN
CNI
COMPLET
COMPUGT
CYPARK
DAYA
DAYANG
DELEUM
DESTINI
DIALOG
DKSH
DSONIC
EASTLND
EATECH
EDARAN
EDEN
EDGENTA
EFFICEN
EIG
EITA
EKIB
0.220
0.420
2.800
0.175
1.360
5.300
0.495
0.025
10.000
1.660
0.230
0.915
0.120
2.900
4.600
0.360
5.900
0.265
0.930
0.410
0.270
6.400
2.090
0.360
2.180
0.685
0.440
3.050
0.605
0.635
3.880
0.760
1.860
2.680
0.805
0.385
0.450
0.070
0.750
0.045
1.720
0.100
1.750
1.150
0.585
1.590
4.150
1.360
0.320
1.040
0.350
0.215
3.320
0.225
0.880
1.210
0.740
UNCH
0.005
UNCH
UNCH
-0.010
-0.180
UNCH
UNCH
0.080
UNCH
UNCH
-0.020
-0.005
-0.020
—
UNCH
-0.160
0.040
-0.010
0.005
0.010
UNCH
-0.040
-0.005
0.030
—
UNCH
-0.050
-0.005
-0.010
UNCH
-0.010
-0.020
-0.070
-0.020
—
—
UNCH
—
UNCH
UNCH
-0.005
-0.080
-0.030
-0.010
-0.010
0.020
0.010
-0.010
-0.010
—
—
0.060
-0.005
—
—
—
16228.4
414
53.8
116.1
48233.5
1840.2
1415.5
254.8
4.1
3
34373.3
18656.3
50
7596.2
—
1612.4
13211.7
11.3
247.2
384.3
2836.5
18.7
1692.1
1522.2
414.5
—
30
823.8
7244.9
171.6
8.2
8
592
49.5
1135.1
—
—
30
—
500
1018.5
8685
183.9
276.3
58
3885.2
18.9
9160.8
10.5
190.9
—
—
1117
636.3
—
—
—
1.040
—
0.344
—
15.101 21.36
0.000 13.67
2.412
—
8.659 12.62
1.512
9.74
0.089
—
12.480 17.25
1.730 13.72
0.311
—
3.968
—
0.140
—
2.917 27.13
— 24.06
0.277 10.43
6.719 20.92
0.310 11.42
1.392
8.29
1.312
—
0.320
8.74
0.000 22.98
1.535 11.39
0.525
2.12
1.679
3.79
—
—
0.490
—
3.924 11.54
0.489 13.21
1.493
—
5.333 12.53
0.000
—
1.759 31.47
2.454
7.70
2.050
7.06
— 17.91
— 39.47
0.105
—
— 83.33
0.050
—
2.457
7.93
0.381
—
5.370
9.35
4.279
7.95
0.371 27.73
2.979 28.65
6.572 12.07
9.405 41.59
0.480
2.12
0.000 17.05
— 109.38
—
—
2.565 14.82
0.146 22.73
— 10.39
— 11.47
—
—
—
11.90
1.79
—
2.21
1.43
—
—
4.00
1.81
—
1.78
2.08
4.14
6.52
—
3.73
3.77
2.15
—
—
3.44
4.65
2.78
1.95
—
—
6.07
—
—
5.41
—
1.08
—
4.97
3.25
1.27
4.29
4.00
—
2.91
—
4.00
6.09
—
1.32
2.29
1.10
—
0.96
—
—
1.51
—
3.98
3.31
—
912.6
172.2
3,931.2
28.0
3,784.8
8,793.7
457.6
29.9
1,643.9
99.6
90.6
5,367.6
79.7
15,085.0
1,166.8
82.3
51,356.6
100.8
765.3
174.9
57.9
2,944.0
2,382.9
1,559.4
817.5
3,425.2
103.4
4,120.6
231.2
150.0
4,012.6
177.7
404.9
270.0
300.6
49.1
75.2
50.4
91.4
96.0
415.5
165.2
1,534.9
460.0
472.7
8,094.1
654.3
1,836.0
78.6
524.2
21.0
66.9
2,700.8
159.6
163.2
157.3
68.0
# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
0.966 1.130
1.090
1.500 1.700
1.700
0.450 0.545
0.515
1.250
—
—
0.110 0.170
0.160
0.110 0.175
0.150
1.892 2.480
2.410
0.820 1.180
1.140
3.744 4.070
3.970
6.510 7.420
7.230
0.960 1.520
1.470
0.380 0.415
0.400
1.890 2.300
2.270
0.060
—
—
0.265
—
—
3.416 5.400
5.350
1.350 2.510
2.440
2.969
—
—
0.010 0.015
0.010
0.250 0.370
0.360
4.576 5.960
5.840
0.599 0.840
0.825
0.790 1.030
1.020
0.205 0.240
0.235
1.450 1.720
1.630
0.365
—
—
0.215 0.290
0.290
1.638 1.870
1.810
0.250 0.350
0.350
1.420
—
—
3.472 4.240
4.110
1.031 1.290
1.270
0.350 0.390
0.385
0.190 0.215
0.210
0.270 0.330
0.315
0.120
—
—
0.500 0.650
0.630
0.637 1.330
1.290
2.421 2.560
2.550
1.180 1.620
1.550
0.135 0.145
0.145
5.912 6.620
6.410
0.775 0.875
0.860
2.507 2.950
2.950
1.011 1.180
1.140
0.500 0.545
0.525
0.685 0.880
0.880
1.886 2.510
2.360
0.895 1.140
1.090
6.365 8.560
8.330
1.490 2.080
1.980
0.330 0.435
0.415
0.065 0.075
0.065
0.155 0.190
0.180
0.270 0.315
0.315
2.500 2.710
2.660
0.560
—
—
2.064 4.300
4.200
0.075 0.090
0.090
0.587 0.700
0.700
0.615 0.765
0.755
1.260 1.340
1.310
0.085 0.100
0.100
0.680 2.260
2.240
0.378 0.425
0.420
0.460 0.600
0.585
0.990 1.000
0.990
0.910 1.050
1.030
0.055 0.085
0.080
0.880 1.150
1.130
0.985 1.550
1.540
0.240 0.340
0.325
0.135 0.165
0.160
2.798 5.820
5.770
14.210 22.000 21.700
0.030
—
—
3.929 6.500
6.500
0.167 0.190
0.190
0.220
—
—
3.337 3.680
3.610
1.296 1.930
1.890
1.864 2.770
2.740
0.100 0.135
0.130
0.340 0.375
0.375
0.535 0.650
0.645
0.572
—
—
0.393 0.480
0.450
0.090 0.115
0.110
1.183 1.880
1.840
0.135 0.185
0.180
0.230 0.275
0.265
0.640 1.100
1.100
1.236 1.400
1.360
1.155 1.480
1.460
6.700 7.470
7.310
0.751
—
—
1.360 1.990
1.900
0.848 1.650
1.640
2.039 2.450
2.440
2.250
—
—
0.100 0.150
0.145
1.900 2.140
2.140
0.110 0.155
0.145
0.330 0.340
0.335
1.521
—
—
2.407 3.750
3.600
10.260 12.180 12.040
0.686
—
—
0.290 0.375
0.370
0.130 0.220
0.200
5.908 6.640
6.530
0.435 0.595
0.555
0.910 1.060
1.050
0.370
—
—
2.563
—
—
0.866
—
—
2.300
—
—
0.860 1.300
1.260
1.200 1.310
1.290
0.500
—
—
1.280 2.000
1.860
0.360 0.410
0.410
2.252
—
—
0.420
—
—
2.713 4.300
4.130
0.755 1.220
1.150
0.035 0.055
0.035
2.310 2.870
2.830
0.434 0.610
0.585
1.440 1.590
1.570
10.083
2.100
3.340
10.100
10.100
4.170
1.225
3.700
7.457
4.453
0.895
1.182
12.300
7.400
12.500
1.770
0.580
0.782
0.125
1.513
0.532
10.559
0.552
2.650
7.963
1.260
2.990
1.290
1.173
16.880
0.198
5.890
0.550
2.010
13.520
2.430
3.450
10.700
—
4.590
—
4.100
8.070
4.720
1.300
1.340
13.380
—
14.200
—
0.720
0.885
0.135
2.630
0.630
13.700
0.715
2.850
8.440
1.520
3.400
1.470
—
18.040
0.275
6.130
0.630
3.750
13.360
2.370
3.400
10.640
—
4.490
—
3.960
8.010
4.580
1.290
1.310
13.080
—
13.800
—
0.705
0.885
0.130
2.610
0.600
13.480
0.705
2.850
8.350
1.470
3.380
1.430
—
17.640
0.270
6.010
0.610
3.720
CODE
5056
6939
9318
7210
0128
9377
5209
0078
4715
3182
3204
7676
7668
7110
7253
3034
2062
5008
7013
5255
5225
5614
5673
8923
0058
8672
5079
6491
0151
5035
5878
5843
9121
4847
6874
7170
8486
5143
3859
5264
3514
6012
5077
5983
4502
5090
7234
3069
5186
3816
2194
0059
0043
3891
3905
0138
9806
5509
4464
5533
0172
5201
3018
5260
8419
5125
5657
5041
6254
5133
7108
0047
7080
5219
5681
7027
7081
7201
7163
4634
5204
8346
0037
8885
8567
5147
7185
9113
0099
7158
7045
7053
9792
5250
4197
9431
5218
5242
6084
9865
1201
6521
0016
5173
8524
5140
5347
8702
7228
7206
4863
0101
8397
7218
5711
5167
7137
5243
7091
5754
7250
7240
5016
7692
5246
5267
7122
7293
7066
4677
5139
5185
2488
1163
1163PA
1015
5088
5258
1818
1023
2143
5228
5819
5274
1082
6688
3379
3379PA
3441
5096
6483
8621
1198
1058
1155
1171
6459
5237
6009
1295
9296
1066
4898
6139
COUNTER
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
0.92
5.29
5.07
3.68
—
—
4.70
0.72
1.57
0.55
3.56
1.48
6.55
—
—
4.65
1.02
4.97
—
—
0.51
4.17
—
—
13.33
—
—
4.70
2.86
3.27
1.92
3.13
—
—
—
—
—
3.76
7.84
—
1.38
5.26
1.15
2.71
9.48
6.22
—
3.23
—
1.59
1.69
2.35
—
—
—
0.56
—
1.63
—
2.86
—
4.55
—
—
5.29
4.30
—
3.61
—
1.74
1.30
—
—
0.69
1.75
—
5.23
2.00
—
3.63
1.72
—
1.85
—
4.65
4.85
9.38
—
3.86
—
—
—
9.29
1.69
4.82
1.32
1.05
1.82
6.15
2.31
—
3.27
—
—
3.46
2.40
2.41
10.20
—
—
3.48
0.51
3.81
—
1.36
5.00
2.44
0.77
3.44
—
1.91
—
2.95
—
2.75
—
—
0.52
—
6.05
323.8
246.0
259.3
235.3
168.5
22.3
3,158.6
1,446.5
23,811.6
27,175.6
447.6
95.6
463.0
5.2
54.4
12,092.1
447.7
206.8
48.8
435.6
48,517.3
149.5
74.6
36.4
231.0
76.2
36.5
501.0
77.0
152.5
4,436.7
638.7
57.7
86.6
180.9
20.4
149.4
352.0
3,666.3
7,850.0
152.9
48,586.5
870.0
1,152.6
1,286.7
919.5
37.0
603.5
1,792.0
37,853.0
6,303.3
69.2
56.9
542.5
742.1
3,221.6
37.3
2,022.1
70.4
72.0
401.4
611.5
102.3
418.1
119.0
369.9
1,093.9
344.5
73.9
370.0
1,152.9
399.7
32.3
1,072.0
21,617.6
2.8
1,682.7
125.0
12.5
1,938.7
914.8
277.0
175.8
322.0
437.1
91.1
88.1
20.8
668.3
290.2
632.3
57.2
1,047.3
1,825.4
46,397.4
30.8
11,504.9
272.3
1,802.1
158.6
522.4
606.3
99.0
408.0
1,586.7
375.0
67,949.1
182.4
143.1
241.0
24,539.3
1,013.7
441.7
15.2
189.1
108.0
100.1
2,810.6
168.4
57.6
576.1
49.2
159.3
24.4
14,219.7
214.2
21.3
3,125.4
95.4
16,946.6
4.22
6.33
4.53
0.47
0.56
5.99
7.59
5.86
4.28
1.69
—
5.43
3.08
1.47
2.71
1.26
1.41
4.52
—
3.80
1.61
4.14
8.39
3.51
6.54
6.37
—
—
6.54
3.11
5.45
0.99
2.88
4.01
1,946.9
4,604.8
5,263.6
1,801.4
984.9
13,744.7
337.4
6,107.2
4,314.3
40,071.8
372.6
249.4
25,002.8
2,518.3
14,738.7
507.8
492.3
117.4
84.1
315.6
453.7
4,541.6
217.6
576.8
80,225.4
4,172.7
722.3
1,029.6
334.5
68,636.2
370.4
15,634.4
1,069.9
3,051.2
ENGTEX
FIAMMA
FITTERS
FREIGHT
FRONTKN
FSBM
GASMSIA
GDEX
GENM
GENTING
GKENT
GUNUNG
HAIO
HAISAN
HANDAL
HAPSENG
HARBOUR
HARISON
HUBLINE
ICON
IHH
ILB
IPMUDA
JIANKUN
JOBST
KAMDAR
KBES
KFIMA
KGB
KNUSFOR
KPJ
KPS
KPSCB
KTB
KUB
LFECORP
LIONFIB
LUXCHEM
MAGNUM
MALAKOF
MARCO
MAXIS
MAYBULK
MBMR
MEDIA
MEDIAC
MESB
MFCB
MHB
MISC
MMCCORP
MMODE
MTRONIC
MUIIND
MULPHA
MYEG
NATWIDE
NCB
NICORP
OCB
OCK
OLDTOWN
OLYMPIA
OWG
PANSAR
PANTECH
PARKSON
PBA
PDZ
PENERGY
PERDANA
PERISAI
PERMAJU
PESTECH
PETDAG
PETONE
PHARMA
PICORP
PJBUMI
POS
PRESBHD
PRKCORP
RGB
RPB
SALCON
SAMCHEM
SAMUDRA
SANBUMI
SCICOM
SCOMI
SCOMIES
SEEHUP
SEG
SEM
SIME
SJC
SKPETRO
SOLID
STAR
SUIWAH
SUMATEC
SURIA
SYMPHNY
SYSCORP
TALIWRK
TASCO
TENAGA
TEXCHEM
TGOFFS
THHEAVY
TM
TMCLIFE
TNLOGIS
TOCEAN
TSTORE
TURBO
UMS
UMWOG
UNIMECH
UTUSAN
UZMA
VOIR
WARISAN
WIDETEC
WPRTS
XINHWA
YFG
YINSON
YONGTAI
YTL
1.090
1.700
0.540
1.360
0.160
0.175
2.460
1.170
4.010
7.260
1.490
0.405
2.290
0.065
0.340
5.380
2.460
3.020
0.015
0.370
5.900
0.840
1.030
0.240
1.650
0.385
0.290
1.810
0.350
1.530
4.210
1.280
0.390
0.215
0.325
0.240
0.645
1.330
2.550
1.570
0.145
6.470
0.870
2.950
1.160
0.545
0.880
2.480
1.120
8.480
2.070
0.425
0.075
0.185
0.315
2.680
0.620
4.300
0.090
0.700
0.760
1.320
0.100
2.260
0.425
0.600
1.000
1.040
0.085
1.150
1.540
0.335
0.165
5.770
21.760
0.055
6.500
0.190
0.250
3.610
1.890
2.770
0.135
0.375
0.645
0.670
0.480
0.110
1.880
0.185
0.270
1.100
1.400
1.480
7.470
0.760
1.920
1.650
2.440
2.600
0.150
2.140
0.150
0.340
3.610
3.750
12.040
1.470
0.375
0.215
6.530
0.585
1.050
0.370
2.760
1.000
2.460
1.300
1.310
0.520
1.980
0.410
2.370
0.545
4.170
1.190
0.035
2.860
0.595
1.570
-0.030
972.6
-0.030
10
0.015 2101.4
—
—
-0.005 20572.4
0.040
82
UNCH
108.4
UNCH
516.7
-0.010 7370.8
-0.250 3475.9
0.010 1887.6
0.005
37.2
0.010
67.6
—
—
—
—
0.030
557.5
-0.050
154.7
—
—
UNCH
276.7
0.005
774.7
-0.050 8194.8
-0.010
80.1
0.040
11
-0.015
118.8
-0.030
2.9
—
—
-0.010
5
0.010
42
UNCH
77
—
—
0.020
284.5
-0.010
212.2
-0.005
190.8
UNCH
503
0.010
861.7
—
—
0.020
78.5
0.010
182.6
-0.010
169
0.010 3313.9
UNCH
982.5
-0.090 3356.7
-0.005
166.2
0.150
0.1
-0.020 1050.5
0.015
911.3
0.060
0.1
0.070
277.3
UNCH
707.3
-0.020 4866.7
0.070
521.9
0.015
1428
0.005 3102.1
UNCH
159.9
-0.005
97
UNCH 2074.8
—
—
-0.050
9
UNCH 1279.9
-0.020
2.5
-0.010
83.5
-0.020 1750.1
UNCH
225
UNCH
75.9
UNCH
58.6
0.005
291.7
UNCH
580.5
0.010
323.8
0.005 1952.4
UNCH
54.7
0.010
85.6
UNCH 8059.7
UNCH
205
-0.030
268.5
0.040
897.5
—
—
0.050
0.1
-0.005
21
—
—
-0.070 2139.8
-0.050
467.6
UNCH
40.1
UNCH
819.4
0.010
10
-0.010 2197.1
—
—
UNCH
104.1
0.005
70
0.010
111.6
UNCH 3329.4
UNCH 2232.9
UNCH
1
UNCH
116.4
-0.020
26.1
-0.060 3543.6
—
—
-0.070 14257.1
UNCH
46
-0.020
200.2
—
—
UNCH 6625.2
-0.010
40.9
0.005
714.8
UNCH
46.6
—
—
0.070
10
-0.140 8722.3
—
—
-0.010 1770.9
0.005 8495.6
-0.110 6462.4
0.030 7038.4
UNCH
33
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.010 2380.6
0.050
5.1
—
—
-0.050
213.7
UNCH
55
—
—
—
—
-0.130 1925.5
0.010
442.7
-0.025 14115.7
-0.010
111.2
-0.015 3310.4
-0.010 5257.5
1.658
6.94
1.888
6.66
0.750 15.00
— 11.55
0.075
8.74
0.210
—
3.875 22.67
2.952 49.16
4.211 19.46
10.196 20.53
1.081 14.24
0.883 10.77
2.644 15.06
—
—
—
6.72
2.654 10.91
0.869
8.60
— 10.00
0.048
—
0.000
8.62
4.042 61.39
0.723
—
0.670
6.04
0.322
—
0.000
3.65
—
8.75
0.275
—
1.978
9.47
0.000 15.09
—
5.43
6.116 28.68
2.191
6.02
0.462
4.38
0.152 10.97
0.429 30.95
— 43.64
1.000
—
1.286 15.74
3.264 14.13
0.000
3.20
0.150
7.29
7.027 29.53
1.704
—
3.599
9.46
2.650 17.03
1.005
7.62
0.000 22.39
1.976
7.56
3.738 16.40
1.000 14.23
2.820
3.77
0.686
8.97
0.094 37.50
0.201
—
0.424
3.87
2.509 47.02
— 3100.00
3.644 51.81
0.115
—
0.000 12.09
0.816 18.36
2.573 13.02
0.124
3.94
0.000 27.00
0.494
7.99
0.994
9.17
3.506 58.14
0.984 14.04
0.080
—
2.187
8.70
1.974 29.11
1.458 13.67
0.346
—
2.757 22.32
30.797 33.82
—
0.59
4.619 16.88
0.175 11.80
—
—
5.937 15.81
2.589 56.25
1.000
2.28
0.115
7.99
0.386
—
0.674 49.24
— 12.03
0.350
8.09
0.217
—
0.654 19.96
0.368
6.17
0.721
9.68
1.000 215.69
1.536 29.35
0.000 30.33
9.647 19.86
— 48.41
4.291 13.64
0.725 25.90
2.459 15.57
— 14.72
0.304
7.77
2.666
4.84
0.118 100.00
0.435 80.95
—
5.10
2.066 13.99
1.000 10.22
— 32.96
0.629
—
0.900
—
1.000 32.34
0.384 53.67
1.000
6.02
— 43.02
— 10.38
—
7.99
— 11.57
3.400 16.07
1.755 12.31
—
—
4.650 10.72
0.000
—
—
—
— 14.08
2.533 27.20
0.000 11.90
0.130 20.59
5.861 11.98
0.000
4.12
1.611 15.24
AEONCR
AFFIN
AFG
ALLIANZ
ALLIANZ-PA
AMBANK
APEX
BIMB
BURSA
CIMB
ECM
ELKDESA
HLBANK
HLCAP
HLFG
HWANG
INSAS
INSAS-PA
JOHAN
KAF
KENANGA
LPI
MAA
MANULFE
MAYBANK
MBSB
MNRB
MPHBCAP
P&O
PBBANK
RCECAP
RHBCAP
TA
TAKAFUL
13.520
2.370
3.400
10.640
10.700
4.560
1.580
3.960
8.070
4.720
1.300
1.330
13.300
10.200
14.000
1.990
0.710
0.885
0.135
2.630
0.620
13.680
0.715
2.850
8.410
1.470
3.390
1.440
1.360
17.680
0.275
6.040
0.625
3.740
0.100
37.7
-0.050
145.4
-0.050 1558.6
-0.060
3
—
—
-0.030 6790.3
—
—
-0.100
213.3
UNCH
763.6
UNCH 13694.9
0.010
15.9
UNCH
151.6
-0.080 1385.8
—
—
-0.240
451.2
—
—
-0.010
705.8
-0.010
2.2
-0.005
180
UNCH
53.1
UNCH
279.3
0.180
36.1
-0.010
246
UNCH
5
-0.110 20221.4
-0.050 1011.6
-0.010
31.2
-0.010
132.4
—
—
-0.440 11882.7
UNCH 1319.2
-0.050 1142.3
-0.010
34.8
-0.020
221.2
15.436
4.253
4.969
10.400
—
7.396
—
1.000
8.033
7.536
1.068
1.512
1.000
—
15.806
—
0.963
0.000
0.160
1.851
0.620
16.538
0.663
1.000
9.750
2.620
3.648
1.767
—
1.000
0.265
7.601
0.782
1.000
67.26
8.84
9.91
6.01
—
7.96
17.01
11.02
21.20
17.11
8.89
9.08
10.52
32.15
9.06
10.22
5.11
—
—
75.14
15.54
13.99
—
16.77
11.41
4.94
5.34
15.88
18.84
14.07
11.55
7.66
7.06
20.56
2
PROP
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
2
3
3
1
2
0
2
1
2
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
2
2
0
2
2
2
0
1
0
0
1
2
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
1
2
0
3
3
2
2
2
0
1
3
0
1
1
1
1
3
0
1
6
3
1
3
1
0
8
0
2
0
1
0
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
0
MINI
1
PLAN
1
18
8
1
0
9
0
8
3
10
1
1
1
2
3
0
1
4
23
3
2
0
3
2
1
1
2
5
0
1
0
4
3
0
6
2
0
1
1
2
6
28
HOTE
0
1
0
7
TECH
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
0
6
0
3
0
0
4
0
* Volu
Markets 3 5
F R I DAY S E PT E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET . ACE MARKET
AP
IL)
3.8
6.0
9.3
5.3
8.5
2.3
8.6
6.5
1.6
5.6
7.6
5.6
3.0
5.2
4.4
2.1
7.7
6.8
8.8
5.6
7.3
9.5
4.6
6.4
1.0
6.2
6.5
1.0
7.0
2.5
6.7
8.7
7.7
6.6
0.9
0.4
9.4
2.0
6.3
0.0
2.9
6.5
0.0
2.6
6.7
9.5
7.0
3.5
2.0
3.0
3.3
9.2
6.9
2.5
2.1
1.6
7.3
2.1
0.4
2.0
1.4
1.5
2.3
8.1
9.0
9.9
3.9
4.5
3.9
0.0
2.9
9.7
2.3
2.0
7.6
2.8
2.7
5.0
2.5
8.7
4.8
7.0
5.8
2.0
7.1
1.1
8.1
0.8
8.3
0.2
2.3
7.2
7.3
5.4
7.4
0.8
4.9
2.3
2.1
8.6
2.4
6.3
9.0
8.0
6.7
5.0
9.1
2.4
3.1
1.0
9.3
3.7
1.7
5.2
9.1
8.0
0.1
0.6
8.4
7.6
6.1
9.2
9.3
4.4
9.7
4.2
1.3
5.4
5.4
6.6
6.9
4.8
3.6
1.4
4.9
4.7
7.4
7.2
4.3
1.8
2.6
9.4
2.8
8.3
8.7
7.8
2.3
7.4
4.1
5.6
3.7
1.6
7.6
6.8
5.4
2.7
2.3
9.6
4.5
6.2
0.4
4.4
9.9
1.2
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
CODE
COUNTER
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
2.315 1.210
PROPERTIES
1.069 0.655
1.295 0.785
0.530 0.370
0.315 0.155
1.426 0.864
0.915 0.510
0.956 0.726
1.480 0.900
2.804 1.850
3.245 1.460
3.414 1.980
1.460 0.430
2.637 1.450
0.375 0.210
2.100 1.170
1.520 0.775
2.950 1.200
1.000 0.655
0.626 0.410
1.123 0.730
0.515 0.340
0.881 0.425
1.150 0.860
1.883 1.020
0.750 0.455
2.383 1.660
2.770 1.770
0.927 0.461
2.120 1.160
2.884 2.329
2.624 1.735
0.605 0.315
1.680 0.745
0.390 0.205
0.095 0.040
1.237 0.808
2.353 1.330
0.625 0.324
1.586 1.100
1.646 1.280
0.390 0.250
1.163 0.742
1.692 1.270
1.130 0.630
2.736 1.727
1.405 1.032
0.685 0.535
0.950 0.555
0.440 0.275
0.294 0.186
3.692 1.900
0.464 0.300
0.460 0.145
1.648 0.795
2.140 0.935
0.515 0.265
3.578 1.950
3.048 2.109
2.152 1.580
2.616 1.706
2.051 1.280
0.660 0.290
1.959 1.315
3.083 1.720
0.320 0.195
1.012 0.715
1.440 0.640
1.141 0.855
1.110 0.450
3.644 2.609
0.225 0.140
1.523 0.850
6.067 4.500
3.540 2.920
1.189 0.702
3.814 2.988
1.065 0.692
0.383 0.245
8.648 5.391
0.125 0.055
2.450 1.160
0.195 0.105
1.140 0.380
0.145 0.075
2.474 1.460
1.344 0.830
1.829 0.755
2.184 1.680
1.888 1.140
1.764 0.698
2.115 1.552
0.960 0.595
MINING
1.650 1.120
PLANTATIONS
1.150 1.000
18.855 16.380
8.450 7.423
1.475 1.096
0.956 0.685
9.606 7.800
0.830 0.380
8.300 7.000
3.604 1.180
10.754 8.520
1.940 0.900
1.270 0.701
1.240 0.790
2.573 1.922
3.754 2.990
0.871 0.605
1.820 1.200
4.874 3.652
23.375 19.127
3.826 2.631
2.846 2.156
0.560 0.345
3.042 2.410
2.068 1.430
1.900 1.500
1.077 0.800
2.879 2.610
5.473 4.000
0.480 0.200
1.230 0.890
0.710 0.465
4.260 3.500
3.742 2.670
0.850 0.560
6.332 3.610
2.557 1.700
0.927 0.510
1.738 1.110
1.848 1.103
2.378 1.730
6.824 5.350
28.000 22.165
HOTELS
0.964 0.515
1.460 0.840
0.530 0.095
7.397 5.810
TECHNOLOGY
1.000 0.690
0.670 0.195
0.320 0.115
0.325 0.210
0.265 0.130
0.320 0.185
0.410 0.180
1.797 1.002
0.733 0.470
2.000 1.107
1.280 0.850
0.410 0.185
0.319 0.232
6.449 3.454
0.743 0.539
3.547 1.804
0.300 0.100
0.780 0.432
4.350 2.246
0.250 0.045
1.350
1.330
5230
0.815
0.930
0.405
0.215
1.170
—
—
1.000
2.040
1.630
2.050
0.580
1.620
0.290
1.530
0.785
1.960
—
0.495
0.835
0.390
0.600
—
1.170
—
1.890
2.710
0.515
2.100
2.570
1.980
—
0.840
0.225
0.045
0.950
1.550
0.420
1.410
1.550
0.270
0.885
1.340
0.770
2.430
1.180
0.575
0.670
0.300
0.200
2.220
0.360
0.160
1.140
—
0.345
2.230
2.950
1.630
1.950
1.790
0.340
1.560
2.040
—
0.900
0.770
0.930
0.480
3.010
—
0.980
4.690
3.270
0.810
3.520
0.720
0.285
—
0.055
1.330
0.130
0.830
0.090
1.560
0.910
1.200
1.930
1.240
—
1.870
0.640
0.810
0.900
0.400
0.200
1.130
—
—
0.950
2.040
1.610
2.050
0.580
1.610
0.275
1.490
0.775
1.910
—
0.480
0.825
0.380
0.505
—
1.130
—
1.870
2.700
0.505
2.030
2.500
1.870
—
0.810
0.225
0.045
0.950
1.500
0.400
1.390
1.500
0.265
0.885
1.320
0.740
2.400
1.110
0.570
0.615
0.290
0.200
2.190
0.345
0.160
1.080
—
0.325
2.190
2.950
1.620
1.950
1.620
0.315
1.530
2.010
—
0.880
0.750
0.900
0.470
2.990
—
0.950
4.670
3.210
0.795
3.490
0.710
0.280
—
0.055
1.280
0.120
0.800
0.085
1.500
0.890
1.070
1.890
1.210
—
1.830
0.635
1007
5959
1007PA
4057
6602
9814
3239
5738
6718
5049
5355
3484
3417
3557
8206
6076
8613
6815
6041
5020
9962
1147
2968
1503
7010
5062
5018
4251
5084
1597
5249
5175
1589
6769
3115
7323
5038
3174
8494
5789
3573
7617
8583
6181
5236
5182
5040
1694
8141
8141PA
6114
8893
6548
1651
9539
3913
5073
5827
5053
6661
1724
6912
1945
5075
2208
4596
5207
2224
4286
6017
4375
5213
1783
8664
3743
5211
1538
5158
2305
2259
5191
2429
7889
7079
5239
5401
5148
5200
2976
7003
3158
2577
1.230
1.220
2186
KUCHAI
—
—
16.900 16.820
8.100
8.100
1.310
1.310
0.745
0.715
—
—
0.430
0.420
7.350
7.350
1.530
1.470
10.120
9.880
1.450
1.390
1.010
1.010
0.810
0.810
2.180
2.100
3.100
3.100
—
—
—
—
3.920
3.830
21.700 21.200
—
—
—
—
0.375
0.365
2.910
2.880
—
—
—
—
0.890
0.830
—
—
—
—
0.225
0.220
—
—
0.500
0.490
—
—
—
—
—
—
4.650
4.460
—
—
0.565
0.550
1.230
1.230
1.370
1.350
1.800
1.750
5.820
5.780
25.740 25.560
7054
1899
5069
5254
8982
1929
3948
5029
5222
2291
7382
2135
7501
5138
2216
2607
6262
1961
2445
2453
5027
1996
2003
6572
4936
5026
5047
2038
1902
9695
5113
2542
2569
4316
5126
5135
2054
5112
5251
9059
2593
2089
AASIA
BKAWAN
BLDPLNT
BPLANT
CEPAT
CHINTEK
DUTALND
FAREAST
FGV
GENP
GLBHD
GOPENG
HARNLEN
HSPLANT
IJMPLNT
INCKEN
INNO
IOICORP
KLK
KLUANG
KMLOONG
KRETAM
KULIM
KWANTAS
MALPAC
MHC
NPC
NSOP
PINEPAC
PLS
RSAWIT
RVIEW
SBAGAN
SHCHAN
SOP
SWKPLNT
TDM
THPLANT
TMAKMUR
TSH
UMCCA
UTDPLT
1.010
16.820
8.100
1.310
0.745
8.200
0.430
7.350
1.480
9.880
1.440
1.010
0.810
2.180
3.100
0.670
1.410
3.900
21.300
3.120
2.480
0.370
2.910
1.500
1.580
0.890
2.800
4.220
0.225
0.890
0.500
3.550
3.050
0.610
4.650
1.830
0.565
1.230
1.350
1.750
5.800
25.560
TUNEPRO
1.340
-0.010
350.6
1.895
AMPROP
A&M
AMPROP-PA
ASIAPAC
BCB
BERTAM
BJASSET
CHHB
CRESNDO
CVIEW
DAIMAN
DBHD
E&O
ECOFIRS
ECOWLD
ENCORP
ENRA
EUPE
FARLIM
GLOMAC
GMUTUAL
GOB
GPLUS
GUOCO
HOOVER
HUAYANG
HUNZPTY
IBHD
IBRACO
IGB
IOIPG
IVORY
IWCITY
JKGLAND
KBUNAI
KEN
KSL
L&G
LBICAP
LBS
LIENHOE
MAGNA
MAHSING
MALTON
MATRIX
MCT
MEDAINC
MENANG
MJPERAK
MJPERAK-PA
MKH
MKLAND
MPCORP
MRCB
MUH
MUIPROP
NAIM
OIB
OSK
OSKPROP
PARAMON
PASDEC
PJDEV
PLENITU
PTGTIN
SAPRES
SBCCORP
SDRED
SEAL
SHL
SMI
SNTORIA
SPB
SPSETIA
SUNSURIA
SUNWAY
SYMLIFE
TAGB
TAHPS
TALAMT
TAMBUN
TANCO
THRIVEN
TIGER
TITIJYA
TROP
UEMS
UOADEV
WINGTM
Y&G
YNHPROP
YTLLAND
0.815
0.920
0.405
0.210
1.170
0.590
0.800
0.990
2.040
1.620
2.050
0.580
1.610
0.280
1.500
0.780
1.910
0.820
0.495
0.830
0.380
0.570
1.050
1.170
0.480
1.890
2.700
0.515
2.100
2.550
1.890
0.375
0.815
0.225
0.045
0.950
1.500
0.400
1.410
1.510
0.265
0.885
1.340
0.760
2.400
1.170
0.575
0.615
0.300
0.200
2.200
0.350
0.160
1.110
0.935
0.335
2.200
2.950
1.630
1.950
1.680
0.340
1.560
2.030
0.245
0.885
0.750
0.900
0.470
3.000
0.170
0.980
4.670
3.240
0.810
3.500
0.710
0.285
6.800
0.055
1.290
0.130
0.815
0.085
1.560
0.910
1.150
1.920
1.230
1.400
1.840
0.635
0.005
92.5
0.020
169.5
UNCH
10.5
0.005 2704.5
0.060
20
—
—
—
—
-0.010
9.8
UNCH
2
-0.020
8
UNCH
15
-0.025
16
-0.010
176.6
UNCH
73
UNCH 1995.2
-0.010
60.6
-0.050
22.8
—
—
0.015
9
-0.025
353
UNCH
74.8
0.060 57387.4
—
—
-0.010
109.5
—
—
UNCH
64.4
UNCH
99.8
0.005
377.9
-0.020
6
0.010
13.9
-0.070 2678.1
—
—
-0.010
139.2
-0.010
371
UNCH
104
UNCH
4
-0.050
289.6
-0.010 2678.6
0.010
113
-0.040
512.2
UNCH
60.1
-0.045
5.8
UNCH
662.6
0.020
232.4
UNCH
307.9
-0.030
181
UNCH
43
-0.065
16
UNCH
30.5
UNCH
40.6
-0.050
34.5
UNCH
426.1
UNCH
24
0.020 5063.6
—
—
-0.010
361
-0.040
366.8
UNCH
2
-0.010
106.9
UNCH
25.6
0.060
179.2
0.020
61.1
0.040
7
-0.010
17.6
—
—
0.010
131.3
-0.020
59.8
-0.010
2
-0.015
59
0.010
21.9
—
—
0.050
53
-0.060
22
0.030 1751.3
0.010
35
-0.020 2583.3
-0.010
772.5
0.005
66.6
—
—
UNCH
1847
-0.020
227.5
0.005
121.2
-0.015
175
-0.005
15626
0.060
220.5
0.015
76.6
0.080 81769.6
-0.020
662.3
-0.010
39.4
—
—
-0.080
437
-0.005
149
0.829
0.932
0.000
0.147
0.000
—
—
1.020
3.069
2.594
3.289
0.380
1.920
0.198
2.716
1.045
1.060
—
0.510
1.083
0.462
0.758
—
1.070
—
2.133
2.302
2.532
2.016
2.710
0.000
—
1.257
0.262
0.076
1.480
2.051
0.373
1.240
1.661
0.325
1.305
2.198
0.882
3.220
0.726
0.794
0.655
0.515
0.000
2.646
0.366
0.377
1.373
—
0.172
3.622
2.410
1.608
1.350
1.536
0.444
1.269
2.699
—
0.927
1.217
0.882
0.519
2.150
—
0.618
4.633
2.873
0.830
2.648
1.086
0.299
—
0.066
1.411
0.160
1.210
0.219
1.555
1.341
2.305
1.990
2.342
—
1.727
0.952
1.226
6.54
—
152.2
—
—
19.530 14.93
0.000 31.29
0.000 28.48
0.938 16.45
— 24.17
0.485
7.50
0.000 14.42
4.456 45.40
10.947 25.33
1.050
—
0.740 19.09
1.336
—
2.617 17.94
3.367 30.39
—
—
— 24.19
5.619 146.62
24.513 26.55
— 40.78
— 12.47
3.488
—
3.678 57.28
—
—
—
—
1.055 19.39
— 33.33
—
—
0.343
—
—
—
0.811
—
— 29.12
— 37.20
—
—
6.100 28.65
— 12.05
0.981 25.45
1.861 31.70
0.000
7.15
2.804 47.30
1.000 25.75
26.600 19.29
1.98
3.57
0.49
—
2.68
1.95
—
4.08
6.76
0.66
0.69
2.97
9.88
3.67
1.94
1.63
—
2.31
2.58
0.32
5.24
—
3.26
3.33
—
2.25
0.36
1.66
—
—
—
2.82
—
—
1.08
4.92
2.65
1.63
11.11
1.43
2.76
1.56
121.2
7,332.7
757.4
2,096.0
237.2
749.2
363.8
1,039.2
5,399.3
7,665.2
321.0
181.1
150.2
1,744.0
2,729.8
281.9
269.6
25,193.7
22,737.8
197.1
773.3
693.8
3,910.0
467.5
118.5
174.9
336.0
296.3
33.7
290.8
709.2
230.2
202.3
70.2
2,045.9
512.4
837.1
1,087.1
537.5
2,372.5
1,213.4
5,319.9
1.230
0.010
16.5
—
—
-0.180
24.4
UNCH
35
UNCH
78.3
0.025
68.1
—
—
UNCH
82.6
UNCH
0.5
-0.020 14900.7
-0.260
144.9
0.050
51.5
-0.050
0.5
-0.040
3
0.080
84.9
-0.030
0.2
—
—
—
—
-0.050 7625.8
-0.240
582.3
—
—
—
—
0.005
380.3
0.010
190.5
—
—
—
—
-0.020
2.1
—
—
—
—
UNCH
19.1
—
—
UNCH
461
—
—
—
—
—
—
0.060
11.3
—
—
UNCH
166.8
0.010
5.5
-0.040
25
-0.030
82.4
0.100
20.8
-0.160
3.9
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
14.12
3.01
1,007.4
6.43
10.93
—
0.57
7.22
8.25
12.31
—
3.79
4.29
16.61
—
12.60
32.94
72.12
—
22.96
7.77
46.70
6.87
4.95
2.27
7.89
4.15
18.75
4.51
24.98
6.60
7.45
16.14
7.52
9.49
—
6.99
—
5.89
3.60
2.46
6.36
10.66
—
5.71
8.75
7.71
5.68
—
—
3.09
90.91
—
10.54
7.94
—
6.45
3.93
—
4.28
13.37
7.63
3.82
11.31
—
8.08
3.57
—
5.55
7.54
4.93
—
6.92
—
14.96
15.67
11.45
24.55
7.31
5.88
11.00
13.51
—
5.46
—
18.52
—
6.80
4.74
10.85
8.08
5.95
8.40
31.45
25.81
3.68
1.63
4.94
1.43
—
—
2.50
—
5.88
14.81
2.44
—
1.70
—
—
—
—
1.83
10.10
5.60
5.26
—
—
1.71
—
6.88
—
2.93
5.99
1.96
3.17
—
—
0.89
—
3.16
6.67
5.00
3.55
2.15
—
5.65
4.85
—
6.19
1.71
—
—
—
2.50
3.64
2.86
—
2.25
—
—
1.59
4.07
4.60
5.13
4.46
—
4.17
—
—
2.82
2.13
3.33
—
8.33
—
2.04
2.57
2.99
—
3.14
7.04
3.51
4.71
—
7.52
—
—
—
2.56
6.78
2.61
6.77
3.80
6.25
—
—
486.6
335.9
120.2
208.4
241.3
122.0
890.4
273.0
466.1
162.0
435.0
179.4
2,028.3
204.4
3,546.4
217.3
260.2
105.0
69.5
604.1
142.7
259.2
154.2
819.5
19.2
499.0
673.9
509.5
372.3
3,480.2
7,142.0
167.1
545.8
170.6
259.9
182.1
1,481.7
436.4
103.2
831.6
95.9
294.6
3,228.6
340.8
1,320.7
1,561.7
283.2
164.3
59.3
18.3
922.7
422.5
46.0
1,983.1
52.8
256.0
550.0
267.1
2,286.1
645.2
709.4
70.0
824.4
774.5
84.8
123.5
176.1
383.5
104.1
726.4
35.7
474.4
1,604.7
8,515.5
595.7
6,243.7
220.1
1,516.7
509.0
232.1
547.0
43.5
204.7
68.8
561.6
1,317.2
5,218.1
2,919.9
598.5
279.1
812.3
536.2
—
1.160
0.275
—
—
1.110
0.265
—
5592
1643
1287
5517
GCE
LANDMRK
PMHLDG
SHANG
0.600
1.130
0.270
6.300
—
-0.010
-0.005
—
—
398.5
592
—
—
1.097
0.065
—
—
—
—
36.84
3.33
—
—
1.90
118.2
543.3
250.8
2,772.0
—
0.280
—
0.305
0.150
0.200
0.235
—
0.610
1.630
1.030
0.255
—
6.230
0.640
3.350
—
0.670
4.320
0.210
—
0.265
—
0.295
0.150
0.200
0.230
—
0.605
1.590
0.990
0.240
—
6.120
0.610
3.280
—
0.655
4.160
0.195
7031
5195
0051
7204
8338
0029
4456
5162
0065
0090
0021
0082
0056
7022
5028
0166
9393
5161
9334
0143
AMTEL
CENSOF
CUSCAPI
D&O
DATAPRP
DIGISTA
DNEX
ECS
EFORCE
ELSOFT
GHLSYS
GPACKET
GRANFLO
GTRONIC
HTPADU
INARI
ITRONIC
JCY
KESM
KEYASIC
0.900
0.270
0.135
0.305
0.150
0.200
0.235
1.410
0.610
1.590
1.020
0.250
0.265
6.200
0.640
3.280
0.110
0.670
4.200
0.205
—
-0.010
—
0.005
-0.010
UNCH
UNCH
—
-0.005
-0.010
UNCH
UNCH
—
-0.030
0.040
-0.060
—
0.005
0.130
-0.010
—
1547.1
—
292.8
255
10
543.3
—
57.5
147.3
713.1
832.2
—
233.9
91.6
2348.6
—
545.8
365.9
1398.7
—
0.579
—
0.310
0.255
0.230
0.264
—
0.509
0.652
0.796
0.462
—
3.122
0.718
1.542
—
0.574
2.047
0.000
65.69
19.57
—
48.41
—
—
16.55
7.39
14.95
15.51
78.46
1.69
10.82
25.58
35.96
13.75
—
8.49
13.62
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
4.26
3.28
4.40
—
—
3.77
1.45
3.13
2.41
—
7.09
0.71
—
44.3
134.1
58.8
298.4
57.5
92.7
182.2
253.8
126.1
288.0
661.9
172.6
128.0
1,745.5
64.8
2,395.6
11.3
1,382.0
180.7
165.0
* Volume Weighted Average Price
# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
7.250 4.022 6.600
6.520
1.890 0.990 1.000
1.000
0.595 0.340 0.410
0.400
0.765 0.446 0.540
0.510
0.425 0.280 0.305
0.300
0.915 0.315 0.805
0.780
0.480 0.200
—
—
0.135 0.045 0.065
0.060
2.598 1.147 1.940
1.900
3.805 2.009 2.830
2.790
0.960 0.606 0.725
0.700
INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT COMPANIES
6.419 4.860 5.500
5.380
5.110 3.206 5.110
5.010
3.740 2.290 2.600
2.560
0.940 0.350 0.520
0.495
6.970 4.130 6.690
6.590
1.670 1.440 1.610
1.580
CLOSED-END FUNDS
2.450 2.100 2.270
2.250
EXCHANGE TRADED FUNDS
1.084 1.030
—
—
1.890 1.630
—
—
1.575 1.010 1.310
1.300
1.910 1.580 1.690
1.655
1.005 0.925
—
—
1.195 0.990 1.080
1.075
1.065 0.940 0.980
0.977
REITS
1.168 0.910 0.990
0.990
1.387 1.200 1.320
1.320
0.938 0.730 0.790
0.790
0.893 0.723 0.845
0.840
1.167 1.010 1.080
1.070
1.812 1.565 1.700
1.690
1.545 1.240 1.430
1.410
1.519 1.337 1.500
1.490
1.340 1.141 1.280
1.270
7.305 6.039 6.960
6.870
1.227 0.995 1.150
1.130
1.580 1.255 1.540
1.520
1.694 1.342 1.530
1.500
1.258 1.080 1.190
1.180
1.634 1.253 1.560
1.560
1.050 0.883 1.040
1.030
SPAC
0.690 0.605 0.675
0.670
0.670 0.565 0.610
0.600
0.500 0.390 0.435
0.435
CODE
COUNTER
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
3867
5011
0083
9008
0041
7160
9075
0118
5005
0097
0008
MPI
MSNIAGA
NOTION
OMESTI
PANPAGE
PENTA
THETA
TRIVE
UNISEM
VITROX
WILLOW
6.590
1.000
0.400
0.540
0.305
0.795
0.260
0.065
1.920
2.820
0.720
-0.010
0.010
UNCH
0.005
UNCH
-0.005
—
0.005
UNCH
-0.020
-0.015
34
10
261.7
3
56.3
1908.8
—
341.3
2021.6
164.1
82
3.211
2.180
0.678
0.784
0.350
0.213
—
0.070
0.871
1.148
0.672
11.54
—
—
—
—
11.76
—
—
12.60
14.78
10.33
3.03
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
3.65
0.89
2.78
1,383.1
60.4
108.2
209.5
73.6
105.9
27.9
64.9
1,409.0
658.2
178.6
6947
6645
6807
5078
5031
6742
DIGI
LITRAK
PUNCAK
SILKHLD
TIMECOM
YTLPOWR
5.480
5.060
2.580
0.505
6.600
1.590
-0.110
0.040
0.020
-0.010
-0.040
UNCH
9714.5
102.4
573.8
519.2
303.6
1851.3
4.873
4.200
3.375
0.385
3.903
1.947
21.41
17.84
—
—
8.01
12.27
4.64
4.94
—
—
0.85
6.29
42,607.0
2,639.2
1,078.5
354.3
3,799.0
11,834.7
5108
ICAP
2.270
UNCH
37.8
2.360
30.31
—
317.8
0800EA
0822EA
0823EA
0820EA
0825EA
0821EA
0824EA
ABFMY1
CIMBA40
CIMBC50
FBMKLCI-EA
METFSID
MYETFDJ
MYETFID
1.035
1.660
1.300
1.655
0.990
1.075
0.977
—
—
-0.040
-0.040
—
-0.030
-0.008
—
—
40
12.4
—
22.2
3.5
—
—
1.035
0.000
—
1.168
0.000
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
5.49
3.77
—
1.72
—
3.07
2.30
712.0
2.2
17.7
2.8
21.8
270.8
21.1
4952
5116
5120
5127
5130
5106
5180
5121
5227
5235SS
5123
5212
5176
5111
5110
5109
AHP
ALAQAR
AMFIRST
ARREIT
ATRIUM
AXREIT
CMMT
HEKTAR
IGBREIT
KLCC
MQREIT
PAVREIT
SUNREIT
TWRREIT
UOAREIT
YTLREIT
0.990
1.320
0.790
0.845
1.080
1.700
1.420
1.500
1.280
6.880
1.150
1.520
1.520
1.180
1.560
1.040
UNCH
-0.020
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
UNCH
-0.020
UNCH
UNCH
0.010
0.020
-0.030
0.010
-0.010
UNCH
0.020
10
3
53.3
13.2
9.5
32.4
29.4
12
1400.7
503.2
89.8
33.4
1808.2
6
0.1
78.8
1.000
1.330
1.019
1.030
0.000
3.340
1.427
1.520
1.216
5.970
1.180
1.300
1.264
1.509
0.000
1.033
38.37
12.72
15.64
4.42
7.78
14.05
11.45
11.69
13.06
12.92
10.74
8.84
8.22
7.13
13.38
14.50
7.27
5.83
7.00
7.68
8.61
5.16
6.33
7.00
6.54
4.89
7.29
5.40
5.74
5.42
7.08
7.66
99.0
919.0
542.3
484.4
131.5
1,862.4
2,875.2
601.0
4,436.0
12,420.7
760.6
4,587.1
4,468.9
331.0
659.7
1,377.4
CLIQ
REACH
SONA
0.675
0.610
0.435
0.005
0.010
Unch
291.3
484.9
1023
0.675
0.000
0.440
—
—
—
—
—
—
425.9
779.5
613.7
CLOSING
(RM)
+/–
(RM)
VOL
(‘000)
VWAP*
(RM)
PE#
(X)
DY
(%)
MKT CAP
(MIL)
0.000
0.128
0.315
0.149
0.000
0.082
0.000
0.140
0.214
0.305
0.196
0.146
0.180
—
0.080
0.000
0.222
0.470
—
70.74
—
34.88
—
11.00
—
11.15
—
—
25.61
—
—
13.01
65.79
14.44
16.94
—
—
37.50
1.13
—
0.38
—
—
—
0.73
—
—
4.76
—
—
1.71
—
—
—
—
—
—
58.5
36.8
162.8
50.8
67.8
43.9
140.5
28.3
23.1
117.6
36.3
29.2
78.1
18.8
74.4
25.5
86.1
40.9
30.8
5234
5256
5241
Ace Market
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS
0.790 0.210 0.680
0.150 0.070 0.085
0.590 0.252 0.460
0.320 0.135 0.240
0.370 0.145 0.335
0.093 0.040 0.055
0.530 0.243 0.465
0.185 0.070 0.090
0.515 0.110 0.175
0.235 0.085 0.105
0.275 0.120 0.150
0.180 0.070 0.115
0.435 0.235 0.355
0.180 0.105
—
0.150 0.055 0.070
0.180 0.085 0.105
0.315 0.120 0.155
0.415 0.145 0.195
0.250 0.150
—
TECHNOLOGY
0.290 0.130 0.165
1.600 0.300
—
0.015 0.005
—
1.160 0.800 0.885
0.395 0.165 0.210
0.120 0.015 0.065
0.150 0.055 0.055
0.145 0.050 0.060
0.142 0.060 0.070
0.430 0.190 0.270
0.145 0.050 0.055
0.260 0.110 0.160
0.070 0.030
—
0.195 0.085 0.115
0.155 0.069 0.120
1.854 0.372 0.895
0.095 0.045 0.060
0.230 0.085 0.150
0.210 0.100 0.130
0.430 0.165 0.215
0.705 0.443
—
0.565 0.120 0.400
0.670 0.180 0.240
0.085 0.040 0.045
0.415 0.100 0.170
0.265 0.105
—
0.160 0.050 0.065
0.660 0.360
—
1.950 0.500 1.120
0.469 0.290 0.345
0.115 0.070
—
0.877 0.368 0.710
0.380 0.180
—
0.365 0.175 0.260
0.265 0.080 0.080
0.931 0.606
—
0.090 0.025 0.035
0.145 0.055 0.075
0.250 0.095 0.115
0.420 0.120 0.230
1.307 0.488 0.780
0.460 0.262 0.370
0.060 0.030 0.045
0.430 0.100 0.260
0.188 0.075 0.090
0.530 0.288 0.440
0.165 0.030 0.050
0.660 0.395 0.490
0.930 0.170 0.270
0.175 0.065 0.100
0.388 0.163 0.335
0.225 0.090
—
0.397 0.104 0.240
0.260 0.100 0.110
0.160 0.080 0.120
0.425 0.140 0.175
0.460 0.070 0.075
0.425 0.055 0.265
0.490 0.110 0.145
0.647 0.485 0.575
TRADING SERVICES
0.280 0.180
—
0.200 0.095
—
0.260 0.050 0.060
0.344 0.186
—
0.335 0.205
—
0.705 0.350 0.390
0.380 0.280
—
0.275 0.100 0.210
0.240 0.150
—
0.370 0.120 0.195
0.400 0.270
—
0.330 0.136 0.205
0.055 0.005 0.010
0.240 0.130 0.170
0.900 0.575
—
1.290 0.480
—
2.670 1.105 1.710
0.310 0.192 0.260
0.560 0.325
—
1.240 0.450 1.190
0.245 0.100
—
0.060 0.030 0.040
0.110 0.045 0.080
FINANCE
0.730 0.390 0.500
DAY
LOW
CODE
COUNTER
0.620
0.080
0.450
0.235
0.320
0.050
0.455
0.085
0.170
0.100
0.135
0.115
0.345
—
0.065
0.105
0.155
0.190
—
0105
0072
0163
0102
0100
0109
0175
0160
0162
0024
0025
0070
0049
0038
0133
0001
0028
0055
0084
ASIAPLY
AT
CAREPLS
CONNECT
ESCERAM
FLONIC
HHGROUP
HHHCORP
IJACOBS
JAG
LNGRES
MQTECH
OCNCASH
PTB
SANICHI
SCOMNET
SCOPE
SERSOL
TECFAST
0.665
0.085
0.450
0.235
0.330
0.055
0.455
0.085
0.170
0.105
0.150
0.115
0.350
0.125
0.065
0.105
0.155
0.190
0.180
0.045
Unch
-0.010
-0.005
0.005
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
0.005
0.010
Unch
-0.010
—
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.005
—
861.8
2920.5
439.1
6538.3
3182.4
5577.8
1747.6
1137.2
199
1594
31.6
1863.4
832.4
—
4996
54.5
20
431.1
—
0.160
—
—
0.865
0.195
0.055
0.055
0.060
0.065
0.265
0.055
0.155
—
0.110
0.115
0.860
0.060
0.140
0.120
0.205
—
0.395
0.235
0.045
0.160
—
0.065
—
1.080
0.330
—
0.675
—
0.240
0.080
—
0.035
0.070
0.115
0.230
0.735
0.360
0.045
0.250
0.080
0.430
0.050
0.460
0.255
0.095
0.330
—
0.230
0.110
0.120
0.170
0.070
0.250
0.145
0.570
0119
0068
0039
0098
0079
0022
0152
0131
0154
0107
0116
0104
0045
0074
0174
0023
0034
0094
0069
0010
0146
0127
0111
0036
0176
0017
0075
0155
0126
0112
0085
0113
0103
0156
0092
0108
0020
0096
0026
0018
0035
0040
0005
0123
0007
0106
0135
0178
0117
0169
0093
0129
0050
0132
0060
0120
0066
0141
0086
0009
APPASIA
ASDION
ASIAEP
BAHVEST
CWORKS
CYBERT
DGB
DGSB
EAH
EDUSPEC
FOCUS
GENETEC
GNB
GOCEAN
IDMENSN
IFCAMSC
INGENCO
INIX
INSTACO
IRIS
JFTECH
JHM
K1
KGROUP
KRONO
M3TECH
MEXTER
MGRC
MICROLN
MIKROMB
MLAB
MMSV
MNC
MPAY
MTOUCHE
N2N
NETX
NEXGRAM
NOVAMSC
OMEDIA
OPCOM
OPENSYS
PALETTE
PRIVA
PUC
REXIT
SCN
SEDANIA
SMRT
SMTRACK
SOLUTN
SRIDGE
SYSTECH
TDEX
TMS
VIS
VSOLAR
WINTONI
YGL
YTLE
0.165
0.440
0.010
0.875
0.210
0.060
0.055
0.060
0.070
0.270
0.055
0.160
0.040
0.115
0.120
0.880
0.060
0.145
0.130
0.210
0.650
0.395
0.240
0.045
0.170
0.130
0.065
0.590
1.090
0.335
0.085
0.700
0.190
0.260
0.080
0.690
0.035
0.070
0.115
0.230
0.760
0.365
0.045
0.255
0.085
0.435
0.050
0.480
0.265
0.095
0.330
0.120
0.235
0.110
0.120
0.175
0.070
0.250
0.145
0.575
Unch
—
—
-0.010
-0.005
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
0.005
Unch
Unch
Unch
—
Unch
-0.005
0.010
Unch
-0.010
0.015
0.005
—
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
Unch
—
Unch
—
-0.030
0.005
—
-0.010
—
0.005
-0.005
—
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
0.010
Unch
Unch
0.005
Unch
-0.005
-0.015
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
-0.005
—
-0.005
0.005
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
-0.015
-0.005
Unch
53.9
—
—
84.2
5.6
1441.4
258
60
10131.1
33.1
230
276.2
—
58.6
5166.6
46176.6
3123
405.5
7219.2
16215.7
—
323.9
2538.4
49.9
1464.8
—
113
—
54.4
1026
—
1383.9
—
11853.6
310
—
350
2744.3
2329.1
19.7
746.2
1212.4
144
8753.4
6336
669.4
50
75.5
1011.2
336.8
252
—
2676.8
81.4
262
313
2253
2739.1
48
306
0.111
—
—
—
—
—
1.193
—
0.185
—
0.070
6.32
0.216
—
0.073 15.00
0.208
—
0.126 36.00
0.075
—
0.130
6.61
—
3.42
0.169 115.00
0.123
—
0.085 13.29
0.079
—
0.146
—
0.262
—
0.275
—
— 26.86
0.000 19.95
0.327 10.13
0.066
—
0.000
2.82
—
—
0.100
—
— 15.28
0.000 26.01
0.260 11.55
—
—
0.203
9.78
— 24.36
0.115 162.50
0.187
—
— 34.67
0.070
—
0.088 17.95
0.070 52.27
0.000
—
0.745 19.69
0.170 11.89
0.047
—
0.100 22.17
0.221 11.18
0.402 14.80
0.000
—
0.000 15.48
0.224 294.44
0.100
—
0.322 13.04
—
—
0.105 27.33
0.121
—
0.066
—
0.585 13.78
0.000
—
0.060
—
0.000
—
0.630 21.62
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1.14
—
—
—
—
1.15
—
2.08
—
—
—
—
—
2.75
1.49
—
2.86
—
—
—
1.45
—
—
—
—
2.63
2.74
—
0.98
—
3.45
—
—
—
—
3.03
—
2.55
—
—
—
—
—
—
6.96
46.4
51.2
8.1
373.6
25.4
6.0
26.9
81.4
104.4
228.4
38.8
56.3
11.6
30.3
59.4
491.9
57.2
20.2
169.1
428.5
81.9
48.6
103.9
26.1
40.3
24.1
12.8
55.5
165.8
94.4
15.9
114.1
17.9
184.7
18.5
303.7
21.9
131.8
57.3
49.1
122.5
81.5
13.1
142.3
90.6
82.4
10.0
96.0
69.0
26.9
65.9
14.5
74.6
41.3
57.4
19.4
21.2
128.3
28.1
776.3
—
—
0.050
—
—
0.385
—
0.185
—
0.175
—
0.205
0.010
0.170
—
—
1.710
0.245
—
1.160
—
0.035
0.075
0122
0048
0150
0011
0157
0081
0147
0167
0153
0177
0006
0171
0110
0080
0032
0173
0158
0161
0137
0089
0145
0140
0165
AIM
ANCOMLB
ASIABIO
BTECH
FOCUSP
IDEAL
INNITY
MCLEAN
OVERSEA
PASUKGB
PINEAPP
PLABS
RA
RAYA
REDTONE
REV
SCC
SCH
STEMLFE
TEXCYCL
TFP
UTOPIA
XOX
0.240
0.115
0.055
0.230
0.270
0.385
0.300
0.185
0.155
0.185
0.280
0.205
0.010
0.170
0.650
0.540
1.710
0.260
0.385
1.180
0.150
0.035
0.080
—
—
—
—
-0.005 7645.5
—
—
—
—
-0.005
72
—
—
Unch
0.2
—
—
0.010 14681.1
—
—
Unch
530.1
Unch
30
-0.020
20
—
—
—
—
Unch
5
0.005 5597.3
—
—
-0.020
180.6
—
—
Unch
90
Unch
983.2
— 120.00
—
—
0.103
—
— 14.20
— 54.00
0.078 13.51
— 65.22
0.000
—
—
—
0.165
—
—
—
0.150 11.65
0.050
—
0.000
—
— 28.63
—
—
1.000 10.85
0.000 12.87
—
—
0.466 37.34
—
—
0.077
—
0.164 32.00
—
—
—
2.74
3.70
—
—
—
3.87
—
—
2.44
—
—
—
—
2.92
5.77
7.79
0.21
—
—
—
63.9
54.4
47.7
58.0
44.6
71.5
41.5
21.7
38.0
54.6
13.6
42.4
9.7
22.2
492.0
72.7
73.1
107.2
95.3
201.5
30.8
34.6
26.6
0.470
0053
OSKVI
0.500
0.536
4.00
98.5
0.010
7.3
—
36 Markets
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
B U R S A M A L AY S I A E Q U I T Y D E R I VAT I E S
Bursa Malaysia Equity Derivatives
Main Market & Ace Market Warrants
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
CODE
0.070
0.120
0.100
0.150
0.065
0.310
0.315
0.435
0.100
0.100
0.095
0.195
0.300
0.145
0.205
0.225
0.130
0.100
0.205
0.080
0.145
0.650
0.310
0.140
0.045
0.275
0.080
0.860
0.220
0.285
0.330
0.145
0.860
0.038
0.237
0.720
0.450
0.200
0.185
0.085
0.305
0.190
0.225
1.950
0.405
0.565
0.035
0.360
0.095
0.675
0.125
0.210
0.350
0.195
0.065
0.105
0.220
0.095
0.170
0.080
0.235
0.550
0.035
0.071
0.086
0.220
0.120
0.850
0.135
0.325
0.350
0.620
0.669
0.680
0.270
0.545
0.750
0.285
0.240
0.940
0.515
0.170
0.435
0.120
0.195
0.340
0.320
0.415
0.135
0.940
0.140
0.225
0.970
1.180
0.150
0.215
0.050
0.735
0.690
0.380
1.060
0.180
0.665
1.320
0.410
0.380
0.635
0.290
1.610
0.575
1.890
0.575
0.920
0.530
0.595
0.770
0.680
1.350
0.920
0.590
0.640
0.625
1.100
0.885
0.725
0.270
0.275
0.070
0.150
0.125
0.335
0.053
0.040
0.145
0.945
0.235
0.695
0.110
2.960
0.175
0.135
0.200
2.950
0.230
0.135
0.219
0.035
0.005
0.005
0.015
0.015
0.090
0.085
0.390
0.005
0.010
0.035
0.080
0.090
0.060
0.010
0.050
0.060
0.005
0.085
0.030
0.055
0.290
0.090
0.010
0.035
0.095
0.040
0.340
0.075
0.035
0.060
0.025
0.410
0.010
0.070
0.255
0.095
0.020
0.045
0.050
0.085
0.085
0.225
0.140
0.160
0.005
0.010
0.150
0.050
0.255
0.020
0.055
0.250
0.005
0.030
0.055
0.035
0.015
0.065
0.020
0.100
0.160
0.005
0.020
0.025
0.080
0.015
0.305
0.035
0.105
0.115
0.040
0.300
0.140
0.085
0.100
0.420
0.140
0.130
0.695
0.475
0.170
0.060
0.035
0.060
0.075
0.055
0.120
0.045
0.540
0.005
0.035
0.005
0.020
0.010
0.010
0.010
0.160
0.305
0.250
0.595
0.140
0.660
0.815
0.220
0.100
0.410
0.175
0.470
0.050
0.500
0.040
0.130
0.080
0.085
0.200
0.160
0.685
0.370
0.100
0.075
0.085
0.480
0.355
0.295
0.195
0.005
0.005
0.025
0.035
0.105
0.015
0.015
0.050
0.300
0.165
0.130
0.010
1.500
0.025
0.075
0.195
0.530
0.125
0.020
0.060
0.055
0.010
0.010
0.085
0.035
0.290
0.280
0.410
0.010
0.015
0.045
0.110
0.140
0.095
0.010
0.080
0.105
0.005
0.085
0.040
0.060
0.360
0.160
0.010
0.035
0.120
0.045
0.485
0.090
0.180
0.185
0.035
0.450
0.015
0.160
0.280
0.135
0.020
0.055
0.055
0.130
0.100
0.225
0.175
0.240
0.005
0.025
0.200
0.050
0.400
0.030
0.075
0.280
0.005
0.030
0.090
0.175
0.045
0.145
0.050
0.230
0.220
0.005
0.035
0.030
0.125
0.050
0.465
0.065
0.165
0.310
0.070
0.385
0.330
0.185
0.205
0.595
0.185
0.170
0.755
0.475
0.170
0.130
0.055
0.075
0.115
0.185
0.280
0.075
0.745
0.010
0.040
0.005
0.030
0.025
0.015
0.025
0.405
0.430
0.380
0.750
0.180
0.665
0.995
0.280
0.140
0.510
0.225
1.150
0.355
1.390
0.305
0.405
0.340
0.350
0.540
0.430
1.160
0.560
0.270
0.280
0.340
0.815
0.675
0.515
0.220
0.015
0.020
0.090
0.085
0.150
0.020
0.020
0.060
0.530
0.185
0.190
0.060
2.180
0.040
0.095
0.200
0.915
0.205
0.035
0.120
0.050
0.010
0.010
0.085
0.035
0.275
0.255
0.390
0.005
0.015
0.040
0.105
0.140
0.095
0.010
0.050
0.095
0.005
0.085
0.035
0.055
0.350
0.140
0.010
0.035
0.115
0.045
0.480
0.090
0.140
0.155
0.035
0.420
0.015
0.155
0.280
0.120
0.020
0.045
0.050
0.130
0.100
0.225
0.175
0.230
0.005
0.025
0.190
0.050
0.385
0.030
0.075
0.250
0.005
0.030
0.090
0.140
0.030
0.125
0.040
0.205
0.200
0.005
0.030
0.030
0.120
0.045
0.445
0.055
0.165
0.310
0.060
0.380
0.310
0.150
0.185
0.570
0.180
0.160
0.745
0.475
0.170
0.115
0.050
0.070
0.105
0.170
0.255
0.065
0.720
0.005
0.035
0.005
0.020
0.025
0.015
0.020
0.375
0.415
0.340
0.715
0.140
0.660
0.965
0.265
0.125
0.495
0.215
1.100
0.325
1.350
0.275
0.325
0.335
0.340
0.510
0.415
1.160
0.520
0.245
0.250
0.315
0.760
0.635
0.475
0.220
0.010
0.010
0.080
0.075
0.150
0.020
0.020
0.055
0.530
0.175
0.170
0.050
2.100
0.035
0.090
0.195
0.880
0.160
0.035
0.115
5238WA
509920
509921
509922
509923
509924
509925
509926
5014CL
1015CV
5194WA
0119WA
52812
52814
5210C2
5210C3
5210C7
5210CY
6399CT
0072WA
6888C3
5258WA
6998WA
3395CW
3395CY
3395WB
7187WA
7036WB
9938WB
7188WA
7188WB
1818C8
7174WA
5229WA
0163WA
7076WA
5195WB
1023C3
1023C6
1023C7
2852CL
2852CM
2852CO
5071WA
2127WA
8591WB
5214WA
7212WA
7277C1
7277WA
6947C3
0029WA
7169WA
161911
161915
161916
5216CB
5216CC
5216CD
5216CE
5216CF
3417WB
0154WA
0154WB
0154WC
3557WC
8206CB
8206WA
1368CC
0107WA
0065WA
6076WA
5056WA
7249WA
9776WB
0650C1
65010
65011
65012
65013
65014
65018
0650C2
0650C3
0650C4
0650C5
0650C6
0650C7
0650C8
0650C9
0650CN
0650CR
0650CS
0650CT
0650CU
0650CX
0650CY
0650CZ
0650H1
65019
0650H2
65021
65023
0650H3
0650H4
0650H5
0650H6
0650H7
0650HF
0650HG
0650HI
0650HK
0650HM
0650HN
0650HO
0650HP
0650HQ
0650HR
0650HT
0650HU
0650HV
0650HW
0650HX
0650HY
0650HZ
0650JA
5222C2
5222C4
5222C6
5222C7
9318WB
0109WA
0109WB
9377WA
7161WA
539821
5226WA
0078CB
2291WA
318223
318224
318226
3182WA
1147WA
0074WA
7676WB
WARRANTS
AAX-WA
AIRASIAC20
AIRASIAC21
AIRASIAC22
AIRASIAC23
AIRASIAC24
AIRASIAC25
AIRASIAC26
AIRPORT-CL
AMBANK-CV
APFT-WA
APPASIA-WA
APPLE-C12
APPLE-C14
ARMADA-C2
ARMADA-C3
ARMADA-C7
ARMADA-CY
ASTRO-CT
AT-WA
AXIATA-C3
BIMB-WA
BINTAI-WA
BJCORP-CW
BJCORP-CY
BJCORP-WB
BKOON-WA
BORNOIL-WB
BRIGHT-WB
BTM-WA
BTM-WB
BURSA-C8
CAB-WA
CAP-WA
CAREPLS-WA
CBIP-WA
CENSOF-WB
CIMB-C3
CIMB-C6
CIMB-C7
CMSB-CL
CMSB-CM
CMSB-CO
COASTAL-WA
COMFORT-WA
CRESBLD-WB
CSL-WA
DESTINI-WA
DIALOG-C1
DIALOG-WA
DIGI-C3
DIGISTA-WA
DOMINAN-WA
DRBHCOMC11
DRBHCOMC15
DRBHCOMC16
DSONIC-CB
DSONIC-CC
DSONIC-CD
DSONIC-CE
DSONIC-CF
E&O-WB
EAH-WA
EAH-WB
EAH-WC
ECOFIRS-WC
ECOWLD-CB
ECOWLD-WA
EDGENTA-CC
EDUSPEC-WA
EFORCE-WA
ENCORP-WA
ENGTEX-WA
EWEIN-WA
FARMBES-WB
FBMKLCI-C1
FBMKLCI-C10
FBMKLCI-C11
FBMKLCI-C12
FBMKLCI-C13
FBMKLCI-C14
FBMKLCI-C18
FBMKLCI-C2
FBMKLCI-C3
FBMKLCI-C4
FBMKLCI-C5
FBMKLCI-C6
FBMKLCI-C7
FBMKLCI-C8
FBMKLCI-C9
FBMKLCI-CN
FBMKLCI-CR
FBMKLCI-CS
FBMKLCI-CT
FBMKLCI-CU
FBMKLCI-CX
FBMKLCI-CY
FBMKLCI-CZ
FBMKLCI-H1
FBMKLCI-H19
FBMKLCI-H2
FBMKLCI-H21
FBMKLCI-H23
FBMKLCI-H3
FBMKLCI-H4
FBMKLCI-H5
FBMKLCI-H6
FBMKLCI-H7
FBMKLCI-HF
FBMKLCI-HG
FBMKLCI-HI
FBMKLCI-HK
FBMKLCI-HM
FBMKLCI-HN
FBMKLCI-HO
FBMKLCI-HP
FBMKLCI-HQ
FBMKLCI-HR
FBMKLCI-HT
FBMKLCI-HU
FBMKLCI-HV
FBMKLCI-HW
FBMKLCI-HX
FBMKLCI-HY
FBMKLCI-HZ
FBMKLCI-JA
FGV-C2
FGV-C4
FGV-C6
FGV-C7
FITTERS-WB
FLONIC-WA
FLONIC-WB
FSBM-WA
FUTUTEC-WA
GAMUDA-C21
GBGAQRS-WA
GDEX-CB
GENP-WA
GENTINGC23
GENTINGC24
GENTINGC26
GENTING-WA
GOB-WA
GOCEAN-WA
GUNUNG-WB
CLOSE
(RM)
+/(RM)
0.050
0.010
0.010
0.085
0.035
0.275
0.280
0.395
0.005
0.015
0.040
0.110
0.140
0.095
0.010
0.080
0.100
0.005
0.085
0.040
0.055
0.360
0.155
0.010
0.035
0.120
0.045
0.485
0.090
0.160
0.170
0.035
0.440
0.015
0.160
0.280
0.135
0.020
0.055
0.055
0.130
0.100
0.225
0.175
0.235
0.005
0.025
0.190
0.050
0.400
0.030
0.075
0.260
0.005
0.030
0.090
0.160
0.035
0.145
0.050
0.215
0.200
0.005
0.035
0.030
0.125
0.050
0.450
0.060
0.165
0.310
0.070
0.380
0.320
0.185
0.195
0.570
0.185
0.165
0.750
0.475
0.170
0.120
0.050
0.075
0.110
0.180
0.270
0.070
0.725
0.010
0.035
0.005
0.025
0.025
0.015
0.020
0.395
0.425
0.380
0.745
0.150
0.660
0.980
0.280
0.125
0.510
0.225
1.150
0.325
1.350
0.285
0.390
0.340
0.340
0.520
0.420
1.160
0.550
0.270
0.255
0.320
0.805
0.660
0.500
0.220
0.010
0.020
0.090
0.080
0.150
0.020
0.020
0.060
0.530
0.175
0.180
0.050
2.110
0.040
0.090
0.195
0.890
0.190
0.035
0.115
-0.005
-0.005
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.035
-0.005
-0.025
-0.010
Unch
-0.005
0.005
-0.005
Unch
-0.010
0.015
-0.005
Unch
-0.010
Unch
-0.045
Unch
0.005
-0.005
-0.005
0.005
Unch
0.015
Unch
0.015
0.005
Unch
-0.010
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
Unch
-0.005
0.005
-0.005
0.045
0.005
-0.015
Unch
Unch
-0.015
-0.045
0.015
-0.005
-0.010
Unch
Unch
Unch
0.005
0.025
0.010
0.020
0.005
-0.010
-0.015
Unch
Unch
-0.005
Unch
Unch
-0.010
Unch
Unch
-0.005
0.010
-0.010
-0.010
0.045
-0.015
-0.055
-0.015
Unch
-0.100
-0.040
-0.020
-0.020
-0.005
Unch
-0.020
-0.030
-0.010
-0.005
-0.045
Unch
-0.005
-0.020
-0.010
-0.005
-0.005
-0.005
-0.025
0.010
0.035
0.030
-0.080
-0.120
0.015
0.020
-0.005
0.020
0.015
0.100
-0.015
-0.070
0.005
0.070
-0.010
0.005
0.020
0.030
0.040
0.035
0.020
0.005
0.005
0.065
0.010
0.025
-0.015
Unch
Unch
0.005
Unch
0.005
Unch
-0.005
0.010
0.020
-0.040
-0.010
-0.010
-0.040
-0.010
-0.015
-0.045
-0.025
0.035
Unch
-0.010
VOL PARENT
EXE
(‘000)
PRICE PRICE
4540.6
150
755
70
3387.3
336
9857.2
110
25.1
50
270
128
22.5
100
50
188.4
420
0.1
10
274
60
76
8789.3
380.1
363
349.1
3
221.3
15
5480.4
2786.5
50
63
100
399.1
5
400.2
65
14166
40
70
100
400
10
327.8
83
2205.7
221.1
10
137
16.7
22.2
399.1
300
248
250
1343.8
4447.5
592.2
22000.5
420
170.5
100
377.8
3.6
15
350
451.1
6020
2
40
60
135.7
175
8.6
3723.5
2738.4
590
22704
58
20
1535
2227.6
3233.9
6924.3
230
6252.4
1046.1
1120.9
4221
3807.1
1486.8
350
230
30
921
325
3338.5
2193
87.5
13629.4
1032.2
30
3042.9
595
24739.2
65
114.3
15
34721.1
5.5
46570
282
75
120
1642.1
389.8
13
3601.7
214.7
16323.8
2642.8
1424
1382
1063.3
10
520.2
669.9
709.5
4184.1
54
30
33.3
45
6.8
92
88
400
16.5
256
100
4200
745.6
31313.5
100
140.1
PR’M
(%)
0.220 0.460 131.82
0.907 2.500 177.84
1.360 2.300
71.32
1.360 1.650
33.82
1.360 1.800
38.79
1.360 1.050
7.54
1.360 1.200
12.94
1.360 0.900
9.74
5.300 7.095
34.67
4.560 6.000
33.55
0.230 0.400
91.30
0.165 0.130
45.45
487.16 429.79
2.59
487.16 448.90
3.85
0.915 1.000
11.48
0.915 0.980
20.22
0.915 0.950
21.31
0.915 1.270
39.89
2.900 2.650
3.10
0.085 0.120
88.24
5.900 6.700
16.82
3.960 4.720
28.28
0.270 0.200
31.48
0.360 0.400
13.19
0.360 0.380
15.28
0.360 1.000 211.11
0.095 0.200 157.89
0.605 0.100
-3.31
0.370 0.820 145.95
0.320 0.940 243.75
0.320 0.200
15.63
8.070 8.400
6.69
1.000 0.550
-1.00
0.115 1.504 1,222.0
0.450 0.320
6.67
1.800 2.400
48.89
0.270 0.460 120.37
4.720 6.000
28.81
4.720 5.400
19.65
4.720 5.650
24.36
5.220 4.900
5.33
5.220 5.200
13.03
5.220 5.300
23.08
1.880 3.180
78.46
0.735 0.500
0.00
0.990 1.000
1.52
0.110 1.150 968.18
0.585 0.400
0.85
1.590 1.480
2.52
1.590 1.190
0.00
5.480 5.600
6.57
0.200 0.130
2.50
1.160 1.300
34.48
1.340 1.800
35.07
1.340 1.750
35.75
1.340 1.400
17.91
1.360 1.250
9.56
1.360 1.250
0.15
1.360 1.180
13.42
1.360 1.450
18.38
1.360 1.000
5.15
1.610 2.600
73.91
0.070 0.250 264.29
0.070 0.120 121.43
0.070 0.100
85.71
0.280 0.300
51.79
1.500 1.680
20.33
1.500 2.080
68.67
3.320 3.900
25.60
0.270 0.180
27.78
0.610 0.680
62.30
0.780 1.000
37.18
1.090 0.830
11.01
0.715 0.610
30.07
0.550 1.000 115.45
1,613 1,740
10.28
1,613 1,720
13.69
1,613 1,600
4.92
1,613 1,520
1.39
1,613 1,560
8.33
1,613 1,500
4.70
1,613 1,680
11.52
1,613 1,800
13.07
1,613 1,708
10.27
1,613 1,700
8.48
1,613 1,750
10.04
1,613 1,700
7.93
1,613 1,650
6.10
1,613 1,720
8.35
1,613 1,640
10.65
1,613 1,800
12.00
1,613 1,730
8.69
1,613 1,720
6.69
1,613 1,660
3.21
1,613 1,848
16.16
1,613 1,800
12.05
1,613 1,750
9.11
1,613 1,680
9.04
1,613 1,720
17.11
1,613 1,675
13.21
1,613 1,600
8.43
1,613 1,500
-0.50
1,613 1,600
9.41
1,613 1,680
16.29
1,613 1,600
7.87
1,613 1,500
-1.59
1,613 1,520
2.13
1,613 1,500
-1.46
1,613 1,840
28.32
1,613 1,800
25.02
1,613 1,880
33.28
1,613 1,735
19.32
1,613 1,680
8.98
1,613 1,788
25.65
1,613 1,808
28.99
1,613 1,850
30.80
1,613 1,800
24.60
1,613 1,780
24.72
1,613 1,660
9.72
1,613 1,688
18.08
1,613 1,658
15.48
1,613 1,700
18.61
1,613 1,750
19.86
1,613 1,700
14.71
1,613 1,650
9.35
1,613 1,266
-1.06
1.480 2.400
64.19
1.480 2.300
60.81
1.480 1.500
19.59
1.480 1.550
25.81
0.540 1.000 112.96
0.055 0.050
27.27
0.055 0.050
27.27
0.175 0.300 105.71
1.550 0.880
-9.03
4.420 4.300
11.54
0.890 1.300
66.29
1.170 1.500
36.75
9.880 7.750
-0.20
7.260 8.880
24.79
7.260 8.000
20.11
7.260 8.000
22.28
7.260 7.960
21.90
0.570 0.800
73.68
0.115 0.340 226.09
0.405 0.400
27.16
EXPIRY
DATE
08/06/2020
01/12/2015
19/02/2016
29/04/2016
29/01/2016
31/05/2016
07/03/2016
18/07/2016
30/09/2015
31/03/2016
13/07/2018
23/12/2024
27/11/2015
29/04/2016
22/10/2015
25/01/2016
07/03/2016
31/12/2015
29/02/2016
29/01/2019
29/01/2016
04/12/2023
15/06/2020
09/12/2015
07/03/2016
22/04/2022
07/07/2023
28/02/2018
12/01/2019
20/12/2019
23/10/2024
29/04/2016
08/02/2020
29/12/2016
09/08/2016
06/11/2019
07/10/2019
09/12/2015
30/12/2015
15/04/2016
02/11/2015
08/06/2016
31/03/2016
18/07/2016
18/12/2015
21/10/2015
18/09/2017
03/10/2016
28/10/2015
10/02/2017
29/01/2016
07/02/2017
10/09/2020
15/12/2015
29/01/2016
30/08/2016
25/01/2016
01/10/2015
28/04/2016
01/12/2015
19/02/2016
21/07/2019
07/12/2015
24/02/2019
18/06/2019
10/09/2019
30/06/2016
26/03/2022
30/12/2015
24/12/2018
17/07/2019
17/03/2016
25/10/2017
09/06/2017
13/07/2018
30/12/2015
29/02/2016
29/02/2016
31/03/2016
31/03/2016
17/03/2016
29/04/2016
30/12/2015
30/06/2016
29/07/2016
31/01/2016
31/01/2016
31/01/2016
31/01/2016
29/02/2016
30/11/2015
29/01/2016
30/09/2015
30/09/2015
31/03/2016
07/12/2015
07/12/2015
30/12/2015
31/01/2016
17/03/2016
29/02/2016
29/04/2016
31/03/2016
29/02/2016
29/02/2016
31/03/2016
31/03/2016
17/03/2016
30/09/2015
30/11/2015
30/09/2015
29/01/2016
30/09/2015
31/03/2016
31/03/2016
07/12/2015
07/12/2015
30/12/2015
30/12/2015
30/06/2016
30/06/2016
29/07/2016
31/01/2016
31/01/2016
31/01/2016
31/03/2016
09/12/2015
31/03/2016
29/07/2016
31/03/2016
12/10/2019
16/06/2017
06/11/2019
16/05/2022
20/12/2017
29/02/2016
20/07/2018
08/06/2016
17/06/2019
30/12/2015
08/06/2016
31/03/2016
18/12/2018
24/12/2019
07/08/2019
02/10/2020
YEAR
HIGH
YEAR
LOW
DAY
HIGH
DAY
LOW
CODE
0.120
0.130
0.290
0.310
0.250
0.145
0.985
1.000
0.370
0.715
1.090
1.490
2.130
0.020
0.595
1.760
0.170
1.640
0.425
0.110
0.095
0.180
0.075
0.395
0.330
0.325
0.225
0.145
0.155
0.430
0.240
0.420
0.185
0.260
0.500
0.313
0.240
0.415
0.390
1.690
0.950
0.615
0.100
0.290
0.065
0.070
0.150
0.416
0.300
0.175
0.130
0.220
0.450
0.120
0.060
0.045
0.275
0.155
0.060
0.215
0.405
0.660
0.140
0.245
0.445
1.950
0.255
0.280
0.055
0.350
0.255
0.145
0.160
0.160
0.070
0.045
0.070
0.095
0.160
1.740
0.470
0.100
0.140
0.190
0.240
1.140
0.620
1.050
0.230
0.120
0.340
2.599
0.155
0.130
0.150
0.150
0.115
2.690
0.215
0.140
0.070
0.145
0.605
0.320
0.115
0.160
0.225
0.165
1.050
0.710
0.270
1.060
0.355
0.355
1.260
0.440
0.225
0.300
0.185
0.250
0.465
0.260
0.200
0.350
1.200
0.055
0.235
0.155
0.200
0.560
0.165
0.615
0.160
0.155
0.100
0.090
0.200
0.075
0.440
0.245
0.195
0.390
0.400
0.280
0.385
0.270
0.065
0.090
0.060
0.135
0.055
0.535
0.305
0.005
0.010
0.050
0.200
0.145
0.050
0.625
0.370
0.160
0.240
0.850
1.140
1.500
0.005
0.245
0.285
0.050
1.020
0.150
0.015
0.030
0.105
0.065
0.150
0.050
0.020
0.070
0.035
0.050
0.025
0.030
0.135
0.015
0.090
0.260
0.065
0.090
0.130
0.220
0.550
0.280
0.260
0.055
0.150
0.025
0.025
0.005
0.145
0.100
0.025
0.020
0.205
0.135
0.020
0.020
0.015
0.005
0.050
0.010
0.155
0.150
0.175
0.020
0.030
0.235
0.500
0.020
0.075
0.015
0.040
0.070
0.055
0.035
0.075
0.030
0.015
0.030
0.025
0.050
0.800
0.280
0.025
0.045
0.110
0.130
0.395
0.220
0.495
0.005
0.010
0.205
0.705
0.015
0.045
0.065
0.070
0.115
1.300
0.030
0.020
0.020
0.005
0.090
0.085
0.005
0.070
0.180
0.100
0.180
0.060
0.045
0.620
0.055
0.045
0.690
0.143
0.040
0.100
0.050
0.115
0.200
0.120
0.045
0.205
0.360
0.015
0.025
0.035
0.105
0.130
0.060
0.195
0.025
0.015
0.010
0.030
0.045
0.015
0.110
0.035
0.025
0.025
0.100
0.130
0.040
0.085
0.015
0.035
0.015
0.030
0.005
0.360
0.110
0.005
0.015
0.245
0.255
0.175
0.065
0.960
0.450
0.260
0.265
0.910
1.330
1.840
0.005
0.265
0.800
0.075
1.330
0.200
0.025
0.060
0.115
0.070
0.155
0.070
0.070
0.085
0.050
0.080
0.040
0.120
0.175
0.035
0.115
0.360
0.085
0.125
0.175
0.320
0.710
0.800
0.330
0.065
0.200
0.030
0.035
0.010
0.185
0.150
0.090
0.090
0.205
0.200
0.035
0.035
0.020
0.005
0.065
0.020
0.170
0.240
0.250
0.060
0.065
0.400
0.740
0.095
0.115
0.030
0.235
0.115
0.080
0.045
0.095
0.035
0.020
0.035
0.035
0.080
0.990
0.320
0.040
0.070
0.120
0.165
0.760
0.240
0.550
0.015
0.050
0.305
1.280
0.045
0.055
0.070
0.080
0.115
1.600
0.050
0.025
0.025
0.005
0.160
0.130
0.010
0.080
0.225
0.140
0.795
0.165
0.085
0.705
0.085
0.080
0.960
0.310
0.045
0.100
0.055
0.170
0.235
0.135
0.110
0.275
0.550
0.020
0.025
0.065
0.155
0.485
0.060
0.245
0.025
0.040
0.055
0.090
0.200
0.065
0.110
0.045
0.025
0.045
0.165
0.150
0.165
0.150
0.020
0.055
0.025
0.045
0.005
0.410
0.155
0.005
0.015
0.245
0.255
0.170
0.055
0.935
0.400
0.260
0.250
0.900
1.240
1.690
0.005
0.260
0.765
0.075
1.310
0.195
0.020
0.050
0.115
0.065
0.155
0.070
0.065
0.080
0.045
0.080
0.035
0.100
0.175
0.015
0.105
0.360
0.085
0.120
0.175
0.320
0.700
0.700
0.330
0.060
0.190
0.030
0.035
0.010
0.180
0.130
0.090
0.090
0.205
0.190
0.035
0.030
0.020
0.005
0.065
0.020
0.155
0.185
0.190
0.060
0.050
0.390
0.740
0.080
0.105
0.025
0.220
0.110
0.080
0.040
0.095
0.035
0.020
0.035
0.025
0.080
0.990
0.315
0.035
0.055
0.110
0.145
0.760
0.220
0.550
0.010
0.045
0.265
1.210
0.045
0.050
0.065
0.080
0.115
1.580
0.045
0.025
0.025
0.005
0.120
0.125
0.005
0.075
0.225
0.140
0.780
0.155
0.080
0.700
0.080
0.075
0.940
0.300
0.040
0.100
0.050
0.170
0.230
0.135
0.105
0.265
0.530
0.020
0.025
0.065
0.145
0.460
0.060
0.245
0.025
0.025
0.035
0.060
0.155
0.065
0.110
0.040
0.025
0.040
0.150
0.145
0.150
0.135
0.015
0.050
0.020
0.040
0.005
0.400
0.145
1503CA
7253WA
3034CK
3034CM
3034CN
9342WB
5095WB
5169WA
7213WB
65111
65112
65113
65114
7013WA
0081WA
0023WA
0166CH
0166WB
3379WB
0069WB
0069WC
1961C7
5249CJ
8834WB
0010WA
0010WB
5175WA
0024WA
8923WA
0111WB
5247CH
3565WE
8303WA
0151WA
5171WA
7164WA
7164WB
7017WB
7153CI
5038WA
2003WC
8494WA
8745WB
7126WA
5068WA
5068WB
8583CY
8583WB
8583WC
5264CA
5264CG
5264CJ
6181WB
5236CD
6012CQ
5189WA
115510
115511
115513
115515
1694WB
3662WB
5186CX
5026WA
9571WD
6114WB
1651C1
1651WA
5150WA
0138CH
0138CJ
0138CK
0138CL
0138CM
0096WA
0096WB
0096WC
7139WA
0083WB
6661WC
5053WC
1295C4
1295C5
1295C6
9997WB
7108WA
8311WC
1945WC
8869CH
8869CL
8869CM
8869WC
5204CB
0007WA
6807CF
6807CG
6807CH
6807WB
5256WA
0133WB
0133WC
7045CE
7073WA
0055WA
4197C2
4197C3
521816
521819
7155WA
0117WA
5241WA
7103WA
1201WA
1201WB
5211WA
0148WA
7106C1
7106C2
7106CZ
7082WB
1538WB
7071WB
534720
534723
7252WA
7079WB
4863C5
4863C7
0101WB
7113CU
7173WA
5401WA
5230CE
514812
514814
514817
514818
5243CY
7091WA
0120WA
0066WA
9679WC
9679WD
9679WE
0141WA
5246CL
5156WB
5156WC
0095WA
5155WA
7122WA
6742WB
2283WA
WARRANTS
GUOCO-CA
HANDAL-WA
HAPSENG-CK
HAPSENG-CM
HAPSENG-CN
HARVEST-WB
HEVEA-WB
HOHUP-WA
HOVID-WB
HSI-C11
HSI-C12
HSI-C13
HSI-C14
HUBLINE-WA
IDEAL-WA
IFCAMSC-WA
INARI-CH
INARI-WB
INSAS-WB
INSTACO-WB
INSTACO-WC
IOICORP-C7
IOIPG-CJ
IREKA-WB
IRIS-WA
IRIS-WB
IVORY-WA
JAG-WA
JIANKUN-WA
K1-WB
KAREX-CH
KEURO-WE
KFM-WA
KGB-WA
KIMLUN-WA
KNM-WA
KNM-WB
KOMARK-WB
KOSSAN-CI
KSL-WA
KULIM-WC
LBICAP-WA
LEWEKO-WB
LONBISC-WA
LUSTER-WA
LUSTER-WB
MAHSING-CY
MAHSING-WB
MAHSING-WC
MALAKOF-CA
MALAKOF-CG
MALAKOF-CJ
MALTON-WB
MATRIX-CD
MAXIS-CQ
MAXWELL-WA
MAYBANKC10
MAYBANKC11
MAYBANKC13
MAYBANKC15
MENANG-WB
MFLOUR-WB
MHB-CX
MHC-WA
MITRA-WD
MKH-WB
MRCB-C1
MRCB-WA
MSPORTS-WA
MYEG-CH
MYEG-CJ
MYEG-CK
MYEG-CL
MYEG-CM
NEXGRAM-WA
NEXGRAM-WB
NEXGRAM-WC
NICE-WA
NOTION-WB
OSKPROP-WC
OSK-WC
PBBANK-C4
PBBANK-C5
PBBANK-C6
PENSONI-WB
PERDANA-WA
PESONA-WC
PJDEV-WC
PMETAL-CH
PMETAL-CL
PMETAL-CM
PMETAL-WC
PRESBHD-CB
PUC-WA
PUNCAK-CF
PUNCAK-CG
PUNCAK-CH
PUNCAK-WB
REACH-WA
SANICHI-WB
SANICHI-WC
SCOMIES-CE
SEACERA-WA
SERSOL-WA
SIME-C2
SIME-C3
SKPETROC16
SKPETROC19
SKPRES-WA
SMRT-WA
SONA-WA
SPRITZER-WA
SUMATEC-WA
SUMATEC-WB
SUNWAY-WA
SUNZEN-WA
SUPERMX-C1
SUPERMX-C2
SUPERMX-CZ
SYF-WB
SYMLIFE-WB
TAKASO-WB
TENAGA-C20
TENAGA-C23
TEOSENG-WA
TIGER-WB
TM-C5
TM-C7
TMCLIFE-WB
TOPGLOV-CU
TOYOINK-WA
TROP-WA
TUNEPRO-CE
UEMS-C12
UEMS-C14
UEMS-C17
UEMS-C18
UMWOG-CY
UNIMECH-WA
VIS-WA
VSOLAR-WA
WCT-WC
WCT-WD
WCT-WE
WINTONI-WA
WPRTS-CL
XDL-WB
XDL-WC
XINGHE-WA
XINQUAN-WA
YFG-WA
YTLPOWR-WB
ZELAN-WA
CLOSE
(RM)
+/(RM)
0.005
0.015
0.245
0.255
0.175
0.065
0.940
0.420
0.260
0.265
0.910
1.240
1.770
0.005
0.260
0.780
0.075
1.310
0.200
0.020
0.060
0.115
0.065
0.155
0.070
0.070
0.085
0.045
0.080
0.035
0.115
0.175
0.035
0.115
0.360
0.085
0.120
0.175
0.320
0.710
0.800
0.330
0.060
0.190
0.030
0.035
0.010
0.185
0.150
0.090
0.090
0.205
0.200
0.035
0.035
0.020
0.005
0.065
0.020
0.165
0.240
0.235
0.060
0.065
0.395
0.740
0.080
0.115
0.030
0.235
0.110
0.080
0.040
0.095
0.035
0.020
0.035
0.035
0.080
0.990
0.315
0.040
0.060
0.110
0.155
0.760
0.230
0.550
0.010
0.045
0.295
1.220
0.045
0.050
0.065
0.080
0.115
1.580
0.045
0.025
0.025
0.005
0.120
0.130
0.010
0.080
0.225
0.140
0.785
0.165
0.085
0.700
0.080
0.075
0.960
0.300
0.045
0.100
0.055
0.170
0.230
0.135
0.105
0.265
0.550
0.020
0.025
0.065
0.150
0.460
0.060
0.245
0.025
0.025
0.050
0.075
0.190
0.065
0.110
0.045
0.025
0.040
0.165
0.145
0.150
0.135
0.020
0.055
0.020
0.045
0.005
0.400
0.150
Unch
Unch
0.005
0.010
0.010
-0.020
-0.020
-0.040
-0.005
-0.050
-0.035
-0.200
-0.090
-0.005
-0.005
0.010
-0.005
-0.030
-0.005
Unch
0.015
Unch
-0.005
-0.020
Unch
-0.005
0.005
-0.005
0.010
-0.005
0.020
0.010
0.015
0.015
0.020
-0.005
-0.005
-0.020
-0.005
-0.045
0.020
-0.010
-0.005
-0.010
-0.005
Unch
Unch
-0.005
0.005
0.005
0.010
-0.015
-0.005
0.010
Unch
Unch
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.010
0.020
0.035
-0.005
0.025
-0.005
0.025
-0.010
0.010
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
-0.005
-0.005
-0.005
Unch
Unch
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.005
-0.005
-0.010
-0.015
0.005
-0.050
0.010
-0.020
-0.005
-0.015
-0.025
-0.060
-0.005
-0.010
-0.005
Unch
-0.035
Unch
Unch
Unch
Unch
Unch
-0.060
-0.005
-0.005
-0.010
0.035
-0.010
-0.010
-0.005
-0.005
0.020
-0.005
-0.005
-0.020
-0.015
Unch
-0.005
-0.010
-0.005
-0.030
Unch
-0.005
Unch
0.010
Unch
-0.025
Unch
0.005
0.030
-0.020
Unch
-0.005
0.005
0.025
0.015
0.045
Unch
-0.030
-0.005
-0.005
-0.010
Unch
Unch
-0.010
-0.040
Unch
Unch
-0.005
0.005
-0.005
-0.010
-0.005
VOL PARENT
EXE
(‘000)
PRICE PRICE
11
50
59
4
4.1
1.9
865.8
55.8
599.1
627
55
30
241.4
1
100
6828.9
100
62.9
205
3140.3
2134.8
30
3900
1.9
20
1861.8
104.5
98.5
5
436.7
125.1
1
940.2
170
0.1
1905.8
734
10
50
5
231.5
30
0.6
13
20
250
20
20.1
33.8
30
50
4
105
200
957.6
50
850
100
195
12167.6
41.7
162.3
430
20
384
9
37
7085.5
5535
515.1
65
1599
15588.2
200
884
802.4
860
500.3
50
2.7
479.4
430
25801.3
484
546.6
2
183.5
19.5
120
270
439.1
309.8
225
61.9
4070
200
50
132.5
1280.3
15
50
100
29.3
160
290
280
50
50
1356.7
293.7
3018.9
5.6
186.5
1641.1
237.4
80
2389
521
130
170
1228.8
10
1210
1001
175.6
79.2
10
1
5049.8
80
20
10
15
1966.7
658.8
71683.7
694.1
5
5
121
500
253.6
100.2
431.6
3489.8
40
1535.6
579.6
430
596
2710
300.4
1249.5
1.170
0.340
5.380
5.380
5.380
0.175
1.190
0.920
0.440
11,808
11,808
11,808
11,808
0.015
0.385
0.880
3.280
3.280
0.710
0.130
0.130
3.900
1.890
0.635
0.210
0.210
0.375
0.105
0.240
0.240
3.190
0.815
0.145
0.350
1.190
0.485
0.485
0.390
7.290
1.500
2.910
1.410
0.135
0.735
0.085
0.085
1.340
1.340
1.340
1.570
1.570
1.570
0.760
2.400
6.470
0.095
8.410
8.410
8.410
8.410
0.615
1.320
1.120
0.890
1.040
2.200
1.110
1.110
0.100
2.680
2.680
2.680
2.680
2.680
0.070
0.070
0.070
0.090
0.400
1.950
1.630
17.680
17.680
17.680
0.535
1.540
0.470
1.560
2.090
2.090
2.090
2.090
1.890
0.085
2.580
2.580
2.580
2.580
0.610
0.065
0.065
0.270
0.635
0.190
7.470
7.470
1.920
1.920
1.350
0.265
0.435
1.900
0.150
0.150
3.500
0.420
2.020
2.020
2.020
0.440
0.710
0.500
12.040
12.040
0.550
0.085
6.530
6.530
0.585
7.980
0.630
0.910
1.340
1.150
1.150
1.150
1.150
1.300
1.310
0.175
0.070
1.350
1.350
1.350
0.250
4.170
0.125
0.125
0.060
0.510
0.035
1.590
0.255
Please refer to the bursa malaysia website For the prices of Loan stocks, bonds and overseas structure warrants
PR’M
(%)
1.600
37.61
0.860 157.35
3.900
-0.19
5.000
9.53
5.000
5.95
0.250
80.00
0.250
0.00
0.600
10.87
0.180
0.00
26,200 123.89
23,000 101.71
21,600
92.37
20,200
84.55
0.200 1,267.0
0.100
-6.49
0.100
0.00
3.400
13.95
2.000
0.91
1.000
69.01
0.310 153.85
0.130
46.15
4.200
16.54
2.000
16.48
1.000
81.89
0.150
4.76
0.150
4.76
0.750 122.67
0.100
38.10
0.320
66.67
0.220
6.25
3.000
6.06
1.180
66.26
0.510 275.86
0.500
75.71
1.680
71.43
0.980 119.59
1.000 130.93
0.300
21.79
7.000
11.39
0.800
0.67
2.770
22.68
1.000
-5.67
0.200
92.59
1.000
61.90
0.100
52.94
0.100
58.82
1.680
26.57
1.440
21.27
2.100
67.91
1.700
25.48
2.000
33.12
1.400
15.29
1.000
57.89
2.657
15.71
7.200
13.45
0.400 342.11
9.000
7.24
8.000
2.85
10.000
19.62
8.800
11.50
1.000 101.63
2.060
73.86
1.250
22.32
1.560
82.58
1.090
42.79
1.890
19.55
1.000
4.50
2.300 117.57
0.180 110.00
2.000
5.32
2.600
9.33
2.800
16.42
3.000
17.01
2.680
21.27
0.100
92.86
0.260 300.00
0.100
92.86
0.160 116.67
1.000 170.00
1.000
2.05
1.800
29.75
19.300
11.43
19.500
13.42
18.000
6.79
0.600
41.12
0.710
-4.55
0.250
2.13
1.000
-0.64
2.680
30.62
2.500
30.38
1.600
11.84
1.100
11.00
2.500
41.80
0.100
76.47
2.700
13.97
2.700
13.95
2.800
21.90
1.000
0.00
0.750
30.33
0.100
92.31
0.100
92.31
0.500
87.04
1.000
76.38
0.180
63.16
8.500
15.13
7.900
10.04
1.800
17.19
1.900
19.38
0.550
-1.11
0.180
30.19
0.350
0.00
1.180
-1.05
0.320 166.67
0.175
66.67
2.500
-1.14
0.100
-4.76
2.250
16.73
2.100
13.86
2.180
16.09
0.700
97.73
1.100
87.32
0.350
-3.00
13.000
14.51
11.000
6.77
1.350 245.45
0.200 158.82
6.800
6.05
7.500
18.84
0.750
53.85
5.200
-0.25
1.500 147.62
1.000
36.81
1.700
32.46
1.280
15.65
1.200
17.39
1.050
10.87
0.930
5.65
1.600
38.08
1.500
22.90
0.250
68.57
0.120 107.14
1.540
17.04
1.710
38.89
2.080
64.81
0.100
0.00
4.300
14.77
0.350 196.00
0.115
36.00
0.100 100.00
1.000 104.90
0.130 285.71
1.140
-3.14
0.250
56.86
EXPIRY
DATE
13/11/2015
05/04/2016
29/02/2016
29/01/2016
30/08/2016
25/08/2023
28/02/2020
21/12/2018
05/06/2018
26/02/2016
30/03/2016
30/03/2016
30/03/2016
04/11/2019
29/04/2019
15/02/2016
01/12/2015
17/02/2020
25/02/2020
07/09/2018
22/01/2020
29/01/2016
29/01/2016
25/06/2019
24/06/2016
20/04/2016
26/04/2017
14/08/2019
23/12/2021
11/12/2015
31/03/2016
26/08/2016
19/10/2016
12/06/2019
12/03/2024
15/11/2017
21/04/2020
21/01/2020
29/01/2016
19/08/2016
26/02/2016
17/04/2018
08/09/2020
26/01/2020
03/06/2022
26/05/2023
25/01/2016
16/03/2018
21/02/2020
28/04/2016
30/06/2016
18/07/2016
29/06/2018
19/02/2016
30/06/2016
24/03/2020
02/10/2015
29/02/2016
31/05/2016
07/03/2016
09/07/2019
09/05/2017
29/04/2016
28/07/2017
23/08/2020
29/12/2017
29/01/2016
14/09/2018
09/11/2017
29/01/2016
09/12/2015
15/01/2016
02/11/2015
30/06/2016
16/05/2022
21/07/2023
15/01/2024
09/08/2017
02/05/2017
28/08/2017
22/07/2020
30/06/2016
29/01/2016
30/09/2016
20/01/2024
26/10/2015
27/01/2020
04/12/2020
29/01/2016
08/06/2016
07/03/2016
22/08/2019
29/04/2016
25/12/2024
30/11/2015
19/02/2016
18/07/2016
20/07/2018
12/08/2022
13/03/2018
24/09/2019
07/04/2016
16/05/2017
18/04/2023
29/02/2016
30/09/2016
31/05/2016
07/03/2016
27/06/2017
01/08/2017
30/07/2018
13/12/2016
03/03/2021
13/11/2018
17/08/2016
14/04/2019
01/12/2015
11/03/2016
29/01/2016
11/11/2019
11/11/2020
02/09/2016
29/01/2016
07/03/2016
29/01/2020
23/12/2018
09/10/2015
30/12/2015
21/06/2019
11/03/2016
20/04/2018
06/12/2019
29/02/2016
30/12/2015
31/03/2016
26/02/2016
30/08/2016
29/07/2016
18/09/2018
01/09/2016
01/12/2017
10/03/2016
11/12/2017
27/08/2020
23/02/2019
30/12/2015
22/01/2017
02/07/2018
22/03/2019
24/06/2019
25/03/2016
11/06/2018
25/01/2019
Markets 3 7
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
GLOBAL ROUNDUP
Singapore
China
15 most active counters
FT Straits Times
STOCK
Index points
3600
3300
3000
2,845.74
2700
2,774.06
-22.73
(-0.79%)
2400
Mar 1, 2010
Sept 23, 2015
VOL (MIL)
INTL HEALTHWAY
NOBLE
HEALTHWAY MEDICAL
STRATECH
ROWSLEY
MDR
EZRA
CHINA YONGSHENG
EZION
SINGAPORE TELECOMM
NAM CHEONG
GENTING SINGAPORE
TLV
NEPTUNE ORIENT LINES
THAI BEVERAGE
Singapore stocks ended weaker on Wednes- Top gainers
day after another weak reading of manu- STOCK
facturing data from China.
MATEX INTL
The Straits Times Index ended the day EASTERN
MINING INTL
0.79% lower at 2,845.74 points, after trading CHINA
CREATIVE TECH
between 2,827.19 and 2,860.1. Decliners TOP GLOBAL
VICPLAS INTL
outnumbered gainers 239 to 153.
A total of 1.35 billion shares worth about LCD GLOBAL INVEST
EUROPTRONIC
S$1.24 billion changed hands, giving an NAM CHEONG
average of 92 Singapore cents per share MAGNUS ENERGY
for the entire market. Singapore markets DAPAI INTL
closed yesterday for the Hari Raya Aid- STARLAND
KLW
iladha holiday.
NEW WAVE
Among the most actively traded counters HLH GROUP
on the Singapore Exchange were Interna- Top losers
tional Healthway Corporation (IHC), Noble STOCK
Group, Healthway Medical Corporation ANNICA
(HMC), The Stratech Group and Rowsley. SINOCLOUD
IHC fell 8.3% to 8.8 Singapore cents, HL GLOBAL ENTERPRISES
SKY INTL
while HMC fell 6.9% to 2.7 Singapore cents OCEAN
JASPER INVEST
after both agreed to revise the terms of CHINA INTL
agreement involving IHC’s acquisition of BLUMONT
MIYOSHI
HMC through a share swap.
In the revised proposal, the consider- AMPLEFIELD
EPICENTRE
ation for each HMC share is 10 Singapore TLV
cents and will be satisfied through the is- RESOURCES PRIMA
sue of new shares in IHC at an issue price ICP
HU AN CABLE
of 43 Singapore cents each.
ALBEDO
Australia
240.49
66.24
63.34
56.61
47.53
45.33
45.02
32.55
30.77
28.47
27.42
27.00
26.75
23.78
14.51
CLOSE (S$)
0.088
0.450
0.027
0.039
0.161
0.005
0.121
0.019
0.720
3.700
0.178
0.730
0.235
0.965
0.705
CLOSE (S$)
0.040
0.430
0.450
1.070
0.005
0.086
0.275
0.008
0.178
0.009
0.009
0.159
0.010
0.010
0.011
CLOSE (S$)
0.002
0.002
0.120
0.090
0.004
0.405
0.005
0.050
0.051
0.182
0.235
0.071
0.008
0.008
0.008
+/– (%)
-8.33
-3.23
-6.90
-9.30
8.78
UNCH
UNCH
-9.52
1.41
UNCH
13.38
-2.01
-12.96
6.63
0.71
+/– (%)
100.00
43.33
28.57
25.15
25.00
24.64
19.57
14.29
13.38
12.50
12.50
11.97
11.11
11.11
10.00
+/– (%)
-50.00
-33.33
-27.27
-24.37
-20.00
-17.35
-16.67
-16.67
-13.56
-13.33
-12.96
-11.25
-11.11
-11.11
-11.11
Europe
ASX 200
Index points
6290
3,079.99
+3.94
(+0.13%)
3800
5,071.666
4,686.53
Mar 1, 2010
+73.535
(+1.47%)
Sept 24, 2015
Australian shares finished 1.47% higher
yesterday, with gains across all sectors as
buyers emerged after steep falls in the previous session.
The S&P/ASX 200 index jumped 73.6
points to end at 5,071.67 after closing at its
lowest since July 2013 on Wednesday. Despite last Thursday’s gains, the index is still
down 1.9% for the week.
“It is a sign of confidence,” said analysts.
“We have strongly bounced back from 5,000
points which is a key psychological level.
The market has been looking oversold so
it’s nice to be in the black.”
Major banks including Commonwealth
Bank and Westpac were up more than 1% each,
while property trusts seen as defensive plays —
Scentre and Good groups jumped over 2.5%.
Senex Energy jumped as much as 24%
on a gas sales deal with Santos Ltd’s GLNG
venture. Miners were mixed with Rio Tinto
rising 0.65%, while BHP Billiton traded flat.
Fortescue fell 1.4%.
“From a technical perspective, the ASX
200 continues to form a classic descending triangle, which is a bearish sign formed
during a downtrend,” said Stuart McPhee,
senior technical analyst at OANDA.
New Zealand’s benchmark NZX 50 Index rose 0.4% or 22.47 points to finish the
session at 5,676.81.
2445
5800
3,142.69
+26.80
(+0.86%)
4825
3850
2875
1900
3,087.842
Mar 1, 2010
Sept 24, 2015
VOL (MIL) CLOSE (RMB)
SDIC POWER HOLDINGS
GUANGDONG MEIYAN JIXIAN
JIHUA GROUP
ZHUZHOU KIBING
CHINA NATIONAL NUCLEAR
CHINA SHIPBUILDING IND
SDIC XINJI ENERGY
CRRC CORP
SHANGHAI ZI JIANG ENTERP
CHINA FIRST HEAVY IND
SHANGHAI DAZHONG
SICHUAN CHANGHONG
AGRI BANK OF CHINA
ANHUI WANJIANG LOGISTICS
DALIAN PORT PDA
China stocks rebounded yesterday, but Top gainers
investor confidence in the economy re- STOCK
HUAYUAN PROPERTY
mained shaky, capping gains.
The CSI 300 Index of the largest listed KAILUAN ENERGY CHEMICAL
CHANGZHENG
companies in Shanghai and Shenzhen rose GUIZHOU
NINGBO ORIENT
0.7% to 3,285 points, while the Shanghai HARBIN DONGAN AUTO
Composite Index gained 0.9% to 3,142.69. CECEP WIND-POWER
SHENQI PHARMA
Among the most active stocks in Shang- SHANGHAI
LIUZHOU CHEMICAL IND
hai were Huajing, down 3.1% to 9.46 yuan; DALIAN RUBBER & PLASTICS
Meiyan Jixiang, up 10% to 5.83 yuan and SHAANXI BAOGUANG VACUUM
NANJING INFORM STORAGE
Jihua Group, up 9% to 13.10 yuan.
GLASS
In Shenzhen, XCMG Machinery, down LUOYANG
HARBIN VITI ELECTRONICS
3.8% to 4.61 yuan; Ductile Pipes, down ANHUI HENGYUAN COAL IND
0.5% to 7.71 yuan; and Yotrio Group, down JIANGSU JIANGNAN HIGH
7.9% to 7.46 yuan were among the most Top losers
actively traded.
STOCK
Total volume of A shares traded in Shang- HARBIN AIR CONDITIONING
hai was 21.2 billion shares, while Shenzhen XINJIANG TIANYE
HEFEI METALFORMING
volume was 22.1 billion shares.
JIANGQUAN IND
The Hang Seng Index fell 1% to 21,095.98, SHANDONG
SHENYANG JINBEI AUTO
while the China Enterprises Index lost 1.1% ARTS
to 9,469.81.
ZHUZHOU KIBING
Among the most actively traded stocks XIAMEN OVERSEAS CHINESE
JINGGU FORESTRY
on Hong Kong’s main board were Ngai YUNNAN
SHANXI ANTAI
Shun Holdings, down 9.5% to HK$0.02, ANHUI WANJIANG LOGISTICS
Carnival Group, up 9.5% to HK$1.04 , and BEIJING DAHAO TECH
China Properties Investment Holdings, SHANGHAI POTEVIO
BEIJING DYNAMIC POWER
down 6% to HK$0.14.
ANXIN TRUST
7200
6590
9.460
5.830
13.090
4.960
9.590
10.430
10.250
13.790
6.200
9.380
8.190
6.210
3.090
5.400
5.700
+/– (%)
-3.07
10.00
8.90
-6.59
1.91
0.97
4.91
1.55
0.16
3.99
0.99
1.64
-0.32
-4.42
9.62
CLOSE (RMB)
+/– (%)
5.900
5.580
13.370
13.810
9.100
16.890
20.970
6.040
7.910
15.390
34.740
25.620
27.420
6.160
6.160
10.07
10.06
10.04
10.04
10.04
10.03
10.02
10.02
10.01
10.01
10.01
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
CLOSE (RMB)
+/– (%)
16.960
12.960
21.310
11.020
5.240
43.530
4.960
6.080
17.360
3.890
5.400
39.500
28.410
10.100
16.180
-10.07
-10.00
-9.97
-9.97
-9.97
-8.15
-6.59
-5.00
-4.98
-4.89
-4.42
-3.56
-3.56
-3.44
-3.40
Dow Jones
Index points
18580
16310
5,405.94
5370
729.58
534.54
303.71
265.30
225.39
222.46
191.29
188.77
158.95
158.37
154.37
152.61
141.03
136.22
132.27
United States
Index points
5980
2930
4630
Index points
FTSE 100
Index points
3415
5460
STOCK
United Kingdom
Euro STOXX 50 Index
3900
15 most active counters
Shanghai Composite
6,032.25
+96.40
(+1.62%)
14040
10,403.79
11770
16,279.89
-50.58
(-0.97%)
2,772.70
4760
1960
Mar 1, 2010
Sept 23, 2015
European stocks closed little changed in volatile trade on Wednesday, with a rebound in
automakers led by Volkswagen and gains in
travel stocks offset by weaker banks.
The pan-European FTSEurofirst 300 Index ended 0.02% higher, giving up earlier
gains as Wall Street declined. Some investors were taking advantage of recent share
price falls and finding value in some stocks.
Among national indices, Germany’s DAX
rose 0.44%, while Spain’s IBEX fell 0.79%.
Shares in Volkswagen rose 5.19%. It had
lost about a third of its value in the previous
two sessions after the German carmaker got
caught up in a scandal that Deutsche Bank
called an “investor’s nightmare” and which
led to the resignation of Chief Executive Officer Martin Winterkorn.
The United States has accused Volkswagen
of rigging its cars to conceal their emissions
level when the engines were tested.
Traders said Volkswagen’s rise, accompanied by other gains by carmakers, were
triggered by short covering. They cautioned
against taking positions in the stock, whose
price swung from an initial fall of nearly 10%
to a gain of almost 9%.
The European oil and gas index rose 0.71%,
reducing earlier gains as crude prices turned
lower on large builds in gasoline that raised
concerns about high autumn fuel supplies.
Mar 1, 2010
9500
Sept 23, 2015
Britain’s top equity index recovered on
Wednesday from a slump in the previous
session, as rising oil prices led to gains by
energy stocks.
The FTSE 100 Index, which had fallen
2.8% in the previous session, closed up
1.6% at 6,032.25 points.
Oil prices stabilised on Wednesday as a
decline in US inventories offset weak economic data from China. Energy groups such
as BP and Royal Dutch Shell advanced.
“There’s a bit of support coming through
the oil price, which is acting as a trigger
for the FTSE to reclaim some ground,” said
Hantec Markets analyst Richard Perry.
Airline IAG rose 4.8%, leading the index higher, after Morgan Stanley lifted its
forecasts for IAG, saying that the company
was its top pick in the sector. Easyjet was
up 3.5%.
Brenda Kelly, head analyst at London
Capital Group, said IAG looks set to be
one of the main beneficiaries of lower fuel
hedging costs.
The FTSE 100 reached a record high of
7,122.74 in late April, but has since fallen
back. The FTSE 100 is down by nearly 10%
since the start of 2015, hit by concerns
over an economic slowdown in China and
the prospect of an interest rate rise in the
United States.
Mar 1, 2010
Sept 23, 2015
US stocks ended down slightly on Wednesday, led by losses in materials and energy
shares as weak Chinese and US factory data
added to growth worries.
The Dow Jones industrial Average fell
50.58 points, or 0.31%, to 16,279.89; the S&P
500 lost 3.98 points, or 0.2%, to 1,938.76; and
the Nasdaq Composite dropped 3.98 points,
or 0.08%, to 4,752.74.
Trading was choppy once again, with
the S&P 500 briefly trading higher following
afternoon comments by Chinese President
Xi Jinping that his country was capable of
maintaining a relatively high growth rate for
a long time.
The S&P 500 is down 2.8% since last
Thursday, when the US Federal Reserve
decided to hold interest rates near zero.
Data showed US manufacturing growth
stayed at a two-year low in September, while
Chinese factory activity shrank to a 6½-year
low in the month, underscoring worries
about demand.
Boeing Co said it had won orders and
commitments from China for aircraft valued
at about US$38 billion at list prices. But its
shares fell 1.7% to US$131.67.
The S&P materials index, down 2.1%,
led the decline of the S&P 500 for a second
day, followed by the energy index, which
was down 1.4%. — Agencies
38 Markets
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY
INSIDER MOVES . TRADING THEMES . EVENTS . FOREX
Trading themes
Insider moves (Filings on Sept 22, 2015)
Eurozone business surveys
Insider Moves show what substantial shareholders are doing with their stakes, which could be a signal of their views on the company’s outlook.
COMPANY
SHARES ACQUIRED
(DISPOSED)
ALLIANCE FINANCIAL GROUP
AMMB
AXIATA GROUP
(706,800)
(6,250,000)
3,050,000
AXIATA GROUP
AXIS REAL ESTATE INVEST TRUST
2,112,200
2,808,500
AXIS REAL ESTATE INVEST TRUST
(510,000)
CAHYA MATA SARAWAK
COASTAL CONTRACTS
CYPARK RESOURCES
DIALOG GROUP
DIALOG GROUP
(300,000)
(436,300)
2,000,000
(2,800,000)
3,000,000
DIGI.COM
ECOFIRST CONSOLIDATED
EG INDUSTRIES
FRASER & NEAVE
(6,040,000)
770,000
(350,000)
(500,000)
GAMUDA
GAMUDA
1,200,000
(3,168,400)
GENTING PLANTATIONS
(500,000)
GENTING PLANTATIONS
GLOBETRONICS TECHNOLOGY
HONG LEONG BANK
IGB CORPORATION
IHH HEALTHCARE
IJM CORPORATION
INARI AMERTRON
(300,000)
940,400
(1,149,100)
816,000
(4,272,100)
1,400,000
(2,414,700)
IOI CORPORATION
IRE-TEX CORPORATION
KLCC REAL ESTATE INVEST TRUST
(2,640,000)
2,362,900
482,500
KNM GROUP
KUALA LUMPUR KEPONG
LAFARGE MALAYSIA
500,000
(527,500)
693,400
MALAKOFF CORPORATION
MALAKOFF CORPORATION
380,000
(2,834,900)
MALAYAN BANKING
MALAYSIA AIRPORTS
MAXIS
MAXIS
(5,935,400)
(356,187)
(1,245,500)
(3,333,400)
MEDIA PRIMA
MMC CORPORATION
MULTI SPORTS LTD
MY E.G. SERVICES
MY E.G. SERVICES
(1,789,000)
1,801,200
3,265,600
(1,000,000)
796,800
PETRONAS DAGANGAN
PETRONAS GAS
PUBLIC BANK
SAPURAKENCANA PETROLEUM
SCGM
367,800
320,300
(2,532,700)
(7,727,900)
500,000
SIME DARBY
(4,000,000)
SUNWAY REAL ESTATE INVEST TRUST 1,000,000
SUNWAY REAL ESTATE INVEST TRUST
SYARIKAT TAKAFUL MALAYSIA
TELEKOM MALAYSIA
(465,800)
460,500
726,000
TENAGA NASIONAL
TENAGA NASIONAL
(5,788,000)
5,000,000
UMW
UMW
(2,873,200)
2,750,000
YTL CORPORATION
YTL POWER INTERNATIONAL
(4,000,000)
(2,000,000)
DIRECTOR/SUBSTANTIAL
SHAREHOLDER
SHARES HELD
AFTER CHANGE
TRANSACTION
DATE
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
283,319,040
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
502,097,537
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
930,652,616
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
1,284,656,255
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
128,000,000
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
KUMPULAN WANG PERSARAAN
70,772,692
(DIPERBADANKAN)
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
81,673,627
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
28,267,600
LEMBAGA TABUNG HAJI
20,577,610
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
589,779,844
KUMPULAN WANG PERSARAAN
259,322,516
(DIPERBADANKAN)
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
1,062,233,640
TEOH SENG AUN
79,462,182
TERENCE TEA YEOK KIAN
90,900
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
63,000,000
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
252,958,805
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
197,000,000
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
KUMPULAN WANG PERSARAAN
39,808,900
(DIPERBADANKAN)
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
114,459,900
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
17,593,400
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
254,322,183
GOLDIS
979,706,103
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
738,244,400
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
493,238,878
KUMPULAN WANG PERSARAAN
61,058,249
(DIPERBADANKAN)
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
591,977,359
SOO TEE WEI
4,862,900
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
108,764,600
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
114,556,720
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
147,765,838
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
59,211,500
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
LEMBAGA TABUNG HAJI
505,973,200
KUMPULAN WANG PERSARAAN
322,113,734
(DIPERBADANKAN)
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
1,400,533,498
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
223,262,753
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
547,455,700
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
589,736,500
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
165,636,743
LEMBAGA TABUNG HAJI
184,401,600
ERWIN SELVARAJAH PETER SELVARAJAH
31,700,000
UTILICO EMERGING MARKETS LTD, BERMUDA
74,583,800
KUMPULAN WANG PERSARAAN
79,245,400
(DIPERBADANKAN)
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
53,712,800
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
230,301,600
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
601,592,963
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
870,869,794
KUMPULAN WANG PERSARAAN
6,609,650
(DIPERBADANKAN)
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
834,317,668
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
255,000,000
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
320,195,300
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
84,348,800
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
458,720,495
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
925,186,419
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
510,836,800
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
197,774,493
AMANAHRAYA TRUSTEES
475,600,000
- SKIM AMANAH SAHAM BUMIPUTERA
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
744,079,747
EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD
377,966,791
17/9
17/9
14 & 15/9
Flash Purchasing Manager’s Index (PMI)
11,14 & 15/9
17 & 18/9
9 & 11/9
17/9
17/9
17 & 18/9
17/9
9 - 11/9
17/9
18/9
21/9
15/9
17/9
9 - 11,17
& 18/9
11/9
17/9
17/9
17/9
18 & 21/9
17/9
17/9
9 - 11/9
17/9
17/9
18/9
17/9
17/9
15,17 & 18/9
15/9
10/9
17/9
17/9
17/9
17 & 18/9
17/9
17 & 18/9
18 & 21/9
18/9
—
17/9
17/9
17/9
17/9
11/9
17/9
17/9
Stocks closest to year high
17/9
17/9
18/9
STOCK
14,15 & 17/9
15 & 18/9
17/9
17 & 18/9
17/9
17/9
While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, the information presented is not an exhaustive list and is not an official record of shareholder
filings. Direct and indirect shareholdings are combined due to space constraints. Readers who are interested should check the official filings filed
with Bursa Malaysia.
Note: * denotes Ace Market
Local events to watch out for today
• China Solid Lighting Alliance organises LED
Centre at TA Family Living Skills Centre, No 1-3,
Business Summit at Pacific Ballroom, 2nd Floor
2nd Floor, Jalan PJS 2/16A, Taman Maju Jaya,
Seri Pacific Hotel, Kuala Lumpur at 9am.
Petaling Jaya, Selangor at 10.30am.
• Green Ocean Corp Bhd’s AGM at Tioman Room, • SKP Resources Bhd’s AGM at Cempaka Room,
Bukit Jalil Golf & Country Resort, Kuala Lumpur
Level 3, Hotel Bangi-Putrajaya, Off Persiaran
at 10am.
Bandar, Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor at 11am.
• The official opening of TA Family Living Skills
TRIPLC
FBMKLCI-H21
FBMKLCI-H19
INSTACO-WD
SHELL
GENTINGC26
PUNCAK-CH
FBMKLCI-C18
UEMS-C18
UEMS-C17
FBMKLCI-H23
TECNIC
SCGM
LITRAK
SKPETROC16
SLP
CMSB-CO
LAYHONG
Stocks closest to year low
HIGH
(RM)
LOW
(RM)
CLOSE
(RM)
VOLUME
('000)
1.520
0.180
0.380
0.060
6.000
0.200
0.115
0.170
0.200
0.090
0.665
1.450
2.610
5.110
0.225
1.730
0.225
4.300
1.350
0.140
0.340
0.050
5.800
0.195
0.115
0.170
0.155
0.060
0.660
1.120
2.530
5.010
0.225
1.670
0.225
4.020
1.360
0.150
0.380
0.060
5.890
0.195
0.115
0.170
0.190
0.075
0.660
1.350
2.540
5.060
0.225
1.710
0.225
4.300
1520.7
1032.2
87.5
953.8
48.5
4200
50
1535
694.1
71683.7
30
1456.1
3564.6
102.4
50
178.9
400
301.6
This table shows stocks that are trading near their year high. This
could suggest a build-up in buying momentum, or the possibility that
profit-taking activities could set in later.
STOCK
UNIMECH-WA
CIMB-C6
ASTRO-CT
AXIATA-C3
FBMKLCI-CT
TUNEPRO-CE
CIMB-C7
AIRASIAC26
PBBANK-C6
YFG
PARKSON
AIRPORT-CL
ARMADA-C3
HSI-CR
MAYBANKC15
MALAKOF-CJ
VSOLAR
SIME-C2
TOYOINK-WA
ENCORP
HIGH
(RM)
LOW
(RM)
CLOSE
(RM)
VOLUME
('000)
0.110
0.055
0.085
0.060
0.030
0.025
0.055
0.410
0.120
0.055
1.000
0.010
0.080
0.020
0.170
0.205
0.075
0.010
0.060
0.785
0.110
0.045
0.085
0.055
0.020
0.025
0.050
0.390
0.110
0.035
0.990
0.005
0.050
0.020
0.155
0.205
0.070
0.005
0.060
0.775
0.110
0.055
0.085
0.055
0.025
0.025
0.055
0.395
0.110
0.035
1.000
0.005
0.080
0.020
0.165
0.205
0.070
0.010
0.060
0.780
5
14166
10
60
230
15
40
110
484
14115.7
580.5
25.1
188.4
50
12167.6
4
2253
290
20
60.6
This table shows stocks that are trading near their year low. This
could suggest a build-up in selling momentum, or the possibility that
bargain hunting could set in later.
Foreign exchange rates
NZ
NZ $
EURO
EURO
0.559
1.788
US
SWISS
BRIT CANADA BRUNEI S’PORE
AUST
M’SIA
CHINA
BANGL’H
DENM’K
UAE
SAUDI SWEDEN
0.841
0.898
0.898
0.905
2.7349
4.014
48.886
4.172
2.310
9,212
41.615
75.248
5.297
29.531
2.290
2.359
5.270
22.845
4.874
1.504
1.606
1.606
1.617
4.8906
7.178
87.419
7.461
4.131
16,472
74.417
134.560
9.472
52.808
4.095
4.218
9.423
40.852
8.716
7.749
1.028
STERLING £
2.422
1.354
1.523
1.482
CANADA $
1.189
0.665
0.748
0.727
0.491
BRUNEI $
1.114
0.623
0.700
0.682
0.460
0.937
SINGAPORE $
1.113
0.623
0.700
0.681
0.460
0.937
1.000
AUSTRALIA $
1.106
0.618
0.695
0.677
0.457
0.930
0.993
0.993
MALAYSIA RM
0.366
0.204
0.230
0.224
0.151
0.308
0.328
0.328
0.331
24.912
13.931
15.670
15.245
10.287
20.958
22.370
22.375
22.533
68.1310
2.046
1.144
1.287
1.252
0.845
1.721
1.837
1.837
1.850
5.5944
8.211
100 DANISH KRONER
23.967
13.402
15.075
14.666
9.896
20.163
21.521
21.526
21.678
65.5460
96.21
100 UAE DIRHAM
43.291
24.209
27.230
26.492
17.876
36.421
38.873
38.882
39.158 118.3967
173.78
2,116
180.63
1000 INA RUPIAH
0.109
0.061
0.068
0.066
0.045
0.091
0.097
0.098
0.098
0.2969
0.436
5.307
0.453
0.251
100 INDIA RUPEE
2.403
1.344
1.511
1.471
0.992
2.022
2.158
2.158
2.174
6.5719
9.646
117.472
10.026
5.551
0.973
0.656
1.338
1.428
1.428
1.438
4.3480
6.382
77.720
6.634
3.672
14,645
66.160
119.631
8.421
46.949
3.641
3.750
8.378
36.320
0.675
1.375
1.467
1.468
1.478
4.4691
6.560
79.885
6.818
3.775
15,053
68.003
122.963
8.656
48.257
3.742
3.855
8.611
37.331
7.965
2.037
2.175
2.175
2.191
6.6233
9.721
118.391
10.105
5.594
22,308
100.782
182.234
12.828
71.517
5.546
5.713
12.762
55.326
11.805
1.067
1.068
1.075
3.2508
4.771
58.108
4.960
2.746
10,949
49.465
89.443
6.296
35.102
2.722
2.804
6.264
27.155
5.794
1.000
1.007
3.0457
4.470
54.442
4.647
2.572
10,258
46.344
83.800
5.899
32.887
2.550
2.627
5.868
25.441
5.428
1.007
3.0450
4.469
54.429
4.646
2.572
10,256
46.334
83.780
5.898
32.879
2.550
2.626
5.867
25.436
5.427
3.0236
4.438
54.047
4.613
2.554
10,184
46.008
83.192
5.856
32.648
2.532
2.608
5.826
25.257
5.389
1.0000
1.468
17.875
1.526
0.845
3,368
15.216
27.514
1.937
10.798
0.837
0.863
1.927
8.353
1.782
1,218
103.944
57.545
1,875
131.960
735.669
57.053
58.764
131.274
569.115
121.429
8.535
4.725
18,843
85.127
153.926
10.836
60.408
4.685
4.825
10.779
46.732
9.971
55.361
220,768
997.37
1,803
126.95
707.76
54.89
56.53
126.29
547.52
116.82
1,802
3,258
229.32
1,278
99.15
102.12
228.12
989.00
211.02
4.518
8.169
0.575
3.206
0.249
0.256
0.572
2.480
0.529
180.820
12.729
70.962
5.503
5.668
12.663
54.897
11.713
1,172
229,475 1,036.702
398,776
22,135
1.329
0.743
0.836
0.813
0.549
1.118
1.193
1.194
1.202
3.6345
5.335
64.966
5.545
3.070
12,241
55.304
18.878
10.557
11.874
11.553
7.795
15.882
16.952
16.956
17.076
51.6300
75.780
923
78.769
43.608
173,897
785.618
1,421
7.040
3.063
39.245
3.044
3.135
7.003
30.360
6.478
557.493
43.235
44.531
99.480
431.278
92.020
3.386
1.894
2.130
2.072
1.398
2.849
3.041
3.041
9.2611
13.593
165.541
14.129
7.822
31,193
140.920
254.811
17.937
100 QATAR RIYAL
43.664
24.418
27.465
26.721
18.030
36.735
39.209
39.218
39.495 119.4177
175.277
2,135
182.189
100.862
402,215
1,817
3,286
231.295
100 SAUDI RIYAL
42.393
23.707
26.665
25.943
17.505
35.665
38.067
38.076
38.345 115.9405
170.173
2,072
176.884
97.925
390,504
1,764
3,190
224.560
1,252
97.088
100 SWEDISH KRONOR
18.977
10.612
11.937
11.613
7.836
15.965
17.040
17.044
17.165
51.9000
76.177
927.707
79.181
43.836
174,806
789.726
1,428
100.523
560.409
43.461
44.764
4.377
2.448
2.753
2.679
1.807
3.683
3.931
3.931
3.959
11.9714
17.571
213.988
18.264
10.111
40,321
182.160
329.382
23.187
129.265
10.025
10.325
23.066
20.515
11.473
12.904
12.555
8.471
17.260
18.422
18.426
18.557
56.1076
82.352 1,002.917
85.600
47.389
188,978
853.750
1,544
108.672
605.841
46.984
48.393
108.107
100 HK$
HK
0.738
0.889
100 THAI BAHT
THAI
0.413
0.914
100 PHILIPPINE PESO
QATAR
1.094
1.590
100 NORWEGIAN KRONER
PHIL
0.612
1.634
100 JAPAN YEN
JAPAN NORWAY
1.125
US $
100 CHINESE RMB
INDIA
0.629
SWISS FR
100 BANGLAD’H TAKA
INA
7.755
1,289
7.988
17.844
77.360
16.506
102.999
230.092
997.525
212.837
968.479
206.640
433.533
92.501
223.392
21.337
468.680
Note: Run your finger down the left-hand side until you reach the country of origin you plan to exchange. Then move your finger until that line intersects with the vertical column of the currency you wish to buy. The figure is how much you will get. The above rates are subject to change and provided by Thompson Reuters.
Markets 3 9
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
FUTURES . MONEY MARKET . COMMODITIES
Money market
Index futures
Index points
1980
US Dollar
Long Rolls - KLCI futures
FKLI
Open Interest
1,606.50 90000
(-10.50)
Klibor
USD Index
Index points
-14.00
18.00
102.00
(+1.00)
Implied interest rate (%)
95.852
(-0.216)
1790
68000
4.75
94.25
1600
46000
-8.50
86.50
1410
24000
-21.75
78.75
4.5
3.82
(Unch)
3.5
2000
1220
Jan 4, 2010
Sept 23, 2015
71.00
-35.00
Jan 4, 2010
KLCI futures finish lower
on cash market
Sept 23, 2015
FBM KLCI futures
INDEX AND FUTURES
CONTRACT
SETTLEMENT
CHANGE
VOLUME
OPEN CHANGE IN
INTEREST OPEN INTEREST
The FBM KLCI futures contracts on Bursa Ma- FBMKLCI 1,613.17 -22.20 132.2M
1,606.50 -10.50
17,184 56,748
-4,584
laysia Derivatives finished lower on Wednes- SEP-15
1,593.00 -10.00
5,401 11,201
2,026
day, tracking the performance of the under- OCT-15
DEC-15
1,571.50 -12.50
31
319
7
lying cash market.
MAR-15
1,554.00 -12.50
2
34
1
September 2015 decreased 10.5 points TOTAL
22,618 68,302
-2,550
to 1,606; October 2015 fell 10 points to 1,593
BID
OFFER
CLOSE
while December 2015 and March 2016 lost 12.5 FUTURES ROLL OVER
-13.5
-14.5
-14.0
points each to 1,571.5 and 1,554, respectively. SEP/OCT
Turnover was higher at 22,616 lots from FUTURES FAIR VALUE
DAYS TO EXPIRY
KLIBOR DIVIDEND FAIR VALUE
13,857 lots on Tuesday while open interest CONTRACT
8
1.07
6.84
-2.46
increased to 68,302 contracts from 58,063 SEP-15
OCT-15
38
5.64
9.62
-2.76
contracts. The benchmark FBM KLCI finished ROLL’S FAIR
-0.30
22.2 points lower at 1,613.17 on Wednesday.
Indonesian shares hit a four-week low on
Wednesday amid sell-off in large caps and a
fall in the rupiah while other share markets in
Southeast Asia fell in line with global equities
On Wednesday, Jakarta’s composite index
after a survey indicating weak factory data ended down 2.3% at 4,244.43, its lowest close
from China.
since Aug 26. — Agencies
Commodities
CPO vs Soyoil
Open Interest
4200
200000
3450
1950
2,240
Jan 6, 2008
Sept 24, 2015
Norwegian crown sheds 2%
after surprise rate cut
The Norwegian crown slumped to a 13-year
low against the US dollar yesterday, after the
central bank surprisingly cut interest rates
to boost growth in an economy struggling
with falling prices of oil, its main export.
The Norwegian currency fell to 9.4699
crowns per euro after the rate decision,
its weakest since Aug 27, having traded at
around 9.2952 crowns beforehand. Against
the US dollar, the currency hit a 13-year low
of 8.4593 crowns, down nearly 2% on the
day, according to Reuters data.
“We expect the crown to weaken to
9.50 crowns against the euro,” said Richard Falkenhall, currency strategist at SEB,
a leading Nordic bank. “Norway’s economy
is still struggling and there is still room for
monetary policy to be loosened further.” —
Reuters
1.5
Oct 1, 2000
Sept 23, 2015
Klibor
MONTH
SETTLEMENT
PRICE
OCT5
NOV5
DEC5
MAR6
JUN6
SEP6
DEC6
MAR7
JUN7
SEP7
DEC7
MAR8
JUN8
SEP8
DEC8
MAR9
JUN9
SEP9
DEC9
MAR0
JUN0
SEP0
TOTAL
(+57)
Crude Oil
Gold
CPO RM/ton
Soyoil US$/Ibs
US$/bbl
US$/troy oz
6400
2,583 0.7300
155.0
(RM0.2697/ton)
CHANGE
96.22
96.22
96.18
96.15
96.12
96.10
96.07
96.07
96.02
95.98
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
95.93
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
VOLUME
OPEN
INTEREST
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0
—
—
500
120
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
620
1980
44.65
(+0.17)
5100
0.5475
122.5
105000
3800
0.3650
90.0
1340
57500
2500
0.1825
57.5
1020
0.0000
25.0
700
152500
2700
1200
Oct 2, 2006
CPO prices react to various factors including soyoil prices, weather conditions and stockpiles. Open interest shows either increasing or decreasing market participation.
CPO & Open Interest
CPO RM/ton
2.5
Sept 23, 2015
Palm oil hits two-and-ahalf month high
(+57)
1200
Jan 6, 2008
Sept 23, 2015
CPO futures
CONTRACT
OCT-15
NOV-15
DEC-15
JAN-16
FEB-16
LAST
2,157
2,206
2,240
2,271
2,296
CHANGE
41
49
57
54
51
VOLUME
305
5,940
30,102
6,724
3,614
OPEN CHANGE IN
INTEREST OPEN INTEREST
5,082
34,539
73,157
35,254
13,199
1,135.00
(+3.40)
2,240
10000
1660
-49
-11,649
770
380
565
Malaysian palm oil futures jumped on
Wednesday to their highest in two and a
half months, bolstered by a weak ringgit and
CPO/SOYOIL
worries over potential dry weather curbing CPO FUTURES
INDICATIVE ROLL-OVER FUTURES BASIS (USD)
crop output.
CURRENT
-57.12
OCT/NOV
-49
The benchmark December palm oil con- OCT/DEC
3 MONTHS AVERAGE
-69.45
-83
tract on the Bursa Malaysia Derivatives Ex- OCT/JAN
6 MONTHS AVERAGE
-67.91
-114
change closed 2.61% higher at RM2,240 a NOV/DEC
-34
tonne on Wednesday.
SGS & ITS EXPORT ESTIMATES (TONNES)
JUN’2015
JUL’2015
AUG’2015
Prices earlier touched RM2,248, the highest SHIPMENT DAYS
473/469
309/320
486/499
level since July 6, and have now gained more 1 - 10TH DAYS
1- 15TH DAYS
783/780
665/666
730/716
than 12% so far this month.
DAYS
1,082/1,074
908/908
991/992
“The drivers on Wednesday included the 11 -- 20TH
25TH DAYS
1,393/1,400
1,179/1,149 1,285/1,276
ringgit factor,” said a trader with a commodi- FULL MONTH
1,696/1,649
1,540/1,544 1,542/1,525
ties brokerage in Kuala Lumpur. “Secondly, MALAYSIAN PALM OIL BOARD
JAN’15
FEB’15
MAC’15
APR’15
people are talking about the El Nino effect
1,161
1,122
1,495
1,693
happening in Indonesia and indications that PRODUCTION
EXPORT
1,184
972
1,182
1,175
El Nino is in Malaysia.”
STOCKS
1,770
1,743
1,866
2,194
On Wednesday, traded volume stood at
MPOB Palm oil physical
52,875 lots of 25 tonnes each, well above the
SEP’2015
OCT’2015
NOV’2015
average 35,000 lots usually traded at the close. (IN RM/TON)
DELD
2,056
2,065
2,080
A weak Malaysian ringgit, which makes CPO
PK EX-MILL
1,560
1,570
1,580
palm cheaper for offshore buyers, has helped CPKO DELD
3,439
3,451
3,492
support palm in recent weeks and was the RBD P.OIL FOB
2,251
2,262
2,283
main supporting factor on Wednesday, trad- RBD P.OLEIN FOB
2,318
2,331
2,357
RBD P.STEARIN FOB
1,805
1,827
1,838
ers said.
The ringgit has lost 19% so far this year, MPOB FFB REF PRICE (MILL GATE PRICE)
GRADE A
GRADE B
GRADE C
and is emerging Asia’s worst-performing cur- REGION
OER (RM/TON)
OER(RM/TON)
OER (RM/TON)
rency. There is a growing consensus among NORTH
20.00% 430
19.00% 410
18.00% 391
weather forecasters for a strong El Nino this SOUTH
20.00% 437
19.00% 417
18.00% 396
20.00% 436
19.00% 416
18.00% 396
year, with some climate experts warning that CENTRAL
it could be one of the strongest on record. — EAST COAST 20.00% 432 19.00% 412 18.00% 392
SABAH
22.00% 415
21.00% 397
20.00% 379
Reuters
SARAWAK
22.00% 422
21.00% 403
20.00% 384
Apr 10, 2007
Sept 24, 2015
Oil price rebounds after
sharp fall
Oil price steadied at around US$48 a barrel
yesterday, as investors sought bargains after
a sharp fall the previous day on an unexpectedly large build-up in US gasoline stocks and
a tepid demand outlook.
Brent crude climbed US40 cents to
US$48.15 a barrel, after ending the previous
session down US$1.33.
US West Texas Intermediate crude rose
US48 cents to US$44.96 a barrel, having
slumped US$1.88 on Wednesday.
“It seems like there’s some technical stabilisation at the US$48 level after the steep
sell-off,” said Bjarne Schieldrop, head of commodities research at SEB in Oslo.
Crude prices fell sharply on Wednesday
on data from the Energy Information Administration that showed a bigger-than-expected rise in gasoline stockpiles in the United
States. — Reuters
Centrifuged Latex
Commodities
AGRICULTURE
UNIT
EXCHANGE
RM/TON
SEN/KG
USC/BSH
USC/BSH
USC/BSH
USC/IBS
US$/TON
USC/IBS
USC/IBS
USC/IBS
MDEX
MRB
CBOT
CBOT
CBOT
CME
NYBOT
NYBOT
NYBOT
NYC
2,240
535.00
382.00
866.25
505.75
133.25
3,302
118.45
11.65
60.11
57
4.00
-1.25
2.50
-1.75
-2.50
-8
-1.00
0.10
0.14
US$/TON
USC/IBS
US$/TROY OZ
US$/TROY OZ
US$/TROY OZ
USC/TROY OZ
RMB/TON
RMB/TON
KLTM
CMX
CMX
NYMEX
NYMEX
CMX
SHF
SHF
14,870
2.283
1,135.00
943.70
640.00
14.80
11,800
13,745
-200
-0.013
3.40
11.50
-5.70
0.03
-5
280
LIGHT CRUDE OIL
US$/BBL
HEATING OIL
USC/GAL
NATURAL GAS
US$/MMBTU
BRENT CRUDE
US$/BBL
GAS OIL
US$/TON
NYMEX
NYMEX
NYMEX
ICE
ICE
CRUDE PALM OIL
RUBBER
CORN
SOYBEANS
WHEAT
LIVE CATTLE
COCOA
COFFEE
SUGAR
COTTON
LAST PRICE CHANGE
METAL & PRECIOUS METALS
TIN
COPPER
GOLD
PLATINUM
PALLADIUM
SILVER
ALUMINIUM
ZINC
ENERGY
44.65
0.17
1.5338 0.0059
2.630 -0.008
47.93
0.18
464.00
-9.25
Sen/Kg
1100
1700
900
1325
409.00
950
(-1.50)
500
535.00
(+4.00)
575
300
Jan 7, 2007
Sept 24, 2015
Rubber - M’sia SMR 20
Sen/Kg
700
Aug 31, 2008
200
Sept 23, 2015
Jan 7, 2007
Sept 23, 2015
Markets
40
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
F U T U R E S . M O N E Y M A R K E T . C O M M O D I T I E S PA G E 3 9
YOUR DAILY FINANCIAL MARKET S ROUNDUP
I N S I D E R M OV E S . T R A D I N G T H E M E S . E V E N T S . FO R E X PA G E 3 8
G L O BA L M A R K E T S PA G E 3 7
M A I N M A R K E T . A C E M A R K E T L I ST I N G PA G E 3 3
RESEARCH: TAI TS [[email protected]; SUGUMARAN [[email protected]]
KLCI 1,613.17
FBM ACE 5,537.48
22.20
FTSTI 2,845.74
2.42
22.73
NIKKEI 17,571.83
498.38
HANG SENG 21,095.98
STOCK
Index point
KL Composite Index
10:30
11:30
12:45
(-22.20)
1,606.50
KLCI futures
8:45 9:30
1,613.17
(-10.50)
14:30
15:30
16:30 17:15
Daily FBM KLCI
Moving average - 20-day
KL Composite Index
1950.0
UEMS-C17
GOB
GOB-WA
MSPORTS
PASUKGB
YFG
MAYBANKC15
EAH
BINTAI-WA
ASIABIO
INSTACO
TMCLIFE
HSI-CW
FBMKLCI-C6
HSI-CZ
MSPORTS-WA
VOLUME
('000)
CHANGE
(%)
CHANGE
(RM)
CLOSE
(RM)
HIGH
(RM)
LOW
(RM)
71,684
57,387
31,314
24,301
14,681
14,116
12,168
10,131
8,789
7,646
7,219
7,038
6,713
6,252
5,879
5,535
25.00
11.76
22.58
5.26
5.71
-41.67
-5.71
7.69
3.33
-8.33
13.04
5.41
-10.43
-14.29
-12.23
0.00
0.015
0.060
0.035
0.005
0.010
-0.025
-0.010
0.005
0.005
-0.005
0.015
0.030
-0.060
-0.030
-0.085
0.000
0.075
0.570
0.190
0.100
0.185
0.035
0.165
0.070
0.155
0.055
0.130
0.585
0.515
0.180
0.610
0.030
0.090
0.600
0.205
0.105
0.195
0.055
0.170
0.070
0.160
0.060
0.130
0.595
0.560
0.185
0.660
0.030
0.060
0.505
0.160
0.090
0.175
0.035
0.155
0.065
0.140
0.050
0.120
0.555
0.470
0.170
0.555
0.025
Table above is from Reuters Volume break 3x 5-day average volume, meaning the total number of shares
traded for a particular counter on the previous trading day is more than triple the average volume for the
last 5 trading days. The table captures the build-up of interest in these companies and is thus a gauge of
market expectations for these counters.
1,613.17
(-22.20)
1667.5
China data drags KLCI into
the red; ringgit weakens
1,613.34
1385.0
1102.5
820.0
Jan 2, 2008
Sept 23, 2015
900
600
300
0
Volume (’mil)
FBM KLCI futures
CONTRACT
SETTLEMENT
CHANGE
HIGH
LOW
SEP-15
OCT-15
DEC-15
1,606.50
1,593.00
1,571.50
-10.50
-10.00
-12.50
1,616.00
1,602.00
1,579.00
1,596.00
1,582.50
1,566.00
FBM KLCI sensitivity*
K.LUMPUR KEPONG
PETRONAS GAS
IOI CORPORATION
SIME DARBY
IHH HEALTHCARE
TELEKOM MALAYSIA
SAPURA-KENCANA
WESTPORTS HOLDING
MAXIS
TENAGA NASIONAL
PETRONAS CHEMICAL
DIGI.COM
GENTING
MAYBANK
AXIATA GROUP
PUBLIC BANK
SUB-TOTAL
OTHERS
GRAND TOTAL
KLCI
POINTS
CHANGE
(RM)
CLOSE
(RM)
VOLUME
('000)
-0.43
-0.53
-0.54
-0.62
-0.69
-0.69
-0.70
-0.74
-1.13
-1.32
-1.34
-1.43
-1.57
-1.75
-2.33
-2.86
-18.67
-3.53
-22.20
-0.240
-0.160
-0.050
-0.060
-0.050
-0.110
-0.070
-0.130
-0.090
-0.140
-0.100
-0.110
-0.250
-0.110
-0.160
-0.440
21.300
21.720
3.900
7.470
5.900
6.530
1.920
4.170
6.470
12.040
6.020
5.480
7.260
8.410
5.900
17.680
582.3
946.3
7625.8
3543.6
8194.8
6462.4
14257.1
1925.5
3356.7
8722.3
3493.0
9714.5
3475.9
20221.4
13211.7
11882.7
* How stock price changes affected the index on the previous trading day
4.10
KLCI FUTURES 1617.00
13.00
STI 2868.47
13.80
RM/USD 4.2940
CPO RM2183.00
32.00
OIL US$48.19
0.73
GOLD US$1131.30
1.80
PP 9974/08/2013 (032820)
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.60 (INCLUSIVE OF 6% GST)
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 23, 2015 ISSUE 2011/2015
FINANCIAL
DAILY
MAKE
BETTER
DECISIONS
www.theedgemarkets.com
‘Property prices buoyed by a
number of factors’ 7 H O M E B U S I N E S S
4 HOME BUSINESS
1MDB takes offence
at Zeti’s remarks
on ringgit
7 HOME BUSINESS
Amendments
to laws enhance
SC’s powers
8 HOME BUSINESS
Jaks’ JV secures
US$1.4b funding
for power plant
18 HOME
Federal Court
upholds guilty
verdict for Khir Toyo
19 HOME
Pakatan Harapan is
new opposition pact
It will comprise
an eco-township,
industrial hub and
affordable homes.
Gho Chee Yuan has
the story on Page 4.
UEMS
UEMS-C17
GOB
AIRASIA
FBMKLCI-HK
IFCAMSC
KNM
FBMKLCI-HG
APFT
GOB-WA
PBBANK-C5
FBMKLCI-H5
MSPORTS
FBMKLCI-C12
DSONIC-CE
HSI-CP
FRONTKN
MAYBANK
AEMULUS
ARMADA
TURNOVER
(‘000)
CHANGE
(RM)
CHANGE
(%)
PRICE
(RM)
PE
RATIO
DIVIDEND
YIELD (%)
81,769.6
71,683.7
57,387.4
48,233.5
46,570.0
46,176.6
41,382.3
34,721.1
34,373.3
31,313.5
25,801.3
24,739.2
24,300.5
22,704.0
22,000.5
20,819.7
20,572.4
20,221.4
19,029.8
18,656.3
0.080
0.015
0.060
-0.010
0.005
0.010
-0.010
-0.015
UNCH
0.035
-0.010
-0.005
0.005
UNCH
0.005
-0.020
-0.005
-0.110
0.005
-0.020
7.48
25.00
11.76
-0.73
1.79
1.15
-2.02
-4.41
UNCH
22.58
-14.29
-3.85
5.26
UNCH
11.11
-11.76
-3.03
-1.29
0.98
-2.14
1.150
0.075
0.570
1.360
0.285
0.880
0.485
0.325
0.230
0.190
0.060
0.125
0.100
0.165
0.050
0.150
0.160
8.410
0.515
0.915
10.09
—
2.03
—
—
13.14
13.83
—
—
—
—
—
3.85
—
—
—
9.02
11.56
—
—
2.80
0.00
0.00
2.19
0.00
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6.46
0.00
1.74
Top gainers and losers (ranked by RM)
UP
NESTLE
TOPGLOV
HSI-HN
TECNIC
HSI-HS
TRIPLC
LPI
HSI-HO
HSI-HM
MBMR
PANAMY
HSI-HD
CLOSE
CHANGE
(RM)
72.740
7.980
1.410
1.350
1.480
1.360
13.680
1.920
1.410
2.950
20.600
1.400
0.440
0.290
0.250
0.220
0.200
0.190
0.180
0.170
0.160
0.150
0.140
0.130
PBBANK
GENP
GENTING
HLFG
KLK
GAMUDA
HSI-C13
BKAWAN
AIRPORT
UTDPLT
PETGAS
AXIATA
0.035
0.065
0.035
0.035
0.060
0.185
0.190
0.225
0.025
0.075
75.00
62.50
40.00
40.00
33.33
32.14
31.03
25.00
25.00
25.00
TM-C5
ARMADA-C2
HUBLINE-WA
YFG-WA
DIALOG-C1
AXIATA-C3
FBMKLCI-H21
HSI-CU
CHINA50-C3
BJCORP-CW
DOWN
CLOSE
CHANGE
(RM)
17.680
9.880
7.260
14.000
21.300
4.420
1.240
16.820
5.300
25.560
21.720
5.900
-0.440
-0.260
-0.250
-0.240
-0.240
-0.230
-0.200
-0.180
-0.180
-0.160
-0.160
-0.160
0.025
0.010
0.005
0.005
0.050
0.055
0.150
0.020
0.010
0.010
-50.00
-50.00
-50.00
-50.00
-47.37
-45.00
-34.78
-33.33
-33.33
-33.33
KUALA LUMPUR: The FBM KLCI fell 22.2 points or 1.4%
as the ringgit depreciated on weaker-than-expected China
factory data on Wednesday.
Reuters reported the preliminary Caixin/Markit China
Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index fell to 47 in
September, the worst since March 2009, missing market
expectations for 47.5 and slipping from August’s final 47.3.
Levels below 50 signify a contraction.
At 5pm on Wednesday, the KLCI settled at 1,613.17, af- Top gainers and losers (ranked by percentage)
ter touching its intraday low at 1,609.83. RHB’s group chief
UP
CHANGE
DOWN
CHANGE
economist Lim Chee Seng said the KLCI fell mainly on globCLOSE
(%)
CLOSE
(%)
al factors, such as the Chinese Caixin data and US shares’
UEMS-C14
0.050
100.00
FBMKLCI-CS
0.005
-80.00
overnight losses. “The two major negative factors continue
0.035
75.00
AIRPORT-CL
0.005 -66.67
to reinforce each other and weighed down the regional mar- HSI-CT
KFM-WA
0.035
75.00
TM-C5
0.025 -50.00
ket,” Lim said.
MHC-WA
0.065
62.50
ARMADA-C2
0.010 -50.00
Yesterday in China, the Shanghai Composite gained 0.86%, DSONIC-CC
0.035
40.00
HUBLINE-WA
0.005 -50.00
while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng fell 0.97%. South Korea’s Kospi MATRIX-CD
0.035
40.00
YFG-WA
0.005 -50.00
0.060
33.33
DIALOG-C1
0.050 -47.37
rose 2.46% while Japan’s Nikkei fell 2.76%. Malaysian markets INSTACO-WC
0.185
32.14
AXIATA-C3
0.055 -45.00
were closed yesterday for the Hari Raya Aidiladha holiday. FARMBES-WB
0.145
31.82
YFG
0.035 -41.67
On Wednesday, Bursa Malaysia saw 483 decliners versus KFM
UEMS-C18
0.190
31.03
FBMKLCI-H21
0.150 -34.78
315 advancers. A total of 1.78 billion shares, worth RM2.12 FSBM
0.175
29.63
HSI-CU
0.020 -33.33
billion, exchanged hands. Top gainer was Nestle (M) Bhd, CMSB-CO
0.225
25.00
CHINA50-C3
0.010 -33.33
while Public Bank Bhd led decliners. The most actively-tradTop gainers and losers - warrants (ranked by percentage)
ed stock was UEM Sunrise Bhd.
Economists foresee more risk for the ringgit, due to the
UP
CHANGE
DOWN
CHANGE
high foreign ownership in Malaysian government bonds. —
CLOSE
(%)
CLOSE
(%)
by Gho Chee Yuan
UEMS-C14
0.050 100.00
FBMKLCI-CS
0.005 -80.00
HSI-CT
0.035
75.00
AIRPORT-CL
0.005 -66.67
World equity indices
DOW JONES
S&P 500
NASDAQ 100
FTSE 100
AUSTRALIA
CHINA
HONG KONG
INDIA
I want an edge!
FBM KLCI 1635.37
50.58
Daily top 20 active stocks
UNUSUAL MARKET ACTIVITIES
FBM KLCI & KLCI futures intraday
DOW JONES 16,279.89
Market movers
Punctuality is the virtue of the bored.
— Evelyn Waugh
1627.0
1623.9
1620.8
1617.7
1614.6
1611.5
1608.4
1605.3
1602.2
1599.1
1596.0
206.93
CLOSE
CHANGE
16,279.89
1,938.76
4,752.74
6,032.25
5,071.67
3,142.69
21,095.98
25,863.50
-50.58
-3.98
-3.98
96.40
73.54
26.80
-206.93
40.51
INDONESIA
JAPAN
KOREA
PHILIPPINES
SINGAPORE
TAIWAN
THAILAND
VIETNAM
CLOSE
CHANGE
4,244.43
17,571.83
1,947.10
6,917.55
2,845.74
8,123.10
1,372.35
570.25
-99.62
-498.38
2.46
-9.36
-22.73
-70.32
-2.82
-2.47
Email: [email protected]
Fax: (03) 7721 8282
KFM-WA
MHC-WA
DSONIC-CC
MATRIX-CD
INSTACO-WC
FARMBES-WB
UEMS-C18
CMSB-CO
UEMS-C12
UEMS-C17
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M A K E B E T T E R D EC I S I O N S
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 25, 2015
ISSUE 2012/2015
A PULLOUT EVERY FRIDAY WITH
Read this copy online @ theedgeproperty.com
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ep3 N E W S
ep7 D E A L M A K E R S
ep8 H O M E I D E A S
The Edge-Mah Sing Millionaire
Contest winner picks Icon
Residence Mont’Kiara
Coming into his own
Island chic
BY TA N A I L E N G
BANDAR
KINRARA
set to grow further
This township
Thi
hi in
i Selangor
S l
has
h seen very strong h
housing
i
price growth over the years. More upside is expected
in the future when the LRT extension of the Ampang
Line is completed. It is also expected to gain from the
growth of its neighbours — Bukit Jalil and Puchong.
BANDAR Kinrara in Selangor is akin to the piece of puzzle connecting Puchong, Selangor, and Bukit Jalil, Kuala
Lumpur. Its easy accessibility and affordability, especially
in the early days of its development, have made it popular
among homebuyers.
Island & Peninsular Group Sdn Bhd (I&P Group), the
master developer of Bandar Kinrara, started with Bandar
Kinrara 1 (BK1) in 1991 and gradually expanded up to Bandar Kinrara 9 (BK9).
Bandar Kinrara is strategically located 25km away from
Kuala Lumpur city centre and Cyberjaya, 30km away from
Putrajaya and 8km from Bandar Sunway.
It can be accessed through the Shah Alam Expressway
(Kesas), Bukit Jalil Expressway, Lebuhraya Damansara
Puchong (LDP), Maju Expressway (MEX), New Pantai Expressway (NPE) and Jalan Puchong.
Early projects in Bandar Kinrara were mostly landed
homes consisting mid-range 1 and 2-storey houses. As the
working population grew, non-landed residences were introduced, especially low to medium-cost ones, including
Kenanga Apartment, Sri Tanjung Apartment and Merak
Apartment.
Knight Frank Malaysia managing director Sarkunan
Subramaniam describes Bandar Kinrara as a well-planned
integrated township, albeit with a conventional design. It
offers a mix of commercial shophouses within residential
areas and other amenities such as schools, recreational
parks and places of worship, making the area a comfortable place to live.
CON T I N U ES ON EP4
SAM FONG/THE EDGE PROPERTY
EP
2
PROPERTY
| NEWS
ON
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
NEWS ROUNDUP
Go to theedgeproperty.com for more listings
at www.theedgeproperty.com
The EdgeMah Sing
Millionaire on
why he chose
Icon Residence,
Mont’Kiara
Bank Negara
urged to
relax lending
guidelines
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Senior Managing Editor Azam Aris
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The Edge Property is published and
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Daily every Friday. For more
property data, listings and news, go
to theedgeproperty.com.
(From left) Au, Yam, Tee and Previndran at the panel discussion themed “Property Watch —
Buy, Sell or Hold?” at the CPA Congress 2015. Photo by Haris Hasan /The Edge Property
Property prices to rise in
future, say industry players
Industry players foresee property
prices to rise in future as incoming
supply falls, making it a good time
to buy property now.
According to members of a panel
discussion themed “Property Watch
— Buy, Sell or Hold?” at the CPA
Congress 2015 on Sept 22.
Previndran Singhe, group CEO
and founder of Zerin Properties,
said property prices will start to
increase due to lower supply of
homes as developers are holding
back launches.
Other panellists were immediate
past president of Real Estate and
Housing Developers’ Association
(REHDA) Datuk Seri Michael Yam
and Bina Puri Holdings Bhd group
executive director Matthew Tee Kai
Woon. The Edge Communications
Sdn Bhd and The Edge Property Sdn
Bhd managing director Au Foong
Yee was the moderator.
Yam said most developers are
adopting a wait-and-see strategy
due to the discouraging market
environment in the first half of this
year due to the implementation of
the Goods and Services Tax, and
poor market sentiment caused by
a weakening ringgit. Nevertheless,
he believed demand for housing
remains strong.
Meanwhile, Tee said property
prices will not be going down anytime soon as construction cost continues to rise including labour and
building material costs.
Eco World buys 26 parcels of
land for RM15 bil township
Eco World Development Group Bhd
is acquiring 26 pieces of leasehold
land in Kuala Selangor, with a collective land size of 2,198.40 acres
for RM1.181 billion.
In a filing with Bursa Malaysia
on Sept 22, Eco World said its wholly-owned subsidiary Paragon Pinnacle Sdn Bhd has signed five separate conditional sale and purchase
agreements with four vendors for the
proposed acquisition. The proposed
acquisitions are expected to be completed by the second quarter of 2016.
Eco World said it intends to
develop the parcels of land into
a self-contained township with a
potential gross development value
of RM15 billion.
1MDB seeks buyers for
Pulau Indah land
1Malaysia Development Bhd
(1MDB) has launched a tender
LAUNCHES & EVENTS
Contact: (019) 270 4218
Besides the Mid-Autumn festival
celebrations featuring funfilled activities, Sunway Lenang
Heights will also be launching
its bungalow show unit set
in a garden resort setting.
Sunway’s Mid-Autumn
festival celebrations
Date: Sept 26 and 27
(Tomorrow and Sunday)
Venue: Sunway Eastwood,
Jalan SE2, Taman Equine,
Seri Kembangan
Time: 10am to 5pm
Contact: (03) 5639 9052
Sunway Bhd is celebrating
the Mid-Autumn festival at
several of its sales galleries.
At Sunway Eastwood, it will
be hosting a lantern festival
with light refreshments while
showcasing its premium semidetached homes collection.
Venue: Sunway Lenang Heights
show unit, Jalan Persiaran Bumi
Hijau, Laman Tasik Pandan,
Taman Molek, Johor Baru
Time: 4pm to 8pm
Venue: Sunway Velocity, Jalan
Cheras, Kuala Lumpur
Time: 10am to 5pm
Contact: (012) 318 9656
Sunway Velocity invites you and
your family to its sales gallery
for a snow skin mooncake DIY
session and light refreshments.
New release of AYKON Nine
Elms in London
Date: Sept 26 and 27
(Tomorrow and Sunday)
Venue: Mandarin Oriental
Hotel, Level 2, Topaz
Room, Kuala Lumpur
exercise for its 127ha (314 acre)
land in Pulau Indah, Selangor. According to a statement on Sept 21,
1MDB said potential purchasers
are invited to register their interest
with Savills (M) Sdn Bhd, which is
advising 1MDB on the exercise.
“The 1MDB land parcel in Pulau
Indah, Mukim Klang, is on a single-large development site, measuring approximately 318 acres,” the
company said. “It is adjacent to the
Port Klang Free Zone and other
industrial developments.”
The proposed land sale forms
part of 1MDB’s rationalisation plan,
which was presented to the Malaysian Cabinet on May 29. 1MDB had
earlier purchased the Pulau Indah
land from Tadmax Resources Bhd at
a revised price of RM294.38 million.
pating its earnings for the financial
year ending March 31, 2016 (FY16)
to be comparable with FY15, if not
better, driven by two projects: the
Penang Times Square and Penang
WorldCity.
In FY15, it saw a net profit of
RM23.51 million on a revenue of
RM270.19 million.
Ivory chief operating officer Goh
Chin Heng said the company still
believes the market has buying
power, and that property market
sentiment will return.
The group aims to complete
the remaining three phases of its
five-phase Penang Times Square,
which has a gross development
value (GDV) of RM800 million,
over the next three to five years.
As for Penang WorldCity, its joint
development with Tropicana Corp
Asian Pac banks on Klang
Bhd, which carries a GDV of RM10
Valley and Johor projects
billion, there are some 80 acres
Asian Pac Holdings Bhd is banking (32.37ha) left for development.
on three product launches in the
Klang Valley and Johor to ride out Al-Salam REIT’s IPO
the challenging year ahead, manag- oversubscribed 2.96 times
ing director Datuk Mustapha Buang The general public portion of the
told reporters after the company’s initial public offering (IPO) of Alannual general meeting on Sept 21. Salam Real Estate Investment Trust
These projects include condo- (REIT) has been oversubscribed by
minium project Damansara 8 @ 2.96 times. The REIT is en route to
Damansara Damai, a mixed-use de- list on the Main Market of Bursa
velopment in Kepong, Kuala Lum- Malaysia on Sept 29.
pur and 30 units of shop offices in
In a statement on Sept 21, MaPhase 2 of Dataran Larkin in Johor, laysian Issuing House Sdn Bhd said
in financial year 2016 ending March the IPO received 2,442 applications
31, 2016 (FY16).
totalling 45.92 million units for 11.6
It is also in the midst of finalising million units that were available for
plans for its maiden township on public subscription. A total of 1,285
400 acres of land in Labu, which is applications for 18.34 million offer
projected to be launched in 2017. units were received for the bumiputera category, which represents
Ivory Properties counting
an oversubscription of 2.16 times;
on Penang Times Square,
while under the public category,
WorldCity for better FY16
1,157 applications for 27.58 milPenang-based developer Ivory lion offer units were received for
Properties Group Bhd is antici- an oversubscription of 3.76 times.
If you have any real estate-related events, email us at [email protected]
Events listed here will also appear on theedgeproperty.com.
Time: 11am to 7pm
Contact: (012) 908 6318
Christine Wong/(013) 272
7875 Jeffri Rahim
Located in prime central London
Zone 1, AYKON Nine Elms is
the first branded residences in
which the lavish interiors are
designed by Versace Home.
It consists of 360 residential
apartments with various layouts
including studio, one, two
and three-bedroom units.
planning and development of
a ‘World Class City’. Jointly
organised by the Real Estate and
Housing Developers’ Association
Malaysia Wilayah Persekutuan
Kuala Lumpur (REHDA KL), the
Malaysian Institute of Planners
(MIP) and the Malaysian Institute
of Architects (PAM), with the
support of Kuala Lumpur City
Hall (DBKL), the theme this
year is ‘Urban regeneration
through smart partnerships’.
International Conference
on World Class Sustainable
Cities (WCSC)
Sheda Property Expo 2015
Date: Sept 29 (Tuesday)
Venue: The Royale Chulan,
Kuala Lumpur
Time: 8am to 5.30pm
Contact: (03) 7803 2978
REHDA KL/(03) 7877 0637
MIP/(03) 2693 4182 PAM
The World Class Sustainable
Cities series provide a
constructive platform to
enlighten, educate and
change the mind sets of city
stakeholders, industry players,
government agencies and
the general public on the
key challenges faced in the
Date: Sept 25 to 27
(Today to Sunday)
Venue: Borneo Convention Centre
Kuching (BCCK), Sarawak
Time: 10am to 9pm
Contact: (08) 236 5001
Organised by the Sarawak
Housing and Real Estate
Developers’ Association (Sheda),
there will be over 100 booths
set up by housing and property
developers, manufacturers and
suppliers of building materials,
home and lifestyle furnishing
retailers, banks and other
housing-related services under
one roof to create a one-stop
centre for house buyers.
NEWS |
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
PROPERTY
EP
3
KRI urges construction industry
to improve productivity
Fragmented home building sector has to be consolidated
BY C H A I Y EE HOON G & R ACHEAL LEE
KUALA LUMPUR: There is a need to incentivise the construction industry to modernise,
but it must innovate and increase productivity first to prevent a housing crisis, said
Khazanah Research Institute (KRI).
Malaysia inherited the structural business
system from the UK and this fragmentation
in the industry has been the norm for over 40
years. Meanwhile, the UK itself has found that
such a fragmentation was a source of inefficiency, and has improvised its system since
1998, said KRI director of research for cities
programme Dr Suraya Ismail during a forum
entitled “Does Greater Prosperity Come with
Less Housing Affordability?” on Wednesday.
She encouraged consolidating the building industry in terms of mass housing to
address the concerns and demand for affordable homes, especially for those with
monthly incomes of between RM3,000 to
RM10,000. She said that government subsidies for this 70% of the country’s population
are not sustainable, and will fiscally incur
more debts for the government.
In order to do this, she highlighted three
inter-linked policy recommendations by KRI
based on three objectives it aims to achieve.
The first objective is to develop measures to
improve the efficacy of the national delivery
system to supply housing at affordable prices
by creating a new designated procurement
route. This will consolidate resources of the
firms involved in delivering affordable houses.
The second objective is to reduce pressures leading to rapid escalation of house
prices. She suggested the imposition of a
moratorium period of five years for the supply of new stock of houses produced through
the new procurement route.
“[Houses produced through the new
procurement route] needs to be insulated from speculative activities in order for
the initiative to be successful. Therefore,
a moratorium is needed for the first batch
of houses to create a buffer period for the
second batch to be supplied at affordable
prices. In the long run, a moratorium is no
longer needed if all new batches of houses
Suraya says government subsidies for housing are not
sustainable. Photo by Patrick Goh/The Edge Property
supplied are affordable,” she explained.
However, she added that this will only be
successful if the planning of housing units are
done and displayed through the data captured
in the proposed National Housing Survey,
which is the third objective. The survey will
help the government plan for the effective
demand and supply of housing.
Michael Yam, immediate past president
of Real Estate and Housing Developers’
Association Malaysia (REHDA), urged for
higher productivity and better quality by
focusing on training in skills, technocrats
and professionals to tackle the issue of affordable housing.
“We should also focus on the greater use
of Industrialised Building Systems (IBS). Investment in IBS plants are high and so grants
by the Construction Industry Development
Board (CIDB) are needed too,” said Yam.
Suraya said some challenges faced in
implementing IBS in the country include
lack of skilled on-site operatives to execute
this technology.
Other speakers at the forum also included KRI managing director Datuk Charon
Mokhzani, National Housing Department director Murali Jayabalan and National House
Buyers Association (HBA) Secretary-General
Chang Kim Loong.
The Edge-Mah Sing Millionaire Contest
winner picks Icon Residence Mont’Kiara
BY TA N A I L EN G
KUALA LUMPUR: The winner of The EdgeMah Sing Millionaire Contest, Brian Lim, has
redeemed his dream home — a one-bedroom
unit at Icon Residence Mont’Kiara in Kuala
Lumpur — almost a month after winning
the contest.
Brian is sharing ownership of the unit with
his younger sister Crystal Lim Ai Ping. The
siblings were accompanied by their parents
— Danny Lim and Lily Yoong — to witness the
signing of the sale and purchase agreement
of their dream home last Thursday.
The unit he chose has a built-up of 1,115
sq ft and the kitchen comes fitted with appliances and cabinets.
Mah Sing Group Bhd group managing
director and group chief executive Tan Sri
Leong Hoy Kum and chief executive officer
Ng Chai Yong, together with The Edge Communications Sdn Bhd and The Edge Property
Sdn Bhd managing director Au Foong Yee,
were at hand to witness the signing.
“I want to thank Mah Sing Group and The
Edge for organising this wonderful contest,
giving me a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to
own this beautiful home,” said the 32-year-old
IT project manager, who was so excited that
he couldn’t sleep the night before the signing.
Brian said he and his family had a long
discussion about property choices, which
included Ferringhi Residence in Penang, M
City in Jalan Ampang, D’sara Sentral in Sungai
Buloh and Southville City in Bangi.
Crystal said it was a difficult decision, as
Mah Sing has many good properties to choose
from. After nearly a month of consideration,
they decided on a unit in Icon Residence
Mont’Kiara.
Brian said Mont’Kiara is considered a
hotspot in the Klang Valley for its location
An aerial shot of the completed Icon Residence
Mont’Kiara. Photo by Mah Sing
and nearby amenities, and the development itself is known for its catchy design.
He believes that it will enjoy a very good
appreciation rate.
“I plan to stay in the unit. Although other
options such as renting it out have crossed
my mind, I decided to make it my new home
and enjoy all the facilities here,” he said.
Leong, who became a millionaire at the age
of 35, was happy to meet Brian yesterday. He
said the contest not only gives the winner an
opportunity to own a home, but also a good
start in achieving a new milestone in life.
Leong said Icon Residence Mont’Kiara is a
good choice as it is located in one of the most
sought-after locations in the Klang Valley. It has
enjoyed a take-up rate of 94% since its launch
in 2012. The current average selling price of
(From left) Danny, Yoong, Crystal, Brian, Leong, Mah Sing marketing and special projects deputy general
manager Rachel Leong, Au and Ng at the signing ceremony. Photo by Patrick Goh/The Edge Property
Icon Residence Mont’Kiara units stands at
RM1,000 per sq ft.
Icon Residence Mont’Kiara was completed in June 2015. The development comprises
three towers with 290 residential units with
built-ups ranging from 1,100 sq ft to 4,000
sq ft. The project offers a range of one to 4+1
bedroom units, as well as penthouses and
has only two to six all-corner units per floor
with contemporary layouts.
Located 15 minutes from Kuala Lumpur
city centre, Icon Residence Mont’Kiara is well
connected via the the Sprint Expressway, the
Penchala Link, North-South Expressway, Damansara-Puchong Expressway and Duta-Ulu
Kelang Expressway.
The Edge-Mah Sing Millionaire Contest is a
collaboration between Mah Sing and The Edge.
The contest ran from June 20 to July 31 and attracted thousands of participants. Twenty-one
finalists were shortlisted and they battled it out
in the grand finale on Aug 22 at Southville City
@ KL South sales gallery in Bangi.
Brian successfully negotiated three elimination rounds and triumphed in the fourth
and final round to emerge the winner.
Visit theedgeproperty.com for more stories, photos and videos on
The Edge-Mah Sing Millionaire Contest.
EP
4
PROPERTY
| C OV E R ST O RY
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
After two decades of development,
Bandar Kinrara has become a mature township.
Photos by Sam Fong/The Edge Property
FR I
C
b
The Zest is one of the most sought after
condominiums in Bandar Kinrara.
yie
fixe
for
fro
are
RM
ren
old
Bandar Kinrara offers
strong fundamentals
F RO M E P 1
“A developer’s good reputation is also
an assurance of capital appreciation. It’s
a highly populated township with a good
sales and rental market,” he says.
Great capital appreciation
In terms of capital appreciation, Michael
Choy, senior real estate negotiator of Reapfi eld Properties Sdn Bhd, says prices of
some landed residential properties in Bandar Kinrara have more than doubled from
six years ago, while high-rise properties
have seen steady price growth in the past
three years. The hike in prices of landed
homes has made high-rise properties more
attractive to homebuyers.
“As an example, a 2-storey house in
Qaseh at BK8, with a size of 24ft by 70ft, is
going for RM1.5 million!
“So, for people who can’t afford it, they
may shift their focus to high-rises, which
are more affordable,” he says.
In an analysis of transactions of
non-landed residential properties by theedgeproperty.com covering areas from
BK1 to BK9 as well as the neighbouring
areas of Taman Kinrara and Taman Bukit
Kuchai, the average price in 2013
was RM248.50 psf, compared
with RM234 psf in 2012. As at
3Q2014, the highest average
transaction price recorded
was RM309 psf.
Choy says there is demand for low and medium-cost apartments, especially those in the price
range of RM110 to RM380
psf, such as Enggang Apartment, with a built-up of 700
sq ft and selling for RM80,000,
and Merak Apartment, with
a built-up of 860 sq ft
and selling for
RM320,000,
as shown in
Giant Kinrara in BK5 is close to a future LRT station.
transactions in the past 12 months.
However, he notes that newer condominiums with facilities in the higher price
range of RM450 to RM600 psf are also
seeing rising demand, resulting in strong
capital appreciation.
He cites as example the smallest units at
The Zest in BK 9 with a built-up of 1,191 sq
ft, which were selling for RM230,000 during the launch in 2008. One of these units
was sold for RM650,000 this year.
Incoming non-landed housing supply
includes 8 Kinrara and Duet Residence. 8 Kinrara, an integrated
development comprising retail and residential units by
I&P, was launched in 2013 at
an average price of RM600
psf, according to Choy. The
project offers 35 storeys of
residential units and shopoffices in one block. It consists
of 236 serviced apartments
with built-ups of 623 to 2,483
sq ft. The development is expected to be completed by 2018.
Three storeys will be allocated
Choy: buyers shifting to
high-rise properties
due to affordability.
for shopoffices, and the rest will be residential units.
Duet Residence, which is located in BK6,
is developed by Bandar Kinrara Properties
Sdn Bhd. The 1.91-acre project comprises
two blocks — 23 and 21 storeys — with a
total of 232 units. The built-ups are between
1,029 and 2,596 sq ft. Duet Residence is slated for completion by the end of this year.
According to Montprimo Sdn Bhd, the
marketing agent for Duet Residence, the
remaining 20% of units for sale are now
priced at an average RM635 psf,
compared with RM500 psf during its launch in 2013.
Currently, there are only
three parcels of vacant land
left for residential developments in Bandar Kinrara, which Choy says,
may see I&P launch additional blocks of serviced apartments near
the Giant hypermarket
and 8 Kinrara. The selling price is expected to be
RM700 psf, he adds. Knight
Frank’s Sarkunan notes that
the prices of low and
medium-cost
apartments
Ne
Wh
per
yea
hig
ed
in
tigh
tie
ma
The LRT extension project will be the next catalyst
for Bandar Kinrara’s growth.
in Bandar Kinrara have been growing in tandem with the rise in prices of new launches.
“The existing landed residential properties in the affordable range are generally dated and require maintenance and
renovations, which may increase the cost
for future buyers. Thus, current buyers are
likely to look for high-rise dwellings due
to affordability issues as well as better returns,” he says.
TPE Realty negotiator Belinda Lim, who
is familiar with the area, concurs. “Most low
to medium-cost, high-rise homes here are
freehold and less than 15 years old. This
is one of the reasons homebuyers and investors are interested in Bandar Kinrara’s
high-rise properties.”
She says most condominiums and apartments are located in BK2 and BK3. Property prices in newer areas, such as BK5 and
BK6, are higher than in the older areas
such as BK1 to BK4.
In terms of rental yields, property agents
concur that those who bought the low to
medium-cost apartments in Bandar Kinrara 5 to 10 years ago, have enjoyed good
yields. According to Choy, the rental yields
are between 5% and 6%.
He notes that the rents of high-rise residences in Bandar Kinrara are mostly
below RM1,000 per month, and
this is drawing strong interest
from those looking for affordable accommodation.
“It is easier to rent properties below RM1,000 [per
month] due to affordability
and the rising cost of living.
With a budget of around
RM220,000, investors can
get a medium-cost unit
and rent it out for RM850 [a
month]. That will generate a
Sarkunan: Upcoming supply will
put pressure on price growth.
Photo by Haris Hassan/
The Edge Property
C OV E R ST O RY |
F R I DAY S E PT E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY
PROPERTY
EP
5
Source: theedgeproperty.com
Chart 1: Bandar Kinrara non-landed residential average price
by average price (RM/psf)
yield of around 5%, which is higher than
fixed deposit rates,” Choy explains.
Currently, the average monthly rent
for older medium-cost apartments range
from RM600 to RM750, while newer ones
are fetching RM1,000.
However, for new launches that exceed
RM500 psf in price, Choy notes that the
rental yield will not be as attractive as the
older ones.
Next growth catalysts
While Bandar Kinrara properties have experienced strong capital growth over the
years, Sarkunan says the price growth of
high-rise residential properties is expected to moderate due to incoming supply
in and around the township. The current
tight financing conditions and uncertainties in the economy and property market
may affect price growth as well.
anes.
opernd
ost
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ow
are
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inra’s
arternd
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esistly
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ity
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n/
PROJECT NAME
TRANSACTION PRICE (RM PSF)
2014
2015
(AS AT AUGUST)
The Zest
495-498
Koi Kinrara
345-360
Koi Legian
278
Suria Kinrara
246
Merak Apartment
358
Kesuma Apartment
349
Enggang Apartment
140
529-560
441-455
355
323
372
345
128
Source: JPPH/Knight Frank Research
According to him, future supply, including projects under construction — Duet
Residences (233 units), 8 Kinrara (236
units) and The Linq at Kinrara Uptown
(684 units of serviced apartments) — are
slated for completion by 2018.
“The existing and impending supply
of high-rise residential units will create a
more competitive rental market that favours tenants. This may inevitably reduce
rental yields going forward, with tenants
spoilt for choice,” says Sarkunan.
He notes that stratified homes in neighbouring residential areas, such as Bukit Jalil,
Pinggiran Putra and Seri Kembangan, are
competitively priced and may put pressure
on price growth as well.
“Some of the projects under construction, particularly those under the DIBS (Developer Interest Bearing Scheme) where low
downpayments were required for property
purchases, may see the soon-to-be-completed units put up for sale at competitive
prices amid the challenging property market conditions,” he adds.
TPE Realty’s Lim is also cautious of the
near-term price movement, especially of
the newer projects if market sentiment
remains sluggish.
“Investors who have purchased the
apartments or condominiums five years
ago or earlier are enjoying good rental
returns. However, for recent buyers, they
may face difficulties in getting tenants or
the rent may be insufficient to cover their
monthly instalments,” she says.
However, Reapfield’s Choy says although
transactions are few, demand remains
strong as the number of enquiries for Bandar Kinrara properties has not let up. “People still want to buy, but affordability is
their main concern.”
He notes that in terms of pricing, Bandar Kinrara tends to be a market follower as it relied on growth in neighbouring
townships, such as Puchong, Bukit Jalil
and residential areas along Jalan Puchong,
for leads.
“In order to grow further, Bandar Kinr-
ara needs new catalysts. The light rail transit (LRT) extension project and Bukit Jalil
City development could be the drivers for
future growth,” he says.
The LRT extension project for the Ampang Line, which starts from the Sri Petaling station, passes through Kinrara before
ending in Putra Heights. There will be two
stations in Bandar Kinrara — Alam Sutera
and BK5.
The Alam Sutera station is located in
between BK1 and BK9, about 10 minutes’
walk from The Zest, and the BK5 station
is located in between BK2 and BK5, right
in front of the Giant hypermarket and 8
Kinrara. The distance from the two stations is 3.5km.
Bukit Jalil City is just 5km away from
these two locations. The 50-acre integrated development, a collaboration between
Malton Bhd and Kuala Lumpur Pavilion
Sdn Bhd, is slated for completion in 2019.
The project has four major components,
including a two million sq ft Pavilion Bukit
Jalil shopping mall (also known as Pavilion 2) and The Park Sky Residence, which
comprises 1,098 serviced apartments, 444
units of 2 and 3-storey shoplots and 3 and
5-storey retail offices.
Although the market is cautious in the
near term, reflecting the current economic conditions, the real estate agents and
consultants believe that with good fundamentals, Bandar Kinrara’s maturity as
a residential development is well poised
for the next phase of growth in the future.
See property listings for this area on
Market Watch EP6
EP
6
PROPERTY
| M A R K E T WAT C H
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
Go to theedgeproperty.com for more listings
FOR SALE [in Bandar Kinrara, Selangor]
The Zest
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Freehold
Asking price: RM700,000
Built-up area: 1,191 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3 + 1
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Fully renovated and
fully furnished unit in movein condition. Comes with air
conditioner, cooker hob and hood,
water heater, swimming pool view
and two parking bays. Accessibility:
Bukit Jalil Highway, Lebuhraya
Damansara-Puchong (LDP),
Sungai Besi Highway, Shah Alam
Expressway (Kesas), KL-Seremban
Highway and walking distance to
upcoming MRT station. Amenities
nearby: Giant Bandar Kinrara Mall,
IOI Mall, AEON BiG Sri Petaling,
Sunway Pyramid, schools, Sunway
University College, International
Medical University, Asia Pacific
Institute of Information Technology
(APIIT), Limkokwing University of
Creative Technology, Alice Smith
School, Australian International
School, Sunway Medical Centre
and Columbia Asia hospital.
Agent/ negotiator: Andy
Tee of Property Exchange
Tel: (012) 209 7573
Email: [email protected]
The Zest
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Freehold
Asking price: RM698,000
Built-up area: 1,205 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: None
Agent/ negotiator: Lorna Lim
of NTC Estate Agency Services
Tel: (012) 204 8864
Email: [email protected]
Sierra Residency
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Freehold
Asking price: RM475,000
Built-up area: 907 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Comes with one
parking bay. Located near Giant,
Tesco, IOI Mall and SetiaWalk.
Unit in Block A; low floor unit.
Agent/ negotiator: Simon
Tan of Vivahomes Realty
Tel: (018) 383 7222
Email: [email protected]
hotmail.com
Sierra Residency
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Freehold
Asking price: RM450,000
Built-up area: 907 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Unit comes with one air
conditioner, fans in all rooms, grilles,
lights, kitchen cabinet and one
parking bay. Unit on the fifth floor.
Agent/ negotiator: Willa
Wong of Vivahomes Realty
Tel: (012) 632 1123
Email: [email protected]
Koi Legian
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking price: RM480,000
Built-up area: 1,087 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 3
Description: Renovated with
built-ins. Well maintained.
Low density. Easy access.
Convenient — near schools, IOI
Mall, restaurants, convenience
stores and other amenities.
Agent/ negotiator: Chan
of Goldman Properties
Tel: (012) 299 4660
Email: [email protected]
FOR RENT [in Bandar Kinrara, Selangor]
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Basic unit with fans,
lights and grilles. Low floor corner
unit. Comes with one parking bay.
Easy access to Kesas Highway,
Jalan Puchong or Old Klang Road;
less than 10 minutes’ drive to Mid
Valley Megamall or Puchong.
Agent/ negotiator: Bryan
Cheng of Dutama Properties
Tel: (017) 881 6331
Email: [email protected]
gmail.com
Suria Kinrara
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking price: RM235,000
Built-up area: 712 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: This is a well-kept
unit that has just been painted.
Agent/ negotiator: Josh Chong
of Reapfield Properties
Tel: (016) 322 9197
Email: [email protected]field.com
Suria Kinrara
Vista Lavender
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking price: RM330,000
Built-up area: 1,017 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Corner unit on the
ground floor. The condominium is in
Taman Kinrara Section 3. It is within
the growth area of neighbourhoods
such as Old Klang Road, Taman
Bukit Kuchai, Taman Kinrara
and Taman Paik Siong. It is also
accessible through Jalan Puchong
and LDP. Vista Lavender is in a
mature neighbourhood where all the
facilities and amenities are in place,
including grocery shops, schools,
restaurants, laundry shops, hardware
stores, night market and so on.
Agent/ negotiator: Ee Ling
of Oriental Realty
Tel: (013) 247 9888
Email: [email protected]
Vista Lavender
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking price: RM340,000
Built-up area: 1,017 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Low floor unit
with balcony, air conditioner,
water heater and city view.
Condo is in a prime location.
Agent/ negotiator: Admen
Ng of Starcity Property
Tel: (012) 270 7228
Email: [email protected]
Kinrara Ria
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking price: RM300,000
Built-up area: 932 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking price: RM250,000
Built-up area: 753 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: None
Agent/ negotiator: Esther Ng of
Hartamas Real Estate Sdn Bhd
Tel: (017) 200 8703
Email: [email protected]
Casa Riana
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking price: RM260,000
Built-up area: 813 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Facilities in the
apartment include allotted
parking space, lifts, swimming
pool, playground, surau and
jogging track. It also features
24-hour security with guards and
a card access system. Amenities
within walking distance are
eateries and shops. Schools
nearby include Taman Puncak
Jalil secondary school, Taman
Desaminium primary and
secondary schools and Taman
Universiti national school. It is
also a short drive to Universiti
Putra Malaysia, AEON Taman
Equine, Giant Bandar Kinrara
Mall and Pasar Borong Selangor.
The apartment is within walking
distance of a bus stop and taxi
stand. It is easily accessible via
various highways including the
LDP, Maju Expressway, New
Pantai Expressway (NPE), New
Klang Valley Expressway (NKVE)
and North-South Expressway.
Agent/ negotiator: Yen Yen
of Global Link Properties
(Selangor) Sdn Bhd
Tel: (017) 227 2255
Email: [email protected]
Taman Puncak Kinrara
Apartments
Vista Lavender
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Freehold
Asking rent: RM800
Built-up area: 800 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Top floor unit in good
condition with city view. Peaceful
and nicely maintained area. About
10 minutes to IOI Mall, Giant and
Tesco. Five minutes to Puchong
Jaya town centre, 10 minutes to
Sunway Pyramid, 10 minutes to
Petaling Jaya, 15 minutes to Mid
Valley Megamall, easy access
to Kesas Highway and LDP.
Agent/ negotiator: Admen
Ng of Starcity Property
Tel: (012) 270 7228
Email: [email protected]
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking rent: RM1,000
Built-up area: 1,017 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Corner unit, partly
furnished, kitchen cabinet, air
conditioners, bed frame and water
heater. Well-kept and in move-in
condition. About five minutes to
Chinese school, Kesas Highway,
Giant hypermarket, restaurants,
clinics and banks. About 15 minutes
to Sunway Medical Centre and
IOI Mall. Available immediately.
Agent/ negotiator: Edmund
Chan of Rina Properties
Tel: (010) 766 8208
Email: [email protected]
gmail.com
The Zest
Koi Legian
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Freehold
Asking rent: RM1,800
Built-up area: 1,200 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Fully furnished with
four air conditioners, two water
heaters, cookware, fridge, microwave
oven, wardrobe and TV. It comes
with two covered parking lots.
High security with access card.
Agent/ negotiator: Wayne
Chong of Tech Real Estate
Tel: (012) 383 9294
Email: [email protected]
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking rent: RM1,300
Built-up area: 1,200 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Partly furnished
unit with air conditioners, water
heater, cooker hob and hood,
and kitchen cabinets. Well-kept
and in move-in condition.
Agent/ negotiator: Edmund
Chan of Rina Properties
Tel: (010) 766 8208
Email: [email protected]
gmail.com
The Zest
Pangsapuri Seri Kasturi
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Asking rent: RM1,800
Built-up area: 1,205 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: This is a high-floor
corner unit previously owner
occupied. Kept in meticulous
condition. Very windy, spacious and
comfortable. Full kitchen cabinetry
for both wet and dry kitchens with
sliding divider doors, curtains, air
conditioners, water heater, dining
set, sofa + coffee table. Broadband
optional with pool and KL views.
Agent/ negotiator: Joey
Leong of Reapfield Properties
(Mont’Kiara) Sdn Bhd
Tel: (012) 231 8667
Email: [email protected]
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Freehold
Asking rent: RM1,100
Built-up area: 886 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: Top floor unit,
available now. Facilities:
Playground, 24-hour security,
swimming pool, covered
parking and so on. Location and
accessibility: About five minutes’
drive to Old Klang Road/ Bukit
Jalil/ Serdang and Petaling
Jaya; 10 minutes’ drive to Jalan
Puchong, LDP and Kesas Highway.
Agent/ negotiator: Jimmy
Low of Goldman Properties
Tel: (012) 681 1666
Email: [email protected]
Suria Kinrara
D’Cahaya Apartment
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Tenure: Leasehold
Asking rent: RM850
Built-up area: 712 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: This unit is partly
furnished with fans, lights, grilles,
fridge, air conditioners and water
heaters. Ready to move in. Comes
with one parking lot. Easy access
to Kesas Highway, Jalan Puchong
or Old Klang Road. Less than
10 minutes’ drive to Mid Valley
Megamall or Puchong. Facilities:
Swimming pools, IT centre, surau,
playground and multipurpose hall.
Agent/ negotiator: Bryan
Cheng of Dutama Properties
Tel: (017) 881 6331
Email: [email protected]
Type: Condominium/
serviced residence
Asking rent: RM1,100
Built-up area: 900 sq ft
Bedroom(s): 3
Bathroom(s): 2
Description: High floor
unit. Unfurnished.
Agent/ negotiator: Emily
Tai of TPE Realty
Tel: (012) 286 3325
Email: [email protected]
DEALMAKERS |
F R I DAY S E P T E MB E R 25, 2015 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY
PROPERTY
EP
7
Coming into his own
Chester Properties’ Jei Chew on his career choice and the importance of reputation in the real estate industry
BY TA N A I L EN G
J
ei Chew, marketing director of real
estate agency Chester Properties Sdn
Bhd, used to be a happy-go-lucky
guy with no thought for tomorrow.
However, one incident moved him
so greatly that it changed him and
led him to the path to become a real
estate negotiator.
“I saw a woman carrying her baby and
wanting to withdraw some money from
the automated teller machine (ATM). But
I noticed that she only had a little more
than RM100 in her account and she looked
at a loss. I still remember her forlorn face.
I started to think, what if I couldn’t earn
enough money for myself, will I or my future wife end up like that lady?” recalls the
29-year-old from Taiping.
Driven by a strong sense of insecurity
following the experience, Jei began to think
more seriously about his future. A medical
science student in Universiti Sains Malaysia
at the time, he could have chosen a career
in the medical field. However, he decided
to pursue a different vocation. After graduating in 2010, he joined Chester Properties
— founded by his elder brother Howard
Chew — as a real estate negotiator.
Jei’s decision was prompted by one reason — he wanted to earn a lot of money.
He soon realised, though, that in order to
achieve this, he had a long way to go and
more to learn. But he was determined and
committed to make real estate negotiating
his profession.
“As a professional negotiator, I need to
know everything about the industry, especially the transaction process. It took me
about two years to study the rules and regulations, the details in the sale and purchase
agreements as well as the legal terms that
appear during the transactions,” says Jei.
The knowledge helped him build his
reputation as a negotiator. He explains that
when customers approach a negotiator,
they usually want to know more about a
certain property such as the surrounding
environment, the capital appreciation and
the process of getting a loan. The negotiator’s advice helps customers in their decision-making.
In 2012, Jei closed the first significant
deal of his career when he sold the remaining 20 units of commercial shoplots
at Alam Avenue 2 in Shah Alam’s Section
16 in two weeks.
“The project was launched about three
years before I handled it. The selling prices
of the shoplots ranged from RM1.6 million
to RM2.2 million, with a total transaction
value of around RM25 million,” he says.
His second significant achievement also
involved properties in the primary market
in Shah Alam —the sale of e-SOFO Suria
Jaya. During a four-month period, he and
his team sold 150 units, ranging from 430
to 840 sq ft in size, at an average price of
RM480 psf. With that sterling performance,
Jei was chosen as the top sales negotiator in
the project segment in the agency for 2013.
Escaping from his brother’s shadow
As the youngest in the family and the only
younger brother of the agency’s founder, Jei
feels that he has to work harder than others
to earn the respect of his colleagues and to
escape from his brother’s shadow.
Howard, 31, has established his reputation and network in the industry and Jei
01
sees him as a role model. It is not a surprise
then that Jei’s performance is constantly being compared with his brother’s and many
have high expectations of him.
“I have to work harder to build my own
reputation and network to separate myself
from my brother,” he says.
Besides focusing on sales, Jei also took
the initiative to learn other skills such as
graphic design applications and computer programming in order to enhance the
company’s marketing tools.
“With these knowledge, I can easily communicate with graphic or webpage designers on the design concepts that we want.”
Jei’s additional skills elevated him from
being just a salesperson to the marketing
director of the agency. He is also in charge
of running the company’s headquarters in
Kota Damansara, Selangor.
“Now nobody introduces me as Howard’s brother. Many new customers don’t
even know that we are brothers. I consider
this as one of my biggest achievements,”
declares Jei.
Chester Properties was set up in 2008
with only five real estate negotiators. The
company now has more than 1,000 negotiators in 14 branches around Peninsular
Malaysia.
On his choice of career, Jei believes he
has made the right decision as all his hard
work seems to have paid off.
“If not for that eye-opening moment at
the ATM, I may still be uncertain about my
financial future, like some of my peers who
are struggling to make ends meet. I am focused on building up my career,” he says.
Reputation matters
For those who want to join the real estate
industry to earn a lot of money, Jei advises
them to focus not only on the monetary aspect but also on the career prospects.
According to him, time is needed to build
02
one’s reputation and personal branding.
Every negotiator needs to understand the
product and know as much as possible about
everything related to the property market.
“Reputation is the most important thing
for a professional negotiator but reputation
takes time to build,” he concedes.
Jei believes one of the most important
principles in building a good reputation
is honesty.
“Be honest, deliver what you have promised and do not hide anything from the
prospective buyer. These are the three main
principles if you want to establish your career in the industry for the long term,” he
says. For instance, if an agent is selling a
unit that was once the scene of a murder,
the prospective buyers need to know the
truth so that they can make an informed
01. Jei: As a professional negotiator,
I need to know everything about
the industry, especially the
transaction process.
Photo by Mohd Izwan Mohd
Nazam/The Edge Property
02. Howard (left) has established his
reputation and network in the
industry and Jei sees him as a
role model.
decision. Some investors may still buy the
unit if they think it is a good deal.
“Hiding the disadvantages or misleading the buyer will ruin one’s reputation. We
can’t afford to lose customers because of
poor reputation,” he concludes.
EP
8
PROPERTY
| HOME IDEAS
FR I DAY SEP TEM B ER 2 5 , 2 0 1 5 • TH EEDGE FI N AN C I AL DAI LY
PHOTOS BY RAYMOND LEE
Botanical style detail on the plate at Hujan Locale.
Mercredi’s chic and casual style with a French accent
Specially designed fabrics are used to create beautiful cushion covers, throws and
bedcovers at Mercredi.
Interesting dining table display at Mercredi features
coral red table cloth and blue and white table ware.
Island chic
More exciting design inspirations from Bali (Part 2)
I
n the heart of Bali’s art and culture
scene lies Ubud. For many years, it
has been home to local craftsmen
with amazing talent for painting,
woodcarving, stone sculpting, jewellery making and textile weaving. Ubud
is quite a large province, with many villages
excelling in their respective crafts.
Since the 1920s, Ubud has attracted many
artists from near and far — artists such as
the late Walter Spies and Antonio Blanco, and more recently, creative icons such
as the flamboyant and talented landscape
designer Made Wijaya (Australia-born Micheal White).
The place attracts artists with its bohemian lifestyle, lush and beautiful natural
surroundings as well as its friendly locals.
Having spent a few days wandering
around Ubud recently, I was once again
inspired as an interior designer, starting with
the accommodation that I was in.
My favourite hotel in Ubud is the Uma
by COMO. Located just next to the Neka
Musuem on Jalan Raya Sanggingan, it
is a small, intimate property with only
46 rooms and suites featuring casual,
relaxed interiors designed by Koichiro
Ikebuchi. Adorned with subtle Balinese
details, Uma’s décor is elegant, timeless
and rather restrained.
Just steps away from the Uma are art studios and galleries that offer original works
on canvasthat are affordably priced from
US$300 (RM1,293). There were a few pieces
that could easily feel at home in any modern
abode in Malaysia.
in the recesses of Ubud. I found his works,
which are mainly narratives of village life,
most charming and engaging. Most feature
Balinese families enjoying some quiet time
with friends and even pets.
Wandering along Monkey Forest Road, I
stumbled upon a branch of homeware store
Mercredi (the main store is in Seminyak).
The shop was packed with furnishing items
such as bedcovers, tablecloths, napkins
and cushion covers designed using fabric
exclusively made or sourced by its French
lady owner.
What’s really nice about Mercredi is that
you can find vintage-style wicker furniture
and charming ceramic tableware plus other
accessories all coordinated and displayed
in actual room settings. The coral red table
runner was a standout for me!
After all that shopping, do head to Hujan
Contemporary Indonesian art at Tony Raka Gallery.
Locale for lunch or dinner. It’s a terrific spot
for more design ideas and Asian-inspired culinary creations. I found the casual Colonial
atmosphere of the dining hall complete with
handcrafted rattan chairs, rustic teakwood
tables and custom designed plates most
convivial indeed. Operated by the team that
brought you the ever popular MamaSan and
Sarong in Seminyak, the food here is rather
Raymond Lee is an interior designer and founder of delicious too.
Xceptional Interiors. He can be contacted at Email:
Can’t wait to head back to Bali!
[email protected] or check out
www.xceptional-interiors.com
Raymond Lee is an interior designer and founder of
Xceptional Interiors. He can be contacted at Email:
[email protected] or check out
www.xceptional-interiors.com
At Diyano Purwadi’s studio in Ubud.
Neil Hoffman’s organic-shaped sculpture at
Gaya Ceramics.
BY RAYMOND LEE
About 10 minutes’ drive away, heading
towards Sayan is the ceramic studio of Gaya.
Founded by Italians Marcello Massoni and
Michela Foppiani, Gaya is located just a few
hundred metres from the Four Seasons, and
showcases beautiful tableware and one-ofa-kind pieces made in porcelain, stoneware
or raku.
Many of the clients include international
brands such as Armani Casa, Bulgari Hotels & Resorts and the Aman Hospitality
Group. During my visit, Gaya had collaborated with artist Neil Hoffman and was
displaying his organic-shaped sculptures.
Also capturing my attention were some
very chic white ceramic vases swathed in
gold or silver.
Another place for those on the lookout
for good quality paintings is the sprawling
Tony Raka Gallery in the village of Mas. Here,
Tony showed me a selection of works from
his group show featuring mainly Indonesian
artists. The paintings of Yusron Mudakhir
and Made Mahendra Mangku stood out
with their contemporary style and great
use of colour.
I was also fortunate to have visited the studio of Javanese artist Diyano Purwadi, deep