bruce county business attraction strategy

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bruce county business attraction strategy
BRUCE COUNTY
BUSINESS ATTRACTION
STRATEGY
FOCUS ON KINCARDINE & WIARTON
Executive Summary & Action Plan
By Tenzing
November 25, 2014
CONTENTS
WORK TO DATE ........................................................................................................... 02
OBJECTIVES & CHALLENGES....................................................................................... 03
TARGET AUDIENCES.................................................................................................... 04
STRATEGY & RATIONALE ............................................................................................. 05
COUNTY LEVEL....................................................................................................... 07
LOCAL LEVEL.......................................................................................................... 10
ONGOING APPLICATION ......................................................................................... 11
NEXT STEPS................................................................................................................ 12
SUMMARY................................................................................................................... 12
APPENDIX 1 - COUNTY OF BRUCE: BUSINESS NEEDS ANALYSIS SITUATION AUDIT .... 13
APPENDIX 2 - BRUCE COUNTY 360 DEGREES OF ATTRACTION .................................... 54
APPENDIX 3 - COUNTY OF BRUCE: BUSINESS NEEDS ANALYSIS BUSINESS MATCHING AND ACTION PLAN................................................... 91
APPENDIX 4 - WIARTON BUSINESS LIST.................................................................... 114
APPENDIX 5 - KINCARDINE BUSINESS LIST............................................................... 118
01
Business growth comes from many places and
takes many forms. It is equally true that the
processes required to facilitate or even change
the behaviours necessary to attracting businesses
to a region are just as varied. There are no silver
bullets, and both private and public sector efforts
are needed. Consistency, alignment and quality
deployment are all critical.
Over the past several months, the Bruce County
Business Recruitment and Enhancement Working
Committee and Tenzing formed a team to create
and guide the execution of business recruitment
and enhancement plans for the communities
of Wiarton and Kincardine. Wiarton and
Kincardine were seen as ‘test cases’ for wider
programming that could potentially occur
throughout the County.
02
THE FOLLOWING WORK HAS BEEN
COMPLETED AND REPORTED IN
SEVERAL DOCUMENTS:
Audit
• A complete review of the current state of business attraction readiness in
each community
• Orienteering sessions in each community with business and public sector leadership
• Reviewed all websites, past strategies, comparable initiatives in similar markets
• Reviewed destination development brands
Situation Analysis
• Based on supplied research and data, and proprietary desktop research
• Filtered through business owner/operator lens
• Presented as 360 Degrees of Attraction PPT
Community Business
Inventory
• Based on five sources, a complete inventory of existing downtown businesses
in each community
Community Gaps /
Recommended Actions
• Business Needs Analysis Phase 1 Final Report
• Includes recommended target business categories by community
As the project evolved, our findings led to the conclusion that a broader and more comprehensive effort was
needed rather than just individual community / grassroots efforts to address the broader ED landscape. The
Bruce2Business concept was developed as a result. While this was out of scope, we felt it was a necessary
addition to the project.
This Executive Summary & Action Plan is designed to organize and highlight the key findings, strategies,
actions and next steps required to address business recruitment and enhancement challenges in Bruce County.
03
OBJECTIVES
Originally...
1) Produce the analysis and strategies required to attract businesses to the downtowns (and surrounding municipal
areas) of Kincardine and Wiarton in Bruce County.
2) Establish a working business recruitment and expansion process for other Bruce County communities to follow.
Additional...
1) Create a plan that optimizes county, municipal and private sector participation in a more holistic approach to
business attraction, enhancement and support.
CHALLENGES
The situation audit revealed two sets of challenges facing the Committee and individual community ED specialists.
These challenges have little to do with the current efforts in local development. Primarily, they are about focus,
resources and collaboration. These are the challenges that informed the Bruce2Business strategy.
LOCAL CHALLENGES
Municipal
Readiness
Based on the situation review, municipalities are not up to date with fast-tracking, websites and
marketing. The effort, skill and will is there - the tools are either missing or out of date.
Destination
Brands
Wiarton and Kincardine’s downtown destination brands are both strong. While the scope of our
project had a downtown focus, broadening the attraction potential beyond that of downtown was
seen as an opportunity to enhance an overall ED agenda.
Entrepreneurial
Culture
The entrepreneurial networks of both communities could be better mobilized, beyond the usual
chamber and service club memberships. The best ambassadors for business recruitment are
other business leaders.
Remoteness
There’s no getting around this challenge. The distance between significant populations of
the segments we deem most likely to set up businesses in our communities can be daunting.
And there are many strong business location choices in between (primarily in Grey County).
REGIONAL CHALLENGES
Competitiveness
This is more of a question: If given a choice between Collingwood with year-round activity /
opportunity and Kincardine with about 10 weeks of opportunity per year, which community will the
entrepreneur choose? To be competitive, our communities must level the playing field by evolving
how we engage prospects both locally and further afield.
Collaboration
Our small communities lack the resources required to attract businesses totally on their own.
A harmonized approach with the County is required to meet this challenge.
Brand
Awareness
Tourism awareness is strong (both as a gateway to the Bruce Peninsula and as individual
communities in their own right). However, the County itself is not known as a cluster centre
(beyond energy) or centre of business and entrepreneurial activity.
Economic
Conditions
The economic realities of central and western Ontario remain soft outside the GTA and Golden
Horseshoe. The London to Windsor corridor is still under-performing and while the KW region may
be a source of business innovation, entrepreneurs there have many options.
Each of these challenges (within reason) is addressed by the strategy put forward to the Committee and adopted thus far.
04
RECRUITMENT AUDIENCES & DESCRIPTIONS
Bruce County shares the usual suspects from a recruitment audience profile point of view. This underscores
the need to create preference by differentiating how we communicate. Every community, large and small, is
chasing the same folks (with the exception of the Power Families and possibly the Alumni groups).
LOCAL AUDIENCES
Existing Business
Owner-Operators
(expansion)
• Business owners who are already committed to the area are the most likely targets for
expansion or complementary ideas.
• An engaged business leadership community would bring these people to the surface;
identifying and eliminating roadblocks would demonstrate ‘business readiness’.
Bruce Alumni (those
who moved away and
want to come home)
• Reaching out to those who have moved away using social media may be the
encouragement needed to bring them home.
Friends & Family
(local outreach &
networks)
• Give residents of each community tools and reason to promote local opportunities
to their personal networks.
Bruce Power Families
• There is a unique cluster of educated, skilled and possibly under-utilized talent in
the region.
• Engage and mobilize this group in business development (whether the topic is energy
or something totally unrelated).
REGIONAL AUDIENCES
Regional / Provincial
Boomers 55+
• They live in the region but are more likely to be located in urban centres to the south
and east.
• They have pensions, savings, desire to try something new and are looking to
fulfill ambitions.
Free Spirits (younger,
entrepreneurial,
seeking change)
• Different age group, same locations as 55+.
• Artisans, small business, contract and freelance lifestyles.
Tourists
(stop and stay)
• 100,000+ pass by each year (and may be attracted to the brands).
• Local marketing and regional marketing can reveal the potential of staying long term.
Seasonal Residents
(already invested)
• There are seasonal residents throughout the region.
• Marketing programs will demonstrate the potential of staying year ‘round
(turning seasonal lifestyle into a full-time lifestyle).
05
STRATEGY
To meet the challenges as outlined in this document (and more fully explored in the Audit and Situation
Analysis) we are recommending the Bruce2Business (B2B) strategy and tactical approach.
CORE STRATEGY
• Align and focus the efforts of county, municipal and private sector partners on positioning
the communities of Bruce County as ‘business-friendly’.
• Call the initiative Bruce2Business (brand it).
• Create synergies between local ‘sales’ efforts and regional ‘marketing’ efforts.
• Establish and support an entrepreneurial culture at the County level and on a community
by community basis.
• Connect and support grassroots activity with County capacity building and tools development.
B2B RATIONALE
1) This process actually turns local and regional economic development into a marketing and sales
relationship which is the best use of resources.
2)
B2B allows and demonstrates innovation and
connectivity (both required by incoming business
prospects).
3) B2B allows community-by-community localization
and autonomy in the right places.
4) The grassroots program can be as turnkey as required
depending on the sophistication of each community.
5) B2B engages community business leadership and has the
potential to engage the entire community (networking).
COUNTY
POSITIONING, AWARENESS,
OUTREACH & FILTER
MUNICIPAL
LOCAL SELLING, SUPPORT,
READINESS
LOCAL LEADERS
NURTURE, GUIDE,
EXPLORE, CULTURE
06
TOP LINE VIEW OF HOW
EVERYTHING WORKS TOGETHER
PARTNER
ROLES
• Create and operate an outreach engine that attracts and filters entrepreneurs to
appropriate communities.
County
(Marketing)
• Position Bruce County as business-ready (digital & PR).
• Create toolkits and segmentation tactics that help local networks attract and/or
nurture the right opportunities.
• Supply participating B2B communities with an inventory of local businesses and
projected best opportunities for attraction and/or expansion.
Municipal
(Sales)
• Apply localized marketing tools to promote local business culture during
high-traffic seasons.
• Support local business leadership network.
• Create a local business fast-track program (identify and remove obstacles).
• Create an online network that welcomes and guides prospective business owners.
Local Business
Leadership
(Engagement)
• Guide local B2B networks on how to engage their own extended networks in
business recruitment.
• Identify and nurture existing business expansion through the same network
(invite participants and incubate growth – create entrepreneurial clusters).
07
COUNTY-LEVEL STRATEGIC
ACTION PLAN
What follows is based on our genuine belief
that individual communities in Bruce are at a
disadvantage when trying to meet the challenges of
sustainable economic development alone. It’s like
having a talented, motivated sales force, but no
tools, no resources and not enough scale.
An integrated approach that aligns the County as
the marketing resources team with ‘sales’ at the
municipal level and local business networks as
ambassadors or champions is the right approach
and should produce results.
The Bruce2Business Strategy is documented
in detail with rationale in the 360 Degrees of
Attraction PowerPoint. Here we have included a
summary version.
1) Brand an initiative called Bruce to Business
(Bruce2Business) that is as strong as local destination
brands. Position Bruce as business-friendly.
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
08
2) Create a regional digital engine that helps people with the right mindset (who not what) find
Bruce County and explore the possibilities on a community by community basis (matchmaker).
This engine will promote Bruce and connect entrepreneurs to local networks.
EXPLORE A DIFFERENT LIFE
B RU C E
C O U NT Y
Imagine what life could be. With time and space to grow.
Where it’s less about the race and more about individual drive.
Where tinkering leads to invention, art becomes industry and
sweat becomes equity. And where that equity goes 100%
further than you ever thought it might. Imagine a life where
energy, nature, agriculture and innovation all combine to
create fertile ground. Imagine it – then start building it here.
ABOUT BRUCE
BUSINESS
PASSION
PARTNERS
LIFESTYLE
3) Build a template toolkit (County resources) that can be localized for community selling and
attraction programs. This toolkit will be the hand-off point between the County and individual
municipalities (see Grassroots Local Strategic Action Plan).
09
4) County Tools
- digital development
- SEO
- Adwords/PPC
- targeted public relations (by category as identified in the Action Plans)
- digital advertising
5)
Localized Toolkit
- advertising
- tactical plan and communications
- business fast-track outline or plan
- brochures
- seasonal promotion
- local business leader network directions &
support (ie. b2bWiarton, b2bKincardine)
Bruce County - B2B - TOOLKIT
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
TOOLKIT
KINCARDINE
10
LOCAL, GRASSROOTS
STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN
1) Review the Kincardine and Wiarton current business inventories.
Add and delete as required and update semi-annually.
(2) Explore the Business Matching & Action Plans for both communities, summarized here:
WIARTON
KINCARDINE
Hostels / Hospitality
Soft Adventure Amenities
Marina (complementary)
Provisioning
Motorcycle / Repair
Bicycle Sales / Repair
Commuter Air
Adventure Training
Quarry / Artisan
Manufactured Homes
Bed & Breakfast
Senior’s Home Care
Multi-use Entertainment Venue
Local Food Market/Co-op
Tourism Training Centre
Scottish Bakery
Specialty Retail
Cold Water Surf Merchandise/Manufacturing
Boutique Hotel
Craft Brewery
Financial Institution (CU#2)
3) Tenzing staff will facilitate and participate in a working session with ED committees in each community
to explain the matching recommendations, improve the list and finalize next steps and possibilities.
4) Plan, localize and implement grassroots marketing tools to promote local business culture during
high-traffic seasons (B2B template tools provided by region).
5) Create a municipal fast-track and ambassador program for incoming business prospects.
6) Identify and nurture a local business leadership network (online and in-person, advanced digital user
interface and networking tools, connected to the County outreach engine).
11
REPLICATING LOCAL STRATEGIC ACTION
PLAN (WIARTON & KINCARDINE MODELS)
THROUGHOUT BRUCE COUNTY
The process used to develop the business recruitment and expansion
work for the two test communities can be scaled up or down depending
on the size of the community and a realistic economic outlook.
The steps are as follows:
(1) AUDIT
• review existing data (as per same sets provided for Wiarton and Kincardine)
• environmental scan
• market context
• realistic, objective assessment
(2) INTERVIEWS
• key stakeholders
• include local business people
• possible partners
(3) SITUATION ANALYSIS
• combine audit and interviews in one final report
• generate conclusions
• propose action plans and strategy
• analyze community readiness
• align with B2B tools if adopted
(4) INVENTORY EXISTING BUSINESSES
• identify possible gaps
• base gap analysis on audit findings
(5) CREATE A MATCHING & ACTION PLAN
• same structure as Wiarton/Kincardine
• work with local ED specialist or business community to narrow and prioritize possibilities
(6) IMPLEMENT B2B IN THE COMMUNITY
12
B2B NEXT STEPS
1) Identify County resources (budget, people) required to create the initiative.
2) Create a detailed initiative architecture and timeline.
3) Build a comprehensive critical path (what gets done by whom by when).
SUMMARY
Tenzing was hired to set up the strategy
for local business recruitment in Bruce County using Kincardine and Wiarton
as test communities. We concluded that while both towns have the talent
and the will, they lack the resources and scale to reach their full potential.
In that context, we created an initiative called Bruce2Business; it is designed
to add scale and capacity at the local level by utilizing County resources; it’s
a simple marketing and sales model. Marketing casts the big net and sales
closes the deal (never quite that simple, but that is the working model).
The goal of the three components (County, Municipal and Local Leaders) of
the initiative is to deliver the right people to both towns and to the County
over time. The B2B initiative will provide the impetus for local programs and
leadership recruitment through the developed networks.
As a result of the implementation of B2B, Wiarton and Kincardine will
become business-friendly and attract a new generation of owner-operators to
the area. At the very least, we’ll help our current batch of economic engines
expand their possibilities.
County of Bruce: Business Needs Analysis
Situation Audit
July 15 th 2014
The County of Bruce’s Rural Business Recruitment and
Enhancement Strategy Involves Three Phases.
The first of these Phases covers: Research Summary and Recruitment
Recommendations for the towns of Kincardine and Wiarton.
The ultimate goal is to suggest a minimum of five strategic and targeted
business recommendations for each community with the purpose of providing
enhancements to existing businesses and potential recruitment opportunities.
As stated in Kincardine’s ICSP report under the Economic Pillar:
“The Community will diversify the economy in tourism, agriculture, light
& heavy industry and emerging sectors. We will ensure the economic
growth that provides residents and visitors with affordable and diverse
opportunities to shop, live, work and play. Our downtown cores will be
vibrant and thriving places for business, residents and visitors.”
Just as importantly, the Town of South Bruce Peninsula “Basecamp Report”
indicated that:
“Looking at our successful businesses, it would seem that success has
less to do with the type of business and more to do with business owners
that ‘get it’. I.e. it’s possible that by finding the right person – there may
be many business opportunities that could work.”
Tenzing’s Situation Audit includes a robust review of existing research reports,
economic data and strategic documents. Five key topics (as outlined by the
County of Bruce) are kept at the forefront of Tenzing’s audit process at all
times. Specifically,
•
•
•
•
•
Understanding the role of data collection and analysis in business
development;
Developing rural recruitment strategies in relation to broader market
trends;
Building the appropriate business mix to strengthen downtowns;
Investigating strategies related to expanding and clustering businesses;
Developing techniques for connecting entrepreneurs directly to business.
Materials Reviewed
Tenzing has reviewed all the materials the County of Bruce has provided to
date. Additionally, Tenzing has conducted its own review of public domain
documents that it is has found through its desktop (web-based) search. This
includes websites, regional economic development best practices, and trend
data, among others.
Some of the material that Tenzing has reviewed is pre-2008. Many things have
shifted over the last six years. The effect of the Great Recession is still being
felt by businesses of all kinds in virtually all sectors and regions. When it comes
to older documents, Tenzing has considered them qualitative rather than
statistical. They are useful in providing learnings about the past as well as
potentially setting future directions.
Each of the communities is unique. And yet, their respective situations share
many commonalities.
Missing from this Situation Audit are the voices of the business owners in
Kincardine and Wiarton. We need to hear from them so they can express their
views and perspectives on the kinds of new businesses they would like to see
come to their respective communities. Their “wish lists” in turn will be
matched with available economic data and filtered to discover the best fits for
each community’s business recruitment strategy.
Initial Conclusions
Many rural communities are homes to global business. On first inspection their
location is unexpected. No one would imagine that the mail-order fashion
company Lands End employs 4,000 people from its headquarters in rural
Wisconsin.
Changes in technology such as 3D printing and batch manufacturing are rapidly
changing how and where things are made.
So too are demographics. Many senior-aged people are planning to keep working
past the typical retirement age. Many of the tourists that Kincardine (and to a
slightly lesser extent Wiarton) attracts each summer are over 50 years of age.
This group could represent a cohort of “greypreneurs” who could invest their
money as well as their vitality in starting post-retirement businesses in either
Kincardine or Wiarton.
More work is necessary to identify how to make both communities welcoming to
different kinds of businesses, but also to different age groups of entrepreneurs
and business owners.
Using Tourism as Resident Recruitment Strategy
Tourism is a strategy to attract potential businesses and new residents to the
community. It is a fact that many business owners first discover new locations
for their companies as tourists. They are attracted to the small town atmosphere
and to its authentic experiences. This is especially appealing to urban dwellers
that want a different pace for themselves and their families. They see
opportunities to expand their companies or to set up new enterprises.
The Martin Prosperity Institute (writing about Prince Edward County) notes that
“…most tourism based jobs (many in accommodations and food services) are
low paying and seasonal, do not offer equivalent employment to lost
manufacturing and agricultural jobs and increase inequality across the region.”
The Institute recommends: “A way to overcome this difficulty is to not focus on
tourism as a final economic base, but instead to use tourism, the regional
amenities, and the quality of place characteristics to attract tourists and
residents.”
It concludes: “While tourist attractions might get them to the region for a
weekend, more is needed to turn them into permanent residents…. Rural areas
are more likely to attract families, mid-life career changers and retirees who
value these characteristics as much as the other amenities that brought them to
the region initially…. If an engineer or two first moves to the region, work with
them to help support them and work to build an engineering consulting
cluster…. The region needs to monitor and understand the opportunities being
presented with at least as much effort as is spent intentionally creating other
opportunities.”
From our observations, there is little to nothing to suggest that either
municipality is using its plentiful tourism activities to send a positive message
to visitors that encourage them to build their businesses and lives in Kincardine
or Wiarton.
Some communities that Tenzing looked at (Hood River, Oregon, and Alturas,
California in particular) have implemented programs to boost the attractiveness
of their towns. Every business in these towns that meets or talks with the public
is turned into an economic development ambassador. Such as restaurant
owners who hear visitors talk about how they want to move “to a place like
this”. Local businesses are given materials to help turn the visitor’s dream into
a reality.*
*Note: Kincardine’s BIA was testing an Ambassador program in summer 2013.
The purpose of the Ambassador program is to promote tourism: “Ambassadors
provide a local resource of volunteers to engage visitors, answer questions,
provide them with suggestions, encourage them to spend money and animate
spending districts and events.”
Clusters
Harvard University’s Michael Porter coined the cluster theory. In 1998 he
suggested that a cluster is a geographically proximate group of interconnected
companies and associated institutions in a particular field, linked by
commonalities and complementarities. Clusters can generate commercial
synergies and strengths that enable it to achieve a global presence even when it
is geographically distant from major markets. Porter said:
“Clusters are not unique, they are highly typical, and therein lies a
paradox: the enduring competitive advantages in a global economy lie
increasingly in local things – knowledge, relationships, motivation.”
The geographic scope of a cluster can include a single city or a region. Clusters
take on various forms, such as product and service companies, suppliers of
specialized inputs, machinery and services, financial institutions, as well as
firms in related industries.
Following up on Porter’s work, others have identified several different types of
clusters:
•
•
•
•
Horizontal: relationships between small and medium-size firms in an
industry or sector that compete and collaborate with each other;
Web: relationships between large firms and their core suppliers;
Virtual: where physical co-location is not important; and
Emerging: Where firms have a common resource base or resource
needs, but have only emerging relationships in production and
innovation.
There is no one-size-fits-all model of clusters. What we know is new business
growth occurs near older established businesses. Because the risk of failure is
always high when starting a new enterprise, risks can be reduced through
locating businesses near established businesses and their customers, workers
and suppliers. The fact is clusters lead to the formation of new businesses.
The region’s clusters may not all be global in scale or reach, but some of them
have the potential to be.
It is worth looking at the Municipalities’ clusters, as they exist today. Some are
nascent; others are more developed. Within the larger clusters, sub-sets of
clusters may also exist. In some instances, clusters may intersect with each
other, creating even more opportunity for business expansion and economic
dynamism. Further exploration of the clusters, and how specific local
businesses fit within each is encouraged.
Potential Clusters (among others):
Tourism: (represents approximately 850 jobs)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Scottish heritage (Kincardine)
Music (Kincardine)
o Pipes
o Blues
Theatre (Kincardine)
o Summer stock
Tourism & hospitality training (Kincardine)
Eco-tourism (both, more so Wiarton)
Agri-tourism (both)
Sports:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Surfing (Kincardine)
Hiking/Trails (Wiarton)
Cycling (both)
Scuba (Wiarton)
Caving (Wiarton)
Cross country skiing/snowshoeing (both)
Birding (both, more so Wiarton)
Snowmobiling (Wiarton)
Marine:
•
•
•
•
Lighthouses (Kincardine)
Yachting and boating (both)
Beachcombers, sunset lovers (Kincardine)
Fishing (both)
Energy: (represents approximately 4,871 jobs)
•
Nuclear tourism (Kincardine)
Agriculture:
•
•
Agri-business (both)
Food hubs (both)
o Local food producers
o Cuisine couture – artisanal cooking
o Culinary festivals
o Locovore movement
o Organic & dietary specialties
How Multiple Clusters Intersect
It is easy to see how multiple sectors could intersect. By doing so they
strengthen the collective offering and make it possible to attract more business
recruitment to the community.
Here are two examples. Sectors align (tourism + agri + culinary experiences +
products and services, both commercial and retail) and integrate to make the
whole far greater than its parts.
•
Kawartha Choice FarmFresh program spearheads and supports
numerous initiatives, such as Speed Dating for Farmers and Chefs, an
Agricultural Symposium, the Kawartha Choice FarmFresh Guide and
Map, a Local Food Summit and more. At the Speed Dating event
producers set up table displays to identify retail opportunities for
their products, develop value chain partnerships, and participate in a
guest panel discussion with Gordon Food Service, Sysco and Disley
Foods on accessing wholesale food distribution for institutional and
restaurant trade.
•
Several municipalities have developed what might best be called
“Cuisine Couture” for their communities. They have created culinary
destinations by playing up the strengths of their community. Stratford
Ontario’s Culinary Adventures has increased its reach beyond the
seasonal Shakespeare Festival. Savour Stratford is the recipient of a
Culinary Tourism Leadership Award, and you can see why. Savour
Stratford’s website connects local food festivals, farmers, tasting
experiences, and food adventures in the area.
http://visitstratford.ca/template.php?maincat_id=19&artcat=172&arti
cle_id=152
Expanding Regional Clusters: Local Food (A Consideration for Both
Communities)
As a sector, food processing, agriculture products and farming grossed close to
$50 billion, making it larger than Ontario’s automotive sector in 2010. In an
economic impact study conducted by the Waterloo Region, it was estimated
that for every job in the region’s agriculture sector, four additional jobs are
supported in the economy.
According to a 2013 report prepared by Deloitte LLP for The Ontario Municipal
Knowledge Network (OMKN), there are six areas of opportunity:
“Six steps in the local food value chain provide a structure that
municipalities can use to assess their existing capabilities, approaches,
and gaps in local food management. The food chain provides a broad and
holistic view of the local food system, including:
1. Producing: Growing agricultural products and raising livestock in farming
operations.
2. Processing/Preparing: Transforming agricultural products into another
form as market-ready products through washing, peeling, packaging,
freezing, canning, as well as meat processing.
3. Distributing: Warehousing and aggregating produce and/or processed
goods and delivering them to retailers.
4. Retailing: Selling produce/processed goods to consumers, either through
traditional retail stores, various forms of farmers markets, or through
evolving channels such as online.
5. Consuming: Cooking with and eating the goods at home, restaurants, or
other venues of consumption.
6. Waste Management: Collecting, transporting and disposing/recycling of
waste materials from food products.”
Source: https://www.amo.on.ca/AMOPDFs/Reports/2013/2013BestPracticesinLocalFoodAGuideforMunicipalitie.aspx
Deloitte maps out the value chain of local food initiatives:
How others have prospered in this sector:
•
Northumberland County: In 2011, 363 local food businesses were
surveyed across the region, which represented 4,200 jobs in production,
manufacturing, retail and service. As a result Northumberland County is
creating a municipally owned niche processing facility with partners
across the region.
•
The Manitoulin Island Community Abattoir is a provincially inspected
freestanding facility that was launched in 2013. The facility has been
developed due to the ongoing challenge that producers were facing in
long transport times to get their product processed (up to 2.5 hours each
way). The abattoir is a “kill and chill” facility only. Processing is done by
partners elsewhere. The abattoir hopes to create jobs by attracting
producers to invest in the community.
•
Toronto Food Business Incubator is a non-profit organization that assists
entrepreneurs in establishing their own food processing companies. The
entrepreneurs participating in this incubator kitchen’s Business
Incubation Program are provided with advisory support from food
industry experts and a commercial kitchen space.
•
The Local Food Hub in Charlottesville, Virginia: This is a non-profit
organization that operates a distribution warehouse and an educational
farm. The initial goal was to create a hub that could offer a buying
experience that is as easy as buying from mainstream distributors, which
expanded to creating an educational program for farmers. The hub
continues to secure Virginia’s food system by improving small farm
viability and increasing community access to local food.
Another example is the very successful Mad River Food Hub representing
eighteen food processors and businesses - raw pet food to root beer to
artisan meats and market garden vegetables. Mad River started in 2011.
http://madriverfoodhub.com/
•
The region of Peel began its kitchen waste composting in the 1990s. The
region produces over 15,000 tonnes of compost each year, and demand
has been expanding through the residential sector to agricultural and
commercial sectors by developing knowledge and understanding of the
use of compost
Expanding Regional Clusters: Surfing (A Consideration for Kincardine)
Surfing and surfing culture is real. The surfer population worldwide is estimated
at:
•
•
•
American…2.4 million
Australian…just under two million
Worldwide…23 million
(Source: 2002 Boardtrac, Survey Industry Group Survey)
In 2006, 4.7% (1,159,884) of adult Canadians went sailing or surfing while on
an out-of-town, overnight trip of one or more nights. (Source: TAMS Survey)
The feasibility of Kincardine becoming a surfing tourism destination is well
reported in the Municipality’s 2013 study.
Cold-water surfing attracts a special breed of enthusiasts. The surfing feasibility
study “suspects” that the market size in Ontario is in the order of 50,000
surfers. Events like 2013 Lake Huron Fresh Water Classic will continue to build
awareness about surfing in Kincardine. Even better news for Kincardine is the
fact the best times to surf are in the Spring and Fall months, outside of the
hectic summer season.
The question here is – outside of it being a tourist attraction – how can surfing
help Kincardine contribute to its business recruitment? There is already one
paddleboard rental business in Kincardine – Stand Up Paddle Board Rentals.
Owner Pam Rantz has “…noted that many renters end up buying their own surf
boards after getting the chance to try the sport for the first time.” The feasibility
study suggests
“Kincardine would benefit from an expansion to the existing board rental
operation… in order to provide an opportunity to attract visitors who are
interested in trying surfing (all types – surfing; stand up paddle boarding;
kite boarding; body boarding) for the first time.” (p. 44)
A further business idea:
“The establishment of surf camps for both children and adults could be
another program organized in Kincardine to help attract more visitors and
improve the awareness of Great Lakes surfing. There are established surf
schools / camps in virtually every other popular surfing destination, with
the exception of Kincardine.” (p. 51)
How many surf shops and camps / schools Kincardine can support remains to
be proven. However, the upside of building a sports cluster around surfing is
exciting.
Here is some idea of where things might go:
•
By the 1960s Torquay, Australia began to attract surfers from around the
world. Bells Beach became one of the best-known surfing locations,
having gained an international reputation for quality surf. Many small
scale, cottage-style, surfboard businesses set up operations in the
Torquay district, representing demand for lighter, faster, custom-made
boards.
Rip Curl was founded in 1969. The founders quickly understood that the
key to year round surfing was not primarily a customized surfboard, but
rather a wet suit that could insulate surfers from the chilly waters of the
Southern Ocean. By 2002 Rip Curl had become the fifth largest surf
wear supplier in the world with its head office still located in Torquay.
Quciksilver was founded in the early 1970s. The initial focus was on
board shorts because many surfers at the time complained about the
poor design and quality of existing garments. Quicksilver board shorts
were durable, light, non-chafing and quick drying. By 1986 Quicksilver
was listed as a public company on NASDAQ. The head office moved to
North America, but Torquay was repositioned as the company’s head
office for Asia. By the late 1990s Quicksilver accounted for 37% of total
global surf wear sales.
•
Tofino on the west coast of Vancouver Island is six hours away from
Vancouver. Washington State is about the same distance. About 12 years
ago a couple of keen surfers started a business making surfboards. They
added a distinctive Sitka Spruce logo to their boards, which became the
name for their fledgling company. Sitka developed largely as a do-ityourself business. They made the boards and screen-printed the t-shirts
themselves until demand got too much and they had to outsource. The
company now employs 50 staff, with three flagship stores (two in Canada
and one in New Zealand), and distributes its clothing through 150
wholesalers in Canada, USA, Europe and New Zealand. The busiest
period for Sitka’s Canadian based stores is the fall, when the surf is
good. The slowest period is February.
Sitka is in the business of wilderness activism. They align their values
with respect and love for the natural environment. The essence of Sitka
is that of a cold water brand that differentiates on “doing what you love
in a harsh climate”. The visual image of their brand shows members of
their surf team in snow and ice.
They focus on quality clothing that can be worn to work as well as in the
wilderness. It’s not just surfing fashion and it’s in line with the
company’s sustainability values. Sitka aims to have 100% domestic
Canadian production by 2016. http://sitka.ca
Rural Economic Development
Numerous groups and associations across Canada and the US point to
developing trends that may have an impact on rural economic growth and
sustainability. Keeping these trends in mind may spark ideas for the kinds of
businesses and ventures Bruce County communities are hoping to attract.
From the Rural Ontario Summit (March 2014):
•
Ontario’s Minister of Rural Affairs, Jeff Leal, recommended that rural
communities learn to adapt to change to attract the right jobs.
•
Dr. David Freshwater, University of Kentucky Professor of Agricultural
Economics, suggests rural development is different (from urban
development); that rural communities should focus on their strengths; a
single strategy won’t work; and that small firms make a difference.
•
Dr. Rob Greenwood, Memorial University’s Executive Director, Leslie
Harris Centre for Regional Policy Development points out that quality of
life is gaining importance as a defining factor so human and social
capital are key investment attractors. Also, there is an increasing focus
on ‘social enterprise’ – the opportunity to fulfill a social purpose and
generate resources for local organizations, enhancing their
interdependence and sustainability. He notes that diversification is
happening in rural communities – new activities like: an aquaculture
sector; up and down-stream sectors are bringing new opportunities to
traditional sectors; niche opportunities in small scale manufacturing; and
so forth.
•
Other comments (participant roundtable and discussion by attendees)
o “Businesses need to be profitable but communities can provide
the readiness factor that stimulates and supports business
development. Communities and citizens need to articulate what
they value as part of the strategy development. Good facilitation
for this process is absolutely essential!”
o “Entrepreneurial outlook from the community; innovative, not riskadverse, active, optimistic – allows community to be resilient,
need to recognize that times change, communities need to as
well.”
o “Diversified economic base; primary resources plus value-added
opportunities and processing, new opportunities and regionappropriate tourism – leads to increased community health.”
o “Welcoming community.”
o “One-stop application process, ‘Navigation Portal’, explain and
link rules and regulations to support small businesses, better
support for understanding and navigating the rules.”
o “Second stage entrepreneurs need support, help identify latent
entrepreneurship.”
Source:
http://www.ruralontarioinstitute.ca/Uploads/UserFiles/files/TheMoment_ROI_Wor
kshopReport_FINAL6.pdf
From “TOP (trends, opportunities, priorities) Update: A Lens on Local Industry”
(Four County Labour Planning Board March 2011):
The report looks at six key industries: Crop & Animal Production; Truck
Transportation; Telecommunications; Professional, Scientific and Technical
Services; Accommodation, Food Services and Drinking Places; and Social
Assistance
•
“The region (Bruce, Grey, Huron and Perth) needs to focus on the
workers it has, since the population growth is slower than that of Ontario,
the skills needed locally must be found locally. In turn this increases
demand on retaining older workers. It also suggests that a labour pool
attraction strategy might be necessary through migration and immigration
measures.”
•
A common theme in each sector is the need for local training
o Agriculture: “Employers identified a need to engage students in
more agricultural-based training” … everything from small engine
maintenance to safety awareness to the care and feeding of
livestock.
o Transportation: “Some of the training and re-training needs
identified by employees includes safety regulations and new and
emerging technologies and communications tools.”
o Telecommunications: “Short term, ongoing training in the field
needs to be available locally as early as high school.”
o Professional, Scientific and Technical Services: “Employers
express that an effective and creative succession strategy needs to
be adopted to engage and retain the knowledge of the population
due to retire in the next five years.”
o Accommodation, Food and Beverage Services: There tends to be a
high family involvement in these businesses. Most employers
noted that in-house training is their preferred training method.
“Effective and on-going customer service excellence training and
industry standard professionalism training is a requirement for the
continued success of this industry in the Four County region.
Higher levels of education in the replacement workforce is needed
as positions continue to be created, particularly in the high tourist
season.”
o Social Assistance: “It was very apparent that the training needs
for managers were most pressing. The training needed would
include local access to Human Resources, Project Management,
Property Management and some Information Technology training.”
Source:
http://www.southbrucepeninsula.com/en/economicdevelopment/resources/2011
TopReport.pdf
From Huron County: Best Practices in Rural & Small Town Economic
Development (Municipal Economic Development Readiness Initiative, January
2004):
•
“Therefore, the best plan for attracting outside economic development
would seem to be to make the community attractive and receptive to
appropriate new industry by focusing on the key ingredients to success
and by building capacity.” (p. 13)
•
“The most persuasive industrial development stories, set in depressed
areas of Belgium and France, appear to owe their success to capacity
building and not recruitment.” (p. 13)
•
Associated with this is a growing market for products of local farmers and
a greater desire to buy foods from the region where people live.
Increasingly, consumers are associating higher quality with reduced
distance between producer and consumer. As well, the rapidly changing
ethno-racial mix of the Ontario population has created demands for new
foods grown and processed in different ways. These realities create
opportunities for small farms.” (p. 21)
•
“… a study of the Niagara Region has identified opportunities for high
quality products, using local supply of bakery goods, jams and jellies for
the hotel/restaurant trade, specialty ice creams (with local fruit) and
specialty pastas. Surveys in Windsor concluded that a high percentage of
local consumers wanted to buy local product and thought they were, but
examinations of retail outlets revealed that much of what people thought
was local product was actually imported. Consumers were very interested
in buying more local product, both fresh and value-added, from a variety
of distribution outlets. Seventy-one percent of grocers indicated an
interest in using local value-added products in their businesses. A study
by Duncan Hilchey of the Farming Alternatives Project concluded that
small scale food processing is the only class of food processing in NY
State (companies with one to four employees). A Wisconsin study of 190
consumers at supermarkets… found that: 89% would pay more for a
meat product if there were assurances that it was a quality product; 66%
would purchase meat products certified as being produced by family
operated farms….” (p. 22)
•
The Huron Business Development Committee conducted a feasibility
analysis of 20 local businesses. They found “…the agri-food
opportunities included: agri-tourism; garlic production and processing;
honey production, processing and pollination services; frozen vegetable
processing; special events and in-home catering…. To date, four local
agri-business ventures have been launched in the area, resulting in five
local jobs.” (p. 24)
•
“A number of programs have been launched by organizations to create
the right kind of infrastructure for agri-tourism activity. Farm tours, field
days, farm bed and breakfast inns, and farm villages are all real
examples of agritourism. Agritourism is also increasingly complemented
with agri-entertainment: festivals, hay rides, petting zoos, seasonal
events, and contests.” (p. 29)
•
“On-farm classes, demonstrations and workshops are also considered a
form of agri-entertainment. Cooking classes, whether offered to chefs or
to the general public, are usually quite successful, as are workshops
showing how to prepare fresh or dried cut flowers.” (p. 29)
•
The Huron Harvest Trail was launched in 1997. “In the first year of the
program, tourists in Huron County increased by over 93,000 person visits
with additional expenditures of $4.9 million.” (p. 30)
Source:
http://www.smallbusinesshuron.ca/publications/edri/best_practices_report_final.
PDF
From 20 small business ideas for small towns (by Becky McCray, author of
Small Biz Survival)
•
“Cater to local outdoor sports… Target the changes in outdoor sports.
Rural small business expert Jack Schultz…said, ‘the fastest growing
spectator sport in the USA is bird watching. Geo-caching, biking, hiking
and extreme water sports and are also growing in importance’. Almost
any type of business could expand to cater to the new types of outdoor
sports, bring visitors to small towns.” (p. 6)
•
“Share your space and your creativity…Entrepreneur Evelyn Miller said,
‘There are lots of hidden assets in small towns, including inexpensive
living space, peace and quiet, and the room to be creative.’ You could
implement this as either a development project or as a for-profit
business.” (p. 9)
Source: http://bizopy.com/20-small-business-ideas-for-small-towns/
From Twenty-five Ways to Save Your Rural Community (by Steppingstones
Partnership, Inc):
•
“Encourage home/farm-based businesses… They are easy to start up,
provide a dependable work force and have little overhead expenses. In
the last few years, over 70 percent of all new jobs in the four western
provinces were created in a home.”
•
“Employ technology… For example, an individual in Manitoba bought a
computer-assisted machine to make badges that he now sells to such
places as Saudi Arabia and Germany.”
•
“Set up an incubation centre…Find an empty office building, borrow
some furniture and equipment and provide a place for start-up
companies to grow. Ask local successful businessmen and women (active
or retired) to serve as advisors and mentors. Negotiate reasonable fees
from accountants, lawyers and other professionals to provide advice and
services to these entrepreneurs.”
Source:
http://www.steppingstones.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=
22:25-ways&catid=18:miscellaneous
From Putting Smart Growth to Work in Rural Communities (Smart Growth
Network / ICMA):
•
“A way of thinking about rural communities… Most rural communities
can be grouped into five categories.
o Gateway communities are adjacent to high-amenity recreational
areas such as National Parks, National Forests, and coastline.
They provide food, lodging, and associated services. Increasingly
popular places to live, work and play, gateway communities often
struggle with strains on infrastructure and the natural
environment.
o Resource dependent communities are often home to single
industries, such as farming or mining, so their fortunes rise and
fall with the market value of that resource. A key challenge facing
resource-dependent communities is diversifying the economy
while maintaining their rural quality of life and character.
o Edge communities are located on the fringe of metropolitan areas
and typically connected to them by state and interstate highways.
They provide their residents with access to economic
opportunities, jobs, and services. More affordable housing and
access to urban amenities have made many of these edge areas
grow at a faster pace than their metropolitan areas as a whole. But
precisely because they are attractive places to settle, edge
communities often face pressure to continue to provide more
housing and services to new residents.
o Traditional main street communities enjoy compact street design
that is often accessible to a transportation hub. In addition,
historically significant architecture and public spaces provide
valuable resources upon which to build. Still, these communities
struggle to compete for tenants and customers with office parks,
regional malls, and big box stores.
o Second home and retirement communities may overlap with some
of the above groups, particularly edge communities and traditional
Main Street communities. Like gateway communities, second
home, and retirement communities struggle to keep pace with
new growth while maintaining the quality of life that drew in
residents in the first place.” (p. 3)
Source:
http://icma.org/en/icma/knowledge_network/documents/kn/Document/301483/P
utting_Smart_Growth_to_Work_in_Rural_Communities
From Business Incubators in Rural Ontario (prepared for the OACFDC
Conference, May 2011):
•
Business incubators support and accelerate the development of new
businesses through the provision of a controlled and structured
environment.
•
Statistically, 87% of business incubator graduates will be sustainable in
business.
•
The average incubator employs 3.2 people.
•
Small-scale, rural incubators look like ‘business motels’, offering
phone/fax and shared boardroom facilities, subsidized lease rates…they
tend to lack sectoral/market niche or technology focus.
•
What does an average rural Canadian incubator look like?
o Partnerships include the Federal Government, the Municipality,
other NFPs, building owner or private sector partner
o Initial funding: $275,000
o Annual operating cost: $38,000
o Client requirements: minimal
o Average occupancy rate of existing rural incubators is 66%
o Almost all existing incubators are reportedly financially selfsufficient mostly through rural rental revenue and service fees
(64%)
o 60% of those surveyed indicated that the demand for incubation
services had met or exceeded expectations
•
Case studies of note: St. Thomas, ON: Elgin CFDC ICE
o ICE = The Innovation Centre for Entrepreneurs
o ICE is a not-for-profit, mixed-use business incubator that provides
small and growing businesses, including home-based and youth
businesses, with all the resources and support they need to grow
and prosper
o 20 partners and growing, including Libro Credit Union, Staples,
Rotary International and Fanshawe College
o Clients include Valesco Pharmaceutical, Saverity, RAMPA Tec Inc,
and Allsource Home Health Supplies
Source: http://www.ontcfdc.com/Conference11/Media/Business_Incubators.pdf
Writing in the Financial Post (April 15, 2013), small business expert Rick
Spence believes “entrepreneurs may keep our small towns alive”. He points out
that new technologies such as 3D printing for small batch manufacturing,
digital medical technologies and alternate energy sources (such as geothermal)
will make small town living more attractive to a new generation of
entrepreneurs. He goes on to say:
“… Small towns should be wooing new Canadians, especially those who
have struggles to start businesses in big cities, such as Vancouver and
Toronto. Attracting these nascent entrepreneurs… gives small centres a
rare double win: many will bring family members to town, creating a
household of economic activity even as they bring their business dreams
to life.”
According to the Canadian Institute for Rural Entrepreneurship, entrepreneurs
are most likely over 30 years old and the largest percentage of high-growth
entrepreneurs are between the ages of 35 and 44. By the time they start
businesses, they have an employment history and tend to have been working in
a related industry. This gives them both the knowledge and networks. They tend
to be well off financially and better educated than average.
The Organization for Economic Development & Cooperation (OECD) describes 4
kinds of innovation: new products or services, new processes, new ways of
marketing, and new ways of organizing. The Canadian Institute for Rural
Entrepreneurship goes on to say:
“We often think of innovation as a new idea but innovation requires two
processes: invention and implementation. A good idea that doesn’t get
implemented is not innovation. Entrepreneurs can spot a good idea and
move it into a viable business model.”
Source: http://www.canadianentrepreneurship.ca
The Bruce Community Futures Development Corporation 2011 report on Bruce
Seniors’ Needs Analysis sets up the opportunity.
•
•
•
Bruce County has a strong presence of retail, service, health and
recreation industries, collectively accounting for almost 30% of all
businesses in the County (p. 21)
Bruce County maintains a large number of seniors who enter selfemployment after the typical retirement age of 65 (p. 23)
Seniors are living longer more active, healthy lives (p. 41)
The report outlines businesses and services that are in short supply. For
entrepreneurs this should suggest an opportunity is to create new businesses to
meet a growing demand. The list includes:
•
•
•
•
Provision of Home Care Services– including housekeeping services, meal
preparation and personal care assistants (p. 30)
Housing (i.e. Home Building) – extends to a broad spectrum of housing
types from bungalows and apartments/condos to assisted living facilities
(p. 29)
Maintenance Services – home repairs / handyman services (p.27)
Transportation – specialized seniors programs and services (p. 54)
Moreover, Statistics Canada has assessed rates of retirement among the selfemployed living in rural and small town (RST) Canada. In 2006, 22% of the
self-employed were aged 55 to 64. StatsCan found the rate of retirement would
be 35% or more among:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Funeral home operators (43%)
Warehouse operators (43%)
Manufacturers of clay and brick products (40%)
Educational counseling and testing services (39%)
Private and boarding school operators (36%)
Wholesale and distributors for businesses (35%)
Source: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/21-006-x/21-006-x2012001-eng.pdf
For entrepreneurially minded individuals the demographics of an aging
population create possibilities, either to take over established businesses, or to
introduce new kinds of ventures to fill in the gaps.
The Canadian Institute for Rural Entrepreneurship advises that one of the main
tools to encourage entrepreneurship is to encourage openness to outsiders. In
other words, make it clear to visitors and interested parties that Kincardine is in
fact welcoming and “open for business”. Show them the opportunities that exist
today and in the near future.
There are numerous examples of highly successful businesses that have
consciously set up shop in rural communities. It may be worthwhile to review
how these businesses have succeeded and prospered. The lessons learned can
then be applied to future recruitment strategies
Some cases:
•
Lands End: Gary Comer moved his mail-order operation from a Chicago
store basement to “the middle of a cornfield in Wisconsin”, as the
business expanded. The headquarters in Dodgeville, Wisconsin now
employs over 4,000 people.
•
Halifax Biomedical Inc. was founded in 2004 in Halifax. Chad Munro
moved his highly specialized measurements company to Mabou,
Inverness County, in rural Cape Breton. Chad Munro believes rural
communities are well positioned to attract and retain early-stage
companies. “You focus on what creates one, two, three, five, 10 jobs. It
sounds like a little deal, like who cares, but 10 jobs does an awful lot in
a smaller community.” He points out that Warsaw, Indiana, a town of
cornfields is also the home of three multi-billion dollar medical device
companies. “They are there because that’s where they started.”
Other Trends To Consider
Agri-tourism
•
Agri-tourism: the practice of touring agricultural areas to see farms and
often to participate in farm activities.
•
This term can cover a wide range of activities including but not limited
to: buying produce direct from a producer, picking fruit, feeding animals,
honey tasting, horseback riding, cheese making, learning about wine
making, fairs, farm to table dinners, dude ranches, staying at a farm
B&B etc.
•
According to the latest Census of Agriculture in the United States, the
amount of money brought in by agri-tourism has risen 24% since 2007
and as of 2012 totals more than $700 million annually.
•
“Current trends in the tourist industry show increasing demand for
experiential, hands-on, non-conventional tourism activities. This trend
has extended into the agricultural sector because the appeal for
agricultural and farm-based tourism attractions is also increasing.”
•
There are several potential benefits of agri-tourism but for the purposes
of this project the most important one being as a catalyst for enhancing
the appeal and demand for local products, fostering regional marketing
efforts and creating value-added and direct-marketing opportunities that
may stimulate economic activity and spread the benefits throughout the
county.
•
Value-added products such as jam, beeswax candles and other locally
produced artisan goods offer broader economic opportunity in areas
where agri-tourism is prevalent.
Agri-tourism in California
“More than 2.4 million visitors participated in agritourism at California farms
and ranches in 2008. They stayed at guest ranches in the foot- hills, picked
peaches in the Sacramento Valley, played in corn mazes up and down the state,
shopped at on-farm produce stands along the coast, held weddings in fields and
vineyards from coast to mountains, and experienced myriad other agriculturerelated tourism activities.”
Source: http://wuis.org/post/states-working-out-kinks-agritourism
Source: http://sfp.ucdavis.edu/agritourism/Case_Studies/agritourSD/
Source: http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/repositoryfiles/ca6502p57-85601.pdf
In Bruce County
•
Bruce County currently has several agri-tourism destinations. The most
unique perhaps being the Bruce Botanical Food Gardens. While still in
its infancy, this destination (located in Ripley) is very unique and has
potential to serve as a centre for agri-tourism expansion in the region.
While many botanical gardens have “edible” sections, this entirely foodbased botanical garden is the first of its kind in Canada.
•
“Eco-tourism and agri-tourism have many parallels and some
development professionals consider the latter a subset of the former. In
either case, much of the experience is designed around an area's natural
variety, including its animal, plant and human cultural diversity.”
o Further developing agritourism in Bruce County should be
considered as it involves assets the county already has and could
be developed further in harmony with the current, nature-based
tourism industry.
Source: http://www.bbfg.org/
Source: http://www.agmrc.org/commodities__products/agritourism/nature-basedecotourism-profile/
The Maker Movement (Artisanal Capitalism)
•
“ The umbrella term for independent inventors, designers and
tinkerers…A convergence of computer hackers and traditional
artisans…Makers tap into an American admiration for self-reliance and
combine that with open-source learning, contemporary design and
powerful personal technology like 3D printers. The creations, born in
cluttered local workshops and bedroom offices, stir the imaginations of
consumers numbed by generic, mass-produced, made-in–China
merchandise”. – Adweek
•
Offers opportunity for specialty/niche products that are relevant to the
area to be produced and sold locally (where appropriate) with the ability
to be sold/distributed nationally and internationally.
•
Speaks to the growing movement of people who want to create and
purchase products made by an individual, not a multi-national
corporation. Handmade, artisanal goods can be made anywhere. Modern
technology and accessibility to transportation/shipping networks makes
remoteness of location less of an obstacle for business.
•
DIY’ers who are able to commercialize because of increased access to
technology and outsourced supply chains – able to work from anywhere
(lack of reliable internet access being the one potential barrier).
•
2012 sales on Etsy totaled $895 million. By October 2013 they had
surpassed $1 billion.
Source: http://time.com/104210/maker-faire-maker-movement/
Source: http://www.economist.com/news/business/21592656-etsy-startingshow-how-maker-movement-can-make-money-art-and-craft-business
•
Norquay Co. – Artisan canoe paddles
o Paddles made in Northern Ontario and hand finished in Montreal.
They are made in small batches and sold direct through the
website, and through retail locations internationally.
o Featured in several magazines including: Monocle Magazine, GQ
Magazine, Outside Magazine and Sharp Magazine.
Source: http://norquayco.com/
•
Good To-Go
o Maine-based company that produces gourmet dehydrated meals
for campers and backpackers
o Manufactured in Maine using ingredients sourced from the USA,
o Sell through website as well as through a network of over 25
stores in the State.
o Recently featured on coolhunting.com and are expanding their
product lines.
Source: http://goodto-go.com/about/
Made in Canada
•
According to a recent IPSOS/BDC (Business Development Bank of
Canada) study, the consumer trend towards purchasing locally made
products is gaining steam.
o 97% of consumers decide to buy local to support the local
economy
o 87% of consumers think purchasing locally made goods is better
for the environment
o 45% of consumers made an effort to buy Canadian products in
the past year
•
“Consumers also buy non-food products from local businesses, and that
has economic benefits. A recent Canadian study showed that a locally
owned business can directly re-circulate up to one third of its revenues in
the community; a comparable multinational directly re-circulated less
than 20%, on average. Similarly, the indirect redistribution of revenues
can be as much as 2.6 times higher for local businesses than chain
establishments. Because local companies are more likely to use local
suppliers, such as accountants, information technology companies and
banks.”
Source:http://www.bdc.ca/Resources%20Manager/study_2013/consumer_trends
_BDC_report.pdf
•
Muskoka Brewery
o Started as a small operation in 1996 in Bracebridge, Ontario. Now
employs over 60 people and in 2013, expanded to a new facility
(six km down the road from the original).
o Operate production facility, retail store, cellar, tap-house and
head office all in Muskoka.
o Distributes product through the LCBO and in restaurants/bars
throughout the country.
“Muskoka Brewery exudes the relaxed and easy living of the Muskoka cottage
lifestyle; a connection to nature and a love for the area.”
Source: http://sundaycrush.com/feature-interview-muskoka-brewery/
Source: http://www.muskokabrewery.com/brewery.php
A Look At Wiarton
•
Wiarton is one of several communities that make up the town of South
Bruce Peninsula. While this amalgamation happened in 1999, there
seems to be an identity crisis of sorts with some of the larger
communities (namely Wiarton and Sauble Beach) appearing as though
they are separate towns. This makes finding information isolated to
Wiarton challenging and somewhat confusing. It’s unclear if these
communities operate independently or as a collective unit. The reality is
that it’s probably a little bit of both.
•
There are many websites detailing the happenings in Wiarton and almost
all are tourism focused. For example: the Town of South Bruce Peninsula
website, while providing information on economic development, housing,
education and healthcare, has a tourist slant with a countdown to
groundhog day featured on the homepage and numerous references to a
four season “destination”. Destination implies that it’s somewhere for
visiting, not for staying.
•
The town of South Bruce Peninsula has quite a few documents available
under the economic development section of their website but most are
outdated. For example, a community profile document (that would be of
interest to people considering opening a business in the area) is from
2005 and uses information from the 2001 census.
•
Also problematic is that out of the 17 documents provided, seven were
dead links. Outdated and inaccessible documents give the distinct
impression that the Town of South Bruce Peninsula is closed for
business.
•
Access to the Bruce Peninsula and proximity to the Bruce Trail and
several provincial and national parks is what makes Wiarton unique.
•
Wiarton’s history shows a town with a lot of spunk. It has managed to
hold itself together for 100 years, despite the adversity it has faced. Its
spirit is indomitable, and fun loving. How else do you explain a town that
starts a festival around an albino rodent in the dead of winter that
revolves around Willy being afraid of his shadow? Yet, the festival
manages to attract crowds 10,000 strong. It’s a place that is trying to
renew itself and push itself forward in a vastly changing economy.
•
In recent years, as with many small towns in sparsely populated areas of
Ontario, Wiarton has experienced a struggling downtown. While the
summer provides an influx of people due to tourism and proximity to the
Bruce Peninsula, there has been a continued struggle for long-term
sustainable business.
o Anecdotally, we can attribute this to several factors including:
declining population, competition from larger centres, increased
cost of operating a business (utilities were mentioned several
times in recent business owner surveys), lack of
business/entrepreneurial support, lack of business savvy,
inconsistent quality and hours and the seasonality of the main
traffic driver – tourism.
•
Population trends show an overall decrease (1.3% decline from 20062011) with the median age of a Wiarton resident being 50.0. These
numbers are in stark contrast with the rest of Ontario which has seen a
population increase of 5.7% over the same time period with the median
age being 40.4. Basically, Wiarton (along with the rest of the county) is
getting older and smaller.
•
Worth noting is the high indexing of skilled trades people with
apprenticeships or trades diplomas and the low indexing of university
educated people. Expectantly, there is a high proportion of “blue collar
occupations such as construction trades, machinists, transportation
equipment operators, agriculture labourers, forestry, processing,
manufacturers, etc.
Source:
http://www.southbrucepeninsula.com/en/economicdevelopment/resources.asp
Source: Census 2011 – StatsCan
Source: Market Data Analysis – OMFRA
Seasonality of Tourism
Bruce County tourism is highly seasonal – far more dramatic than in
neighbouring counties. This makes sustainability a much larger issues than in
counties where the flow of visitors is more consistent. Wiarton has been known
as the “gateway” to the Bruce Peninsula, which implies passing through rather
than stopping. Efforts to change outside perceptions have already been made
by the recent change in positioning of Wiarton to “Basecamp” to the Bruce.
This is a positive first step in capturing visitors for longer periods of time.
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According to RTO7 Consumer Insight Research, the three main groups traveling
through the area are “Up & Coming Explorers”, “Nature Lovers”, and “Sports
Lovers”.
•
While these descriptions are basic and offer minimal insight, we can
consider this when looking at who is exposed to Wiarton with the
potential for relocation.
Up & Coming Explorers
•
“This is a youth-oriented group that is on its way up in the world. These
travelers are emerging into a new life-stage, often characterized by
greater affluence and new opportunities. Visible minorities and
immigrants often fall into this segment. Travel is not about connecting
with family or friends. While these people often want to be adventurous
and energetic, their travel experiences often start with what is nearby,
and typically with core tourist attractions. Ontario is very popular with
this group and visitation is typically very recent.”
Nature Lovers
•
“This is a consumer segment attracted to outdoor experiences aligned to
Ontario’s quintessential parks & lakes offering. Camping and associated
activities, (e.g. hiking, canoeing, fishing) are key interests for this group.
The majority classify as “nature lovers”. Activities align with the
recreational aspects of the outdoors and not necessarily the extreme
aspects of the outdoors, (e.g. avid angling or hunting). Not surprisingly,
the travel style is basic with camping prevalent.”
Sports Lovers
•
“This group, skews more male, and is driven by a love of sports, either
watching or participating. By the nature of their passion these people
describe themselves as more active and energetic than most. In reality
their sports are not necessarily extreme, rather more in keeping with what
is readily available, and more likely to be organized team sports and
golf.”
Source: RTO 7 Consumer Insights 2013 Report
A Unique Position
Wiarton (and the larger Town of South Bruce Peninsula) is in quite a unique
geographical position. It’s proximity to countless natural attractions such as
Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, The Bruce Peninsula, national and provincial parks,
various rivers and waterways, beaches, caves and trails is something that needs
to be continually celebrated as what makes Wiarton special. There are many
things you can change about a town, but physical location isn’t one of them and
this is Wiarton’s advantage.
Gateway Communities
In a recent study done on recreational trail use and economic impact for
gateway communities on the Gandy Dancer State trail in Wisconsin, several
insights were discovered. While the data collected was specific to this trail and
it’s use, broader implications can be drawn about habits and tendencies for trail
users in general.
•
Ranking was done to show the performance and importance of each
business amenity category.
Top ranking categories in terms of performance and importance were:
•
•
•
•
•
Sit down restaurants
Hardware stores
Fast food restaurants
Historical sites
Festivals/events
Lowest ranking were:
•
•
•
•
•
Gambling
WiFi locations
Handicrafts and souvenirs
Interpretive displays
Amusements
Of high importance but low performance were: bicycle shops/repairs, sporting
goods stores and takeout restaurants.
Source: http://learningstore.uwex.edu/Assets/pdfs/G3880.pdf
Trail Towns
•
“Trails stimulate business creation, influence corporate location
decisions, boost spending at local businesses, increase property values,
reduce medical costs by encouraging exercise, and generate tax dollars.
They also of course provide low or no-cost recreational opportunities and
transportation options to the public.”
•
Key Benefits:
o Make communities more attractive places to live (quality of life
factor)
o Create influx of visitors to towns they are located near
o Companies often choose to relocate to places that offer a high
level of amenities as a means of attracting and retaining highvalue employees
Source: http://conservationtools.org/guides/show/97-Economic-Benefits-ofTrails#ixzz37V71c4S5
•
Over arching theme is that while trail users provide reliable traffic and
income source, they are inevitably seasonal.
•
“All of these trail users are potential customers at restaurants, grocery
stores, gear shops, hotels and other local businesses. Often, however,
there is little connection made between rural downtowns and the trails or
recreational opportunities around them”.
•
Communities that are seeking to develop trial-based economic
development should address four main components:
o Trail development (very important to physically connect the trail
with the town – bringing railheads into town, info kiosks, public
bathrooms etc.)
o Business development
o Marketing and events
o Stewardship
Case Study: Oakridge, Oregon
•
Branded themselves as the mountain biking capital of the Northwest.
•
Bike wash stations, private guide service, shuttle service, equipment
rental, hostel with secure indoor bike parking, outdoor bike parking at
many shops.
•
Designated by the international mountain biking association as a ride
centre.
•
Hosts national mountain biking festival.
•
Chamber of Commerce holds training sessions for local employees in
order to become ambassadors for the various local activities.
Case Study: Damascus, Virginia
•
Successfully branded themselves as “Trail Town USA”.
•
Historically, was economically reliant on timber and the railroad – this
stopped when the US Forest Service was formed (limiting ability to
harvest the lumber) and when the railroad was decommissioned.
•
Area benefits from many recreation assets including several trails, bird
watching, fishing and rock climbing.
•
In business owner surveys, approximately 60% of income can be
attributed to trail-user spending.
•
Various successful businesses include: gear rental, shuttles,
hotels/hostels, tour operators and restaurants.
•
Struggles with fluctuating seasonal traffic.
Important takeaway:
• Connect the trail with your downtown and make your downtown
somewhere that people want to spend time in.
Source:http://www.connectcascadelocks.com/uploads/1/0/0/9/10099646/appen
dix_a_case_studies_final.pdf
Benefits of Hiking Trails
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Connectivity
Economics
Education
Environmental
Health
Heritage
Recreation
Transportation
While economics may seem to be the main driver for the purposes of this
project, not to be overlooked are the huge impact hiking/trail use has on quality
of life as demonstrated by connectivity, health, education, heritage and
recreation.
Source: http://hikeontario.com/why-hike/benefits-of-trails/
A Look At Kincardine
•
From its websites, the general impression is that Kincardine, Ontario is a
very busy tourist destination for two months of the year, but after the
summer season is over there is very little economic activity to sustain
local businesses.
•
Despite attracting thousands of tourists each year, there is very little
evidence that Kincardine actively recruits future business owners from
this pool to come to its Municipality and start a company or move an
existing business.
•
While there is some economic data on Kincardine, it is not collected
together, found in one place, or necessarily the most convincing
information. This makes it difficult for prospective business owners to
determine the economic vitality of the Municipality.
•
Anecdotally, it is suggested that the kinds of business owners that the
Municipality should be attracting are the ones that “get it”. (This is
based on verbatim comments in the reports the County of Brue provided
Tenzing for its Situation Audit.) A composite profile of the ideal
prospective owner would be useful to help target future businesses. I.e.
who are they, what traits or characteristics will make them successful in
Kincardine, what is their motivation for setting up a business in the
Municipality, and so on.
•
Moreover, based on businesses that have failed or closed in recent years,
it appears that the kinds of businesses that succeed in downtown
Kincardine are the ones that are value-added or specialty stores that can
charge more for their goods or services. The businesses that typically fail
are the ones that compete on price with the big box or mass merchants.
That being said, a profile of the kinds of businesses that Kincardine
wants (or needs) or believes complimentary to the Municipality’s brand,
would be useful.
•
Bruce Power has a beneficial impact on Kincardine’s economic well
being. The question is, could Bruce Power do more to attract businesses
to the Municipality? This opportunity should be studied further.
•
There are two different kinds of business parks in Kincardine’s
catchment area: The Bruce ECO Industrial Park, which is adjacent to
Bruce Power; and the Kincardine Business Park, which is located nearby
the downtown core. At the present time both parks are underdeveloped
as economic magnets to the area. The roles the parks could play in
attracting businesses to Kincardine needs to be examined further.
•
Locally, some people feel that Kincardine does not have any economic
clusters on which to build. Contrary to this opinion, the Municipality
does have several different kinds of clusters in its vicinity. For the most
part, these clusters are nascent; but individually, they represent growth
potential for Kincardine. Further exploration of the clusters is needed in
order to determine which ones offer the best opportunity for
advancement, and which ones best fit the Municipality’s (and the
Region’s) business recruitment strategies.
•
Much has been written about ways to build sustainable economies in
rural communities. Various trends have been put forward, such as agritourism, the locavore movement and foody culture. Some of these trends
intersect with other activities and interest, such as eco-tourism. Bird
watching it is said, is the fastest growing spectator sport. The Grey-Bruce
Region, and possible the County of Bruce itself, indicates that it is
developing agri-tourism. If so, how these efforts directly impact
Kincardine, or could be focused to attract new business to the
Municipality should be looked at more closely.
•
The opportunity to attract businesses and grow them locally is a real
possibility for Kincardine. The diversity of the kinds of businesses is
open, and should remain open to discussion.
Tourism is great for businesses. But the takeaway is that Kindcardine is a
seasonal economy.
Look at Kincardine objectively. Spend a few minutes on the town’s website.
Visit the various microsites that promote the festivals and activities in the area.
And you quickly surmise that Kincardine is open for business May through
Labour Day. But as soon as back-to-school happens the town appears to go into
a form of economic hibernation.
Examples:
From http://www.sunsets.com
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Victoria Park Gallery: Open seven days a week during the summer.
Lighthouse Destination: Open July 1st thru Labour Day.
Bluewater Summer Playhouse: the name says it all.
Kincardine Theatre Guild
Music in the Park: Concerts July and August.
The Phantom Piper: Appears July and August.
Kincardine Scottish Festival: July 4-5-6 weekend event.
Bruce Telecom Lighthouse Blues Festival: July 11, 12, 13.
Information on the Municipality’s website informs that the Aztec movie theatre
and outdoor market are also seasonal operations.
The events listed by month after September drop in number precipitously. Most
of these are very local concerns, such as fundraising dinners, society meetings
and community concerts.
From http://www.explorethebruce.com/kincardine
Lead in copy reads:
“Come visit the shorelines of Kincardine this Summer. Welcome to
Kincardine – a town full of excitement and entertainment all summer
long!”
From http://www.kincardine.net/committee-bia.cfm
Under the Section “Our Community”:
“Kincardine is the gateway to the Sunshine Coast, the Bruce Peninsula,
as well as Cottage Country. Our beautiful shorelines provide excellent
boating, fishing, and of course, swimming.
Stroll several miles of sandy beach, or dabble your feet in the crystal
clear waters of Lake Huron. Take an evening to experience Kincardine's
3/4 mile long boardwalk and catch our World Famous Sunsets.
Whatever the season, the Municipality has something to offer. Encounter
our many antique stores and quaint boutiques, festivals and events, and
dazzling summer theatre, and you'll understand how enticing it is to be a
part of this wonderful community.”
But there is scarce information on winter activities. Penetangore Regional
Economic Development Corporation’s site http://www.predc.ca tells visitors
about the various festivals that Kincardine hosts but only mentions the Grand
Prix de Kincardine Snowmobile Racing in passing, saying Rick Mercer attended
the event in 2011 “bringing forward his colourful splash of comic relief and
entertainment”. The only other indication of winter activities is Kincardine’s
tourism-facing website sunsets.com, which offers a page on snowshoeing and
cross-country skiing in the area
http://www.sunsets.com/kincardine/activity.php?Activity=47.
The municipality’s slogan is “Great energy. Balanced life.” There is nothing
wrong with celebrating the summer months, but it creates a perceptional
imbalance about Kincardine. The takeaway for someone considering moving to
Kincardine or planning to open a business is that and the business opportunity
is very seasonal, and weighted to about 60 days a year during the summer
months.
Interestingly, the report titled “Impact Analysis of the Summer of 2013”
indicates that just 30 business of the 160 members of the Kincardine Business
Improvement Area completed the survey. The survey examines the impact of
five major events. However, the survey was only distributed to retailers, and not
to members who operate personal services or offices. Yet, the economic impact
of tourism on all members of Kincardine’s BIA is real. To this point 168
businesses in Kincardine are open all year round, although some businesses
have shorter winter hours, or are open only six days a week from seven in
summer, and have longer summer operating times as well.
Economic Data on Kincardine is Hard to Find
Every summer Kincardine’s population of approximately 11,000 swells by about
100,000 visitors, who attend various events, of which the Kincardine Scottish
Festival is the largest single attraction (12,000 visitors).
This is an impressive figure. A prospective business owner might see the total
number of visitors; calculate the share-of-wallet they potentially represent; and
then decide Kincardine is a goldmine for her or his future business.
Yet, this information, or indeed, any basic economic data on Kincardine is hard
to locate.
According to Kincardine’s Wikipedia entry, the municipality’s official website is
http://www.kincardine.net. Follow the site’s navigation to “Our Community”,
and from there the dropdown menu includes “Economic Development”. Click
on this link and it takes you out of the municipality’s site to Penetangore
Regional Economic Development Corporation’s site http://www.predc.ca. It is
not immediately apparent to the visitor that this new site represents Kincardine.
Still, after some hunting about, the visitor might realize that there is economic
data under the tab “Business Sectors”. They will find a report titled “Regional
and Business Sector Statistics, Posted March 22, 2012”. Only after the word
document is opened is it revealed the statistics (based on the 2006 Census) are
for Kincardine.
Under the same tab the dropdown menu features four business sectors:
Tourism, Industry, Service and Retail, and Agriculture. It is under Tourism that
a report titled “May 2013 – Full Report – 100,000 Welcomes.” is found. This
is in fact a Tourism Strategic Plan for the Municipality of Kincardine. (Also
posted are PowerPoint and summary report versions.) The Full Report is over 70
pages long. While there is much interesting information on tourism trends, only
some of it relates to tourism as it affects Kincardine’s economic development.
Interestingly, there is no mention in this report (at least that we can see) of the
100,000 visitors to Kincardine’s summer events and activities, despite the
report’s title “100,000 Welcomes”. This information is found in the
“Kincardine’s Spruce the Bruce Annual Report Card” (page 10), which is not
included in the Penetangore Regional Economic Development Corporation’s
site. If this information is posted on the Bruce County’s website
https://www.brucecounty.on.ca, on its affiliated websites
https://www.brucecounty.on.ca/business/spruce-the-bruce.php or
http://www.explorethebruce.com, we were not able to find it.
The information included on the other business sectors is fairly thin. Under
“Industry” the information provided is mostly to do with Bruce Power. The
Service and Retail sector tells us (politely) “Please take the time to visit the
Downtown BIA Facebook site for informative insights into our downtown”. Once
there, the Facebook page tells us there are 160 businesses in Kincardine’s BIA
and that street parking is available. There is also a contest to get to a “1000
Likes… by the beginning of the first Scottish Pipe Band Parade of the
summer”. The Agriculture sector informs us that there are 322 farms,
“expanding over 32,014 hectares of land”, and that there is “a growing
movement towards procuring locally produced food in support of local farmers”.
Alternatively, someone might choose to investigate the regional advantages of
Grey Bruce, for which there is investingreybruce.com, which in turn links to
some economic data on Kincardine. This features Jobs by Industry and Earning
by Industry, which for some reason is absent from the “Regional and Business
Sector Statistics” report for Kincardine that is posted on Penetangore Regional
Economic Development Corporation’s site.
All and good to know. But only the most determined individual is going to hunt
through all this data and information, spanning numerous websites and pages,
in order to get a snapshot of what Kincardine’s economy looks like. Missing is a
compelling, succinct argument or reason why anyone should set up business in
the municipality.
Also missing are
•
•
Testimonials: There is only one video testimonial, and that is found on
Invest In Grey Bruce. It is included among other testimonials from the
region, and does not indicate upfront that the business being featured is
located in Kincardine. http://investingreybruce.com/index.php/brucecase-studies
Business Opportunities: Listing of businesses for sale or land
development opportunities. The link on Bruce County’s site is not active:
http://www.investingreybruce.com/en/real-estate.html; Penetangore
Regional site links to RAGBOS, but the realtors’ association site seems
aimed at the housing market, and not ICI properties
http://www.predc.ca/region.php?pgid=12; the link on Invest In Grey
Bruce does work; but it takes visitors to the region, which might distract
their focus and ultimate interest in Kincardine
http://investingreybruce.com/index.php/real-estate-info
The Businesses Kincardine Needs or Wants (or thinks it does)
A study in 2010 for the Kincardine Business Improvement Area for the benefit
of Downtown Kincardine examined residents’ use and frequency of businesses
in the Municipality. At the time it was suggested that:
“Services and amenities receiving high response totals should be
considered ‘downtown pulls or attractors’. Effort should be made to
maintain their role in the downtown core.”
(p. 22)
These service and amenities included:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Groceries
Financial services
Post office
Dinner services
Coffee/tea break
Pharmacy
Moreover, residents determined the top five ideas for additional businesses or
services included
(p. 20)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Men’s clothing store
Clothing store (no specification)
Children’s clothing store
More restaurants
Bakery/deli
Year round movie theatre
Other suggestions (not the top five) included (p. 20)
•
•
•
Niche stores
Video/music DVD
Arts/crafts/sewing store
In 2014 the economic viability of some of these ideas is uncertain (for example,
video stores).
Also, more recent analysis by Downtown Kincardine has revealed that many food
stores find they cannot compete with big box and mass merchants, because as
reported, “Those who don’t work at Bruce Power can’t afford to shop in
Kincardine.” (p.26)
A further complication is an unintended consequence of Kincardine’s rebranding as part of the “Spruce the Bruce” initiative. The stores that are a best
fit today for Kincardine’s refreshed brand are not necessarily the same kinds of
businesses that traditionally lined the downtown core.
More analysis is required to determine the businesses that are the right size and
fit Downtown Kincardine’s economic development.
Bruce Power: An Undeveloped Opportunity
Bruce Power is the largest nuclear power facility in the world. It is also the
largest employer in Kincardine’s catchment area, providing work for 4,000
employees, and about 3,000 contractors. Bruce Power’s site in Tiverton, ON is
home to eight CANDU reactors, each of which is capable of providing enough
electricity to meet the annual needs of a city the size of Hamilton. Formed in
2001, Bruce Power is an all-Canadian partnership among Borealis
Infrastructure Management (a division of the Ontario Municipal Employees
Retirement System), TransCanada, the Power Workers’ Union and the The
Society of Energy Professionals. A majority of Bruce Power’s employees are also
owners in the business.
According to Bruce Power, the nuclear power plant attracts thousands of visitors
a year, though the exact number is not verifiable at this time. The Visitor’s
Centre is open year-round Monday thru Friday, and on Saturdays during July
and August. The Centre offers free WiFi. It also has an Electric Vehicle car
charging station – free electricity for those who make the trip in their EVs.
Interestingly, there is a global rise of what is being termed “nuclear tourists”. A
nuclear power plant in Sweden attracts over 15,000 tourists annually.
http://www.jaunted.com/story/2007/10/30/7119/8122/travel/Extreme+Tourism
%3A+Nuclear+Power+Plants+in+Sweden.
The question is: In as much as Kincardine’s festivals attract thousands of
visitors, some of whom in turn might be encouraged to set up businesses in the
Municipality, can Kincardine make more use Bruce Power to attract businesses
to its community?
The Value of Industrial and Business Parks
There are two parks in Kincardine’s catchment area. The Bruce ECO Industrial
Park has been in operation since the 1980s. The other is the proposed
Kincardine Business Park between Highways 21 and 9.
Both parks have the potential to attract businesses to Kincardine. And these
businesses in turn have the potential to attract other businesses, either similar
in pursuit or activity, or services that support the resident businesses. For this
reason it is worth spending a few moments to examine both parks.
Definitions
•
•
An industrial park is typically “a large tract of land, sub-divided and
developed for the use of several firms simultaneously, distinguished by
its shareable infrastructure and close proximity of firms”.
An eco-industrial park satisfies the definition of an industrial park, but in
addition is “a community of businesses that cooperate with each other
and with the local community to efficiently share resources, (information,
materials, water, energy, infrastructure and local habitat), leading to
economic gains, gains in environmental quality, and equitable
enhancement of human resources for the business and local
community”*
* See 2010 presentation by Raymond Côté, Senior Fellow Eco-Efficiency
Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax:
http://www.crsc.ualberta.ca/en/Events%20Archive/2010-09-16EcologicallySustainableIndustrialParks.aspx
The Bruce ECO Industrial Park
Originally called The Bruce Energy Centre, the park is located about 12 km
from Kincardine and occupies 245 acres of land immediately adjacent to Bruce
Power. Steam, electricity, water and sewer services were supplied to the site by
Bruce Power. The eco-industrial park designation allowed for medium to heavy
industrial uses all with the possibility of outdoor storage.
Canadian Agra Inc* located in Kincardine helped kick-start the project.
* Canadian Agra was established in 1981, is owned by the Sieber family,
originally from Austria. The company was founded to buy farmland throughout
Canada and to assemble land holdings of 1000 to 5000 acres. That land was
then sold to European investors. Canadian Agra would then lease out the land
and provide property management.
Initially, six companies organized around Bruce Power to take advantage of its
waste heat and steam generation. The main industries in the park included:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Bruce Tropical Produce – a hydroponic greenhouse, equivalent to a 100acre field, growing 2.3 million pounds of tomatoes each year.
Bruce Agra Foods – which processed fruits and vegetables into
concentrates, sauces and purees.
Bruce Agra Dehy – dehydrated locally grown crops to produce nutrient
rich feeds for livestock and horses.
Commercial Alcohols – the largest manufacture and distributor of alcohol
in Canada
BI-AX International – as specialized company that manufactures special
polypropylene films.
St. Lawrence Technologies – a research and development facility that
specializes in finding ways to convert renewable resources to viable
products.
Despite the remoteness of the location, businesses with larger energy needs
located there because of the cheap heat/energy. Once Bruce Power was brought
in, they stopped offering ‘cheap heat’. Only full-priced energy is available.
Currently, the greenhouse is empty; the brewery closed; Greenfield Ethanol still
uses the building; and two small tenants are on site.
One potential inhibitor for successful development in the ECO Park is lack of
natural gas. With the exception of certain types of heavy industry, which
require remoteness, no competitive advantage cost-wise has been identified for
the site.
About 30 eco-industrial parks are at various stages of development around the
world. Most have only reached the design stage. Some like Bruce have set up
but failed to launch successfully. A couple of examples of eco-industrial parks
that have prospered:
•
•
Kalundborg, Denmark: Partners include Novo Nordisk (the largest
producer of insulin in the world), Novozymes (the largest producer of
enzymes in the world), Gyproc (French producer of gypsum board), RGS
90 (Danish soil remediation and recovery company) and others.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalundborg_Eco-industrial_Park
TaigaNova, Alberta, Canada: Partners include the Alberta Construction
Safety Association, Epcor, Honeywell, Cummins, AGAT Laboratories, and
others. http://www.taiganova.com
Kincardine Business Park
The proposed park is planned for light or prestige industrial uses. The
Municipality is studying the park’s development. In 2013, a price tag of at least
$10 million was assessed for its development, plus another $1-$2 million for
servicing the park and completing upgrades to existing municipality
infrastructure. The Municipality is looking at developers or landowners to kickstart the project.
However, prospective developers or landowners interested in finding more about
Kincardine Business Park, will have a hard time finding information on the
Municipality’s website.
http://www.kincardine.net/documents.cfm?categoryid=71
So it was interesting to read a report in The Kincardine Independent (May
2014), which informs that Kincardine’s business park could be greatly
expanded in the next few years. Work has begun on a new TownPlace Suites
Marriot. The hotel expects to open late spring 2015 with 84 guest rooms. A
6,500-square foot conference centre will connect the hotel. Moreover, the
Legacy Hospitality Management and Development, which is developing the
project on three acres, also owns 30 acres that Legacy’s managing partner, Arif
Ismail, says his company is in talks “with a number of businesses that have
expressed interest in occupying space on the property…. We are negotiating to
get industrial, commercial and retail here. We want to develop that portion on
land in the next few years.” http://www.independent.on.ca/site/?q=node/4373
Target Groups
Kincardine BIA’s 2013 survey of businesses on summer events (Impact
Analysis of the Summer of 2013) includes this comment from one of the
owners:
“Need events that include younger age groups. All events are for 40+ age
groups” (additional comment #16)
Other data collected by Kincardine seems to confirm this. The 2009 Economic
Impact Study on the Kincardine Scottish Festival indicate that the “non-local
visitor is over the age of 50, mostly female… are married / living together with
children grown up”.
Senior visitors to Kincardine can be considered good news for community
business recruitment and retention. It all depends on how you look at it. As
discussed earlier, tourism is a business attraction strategy. It can and should be
used as a way of bringing new businesses into Kincardine.
According to a recent study by Merrill Lynch, titled “Work in Retirement: Myths
and Motivations, Career Reinventions and the New Retirement Workscape”
(June 2014), many senior-aged tourists could eventually set up shop in
Kincardine.
Working in retirement (based on 1,800 working retirees)
•
•
•
•
•
62%
46%
42%
36%
31%
continued to work to stay mentally active
work to stay physically active
work for the social connections it provides
work for sense of identity and self-work
work to make money
Even if Kincardine is not able to attract “grey entrepreneurs” the aging
population base offers numerous opportunities for a younger cohort of business
owners.
Potential Wins
•
Dooher’s Bakery in Campbelford, ON is regularly voted the best bakery in
Northumberland County. It sells out its bake goods not just in summer
during the busy tourist season, but all year round as well. The 2010
survey of residents listed a bakery as one of their top five ideas.
A Scottish Bakery fits Kincardine’s overall heritage and branding.
- Grandpa Jimmy’s Scottish Bakery is located in Grand
Bend. Perhaps they could be encouraged to expand to a
second location in Kincardine?
https://www.google.ca/webhp?sourceid=chromeinstant&ion=1&espv=2&es_th=1&ie=UTF8#q=grandpa%20jimmy's%20scottish%20bakery
•
Several sources point on the need for tourism training. The 2010 study
for the Kincardine Business Improvement Area states: “We really need
hospitality training, to address the lack of really good customer service.”
(p. 26). In 2011 the Four County Labour Planning Board made the same
point: “Effective and on-going customer service excellence training and
industry standard professionalism training is a requirement for the
continued success of this industry in the Four County region. Higher
levels of education in the replacement workforce is needed as positions
continue to be created, particularly in the high tourist season.”
Kincardine could set up a tourism and training campus, in conjunction
with Fanshawe College and its School of Tourism and & Hospitality.
http://www.fanshawec.ca/tourism
Given Kincardine’s tourism focus, providing training and co-op
experience is a real possibility. Stratford, ON did something similar when
it successfully partnered with Waterloo and set up the innovative Digital
Media Campus.
Going Forward
After reviewing about 2,000 pages of surveys and available data that is relevant
to the topic of business attraction and recruitment in smaller (rural)
communities, we believe the following conclusions can begin to inform a
strategy for going forward.
1. Economic development or business attraction in smaller communities
may not be about the 'what' or type of business but the 'who' or type of
person inclined to start/operate a small town enterprise. A successful
strategy will profile the types of people wanted and where to find them.
2. While tourism is often seen as a contributor to business recruitment, it
may not be working in Wiarton and Kincardine. Both communities feel
closed to business for 10 months per year. Both community brands have
not yet been interpreted for business recruitment. Community
information regarding economic development is not easy to find.
Recruitment communications will have to be aligned with the audience
we want to attract.
3. Existing data is either too old or too thin, and there are no ‘magic bullets’
that we could identify. That said, we also believe collecting more data
will be of little use in the execution of a business attraction program.
4. We believe both community brands can be interpreted for business
development/attraction. There is no need to evolve the brands. We just
have to aim them in the right direction.
5. There are clusters in and around both communities. While small, they
are the foundations for attracting new business (owners) to the area.
6. The Bruce Nuclear Generating Station is a potential source of
entrepreneurs - this will impact Kincardine and should be core to our
strategy. Wiarton does not enjoy this 'side effect' of a huge local
employer with international reach. But Wiarton does have hundreds of
thousands of tourists passing through per year and an extremely unique
piece of geography. Both, in addition to agri-businesses, will inform a
strategy for Wiarton.
7. Local business people in both communities will be important
participants in recruitment. We'll need local mentors, champions, their
opinions and their networks.
Finally - we believe ideas, innovation and action (implementing a plan) will
contribute more to business development and recruitment than more data
collecting. There are examples of small communities throughout North America
that are successful because they take bold steps to position themselves as
progressive, interesting places to bring ideas to life and to live. That's the
opportunity going forward.
BRUCE COUNTY 360 DEGREES OF ATTRACTION CONTENTS •  The Journey So Far •  Who Not What •  PosiBoning NarraBve •  Top-­‐line Strategy •  Regional Strategy •  Community Strategy •  Recommended Next Steps THE JOURNEY SO FAR… THE JOURNEY SO FAR… •  The objecBve remains clear; aQract and/or grow businesses to Bruce County (Kincardine & Wiarton as test cases to establish a winning process). •  We expanded the premise to reach beyond main streets. The ecosystem of a community extends beyond its downtown. •  The Audit Report was delivered to the working commiQee on July 22. •  We audited exisBng data, websites, business aQracBon readiness, exisBng plans and an inventory of current businesses and gaps. THE JOURNEY SO FAR… •  We reviewed exisBng tourism brands; while extremely good and on the right path in both communiBes, the brands do not necessarily transiBon tourism to BR&E. •  We conducted orienteering sessions in both communiBes (business leaders and influencers). •  We studied ED reports and data, best pracBces from similar communiBes and resources. The majority reveal good planning but limited execuBon. •  We searched, filtered and considered informaBon as business operators/owners from outside the communiBes. THE JOURNEY SO FAR…CONCLUSIONS 1)  The data is thin, somewhat out of date and does liQle to establish a way forward. It is also inconsistent between both communiBes, so must be assumed the inconsistency grows when you add more communiBes. 2)  Both communiBes lack BR&E brands that are equal and complementary to the tourism brands. We're not business-­‐
ready. 3)  There seems to be a gap in strategy between the region and individual communiBes. One is not (yet) feeding the other (funnel process). THE JOURNEY SO FAR…CONCLUSIONS 4)  Respecdully -­‐ both towns are aQracBve. So are many of the other similar communiBes with similar aQributes that are using similar grants to reposiBon themselves for BR&E (all using similar strategies). 5)  In the context of (4), remoteness becomes a significant obstacle for the communiBes of Bruce County. 6)  And in the context of (5), how Bruce networks and builds its business community at and around home is just as important as reaching further afield. To simply create a 100-­‐page strategy document that idenBfies gaps, quotes subject maQer experts, references entrepreneurial psychographics and so on will not generate tangible results in our opinion. Most communiBes lack the on-­‐staff resources to execute these programs. WHAT’S NEEDED IS AN ACTION PLAN THAT WILL RESULT IN: •  A connected regional/local process for aQracBng and supporBng community specific BR&E. •  Mobilizing regional and local business people to contribute to and support public sector efforts. •  A business brand that is equal in strength and inspiraBon to the tourism brands. •  A clear understanding of who (not what) we want to aQract. And the means to reach them. Who Not What… The Business AQracBon/Expansion appeal for all of Bruce County (with the possible excepBon of businesses related to Bruce Power) should focus on an entrepreneurial mindset as opposed to specific kinds of businesses to fill a gap. THERE ARE (AT LEAST) EIGHT SEGMENTS OF PEOPLE WE SHOULD KEEP TOP OF MIND WHEN DEVELOPING THE BRUCE ACTION PLAN. • 
ExisBng Owner/Operators (Expansion) • 
Bruce Alumni (Come Home) • 
Friends & Family (Mobilized Network) • 
Pension-­‐Happy (55 & Flush) • 
Free Spirits (Trekkers & Surfers) • 
• 
Tourists (What if…) Bruce Power Families (Bored Brains) • 
Seasonal Residents (Investors) CreaBng and execuBng communicaBons tacBcs against each segment is a key success factor. Engage The Mindset: Bruce Business AQracBon NarraBve A NarraBve posiBons the brand and sets the message parameters. It establishes context and answers the quesBon why. It informs both what you should focus on inside and communicate outside. IMAGINE A DIFFERENT LIFE... In this life, whether you're starBng out or easing back, your ideas have space and Bme to grow. In this different life, the pursuit of what truly gets you up in the morning is less about the race and more about individual drive. In your new life, the pressure cooker has an off-­‐switch. Imagine a life where accomplishment replaces what might have been, Bnkering leads to invenBon, art becomes industry and sweat becomes equity. Imagine a life where that equity -­‐ past, present and future -­‐ goes 100% further than you ever thought it might. Imagine a life where independent thinking is supported by enBre communiBes of like-­‐minded people; so you can be on your own, but only as alone as you choose to be. Imagine a new life where energy, nature, agriculture and innovaBon all combine to create ferBle ground for your dream to grow. There is a different life for those with the spirit to explore it in the communiBes of Bruce County. And we're here to help when that spirit moves you... BRUCE TO BUSINESS (B2B) •  Lead regionally (Bruce County). Act locally (Kincardine, Wiarton, etc.). Create an iniBaBve called Bruce To Business that takes advantage of Bruce resources to aQract and posiBon, while mobilizing local parBcipaBon to bring opportuniBes home and support them. BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
REGIONAL: •  Create a B2B Digital Engine that helps entrepreneurs and businesses determine (explore and self-­‐select) which Bruce community is the best fit for their specific 'dream' or needs. Use digital communicaBons to spread the word. LOCAL: •  Create the B2B Mentoring Network and Toolkit that provides communiBes with a step-­‐by-­‐step program to fulfill what the Engine delivers (funnel) while encouraging local expansion and exploraBon within the exisBng business community. THE DIGITAL ENGINE Explore a different life.
BUSINESS PRIMER
PARTNERS
Imagine what life could be. With time and space
to grow. Where it's less about the race and more
about individual drive. Where tinkering leads to
invention, art becomes industry and sweat
becomes equity. And where that equity goes
100% further than you ever thought it might.
Imagine a life where energy, nature, agriculture
and innovation all combine to create fertile
ground. Imagine it – then start building it here.
PASSION MATCH
ABOUT BRUCE
LIFESTYLE
THE DIGITAL ENGINE Explore a different life.
BUSINESS PRIMER
PARTNERS
Imagine what life could be. With time and space
to grow. Where it's less about the race and more
about individual drive. Where tinkering leads to
invention, art becomes industry and sweat
becomes equity. And where that equity goes
100% further than you ever thought it might.
Imagine a life where energy, nature, agriculture
and innovation all combine to create fertile
ground. Imagine it – then start building it here.
PASSION MATCH
ABOUT BRUCE
World-leading energy
innovation, world biosphere
reserve, two million people...
LIFESTYLE
THE DIGITAL ENGINE ABOUT BRUCE
BUSINESS PRIMER
PASSION MATCH
PARTNERS
LIFESTYLE
How to grow a business in Bruce County.
Startups & expansion, aid & tips.
BRUCE COUNTY /
NORTH BY NORTHWEST
NAVIGATION
FACEBOOK
TWITTER
LINKEDIN
Starting
Expanding
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erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim
veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation
ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip
ex ea commodo consequat.
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consequat.
THE DIGITAL ENGINE ABOUT BRUCE
BUSINESS PRIMER
PASSION MATCH
PARTNERS
LIFESTYLE
Match your talents to the best opportunities in Bruce County.
Content is focused on having the visitor complete a simple form that helps the search engine identify
opportunity matches in the region.
Name
BRUCE COUNTY /
NORTH BY NORTHWEST
NAVIGATION
Skills
Talent
FACEBOOK
TWITTER
Preferred Business
LINKEDIN
Lifestyle Options
Submit
Contact info is provided along with a few successful matches to consider.
EXPLORE A DIFFERENT LIFE •  Allows visitors to explore Bruce communiBes by establishing their preferences and match talents. •  Provides basic, up-­‐to-­‐date ED informaBon in one place and links to other sites/sources of info. •  Where success-­‐story videos about senng up shop or expanding in Bruce reside. •  Links visitors directly to the Business Owner Network of their choice in each community. •  PosiBoning is aligned with the strategy and narraBve; site is current, fresh and appealing. REGIONAL RATIONALE: EXPLORE A DIFFERENT LIFE (DIGITAL ENGINE) •  Think of it as eHarmony for entrepreneurs (we're connecBng businesses and communiBes). •  AQracts candidates from all segments and invites exploraBon by people who are looking, who 'get it’. •  Scalable; also beQer and easier to support at the regional level; provides real value to community iniBaBves. •  Links to real people in each town/faster track. •  Measurable, easy to change, evolve. REGIONAL COMMUNICATIONS: •  Digital development •  SEO (entrepreneurial focus) •  Adwords/PPC •  Targeted PR (Energy/Eng, Ag, Enviro, EcoTour, etc.) •  Digital adverBsing B2B LOCAL: THE LOCAL NETWORK Find Yourself In Bruce County
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
The opportunities to start or expand your business ideas and
passions in Bruce County are almost unlimited. But a great, real
world way to determine the best fit is to connect with a network
of mentors and business people who are already living a different
life and loving it in the communities of Bruce.
Choose the community network that fits you best. Or follow the
path to B2B Regional to join the discussion in the Bruce
Regional Economic Development office.
B2B Wiarton
B2B Kincardine
B2B Regional
B2B LOCAL: THE LOCAL NETWORK Welcome to B2B Wiarton
Subhead for Wiarton
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
B2B Wiarton
B2B Kincardine
main
my page
about Bruce2Business
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How to Form a B2B Wiarton Group
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euismod.
groups
James Smith
Enershare Tech
9 members
B2B Regional
groups
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euismod.
6 members
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Surfia
Custom Boards
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Michelle Wallace
Biosphere Treks
18 members
Yakobov & Lee
Chartered
Accountants
24 members
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blog posts
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THE LOCAL NETWORK •  Create a pladorm where individual community business owner networks can connect, share ideas, leads and mentoring. •  Develop on WordPress, Ning Pladorm or LinkedIn. •  Most likely there will be a common front door (Bruce To Business); this will be linked upstream to the Regional site (Explore A Different Life). •  Two groups to start; Kincardine and Wiarton. Visitor gets to the front door, chooses a community and gets involved, or goes directly to the community that you are involved in, bypassing the front door. B2B LOCAL: THE COMMUNITY TOOLKIT BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
TOOLKIT
KINCARDINE
B2B LOCAL: THE COMMUNITY TOOLKIT Bruce County - B2B - TOOLKIT - Instruction Card / Flashdrive
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
TOOLKIT
KINCARDINE
All the ideas,
tools and
guidance you
need to attract,
grow and
support local
businesses.
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minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation
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aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.
!"#$%&'()*+
Welcome to your Kincardine B2B toolkit.
Start at the beginning and work your way
through the easy-to-follow process for
attracting businesses, supporting expansion
and supporting local business culture.
WHERE
TO START
WHO
TO LOOK FOR
HOW TO
COMMUNICATE
FAST-TRACKING
USING THE
B2B NETWORK
REGION
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
TOOLKIT
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
TOOLKIT
WHERE
TO START
WHO
TO LOOK FOR
HOW TO
COMMUNICATE
FAST-TRACKING
USING THE
B2B NETWORK
REGION
Where To Start
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tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim
veniam, quis nostrud exercitation lobortis nisl ut consequat. Dolor sit amet,
consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut
laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam,
ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.
Dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod
tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim
veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex
ea commodo consequat.
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
TOOLKIT
WHERE
TO START
WHO
TO LOOK FOR
HOW TO
COMMUNICATE
FAST-TRACKING
USING THE
B2B NETWORK
REGION
How To Communicate
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tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim
veniam, quis nostrud exercitation lobortis nisl ut consequat. Dolor sit amet,
consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut
laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam,
ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.
Co-op Kit
Print Ads
Online
Online
Brochure
etc
BRUCE 2
BUSINESS
TOOLKIT
THE COMMUNITY TOOLKIT •  Create a repository of ads, tacBcs, sample brochures and direcBon that local B2B Groups and ED commiQees can use to transiBon regional acBvity into local business aQracBon markeBng and support. •  Could be a real box or a 'digital box'. -­‐ Self-­‐service, like a co-­‐op adverBsing kit -­‐ How to collect the right informaBon -­‐ Advice for fast-­‐tracking business queries •  Make it easily updatable; may want to consider a B2B intranet COMMUNITY RATIONALE: B2B LOCAL NETWORK & TOOLKIT •  Gives local communiBes ulBmate control over execuBon and costs (and related results). •  Is as turnkey as possible; allows slow or fast launch depending on the town and resources. •  Can include an IniBaBon Program where the local group is 'taught' how to use the program. •  Allows more accurate targeBng. •  Is owned and managed by the local B2b group. OVERALL B2B ATTRIBUTES: •  Allows both outbound and inbound digital connecBvity. •  As turnkey as is possible; as self-­‐directed as necessary. •  Allows segmentaBon and tailoring. •  Engages community business leadership, parBcipaBon and ownership -­‐ takes advantage of local/personal networks. •  Visual branding is as strong as Spruce The Bruce (but less intrusive so as not to interfere). •  Uses both regional and local resources in the right way to maximize value. NEXT STEPS: •  Improve and approve top line strategy and regional/local collaboraBon. •  Complete segment profiles. •  IdenBfy community business leader networks and sell parBcipaBon; choose the right pladorm. •  Finish conceptual creaBve for all tools create a deployment budget. County of Bruce: Business Needs Analysis
Business Matching and Action Plan
November 14 th 2014
Introduction
The business matching criteria is based on what we know or have learned about
the communities of Kincardine and Wiarton through site visits, discussion with
local stakeholder groups, and through Tenzing’s situation analysis process,
including some but ultimately limited economic data.
The two communities are distinct from each other. Not just in their location,
but also in how they regard their towns’ growth prospects. Each has specific
conditions that encourage or discourage business development.
What we know – and what has been generally acknowledged by all concerned –
is that candidates that are likely to set up businesses, or invest in commercial
enterprises, are those who “get it”. In other words, the place/location chooses
them, more than the other way around. For the most part, the business owners
that we are likely to appeal to are the ones who - for whatever reason - connect
with Kincardine or Wiarton. We heard this stated repeatedly. The connection or
bond that is formed with Kincardine or Wiarton may be based more on
emotional ties than on left-brain logical considerations. Though importantly,
empirical facts and data are necessary to support the emotional pull to set up a
business in either of the two towns.
Someone with $100,000 to invest in a new restaurant may choose Kincardine
because of its beautiful setting on Lake Huron and the quality of life that the
town offers. Nonetheless, the future business owner will also want to be assured
that the volume of seasonal visitor traffic plus trade from local customers will
provide the new venture with a reasonable ROI.
Sophisticated site selectors may shortlist either Kincardine or Wiarton for
numerous reasons. Bruce Power’s presence is clearly a strong draw for
companies that are aligned to the energy sector (nuclear or otherwise),
including companies that provide technical, consulting, maintenance or
equipment services. Their reasons for choosing Kincardine will not be based on
emotions but on other factors, such as wanting to be part of a growing energy
cluster, and the benefits that provides, including access to a growing talent
pool, networking opportunities, availability of lucrative contracts to sell or
develop reciprocal services, geographic clout in the region, and more.
It will take an integrated strategic and tactical plan to attract and recruit
businesses. Specific recruitment and target engagement tactics will be needed,
given the differences between the prospects. The business owner who moves to
Kincardine or Wiarton because “they get it” and the prospects whose site
selection criteria are very deliberate have distinct needs and interests. For this
later group, the selected location has to literally check off all the boxes before
any consideration to setting up a new business is seriously contemplated. To
convince the former may only take a visit for them to visualize their future in a
new setting. Kincardine and Wiarton have to prepare for each possibility.
This is up for further discussion.
Kincardine
There is no shortage of retail in Kincardine; the mix may not be perfect or to
everyone’s tastes. Local stakeholders indicated some of the shopping is too
exclusive (expensive) in that it appeals to rich out-of-town shoppers, or those
with higher incomes, mostly represented by the employees of Bruce Power.
Previous research pointed out gaps in the retail scene. Changing technology and
consumer preferences mean some of the options are no longer viable – such as
having a video store in town, like Blockbuster (used to be before it went out of
business).
Kincardine stakeholders have also indicated they are flexible in their shopping
habits, meaning, they do not hesitate to drive to a big box store on the outskirts
of town, or to a discount mall down the highway, or even to drive as far as
Toronto or other urban centres to get what they want.
If previous retailers were not able to sustain their operations in downtown
Kincardine, this might suggest that the local residents did not support them
with their business, and rather took their business to where there was better
selection, better service, cheaper prices or perhaps all three.
Across Canada the small, independent hardware stores that used to be a
mainstay of every shopping district have closed because shoppers have taken
their business to the big box outlets. The small hardware store has fallen to the
cold law of supply and demand. It is unlikely that another retailer – including
chain’s will actively choose to set shop in downtown Kincardine.
Moreover, the face of retail is rapidly changing. More and more people are
choosing to purchase goods and services online. The traditional “bricks” model
of retailing is morphing, and will continue to do so in both small towns and
large cities, leaving darkened store windows and closed shops along main street
and in the malls.
It will take more than retail outlets and chains to fulfill Kincardine’s wish-list
for more business.
That being said, there is a virtuous cycle that occurs when businesses (of any
kind) grow and expand. As businesses expand they attract more people. Higher
populations attract more retail. Higher density creates the opportunity to startup new and different kinds of stores, with multiple offerings and choices within
the same category, such as clothing and restaurants. And on it goes.
The point being, Kincardine’s focus should be on attracting businesses, not just
retail operations, and not just to the downtown core, but throughout the
municipality.
In no particular order, the following businesses match Kincardine’s needs,
based on what know, or have heard, or believe to be true.
1. Accommodation
Opportunity: Bed & Breakfast Inns
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Currently, there are four (4) B&Bs listed. There is opportunity to add
more inns.
Rationale:
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The town’s tourism push (currently, over a 100K visitors each year)
suggests the need for additional, alternative forms of accommodation to
keep visitors in town for overnight stays.
B&Bs appeal to visitors of all kinds, with an emphasis on the 30-50 year
old demographic, with middle-class incomes.
Source: http://teoros.revues.org/738
The average B&B employs 4.6 people.
Source: http://www.thebandblady.com/bb-statistics-highlight-growingtrends.html
The B&B sector is also highly profitable for operators, making it a
desirable entry-level business for anyone who may want to move to
Kincardine and start a new life.
Source:
https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/sbms/sbb/cis/benchmarking.html?code=721
191&lang=eng and http://www.moneysense.ca/property/income/startinga-business-how-i-started-a-bb
Action:
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There are numerous websites that cater to prospective owners/operators
of B&B inns, including forms, government sponsored sites on how to
start / run a B&B, and as well as trade and association sites. A few
options include:
o The Federation of Bed and Breakfast Accommodation (also see
the Conference Program that was held last weekend)
http://www.fobba.com/
o BBCanada - see the owners’ section, including instruction on how
to start a
B&B http://www.bbcanada.com/bb_marketplace/instructors/
o Bedandbreakfast.com is a US site that offers advice and programs
for innkeepers: http://www.bedandbreakfast.com/innkeepers
According to INC magazine, operating a B&B is the 7th top start-up (out
of 10) among retirees. Which suggest, Kincardine could promote to
residents age 55 plus who have retired or are contemplating future
opportunities post retirement.
Source: http://www.inc.com/ss/7-top-retirement-start-ups#6
2. Entertainment
Opportunity: Multi-use Venue / Movie Theatre
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The Aztec’s building condition makes it unsuitable for performances
after Labour Day, leaving Kincardine without a local movie theatre for
most of the year.
A movie theatre is on the town’s 2010 wish list.
Rationale:
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According to at least one source, movie theatres have been proven to
thrive even when the economy is down, making them a good bet for a
small business operator.
Source: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/233491
Movies theatres are important to a town’s sense of place, and play an
integral role in helping to retain local workforce.
Source: http://celluloidjunkie.com/2014/04/11/gates-family-foundationsaves-small-town-cinema-death-digital
Mixed use venues that combine cinema screens, coffee shops and other
features provide more consistent revenue streams. Besides screening
first-run movies, Cineplex has expanded its business operations by
showing opera, sporting events, museum tours, as well as by renting out
their venues to business groups, monetizing advertising opportunities
and more.
Source:
http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/movies/2013/03/07/why_cineplex_
ceo_ellis_jacob_doesnt_fear_the_future.html
Action:
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The opportunity might be taken up by a local resident (seasonal or
fulltime) who has an interest in cinema, wants the experience of being a
theatrical exhibitor, or who just wants to see the experience of “going to
the movies” continue in their town.
A second avenue is to contact known exhibitors, such as the Rainbow
Cinema chain out of Edmonton, that recently took up ownership of the
cinema in Cobourg, ON (pop. 11,000)
Source: http://www.northumberlandmall.ca/news/detail/new-cinemaoperator-announced-at-northumberland-mall/
A third avenue is for the community to start a coop venture to run a
cinema. This has proved financially successful for at least one town in
Ontario
Source: http://www.northerndevelopment.bc.ca/explore-ourregion/success-stories/beacon-theatre-goes-hollywood-with-new-digitalprojector
3. Senior Services
Opportunity: Home Care Service Provider
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The Bruce Community Futures Development Corporation 2011 report on
Bruce Seniors’ Needs Analysis sets up the opportunity.
The report outlines businesses and services that are in short supply. For
entrepreneurs this should suggest an opportunity is to create new businesses to
meet a growing demand. The list includes:
o Provision of Home Care Services– including housekeeping
services, meal preparation and personal care assistants (p. 30)
o Housing (i.e. Home Building) – extends to a broad spectrum of
housing types from bungalows and apartments/condos to assisted
living facilities (p. 29)
o Maintenance Services – home repairs / handyman services (p.27)
o Transportation – specialized seniors programs and services (p. 54)
Rationale:
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Aging population isn’t unique to Kincardine, but Kincardine’s population
is ageing slightly faster than the median age of Ontario.
Source: http://www.city-data.com/canada/Kincardine-Municipality.html
Significant opportunities are available for businesses that cater to baby
boomers’ healthcare, home maintenance and delivery/transportation
requirements.
Health care is just one opportunity, but arguable the most significant
opportunity. According to the Canadian Home Care Association the sector
is worth $7 billion a year.
Source: http://www.nursenextdoorfranchise.com/home-health-carefranchise/home-health-care-a-growing-industry
According to the Ontario Home Care Association’s CEO, “We have seen
the growth of small companies, like the beginning of franchises. That
sort of growth I'd say is greater than the big companies.”
Source: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/smallbusiness/sb-growth/day-to-day/aging-population-sparks-opportunity-inhome-care/article15061458/
Action:
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Far ranging - from attracting franchise operators to the community like
the Canadian chain “Nurse Next Door” - to encouraging local
entrepreneurs to step up and seize the opportunity for themselves.
Source: http://www.nursenextdoorfranchise.com/home-health-carefranchise/home-health-care-a-growing-industry
4. Bakery
Opportunity: Not just a bakery, but a SCOTTISH BAKERY
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A bakery is on the town’s 2010 wish list.
Rationale:
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A Scottish Bakery fits Kincardine’s overall heritage and branding.
Action:
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Grandpa Jimmy’s Scottish Bakery is located in nearby Grand Bend.
Perhaps they could be encouraged to expand to a second location in
Kincardine?
Source: https://www.google.ca/webhp?sourceid=chromeinstant&ion=1&espv=2&es_th=1&ie=UTF8#q=grandpa%20jimmy's%20scottish%20bakery
Several community colleges across Ontario offer chef and culinary
programs. Reaching out to the college’s placement services could lead to
graduates who might want to relocate to or start a new business in
Kincardine.
5. Tourism & Hospitality Training
Opportunity: A Regional Training Centre
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Several sources point to the need for tourism training. Many Kincardine
businesses undertake training of staff in order to ensure their service
needs are maintained during the busy summer season. This is probably
effective, but it is not cost-efficient, and likely it results in inconsistent
training standards.
Given Bruce County’s emphasis on tourism and the push by communities
in the region to attract visitors to their festivals and events, it makes
sense to establish a training program that meets the specific
requirements of local businesses. Kincardine could become the centre
for a tourism and training campus.
Rationale:
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The 2010 study for the Kincardine Business Improvement Area states:
“We really need hospitality training, to address the lack of really good
customer service.” (p. 26).
In 2011 the Four County Labour Planning Board made the same point:
“Effective and on-going customer service excellence training and
industry standard professionalism training is a requirement for the
continued success of this industry in the Four County region. Higher
levels of education in the replacement workforce is needed as positions
continue to be created, particularly in the high tourist season.
Action:
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Kincardine could set up a tourism and training campus, in conjunction
with Fanshawe College and its School of Tourism and & Hospitality.
http://www.fanshawec.ca/tourism
6. Surf Culture
Opportunity:
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To be at the front end of a growing market, as Kincardine becomes the
leading cold water surf destination on the Great Lakes.
There are several ready-made businesses that fit this sector including
shops that rent, sell or manufacture surf paraphernalia, schools that
teach surfing, support services that cater to surfer accommodation and
food destinations, and more.
Rationale:
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Tofino, BC has a population just 2000, yet it punches above its weight in
establishments that cater to visitors and in particular, to cold water
surfers from around the world. For example: Tofino offers visitors 142
places to stay; 70 places for food and beverages; 59 kinds of shops,
including 13 outfitters and rentals. There is no reason why Kincardine
could not achieve the same success.
Source: http://www.tourismtofino.com/directory
Action:
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Sitka is a Canadian company with an established brand among surfers
and wilderness activists. The essence of Sitka is that of a cold water
brand that differentiates on “doing what you love in a harsh climate”.
The visual image of their brand shows members of their surf team in
snow and ice.
Sitka aims to have 100% domestic Canadian production by 2016.
Make the business case to Sitka to establish an outlet in Kincardine.
Source: http://sitka.ca
Surf Ontario (http://www.surfontario.ca/) is a surf shop in Toronto that
sells equipment, offers lessons, and is a resource for cold water surfing
enthusiasts in Ontario. Kincardine and other locations on Lake Huron are
currently listed as lesson locations; there may be a natural opportunity
for an expansion of their business.
7. Drake Hotel / Drake General Store
Opportunity:
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The Drake Hotel and its sibling, The Drake General Store offer an
alternative and somewhat unique shopping / dinning / accommodation
experience that fits in with Kincardine’s artistic culture.
Rationale:
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The proprietors of the Drake Hotel have just opened a new boutique hotel
in Wellington (population 1,200). One local commentator (her online
handle is Mama Fish) commented “The Drake is an excellent addition to
our village it will bring interesting people and contribute to the economy
of the county.”
Source: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/destinations/hip-hitsprince-edward-county-at-the-drake-devonshire/article21024193
The Drake General Store concept has been expanding retail outlets
across southern Ontario, including pop-up seasonal pop-up stores in
conjunction with HBC.
Source: http://www.drakegeneralstore.ca
Action:
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Contact Drake Hotel owner Jeff Stober and make the case for opening
soon in Kincardine.
8. Local Foods
Opportunity:
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Create an outlet store that showcases local foods – from fresh produce in
season, to prepared local specialties. Why shouldn’t Kincardine become
a food destination?
Rationale:
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Walk along Niagara-on-the-Lake’s Queen Street and visitors quickly get a
sense of the town as a food lover’s Mecca. Shops like Greaves Jams and
Hillebrand Winery Boutique convey the bounty of the local countryside.
Kincardine could set up a storefront that highlights the area’s importance
in food production. It could be the centre where people learn about the
agri-tourism opportunities in the region, and where visitors can buy local
specialties.
Source: http://www.kincardinenews.com/2009/09/15/local-food-projectcontinues-to-grow
Given the growth of online delivery of food products, the outlet could be
set up as a “bricks and clicks” operation, open all year, and selling local
produce to customers around the world.
Action:
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Establish a cooperative among all the food growers in the area.
9. Brew Pub / Craft Brewery
Opportunity:
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Kincardine was once home to Steelback (now defunct). The opportunity
is to open a new craft brewery or a brew pub that features its own locally
brewed beers and ales, plus serves a full menu of food items.
Kilannan Brewing Company is the only craft brewery in Bruce Region,
and it is located in Owen Sound.
Source: http://www.ontariocraftbrewers.com/breweriesMap.php
Rationale:
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Craft breweries are growing as tastes change. Ontario is home to 32 new
community breweries that have opened in 2013, and over 150 more
listed as either open or in the planning stage.
Opportunity:
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Contact the Ontario Craft Brewers Association for a line on companies or
individuals who maybe ideal future partners for Kincardine’s needs.
Source: http://www.ontariocraftbrewers.com
10. Credit Union
Opportunity:
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Kincardine’s retail financial services are covered by three big banks
(RBC, Scotia and BMO) and by one credit union (Meridian).
Meridian’s historic connection to HEPCOE (the former power workers’
credit union merged with Meridian in 2005) underscores its presence in
Kincardine, but this should not rule out the opportunity for another credit
union to open a branch in Kincardine.
Rationale:
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Stakeholders commented on how Kincardine pulls from southwestern
Ontario. Notably, either families who are looking for vacation property or
a retirement community. Kitchener-Waterloo-London is within
Kincardine’s catchment area, and even more so than the Greater Toronto
Area (other than the outskirts of Mississauga).
It makes sense that credit unions within southwestern or south central
Ontario may want to follow their customers to where they live and set up
branches to serve them.
Action:
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Present the business case to leading credit unions such as Libro or First
Ontario.
Wiarton
According to Spruce The Bruce’s Wiarton Toolkit:
“As the provisioning headquarters to the beautiful Bruce Peninsula, Wiarton is
the perfect central basecamp for any day hike, boat trip or camping adventure.”
This statement is essentially true. The physical beauty of its location, its
proximity to the Bruce Trail, its setting on Colpoy’s Bay with access to Georgian
Bay and the Great Lakes beyond give Wiarton many natural advantages. But
according to discussions with Wiarton stakeholders, the town has some way to
go before it becomes “the perfect central basecamp”.
Many of the amenities that stakeholders discussed had to do with the need for a
wider offering of services to appeal to a wide strata of visitors: from
accommodation at different price points and comfort levels, to activities for
visitors (including children) during the shoulder seasons and in the winter
months, to broader availability of food and dining options.
As discussed were the challenges that visitors have getting to and from Wiarton
from large urban centres. Winter road conditions make the drive to Wiarton an
adventure, to say the least. In the summer months the stated three-hour drive
(see the Town of South Bruce Peninsula Community Profile) only applies to
travelers coming from outer fringes of the Greater Toronto Region. In reality, it
is more like fours hours (or longer) by car to reach downtown Toronto. In other
words, the distance and the time it takes to travel, means that visitors who drive
are committing to the destination, and to the likelihood of an overnight stay in
Wiarton.
The Wiarton/Keppel District Airport is certified to handle a variety of aircraft
types and sizes. However, stakeholders indicted that the airport badly needs
upgrading; and there are federal restrictions on the types of services it can
provide under its current license. As well, there are ongoing disputes about the
source of funding (i.e. who will pay) for the improvements the airport needs.
That said it is universally recognized that the airport is an underdeveloped
asset, which, in future could make a significant contribution to Wiarton’s
economic development.
As a smaller centre (Wiarton’s population is 2,291; the Town of South Bruce
Peninsula is 8,500) it is understandable that local residents might travel to
larger municipalities for the services they need or want. Nearby Owen Sound
(population 21,680) in Grey County is approximately thirty minutes away by
car.
However, visitors expecting a basecamp experience do not want to drive out of
town (or even out of the county) for services and amenities. They want
everything close at hand.
Wiarton needs to become a purpose-built centre. The town must live up to the
experience of truly being Basecamp to the Bruce Peninsula.
Case-in-point: Whistler Mountain Bike Park is based in the British Columbia ski
resort using ski lifts, ski runs, and other infrastructure to attract mountain
bikers in the summer months. The study concluded that total visitor spending in
Whistler attributable to mountain biking exceeded $34.3 million over the period
June 4 to September 17, 2006, supporting an estimated $39.1 million in new
economic activity (GDP). (Source: Sea to Sky Mountain Biking Economic
Impact Study, Western Canada Mountain Bike Tourism Association).
Moreover, there are positive economic indicators that suggest “soft outdoor
adventures” represent a growth market for Wiarton. These include people who
engage in hiking / backpacking, kayaking or canoeing, biking, horseback riding
and birding.
In North America there are upwards of 11 million potential customers who
participate in “soft adventure activities” (Source: A Snapshot of the Hiking &
Backpacking Travel Market in North America, 2003).
Among Ontario adventurers, long distance hiking trails like the Bruce Trail are
the most popular (Source: Hike Ontario Survey, 1998).
According to the aforementioned survey, attributes of Ontario hikers and walkers
indicate:
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48% were male; 52% female
79% were under 50 years of age and of this number, 34.6% were 29 or
younger and 44.4% are between 30 and 49 years of age
20% of the total number of respondents is between the ages of 50 and
69 years
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Hikers are generally well-educated – the majority hold a college diploma
or higher
Hikers are in the middle to upper income range;
Autumn is the most popular season for hiking, followed by spring,
summer and winter;
Most hikers hike with friends and/or family.
Source: http://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/assets/files/pdf/memberarchives/reports/HO-BestPractices-Web.pdf
And more, Canada’s more than 6 million hikers, climbers and paddlers engage
in numerous cultural and entertainment activities that have significant
economic spin-offs:
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Going
Going
Going
Going
out to eat in restaurants: 92.4%
to festivals and fairs: 67.0%
to farmers’ markets: 44.3%
to day spas: 16.1%
And so is their preference for accommodation while on trips:
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Public campgrounds: 44.5%
Lakeside resort: 30.5%
Private campground: 29.5%
Health spa: 8.6%
Country inn with a gourmet restaurant: 6.9%
Source: TAMS 2006 – Canadian Activity Profile http://encorporate.canada.travel/sites/default/files/pdf/Research/Productknowledge/TAMS/Canadian%20Travellers%20Outdoor%20Activity/CDN_
Hiking_Climbing_Paddling_en.pdf
In other words, the facts and figures support investment by entrepreneurs in
Wiarton’s basecamp positioning.
1. Accommodation
Opportunity: Hostels
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Wiarton’s business list features eight (8) campgrounds and two (2)
hotels. There are no hostels at the moment.
Rationale:
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More accommodation options will appeal to a wider sector of visitors, and
extend the season beyond the traditional May thru October cycle. Local
campgrounds like Trillium Woods close after Thanksgiving.
Hostels appeal to a younger demographic that fit the profile of the largest
cohort of hikers. For many younger foreign visitors, staying in hostels
becomes part of the travel experience.
Tofino, BC (population 1,876 residents) is similar in many ways to
Wiarton. Tofino attracts visitors from around the world. Providing
accommodation has become a leading business for the community. The
town lists at least 25 B&Bs as well as subsets of inns, guest houses,
hostels, campsites plus more up-market options, including condo suites,
resorts, motels and hotels.
Source:
http://www.tofinochamber.org/business_directory/accommodations
Action:
• Based on Tofino’s experience, “build it and they will come” seems to be
the message. The opportunity is there for local residents to extend the
welcome mat by opening B&Bs or investing in the development of
hostels, and guesthouses, or more expensive forms of accommodation.
• An alternate approach is to contact HI-Canada. Hostelling InternationalCanada (as it is also known as) has over 80 years of experience. This notfor-profit association manages a network of 60 hostels across Canada.
They will be a rich source for leads, information, and know-how on how
to set-up a hostel in Wiarton, or possibly to put the town in contact with
entrepreneurs that are interested in expanding hostelling options in new
communities.
2. Service Amenities
Opportunity: Dry Cleaners, Ice Cream Shops, Niche-type Stores
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These services were identified as missing in OMAFRA’s 2008 Report on
Wiarton
Source:http://www.southbrucepeninsula.com/en/economicdevelopment/re
sources/FirstImpressionsReport.pdf
Rationale:
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The writers of the First Impressions Report indicated their surprise that
Wiarton had on offer several kinds of shoe stores, but lacked basic
amenities such as ice cream, confectionary stores, or a dry cleaner,
which typically are staples of small towns. (Note: Northern Confections
started in Wiarton in 2008, so perhaps after the writers of the First
Impressions Report published their findings).
These businesses usually have a low-cost entry point but provide the
potential of high margins, and this appeals to a wide range of
entrepreneurs.
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As a basecamp, many adventurers are looking for small mementoes they
can take home with them or food items they can consume while on the
trail. They are looking for unique items, such as craft and handmade
goods by local artisans and artists. Food and clothing items are
particularly of interest. Banff, AB is similar size to South Bruce
Peninsula (the population of Banff is 7,584). By comparison the town
lists 16 different niche shops.
(Source: http://www.discoverbanff.com/Shopping/GiftsKeepsakes).
Wiarton’s long history in stone quarrying and wood finishing also suggest
that more local stone and wood souvenirs could be offer to visitors.
Action:
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Many newcomers to Canada find initial business success in retail. As
small business owners they often choose to operate establishments like
dry cleaners and specialty stores. The Canadian Immigrant Newsletter
details Simcoe’s success at recruiting new Canadians to its communities.
Source: http://www.cicnews.com/2014/09/small-canadian-towns-hopingattract-immigrants-canada-093763.html
An alternate approach is to reach out to the many community centres in
Toronto, representing the Province’s different ethnic and cultural groups,
for their advice on recruiting future business owners to Wiarton.
It seems as well, some of the opportunities discussed above could (and
should) appeal to local Wiarton residents, and especially to the local
craft and food producers, who would benefit from the opening of a yearround co-op store or craft centre. This may simply be a matter of planting
the idea through an article in the community newspaper (Wiarton Echo)
or encouraging a local business like jc Custom Art’s Jennifer Michelle
Crawley 9 http://www.wiartonecho.com/2013/11/04/new-artist-in-town)
to see the possibility in a new, but complimentary enterprise, or inviting
a successful well-established manufacturer like Caframo to sponsor the
development of a local art centre.
Ottawa’s Rideau Canal Skateway is essentially a business managed by
the National Capital Commission. Last winter the world’s longest skating
rink attracted over a million visitors. Wiarton could create a similar
attraction, with skate trails along the Bruce.
The Skateway also gave birth to the very popular BeaverTails pastry,
which is now a national franchise chain (http://www.beavertails.ca).
WillyTails anyone?
3. Adventure Training
Opportunity: Training Centre for Industry Professionals or Wanabees
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Adventure training and certification of professionals is on the rise
because the sector is growing rapidly.
Rationale:
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There is a lack of training standards and this is causing concern among
the public. For profit and not-for-profits, including community colleges,
are seeing the opportunity to step up and create standards by offering
training programs.
Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/outdoor-adventure-industrylacks-oversight-victims-lack-recourse-1.2561140
In addition to individuals who want credentials in order to advance their
careers in the industry, there is also a large group of amateurs who want
to make sure they are properly certified in order to enjoy their adventure
sports safely. Scuba diving has a long-standing history of training novices
and professionals. Amateurs (sport divers) obtain their international open
water card, while others wishing to advance to a professional level,
obtain certification as a dive master. Authorized training is often
provided through learn-to-dive programs offered by local dive shops. The
shops also sell wet suits, masks, tanks and other kinds of scuba
equipment. They may also act as travel agents for scuba-diving holidays.
Action:
•
•
•
Contact Fleming College in Lindsay, ON about setting up an adjunct
campus in Wiarton. Fleming’s Outdoor Adventure Skills Program fits
perfectly with Wiarton’s basecamp persona. There are numerous
examples of colleges and universities that partner with communities
outside of their traditional catchment areas in order to provide local
training and education programs. Algoma University’s (Sault Ste. Marie)
St. Thomas, ON campus is one example.
Source: http://flemingcollege.ca/programs/outdoor-adventure-skills
Alternatively, Wiarton could contact one of the for-profit groups that
provide adventure training, such as Adventureworks Associates, Inc in
Dundas, ON.
Source: http://www.adventureworks.org/index/about.html
A third option is to contact Canada’s Department of National Defence
(DND) and convince them to sponsor an adventure training centre. DND
would support the centre with personnel and set up training programs for
the public. Additionally, the centre could be used for recruitment
purposes.
Source: http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/about-policies-standards-defenceadmin-orders-directives-5000/5031-10.page
4. Provisioning
Opportunity: Sporting Goods Outfitters
•
•
These are broadly defined by Statistics Canada as retailers under NAICS
45111.
Sports equipment and repair services were identified as one of the gaps
in the abovementioned First Impressions Community Exchange Report.
•
More recently, Wiarton stakeholders identified this gap as an impediment
to the town’s growth as “basecamp’.
Rationale:
•
•
•
A community the size of Wiarton can support more than one outfitter.
Indeed, adventurers will likely want to choose from a variety brands and
makes of equipment at different price points.
It is quite common in centres that cater to sports adventurers to see
several establishments selling or renting sports equipment. Indeed, their
multiple storefronts add to the visitors’ impression that town is a mecca
for sports enthusiasts.
The businesses are profitable. In 2011 the average annual net profit for
small and medium-sized businesses in the Sporting Goods Stores
category was $23,600. The gross margin was a healthy 37.5%
Source:
https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/sbms/sbb/cis/benchmarking.html?code=451
11&lang=eng
Action:
•
•
•
Mountain Equipment Coop (MEC) is a Canadian success story. Consider
approaching MEC about setting up an outpost in Wiarton.
Source: http://www.mec.ca/AST/Navigation/MEC_Global/AboutMEC.jsp
Alternatively, contact Thorncrest Outfitters, which has outlets in
Southhampton and Tobermory, about setting up a Wiarton store.
Source: http://www.thorncrestoutfitters.com/about.htm
A source of business leads and detailed industry information is the
Canadian Sporting Goods Association.
Source: http://csga.ca/about
5. Bicycle Sales & Repairs
Opportunity: Specialist Cycle Sales & Service
•
•
This sector is dominated by small, independents, making it an ideal
start-up business for a cycling enthusiast with a desire to own their bike
shop.
Source:
https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/scr/sbms/sbb/cis/establishments.html?code=45
1113&lang=eng#est2
Stakeholders recently identified the absence of “a good bike shop” as an
impediment to Wiarton’s growth as “basecamp”, given the area’s
attraction to mountain bikers and trail riders.
Rationale:
•
The category appeals to a broad cross-section of prospective
entrepreneurs. There is not really a typical bike shop owner. Case in
•
•
•
•
point. Jamie Thiers is a 50-plus-year-old. He decided to open a bike
shop in downtown Toronto as part of his retirement plan after a
successful career as a high school teacher. His one-man shop on a side
street in a residential neighbourhood is called “Biketoons”
Source: http://cycleto.ca/org/biketoons
Bike shops are becoming the new Starbucks – as a meeting place where
people hang out, socialize, and even party. This adds to their attraction
as businesses.
Source: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/bike-shops-the-newstarbucks-2013-08-29
Wiarton’s population base (2,000+ residents) is large enough to support
a local shop year-round, with the upside of sales, rentals and services to
visitors during peak riding season.
The whole sector is growing rapidly, with cycling becoming “the new
golf” for Baby Boomers.
Source: http://cyclingmagazine.ca/sections/news/bicycle-sales-in-canadaregain-footing/
In 2013, Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation laid out a 20-year cycling
plan with the goal of becoming recognized as the “the best Canadian
province for cycling and ranked among the top 10 jurisdictions
worldwide”.
Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/is-canada-missing-the-boat-on-cyclingtourists-1.2717129?
Action:
•
•
•
There are numerous sites and forums that connect the cycling
community. All it might take is to post an ad in one (or more) of the
sites, inviting the community to set up a bike shop in Wiarton.
Source: One such forum is Cycle Toronto: http://cycleto.ca/our-team;
another is the eponymous Bike Forums:
http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php
Bike Brothers is an independent store, based in Cochrane AB (population
17,580) that is hoping to franchise its operations. They might be a
source for business leads.
Source: http://www.bikebros.ca/bikebros.htm
Incase someone locally wants to take up the opportunity but does not
have prior experience of running a bike shop, the US-based National
Bicycle Dealers Association provides detailed information on starting a
bike shop, including typical operating costs / potential profit margins,
and more. Advertising the opportunity in the Wiarton Echo might just
kickstart the idea, and find someone locally like the above-mentioned
retired high school teacher.
Source: http://nbda.com/articles/want-to-start-a-bike-shop-pg70.htm
6. Tapping Into The Commuter Market
Opportunity:
•
•
•
•
This is an opportunity for a small carrier that wants to make the WiartonKeppel Airport its home base for a commuter flight service.
Daily air service will connect commuters in the crowded KitchenerWaterloo-London market with Wiarton.
Commuting by air will appeal to commuters who want to enjoy all the
benefits of living in the natural beauty of the Bruce Peninsula.
The travel distance from Wiarton to Kitchener is 114 miles (183 miles).
By air this is well under an hour’s commute.
Rationale:
•
•
•
County of Bruce stakeholders confirmed some residents already make the
commute from Toronto and the Kitchener-Waterloo-London area.
Commuting by air is popular in BC’s Lower Mainland. Everyday
commuters catch flights from Nanaimo or Port Alberni or Salt Spring
Island to go to work in downtown Vancouver. These commuters are like
any other, except they fly rather than drive the distance. They choose to
leave the city at night to return by air to more tranquil settings.
Source: http://www.nanaimodailynews.com/news/nanaimoregion/benefits-of-living-in-nanaimo-just-too-much-for-workers-to-passup-1.244652
Operationally, it is clearly a win-win for the carriers as well as for the
commuters. For example, by road, Vancouver to Abbotsford is a little
more than 67 kilometers. Because of traffic conditions in and around
Vancouver, travel time can be more than an hour each way. By air, travel
time is just 15 minutes, and costs about $50 each way.
Source: http://www.abbotsfordairport.ca/assetfactory.aspx?did=17549
Action
•
•
•
Brucelandair already operates a charter service out of Wiarton CYVV. This
could be the starting point.
Source: http://www.brucelandair.com
Alternatively, Bearskin Airlines out of Thunder Bay has a history of being
innovative, with flights to and from smaller communities.
Source: http://www.bearskinairlines.com
The industry publication AirCharterGuide.com lists more than 40 charter
operators in Ontario. One or more of these maybe interested in a new
business opportunity.
Source: http://aircharterguide.com/CA_Operators/ON/Ontario
7. Marina
Opportunity:
•
•
The opportunity is for Wiarton Marina to brand, sponsor, or take
ownership of new summer and winter season sporting activities.
The activities themselves will be a source of incremental business for the
marina, while helping to build local businesses that are associated with
the activities, such as rentals, boat equipment and repairs, concessions
selling branded goods, waterfront accommodation, and more.
Rationale:
•
•
•
•
The above-mentioned First Impressions Community Exchange Report (p
17) indicates that the Marina and waterfront in Wiarton are undeveloped
attractions. The reports suggest more water-based activities and
community events have “the potential to attract tourists”. The activities
listed fit nicely within Wiarton’s basecamp positioning. They include
wind surfing / wake boarding; para sailing; kayaking; and sailing regattas
/ seadoo races.
Wairton Marina is under new ownership – with new ownership comes
fresh ways of looking at a business’s future potential.
Sponsored events will help Wairton become a marina destination.
Some of the most successful marinas have branded events as ways to
attract new customers. Some examples:
o Ocean Marina is the Pattaya Boat Show and Top of the Gulf
Regatta – Asia’s largest multi-class regatta.
Source: http://www.tccc.or.th/ocean-marina-pattaya-boat-showdrives-marine-leisure-tourism-greater-pattaya/
o UK’s MDL Marinas sponsor the MDL Big Boat Championships
Source: http://www.hamblewinterseries.com/news/mdl-marinassupports-the-hamble-big-boat-championships-as-lead-sponsor-in2014
o Marine Outfitters in Kingston, ON sponsors the annual Amherst
Island Pursuit Race
o Source: http://www.hamblewinterseries.com/news/mdl-marinassupports-the-hamble-big-boat-championships-as-lead-sponsor-in2014
Action:
•
•
One idea is to establish an annual sail race from Wiarton to Kincardine –
from Georgian Bay to Lake Huron, around the treacherous waters at
Tobermoy – and perhaps called “Wiarton Marina’s Bay to Lake Race”.
The very successful Race to Mackinac Island at the top of Lake Huron
covers a distance of 333 miles and attracts more than 350 boats each
July.
Source: http://www.cycracetomackinac.com/
8. Motorcycle Shop
Opportunity:
•
Peninsula Sport and GT Sport are local businesses - but both are located
out-of-town (Peninsula is nearby; GT Sport is further a field) - there is an
opportunity to add a third shop, located in downtown Wiarton.
Rationale:
•
•
•
•
Sales of new motorcycles and ATVs are on the rise. Many women riders
are taking to the road for the first time. According to one study, as many
as 25% of new riders are women, which opens a new sales channel for
bike store owners.
Sources:
http://www.mmic.ca/images/content/PDF/Annual%20Industry%20Report
%20MMIC%20&%20COHV%20-%202013%20-%20summary.pdf
and
http://www.womenridersnow.com/pages/About_Women_Riders_Now.aspx
The statistics on bike tourism suggest there is significant opportunity for
Wiarton to gain greater share-of-wallet from riders. The average rider
spends $300 - $400 to attend events. They need to stop for gas every
three hours or so because their fuel tanks are small. This puts many
riders in southern Ontario within striking distance of downtown Wiarton.
Source: http://www.slideshare.net/alig8r/motorcycle-tourism
The Bruce Peninsula is made for motorcycle enthusiasts. Numerous
websites comment on the area’s open roads, beautiful trails, and scenic
landscape.
Source (among many): http://www.ridegreybruce.com/
The First Impressions Community Exchange Report (p 18) suggests
Wiarton could engage in more events to attract tourists – “motorcycle” is
one of the activities listed. A cycle shop located in downtown Wiarton
could take charge and make its own event or calendar of activities that
attract riders from across North America.
Action:
•
The action may be as straightforward as contacting one of the local bike
shops and recommending they set up a location in town in order to take
advantage of Wiarton’s basecamp positioning.
The following ideas are not specifically related to Wiarton’s basecamp
positioning, but are interesting nonetheless.
9. Quarrying Operations
Opportunity:
•
Build on the existing quarry operations. Pulverized limestone products
are used in dozens of business sectors – from agriculture to oil & gas
drilling operations (as drilling mud additives) to exhaust gas scrubbers
for power plants, and more.
Rationale:
•
•
•
There are several quarries in the Wiarton area that produce high-grade
limestone and marble. Local businesses like Ebel, Arriscraft and Bruce
Peninsula Stone offer cut and shaped natural stone for landscaping and
building finishes. They ship material to company stores and authorized
distributors across Canada through the US.
However, according to the Town of South Bruce Peninsula Economic
Development Plan 2005 (page 18), much of the quarried stone
“…leaves the municipality largely in a raw, unfinished state. Some
finishing is done, but we could do much better in terms of revenue
generation, cottage industry development, jobs and skills development if
more product left the Municipality in a value-added state.”
In one form or another, each person needs about 62 kilograms (138
pounds) of limestone each year.
Source: See below
Action:
•
•
Contact the companies that specialize in producing pulverized limestone.
One of these is Graymont, located based in Richmond, BC
Source: http://www.graymont.com
The National Lime Association lists member companies in Canada and
the US.
Source: http://www.lime.org/index/index.asp
10. Manufactured Homes
Opportunity:
•
Build on Wiarton’s lumber and wood fabricator business sector by
attracting prefabricated micro-home manufacturers.
Rationale:
•
•
There are several wood and building fabricators in the area including
Frontier Log Homes, International Woodworking Limited and Brough &
Whicher Limited, as well as several businesses that align to the
construction trades. This suggests there are skilled technical and trades
personnel who could support the development of a new venture, like
manufactured micro-homes.
Micro-homes represent a growing trend, as small prefabricated homes are
being sought for infill projects in crowded cities, for first homes, as well
as for vacation properties. Micro-homes range from basic construction to
mid-market designs to luxury dwellings, appealing to a wide demographic
and customer group that includes public housing, trailer camps, young
professionals who want a first step on the property ladder, to retirees,
and more.
Sources: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/20/garden/small-world-bigidea.html?_r=0
and
http://online.wsj.com/articles/rethinking-the-double-wide-1407431525
and
http://tinyhouseblog.com/park-model-homes/escape-park-models/
Action:
•
•
•
There are several specialist manufacturers. Escape Homes has become
the “poster child” for the micro-home movement, following an article
that appeared in the Wall Street Journal earlier this year. Escape Homes
was started by a resort owner in Wisconsin. It might be as simple as
contacting Escape’s founder - Don Dobrowolski - about setting up a
Canadian manufacturing operation.
Sources: http://kstp.com/article/stories/s3495361.shtml
and
http://www.escapehomes.us
A further source of leads is the National Home Builders Association.
NHBA’s annual Builders’ Show (January 2015) is the largest gathering of
professional home builders.
Source: http://www.nahb.org/
As well there are several Canadian prefab home builders, including Kent
Homes in Atlantic Canada and Karoleena in Okanagan Falls, BC that may
want to extend their operations to take advantage of markets in Central
Canada or mid-US states.
Sources: http://offer.karoleena.com/modern-prefab-modular-inquiry
and
http://www.kenthomes.com/kent-homes-home.aspx
Wiarton - Business List
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Address
179629 Grey Rd.
112 Park St. RR 5
50 Oliphant Way RR 3
2 Hope Bay Rd. RR 6
102 Mountain Lake Dr.
428 Huron Rd.
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624 Berford St.
877 Berford St.
156 Dewar St.
294 Berford St.
33 Maadookii Cres.
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330 Boyd St.
563 George St.
572 Berford St.
501273 Gret Rd. 1
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381297 Concession 17
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Phone Number
519-396-9864
519-396-8754
519-396-0481
519-396-9895
519-396-8698
519-396-8533
519-395-2808
519-395-2757
519-396-8242
519-395-3545
519-396-3311
519-396-3887
519-396-7511
519-396-3301
519-396-5888
519-396-5454
519-396-3444
519-395-2615
519-395-2434
519-396-45-34
519-396-9716
519-396-2951
519-395-0997
519-396-3150
519-396-3837
519-396-3532
519-396-1850
519-396-8555
519-396-4502
519-395-3916
519-368-7723
519-368-7015
519-396-8030
Address
460 Queen St.
41 Inverlyn Cres.
352 Penetangore Row
215 Mechanics Ave.
847 Saugeen St.
2435 Huron Conc 12
RR 1, Kincardine
RR 4, Kincardine
791 Durham St.
2 Millenium Way
249 Harbour St.
392 Queen St.
319 Kincardine Ave.
378 Queen St.
481 Broadway St.
1111 Sutton St.
1126 Sutton St.
RR 1, Kincardine
RR 4, Kincardine
707 Queen St.
709 Russell St.
2334 Concession 12
236 Harbour St.
219 Lambton St.
278 Lambton St.
235 Harbour St.
214 Bruce St.
252 Saratoga Rd.
528 Hwy 9, RR 4
RR 3, Tiverton
3 Farrll Dr. Tiverton
813 Queen St.
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Restaurant
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Bean's Bistro
Boston Pizza
Bruce Steakhouse
Coffee Culture
Crabby Joe's Tap & Grill
Cuyler's Family Restaurant
Dairy Queen
Erie Belle Restaurant
Gilley's Feedlot
Godfather Pizza
Harbour Street Braaerie
Hawgs Breath Saloon
Jean's Family Restaurant
KFC
Knotty Pine Restaurant
Lake Range Market Café
McDOnald's
My Wraps
New Orleans Pizza
New Season Tavern & Restaurant
Scoop & Save Bulk Food, Ice Cream
Tay's Eatery
The Verandah Tea Room
The Winning Booth
Tramonto
Victoria Park Restaurant
Watercress Bistro
A Delicate Edge
Baxter's Row Fasion
Becker Shoes
Corabelle's
Creative Casuals
Eight Sisiters
Fashion by Rose
Gilbert's Jewellery
JB's Lingerie
519-396-4777
519-395-3966
519-396-5100
519-396-6420
519-396-9050
519-396-9144
519-396-2237
519-396-4331
519-396-7423
519-396-4444
519-396-6000
519-396-6565
519-396-1900
519-396-3850
519-396-3132
519-395-0322
519-396-4414
519-396-9272
519-396-3100
519-396-2323
519-396-8442
519-396-8291
519-396-1960
519-396-8235
519-396-8466
519-396-8001
519-396-5727
519-396-6434
519-396-5757
519-396-2902
519-396-2100
519-396-5200
519-396-7478
519-396-5129
519-396-2672
519-396-4455
728 Queen St.
4 Millenium Way
750 Queen St.
764 Queen St.
1113 Sutton St.
401 Kincardine Ave.
708 Queen St.
259 Harbour St.
832 Queen St.
950 Queen St.
217 Harbour St.
896 Queen St.
1120 Sutton St.
1796 Hwy 21
507 Broadway St.
195 Lake Range Dr.
792 Broadway St.
925 Queen St.
923 Queen St.
722 Queen St.
286 Harbour St.
810 Queen St.
315 Durham Market North
908 Queen St.
765 Queen St.
335 Durham Market St.
829 Queen St.
801 Queen St.
740 Queen St.
790 Queen St.
775 Queen St.
312-B Durham Market Square
831 Queen St.
738 Queen St.
743 Queen St.
789 Queen St.
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Apparel
Arts
Automotive
Automotive
Automotive
Automotive
Automotive
Automotive
Communications
Construction
Construction
Entertainment
Entertainment
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
Food
General
General
General
General
General
MacG's House of Fasion
New Look Consignment Clothing
Nine Waves Clothing
Presto-Crest Custom Sports Wear
Sandy's Sportswear
The Loop
Tropix Sun & Swim
Weekins Children's Clothing
West Shore Clothing Shoppe
See View Art Studio
Lakeside Chevrolet Buick GMC
MacMaster Motors
NAPA Auto Parts
Pierson Motors Inc
Rowe Motors
Spike's Auto Parts
Rogers Communications
Bruce County Flooring & Interiors
TIM-BR Mart
Aztec Movie Theatre
Bluewater Summer Playhouse
Bulk Barn
Foodland
LCBO
Mac's Convenience Store
Sobeys
The Beef Way
The Beer Store
The Bruce County Wine Seller
Wine Kitz
Zehrs Market
Accents By Gordon's
Affordable Appliances
Artemis Art Supplies & Instruction
B&W Appliances Limited Sales & Services
Canadian Tire
519-396-3145
519-396-2001
519-396-6463
519-396-4420
519-396-511519-396-7861
519-396-5437
519-396-5369
519-396-8599
519-396-3367
519-396-8231
519-396-3381
519-396-7000
1-866-396-7693
519-396-1515
519-396-6677
519-396-4900
519-396-3355
519-396-3250
519-396-3250
519-396-6052
519-396-3375
519-396-2923
519-396-2134
519-395-0022
519-396-2257
519-396-2782
519-396-5161
519-396-2508
419-396-3474
519-396-3434
519-396-4842
519-396-5463
519-396-8513
519-396-3461
325 Durham Market Square
330 Durham Market Square
737 Queen St.
929 Queen St.
736 Queen St.
806 Queen St.
928 Queen St.
750 Queen St.
792 Queen St.
708C Queen St.
792 Broadway St.
520 Broadway St.
1117 Sutton St.
856 Queen St.
441 Broadway St.
287 Lambton St.
827 Queen St.
312-A Durham Market Square
Hwy 21, Kincardine
877 Queen St.
707 Queen St.
781 Broadway St.
911 Queen St.
233 Braodway St.
954 Queen St.
814 Durham St.
RR 2, Kincardine
427 Broadway St.
1802 Hwy 21
260 Durham St.
Sutton Park Mall
775 Queen St.
330 Lambton St.
386 Harbour St.
788 Queen St.
811 Durham St.
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
General
Home
Home
Home
Home
Home
Home
Medical
Medical
Medical
Cancussion
Chester's Prints
Compliments Gifts
Condor Fine Books
Crowston Marlow
Dollar Store
Fincher's
Fine Table and Bed
H&H TV & Appliances
Harbour Rose Boutique
Home Hardware
Home Hardware
Huron Video
J'Adorn
Jerome Flowers & Gifts
Kincardine Country Depot
Kincardine's Scottish Shop
Kwik K Vairety & Bakery
Lake Huron Video & Books
Lowry's Store
MacNay;s Country Market
Pet Valu
Pet Valu
Quinn Florist Ltd.
Shoppers Drug Mart
The Plant Place
Victoria Park Gallery & Gifts
Dar-Lyn Pools and Spas
H&H TV & Appliances
McFadden's Maytag Home Appliance Centre
Sears Hometown Appliance Store
Sleepers Bed Gallery
Sunset Blinds Ltd.
Gordon Pharmasave
McKechnie Pharmacy Ltd
Rexall Drug Store
519-396-8595
519-396-7551
519-396-7600
519-396-3323
519-396-2612
519-396-5900
519-396-7012
519-396-5129
519-396-3844
519-396-6861
519-396-2032
519-396-2032
519-396-3531
519-396-4438
519-396-2211
519-396-3451
519-396-1960
519-396-2224
519-396-3531
519-396-5995
519-395-3855
519-396-9135
519-396-2483
519-396-2563
519-396-6220
519-396-2612
519-396-6699
519-396-3388
519-396-3844
519-396-8740
519-396-7551
519-396-1838
519-396-4541
519-396-3364
519-396-2133
519-396-3353
749 Baird St.
798 Queen St.
284 Harbour St.
811 Queen St.
689 Huron Terr
711 Philip Pl.
816 Queen St.
738 Queen St.
356 Princess St.
290 Harbour St.
1770 Hwy 21
1770 Hwy 21
855 Queens St.
770 Queen St.
760 Queen St.
315 Mechanics Lane
315 Durham Market St.
751B Queen St.
855-A Queen St.
791 Queen St.
RR 1, Kincardine
320 Durham Market
711 Philip Pl
929 Queen St.
781 Broadway St.
689 Huron Terr
707 Queen St.
861 Queen St.
356 Princess St.
960 Queen St.
798 Queen St.
828 Queen St.
312-C Durham Market Square
767 Queen St.
44 Queen St.
1116 Sutton St.
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Retail
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Medical
Personal
Recreation
Technology
Technology
Transportation
Transportation
Travel
Rexall Pharma Plus
Sugar Shack Tatoo
Bruce Bowling Lanes
Don's Hi-Fi
Rogers
Kincardine Marina
V-D Fiberglass Concepts
Expedia Cruise Ship
Quinn Martin Ornamental Grasses
J&D Signs
Animal
Cozy Cat Kennels
Animal
Back Alley Professional Pet Groomer
Animal
Dogs on Broadway
Animal
Queen St. Veterinary Services
Animal
Kincardine Veterinary Services
Animal
Paws Boarding Kennels
Athletic
Kincardine Karate Dojo
Automotive
CARSTAR Kincardine
Automotive
Doug's Auto Repair
Automotive
MD Auto Clinic
Automotive
West Ontario Classic Auto
Business
Weber Allan Consulting
Business
MJ Krupp Managemnet Inc.
Communications Bruce Telecom
Communications Eastlink
Communications Kincardine Commericial Printing
Construction
Amarillo Custom Homes
Construction
Bogdanovic Homes Construction Inc.
Construction
Buchanan Resoration & Contracting Inc.
Construction
Champagne Renovations
Construction
Grant Frook Contracting Ltd.
Construction
Helm Plumbing & Electrical
Construction
Mike Small Plumbing Contracting
Construction
Quality Construction Services
Construction
Reyen Renovations
Construction
Wilken Paul Buillder
519-396-3353
519-396-8282
519-396-7143
519-396-3546
519-396-6677
519-396-4336
519-385-0528
519-396-2929
519-395-3255
519-396-7836
519-396-3232
519-396-7733
519-396-5553
519-396-3647
519-396-2071
519-395-4102
519-396-5211
1-866-396-7693
519-396-6995
519-396-6288
519-396-7065
519-395-5839
519-396-8091
519-368-2000
1-855-714-4940
519-396-3811
519-385-0426
519-396-9090
519-396-8928
519-396-7006
519-396-8942
519-396-7636
519-395-5724
519-396-1095
519-386-2313
519-395-3663
1116 Sutton St.
786 Queen St.
515 Broadway St.
780 Queen St.
827 Queen St.
236 Harbour St.
25 North Line
880 Queen St.
RR 4, Kincardine
273 Lambton St.
18 Inverlyn Cres
807 Queen St.
237 Broadway
1005 Queen St.
RR 1, Kincardine
RR 4, Kincardine
337 Lambton St.
441 Broadway St.
365 Kincardine Ave.
5-160 Mahood Johnston Dr.
312 Durham Market St.
RR 4, Kincardine
68 Penetangore Row
725 Queen St.
273 Lambton St.
1080 Kincardine
808 Park Place
346 Kingsway St.
RR 2, Kincardine
39 Queen St.
RR 5, Kincardine
RR 4, Kincardine
1808 Hwy 21
352 Renetangore Row
RR 1, Kincardine
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Construction
Construction
Death
Distribution
Education
Education
Energy
Energy
Energy
Energy
Energy
Energy
Energy
Energy
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Beisel Contracting
R.F. Dore Surveying Ltd.
Davey-Linklater Funeral Home Ltd.
Rogby Trade Ltd
Young Drivers
KIDS Co-Op Nursery School
Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd
Bervie Sipply
Bruce Power
Edward Fuels Ltd
Leader Resources
SP Armow Wind
Technology Convergence Inc.
Vestas Canadian Wind Technology
Merlin General Corporation
NA Engineering Associates
RCM Technologies Canada Corp
BMO Bank
Brian Taylor Manulife Securities
CIBC
Debbie Kesteloot Accountant
Dundee Securities Corp
Edward Jones Investment
Freedom 55 Financial
H&R Block
Harvey Financial Solutions Inc.
Heather Padfield CFP
Manulife Securutues
Matchett Financial Services
Meridian Credit Union
Miller Insurance Brokers
Mortgage Intelligence
Nancy Ackert Financial Solutions
Olympian Financial
Plantax Accounting
Royal Bank
519-396-6583
519-396-3464
519-396-2701
519-396-6060
519-396-6606
519-396-4532
519-361-3200
519-395-3586
519-361-2673
519-396-8841
519-396-3540
519-396-9433
519-396-9832
419-368-7500
519-396-7900
519-396-1000
519-396-7070
519-396-3335
519-396-5511
519-396-7515
519-396-3399
519-396-7700
519-396-9007
519-396-3874
519-396-6500
519-396-7224
519-832-8768
519-396-5511
519-396-7526
519-395-3122
519-396-3465
519-396-6800
519-396-6880
519-396-6262
519-396-8100
519-396-3481
281 Durham St.
932 Queen St.
757 Princess St.
Box 338, Kincardine
910 Queen St.
415 Russell St
Bruce County Rd Tiverton
RR 4, Kincardine
Box 3000 B0602
Hwy 21 Kincardine
147 Mahood Johnston Dr.
322 Lambton St.
Box 269 Kincardine
RR2, Tiverton
1475 Conc, Box 272
933 Queen St.
RR 5, Kincardine
761 Queen St.
904 Queen St.
822 Queen St.
281 Durham St.
250 Durham St,
945 Queen St.
287 Lambton St.
900 Queen St.
346 Durham St.
630 MacKendrick Dr.
904 Queen St.
886 Queen St.
818 Durham St.
1115 Sutton St.
819 Queen St.
182 Carolway Trail
325 Lambton St.
325 Lambton St.
757 Queen St.
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Financial
Fitness
Fitness
Fitness
Fitness
Food
Home
Home
Home
Home
Legal
Legal
Legal
Legal
Legal
Legal
Legal
Legal
Legal
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Scotiabank
Sharon Van Derlip & Associates
Sunlife Financial
TD Bank
The Co-operators
Tom Thompaon Investments
The Shadeland Group Inc.
Curves
Magnum Total Fitness
Magnum Personal Fitness
YMCA
Specialty Cakes
Creative Image Landscaping
Garden Concepts
Paul's Painting & Wallpapering Service
Wayne Zettler Furniture Refinishing Hand Stripping
Barker Diane Barrister & Solicitor
Donnelly, Murphy Lawyers
J. Pitblado Law Office
Laschuk & Farr
Marshall & Mahood
Mathers William
Smith Hunt Black
Smith, Hunt & Buck Law Office
William Mathers Barrister & Solicitor
Brenda Manderson Homeopathic & Energy medicine
Dr Miranda Deller-Quinn & Associates
Dr R Thiel
Dr Stanley Soloduka Chiropractor
Dr W H Pym
Dr. Karen Rapley Chiropractor
Fine Fettle Natural Foods & Health
Herbal Magic
Joanne Metters RMT
Joint Physiotherapy
Kincardine Chiropractic & Wellness
519-396-3328
519-396-1771
519-396-2220
519-396-3314
519-396-7541
519-396-1177
519-396-8700
519-396-2882
519-396-3488
519-396-3488
519-396-9622
519-396-8040
519-396-4529
519-395-0333
519-396-3889
519-395-3625
519-396-9542
519-396-3636
519-435-9220
519-396-3307
519-396-8144
519-396-3307
519-396-3558
519-396-3458
519-396-1872
519-396-6001
519-396-3260
519-396-3663
519-396-7585
519-396-3663
519-396-4552
519-396-9600
519-396-4828
519-396-2222
519-396-2828
519-396-9355
755
288
926
665
947
140
125
776
911
366
898
Queen St.
Harbour St.
Queen St.
Philip Place
Queen St.
Kitchener St.
Boiler Bch Rd.
Queen St.
Queen St.
Lambton St.
Queen St.
410 Princess St.
744 Princess St.
941 Saugeen St.
1041 HWY 21
329 Durham Marker St.
969 Queen St.
926 Queen St.
282 Durham St.
313 Lambton St.
807 Queen St.
281 Durham St.
281 Durham St.
807-1 Queen St.
281 Durham St.
381 Lambton St.
325 Lambton St.
859 Queen St.
325 Lambton St.
264 Lambton St.
928 Queen St.
943 Queen St.
855-B Queen
281 Durham St.
747 Queen St.
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Service
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Medical
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Personal
Realty
Realty
Realty
Realty
Realty
Recreation
Recreation
Technology
Technology
Transportation
Transportation
Kincardine Dentistry
Kincardine Family Eye Care
Kincardine Holistic Health
Kincardine Total Foot Care & Orthodics
Lakeview Dental Services
Pathways Family Therapy
Zen Moments Massage Therapy
Allure Beauty & Med Spa
Dynamic Hair Design
First Impressions Salon
Hair Connection (Kincardine)
Instyle Hair Studio
Julia Health & Beauty Spa
New Image Hair Design
The Golden Comb
The Hair Loft
Trigger Points
Chrome Hair Studio
Snipin' Clip
The Old Barber Shop
Penny's Laundromat
Coldwell Banker The Property Shoppe
Re/Max Bluewater Realty
Re/Max Land Exchange Ltd. Broker
Royal LePage Exchange Realty Co
Royal LePage Kincardine
Ainsdale Golf Course
Kincardine Golf & Country Club
MTC Computer Systmes
Shoreline Communications
Robert Q Travel
Kin Taxi
Commissioning & Technocal Services
Taylor Sales & Service
Piper House
Pumping Station
519-395-5100
1-888-390-5940
519-396-4018
519-396-9255
519-396-3339
519-396-7200
519-396-2332
519-396-5952
519-396-8888
519-396-2282
519-396-7487
519-396-1234
519-396-1008
519-396-2231
519-396-2875
519-396-4333
519-396-7585
519-386-1098
519-396-3121
519-396-9389
519-396-6556
519-396-3300
519-395-3977
519-396-8444
519-396-5522
519-396-3396
519-395-5555
519-396-2112
519-396-3274
519-395-0593
519-396-9595
519-396-3411
519-396-7910
519-396-2883
519-396-7300
519-396-8551
6 Millennium Way
316 Lambton St.
281 Durham St.
277 Lambton St.
736 Queen St.
281 Durham St.
724 Queen St.
708 Queen St.
383 Kincardine Ave.
750 Queen St.
2-281 Durham St.
802 Queen St.
335 Durham Market St.
922 Queen St.
1361 Concession 5
363 Oenetagngore Row
859 Queen St.
708B Queen St.
730 Queen St.
892 Queen St.
330 Durham Market Square
926 Queen St.
768 Queen St.
969 Queen St.
777 Queen St.
RR 1, Kincardine
2 Golf Course Trail
746 Queen St.
RR 1, Kincardine
751 Queen St.
279 Albert Rd.
1475 Conc 5
Hwy 21, Kincardine
330 Durham Market St
570 Kincardine Ave.
Merlin-Simex Corp
Hydro Save
Bruce Control Systems
Tarquil Productions
Cottage Artistry
Anderson Paper Products
519-395-3450
519-395-4535
519-395-2455
519-395-5346
519-396-2787
519-395-0876
RR 4, Kincardine
RR 4, Kincardine
RR 5, Kincardine
52 Main St.
160 Mahood Johnston Dr.
arket Square
arket Square
arket Square