foodstuff

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foodstuff
no 1/00
1/01
no
Lyckeby
foodstuff
“Swedish” ketchup
breaks through
in the Ukraine p . 2
Kiev
UKRAINE
Odessa
Kachovka
The new trends
5
Building the food of the future
6
Starch improves yoghurt
8
www.food.lyckeby.com
Ukrainian tomatoes
a true “c atc h
u p” s t o r y
They did not start with two empty hands – but with a bag of
cucumber seeds and a ton of determination.
Today, almost eight years later, Johan Bodén and Carl Sturén are
running one of Ukraine’s most successful companies – Chumak.
TEXT JÖRGEN OLSSON PHOTO ERIK MÅRTENSSON
T
omato ketchup is Chumak’s most successful
product. The product was established in 1997 and
has recently been voted ’best known brand name’ in
the country. More than 90 percent of the people in the
Ukraine know what Chumak is and what they do.
“We analysed how the Ukrainians consume and what
they eat. The food is not very varied; people eat lots of
fried potatoes and fried meat. We realised that there was a
golden opportunity to sell seasoning accessories,” says
Johan Bodén.
They decided on ketchup. Until then, ketchup had been
available mostly as expensive, occasional imports or as
domestic products of varying quality. To help them, they
found an American who had been in the tomato industry
for 40 years.
Their original attempt was growing cucumbers on 100
acres of land, borrowed from a kolkhoz. They did
everything themselves, from planting to selling canned
cucumber. That way they learned what was required to
make the production work.
You have to be independent
“But we also learned that it was necessary to be totally
independent in every respect; we could not be sure that
anything would work if we did not handle it by ourselves.
It is only now that we have been able to outsource work
and get some partners. We realised that producing and
selling cucumbers was like selling igloos to Eskimos.
2➞3
Swedish entrepreneurs Carl Sturén and Johan Bodén have
taken ketchup to new heights in the Ukraine. Called Chumak,
their company is one of the most successful in that country.
Everyone here knows everything about cucumbers,” says
Johan Bodén
Chumak runs its operation in the vicinity of the town
Kachovka, close to the northern edge of the Black Sea.
Today, the company has four production facilities and four
warehouses in different communities, plus its own transport company.
Chumak has 1,200 employees and sales of SEK 400
million per year. The number of employees triples during
the busy season.
“For every person employed by us, another six or seven
people are occupied indirectly one way or another. That
means that during the busy season, more than 20,000
people are dependant on us in some way. In a region of
900,000 people, we are an important employer,” says Johan
Bodén.
Two and a half million acres
Southern Ukraine, where Chumak’s farming operations are
located, offers unique conditions. The area is made up of
dry, flat steppes with enormous fields. It rarely rains more
relations
Poland
Chumak:
fact and fiction
White
Russia
Kiev
Chumak is not a made up name, the word has
UKRAINE
been part of the Ukrainian language for
Moldavia Odessa
centuries. The original Chumak was a merchant
Kachovka
during the Middle Ages. He traded salt, which at
the time was used as currency. Throughout
Romania
history, the Chumaks have occupied an
the Black Sea
important place among Ukrainian story tellers.
Legend has it, for example, that the Milky Way is
”Road of the Chumaks.” Every now and then,
they would drop grains of salt during their walk
in the sky; this salt is what we call stars today.
Russia
››
www.food.lyckeby.com
››
than 70 millimetres during the growing season, June
through September. But – they have an irrigation system,
quite possibly the best in the world. It took 20 years to
build and has the capacity to irrigate two and a half million
acres, an area that seems hard to comprehend. That
corresponds to more than a third of the total area being
cultivated in Sweden.
“The irrigation system enables us to grow fruit,
vegetables and oil producing plants in the same location,
something that is very unusual. Normally, you get about
8 tons of tomatoes per acre – we get around 22 tons,” says
Johan Bodén.
The two are related. Johan Bodén is Carl Sturén’s uncle,
and the tradition of food production runs in the family. The
Örnäs family business has been producing jams and juices
since 1932.
“I have had the privilege of travelling a lot, and I have
been exposed to growing and farming in many parts of the
world. I have watched, listened, and learned and as time
went on, I heard more and more about the exceptionally
good conditions in the Ukraine,” says Johan Bodén.
When his nephew, Carl Sturén, had finished his military
service, both he and Johan Bodén wanted to establish
themselves internationally. Carl went to the Ukraine and
spent a year travelling to get to know the country.
“We brought our own knowledge and our traditions, but
it was difficult in the beginning,” Johan Bodén recalls.
Everything in the Ukraine had been destroyed after the fall
of the Soviet Union; the
infrastructure was in shambles.
An enormous market
The market in this part of the world is
huge, especially if you are producing food.
“There are 50 million people here who
wake up every day with the same
question: ’What are we going to eat
today,’ Johan Bodén says.
Chumak recently started exports to
Russia, where they have opened sales
offices in a number of
locations. The long-term
goal is to establish several
brand names with the same
recognition and impact as
the largest equivalents in the
western world. But Johan
Bodén and Carl Sturén are
also making plans for the
international market.
“Israel, the U.S. and
Canada are very interesting.
There are many descendants
of immigrants, and our products fit their culinary traditions,” Johan Bodén says.
Svetlana Stytsura is
food technician at
Chumak. She is one
example of the
collaboration with
Lyckeby Stärkelsen in
that she’s been trained at
Lyckeby Stärkelsens’s
facilities in Sweden.
”Lyckeby Stärkelsen
understands our needs”
Chumak started to collaborate with Lyckeby Stärkelsen
early on. The advantages of potato starch became evident
during development of the ketchup.
“We worked on developing a ketchup with a home
cooked taste and quality, because we had discovered that’s
what people wanted. During that process, we came across
4➞5
Lyckeby Stärkelsen. It turned out that their potato starch
had the properties we needed – which the corn starch did
not,” Johan Bodén says.
Other starch producers are calling on Chumak all the
time, but Johan Bodén expects co-operation with Lyckeby
Stärkelsen to develop and get closer. Svetlana Stytsura, one
of Chumak’s food technologists, has participated in training
at Lyckeby Stärkelsen’s facilities in Sweden. Chumak
expects to send more employees soon.
“This has to do with how you do business down here.
You can’t just come here and sell a product. You have to
offer more: support of different kinds, or training. Lyckeby
Stärkelsen has understood that,” Johan Bodén explains.
health
& safety
They are developing
the n e w
starch
What do top athletes and diabetics have in common?
The answer is starch – but with different functional properties.
Intensive research is going on within the Lyckeby Stärkelsen Group to
develop the starches of the future.
TEXT AND PHOTO JÖRGEN OLSSON
T
“
wo trends become clear. One supplies the athletes
with quick energy, the other may help make life
easier for diabetics,” says Hans Rydin, president of
Lyckeby Stärkelsen Food & Fibres’ sister company,
Carbamyl.
Carbamyl is behind the sportsdrink Vitargo. Because of
its patented starch, Vitargo keeps its promises. Other
sportsdrinks only makes them.
The special carbohydrate in Vitargo represents one of
the development trends. Here we are talking about a type
of starch that helps the body absorb extra energy very
quickly. This is important for endurance during long, hard
workouts or competition.
The Vitargo solution is hypotonic, or rather extremely
hypotonic, compared to the established carbohydrates in
sportsdrinks, which makes Vitargo leave the stomach
almost as fast as plain water. The body’s carbohydrate
reserves are replenished faster. The result for the athlete is
that his/her energy balance is assured and endurance is
increased.
Carbamyl GM Hans Rydin works with Åke Ståhl on
developing tomorrow’s starch. Product development of the
energy drink Vitargo continues and Hans
Rydin predicts there will be many
more uses in the future.
The Swedish national tennis team and the top skiers are
among the consumers, but the general public has yet to
discover and embrace the drink. The reason they have not
is that Vitargo cannot yet be sold ready-mixed.
“Drink your meal!”
“The goal is to be able to supply Vitargo ready to drink.
We can then enter the soft drink market,” says Hans Rydin.
Rydin envisions a future where the patented Vitargo starch
may be used in other drinks – in health care, for example.
“In the U.S., some drinks are advertised as meal
replacements, which means that you “drink your meal”.
Other studies have shown that if you take protein to build
muscle mass, an even better result is achieved if you
combine the protein with carbohydrates. Vitargo is
interesting in all those cases,” Rydin says.
A completely different trend
The other trend within the development of starch goes in
the opposite direction. Here we are talking about so called
resistant starch or white fibre. Its properties are totally in
line with current thinking in nutrition and food industry.
The resistant starch, a dietary fibre component, has what in
technical language is called a low glycemic index. This is a
way to measure how fast and how much the blood sugar
rises after a meal. The lower the glycemic index, the
smaller the increase in blood sugar.
The resistant starch has a very low index. This is due to
the fact that the nutrients from the starch are not absorbed
in the small intestine but proceed into the large intestine
where they are converted by the natural bacterial flora in
the digestive system.
“This is very important for diabetics. But it is also
thought to counter some diseases of the good life,”
Rydin says.
w w w. c a r b a m y l . s e
www.food.lyckeby.com
The engineer who creates
f o o d s f o r t he f u t u r e
“The four key words for the food of the future are convenience, safety, experience
and health.” We are quoting Kenneth Andersson, head of research and development
at the Swedish dairy-company Skånemejerier.
Kenneth Andersson advises food producers not to lock themselves into specific raw
materials. The controlling factor should be customer’s needs, not your own process.
TEXT AND PHOTO JÖRGEN OLSSON
W
hen Andersson talks about the foods
of the future and future food consumption, he usually builds his reasoning on the
four basic principles: convenience, safety,
experience and health. All of them must be
there and all are equally important. For
example, it is no longer possible to sell a food item based
only on the message that it is healthy – it also has to taste
good.
“And nobody can compromise safety. If, for example, you
eliminate the sugar, you have to replace it with something
that is not more dangerous than the sugar would have
been,” Andersson explains.
He says that the way to compete successfully in the
future market for foodstuffs is to start thinking in new
directions.
“You really must not base your thinking on the raw
materials you use most of the time – milk in our case. You
must base your thinking on the needs of the marketplace,
otherwise you get locked in. At Skånemejerier, we are
thinking of cereals, but not in the traditional form of flour
or mueslie, but in the form of drinks. For instance, the
fuctional food-drink ProViva is based on oats, and oats are
interesting. In part because of its fibre content and in part
because it is naturally gluten free.”
More and more starch
Another raw material which is attracting the interest of
Skånemejerier is fruit.
6➞7
“It has to do with the fact that we think that the market
for desserts, which we in Sweden traditionally have not
known how to capture, will be expanding. In this context it
is easy to see that our use of starch will increase. As
demands for reduction of fat in foods escalate, the functional properties of fat have to be replaced. Starch is the
natural replacement,” Andersson says.
An increasing market for desserts is one of the future
trends Andersson is predicting. But he suggests that the
food industry in general is not moving in any one specific
direction.
“Rather, we are seeing a number of parallel developments. One trend is increasing consumption of fast food,
which means that we must make it better and more
nutritious. Another trend is in the opposite direction, i.e.
‘slow-food,’ There is great interest in cooking in Sweden
right now. Cooks are treated like stars, and cooking is very
popular. This means that raw material standards increase.
A third trend is simplification; making cooking easier.
People are no longer as knowledgeable. Therefore cooking
needs to be simplified. In our case, that might mean that
we provide creme fraiche with different flavours.”
Bridge for ideas
Andersson describes his present work at Skånemejerier as
“being the ’&’ in R&D – a bridge between the research and
the company.” He collects and evaluates ideas coming from
the outside. Eight years ago the successful Swedish ProViva
drink was one of these.
portrait
“On the other hand, you need a whole lot
of ideas to develop one new product. The
trick is for all parties to realise what it is
that they are good at. At Skånemejerier we
know we are not good at research, but we
are good at finding the right partners. We
are also careful to make sure that there
will be a win-win situation for all partners,
such as the researcher keeping the patent
while we own the trademark. That way we can be
sure that those who conduct studies for us are
very active,” Kenneth Andersson says.
Affe 2001 ©
“Skånemejerier does not have its own research department and we are not planning to build one either. We are
good at product development, production and marketing.
We buy research from the outside,” Andersson explains.
He is the one who collects the ideas, sifts them, evaluates
them, and runs projects. At present about ten different
potential projects are being studied.
According to Kenneth Andersson, there is no shortage of
new product ideas. Especially after the success with
ProViva ideas are submitted in a steady stream, mostly
from researchers.
Threats and opportunities
Kenneth Andersson is also a
believer in continuing
development of “functional
foods” - foods that occupy
the grey area between
foodstuffs, health
food and medicines.
But he also recognises that development
is associated with risks.
“The danger is that
opportunists emerge, add a vitamin
to the juice and call it functional food. They
could destroy much and that would be too bad. As I see
it, this development is a great chance for consumers to get
good products. At Skånemejerier, we are working to enact
laws regulating functional foods. We want clinical studies of
the finished product to be required, not only for specific
ingredients.
“But this certainly is a grey area. The way laws are
structured today, we cannot claim that ProViva either
cures, alleviates or prevents anything, for example. At the
same time we know that doctors recommend it to patients
who are being treated with antibiotics.”
Kenneth Andersson
Kenneth Andersson has been head of Skånemejerier’s
R&D for ten years. Before that he worked as a process
developer at Alfa Laval, and as product developer at
Svenska Mejeriernas Riksförbund (Federation of Swedish
Dairies). He has a masters degree in Engineering from
Lund’s Technical University, Sweden. This year, he received
the Swedish Food Technology Association Foodstuff Award
for his work with ProViva.
www.food.lyckeby.com
Yoghurt with starch
–the
right feel
Dairy products have a central role in our diet. In the EU alone, dairy
products represent all of 16 percent of foodstuffs production at a market
value of 88 million Euro or approximately 81 million USD.
TEXT CARL-GUNNAR NILSSON PHOTO KARL ERIKSSON
Carl-Gunnar Nilsson is a development technician at Lyckeby Stärkelsen Research & Technology
T
here is a desire to attain attractive texture, taste
and appearance for many of these products in
combination with improved nutritional content.
This could mean reduced fat content or an altered
fats composition, but without changing the texture,
taste or mouthfeel, and all without too great a cost.
Yoghurt is one dairy product that increases steadily both
in volume and in number of new products.
Definition of yoghurt
According to FAO/WHO, yoghurt is a
coagulated milk product made by adding
the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus
Bulgaricus and Streptococcus
Thermophilus to milk or milk products.
These bacteria lower the pH value and
initiate fermentation. The process can be carried
out with or without various additives such as milk
powder, skim milk powder, whey powder or similar
products. The micro-organisms in the final product must
be viable and numerous. However, depending on national
rules, the appellation yoghurt is also used for so-called
long-life yoghurt where the product has been heat-treated
after fermentation in order to kill the bacteria.
Legislation varies from country to country as to what is
yoghurt and which ingredients may be included.
Consistency, texture and taste may vary greatly in
yoghurt. The most common type is called “stirred”,
fermented in a tank and stirred before packaging. This
yoghurt does not achieve the same firmness as the one
called “gelled”, which is fermented in the packaging
without stirring.
There is also a thin, drinkable yoghurt variant.
8➞9
Consistency and taste
To attain a full-bodied taste and texture, yoghurt must
have a rather high fat content and an enhanced solids
content. Though comparably expensive, the latter is raised
either by evaporating milk to make it more concentrated or
by adding milk protein or milk powder.
Fat content is controlled at the raw material stage by
choosing milk with the desired fat content. While this can
vary from zero percent up to ten, the most common is
between 1.5 and 3 percent.
Whey separation is common in yoghurt because of the
raw materials composition and the manufacturing process.
A free aqueous phase or syneresis forms which both looks
unappetising and reduces shelf life.
A stabiliser is often added to the finished yoghurt in
order to prevent syneresis, such as gelatine, pectin, other
hydrocolloids or mixes of these. Gelatine is the most
common, though of late it has been replaced due to the
BSE debate and a negative reputation. Pectin and
various types of hydrocolloid mixes are all
comparably expensive.
It is more cost-effective to use starch. Not
only does it provide a better texture and
mouthfeel, especially at low fat contents, but
it is also very effective at preventing whey
separation during storage. Modified potato starch is a very
attractive alternative for yoghurt since it binds more water
at the same concentrations than do other starches. The
Microlys starches from Lyckeby Stärkelsen consist of
modified potato starch that not only provide high viscosity,
but also lend the final product a lustrous, smooth texture.
The choice of process parameters, such as temperature
and homogenising method, is important to ensure that the
functionality
Advantages
with using starch
in yoghurt
• Helps create a full-bodied and rich taste
without added tinges.
• Does not form lumps.
• Improved water binding prevents separation
(syneresis) and extends shelf life.
• Improves consistency and creates a creamier texture.
• Generally has a higher hygienic standard than
milk powders.
• Is more standardised than milk powder that
often varies with the seasons.
• Takes less space than milk powder to store
and needs no cooling.
final yoghurt meets
desired standards. The
Microlys starches have
been developed to work in
many different processes.
Whether we’re talking about
high temperatures, long dwell
time or varied homogenisation, these
products contribute to making a yoghurt
with a smooth structure and a full-bodied feel.
Since the Microlys starches can withstand low
temperature storage, they are perfectly suited for use in
yoghurt products that almost always are stored cold.
Manufacturing
When yoghurt is made, starch is added to milk with a
standardised fat content of say 1.5 percent. The milk is
continuously stirred and pre-warmed, homogenised and
pasteurised. It is then cooled to the fermentation temperature after which the yoghurt culture is added. In order to
attain the desired pH level, texture and taste, the milk is
fermented for three to four hours at app. 43°C (110°F).
The starch chosen depends on such factors as the fat
content of the milk, pre-warming temperature,
homogenisation pressure and the texture desired in the
finished product. To get a thick, full-bodied texture using
milk with a 1.5 percent fat content, the following recipe
might be used:
Milk: 96.0 %
MICROLYS 34: 1.5-2.0 %
Culture: 2.0 %
The pre-warming temperature ought to be between 5055°C (122-131°F) and the homogenization pressure 150200 bar. After that the milk should be pasteurised at 9095°C (194-203°F) with a holding time of app. 5 min. How
the yoghurt is to be stored is also a deciding factor in order
to ensure that
syneresis not occur and
the texture remains unchanged.
Fruit preparations
When using fruit preparations in yoghurt it is important
that the perception and sensation of fruit is emphasised
and that any fruit pieces remain intact. The fruit preparation should also contribute to the viscosity of the final mix
via a so-called carry-over effect that makes the product
more stable. Using the right starch is vital to obtaining the
right texture and preventing syneresis. The choice depends
on the type of fruit, taste desired, pH level and texture
requirements. The Microlys starches from Lyckeby Stärkelsen satisfy all parameters of weight for yoghurt.
A typical fruit preparation can comprise the fruit raw
material, sugar and/or glucose syrup, Microlys, aromatic
and colour additives, plus an acidity controller.
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www.food.lyckeby.com
M I C R O LY S
•
POTEX
•
OPASET
•
MEETEX
•
TRECOM
Nordiskt Mejeriforum
in Malmö, June 14-16
For the first time since 1986 Sweden will act as host for the Nordic Dairy Forum. Previously the
event was arranged by the Svenska Mejeritekniska Föreningen (Swedish Association of Dairy
Technology), Svenska Mejeristföreningen (Swedish Dairy Association) and the Swedish dairy
companies. From now on the arranger will be the new association called Mejeritekniskt Forum.
This year’s Mejeriforum is the 39th since the first one in 1920. Since 1977 the congresses have
been run jointly between the five Scandinavian countries.
In June when the large Scandinavian dairy companies, including Arla Foods, Valio and Norske
Mejerier gather in Malmö the emphasis will be on quality and product development.
w w w. n o r d i s k m e j e r i k o n g r e s s . o r g /
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An agreement has been reached between the member states of the EU
through the European Council and the European Parliament regarding the
renegotiation of the ten-year old GMO Directive 90/220. One the areas
covered by the directive is how member states should test genetically
modified crops before they are released on the market. The regulations
include permits for and labelling of genetically modified organisms (GMO)
and some of the changes in the directive follow:
• Imposing a ten-year maximum time-limit on permits
to grow GMO crops.
• Phasing out and gradually forbidding use of antibiotic
resistant genes in GMOs.
• Requirements for clear labelling of GMO products.
According to Robert Andrén, departmental secretary at the Swedish
Ministry of the Environment, ”the directive was adopted in February 2001.
After that the member states will have 18 months to incorporate the rules
in their national legislation, meaning that the directive should be in force
throughout the EU no later than six months into year 2002.”
In addition, the European Commission has presented a working paper on
traceability and labelling. A sharper proposal for a traceability and labelling
system of GMOs is expected in March this year.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ready for new steps
GMO directive
Starch that
purifies water
Carbamyl AB, Lyckeby Stärkelsen's company for business
development, is carrying out trials using a starch to purify
water. The background is that as environmental requirements increase, the occasions when traditional purification ceases to function increase as well. So far, this
new, starch-based purification agent is unnamed, but it is
being used in experiments purifying water containing oil
and fats from such sources as boats, diaires and the
chemo-technical industry. Because the pollutants in these
cases often are so finely divided in the water, traditional
separation methods simply don’t work. The purification
agent is a floculation type, meaning that it attracts and
collects finely divided pollutants in the water for later
removal by filtration or centrifugation. The experiments
conducted so far have left positive results.
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10 ➞ 11
MEX
•
M A R I B I N D • E M O LY S • L Y G E L • S W E LY
Good times for
potato starch
Solid results from the 2000 potato campaign.
”We’re satisfied, the growers are satisfied and the harvest
has been good,” says Hans Berggren, Managing Director for
Lyckeby Stärkelsen Food & Fibre.
In spite of the excellent harvest there seems to be too
little starch on the market.
”The reason is that EU rules have reduced allowable
harvest volumes,” says Hans Berggren.
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Improved
MPS System
During the spring Lyckeby Stärkelsen Food & Fibre
will introduce a new MPS system. (MPS = material
and productions control).
The new system will enable more efficient handling
of forecasts, as well as facilitating and improving
production planning. Traceability over the whole
production chain will also be improved.
It is expected that the new system will begin
functioning May 1, 2001.
”The most visible result will be that the analysis
certificate will have a somewhat different
appearance. However, the contents will still be the
same,” says plant manager Ingvar Persson.
GEL
news stuff
New times
in the old East
Welcome to a new issue of Lyckeby
Foodstuff! Since the last issue we
have made progress and are proud to
present a magazine that is both more
filling and easier on the eye.
In this issue, you will find an article
about one of our customers in the
Ukraine. Chumak is a very successful company. We have
collaborated from the start. Lyckeby Stärkelsen is investing a
lot in the East European markets, and this investment will
continue during the next few years. Great opportunities
open up in these new/old states, and new food companies
with the right direction and focus often grow very fast. This
is where Lyckeby Stärkelsen has a place as an active and
advanced knowledge partner.
The dairy business is another theme in the magazine. This
industry is developing quickly, with new products appearing
almost daily. The possibilities for improvement of these
products, using different types of processed potato starches,
are great. We are investing significant development resources
in this area, so we will continue to be the collaborative
partner our customers need.
Finally, you can’t help being fascinated by all the
possibilities starch offers. We find starches as additives
throughout the entire food industry, while at the same time
a unique starch product like Vitargo is one of the most
effective carbohydrate loaders on the market.
What’s next?
Check out our home page – you may find the answer
there!
Hans Berggren
Managing Director, Lyckeby Stärkelsen Food & Fibre AB
Lyckeby foodstuff
Editorial board Hans Berggren, Bengt
Jakobsson, Ingela Asplund, Jörgen Olsson (editor)
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Editorial production Wirtén Media AB, Lund
Graphic design Edgren & Co, Lund.
Address Lyckeby Foodstuff,
Lyckeby Stärkelsen Food & Fibre AB,
SE-291 91 Kristianstad, Sweden.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prepress & print Trydells, Laholm.
Translation DagForsell/Transförlag.
w w w. f o o d . l y c k e b y. c o m
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the Internet
Visit our website for news, application
ideas and more information about what
Lyckeby Stärkelsen has to offer for your
company’s processes and products.
food.lyckeby.com
Lyckeby Stärkelsen
Food & Fibre AB
SE-291 91 Kristianstad
Tel +46(0)44-23 42 00 Fax +46(0)44-23 42 09
e-mail [email protected]
website food.lyckeby.com

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