Norton Museum of Art 2012 - 2013 Annual Report

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Norton Museum of Art 2012 - 2013 Annual Report
1451 s. olive avenue, west palm beach, fl 33401
n o r t o n museum of art
www.norton.org
2012/2013 Accomplishments
NortonMuseum of Art
NortonMuseum of Art
2012 /2013
Accomplishments
introduction......................................... 2
curatorial............................................. 8
education.. ........................................... 56
board of trustees............................... 76
development........................................ 78
communications.................................. 92
thank you.......................................... 100
2 intro ducti o n
2 01 2 /2 01 3 b oar d of t r ust ees
Kemp C. Stickney, Chair
Christine Aylward
Richard Barovick
Ruth Baum
Bruce A. Beal
M. Diane Bodman
Jane C. Carroll
R. Reed Daniel
Annie Falk
Bruce Gendelman
Peter Georgescu
Pamela Goergen
Gayle Gross
Nicki Harris
Harry Howell
Henry Kaufman
Jane Korman
Gilbert C. Maurer
Janine Mayville
Carlos Morrison
John F. Niblack
Jerry Pearlman
Joey Pearson
John Richman
Mitch Rubenstein
Ralph Saltzman
Jean Sharf
Anne Berkley Smith
Debbie Stapleton
Hope Alswang
visit
Tuesday
10 am / 5 pm
Wednesday 10 am / 5 pm
Thursday
10 am / 9 pm
Friday
10 am / 5 pm
Saturday
10 am / 5 pm
Sunday
11 am / 5 pm
closed Mondays, New Year’s Day,
Independence Day, Thanksgiving,
and Christmas
admission
Members free / Adults $12 /
Students $5 / Age 12 & under free
All images © Norton Museum of Art except when noted.
A museum’s strength lies in its collection, exhibitions,
and programming. This year, the Norton was the
beneficiary of an impressive array of works of art
from donors and collectors. Their generosity dramatically strengthened the Museum Collection. We are
deeply grateful to longtime Trustee and former Board
Chair Anne Berkley Smith, who donated two Richard
Diebenkorn paintings and one by Wayne Thiebaud,
all from the early 1960s. They are transformative
gifts to the Collection.
Palm Beach resident Damon Mezzacappa gave
the Norton two more significant paintings by Italian
Old Masters: Lorenzo Lotto’s 16th-century oil
painting Saint Onuphrius of Egypt, and Marcantonio
Franceschini’s oil painting Adam and Eve with the
Infant Cain and Abel, painted in 1705, are now part of
the Norton’s collection of European Art.
The Museum was also delighted to receive a
Claude-Joseph Vernet work titled The Fishermen,
painted in 1746, and an Edward Weston photograph,
Shell and Rock Arrangement, 1931, printed by the photographer himself. These were among 266 important
gifts of art that came into the Collection during the
past year. The Curatorial overview in this report
includes a complete list of art and donors.
Special exhibitions and programming often spring
from the Collection, as highlights of the 2012–2013
exhibition season illustrate. The Norton-originated
exhibitions Annie Leibovitz, which featured 39 of the
photographer’s iconic works acquired by the Norton,
and Say it Loud: Art by African and African-American
Artists in the Collection are wonderful examples of
that. Another Norton-originated exhibition of note
was Sylvia Plimack Mangold: Landscape and Trees, the
second of the RAW (Recognition of Art by Women)
exhibition series made possible by the Leonard and
Sophie Davis Fund/ML Dauray Arts Initiative.
The Museum’s goal of being a welcoming
community resource was (and continues to be)
achieved through year-round outreach and education
programs such as PACE (Progressive Afterschool
Art Community Education), which offers children
in the county’s underserved communities significant, year-round exposure to art, and Norton
School Partnerships, which this year include Forest
Hill Community High School and Palm Beach
Day Academy. Student exhibitions in the Marden
Community Gallery, school tours, summer camp
programs, Family Studio days, and other programs
are also a part of the Museum’s outreach to Palm
Beach County and beyond. A new initiative to provide
greater public access — Free Thursdays for Florida
Residents during the summer — proved to be wildly
successful, attracting 1,000 to 2,000 visitors every
Thursday in June, July, and August. The community
also took advantage of the Free Saturday program,
which provides residents of West Palm Beach free
admission every Saturday, and free admission to
residents of Palm Beach County the first Saturday of
each month.
Now in its third year, the Thursday evening
Art After Dark series — Where Culture and
Entertainment Meet! — continued to be popular with
visitors, residents, and tourists. Most importantly,
it has proved to be a welcoming gateway into the
Museum, leading to the discovery and appreciation
of great art.
Art After Dark programming (and free Thursday
admission for Floridians), coupled with the summer
exhibition Block by Block: Inventing Amazing
Architecture — which featured landmark buildings
made from lego‰ bricks — and the companion exhibition Architecture in Detail: Works from the Museum
Collection, was hugely successful for the Museum,
ending the exhibition year on a most upbeat note.
The result was one of the strongest years for attendance in the past decade.
I am proud to lead a team of more than 75
talented and dynamic people who contribute so
much to the Norton. I am also privileged to serve
an outstanding Board of Trustees whose leadership
and commitment have created so many important
opportunities for this institution.
Hope Alswang
ex ec u t i v e d i r ector a n d c eo
4 intro ducti o n
A visitor gazes at the
Gaston Lachaise bust,
Portrait of John Marin,
in the newly reinstalled
American galleries.
© lila photo
april 2013
6 intro ducti o n
Guard Catherine Williams
assists young visitors
in the Block by Block
exhibition.
© lila photo
j u ly 2013
8
curatorial
may 2013
Masterpiece of the Month
opened with Lucian
Freud’s The Brigadier,
spurring Lucian Freud:
Paintings and Prints with
its popularity.
Organizing and presenting outstanding exhibitions
and enhancing the Collection with critically important acquisitions were priorities for the curatorial
division of the Norton Museum of Art in the 2012–
2013 season. And as evidenced in the succeeding
pages, the Norton has continued to meet these core
initiatives with excellence. We are also pleased that
Ellen Roberts, Ph.D., joined the Norton as the Anne
Berkley Smith Curator of American Art, bringing her
expertise and scholarship to the Museum.
Sixteen exhibitions and projects comprised last
season, with remarkable examples of paintings,
sculpture, photographs, and works on paper on view.
Fashions and movies of the 1940s were also exhibited in Keep Calm and Carry On. Twelve exhibitions
and a site-specific installation were organized by the
Museum, including four exhibitions that celebrated
the Collection. Among them were Clear Water and
Blue Hills: Stories of Chinese Art and Say It Loud: Art by
African and African-American Artists.
The generosity of ardent supporters was evident
throughout the season. The Museum presented
the inaugural Rudin Prize, created as a celebration
of work by emerging photographers, with an award
of $20,000 to Los Angeles-based artist Analia
Saban. The prize is made possible by Beth Rudin
DeWoody in honor of her late father, New York City
real estate developer Lewis Rudin. Alan Davis and
Mary Lou Dauray made possible the second RAW
(Recognition of Art by Women) exhibition. With their
exceptional contribution to further this initiative, the
serene paintings and prints of landscape and trees
by American artist Sylvia Plimack Mangold were
featured. Demonstrating their enthusiasm for contemporary photography, Muriel and Ralph Saltzman
made possible the exceptional exhibition and
acquisition of intriguing portraits by internationally
renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz. Rob Wynne,
a New York-based artist, enlivened the lobby with a
brilliant installation featuring his own silkscreened
wallpaper, poured glass reliefs, and exquisite beaded
drawings. This was the second lobby project and the
second year of support for contemporary art from
Vanessa and Tony Beyer.
The Norton also presented Legacy: The Emily
Fisher Landau Collection. Organized by the Whitney
Museum of American Art, the exhibition recognized
Mrs. Landau, a Palm Beach resident, for her visionary
collecting and extraordinary philanthropy through
highlights from her gift of more than 300 works of
art to the Whitney. Both Adam Weinberg, director of
the Whitney Museum of American Art, and Leonard
Lauder, chairman emeritus, joined the Norton in
celebrating Mrs. Landau’s decades of adventurous
support of contemporary art.
Exhibitions examining historical movements and
exotic locations were also presented in The Radical
Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936-1965 and
Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and
Islamic Art. Surviving members of the Photo League
visited the Norton to discuss the League’s impact on
furthering social causes. Marion Syms Wyeth, who
was Ralph Norton’s choice for the architect of the
Norton Museum of Art, was also Doris Duke’s choice
to create her exquisitely detailed Hawaiian sanctuary,
Shangri La, which was explored in the exhibition
hosted by the Norton.
Some of the many notable additions to the collection are discussed on the following pages by my colleagues who, once again, found exceptional examples
1 0 c urato ri al
of art worthy of inclusion in the Museum Collection.
Through the generosity of the Museum’s support
groups — Contemporary and Modern Art Council,
Friends of Chinese Art, and Photography Committee
— as well as collectors and artists who donated art
or gifts of funds to purchase art, the Works of Art
Committee accepted nearly 360 artworks, which are
now part of the Collection.
For example, the Friends of Chinese Art
contributed to the purchase of two works of art — a
ninth-century white-ware ewer and a late 19th-century silk gauze surcoat that will be in a 2015 tea
exhibition organized by the Norton.
As we look forward to celebrating the Museum’s
75th anniversary in 2016, we are tremendously
excited to add to the remarkable collection Ralph
Norton assembled and gifted to the country with
brilliant examples of artwork of comparable quality.
We are grateful to devoted Norton Trustee Anne
Berkley Smith for her gift of paintings by Richard
Diebenkorn and Wayne Thiebaud, which Ellen
Roberts discusses in these pages. We are also
pleased to add two outstanding paintings to the
historical European Collection: a panel by Lorenzo
Lotto (1480–1556) — rare in the United States —
thanks to the continuing generosity of Damon
Mezzacappa; and the first painting by Claude Joseph
Vernet (1714–1789) to enter the Collection, the gift of
Eleonore and Ronald Bacher.
Photographers from around the globe have
enthusiastically gifted examples of their work, a
tribute to Tim B. Wride, the William and Sarah Ross
Soter Curator of Photography, and his relationships
with these artists. Paul Hertzmann and Susan
Herzig of San Francisco gifted a true masterwork by
photographer Edward Weston to the collection as
a show of support of the Photography Collection,
which grew by more than 300 objects.
The Norton Museum of Art boasted another
exceptional year in 2012–2013, and the Curatorial
Division is proud to contribute to its success.
Cheryl Brutvan
d i r ector o f c u r ato r i a l a f fa i r s
c u r ator o f co n t emp o r a ry a rt
dec em ber 2 01 2
Sylvia Plimack Mangold:
Landscape and Trees
1 2 curato ri a l
Rudin Prize for Emerging Photographers
sep t. 27 – dec . 1 1 , 2 01 2
organized by the norton m useum of art
c urated by tim b. w ride, w illiam and sarah ross
soter c urator of p hotograp hy
Exhibitions
15 Exhibitions
12 Organized by the Norton Museum of Art,
one of which traveled
Rob Wynne: I Remember Ceramic Castles,
Mermaids & Japanese Bridges
sep t. 1 8, 2 01 2 – sep t. 1 , 2 01 3
organized by the norton m useum of art
c urated by c hery l brutvan, director of
c uratorial affairs, c urator of contem p orary art
New York-based artist Rob Wynne creates stunning
and beautiful sculptures, reliefs, and installations
inspired by art, literature, and nature. He created the
second site-specific project for the Norton’s lobby
using elements such as his signature mirrored glass
reliefs. Shaped into large words and mirrored clouds,
they simultaneously appear reflective and invisible.
With this material, Wynne gave form to the title
of this piece. In addition, he integrated the natural
world related to the Norton’s proximity to the ocean
through silkscreened wallpaper and glass-beaded
drawings of life found above, near, and under the sea.
Several works from the Museum Collection were
incorporated into the installation.
this installation was made possible through the
generosity of vanessa and anthony beyer.
d ec emb er 201 2
Beth Rudin DeWoody
announces Analia Saban
as the winner of the
inaugural Rudin Prize.
© lila photo
Reinstalled objects from the
Collection were arranged by
theme and movement. Here,
post-impressionist works are
displayed in the The Jeffry M.
and Barbara Picower Gallery.
The Museum was proud to announce an international
biennial showcase and award for emerging
photographers in 2012. Finalists for the Rudin Prize
were selected by a panel of five established artists.
Each panelist was charged with nominating an artist
who had not yet had a solo museum exhibition, and
whose work was on the leading edge of contemporary
photography-based art. The inaugural panel was
composed of John Baldessari, Graciela Iturbide, Susan
Meiselas, Michal Rovner, and Yinka Shonibare. Their
five nominees were, respectively, Analia Saban (Los
Angeles); Nin Solis (Mexico City); Eunice Adorno
(Mexico City); Mauro D’Agati (Palermo), and Bjorn
Veno (London). The exhibition culminated with
awarding the inaugural Rudin Prize of $20,000 to
Analia Saban. The prize is named after the late Lewis
Rudin of New York City, and is generously sponsored
by his daughter, Beth Rudin DeWoody.
this exhibition was made possible in part through
the generosity of ms. beth rudin dewoody and the
photography committee of the norton museum of art.
Keep Calm and Carry On: World War II and
the British Home Front, 1938–1951
nov. 1 , 2 01 2 – jan. 2 0, 2 01 3
organized by the norton m useum of art
c urated by guest c urator donald albrec ht
This exhibition explored the gamut of England’s homefront efforts just before, during, and after the war
years. While millions of British men and women served
in the military overseas, England’s creative class
mobilized to win the war on the home front. Drawings,
posters, photographs, film, furniture, and fashion
illustrated how they did so. Included were examples
of how designers created fashions and furnishings to
save on essential wartime materials, and how graphic
artists and filmmakers produced inspirational work,
convincing the country, as the era’s most famous
slogan urged, to “Keep calm and carry on.”
this exhibition was made possible in part through
the generosity of jean s. and frederic a. sharf.
corporate support was provided by wilmington
trust, with additional support by the michael m. rea
endowment for special exhibitions. media support
was provided by the palm beach post and palm beach
daily news.
1 4 c urato ri al
Sylvia Plimack Mangold: Landscape and Trees
dec . 9 , 2 012 – march 3 , 2 01 3
org anized by the n o rto n m u s e u m o f a rt
c u rated by c he ry l br u t va n , dir ecto r o f
c u ratorial affai r s , cu r ato r o f co n t em po r a ry a rt
Sylvia Plimack Mangold was the second artist to be
celebrated in the Norton’s RAW (Recognition of Art
by Women) program. With painting as her primary
medium, Plimack Mangold’s devotion to the realist
tradition belies the aesthetics of the late 1960s,
when she completed her studies at Yale University.
Plimack Mangold’s relationship with the pared-down
elements of that time — the power of space and
the materials of the artist — were manifest in her
canvases, with depictions of wooden floors, tapes
and measures, and, eventually, nature. For the past
three decades, the artist has concentrated not only
on the landscape surrounding her Hudson River-area
studio, but also on the individual trees comprising
it, considering these subjects in paintings, drawings,
and prints. This was the first exhibition devoted to
Plimack Mangold’s meditation on time through her
landscape and trees.
raw — recognition of art by women — is a six-year
project (through 2016) made possible by the leonard
and sophie davis fund/mldauray arts initiative.
raw’s mission is to promote living women artists
working in painting and sculpture.
Say it Loud: Art by African and AfricanAmerican Artists in the Collection
dec . 27, 2 012 – ma rch 3 , 2 01 3
org anized by the n o rto n m u s e u m o f a rt
c u rated by c he ry l br u t va n , dir ecto r o f
c u ratorial affai r s , cu r ato r o f co n t em po r a ry a rt
Paintings, sculpture, photographs, and works on
paper by African artists and artists of African
descent comprised this exhibition, which celebrated
a renewed emphasis on diversity in the Museum
Collection. More than 20 artists whose practices
span the 20th century represented ideas and issues
inspired by personal and artistic concerns.
this exhibition was made possible in part through
the support of the diane belfer endowment for
sculpture. additional support was provided by the
west palm beach chapter of the links, incorporated.
Annie Leibovitz
ja n . 1 7 – j u n e 9 , 201 3
org a n i z ed by t he n orton mu seu m of a rt
c u r at ed by c ha r l i e sta i n b ac k, a ssi sta n t d i r ector
This exhibition of the internationally renowned
photographer featured 39 of her iconic photographs
acquired by the Norton. The exhibition shifted the
focus from Leibovitz’s elaborately staged sittings
to work that is direct, straightforward, and relies on
an essential element of all great portraits: a vital
connection between artist and subject. Exhibition
curator Charles Stainback had long admired
Leibovitz’s work, but believed too much emphasis
had been put on a select few images from the artist’s
overall oeuvre — Whoopi Goldberg, Steve Martin,
John & Yoko — that have become as famous as
the people they portray. While the images in this
exhibition were also of celebrities, they are quieter,
more subtle, and, in some ways, more provocative
and interesting than the images that made Leibovitz
a household name. The celebrity of the photographer
had also overshadowed much of her outstanding
portraiture. This exhibition rectified that, shining a
light on work that should no longer be overlooked.
this exhibition was made possible through the
generosity of muriel and ralph saltzman. corporate
support was provided by bmo private bank, with
additional funding by the mr. and mrs. hamish
maxwell exhibition endowment, the photography
committee of the norton museum of art, and mr.
and mrs. john m. richman. media support was
provided by wptv channel 5 and the miami herald.
The Middle East and the Middle Kingdom:
Islamic and Chinese Artistic Exchange
f eb. 2 – au g . 4, 201 3
org a n i z ed by t he n orton mu seu m of a rt
c u r at ed by l au r i e b a r n es, el i z a b et h b. mcg r aw
c u r ator o f c h i n ese a rt
Chinese art has fascinated the outside world,
especially the Islamic world, for more than a
millennium. Only recently has the influence of the
art of Islamic nations on China been explored. (A
recent example is an exhibition at the National Palace
Museum in Taipei of Mughal and Ottoman jades
collected by the Qianlong emperor.) This installation,
complemented Doris Duke’s Shangri La, highlighted
Chinese works with ties to the Islamic world.
this exhibition was made possible in part through
the generosity of john and heidi niblack.
Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection
feb. 2 1 – june 2 , 2 01 3
organized by the w hitney m useum of am eric an
art. c urated by donna de salvo and dav id k iehl,
w hitney m useum of am eric an art
Considered one of the preeminent collectors of
postwar art in the United States, Emily Fisher
Landau assembled an extraordinary collection of
contemporary art over the past five decades. In 2011,
she donated more than 300 paintings, sculptures,
photographs, and works on paper to the Whitney
Museum of American Art. The exhibition included
works by Richard Prince, James Rosenquist, Susan
Rothenberg, Ed Ruscha, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol,
Kiki Smith, Nan Goldin, Peter Hujar, Jasper Johns, and
Agnes Martin.
the presentation at the norton museum of art
was made possible by muriel and ralph saltzman.
corporate support was provided by hollywood
media corp. (mitchell rubenstein/laurie silvers),
with additional support by the milton and sheila
fine endowment for contemporary art and the dr.
henry and lois foster endowment for the exhibition
of contemporary art. media support was provided by
palm beach daily news.
The Radical Camera:
New York’s Photo League, 19361951
m arc h 1 4 – june 1 6 , 2 01 3
organized by the jew ish m useum , new york , and
the colum bus m useum of art, ohio. c urated by
m ason k lein ( tjm ) and c atherine evans ( c m a)
In 1936, a group of young, idealistic photographers
formed an organization in Manhattan called
the Photo League. The League helped validate
photography as a fine art, presenting student work
and guest exhibitions by established photographers.
Offering classes, mounting exhibitions, and fostering
community, members of the Photo League focused
on social reform and the power of the photograph to
motivate change. Featuring more than 150 works, The
Radical Camera traced the organization’s interests,
attitudes toward photography, and impact during its
15-year lifespan.
major support was provided by the
phillip and edith leonian foundation,
the national endowment for the arts,
and limited brands foundation.
local presentation of this exhibition was made
possible in part by mr. and mrs. william j. soter, with
additional support by the gioconda and joseph king
endowment for exhibitions and the sydelle and arthur
i. meyer endowment fund. media support was provided
by the palm beach post.
Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture,
Landscape, and Islamic Art
m arc h 2 1 – july 1 4, 2 01 3
organized by the doris duk e foundation for
islam ic art. c urated by guest c urators
donald albrec ht and thom as m ellins
Doris Duke’s Shangri La was the first comprehensive
traveling exhibition of objects from Duke’s
remarkable collections within the context of Shangri
La, her extraordinary Hawaii residence, and her
personal role in collecting and commissioning works.
Situated amid five acres of interlocking terraced
gardens and pools overlooking the Pacific Ocean and
Honolulu’s Diamond Head, Shangri La is a powerful
reflection of Duke’s lifelong aesthetic passions.
Shangri La incorporates unique architectural features
such as carved marble doorways, decorated sliding
panels known as jalis, gilt and coffered ceilings,
and floral ceramic tiles. The interiors weave
together artifacts such as silk textiles, jewel-toned
chandeliers, and rare ceramics, many collected
during her extensive international travels. (Marion
Sims Wyeth, the architect who designed Duke’s
Hawaiian home, which was completed in 1937, also
designed the original Norton Gallery and School of
Art building, which opened in 1941.) This exhibition
brought together furnishings and objects from
Shangri La, newly commissioned photographs by
Tim Street-Porter, vintage photographs and films,
documentation of the estate’s construction, original
architectural drawings, and ephemera to explore the
history and experience of this remarkable place.
this exhibition was organized by the doris duke
foundation for islamic art.
Masterpiece of the Month
The Norton spotlighted major works by iconic artists
borrowed from private collections:
m ay 2 – 2 9 : Lucian Freud’s The Brigadier, 2003–2004
m ay 3 0 – june 3 0: Mary Cassatt,
a quartet of works on paper, 1890–1908
july 4 – 28: Dorothea Lange’s
Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936
aug. 1 – 3 1 : Salvador Dalí’s
Portrait of Marquis George de Cuevas, 1942
sept. 17 – oct. 13: Court Portrait of Yinli, Prince Guo, 1717
1 6 c urato ri al
Block by Block:
Inventing Amazing Architecture
j u ne 2 0 – oct. 2 0 , 2 01 3
c u rated by mag gie e dwa r ds , cu r ato r ia l a s s ista n t
This exhibition featured 10 landmark buildings, each
masterfully constructed with lego® toy building
bricks by artist Dan Parker. From four to nine feet tall,
the architectural wonders included One World Trade
Center in New York, the Seattle Space Needle, Burj
Khalifa in Dubai, and Taipei 101 in Taiwan.
swiss re/ 30 saint mary axe, london (the gherkin)
building was made possible by a grant from the
george and frances armour foundation. the hearst
corporation building, new york, was made possible
by a gift from mr. and mrs. gilbert c. maurer.
Architecture in Detail:
Works from the Museum Collection
j u ne 2 0 – oct. 2 0 , 2 01 3
c u rated by ellen e . ro be rts , h a ro ld a n d a n n e
be rk ley smith c ur ato r o f a m e r ica n a rt, a n d t im
b. wride, william a n d s a r a h ro s s s ot e r cu r ator
of photog raphy, in co n j u n ct io n w it h t h e blo ck by
bloc k leg o exhibit io n
From the beginning of the 20th century, architecture
has fueled the imaginations of photographers,
painters, and printmakers. Their efforts are well
represented in the Collection. Architecture in Detail
celebrated the aesthetics and achievements of the
man-made environment.
Lucian Freud: Paintings and Prints
j u ne 27 – se pt. 1, 2 01 3
c u rated by c he ry l br u t va n , dir ecto r o f
c u ratorial affai r s , cu r ato r o f co n t em po r a ry a rt
This rare presentation of portraits by one of the
most important painters of our time included Freud’s
masterpiece The Brigadier (2003–2004), a life-sized
portrait of Andrew Parker Bowles, a self-portrait, and
a selection of prints from private collections.
Bernard and Chris Marden
Community Gallery Exhibitions:
Based on Books
n ov. 3, 201 2 – ja n . 6 , 201 3
Stories about Myself:
Elementary and Middle School Invitational
ja n . 1 7 – ma rc h 3, 201 3
Pathfinder Scholarship Awards Art Nominees Exhibition
ma rc h 1 4 – may 5, 201 3
The exhibition featured more than 30 judged works
by exemplary high school seniors from Martin and
Palm Beach counties. Four students received college
scholarships ranging from $2,000 to $4,000.
Variety: Rising Seniors from the
Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts
may 1 6 – j u ly 1 9 , 201 3
Little Boxes: Images of Vernacular Architecture
from the Museum Collection
au g . 1 – oct. 1 7, 201 3
This exhibition was curated by the Museum’s
summer interns, who mined the Collection of prints,
drawings, and photography in a celebration of the
everyday structures that punctuate the “built”
environment.
Traveled to Other Institutions:
On the Silk Road and the High Seas:
Chinese Ceramics, Culture and Commerce
Crow Collection, Dallas, TX
Sept. 1, 2012 – Jan. 27, 2013
Circa 1960: Figure and Form
j u ne 27 – se pt. 1, 2 01 3
c u rated by ellen e . ro be rts , h a ro ld a n d a n n e
be rk ley smith c ur ato r o f a m e r ica n a rt
Showcasing important, recent acquisitions and loans
to the Norton, the exhibition considered the ways
mid-century artists such as Richard Diebenkorn,
Fairfield Porter, and Wayne Thiebaud used elements
of abstraction to suggest the world around them.
nov em ber 2 01 2
Keep Calm and Carry On
1 8 curato ri a l
Install Photos
Annie Leibovitz leads
Gala guests on a tour
of Annie Leibovitz.
© lila photo
ja n uary 2013
2 0curato ri a l
A
crowd
gathers
Jenny
Saville
exhibition
around Mary Sibande’s
stunning …of Prosperity
in the Say it Loud
exhibition.
© grayson hoffman
decem
beer
r 22012
n ovemb
011
2 2curato ri a l
february 2013
Curator Cheryl Brutvan
leads a tour of Legacy:
The Emily Fisher Landau
Collection.
2 4 c urato ri al
j un e 201 3
Block by Block: Inventing
Amazing Architecture
Guests at the opening
of The Radical Camera:
New York’s Photo
League, 1936-1951
© tom brodigan
ma rch 2013
© lila photo
2 6 c urato ri al
dec em ber
august
2 012301 1
Objects enjoy
from the
Visitors
Circa
1920sFigure
in theand
Cocktail
1960:
Form
Culture Art
exhibition
during
After Dark.
2 8curato ri a l
A visitor engages with
the newly acquired
Richard Diebenkorn
paintings.
© lila photo
n ovemb er 2 012
30 c urato ri al
American
Acquisitions
RICHARD DIEBENKORN (American, 1922–1993)
Landscape with Figure, 1963
Oil on board
15 x 16 1/2 in. (38.1 x 41.9 cm)
Gift of Anne Berkley Smith, 2012.185
RICHARD DIEBENKORN (American, 1922–1993)
Mission Landscape, 1962
Oil on canvas
14 x 16 1/8 in. (35.6 x 41.0 cm)
Gift of Anne Berkley Smith, 2012.186
WAYNE THIEBAUD (American, born 1920)
Neapolitan Pie, 1963
Oil on canvas
17 x 22 in. (43.2 x 55.9 cm)
Gift of Anne Berkley Smith, 2012.187
This year, one of the Norton’s transformative
donors, Anne Berkley Smith, enriched the American
Collection by giving the Museum three major
paintings: Richard Diebenkorn’s Mission Landscape
and Landscape with Figure, and Wayne Thiebaud’s
Neapolitan Pie. The first oils by these important artists
to enter the Collection, these works demonstrate
the trend toward representation in painting in the
1960s, as artists sought to move beyond Abstract
Expressionism.
Diebenkorn started as an Abstract Expressionist,
but by the mid-1950s grew dissatisfied with nonobjective art and began to paint the physical world
again. He described this transformation: “As soon
as I started using the figure, my whole idea of my
painting changed. Maybe not in the most obvious
structural sense, but these figures distorted my
sense of interior or environment, or the painting
itself, in a way that I welcomed. Because you don’t
have this in abstract painting.” Mission Landscape and
Landscape with Figure are from an especially strong
group of landscapes that Diebenkorn executed
between 1962 and 1963. Though small in scale, these
works masterfully explore the tension between the
two-dimensional canvas and the three-dimensional
landscape. Diebenkorn later synthesized these
pictorial concerns into his most famous paintings: the
Ocean Park series.
Wayne Thiebaud reengaged with representation
in this same era, as Neapolitan Pie demonstrates.
Stimulated by the Abstract Expressionists he met
when he was living in New York in 1956–1957, he
experimented with non-objectivity, but became
frustrated by its limitations. In 1960, he began to
paint figuratively, focusing on food, inspired in part
by his experience working in restaurants as a young
boy. Thiebaud recalled his observation of “rows of
pies, or a tin of pie with a piece cut out of it and one
piece sitting beside it. Those little vedúta [views] in
fragmented circumstances were always poetic to me.”
Such desserts became Thiebaud’s favorite subjects.
In Neapolitan Pie, he painted the pie from a tipped-up
perspective, launching the viewer imaginatively into
the tin’s delicious contents. Critics labeled such works
Pop art, but Thiebaud maintained that they were not
meant to disparage American consumerism, but to
invoke nostalgia, and to apply the creamy physicality
of paint to an appropriate subject.
Ellen E. Roberts
harold and anne berk ley sm ith
c urator of am eric an art
32 c urato ri al
Chinese
Acquisitions
other ame ric an acqu is it io n s :
Ewer
Chinese, Tang Dynasty (618–906), 9th century
Porcelaneous stoneware, probably made at a kiln in Hebei
province
6 x 4 3/4 x 4 3/4 in. (15.2 x 12.1 x 12.1 cm)
Purchase, acquired through the generosity of the
Friends of Chinese Art and R.H. Norton Trust, 2012.93
MARY FRANK (American, born England, 1933)
Head, circa 1970s
Ceramic
24 x 21 x 13 in. (61 x 53.3 x 33 cm)
Gift of Midtown Payson Galleries, 2012.224
JACK LEVINE (American, 1915–2010)
Portrait of Anna Weissberger, 1966
Oil on canvas
24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm)
Gift from the collection of John and Joanne Payson, 2012.225
JACK LEVINE (American, 1915–2010)
Jacob Wrestling with the Angel, 1975
Oil on canvas
40 x 35 in. (101.6 x 88.9 cm)
Gift of Midtown Payson Galleries, 2012.223
STANTON MACDONALD-WRIGHT (American, 1890–1973)
Landscape, circa 1907
Watercolor on paper
23 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. (60.3 x 50.2 cm)
Gift of Alice Rudin, 2013.97
Aristocratic Ladies’ Summer Surcoat
Chinese, late Qing dynasty, circa 1875-1900
Midnight blue patterned silk gauze with silk satin trim
Overall 53 x 36 in. (134.6 x 91.4 cm)
Purchase, acquired through the generosity of the Friends of
Chinese Art, 2013.18
The two Chinese acquisitions this year will play
important roles in the 2015 tea exhibition the
Norton is organizing. The Museum is grateful to the
Friends of Chinese Art committee, which made the
acquisitions possible.
This finely potted pouring vessel is covered with
a minutely crackled ivory-white glaze. Various white
ewers of similar form have been ascribed to the late
Tang period in the ninth century, and are believed to
have been produced at the Xing and related kilns in
Hebei province. The author of the earliest monograph
on tea, written between 760 and 780, praised Xing
ware for its silvery whiteness. This ewer’s creamcolored body indicates that it is from an affiliated kiln
in north China. It would have been used for hot water
added to powdered tea.
Suitable attire for a formal summer tea gathering,
silk gauze robes were often embellished with
embroidered or woven squares denoting the rank
of scholar-officials who served the emperor. These
scholars played a critical role in the popularization
of tea drinking as a cultured activity. Commemorative
portraits from the 15th century and later depict
members of the scholar-official class wearing such
attire while hosting elegant gatherings where tea
was served.
Laurie Barnes
elizabeth b. m cgraw c urator of c hinese art
34 c urato ri al
Contemporary
Acquisitions
LYNDA BENGLIS (American, born 1941)
Cocoon, 1971
Purified pigmented beeswax and damar resin on wood and
Masonite
36 x 5 in. (91.4 x 12.7 cm)
Purchase, acquired through the generosity of the
Contemporary and Modern Art Council of the Norton Museum
of Art, Irene and Jim Karp, Tina Bilotti, and Bruce Beal, 2013.1
(image next page)
JENNY SAVILLE (British, born 1970)
Mnemosyne I, 2012
Charcoal on paper on board
89 3/8 x 70 1/16 in. (227 x 178 cm)
Purchase, acquired through the generosity of the Contemporary
and Modern Art Council of the Norton Museum of Art and the
R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.14
Cocoon is an outstanding example of the
revolutionary abstract art Lynda Benglis was making
in the late 1960s. It is a simple, oblong form nearly
the length of an adult arm and made from the artist’s
repeated application of beeswax colored by the
introduction of pigments. Its surface is physically
compelling and sensual while, as an artwork, it
hovers between painting and sculpture, defying the
typical characteristics of either category.
We willingly accept the appearance of this work
today; but, at the time Benglis created it, artists
were developing a visual language that eliminated
evidence of human gesture, as seen in the abstract
paintings of De Kooning and Pollock. Canvases
were monochromatic and flat, and sculpture was
geometric, often formed from industrial materials.
In terms of scale, monumentality ruled. Benglis
instead freely explored “unorthodox” materials in
ways that were new while maintaining a physical,
human presence in her distinctive abstractions.
During the same period from which Cocoon dates,
Benglis was pouring colorful latex on floors to make
“fallen paintings” and piling up candy-colored layers
of polyurethane to make a previously unseen form of
sculpture — like a static flow of psychedelic lava.
Benglis’s abstract art has always received
the respect of her peers and her adherence to
color, atypical materials, and integration of the
“masculine and the feminine” has been influential
to later generations of artists. Wider and deserved
recognition was received in 2009 when her work was
the subject of a circulating retrospective. Reflecting
on her sometimes controversial earlier work, Benglis
recently stated, “I was more interested in ideas, in
showing that an artist can be both masculine and
feminine. But, most importantly, an artist is an artist.”
Cocoon is an exceptional addition to the
Museum Collection and the result of generous and
enthusiastic supporters of contemporary art.
In 2011 the Norton presented the first retrospective
of the paintings and drawings of Jenny Saville. It
was made possible by the generosity of the Leonard
and Sophie Davis Fund/ML Dauray Arts Initiative.
Despite her name recognition, Saville’s work had
been rarely exhibited publicly since her emergence
in the early 1990s. Even before graduating from
the Glasgow School of Art in 1992, her life-size oil
paintings of naked women were admired for the
frank interpretation of her subject and appreciated
for her masterful handling of paint. Charles Saatchi,
an advertising executive and one of England’s first
major collectors of contemporary art, purchased
as many as were available. Saville is exceptional
not only because of her evident talent, but her bold
choice to concentrate on the female form and work
in a traditional medium, rather than the more typical
exploration of video and installations of the period.
Two decades later, Saville reinterprets the traditional
theme of mother and child (or Madonna and Child);
again, an unusual subject for contemporary artists
and one that today is more often an example of
serene bonding than a relationship filled with
struggle, as suggested here. Saville’s knowledge and
study of both modern and historical art continually
informs her development. The masterpiece by
Leonardo Da Vinci, The Virgin and Child with Saint
Anne and Saint John the Baptist, 1499–1500, in the
National Gallery, London, was the first reference
for the drawings of which Mnemosyne I is a recent
example. The title refers to the Greek goddess of
memory and the mother of the nine muses by Zeus.
Cheryl Brutvan
director of c uratorial affairs
c urator of contem p orary art
36 c urato ri al
ot her co n t emp o r a ry acq u i si t i o n s:
SANDOW BIRK (American, born 1964)
Monument to the Constitution of the United States, 2012
Direct gravure in black ink on 9 gampi panels backed with kozo paper
48 x 63 in. (121.9 x 160 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.9
PEDRO PARICIO (Spanish, born 1982)
The Golden Player, 2012
Acrylic on canvas
38 3/8 x 51 5/16 in. (97.5 x 130.3 cm)
Gift of Bruce A. Beal, 2012.172
ROB WYNNE (American, born 1950)
White Butterfly, 2012
Glass beads and thread on vellum
24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.26
ROB WYNNE (American, born 1950)
I Remember Ceramic Castles, Mermaids & Japanese Bridges, 2010
Poured and mirrored glass
114 x 120 in. (289.6 x 304.8 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.24a‑uu
ROB WYNNE (American, born 1950)
Octopus, 2008
Glass beads and thread on vellum
27 x 21 in. (68.6 x 53.3 cm)
Gift of the artist and Gavlak Gallery, 2013.27
YUN‑FEI JI (Chinese, active United States, born 1963)
The Three Gorges Dam Migration, 2009
Hand-printed watercolor woodblock mounted on paper and silk
15 7/8 x 123 1/2 in. (40.3 x 313.7 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.19
YUN-FEI JI (Chinese, active United States, born 1963)
Ghost Market, 2012
Watercolor on Xuan paper
72 x 51 11/16 in. (182.9 x 131.3 cm)
Purchase, acquired through the generosity of Irene and Jim
Karp and R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.4
ROB WYNNE (American, born 1950)
Spider Web, 2009
Glass beads and thread on vellum
24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.25
38 c urato ri al
European
Acquisitions
MARCANTONIO FRANCESCHINI (Italian, 1648–1729)
Adam and Eve with the Infant Cain and Abel, circa 1705
Oil on canvas
76 x 98 in. (188 x 260 cm)
Gift of Damon Mezzacappa, 2012.188
LORENZO LOTTO (Italian, 1480–1556)
Saint Onuphrius of Egypt, circa 1547
Oil on canvas
34 x 17 in. (85.5 x 42.5 cm)
Gift of Damon Mezzacappa, 2012.171
CLAUDE-JOSEPH VERNET (French, 1714–1789)
The Fishermen, 1746
Oil on canvas
30 x 39 1/2 in. (76.2 x 100.3 cm)
Gift of Eleonore and Ronald Bacher, 2013.20
Thanks to the generosity of Damon Mezzacappa,
works by Italian artists Lorenzo Lotto (1480–1556)
and Marcantonio Franceschini (1648–1729) entered
the Collection. Mezzacappa, well-known in the world
of finance, is an avid art collector. He has donated
works of art to the National Gallery, Washington, DC,
and Princeton University Art Museum.
Lorenzo Lotto is a major figure in northern Italian
Renaissance painting, whose works are rare in
America. Born in Venice, his most important commissions were for altarpieces, for which the Saint
Onuphrius of Egypt painting was originally conceived. It
is, remarkably, the sole surviving known section from a
multi-figured altarpiece that depicted the Madonna of
Loreto with Saints Roch, Sebastian, and Paul Hermit.
Marcantonio Franceschini is a leading master
in Bolognese painting. He was exceptionally skilled
at large-scale compositions, such as Adam and Eve
with the Infant Cain and Abel. Franceschini was a
founder-member and later director of the Accademia
Clementina, Bologna’s first official art academy.
The gift of these two paintings is transformational
to the Collection of earlier European art, as the
Norton has no comparable works by Italian artists
from these or periods. Seen together with northern
and central Italian works, they will provide a better
vision of the development of Italian painting.
Due to the generosity of Ronald Bacher, a
longtime resident of West Palm Beach, the Museum
received the gift of a painting by French artist ClaudeJoseph Vernet (1714–1789).
Vernet is the most well-known of the French
landscape artists working in Rome in the 18th
century. He continued the tradition of both Claude
Lorrain and Salvador Rosa, painting evocative representations of the Roman countryside. In 1753, King
Louis XV commissioned him to paint 15 large-scale
canvases of the ports of France. The Fishermen is one
of eight scenes created by Vernet that were specially
commissioned in 1746 by Pierre Charles Marquis de
Villette (1700–1763). The Norton painting is one of
only four from the series known to have survived.
This gift fills a notable lacuna in the Collection,
bridging the gap that previously existed from
17th-century northern European landscapes to the
works of the Barbizon School.
Jerry Dobrick
c uratorial assoc iate
other europ ean acq uisitions:
CHARLES KEITH MILLER (British, 1836–1907)
HMS Victory being towed into Gibraltar Harbor, 1877
Oil on canvas, 30 x 44 in. (76.2 x 111.8 cm)
Gift of Allen F. Dickerman, 2013.21
GEORGES ROUAULT (French, 1871–1958)
The Lawyer, 1922
Etching, aquatint, and drypoint on paper
21 1/8 x 16 1/2 in. (53.7 x 41.9 cm)
Gift of Alice Rudin, 2013.96
40 c urato ri al
Photography
Acquisitions
EDWARD WESTON (American, 1886–1958)
Shell and Rock Arrangement, 1931, printed circa 1947
Gelatin silver print
7 1/2 x 9 3/8 in. (19.1 x 23.8 cm)
Gift of Paul M. Hertzmann, Inc., 2013.22
SAM TAYLOR-WOOD (English, born 1967)
Five Revolutionary Seconds VII, 1997
Chromogenic development print, artist proof
11 5/8 x 78 5/8 in. (29.5 x 199.7 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.174
EILEEN COWIN (American, born 1947)
Adam and Eve (after Van Eyck), 1991
(2) Silver dye bleach (Cibachrome) prints
Each 60 x 26 in. (152.4 x 66 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.28a&b
During 2012–2013, the Department of Photography
added more than 300 objects to the Museum
Collection. While every acquisition is important,
many become pivotal additions by virtue of their
subjects, their makers, the manner in which the
artists have chosen to render them, and their
interaction with the rest of the Collection. The three
objects featured here are pivotal acquisitions.
Edward Weston is indisputably atop any list that
seeks to identify the masters of modern photography.
Along with photographers Ansel Adams, Imogen
Cunningham, and others, Weston was a founding
member of Group f/64 in 1936, advocating the
unmanipulated, full-frame, sharp-focus rendering
of subject matter. Shell and Rock Arrangement, 1931,
is an exquisite example of Weston’s mastery of
both subject and process. His seemingly simple
counterbalance of the radiant white and sharply
spiked shape of the shell against the deep shadows
and rolling contours of the rocks into which he has
nestled it belies his mastery as a printer. Through the
generosity of Paul Hertzmann and Susan Herzig of
San Francisco, this is the first Weston image actually
printed by the photographer himself to enter the
Norton Collection. It ranks as a true masterwork
within the Museum’s photography holdings.
Five Revolutionary Seconds VII, 1997, by English
artist and filmmaker Sam Taylor-Wood, is an
important piece for the Collection not merely
because of its masterful composition and rendering,
but because of its position as a stylistic signpost,
of sorts. The broad panorama that Taylor-Wood
employs carries with it references to the past
in its use of the early-Renaissance strategy of
“simultaneous narrative,” but also grounds itself
firmly in its present, establishing a modern cinematic
feel that would rapidly become the lingua franca of
two generations of photographic imagemakers.
Eileen Cowin is part of a generation of women
photographers who came of age during the 1970s
and ’80s. She, like many of her contemporaries,
balanced her work as an artist with that of an
educator as university graduate programs in
photography became part of the curricula across
the nation. Adam and Eve (after Van Eyck), 1991
was part of a broader series of works that Cowin
made that employed pointed references to art
historical precedents. Adam and Eve is modeled
after the figures rendered by Flemish master Jan van
Eyck that adorn the wings of The Ghent Altarpiece,
1432. In Cowin’s versions, however, the figures are
contemporary in dress and attitude. This print is
the only one made at the time by the artist and, as
the materials used are no longer available, this is a
unique example of the artist’s work.
Tim B. Wride
w illiam and sarah ross soter
c urator of p hotograp hy
42 c urato ri al
other photog rap h y acqu is it io n s :
RUTH-MARION BARUCH (born Germany, active United
States, 1922-1997)
Black Panther guard at the Unitarian Church in San Rafael, CA, 1968
Mother and child, De Fremery Park, Oakland, CA, 1968
Entertainer at the Free Huey Rally, Bobby Hutton Park, Oakland, CA,
1968, printed 1988
Huey P. Newton, co-founder, leader, and Minister of Defense of the
Black Panther Party in Alameda Co. Court House jail, the day before
his sentence was pronounced, 1968
Baby Jesus X, San Francisco, CA, 1968
Young woman at Free Huey Rally, De Fremery Park, Oakland, CA, 1968
Black Panther in doorway of Manzanita Center, Marin City, CA, 1968
Portrait of Black Panther, Marin City, CA, 1968
Black Panther feeding son, at Free Huey Rally, De Fremery Park,
Oakland, CA, 1968
Eldridge Cleaver, Minister of Information for the Black Panther Party,
at Free Huey Rally, Bobby Hutton Memorial Park, Oakland, CA, 1968
Couple listening, Free Huey Rally, De Fremery Park, Oakland, CA, 1968
(11) Gelatin silver prints (selenium toned)
Various sizes
Gift of Pirkle Jones Foundation, 2013.72, .73–.82
IAIN BAXTER& (Canadian, born England, 1936)
Racing Queens, Mosport International Raceway, near Bowmanville,
Ontario, 1983
Chromira print
31 1/2 x 46 1/2 in. (80 x 118.1 cm)
Gift of Joan and Charles Lazarus, 2012.94
LINA BERTUCCI (American, born 1958)
Natasha, 22, Graphic Designer, 2007
Sara, 22, Graphic Designer, 2007
from the series Women in the Tattoo Subculture
(2) Chromogenic development prints
22 x 17 in. (55.9 x 43.2 cm)
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.152–.153
JOHN BOCK (German, born 1965)
Untitled, 2001
Photo collage, metal, yarn, fabric, and glue on foamcore
13 7/8 x 13 1/8 x 11 1/8 in. (35.2 x 33.3 x 28.3 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.238
Girl standing in front of Bank of America, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
Hippies sitting on car, San Francisco, 1967, printed 2011
Hare Krishna dance in Golden Gate Park, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
Blind musician, Haight-Ashbury, 1967, printed 2012
Girl singing on steps, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
Barefoot, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
Love on a motorcycle, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
Paisley, Haight-Ashbury, 1967, printed 2012
“BE FREE,” Haight-Ashbury [sign], 1967
Girl with cat on shoulder, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
Three sitting on doorstep, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
Sailor couple, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
Gypsy couple with knife, Haight-Ashbury, 1967
from the series Haight-Ashbury
(13) Gelatin silver prints
Various sizes
Gift of Pirkle Jones Foundation, 2013.83–.89, 2013.90–.95
THOMAS L. BOLLINGER (American, born 1959)
Spiders from Mars, Paris, 2008
Bridge Simon de Beavoir, Paris, 2008
Paris Fairies, 2008
(3) Gelatin silver prints
Various sizes
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.154–156
MIMI BOTSCHELLER (American, born 1961)
A Cradle Song (After William Blake), 2010
Archival pigment print
24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm)
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.157
SLATER BRADLEY (American, born 1975)
Doppelganger, 2001
Silver dye bleach (Cibachrome) print transverse mounted to
Plexiglas
39 1/2 x 50 in. (100.3 x 127 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.239
OLAF BREUNING (German, active United States, born 1970)
911 (medium), 1999–2000
Chromogenic development print mounted on plexi
31 1/2 x 39 1/2 in. (80 x 100.3 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.240
ELLEN BROOKS (American, born 1946)
Untitled (Red Balls), 1987
Silver dye bleach (Cibachrome) print
38 1/2 x 25 in. (97.8 x 63.5 cm) Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.109
SANCHEZ BROTHERS (Canadian, Carlos born 1976, Jason born 1981)
Masked, 2007
Archival pigment print
59 1/4 x 74 1/8 in. (150.49 x 188.28 cm)
Gift of Catharine Clark Gallery, San Francisco, and Carlos and Jason
Sanchez, 2012.258
ADRAIN CHESSER (American, born 1972)
I Have Something to Tell You, 2003
(52) Chromogenic development (Fuji crystal archive) prints
Various sizes
Anonymous gift, 2013.32.1–.52
JOHN COPLANS (British, 1920–2003)
Self Portrait (Feet Frontal), 1984
Self Portrait (Back View, Upright), 1985
(2) Gelatin silver prints
Various sizes
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.241–242
EILEEN COWIN (American, born 1947)
Mirror Of Venus, 1988
Silver dye bleach (Cibachrome) print
39 x 47 in. (99 x 119.4 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.108
44 c urato ri al
DARRYL J. CURRAN (American, born 1935)
Five Squash Blossoms, 1996
Carrotid Scan, 1995
Savoy Cabbage, 1995
(3) Archival pigment prints
Each 18 x 11 3/4 in. (45.7 x 29.8 cm)
Gift of the artist, 2012.229–231
CHRIS ENOS (American, born 1944)
Untitled, 1976
from the series Plant/Life
(12) Gelatin silver prints
Each 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm)
Gift of the artist, 2012.173.1–.12
ROBERT FICHTER (American, born 1939)
Darryl Curran’s Work ‑ Studio in a Sea of Green, 2012
St. Marks, Florida, December 30, 2011
Screamer Mountain, 2012
(3) Archival pigment (Epson K3) prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.232–234
VALERIE GEORGE (American, born 1975)
Split: These Landscapes are Our Living Rooms, 2010
Archival pigment print with MP-3 player and headphones
Purchase, Photography Committee of the Norton Museum of
Art, 2012.254
Watch Us Go!!!, 2010
Digital video
Purchase, Photography Committee of the Norton Museum of
Art, 2012.255
BARBARA DE GENEVIEVE (American, born 1947)
The Jock Strap, 1979, printed 2011
#11 The Pink Pistol, 1980, printed 2011
part of the series True Life Novelettes
(2) Archival pigment prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.256, .257
JOHN DUGDALE (American, born 1960) Pascal, 1995
Cyanotype with artist’s frame 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.112
WILLIAM EGGLESTON (American, born 1939)
Untitled, circa 1960–1965
Gelatin silver print
10 3/4 x 16 1/4 in. (27.3 x 41.3 cm)
Gift of Adam Sheffer in honor of Cheryl Brutvan, 2013.17
LOUIS FAURER (American, 1916–2001)
Freudian Handclasp, New York, 1946–1949, printed 1980
42nd Street Collage, New York, N.Y., 1946–1949, printed 1981
New York, N.Y. (Smooth toupee), 1948–1949, printed 1981
56th Street behind City Center on a Sunday, 1951, printed 1981
Barnum & Bailey Circus Performers, Old Madison Square Garden,
New York, N.Y., 1950, printed 1980
Longchamps Restaurant, 42nd and Lexington Ave., New York, N.Y.,
1946, printed 1980
Times Square, New York, N.Y., 1947, printed 1980
Ritz Bar, New York, N.Y., 1947–1948, printed 1981
Staten Island Ferry, 1946, printed 1981
Eddie, New York, N.Y., 1948, printed 1980
(10) Gelatin silver prints
Each 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm)
Gift of Howard and Ellen Greenberg, 2012.213–.222
LUCY G. FELLER (American, 20th century)
Monkey House, Monkeywood, 2006
Archival pigment print
30 x 20 in. (76.2 x 50.8 cm)
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.158
ROBERT FLYNT (American, born 1956)
Untitled (traviata), 1983
Gelatin silver prints with mixed media on board
Overall 16 x 40 in. (40.6 x 101.6 cm)
Gift of the artist, 2012.104.a–b
RALPH GIBSON (American, born 1939)
Untitled, 1991
Chromogenic development print
39 1/4 x 26 3/8 in. (99.7 x 67 cm)
Gift from the Carol and Ray Merritt Collection, 2013.23
NEIL FOLBERG (American, born 1950)
Venice, Grand Canal, 2004
Chromogenic development print
41 1/2 x 52 1/2 in. (105.4 x 133.4 cm)
Gift of Joan and Charles Lazarus, 2012.95
RICHARD GILLES (American, born 1955)
Silver Tanks, 2010
White Tanks, 2008
Striped Tanks, 2010
(3) Archival pigment prints
Each 17 1/4 x 44 1/2 in. (43.8 x 113 cm)
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.159–.161
46curato ri al
NAN GOLDIN (American, born 1953)
Ivy Wearing a Fall, Boston, 1973, printed 1980s
Gelatin silver print
16 x 12 in. (40.6 x 30.5 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.243
LYNN GOLDSMITH (American, born 1948)
Madison Square Garden, 1978, printed 2012
Archival pigment print
16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.13
BONNIE GORDON (American, born 1941)
Fire Man, 1975
Eyesight, 1977
Sight and Light, 1980
Word Man, 1982
Photography, 1982
Sand Man, 1982
(6) Cyanotypes
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.98–.103
DENNIS GRADY (American, born 1952)
Experience is the material of expression which contains possibility, 1981
The unity of experience is a sphere which oversteps its content, 1981
from Discourse on the Logic of Perception
(2) Chromogenic development prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.108a–b, 2012.109a–b
NAOYA HATAKEYAMA (Japanese, born 1958)
Underground # 6601, 1999, printed 2000
Chromogenic development print
19 5/16 x 19 1/4 in. (49.1 x 48.9 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.244
SUDA HOUSE (American, born 1951)
Kalima, 1985, printed 2012
Juno Lucia, 1985, printed 2012
Sedra, 1986, printed 2012
(3) Archival pigment prints
16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm)
Gift of the artist, 2012.226–.228
JEFFREY HUBERT (American, born 1956)
Three Musicians, Santiago de Cuba, 2000, printed 2011
Archival pigment print
10 3/4 x 8 5/16 in. (27.3 x 21.1 cm)
Gift of the artist, 2012.97
OLIVER HERRING (German, active United States, born 1964)
Cheryl with Cheryl’s Features, 2007
Cheryl with Cheryl’s Features – Close Up #1, 2007
(2) Digital chromogenic prints
Each 16 x 12 in. (40.5 x 30.5 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.245, .246
LOTTE JACOBI (American, born Germany, 1896–1990)
Abstraction (Photogenic), circa 1946
Gelatin silver print
14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.103
HENRY HORENSTEIN (American, born 1947)
Harmonica Player, Merchant’s Cafe, Nashville, Tennessee, 1978
Jukebox, Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge, Nashville, Tennessee, 1972
Playing for Tips, Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge, Nashville, TN, 1974
(3) Archival pigment prints
Each 15 x 15 in. (38.1 x 38.1 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.10–.12
PIRKLE JONES
(American, 1914–2009)
Mirrors, Flea Market, Marin City, CA, 1974
Three figures and vintage baby photo, Flea Market, Marin City, CA, 1976
Dice, Flea Market, Marin City, CA, 1976
Bust of Dr. Jose Hernandez, South American hero, Flea Market, Marin
City, CA, 1978
from the Flea Market series
(4) Gelatin silver prints (selenium toned)
Each 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm)
Gift of Pirkle Jones Foundation, 2013.33–.36
Black Panther guard, Marin City, 1968
Black Panther couple listening, Free Huey Rally, De Fremery Park,
Oakland, CA, 1968
Free Huey Rally, De Fremery Park, Oakland, CA, 1968
Kathleen Cleaver, Communications Secretary of the Black Panther
Party, De Fremery Park, Oakland, CA, 1968
Black Panther demonstration, Alameda Co. Court House, Oakland, CA,
during Huey Newton’s trial, 1968
Audience, Free Huey Rally, at De Fremery Park, Oakland, CA, 1968
Plate glass window of the Black Panther Party National Headquarters,
the morning it was shattered by the bullets of two Oakland policemen,
September 10, 1968, 1968, printed 2002
Black Panthers discussing their reading material, Bobby Hutton
Memorial Park, Oakland, CA, 1968, printed 2010
Getting the Black Panther newspaper ready for national distribution,
Black Panther National headquarters, Berkeley, CA, 1968, printed 2010
Black Panthers and crowd, Free Huey Rally, Bobby Hutton Memorial
Park, Oakland, 1968, printed 2010
Couple listening at Free Huey Rally, De Fremery Park, Oakland, CA,
1968, printed 2012
from A Photographic Essay on the Black Panthers
(12) Gelatin silver prints (selenium toned)
Various sizes
Gift of Pirkle Jones Foundation, 2013.37–.42, .55–.59
48 c urato ri al
Mud Man, Mud Wedding, 1970
Captain Garbage, Mud Wedding, 1970
Heather & C.C. Wilcoxen, unidentified woman and Danny Joe
Crumb, 1969
Blue heron and houseboats, 1970
Jean Varda and two dancers on his houseboat, 1970
Houseboats, 1970
Wayne with his parrot, 1970
Madonna and Mt. Tamalpais, 1970
Mother and child, 1969
Iasso’s torso, 1970
The Owl, San Rafael, and Madonna viewed from the hill, 1970
Leslie Dee Sirota and Jac Campbell with three friends, 1970
from the series Gate Five
(12) Gelatin silver prints (selenium toned)
Various sizes
Gift of Pirkle Jones Foundation, 2013.43–.54
JEAN-PIERRE KHAZEM (French, born 1968)
Volume 2, 2000
Chromogenic development print (transverse mounted on
aluminum)
19 1/2 x 27 3/4 in. (49.5 x 70.5 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.247
JOANNE LEONARD (American, born 1940) In My Mother’s Garden, 1991
Mixed media collage
8 1/4 x 11 in. (21 x 27.9 cm) Purchase, Norton Acquisition Fund, 2012.110
Breaking Wave, Golden Gate, San Francisco, 1952, printed 1968
Log and Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, 1952, printed 1968
View of San Francisco in the Rain, 1952, printed 1968
Woman with umbrella, San Francisco, 1955, printed 1968
Sunset District and Pacific Ocean, San Francisco, 1951, printed 1968
Figures in the Rain, San Francisco, 1955, printed 1968
Worker, Saratoga, California [from The Story of A Winery, Paul
Masson, No. 19 in the series], 1958, printed 1968
Grape Picker, Berryessa Valley, California, 1956, printed 1968
Oak Tree and Rock, Black Hawk Ranch, California, 1954, printed
1968
Cowboy, Arizona, 1957, printed 1968
Landscape, Jackson, CA, 1948, printed 1968
Garden Detail, San Francisco, 1947, printed 1968
from Portfolio II
(12) Gelatin silver prints (selenium toned), ed. 34 of 110
Each 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm)
Gift of Pirkle Jones Foundation, 2013.60–.71
ANNIE LEIBOVITZ (American, born 1949)
Mikhail Baryshnikov and Mark Morris, New York City, 1988
Cindy Sherman, New York City, 1992
The Reverend Al Sharpton, PrimaDonna Beauty Care Center,
Brooklyn, New York, 1988
Leonardo DiCaprio, Tejon Ranch, Lebec, California, 1997
Jerzy Kosinski, New York City, 1982
Keith Richards, New York City, 1980
Mick Jagger, New York City, 1980
Tom Wolfe, New York City, 1980
John Irving, New York City, 1982
Dennis Hopper and Christopher Walken, Chateau Marmont,
West Hollywood, California, 1995
Brad Pitt, Las Vegas, Nevada, 1994
Agnes Martin, Taos, New Mexico, 1999
Lucinda Williams, Austin, Texas, 2001
Tom Cruise, Los Angeles, 2000
Richard Avedon with His 8x10 Sinar Camera, New York City, 2001
Yoko Ono, New York City, 1981
Hunter S. Thompson, Dulles International Airport, Virginia, 1972
Eileen Collins, Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, 1999
Todd Haynes and Julianne Moore, Los Angeles, 2003
Susan McNamara, Las Vegas, Nevada, 1995
Merce Cunningham, New York City, 1994
Frances McDormand, New York City, 1996
(22) Archival pigment prints
Various sizes
Purchase, acquired through the generosity of Muriel and Ralph
Saltzman, 2012.113, .115–.124, .126, .127, .129, .130a–b, .131,
.133, .139, .143, .145a–b, .147, .150
Matthew Barney, Hotel New York, Rotterdam, 1995
John Belushi, Staten Island, New York, 1981
Patti Smith, New York City, 1996
American Soldiers and Mary, Queen of the Negritos, Clark Air Base, The
Philippines, 1968
Jack Pierson, New York City, 1994
Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sandra Day O’Connor,
Washington D.C., 1997
Lil’ Kim, New York City, 1999
Othar Turner, Como, Mississippi, 2000
Ron Kovic, Santa Monica, California, 1973
R2-D2, Pinewood Studios, London, 2000
William S. Burroughs, Lawrence, Kansas, 1995
Tennessee Williams, Key West, Florida, 1974
Sean Combs with His Sons, Justin and Christian, Bridgehampton, New York,
1998
Allen Ginsberg, New York City, 1995
Spike Lee, New York City, 1988
(15) Archival pigment prints
Various sizes
Purchase, Norton Acquisition Fund, 2012.125, .132, .134–.138, .140–.142
.144a-b, .146, .148, .149, .151
DENNIS LETBETTER (American, born 1954)
Spranger Barry as Macbeth, 1752, 1983
Henry Irving as Mephistopheles, 1885, 1983
Charles Kean as King Lear, 1858, 1983
(3) Gelatin silver prints
Each 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm)
Gift of Dennis Letbetter, 2012.110–.112
WAYNE R. LAZORIK (American, born 1939)
Untitled, 1977
Gelatin silver print
36 x 36 in. (91.4 x 91.4 cm)
Gift of the Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA, 2012.253
David Byrne, Los Angeles, 1986
Andy Warhol, New York City, 1976
(2) Archival pigment prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.114, .128
RONALD LUSK (American, born 1961)
Untitled, circa 2006
Untitled, circa 2006
(2) Silver dye bleach (Fujichrome) prints
Each 12 x 8 in. (30.5 x 20.3 cm)
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.162, .163
50 curato ri al
ELAINE LUSTIG-COHEN (American, born 1927)
Espana, Confirm By Telegram, Cortina, 1994–1996
(3) Mixed media collages
Various sizes, largest 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 in. (23.5 x 18.4 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.105–.107
DEBORAH MESA-PELLY (Cuban, active United States, born 1968)
Cabin, 1999
Slide, 1998
(2) Chromogenic development prints
Each 29 x 36 3/4 in. (73.7 x 93.3 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.248, .249
CHRISTOPHER MORRIS (American, born 1958)
Presidential Palace, Grozny, 1995, printed 2012
RPG Blow Back, Grozny, 1995, printed 2012
Tank Attack, Chechnya, 1995, printed 2012
RPG Launch, Chechnya, 1995, printed 2012
Street Fighters, Chechnya, 1995, printed 2012
Palace View, Chechnya, 1995, printed 2012
Street Boy, Chechnya, 1995, printed 2012
Bunker Fighter, Chechnya, 1995, printed 2012
Field Agent, Wells, Maine, 2004
Blue Eye Agent, Tampa, Florida, 2004
Garage Agent, Washington, DC, 2004
Tree Agent, Nampa, Idaho, 2005
Curtain Man, 2004
Park Agent, 2004
Warehouse Agent, 2004
(15) Gelatin silver prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.198–.212
WANGECHI MUTU (Kenyan, active United States, born 1972)
Crown, 2006
Photocollage and mixed media on Mylar
37 3/4 x 22 1/8 in. (95.9 x 56.2 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.251
EADWEARD J. MUYBRIDGE (English, active United States, 1830–1904)
Man Jumping, Pole Vaulting, 1884–1886
Man, Shot Putting, 1884–1886
Man, Pitching, 1884–1886
Woman, Walking, Dressing, 1884–1886
from Animal Locomotion, 1887
(4) Collotypes
Various sizes
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.164–.167
ALICE O’MALLEY (American, born 1962)
Nicole Eisenman, NYC, 2000, printed 2008
Gelatin silver print
22 3/4 x 17 3/4 in. (57.8 x 45.1 cm)
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.168
JANE L. O’NEAL (American, born 1945)
Evergreen Elm, 2006, printed 2012
Plastic-Wrapped Pepper, 2008, printed 2012
Dead Apple Cactus Flower, 2008, printed 2012
(3) Archival inkjet prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.235–237
OLIVIA PARKER (American, born 1941)
On the Wall, 1983
At Some Distance, 1984
(2) Gelatin silver prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.105, .106
HOLLY ROBERTS (American, born 1951)
Crow with No Arms, 1990
Man Holding His Own Hand, 1991
Snake Truck, 2007
Women on Fire, 1989
(4) Gelatin silver prints with oil paint on various substrates
Various sizes
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.5–.8
ANALIA SABAN (American, born Argentina, 1980)
Folded Horizon, 2012
Gelatin silver print on resin-coated paper
16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm)
Purchase, acquired through the generosity of the Young Friends and
the Photography Committee of the Norton Museum of Art, 2013.2
Grid, 2012
Gelatin silver print on resin-coated paper
10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm)
Purchase, acquired through the generosity of the
Young Friends of the Norton Museum of Art, 2013.3
SUSUMU SAKAGUCHI (American, born Japan, 1944)
Untitled, 1975
Painting on paper
24 1/2 x 20 1/2 x 1 1/2 in. (62.2 x 52.1 x 3.8 cm)
Gift of Joan and Charles Lazarus, 2012.96
DAVID SCHEINBAUM (American, born 1951)
Planet Asia, Sunshine Theatre, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2001
Mos Def, Short List, Los Angeles, California, 2002, printed 2003
Yelawolf, Sunshine Theatre, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2010
(3) Gelatin silver prints
Various sizes
Gift of Scheinbaum & Russek, Ltd., Sante Fe, NM, 2012.192–.194
Launchpad, Albuquerque, NM, 2009
Erykah Badu, Sunshine Theatre, Albuquerque, NM, 1/20/2003, 2003
(2) Gelatin silver prints
Various sizes
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.15, .16
SARAH SCHORR (American, born 1977)
Fritzie’s Eyelashes, 2007
Chromogenic development print
23 x 19 in. (58.4 x 48.3 cm)
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.169
5 2 c urato ri al
CINDY SHERMAN (American, born 1954)
Untitled (Mother), 2002, printed 2004
Chromogenic development print
29 1/16 x 20 in. (73.8 x 50.8 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.252
NOELLE K. TAN (Filipino, active in the United States, born 1969)
Drawing IX, 2003-2005
Drawing XVI, 2003-2005
(2) Silver gelatin prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist and Civilian Art Projects, Washington, DC,
2013.29–.30
ROBERT VON STERNBERG (American, born 1939)
Silvas Oil Company, Ventura, California, 2012
Arlanda Airport, Stockholm, 2011
Bastian Point, Mallacoota, Australia, 2010
(3) Archival pigment (Epson K3) prints
Each 11 5/8 x 17 1/2 in. (29.5 x 44.5 cm)
Gift of the artist, 2012.195–.197
DEBORAH WILLIS (American, born 1948)
Christmas, 1995
Mixed media
69 x 42 in. (175.3 x 106.7 cm)
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.104
Untitled #12, 2001-2002
Silver gelatin print
Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.31
RENA SMALL (American, born 1954)
Sam Francis, 1989
Lloyd Hamrol, 1985
Margaret Smith Francis and Augustus Francis, 1989
(3) Gelatin silver prints
Various sizes
Gift of the artist, 2012.189–.191
DOUG STARN (American, born 1961)
MIKE STARN (American, born 1961)
Yellow Hands, 1982, printed 1987
(6) Gelatin silver prints
Overall 60 x 36 in. (152.4 x 91.4 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.184a-f
DIANE TANI (American, born 1965) Communiqué, 1989
Chromogenic development print
15 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. (39.37 x 49.5 cm) Purchase, R.H. Norton Trust, 2013.111
ROBERT WARNER (American, born 1956)
Sleeping with Scissors: A production in Seven Acts, Act 2 Scene 2
Sleeping with Scissors: A production in Seven Acts, Act 7 Scene 5
Sleeping with Scissors: A production in Seven Acts, Act 5 Scene 2
Sleeping with Scissors: A production in Seven Acts, Act 6 Scene 2
Sleeping with Scissors: A production in Seven Acts, Act 5 Scene 1
Sleeping with Scissors: A production in Seven Acts, Act 1 Scene 3
Sleeping with Scissors: A production in Seven Acts, Act 5 Scene 7
Sleeping with Scissors: A production in Seven Acts, Act 5 Scene 3
(8) Collage on cabinet card portraits
Each 6 1/2 x 4 1/2 in. (16.5 x 11.4 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.175–.182
BURK UZZLE (American, born 1938)
Red Hamburgers, California, 2006
Chromogenic development print
18 7/8 x 23 3/4 in. (47.9 x 60.3 cm)
Gift of the Robert A. Lewis Collection, 2012.170
T.J. WILCOX (American, born 1965)
Tragedy (Sissi at the Great Gallery IV), 2007
Archival pigment print on watercolor paper with watercolor and
collage
59 1/2 x 62 3/4 in. (151.1 x 159.4 cm)
Gift of Rita Krauss Fine Art, New York, 2012.183
LINDA WOLF (American, born 1950)
Untitled, 1980
Gelatin silver print
7 1/4 x 17 15/16 in. (18.4 x 45.6 cm)
Gift of the artist, 2012.107
5 4 c urato ri al
Objects Loaned to
Other Institutions
g eo rg e b e l lows, Winter Afternoon, 1909
to George Bellows
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC: June 10, 2012 – Oct. 8, 2012
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY: Nov. 15, 2012 – Feb. 18, 2013
g eo rg es b r aq ue , Still Life with Guitar I (Red Tablecloth), 1936
to Georges Braque and the Cubist Still Life: 1928-1945
Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, MO: Jan. 25 – April 21, 2013
The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC: June 8 – Sept. 15, 2013
m a rc ch ag a l l , Anniversary Flowers, 1947
to Chagall: Love, War, and Exile
The Jewish Museum, New York, NY: Sept. 15, 2013 – Feb. 2, 2014
m a n i e r r e dawson , Wharf Under Mountains, 1913
to The New Spirit: American Art in the Armory Show, 1913
Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, NJ: Feb. 17 – June 16, 2013
lyn n e g o lo b g elfm an , Untitled, 1974
jo h n h e r s ey, Mingus Doors, from Water Wall series, 1982
two-year loan to 4th District Court of Appeals, West Palm Beach, FL: June 30, 2013 – June 30, 2015
k e i t h h a r i n g , Untitled, 1982
j u l i a n s ch n a be l, A Boy from Naples, 1985
j u l i a n s ch n a be l, Prison Rodeo, 1985
to ReFocus: Art of the 1980s
Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL: Sept. 15, 2012 – Jan. 6, 2013
l ew i s h i n e , Steamfitter, 1920, printed 1996
pau l st r a n d , Wall Street, 1915
to The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936-1951
Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA: Oct. 11, 2012 – Jan. 21, 2013
Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL: March 15 – June 16, 2013
he nri m atis s e , The Two Rays, 1920
to Matisse: In Search of True Painting
Centre Pompidou, Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris, France: March 7 – July 8, 2012
Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark: July 14 – Oct. 28, 2012
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY: Dec. 4, 2012 – March 17, 2013
g eorg ia o’ke e ffe , Ranchos Church No. 1, 1929
to Georgia O’Keeffe in New Mexico: Architecture, Katsinam and the Land
Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, NJ: Sept. 28, 2012 – Jan. 13, 2013
Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO: Feb. 10 – April 28, 2013
Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, NM: May 17 – Sept. 8, 2013
Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ: Sept. 28, 2013 – March 3, 2014
charl es s e l ig e r, Hidden Skeleton, 1945
to Seeing the World Within: Charles Seliger in the 1940s
Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC: Feb. 11, 2011 – April 29, 2012
Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy: June 9 – Sept. 16, 2012
Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute, Utica, NY: Oct. 20, 2012 – Jan. 20, 2013
m ary s ib and e , …of Prosperity, 2011
to Mary Sibande, Artist in Residence
Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, Ann Arbor, MI: Sept. 1 – Oct. 11, 2013
he nry os s awa tanne r, The Seine — Evening, circa 1900
to Henry O. Tanner: The Modern Spirit
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA: Nov. 27, 2011 – April 15, 2012
High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA: June 2 – Sept. 2, 2012
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX: Oct. 14, 2012 – June 6, 2013
m ax w e b e r, Alone, 1926
to Models and Muses: Max Weber and the Figure
Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa, OK: Nov. 4, 2012 – Feb. 3, 2013
5 6
j uly 2013
A family enjoys “Detail
Detective” Just for
Kids! gallery cards in
the European galleries.
© lila photo
education
The Norton Museum of Art hosted fascinating
guest speakers in 2012–2013. Artists Sylvia Plimack
Mangold, Faith Ringgold, Shahzia Sikander, and Rob
Wynne introduced audiences to their work and ways
of thinking. Wynne’s and Mangold’s programs were
videotaped for display in the galleries. Chinese painting master Li Huayi demonstrated his art by unrolling
mulberry paper on the Theater floor and painting a
landscape before a rapt audience.
To help public schools overcome a major hurdle
in scheduling field trips, the Norton funded busing
for Title-1 school students to the Museum. Thanks to
generous support, the Museum hosted thousands of
children for educational tours last spring after Palm
Beach County School District funding for transportation was exhausted. The Museum will continue
to ensure that as many students as possible have
first-hand experiences with art.
New partnerships with Forest Hill Community
High School and Palm Beach Day Academy developed integrated lessons with teachers at both ends of
the k–12 spectrum, linking the visual arts to themes
in Advanced Placement English Composition and
kindergarten learning. With support from Muriel
and Ralph Saltzman, the Forest Hill Museum as a
Classroom program culminated in student presentations on Norton artworks, while the kindergarten
program resulted in a mural and school assembly.
The Norton’s Progressive Afterschool Art
Community Education (PACE) program continued
to support young people year round in underserved
areas of the community. In a special workshop at
the Salvation Army Aftercare program in West
Palm Beach, students created a community garden.
The results, including plantings, paths, and student
sculptures, received great support from the neighborhood. PACE instructors also hosted student exhibitions at six sites, including the Boys and Girls Club
and the Police Athletic League.
Art After Dark, the Museum’s Thursday night program, attracted large audiences all year. Live music
filled the Atrium and Theater, docent-led tours and
Curators’ Conversations drew standing-room-only
audiences, and Free Thursdays for Florida Residents
introduced new visitors to the Museum all summer.
Thanks to the West Palm Beach Chapter of The Links,
Inc., the community reception for the opening of Say
it Loud: Art by African and African-American Artists
in the Collection attracted more than 600 guests; a
Block Party featuring artist Dan Parker drew more
than 1,000 visitors.
Long-standing programs were revitalized. The
Summer Camp program hosted more than 1,350
children from around Palm Beach County. They
visited Block by Block: Inventing Amazing Architecture,
learning about skyscrapers and engineering through
simple hands-on projects. The Summer Intern
program served four college students whose professionalism and commitment ensured their success in
the program. A Closer Look talks integrated gallery
discussions of great artworks with power-point
presentations that placed them in historical context. In conjunction with Legacy: The Emily Fisher
Landau Collection, a subscription-based class titled
Contemporary Art 101 introduced participants to
contemporary art through conversations with curators, collectors, and art dealers.
Glenn Tomlinson
w illiam randolp h hearst c urator of educ ation
5 8 e ducati o n
Adult Learning
exhibition lectur e s e r ies
More than 1,250 members and visitors heard exhibition lectures on topics ranging from the Buddhist
cave temples of China to first-hand accounts of life
in London during the Blitz, participation in the Photo
League, as well as the thoughts of contemporary
artists on their art. Speakers included Rob Wynne,
Donald Albrecht, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Barry
Day (O.B.E.), Faith Ringgold, Li Huayi, Lidu Yi, Linda
Komaroff, Shahzia Sikander, and members of the
Photo League Sonia Handelman-Meyer, Marvin
Newman, and Ida Wyman.
a rtsp ea ks
m arion sim s w y eth: an arc hitecture tour
With more than 430 subscribers, the 2013 ArtSpeaks
luncheon/lecture series drew enthusiastic responses
for each of the five authors of recent books on art
and design. Speakers included Carol Troyen, Kristin
and Roger Servison Curator Emerita of American
Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, who
spoke about the revival of interest in American realist
George Bellows; and Tom Mellins, independent
curator, who engaged audiences in a wonderful tour
of Doris Duke’s Shangri La, its design, rooms, and
gardens. Proceeds from ArtSpeaks support museum
programs for children.
This event celebrated the architect who designed
Doris Duke’s Shangri La, as well as so many
memorable buildings in Palm Beach. Dr. Jane Day,
president of Research Atlantica, Inc., led this limitedenrollment tour, beginning with an introductory talk
at the Museum and followed by a bus tour with visits
to several homes and sites.
b r i t i sh f i l ms w i t h scot t eyma n
In addition to regular programming at Art After
Dark, Curators’ Conversations were a popular draw,
providing visitors with a chance to speak directly with
curators who shape our exhibitions and collections.
The sessions were so popular during the Masterpiece
of the Month program (May through October), that
each curator offered two presentations per night.
Author, scholar, and Palm Beach Post Books Editor
Scott Eyman returned for a third-annual
exhibition-related film series. This year’s program
addressed British films in relation to the special
exhibition Keep Calm and Carry On. Eyman introduced
films such as In Which We Serve (1942) and Hope and
Glory (1987), and followed each screening with an
insightful commentary.
a c lose r look
con t emp o r a ry a rt 1 01
This new program replaced the long-running
Treasure of the Month, offering members and visitors
the opportunity to discuss a single artwork in the
galleries with Education staff, and then adjourn to the
Theater for a contextual presentation on the selected
work. More than 400 participants engaged in these
dialogues regarding works ranging from Teresita
Fernandez’s Nocturnal to Lorenzo Lotto’s St. Onuphrius
in Egypt.
This limited-enrollment subscription series offered
50 members and visitors the opportunity to explore
issues in contemporary art from multiple viewpoints.
Each program included a staff-led discussion in the
galleries, as well as a visit with community members
intimately involved with the art world, including collector Jerry Fine, art dealers Sarah Gavlak and Holden
Luntz, and William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of
Photography Tim B. Wride.
c u rators’ conve r s at io n s
this program is generously underwritten in part by
the maurer family fund for arts education.
this program has been generously underwritten in
part by the doris duke foundation for islamic art.
m usic at the norton
More than 600 music fans enjoyed concerts ranging
from a Latin American guitar repertoire to flute and
piano duets. In addition to the Live! At the Norton
concert series, this year’s musical offerings included
two special programs hosted in conjunction with the
Palm Beach Symphony on Thursday nights, featuring
a marvelous harp, flute, and viola trio, as well as the
dynamic piano duo Anderson & Roe.
p ublic , college, and adult group tours
Docent-led tours are at the core of the Museum’s
educational mission, reaching more than 10,000
adult visitors each year. Privately scheduled group
tours attracted many to the special exhibitions and
the Museum Collection this year, and these groups
often booked lunches and stayed throughout the
day. College professors also scheduled tours for their
students on subjects from art history to engineering.
ArtVentures tours at 2 pm offered the public a conversational look at major artworks in the Museum.
Lunchtime Lecture Tours at 12:30 pm provided a
30-minute tour format during the season. Art After
Dark tours at 5:30 pm and 6:30 pm were so popular
that two docents were required for each one. Special
Exhibition Tours during the height of the season
guided visitors through major exhibitions, while
French Language Tours, offered in conjunction with
the Multilingual Language & Cultural Society, were
a popular addition on the second Saturday of the
month, November through April.
digital m edia in the galleries
In 2012–2013, the Norton produced two original
videos for display in the Museum to enrich visitors’
experiences of Rob Wynne’s lobby installation piece
and Sylvia Plimack Mangold’s exhibition of landscapes and trees. These videos featured excerpts
from the artists’ appearances at the Museum in
conjunction with their exhibitions. Curatorial and
design staff produced popular iPad programs for
numerous installations, including Middle East and
Middle Kingdom and Block by Block: Inventing Amazing
Architecture. Between March 21 and Sept. 26, 2013,
1,920 visitors made more than 4,300 cell phone tour
calls in the Doris Duke’s Shangri La and Architecture in
Detail exhibitions.
60 e ducati o n
Art After Dark
Thursday Evenings
Since extending hours every Thursday evening to 9
pm in early 2011, the Museum has attracted a diverse
audience to a varied menu of cultural programs. Live
music by an eclectic range of musicians and bands
set the tone for a lively evening every week at Art
After Dark. Artists’ talks and gallery tours by curators
and docents provided fascinating insights into the
history and context of artworks on view. Fratelli
Lyon offered wine tastings and a growing variety
of culinary events, as well as a terrific menu in the
café. Films, DIY art projects, and many other activities made Art After Dark the place “where culture
and entertainment meet.” A few special evenings
included:
novembe r 8: A tribute to World War II veterans in
conjunction with Keep Calm and Carry On.
dec ember 27 : The opening celebration of Say it Loud:
Art by African and African-American Artists in the
Collection, attended by more than 600 guests, with
the support of the West Palm Beach Chapter of The
Links, Inc.
j u ly 11: A Curator’s Conversation about Dorothea
Lange’s iconic photograph Migrant Mother, Nipomo
California, DIY art projects related to architecture, and
Chrystal Hartigan’s Songwriter’s Showcase were among
the programs that drew more than 800 visitors.
au g u st 8: Family Block Party attended by more than
1,000 visitors, featuring workshops by artist Dan
Parker, creator of the skyscrapers in Block by Block:
Inventing Amazing Architecture.
© lila photo
this program is made possible in part through the
generosity of the addison hines charitable trust.
media support provided by the palm beach post and
pbpulse.com.
june
0132
july 2201
Visitors
dancelocal
to
One
of many
the music during
musicians
who the
Summer Soulstice’s
performed
this year at
silent
disco
Art
After
Dark.
62 e ducati o n
Family Programs
family stu dio
Children and their parents participate in thematic
gallery talks and create their own related artworks
at Family Studio one Saturday each month. Up to 25
children, ages 5 to 12, learned about diverse artists
and artforms — and express their own creativity — at
each session. A materials fee covered the cost of art
supplies for each student. Between October 2012 and
August 2013, 229 children participated.
family programs are generously underwritten by the
sarah vierck mettler family fund, the andrea and charles
bronfman fund for families, and the samuel rosenthal
endowment for education and outreach programs.
diy art projects
On the first Saturday of every month through May
2013, and several Thursday nights throughout the
summer, the Education Department hosted DIY Art
Projects in which children and their families could
take a self-guided tour and create hands-on art projects related to special exhibitions and featured works
in the Museum Collection. DIY Art Projects proved
particularly successful at Art After Dark during the
summer, when family participation is especially high.
j u st for k ids! g alle ry a rt ca r ds
This past summer, the Education Department introduced Gallery Art Cards in three galleries and labels
for children in a fourth gallery. The Art Cards featured
questions and games to engage children with older
family members in looking closely and exploring their
own responses to artworks on view. Cards in the
Delacorte Gallery, the Chinese Galleries, and the Kohl
Gallery proved to be particularly engaging.
this program is generously underwritten in part by the
mr. and mrs. lewis schott endowment for education.
fa mi ly days
On Nov. 3, 2012, the Museum collaborated with
the Palm Beach County Library System to host the
annual Families Reading Together Kick-Off event with
children’s author Bob Raszka. This community event,
featuring a reading and discussion by the author
of children’s art books, attracted more than 400
visitors. The Holiday Family Festival on Dec. 2, 2012,
was a great success, offering more than 900 visitors
an array of programs, including holiday music, dance
performances by marvelous community groups, a
magic show, face painting, a Museum Collection
treasure hunt, tours, and a visit by Santa Claus. The
eighth-annual Chinese Moon Festival Celebration,
held on Sept. 21, 2013, drew more than 500 visitors
to Curator’s Conversations and special tours; an
Imperial Palace Building workshop with artist Dan
Parker; a concert of music from the Qing dynasty by
the Ann Yao Trio; and a reception featuring green tea
and moon cakes.
chinese moon festival is made possible in part through
the generosity of john and heidi niblack.
l eg o® p l ayro om
In conjunction with the special exhibition Block by
Block: Inventing Amazing Architecture, curators and
educators developed a playroom alongside the
exhibition where young “architects” could create
their own towering skyscrapers. Throughout the
five-month run of the special exhibition, thousands
of young (and young at heart) visitors enjoyed this
special feature of the exhibition.
Community
and Outreach
Programs
pac e ( p rogressiv e aftersc hool art
com m unity educ ation)
The PACE program — provided free to students
and organizations — supported more than 1,000
children and teens at organizations in underserved
parts of our community, including the Police Athletic
League and West Palm Beach Housing Authority;
Gaines Park, West Palm Beach Parks and Recreation
Program; the Highridge Family Center; My Choice
Community Development; Salvation Army Northwest
Community Center; and the PACE Center for Girls.
The PACE Program seeks to:
• Foster creativity and stimulate critical thinking in
a safe, supportive afterschool environment;
• Provide art activities that relate to multicultural
learning, the Museum Collection, and special exhibitions;
• Offer PACE students three visits to the Museum
each year for tours and workshops;
• Provide PACE participants with opportunities to
exhibit their work in their communities;
• Employ excellent teaching artists who serve as
positive role models for the children.
this program is generously underwritten in part by
dr. norman* and ruth h. rosenberg, estate of desna
goldman, marmot foundation, the berlin foundation,
and the christina orr-cahall endowment for
community outreach. *deceased
sum m er youth c am p tours
Summer camp tours of Block by Block: Inventing
Amazing Architecture, drew 1,350 students and their
counselors to the Museum in June and July. This year,
educators expanded the visits to include a hands-on
paper architecture project before visiting the exhibition. Tours ended in the lego® Playroom.
sum m er intern p rogram
For the first time this year, the Summer Intern
Program hosted exclusively college students, drawing
applicants from across the country. Four successful
candidates from colleges and universities in Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and California joined
the Museum for seven weeks during which they led
summer camp tours, worked with staff on research
and administrative projects, and organized an
exhibition, Little Boxes: Vernacular Architecture from
the Collection. Readings and discussion sessions introduced the interns to the Museum profession.
the intern program is generously underwritten in part
by dr. norman* and ruth h. rosenberg and the chastain
foundation endowment. *deceased
m arden gallery p rogram
Each year, the Chris and Bernard Marden Community
Gallery provides an exhibition venue for hundreds
of student artworks from schools whose teachers
develop art and photography assignments related to
the Museum Collection and exhibitions. The Gallery
also serves as the venue for the annual Summer
Intern exhibition, a project the interns work on with
curatorial staff.
p rogram s for audienc es w ith disabilities
Since 2005, the Museum has partnered with VSA
Palm Beach County to provide tours and hands-on
workshops in the fall and spring to teen and adult
participants in VSA. This year, the programs included
a tour of Doris Duke’s Shangri La and a pattern and
design project, as well as a tour called Architecture
in Art, followed by a recycled materials architecture
project. In addition, the Museum reinitiated a tour
program with clients and staff at the Jerome Golden
Center for Behavioral Health and at Chrysalis Health.
64 e ducati o n
Free Educational
Programs for
Students and
Teachers
stu de nt learnin g t h ro u gh s ch o o l to u r s
Each year, between 6,000 and 12,000 students visit
the Museum for free tours that address works of
art in the Collection and special exhibitions, while
reinforcing age-appropriate curricular goals related to
specific disciplines such as history, writing, math, and
the sciences, and broader education initiatives, such
as the students’ development of critical-thinking
skills and creativity. Tours led between August and
May serve pre-k through grade 12 students and are
developed in relation to national educational standards for different grade levels.
this program has been generously underwritten
in part by dr. norman* and ruth h. rosenberg, the
palm beach community trust fund, and the william
randolph hearst endowment fund for education and
outreach programs. *deceased
bu sing for title-1 st u de n t to u r s
Due to the challenges regarding public school funding, and thanks to generous support, in 2012-2013
the Norton Museum of Art began to cover the cost of
busing students from Title-1 schools to the Museum
for tours. Palm Beach County Title-1 schools represent about 60 percent of the Museum’s school tour
audience per year. The Museum’s funding kicks in
when the school district notifies the community that
their own field trip resources are depleted. This initiative allowed thousands of children — who otherwise
would not have been able to do so — to experience
the Museum last spring.
t eac her r esou rc e pac kets
sp ec ial p roject — the m useum as c lassroom
sp ec ial p roject — palm beac h day ac ademy
To make the Museum’s Collection and special
exhibitions accessible in the classroom, Teacher
Resource Packets are available online to all teachers,
and specifically to those who book class tours of the
Museum. Teacher resources are developed according
to specific themes related to classroom learning and
national standards, as well as the Museum Collection
and special exhibitions.
The Museum as Classroom project with Forest Hill
Community High School in West Palm Beach began
in 2012. This initiative drew upon what educators had
learned from the Norton School Partnerships (20042011) and, in close collaboration with principal Mary
Stratos, focused on 40 students in two Advanced
Placement English Composition classes at the Title-1
school. Through repeated meetings at the Museum
and educators’ visits to the classrooms, students
were able to select an artist, research their lives and
their painting or sculpture in the Collection, select
other examples of the artist’s work that they liked,
then select a literary work that corresponded with the
visual works. At the end of the year, these students
presented their research to student colleagues,
teachers, and families in power-point presentations at the Museum. As part of the program, the
school received computers for student research,
and students were provided with memberships to
the Museum and met art collectors and program
supporters Muriel and Ralph Saltzman. This program
is set to expand in 2012–2013.
In summer 2011, Palm Beach Day Academy invited
the Museum to partner with the Academy’s Lower
School to engage kindergarten and elementary
school students in learning at the Museum.
Throughout the year, the entire kindergarten class
visited the Museum several times. They met with
docents to learn about art and how Museums are
a part of their community. The culmination of the
program took place during a school assembly, where
students presented two marvelous murals and a skyscraper sculpture based on the Museum’s New York
Mural by Stuart Davis. As preparations ensued for a
second year of the program, Norton educators led
professional development sessions for Palm Beach
Day Academy faculty members, as well as teachers
and staff from other private schools in the area.
p rof essi o n a l d ev elo pmen t
for t eac h er s a n d a d mi n i st r ator s
The Museum offers free professional development
sessions for teachers and administrators throughout
the year. In 2012–2013, 187 teachers and administrators took part in meetings and workshops at the
Museum, where they learned ways to incorporate
the visual arts into classroom teaching. Through
hands-on workshops and discussion-based gallery
sessions, teachers were encouraged to see the fundamental role the arts can play in engaging students.
this program has been generously underwritten
in part by dr. norman* and ruth h. rosenberg, the
palm beach community trust fund, and the william
randolph hearst endowment fund for education and
outreach programs. *deceased
t eac her a p p r ec i at i o n
In September 2013, the Norton also hosted a Teacher
Appreciation Night at Art After Dark, and announced
that teachers and school administrators with valid
professional IDs (pre-K through college) would
receive free admission to the Museum every day.
For several years, the Museum has hosted meetings
for 120 elementary school principals and district
administrators, as well as monthly meetings of the
Palm Beach County Art Teachers Association, at no
charge to the school district.
this program is generously underwritten by
muriel and ralph saltzman.
66 e ducati o n
Cheryl Brutvan,
Curator of
Contemporary Art, and
artist Rob Wynne at
a public conversation
about his work.
© lila photo
n ovemb er 2 012
68 e ducati o n
Programming
Images
Tim Wride, William
and Sarah Ross Soter
Curator of Photography,
holds a Curator’s
Conversation.
© lila photo
j uly 2013
70educati o n
Hope Alswang leads a
discussion with collector
Leonard Lauder and
Whitney Museum director
Adam Weinberg.
© lila photo
february 2013
72 educati o n
Opening celebration
of the Salvation Army
Aftercare Community
Garden, a Norton PACE
project.
© tom brodigan
ja n uary 2013
74 educati o n
a p ri l 2013
Docent Carol Ann Khawly
conducts a tour for
students from Palm Beach
Day Academy.
76
may 2013
Trustees visit a private
collection in Chicago.
courtesy james b. hall
board of trustees
The addition of five new, energetic, and passionate
members to the Board of Directors brought the
number of Trustees to 30, giving the Museum one of
the strongest Boards it has had in some time. We are
thrilled that this group will steer the institution into
the future.
Two annual offsite Trustee meetings have become
wonderful opportunities for Board members to
get better acquainted with one another as well as
visit other public and private collections, explore
first-hand the role that other museums play in their
communities, and see artists at work in their studios.
This past year, the May Board meeting was held
in Chicago, where a number of extraordinary private
collectors opened their homes for rare glimpses of
remarkable art. Norton Trustees take an active role
in planning these trips, helping to ensure that their
fellow Board members and their spouses have a truly
intimate look at the cultural life of world-class cities,
and unique access to the best that these great metropolitan centers have to offer. Thanks to the efforts of
Nicki and Ira Harris, this trip was perfect in every way.
The Art Institute of Chicago, with its new Modern
wing by Renzo Piano, was the site of a private tour led
by James Rondeau, the Frances and Thomas Dittmer
Chair and Curator of Contemporary Art. The group
also learned about the development of Millennium
Park and the stunning Frank Gehry-designed
Pritzker Pavilion. New Trustee Bruce Gendelman, an
accomplished photographer, tirelessly recorded the
highlights of this memorable trip. Artist Nick Cave
welcomed the Trustees to his magical home and
studio to see the creation of his Soundsuits.
In October, the Board reconvened, this time
in New York, where Trustees were hosted by Gil
Maurer and The Hearst Corporation at the stunning
new Hearst Tower, designed by Foster + Partners. In
addition to a presentation of the most recent plans
by Foster + Partners for the Norton, Trustees took
advantage of a perfect fall weekend to visit two
important public collections: Dia Beacon and the
Storm King Art Center. The visit also included a private viewing of the remarkable home and collection
of Beth Rudin DeWoody, who shared with the group
her approach to collecting, and living with, a dizzying
array of art and objects. A dinner at the historic
Links Club, hosted by Peter and Barbara Georgescu,
honored departing Board Chair Kemp Stickney and
recognized the long and dedicated service of Graham
Russell, who arranged and managed Trustee travel
for many years.
James B. Hall
dep uty director
78
dec ember 2012
Mary Lou Dauray, Alan
Davis, and Paul Gross
at the opening of
Sylvia Plimack Mangold:
Landscape and Trees
© lila photo
development
One measure of a museum’s importance is the
strength of the support it receives from its benefactors. By this measure, the Norton’s sponsors have
continued to ensure that the institution maintains
and expands its role and relevance as an important
national and international institution.
The generous bequest from Valerie Delacorte
provided the Norton with invaluable unrestricted
funds for its operations. Corporate backing is increasingly important to promote the Norton’s message,
and we are proud to note that BMO Private Bank and
Wilmington Trust each contributed sponsorships to
two of the Museum’s most significant exhibitions in
the past year. PNC Wealth Management and Wells
Fargo Private Bank provided programming assistance.
Thanks to these institutions and additional corporate
partners, support for the Norton increased more than
40 percent over the previous year.
Foundation contributions also grew. Major grants
from the Leonard and Sophie David Fund/MLDauray
Arts Initiative and from the Addison Hines Charitable
Trust resulted in a 16 percent increase in foundation
grants. Every aspect of the Museum’s programming,
from underwriting of exhibitions to support of the
Norton’s popular Thursday evening Art After Dark
program, was backed by foundation grants.
In addition, individual benefactors played a crucial
role in supplying the Museum with resources for
expanding collections, mounting exhibitions, and
furnishing educational and community programming.
This essential support from individuals allowed
the Norton’s three signature fundraising events to
exceed their respective goals. The Annie Leibovitz
Exhibition Gala, chaired by Tracy Smith, premiered
39 of the Norton’s newly acquired photographs by
the renowned photographer. Guests were treated
to a tour of the exhibition by Ms. Leibovitz, who
provided commentary on her art. The annual Bal
des Arts, led by Lori Gendelman, Nicki Harris, and
David Ober, provided an elegant evening of dinner,
dancing, and conversation. To the delight of many,
BIJOUX!, the contemporary art jewelry exhibition and
sale, returned for a second year. Chaired by Donna
Schneier, this event included 49 international artists
and attracted jewelry enthusiasts from across the
country to the Norton. We are grateful for the work
of Trustees and Volunteers who made these events
outstanding successes.
This has been a year of change in the development office. We bid farewell to Graham Russell, who
retired after serving the Norton admirably in a variety
of capacities for 25 years. I joined the Museum as
Deputy Director for Development in March, also
assuming responsibility for Membership and Special
Events. Plans are already under way to strengthen
all these revenue-generating departments to help
provide a solid foundation and future for the Norton
Museum of Art.
Holly Davis
dep uty director for dev elopm ent
8 0develo pmen t
Development Events
Rob Wynne: I Remember
Ceramic Castles, Mermaids, and Japanese Bridges Lecture
nov em ber 1 , 2 01 2
Dinner celebrating Rob Wynne
nov em ber 1 , 2 01 2
Planned Giving Networking Reception
nov em ber 1 5 , 2 01 2
Holiday Family Festival
dec em ber 2 , 2 01 2
Rudin Prize Award Presentation Lunch
dec em ber 4, 2 01 2
Tracy and Matt Smith
Nicki Harris
Donna Schneier
Founder’s Circle trip to Art Basel Miami Beach
dec em ber 6 , 2 01 2
Director’s Dinner Art Basel Miami Beach
dec em ber 6 , 2 01 2
Cocktails and Dinner celebrating Sylvia Plimack Mangold
dec em ber 8, 2 01 2
Cocktails and Dinner celebrating Keep Calm and Carry On
dec em ber 1 3 , 2 01 2
Annie
Leibovitz
Exhibition Gala
Bal des Arts
The Norton Museum of Art feted iconic photographer Annie Leibovitz, who made a special appearance
at a dinner held in her honor at the Museum. The
gala evening, chaired by Palm Beacher Tracy Smith,
drew more than 250 patrons and special friends of
the Museum, who came to view the collection of 39
recently acquired portraits by Leibovitz. The evening
began with a VIP champagne reception with the
artist, who led a riveted audience through the exhibition with Assistant Director and exhibition Curator
Charles Stainback. Leibovitz regaled the crowd with
anecdotes about the photographs and her career. The
dinner, attended by gala sponsors, was held in the
Museum’s grand entry hall, which was transformed
into a stylish, intimate dining venue.
This year, the Museum hosted an artful adaptation
of its Bal des Arts. Attendees were transported to
the Palm Beach home of Bridget and Bill Koch for
cocktails and a tour of the Kochs’ outstanding art
collection. Once back at the Museum, guests sipped
champagne as they toured the recently opened Annie
Leibovitz exhibition with Assistant Director Charles
Stainback. The evening continued with a magnificent dinner and entertainment by the Alex Donner
Band. This event exceeded its goals, raising critical
funds for the Museum’s collections, exhibitions, and
programs. The Bal des Arts Committee included Lori
Gendelman, Nicki Harris, and David Ober.
f eb r ua ry 2, 201 3
january 16 , 2 013
this event was generously underwritten in part by bm0
private bank. wine provided by chateau montelena winery.
BIJOUX!
Preview Cocktail Party
Say It Loud Opening Reception
dec em ber 27, 2 01 2
Windsor Lecture and Afternoon Tea with James Canon Woodward
january 1 5 , 2 01 3
w ednesday, february 27, 2 01 3
Members’ Annual Meeting
january 1 7, 2 01 3
Open to the Public
Cocktails and Dinner celebrating Faith Ringgold
january 2 0, 2 01 3
thursday, february 28 – sunday, m arc h 3 , 2 01 3
BIJOUX!, the Norton’s five-day contemporary art
jewelry fundraising event, featured the work of 49
jewelry artists from around the world. Attendees
were inspired by the incredible variety of jewelry
on display, and by the accompanying educational
programming. Public tours of the show, a lecture
by renowned artist and author Bruce Metcalf, and
daily bead-making demonstrations by glass artist
Nirit Dekel highlighted the program. Prior to the
show’s opening, an exclusive reception was held for
participating artists and major sponsors at the home
of BIJOUX! Chair Donna Schneier. A preview
cocktail party opened BIJOUX! to those who craved
a first look at the show, then opened to the public
for four days, offering visitors the opportunity to
purchase one-of-a-kind, wearable works of art.
participation of the israeli artists was underwritten
in part by the association of israel’s decorative arts.
“Because We Like It”
Muriel and Ralph Saltzman Book Signing and Reception
january 2 2 , 2 01 3
Founder’s Circle Breakfast and Tour: Annie Leibovitz
january 3 0, 2 01 3
Founder’s Circle Miami Day Trip
february 4, 2 01 3
Donors of Art Luncheon
february 6 , 2 01 3
Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce Breakfast
Featuring guest speaker Hope Alswang
february 1 4, 2 01 3
Cocktails and Dinner celebrating Emily Fisher Landau
february 1 9 , 2 01 3
Founder’s Circle Preview of LEGACY: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection
february 2 1 , 2 01 3
R.H. Norton Society Appreciation Luncheon
m arc h 6 , 2 01 3
New Ideas about Old Masters Lecture and Dinner
m arc h 6 , 2 01 3
Diana Society Trustee Luncheon
m arc h 1 1 , 2 01 3
Donor Education Seminar
m arc h 1 3 , 2 01 3
Cocktails and Dinner celebrating The Radical Camera
m arc h 1 4, 2 01 3
Cocktails and Dinner celebrating Doris Duke’s Shangri La
m arc h 2 1 , 2 01 3
Architecture Tour: Marion Sims Wyeth
ap ril 3 , 2 01 3
8 2develo pmen t
Exhibition and
Gala Sponsors and
Supporters enjoy the
Annie Leibovitz Gala.
© lila photo
january 2013
8 4 develo pmen t
Guests atsupporters
the annual at
Museum
Bal
ArtsArts.
fundraiser.
the des
Bal des
© lila photo
fe bruary 2012
2013
8 6 develo pmen t
© lila photo
Museum
Committees
To help the Norton fulfill its mission, the Museum
has a number of valuable committees comprised of
Trustees, docents, staff, and volunteers experienced
in their fields. The Works of Art Committee (WOAC)
is one of the most prestigious on which to serve
because of its paramount responsibility — acquiring
artwork for the Collection.
“The Committee is charged with the stewardship of the Norton’s most important asset — its art
Collection — now and in the future,” explains WOAC
Chair Gil Maurer. “Our primary charge is to adopt
and pursue policies and objectives that assure the
Collection is as relevant and significant in 2050 and
2075 as it is today.” The Committee, which relies
heavily on the recommendations of Norton curators,
is also responsible for reviewing loan requests from
other museums.
While WOAC works diligently to enhance the
Collection by acquiring iconic pieces from the past, it
is eager to acquire the work of living artists who may
become art world icons of the 21st century.
To serve on the committee, which meets four
times during the season, one must be invited, and,
says Maurer, meet three criteria: “Have a love of art,
a curious eye, and a spirit of generosity.”
The Contemporary and Modern Art Council,
Friends of Chinese Art, and Photography Committee
are auxiliaries of the Works of Art Committee.
con t emp o r a ry a n d mod er n a rt cou n c i l
The Contemporary and Modern Art Council
(CMAC) of the Norton Museum of Art advances the
Museum’s efforts to build and maintain a collection
of contemporary art and sustain programs, projects,
and related activities originated by, or in support of,
the Curator of Contemporary Art.
f r i en ds o f c h i n ese a rt
The Friends of Chinese Art (FoCA) of the Norton
Museum of Art exists to advance the Museum’s
efforts to build and maintain a collection of Chinese
art and to sustain programs, projects, and related
activities originated by, or in support of, the Elizabeth
B. McGraw Curator of Chinese Art.
p hotog r a p hy co mmi t t ee
The Photography Committee of the Norton Museum
of Art exists to support the Museum’s efforts to build
and maintain a world-class photography collection
and sustain other programs, projects, and activities
of the William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of
Photography. It is assumed that the Photography
Committee, as advised by the curator of photography, will use up to 50 percent of its members’ dues to
acquire photographs for the Collection.
2 01 2 /2 01 3 works of art
com m ittee
2 01 2 /2 01 3 contem p orary
and m odern art counc il
Gilbert C. Maurer, Chair
Dale Anderson
Richard Barovick
Ruth Baum
Bruce A. Beal
Tony Beyer
Diane Bodman
Jane C. Carroll
Mary Ann Casey
Beth Rudin DeWoody
Sherry Endelson
Gerald S. Fineberg
Damaris Ford
Pamela Goergen
Nicki Harris
William Kerr
Jane Korman
Carlos Morrison
John F. Niblack
Joanne Payson
Joey Pearson
John Richman
Mitchell Rubenstein
Ralph Saltzman
Anne Berkley Smith
Kemp C. Stickney
Marlene B. Strauss
Ruth Baum, Co-Chair
Irene Karp, Co-Chair
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Barovick
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Baum
Mr. Bruce A. Beal and Mr. Frank Cunningham
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Beyer
Mrs. Margaret Bilotti
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Endelson
Ms. Laura Evans
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Fine
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Fineberg
Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Goergen
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Greenfield
Mr. and Mrs. J. Ira Harris
Mr. and Mrs. James Karp
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Katz
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Kinney
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Korman
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lazarus
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Martinez
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert C. Maurer
Mrs. Sydelle Meyer
Mr. Burt Minkoff
Mrs. Lyn Ross
Mr. Mitchell Rubenstein and Ms. Laurie Silvers
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Safir
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Saltzman
Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Sharf
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Stern
8 8 develo pmen t
© lila photo
2 012 / 2 013 frie nds o f ch in es e a rt
201 2 / 201 3 p hoto commi t t ee
adult p rogram s com m ittee
Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson
Mr. and Mrs. E. William Aylward
Mr. and Mrs. Willard Boothby
Mrs. Jane C. Carroll
Mr. Loyd F. Crawley
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Davison
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Dicker
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Dorf
Mr. and Mrs. John Galiardo
Mrs. William M. Guttman
Mrs. Doris C. Hodroff
Mrs. Vickie Johnston
Mr. and Mrs. William Kerr
Mr. and Mrs. Jay Light
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert C. Maurer
Mr. and Mrs. Peter D. McLeod
Mr. and Mrs. John McNiff
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Niblack
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Nolen
Mrs. Andrall Pearson
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Scullion
Drs. Ayten and Tuncer Someren
Joan Lazarus, Co-Chair
Jan Robinson Willinger, Co-Chair
Dale Anderson
Tony Beyer
Joan Daniels
Beth Rudin DeWoody
Nicki Harris
Diane Krane
Holden Luntz
Gilbert C. Maurer
Becky Mayer
Tommy Morrison
Sally Ross Soter
Janine Mayville, Chair
Doug Anderson
Ruth Baum
Jane C. Carroll
Gayle Gross
JoAnn Marcus
Jean Sharf
Jo-Anne Weingarden
Glenn Tomlinson, William Randolph Hearst
Curator of Education
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
ex ec u t i v e commi t t ee
Kemp Stickney, Chair
Peter Georgescu
Harry Howell
Gilbert C. Maurer
Janine Mayville
John F. Niblack
Joey Pearson
Mitchell Rubenstein
Hope Alswang, Executive Director
audit com m ittee
Jerry Pearlman, Chair
Harry Howell
Gilbert C. Maurer
Lucy Bukowski, Chief Financial Officer
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
building com m ittee
Bruce A. Beal, Chair
Ruth Baum
Jane C. Carroll
Peter Georgescu
Paul Gross
Leonard Korman
Gilbert C. Maurer
Janine Mayville
John F. Niblack
Joey Pearson
Jean Sharf
Hope Alswang, Executive Director
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
com m unic ations com m ittee
Janine Mayville, Chair
Richard Barovick
Jay Berkowitz
Tony Bonvini
Janice Laff
Greg Martini
Zach Morfogen
Scott Benarde, Director of Communications
Hilary Greene, Communications Coordinator
Hilary Jordan, Senior Graphic Designer
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
financ e com m ittee
Harry Howell, Chair
Diane Bodman
Paul Gross
Gilbert C. Maurer
Jerry Pearlman
John Richman
Lucy Bukowski, Chief Financial Officer
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
gov ernanc e com m ittee
Peter Georgescu, Chair
Richard Barovick
Diane Bodman
Jane Korman
Mitchell Rubenstein
Hope Alswang, Executive Director
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
90 develo pmen t
m arc h 2 01 2
Charles Stainback,
Assistant Director,
leads the Young
Friends on a private
tour of Tacita Dean.
© lila photo
i nvestment commit t e e
yo u t h, fa mi ly, a n d sc h ool p ro g r a ms co mmi t t ee
2 01 2 /2 01 3 young friends of the norton com m ittee
Gilbert C. Maurer, Chair
Howard Cox
Milton Fine
Pam Goergen
Harry Howell
Henry Kaufman
John Richman
Dan Stanton
Lucy Bukowski, Chief Financial Officer
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
R. Reed Daniel, Chair
Christine Aylward
Linda Boothby
Patricia Bush
B.J. Goldboro
Jane Grandusky
Janine Mayville
Laura McSherry
Susan Mosely
Sally Rosanski
Ralph Saltzman
Mary Stratos
Jacqueline Smith
Glenn Tomlinson, William Randolph Hearst
Curator of Education
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
Daniel Kahan, Co-Chair
Shanna Kahan, Co-Chair
Zachary Appleman
Virginia Oatley Bergés
Otto Bergés
Eve Bucwinski
Cherryl Cannon
Emily Clifford
Jay Clifford
Ted Cooney
Angela Culveyhouse
Damienne De Cristo
Alexander Harvey
Brandie Herbst
Todd Herbst
Alexander Ives
Katherine Lande
Bruce Langmaid
Scott Moses
Zak Odhwani
Charles Poole
Dara Ross
nominating commit t e e
John F. Niblack, Chair
Christine Aylward
Annie Falk
Nicki Harris
Gilbert C. Maurer
Joey Pearson
Mitchell Rubenstein
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
pe rsonne l commit t e e
Peter Georgescu
Gilbert C. Maurer
Janine Mayville
Joey Pearson
Hope Alswang, Executive Director
Lucy Bukowski, Chief Financial Officer
Jane Wattick, Human Resources Manager
Kemp Stickney, ex-officio
Young Friends
of the Norton
The Young Friends of the Norton is a dynamic group
of young professionals in their 20s to 40s who seek
to promote and advance the appreciation of, and
participation in, the visual arts. Each season, the
Young Friends of the Norton present exciting events
that bring young professionals together.
The Young Friends of the Norton enjoyed a
successful 2012–2013 season, which began with
a kick-off cocktail party at the Museum, featuring
a curator-led tour of the inaugural Rudin Prize for
Emerging Photographers exhibition. Young Friends
raised funds to acquire for the Museum Collection
work by Los Angeles-based artist and Rudin Prize
recipient Analia Saban.
The momentum continued with the Holiday Party,
a celebration of Doris Duke-inspired fashion at Gypsy
on Palm Beach, a private event at Art Palm Beach,
and A Midseason Night’s Dream at Arcature Fine
Art. At the Museum, Young Friends enjoyed special,
reduced-price tickets to the Annie Leibovitz Exhibition
Opening Gala and the annual Bal des Arts, as well as
cocktail parties and curator-led tours celebrating the
opening of special exhibitions.
the young friends 2012–2013 season was generously
underwritten in part by applied advertising
solutions inc., bulldog marketing, lila photo, palm
beach proper, and palm beach young society.
92
communications
The media’s heightened interest in the Norton
continued in 2012-2013. Hispanic TV station Azteca
America (an affiliate of wpec News 12) covered the
Museum for the first time. Jupiter magazine and the
Boca Observer, among others, gave the Norton more
coverage than in previous years.
South Florida’s major dailies, The Palm Beach Post,
Sun-Sentinel, Miami Herald; weeklies New Times and
Florida Weekly; monthly, bi-monthly, and quarterly
publications such as BOCA magazine, City & Shore,
ArtsPaper, and Art & Culture continued to highlight
the Norton on a regular basis. In addition to frequent
exhibition coverage, local, regional, and national
media devoted substantial space to the 2012 hiring
of Deputy Director James Brayton Hall and of Ellen
Roberts, Harold and Anne Berkley Smith Curator of
American Art.
The Museum enjoyed TV exposure on all four
Palm Beach County network affiliates — wptv (nbc),
wpec (cbs), wpbf (abc), and fox 29 — with coverage of the openings of the Annie Leibovitz and Block
by Block: Inventing Amazing Architecture exhibitions,
and the annual September closing to prepare for the
coming season. Miami Public television station
wpbt 2 broadcast an interview with Leibovitz.
Miami npr station wlrn (91.3 fm) devoted an
entire episode of its weekly Arts Beat program to
an interview with Annie Leibovitz recorded at the
Museum. Norton staff continued to appear with
regularity on the Clear Channel and Palm Beach
Broadcasting radio networks’ Sunday public affairs
programs (and in psas), discussing special exhibitions, pace outreach programs, and Art After Dark.
The Museum also had a hefty presence on social
media, with more than 19,000 Twitter followers
and more than 7,000 likes on Facebook. Blogs such
as Champagne Living and Art Log also paid a lot of
attention to the Norton; and the Museum’s website
generated an average of 13,000 unique visitors
per month. Marketing dollars from the Tourist
Development Council also enabled the Museum to
get out its message and notify the community of its
exciting and innovative programming and exhibitions.
New York PR partners Resnicow Schroeder
Associates (rsa) helped generate national media
attention throughout the year, including widespread
coverage of the winner of the inaugural biennial Rudin
Prize for Emerging Photographers as well as inclusion of
next year’s David Webb: Society’s Jeweler exhibition in
a Wall Street Journal article on the trend of museums
presenting jewelry and fashion exhibitions. Rsa also
generated coverage in national art publications such
as Art in America and ARTnews, Art Info, Art Daily, and
the London-based The Art Newspaper.
This frequent and positive coverage occurred
in conjunction with the clearly stated vision of the
Museum administration: Be responsive and sensitive
to the South Florida community while simultaneously
becoming an institution of greater significance in the
art world. And it translated into increased awareness,
public good will, and attendance. That was especially
evident with the Free Thursdays for Florida Residents
program during summer 2013, which saw a doubling
of attendance compared to most summers of the
past 10 years.
Scott Benarde
director of com m unic ations
94communications
radio
wlrn 91.3 fm (NPR/Miami)
850 wftl am (Ft. Lauderdale)
Palm Beach Broadcasting (wrmf 97.9 fm,
wirk 103.1 fm, sunny 107.9 fm, x102.3 fm)
Clear Channel Media (wrlx 92.1 fm, wavw 92.7 fm,
wldi (wild 95) 95.5 fm, wkgr (The Gater) 98.7 fm,
woll 105.5 fm, wbzt 1230 am, wjno 1290 am)
loc a l p u b l i c at i o n s
Press
national pu blic at io n s
Antiques and Arts Weekly
Architectural Digest
Art Basel Magazine
Artdaily
Art in America
Artnet
Artnews
Blouin ArtInfo
DuJour Magazine
HuffingtonPost.com
Hyperallergic
Interior Design
GalleristNY.com
Go AirTran Inflight Magazine
Modern Magazine
Museum Magazine
New York Times
On View
Real Clear Arts
Sotheby’s Magazine
Wall Street Journal
i nternational/fo r e ign pu blicat io n s
The Art Newspaper (England)
Asian Art Newspaper
television
wpbt 2 (PBS Miami)
wptv 5 (NBC)
wpec 12 (CBS)
wpbf 25 (ABC)
wflx 29 (FOX)
Azteca America (Latin)
Art & Culture of Palm Beach County
Art Districts
Boca Forum
Boca Magazine
Boca Observer
Boca Tribune
Broward-Palm Beach New Times
City & Shore Magazine
Coastal Star
Delray Beach Magazine
Fisher Island Magazine
Florida Design
Florida Weekly
Jewish Journal
Jupiter Magazine
Miami Art Exchange
Miami Art Guide
The Miami Herald
Ocean Drive
Orlando Sentinel
Palm Beach ArtsPaper
Palm Beacher
Palm Beach Daily News
Palm Beach Illustrated
The Palm Beach Post
Palm Beach Society
The Parklander
South Florida Parenting
Sun-Sentinel
Town-Crier
Tropic Magazine
The Norton already has a great photography collection.
So I’m very proud to be a part of that.
— Annie Leibovitz, WPTV Channel 5, jan . 1 7, 2 01 3
The Norton focuses on celebrity photographer Annie
Leibovitz’s straight-up portraits, and reveals an
underappreciated aspect of her talent.
— Scott Eyman, The Palm Beach Post, jan . 3 1 , 2 01 3
Lucian Freud: Paintings and Prints at the Norton Museum of Art
is a small exhibition, but it packs more visual firepower than
shows many times its size.
— John Cappola, The Miami Herald, july 28 , 2 01 3
Through its Masterpiece of the Month series, the Norton has
been displaying some striking — though seldom-exhibited —
works by renowned artists.
— Kingsley Guy, City & Shore, aug . 1 , 2 01 3
96communications
December 5, 2012
98communications
RESNICOW
SCHROEDER
April 15, 2013
Norton Museum of Art receives nine important works of art from
Palm Beach collectors
Online
we bsite
Average of 13,000 unique visitors per month
(October 2012 – September 2013)
fac e book
Total 7,980 likes
(160 percent increase over last year)
twitter
20,114 followers
(288 percent increase over last year)
Richard Diebenkorn (US, 1922-1993), Mission Landscape,1962. Oil on canvas, 14 x 16 1/8 in.
Gift of Anne Berkley Smith.
WEST PALM BEACH, FL.- The Norton Museum of Art, recognized nationally for its important
collection of modern American and European art, recently accessioned into the collection nine
significant works of art. These works range from Italian Old Master paintings and paintings by
Richard Diebenkorn and Wayne Thiebaud to contemporary works by Jenny Saville and Lynda
Benglis. These works add important dimension and depth to the museum’s European art
collection and expand the museum’s growing contemporary collection.
“The impact of these gifts of art—especially when they are as notable as those recently
donated—cannot be overstated,” said Norton Museum of Art director Hope Alswang. “The
Museum’s permanent collection has been profoundly enhanced because of the generosity of
RESNICOW
SCHROEDER
December 4, 2012
Analia Saban Wins Norton Museum’s Inaugural Rudin Prize for
Emerging Photographers
By Benjamin Sutton
It’s a big week in the art world, and not only because of Art Basel Miami Beach. After Elizabeth Price
was named the 2012 Turner Prize winner yesterday, today West Palm Beach’s Norton Museum of Art
announced that Los Angeles-based, Argentina-born artist Analia Saban is the winner of its inaugural
Rudin Prize for Emerging Photographers, an award that will be given every two years. Saban was
nominated by John Baldessari.
“Analia Saban is leading the field in inventive, engaging new work” said the Norton’s photography
curator Tim B. Wride. “Her work is characterized by combining photographic imagery with other art
forms with stunning results.”
The prize comes with a $20,000 purse. The other nominees were: Eunice Adorno and Gabriel Nin Solis,
both of whom are based in Mexico City (and were nominated by Susan Meiselas and Graciela Iturbide,
respectively); Palermo-based Mauro D’Agati, who was nominated by Michael Rovner; and Bjørn
Venø, who is based in London and was nominated by Yinka Shonibare. Through a combination of gifts
1 0 0
The Hearst Corporation
Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau
Palm Beach County Cultural Council
Palm Beach County Tourist Development Council
Mrs. Andrall Pearson
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Richman
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Saltzman
$2 5 ,000 to $ 9 9 ,9 9 9
thank you
Thank You
The Norton Museum of Art is an invaluable resource,
sharing great art with the residents and visitors of
South Florida and preserving that art for generations
to come. With its outreach and educational programs
and low (sometimes free) price of admission, the
Norton welcomes visitors of all ages and backgrounds to explore and engage with its extensive
Collection. This is only possible through the generosity of the Norton’s donors, who recognize the vital
role that art plays in the well-being of a community.
With this in mind, the Norton gratefully acknowledges those who supported the Museum from Oct. 1,
2012 to Sept. 30, 2013.
v isionary donors
Mr.* and Mrs. Melvin Levine
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert C. Maurer
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Niblack
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Richman
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Saltzman
Mrs. Harold Smith
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Soter
$2 50,000 to $ 49 9 ,9 9 9
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Niblack
$1 00,000 to $2 49 ,9 9 9
A detail of Adam and Eve
with the infants Cain and
Abel, a gift from Damon
Mezzacappa.
Mrs. Glenn Bailey
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Baum
Mrs. George T. Delacorte*
Mr. and Mrs. Alan S. Davis
The Leonard and Sophie Davis Foundation, Inc.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Gross
Addison Hines Charitable Trust
Mrs. George Andreas
Mr. and Mrs. E. William Aylward
Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Barovick
Mr. Bruce A. Beal
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony M. Beyer
BMO Private Bank
The Honorable and Mrs. Samuel W. Bodman
Mrs. Jane C. Carroll and Mr. Leo Arnaboldi
Mrs. E. Paul Casey
Chastain Charitable Foundation
Ms. Beth Rudin DeWoody
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Falk
George and Valerie Delacorte Fund
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Georgescu
Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Goergen
Estate of Desna Goldman
Mr. and Mrs. J. Ira Harris
Hollywood Media Corp. (Mitchell Rubenstein/Laurie Silvers)
Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Howell Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp
Dr. and Mrs. Henry Kaufman
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard I. Korman
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lazarus
Marmot Foundation
Mr. and Mrs.* Hamish Maxwell
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Mayville
Mr. and Mrs. John L. McGraw
Mr. and Mrs. Carlos G. Morrison
Dr. Norman* and Mrs. Ruth Rosenberg
Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf
Ms. Laurie S. Silvers and Mr. Mitchell Rubenstein
Mrs. Harold Smith
Mrs. Beverly Sommer
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Soter
Ambassador and Mrs. Craig R. Stapleton
Mr. and Mrs. Kemp C. Stickney
Wilmington Trust, FSB
1 0 2
t han k yo u
$10,000 to $2 4 ,9 99
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Ames
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Anbinder
Dale and Doug Anderson
BB&T
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence R. Beyer
Mrs. Margaret S. Bilotti
Crystal & Company
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin H. Davidson
Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Endelson
Ms. Laura Evans and Mr. James Diack
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Fine
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald S. Fineberg
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ford
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Gendelman
Mr. and Mrs. J. Arthur Goldberg
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Greenfield
Mr. and Mrs. Martin D. Gruss
JPMorgan Chase Bank
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Katz
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Kinney
Mrs. Marion Kleinkramer
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Martinez
Mrs. Elaine A. Merriman
Mrs. Arthur I. Meyer
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond K. Moran
Palm Beach Community Trust Fund
Mrs. Elizabeth Richebourg Rea
Mrs. George M. Ross
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Safir
Mr. John C. Smith
Mr. and Mrs. Matthew K. Smith
Sotheby’s
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome L. Stern
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stiller
Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Vecellio Jr.
$2 ,500 to $9 ,9 9 9
Anonymous
George & Frances Armour Foundation
Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass
The Association of Israel’s Decorative Arts (AIDA)
Ms. Louise Austin
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Bassin
Mr. Howard Bernick
Mrs. Judy Black and Mr. Richard Schlosberg
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Blumenstein
Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Bronfman
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Brown
Mr. William K. Caler Jr.
Mrs. Malcolm G. Chace
Mrs. Leona Chanin
Christina’s Catering
Mr. Howard Cox
Mr. Loyd F. Crawley
Ms. Grace C. Dana
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Daniels
Mr. Milton Dresner
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Eaton
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Ehrlich
Ms. Susan Esson
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fabrikant
Mrs. Marjorie S. Fisher
Mrs. Miles Q. Fiterman
Frank L. Weyenberg Charitable Trust
Mr. and Mrs. Howard L. Ganek
Mr. Dorsey R. Gardner and Ni Rong
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Hall
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce T. Halle
Mr. and Mrs. Torrence C. Harder
Mrs. Kerry Healey
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hewitt
Mr. and Mrs. Ashley D. Hoffman
Ms. Jo Ann Hoffman and Ms. Beth Priest
Mrs. Mary Hulitar
Itto Willits Foundation
Jack and Goldie Wolfe Miller Fund
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Jacobs
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Jaffe
Mr. and Mrs. William Johnston
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Kahan
Mrs. Jeanne Kanders
Mrs. Jack G. Kay
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Kessler
Judge and Mrs. R. Khawly
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kirchhoff
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney A. Kohl
Mr. and Mrs. Brian Kosoy
Ms. Diane Krane and Mr. Myles Slosberg
Dr. Robert and Janice Laff
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Lane
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lester
Mr. and Mrs. H. Irwin Levy
LILA PHOTO
Mrs. Ellen Liman
Mr. and Mrs. Earle I. Mack
Mr. and Mrs. William L. Mack
Mr. and Mrs. James Mayer
Mr. and Mrs. John B. McCoy
Mrs. Sydell L. Miller
Mr. Burt Minkoff
Mr. Tom Morrison
Mr. and Mrs. David H. Moscow
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Munder
Mrs. Beverly J. Myers
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Nakushian
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Neff
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Nolen
Palm Beach Proper
Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry K. Pearlman
PNC Bank
PNC Wealth Management
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Pohanka
Richters of Palm Beach
Mr. David Schafer
Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Schlenger
Mrs. Donna Schneier and Mr. Leonard Goldberg
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald S. Schuster
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Scott Sr.
Mr. Donald B. Scott Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Silpe
Mrs. Sylvia Slifka
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Smith
SunTrust Foundation
Mr. and Mrs. Alberto Vitale
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Wainger
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
Mrs. Jan Willinger
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Wish
r.h. norton heritage soc iety
Anonymous (4)
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Apfel
Mr.* and Mrs. Glenn W. Bailey
Natalie and Scott W.* Bates
The Honorable and Mrs. William E. Benjamin II
Mrs. Randi Kjekstad Bull
Mr. William K. Caler Jr.
Drs. Joan and Bernard Chodorkoff
Mr. Richard P. Coonan
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Sumner Feldberg
Mrs. Shirley Fiterman
Mr. and Mrs.* Henry G. Gardiner
Mr.* and Mrs. Robert B. Gronlund
Mr.* and Mrs. Jack Hight
Mr. Stephen M. W. Hofrichter III
Mr.* and Mrs. Nathaniel Jacobs
The Honorable and Mrs. Harry A. Johnston II
Mr.* and Mrs. Saul Kleinkramer
Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman
Felice and Marvin* Kronfeld
Baroness Erminia Landau
Mrs. Bernice Levinson
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert C. Maurer
Mr. and Mrs.* Hamish Maxwell
Colonel and Mrs. James F. Miller
Mr.* and Mrs. Melvin B. Nessel
Mr. George Newburger
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Niblack
Mr. David J. Patten
Mr. and Mrs. Kai Petersen
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Prigoff
Mrs. Elizabeth Richebourg Rea
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Richman
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Saltzman
Mrs. Donna Schneier and Mr. Leonard Goldberg
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold I. Simon
Mr.* and Mrs. Harold Smith
Mr. Kemp C. Stickney and Ms. Edith E. Huntley
Mr. Harry Striebel
Dr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Swanson
Mrs. T. Suffern Tailer
Mr. and Mrs. Terry Wallace
Mr.* and Mrs. Eric Weinberger
Mr. Robert A. Wiener
Gloria Winston
Mr. and Mrs. Frederic D. Wolfe
For changes or corrections, please contact
Holly Davis, Deputy Director for Development,
at (561) 832-2659.
1 0 4
t han k yo u
donors of art
Dale and Doug Anderson
Eleonore and Ronald Bacher
Bruce A. Beal
Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA
Dr. Irwin Berman
Civilian Arts Projects, Washington, DC
Darryl J. Curran
Tacita Dean
Barbara DeGenevieve
Beth Rudin DeWoody
Allen F. Dickerman
Chris Enos
Robert W. Fichter
Robert Flynt
Bonnie Gordon
Lorraine and Sy Grabel
Dennis Grady
Howard and Ellen Greenberg
Dr. Selma Halo and Fred Croton
Paul M. Hertzmann, Inc., Vintage Photographs
Doris Hodroff
Suda House
Jeffrey Hubert
Pirkle Jones Foundation
Rita Krauss
Joan and Charles Lazarus
Annie Leibovitz
Dennis Letbetter
Robert A. Lewis
Carol and Ray Merritt Collection
Damon Mezzacappa
Midtown Payson Galleries
Christopher Morris
Jane L. O’Neal
Olivia Parker
John and Joanne Payson
Alice Rudin
Scheinbaum & Russek, Ltd., Santa Fe, NM
Adam Sheffer
Rena Small
Anne Berkley Smith
Drs. Ayten and Tuncer Someren
Sarah Ross Soter
Marcia and Robert E. Sparrow
Robert von Sternberg
Jan Willinger
Linda Wolf
Rob Wynne and Gavlak Gallery
Noelle K. Tan
med i a sp on sor s
The Miami Herald
Palm Beach Daily News
The Palm Beach Post and pbpulse.com
Palm Beach Young Society
WPTV NewsChannel 5
norton m useum of art nam ed endowm ents
Mr. and Mrs. E. William Aylward Intern Endowment
Diane Belfer Endowment for Sculpture
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Benjamin II
General Endowment
Andrea and Charles Bronfman Program Fund
for Families
William K. Caler General Endowment
Chastain Foundation Intern Endowment
George and Valerie Delacorte Endowment Fund
Dreyfoos Endowment Fund
Milton and Sheila Fine Endowment
for Contemporary Art
Florida Department of State
Cultural Endowment Program
Dr. Henry and Lois Foster Endowment
for the Exhibition of Contemporary Art
Gayle and Paul Gross Education Endowment Fund
William Randolph Hearst Curator of Education
William Randolph Hearst Endowment Fund
for Education and Outreach Programs
Janirve Foundation Education Endowment
in Memory of Irving and Jeannett Reuter
Kanders Endowment for Art Enrichment
for School Children
Gioconda and Joseph King Endowment
for Exhibitions
Bruce Mahon Endowment for Docent Education
Maurer Family Fund Arts Education Endowment
Mr. and Mrs. Hamish Maxwell Exhibition Endowment
Elizabeth B. McGraw Curator of Chinese Art
Elizabeth B. McGraw
Building Preservation Endowment
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Jack Merriman General Endowment
Sarah Vierck Mettler Family Fund
Sydelle and Arthur I. Meyer Endowment Fund
National Endowment for the Arts
John and Heidi Niblack Endowment for Chinese Art
Christina Orr-Cahall
Endowment for Community Outreach
Michael M. Rea Endowment for Special Exhibitions
Priscilla and John Richman
Endowment for American Art
Samuel Rosenthal Foundation Endowment
for Education and Outreach Programs
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Schott Endowment for Education
Donald and Linda Silpe Endowment
for the Continuing Education of Docents
Harold and Anne Berkley Smith
Curator of American Art Endowment
William and Sarah Ross Soter Photography Fund
William and Sarah Ross Soter
Curator of Photography Endowment
*deceased
1 0 6
t han k yo u
The Museum wishes to thank the docents and
volunteers who devoted their time to working with
the Museum and shared the Collection and exhibitions with visitors. Last year, Museum docents led
more than 1,200 tours, and docents and volunteers
devoted more than 13,500 hours providing vital
educational outreach and visitor services.
Volunteers
Naomi Anderson
Taylor Anderson
Thomas Baker
Farrah Barstrom
Roger Bash
Elissa Baum
Lea Beinstein
Yvonne Belton
Marcia Beutner
Ana Bishop
George Bishop
Verna Bittenbinder
Sheila Bloom
Sonja Brankovic
Savannah Brown
Susan Buzzard
Jean Bytner
Caitlin Cantor
Carly Capko
Marguerite Carrera
Vivian Chen
Jade Chung-Lee
Elizabeth Closson
Chris Conner
Holly Coombs
Jessica Consuegra
Paolo Correia
Kathy Cottier
Ariella Cowrie
Karen Crea
Yvonne Cruz
Diana Deresz
Brooke Dodrill
Shannon Donahue
Jennifer Driskel
Donna-Lee Erickson
Wilmary Escoto
Michelle Evans
Robert Feller
Libby Fishman
Rosalie Friedmann
Rulonda Fuller
Pat Geltz
Nina Gonzalez
Lyn Gordon
Sarah Griffin
Roberta Groobert
Nancy Grossman
Russ Haidinger
Jaclyn Handford
Maritza Harrington
Xudan He
Carole Held
Joanne Heron
Gloria Hoffman
Chelsea Horton
Harriet Hurwitz
Daniel Hyland
Nadine Ivangine
Nancy Katz
Emma Kirby
Martha Klein
Kay Koch
Florence Kram
Serena Laine-Lobsinger
Jordan Lane-Palmer
Nicholas Larsen
Doris Le
Jeannie Le
Eleanor Levine
Li Lin
Ming Lin
Susan Lotman
Phyllis Magarian
Shahayra Majumder
Ingrid Martinez
Juan Matiz
Amanda Mianguy
Ellen Mann
Ann Margulis
Keeter Martinson
Barbara McDonald
Nicole McGowan
Danielle Mercier
Lana Meredith
Linda Miller
Nina Minervini
Valerie Mishko
Kaitlyn Moore
Marjorie Most
Meghan Murray
Arlene Neivert
Karli Newton
David Nitz
Docents
Jan Northrop
Jenny O’Brien
David Ocampo
Alovarson Odige
Sunny Organ
London Ott
Jack Ozer
Marisa Papenfuss
Mildred Pariente
Diane Partridge
Alice Pearce
Ursula Peckerman
Ariana Picchetto
Tirza Pletcher
Carolyn Potter
Joyce Potter
Barbara Prine
Sylvia Raftery
Mary Jane Range
Sallie Ransom
MacKenzie Rattray
Kristen Reisig
Elissa Rendzia
Vivien Rey
Chelsea Robbins
Eliane Rochefort
Edye Rollins
Ian Rollins
Arlene Rosenbaum
Tess Roy
Diane Sacchetti
Sarah Sadiah
Kaitlyn Salley
Chandler Sandy
Cynthia Santiago
Kelsey Satalino
Eva Schlanger
Rez Seyedin
Enid Shames
Lenny Silverberg
Jim Smith
Juanita Smith
Micki Sokol
Willa Spivak
Lynne Spozarsky
Annalisa Spreadborough
Carole Stein
Hannah Suh
Kimberly Tehan
James Toomey
Ted Tribolati
Hortense Vantresca
Phyllis Verducci
Kayla Viaud
Elaina Voyles
Sarah Ward
Brianna Webster
Sylvia Weinberg
Chuck Werner
Shirley Arffa
Helene Augenblick
Bud Benson
Lou Ann Berkley
Judy Brownstein
Fredda Butowsky
Nancy Carlin
Mary Cory
Barbara Dicker
Mildred Drees
Lenore Dreyfuss
Harriett Eckstein
Gail Elias
Meg Fisher
Adele Freidensohn
Michael Friedlander
Ilene Gerber
Bernice Gershon
BJ Golboro
Florence Goodman
Fay Graham
Gayle Gross
Howard Gross
Renate Gross
Gail Hano
Robert Harris
Joan Heller
Jean Ellen Heron
Helane Hertz
Phyllis Hopman
Raquel Howard
Marjorie Isenberg
Roman Kadron
Susanne Kaletsch
Jeanne Kanders
Evelyn Katz
Sue Keller
Carol Ann Khawly
Rhoda Kleid
Joan Korostoff
Jane Krasker
Janice Laff
Natalie Lederer
Joan Lumb
Karol Lurie
Danette MacGregor
Morrine Marantz
JoAnn Marcus
Robert Marsey
Drew McAllister
Laura McSherry
Jean Meade
Michele Misci
Barbara Mitrione
Sylvia Moffett
Dorothy Morton
Beverly Myers
Jules Organ
Virginia Pappalardo
Richard Pelletier
Harriet Pollack
Hinda Pollack
Nancy Purucker
Howard Roberts
Lucille Rockley
Alice Rudin
Faith Schullstrom
Iris Schulman
Mary Louise Schwab
Marilyn Schwartz
Isabel Shattuck
Bei Bei She
Bobbi Shorr
Barbara Sider
Linda Silpe
Elinore Simon
Anita Smith
Charlyne Smith
Robert Steinnagel
Elizabeth Stevens
Frances Stevens
Alex Sussman
Mary Twitty
Jo-Anne Weingarden
Kate Weingart
Patti Zeeman
1 0 8
t han k yo u
Nancy Pawlowski, PACE Instructor
Sara Rabinowitz, PACE Instructor
Staff
Hope Alswang, Executive Director & CEO
Patricia Williamson, Manager, Director’s Office
James B. Hall, Deputy Director
Charles Stainback, Assistant Director
Regine David, Special Assistant, Director’s Office
Ashley Snyder, Special Assistant, Director’s Office
Hilary Jordan, Senior Graphic Designer
Ashley Simmons, Graphic Designer
Jamie Hoffman, Visitor Services Manager
Catheryn Espino, Visitor Services Representative
Diego Guiterrez, Visitor Services Representative
Kelly Knapp, Visitor Services Representative
Patricia Long, Visitor Services Representative
Scott Rachesky, Visitor Services Representative
Jane Wattick, Human Resources Manager
Cheryl Brutvan, Director of Curatorial Affairs
& Curator of Contemporary Art
Laurie Barnes, Elizabeth B. McGraw Curator of Chinese Art
Ellen Roberts, Harold and Anne Berkley Smith
Curator of American Art
Timothy Wride, William and Sarah Ross Soter
Curator of Photography
Jerry Dobrick, Curatorial Associate, European Art
Maggie Edwards, Curatorial Assistant
Ashley Ford, Davis Fellow
Pamela Parry, Senior Registrar
Aleesha Ast, Assistant Registrar
John Welter, Assistant Registrar
Kevin Cummins, Senior Art Handler
Jason Fennell, Art Handler
Glenn Tomlinson, William Randolph Hearst
Curator of Education
Carole Gutterman, Associate Curator of Education
Jessica Kennedy, Assistant Curator of Education
Marcy Koch, Assistant Curator of Education
Malissa Reese, Volunteer Coordinator
Yimarie Rivera, Program and Volunteer Coordinator
Kitty Bowe Hearty, Education Programmer
Yael Matan, Education Programmer
Britt Feingold, PACE Instructor
Guadalupe Lawrence, PACE Instructor
Patricia Parry, PACE Instructor
Holly Davis, Deputy Director for Development
Graham Russell, Associate Director of Development
Suzanne Crell, Assistant
to the Deputy Director for Development
Melissa Benilous, Senior Membership Associate
Catherine Collins, Development Assistant
Natalie Ellis, Grants Writer
Jonathan Wemette, Grants Writer
Angela Martin, Donor Relations Coordinator
Katherine Matevia, Annual Giving Coordinator
Rebecca Levine, Senior Special Events Coordinator
Pamela Comiter, Special Events Coordinator
Jaimie Hart, Special Events Coordinator
Scott Benarde, Communications Director
Hilary Greene, Communications Coordinator
Lucy Bukowski, Chief Financial Officer
Christina Imbriani, Accounting Manager
Otilia Olvera, Financial Analyst
Debbie Mays, Accounting Associate
Lisa Nicoletti, Accounting Associate
Ike Chimbandi, IT Department Head
Sonia Latalladi, Facility Use Coordinator
Heather Blades, Retail Operations Manager
Robin Hoffenberg, Weekend Museum Store Manager
Carolyn Smith, Weekend Museum Store Manager
Linda Huggins, Museum Store Associate
Kathy Morlock, Museum Store Associate
Raymond Hall, Director of Security & Building Operations
Maurice Williams, Security Manager
Robert King, Assistant Security Supervisor
Anthony Bell, Floor Captain
Kahane Brown, Security Officer
Wilbert Canzater, Security Officer
Errol C. Garrick, Security Officer
Nicholas Hill, Security Officer
Allen Jones, Security Officer
Matthew McCarthy, Security Officer
Clemente Mendoza, Security Officer
Eugene Mniuch, Security Officer
Sharon Peterkin, Security Officer
Bob Salci, Security Officer
Maria Sanchez, Security Officer
Herbert Thomas, Security Officer
Roddrick Wesley, Security Officer
Andrew Williams, Security Officer
Catherine Williams, Security Officer
Shibeshi Woldetekle, Security Officer
Robastiano Morrero Jr., Audio/Visual Technician
Willie Wilbon, Maintenance Supervisor
Rocky Paulk, Assistant Maintenance Supervisor
Hubert Benniefield, Maintenance Technician
Lisandro Cisneros, Maintenance Technician
David Harris, Maintenance Technician
Jose Rafael Martinez, Maintenance Technician
Robert Stanley, Maintenance Technician
Kathy DeBoer, Receiving Dock Master