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I
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VOL. IlLIll
UUIHSHInGTOIf,
D. 1.
APRIL, 1944
flU. 4
U
r~~oIA
A
-
-~
.....
-
......
..
---------
"iheem's
....
.....
&
morand more
Whore merchants hold take
of len. of workers' kaled
They say, too, wellliav. less and loss of
more when It's to spare
Ualess we save and buy more bonds ard more
of less we share;
The.e promeies of more or less seem more
or less a fake,
With "frozen" waes we have less lack and
mero of less they take
oere or less,
square and more or
Try Rymnows.
L. U. No, 65.
JUST A WEATHER-;IRD
The sign. all point to an early spring
With its usual quota of birds tha sing
Aad the swelling buds of the elm and larch
And the tax headhe on the Idea of March.
From this and that strology shark
I learn that the cropswill beat the mark,
And the stan are aet for a busy stork.
Jim Byrnes looks for a rise in pork,
And crotchety lekes, whom fate preserves.
Can see the end of the oil reser",es
And devotees of the crystal bal
Are sure of & German collapse by fall.
By signs aId tokens the seero and sages
Profe to pM-read historey' pages;
But me, I'll stick to the weather thing:
The signs all point to an eatly springT
RgncHAyL Lnvn,
L. U. N, 124.
(WITH APOLOGIES TO KIPLING)
The Japs mew up the old pagoda
Looking eastward to the sea.
And the Burma girl ain't sittin'
In the place she uead to be.
For the wind, that's in the palm trees
Is a flying, screaming hell
And the temple bells ain't ringin'
'Case there ain't Io temple bels.
Come ye back ye Yankee By.rlI
Come ye back to Mandalay,,
Where the Jap machine guns spray,
Can't you hear the children screamia'
From Rangoon to Mandalay?
0 come ye back to Mandalay
Where the "yellow bellies" play
And the "Rus boom up like thunder
Outs China '%est the bay.
T. O DaflMMOmo,
L. U. No. 1141.
......
72augh Or
Together we have banded,
Formerly we stood stranded.
Our union is us,
Unification is a must.
Sacrifices we will endure,
Our due to assure
Rum.rs are not good
For us, the Brotherhood.
Meetings we must attend,
tranmend
S, we meay
Far above that prison
From whicl w're risen.
Onward we must stride
In our heart "pride"
For ours, "o.r Rnion."
HEERaC. Rimic*ALD.
L, U. No. 1320.
* * ·
They tell us there is more and mom of less
and less each day,
'ore and
Though folks pay cash and carry
and more of less away;
The aivertfsingi. Just the alme, there's always a "big sale"
Today I'm serewy more or lest from listening
to each elan;
I'm thinking I should hibernate and study
more I guesa,
To learm if Wrong is less or more or right Iz
...
OUR UNION
A PUZZLE MORE OR LESS
In trying to be fair and
.. C
U.
OH, OH!
youa new to meWell, Linema, Tennie,
Just heard of you todayBut you're right about the ladies
Takit' mena's Jobs and their pay.
They've always got the credit
For takin' their husband's pay.
But now they're workin' for it;
Pattln' i, eight hours pea day.
They are welders and they are plumbers,
Taxi drivers and traffic cops.
And Pm a "al who works with the wire
That you strung o'er the "teps*"
Your technique with wre was surely good:
I'll bet no oer could match It.
Well, I don't string that wire around
But, ioldine me, I can patch It.
Russ. Mi~rage
L. U. No. 1112.
EFFICIENCY
One m.orning, in rather a tongh-sounding
voice, the foreman was reprimanding one of
the helpers for not charging material used
each day. "Charge the material used each
day, we can't make any money if material
slips by uncharged. This is a T and M job,
CHARGE the MATERIAL." That night the
helper's time-slip read omething like this:
Construction: a bours.
Material: Two San1 inch holes.
R.AYR
WSLCRa,
L. I. No. 415.
A PAST MASTER OF THE RUMOR
FACTORY
(Any alluion to any or all ,mberb
past
and present o L. U. No. 4S1 ic parch, co¢nO. r
eaenl.l C
rBtkrra wotdd never stort
One of our dearly beloved Brothers died
and appeared before St. Peter for sentence.
St. Peter said, "Though your work was very
good en earth, and there are no black marks
against you. I must setence you to hell, as
ther is no more room inheaven."
"'St Peter,
Our worthy Brother replie,
all my working life and dounuithe part when
I didn't work, I have been told of the wonders
of heaven where the streets were paved with
gold, and milk and honey flows. Now won't
you piease give me Just a fifteensninute pass
into that heaRenly paradise and let mn see
lor myself lust what I'm
missing?'
So St. Peter being a Just guy let the
Brother bare his pass. He had Just got
through the gates when he met a couple of
Brother wire Jerker. who started totell
him of the wonderful lighting effects In
when our Brother interrupted to say.,
heaven,
I have no time for idle chatter, I Just have
a few minutes between busses, I am reportng
to a big Job in hell. The devil is going to
re-wire all bades and therell be overtime
double time for Saturevery day and double
day and Sunday, lots of wine, women aid
song for them that likes it and pay day every
dy. With that the Brother walked on and
pretty soon he noticed groups of five or 10.
then 50 and 10 rushing for the gate, As he
hod now been in heaven for 10 minutes. he
said, "Time is getting short. Guess I had bettmr get over to the gate and see what the
rush is abot," St. Peter met him at the gate
and said. "There have ben a great many
wire Jerker. asking for tra.f.ers; seems like
there is a rumor the devil is going to re-wire
all hell, and ao there now being lots of room
But our worthy
,tay."
Fan
in heaven, you
Brother replied, "Quite so, Brother Pete, but
lIn turning in my pas:; there may be sorething to that rumor after ail'
Ritt GSEN,,Z
L. U. No. 481.
flerr's a cold ueather joke from Lono:
She: "1 eny the great big polar bears in
this weather"
He: -I wouldn't mind being a little otter."
Ai..o.o Fox, 1. 0.
IN THE NATION'S CAPITAL
A "rier-rat" went to Washintn., D. C.,
on a busiless and sight-seeing trip. On his
return his friends asked him for his opinion
of Washington.
'Welh," said the "river-tat" 'Washington
reminds me of the Mississmppi river during
the flood season, "What about the people?"
his friend, asked again. With a silly grin.
the "river-rat' said, "The people remind me
of a bunch of autsthat have Just about overloaded a large log in the middle of the flooded
Mississippi, and each ant Is conceited enough
to think that it is steering the log down the
river."
FRANK TH
No.ER,
L; U. No. 602.
LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT
An electrical contractor was dying Rs he
called In a lawyer and began to dictate hig
will. He said, my euity In my car shall go
to my son; he will now have to go to work
to keep up the paymnts,. My bank balance
shall go to my wife; she can eplain the overdraft. Give my goodwill to the supply houses.
they took some awful chances on me. Gie
my tools and equipment to the junk man;
he's had his eyes on them for years. Lastly,
I'd like six of my creditors to be my pallbearers, they have carried me so long they
night as well finish the Jb.
Roy L. DA¥1[,
L. U. No., 084.
Oh#e4z C"rn
4j~e
InTERnITIOnDt
ELECTRICAL WORKERS and OPERATORS
PUBLISHED
q. 3u8a
9 h2
MONTHLY
1f2OO,4
e editn'
d St., /V.W. *16amthitoon5,.
Frontispiece Pari(
Gargoyle
Whalt Will Lahor's Part Be in tile Peace?(
howhing Beaion iB it Troubled Wo Id
l'lcctrieitv's A in I Ext ended Service
Church Vanips Planning on Basis of Mixed Econonmy
Cornell lUniversitv Founds Labor Relations School
Plan, for War and Postwar at Bonneville
I
Birdsoeye View of Electric Utility Industry
Men il OverasIs Pour Inti Pacific After Debacle
Lighting, Mlan's Goal, Makes Great Progress
Freight Ratos Nomish, Starve Iulndsitrial (oenters
O1 Tinier Reviews Gains As lie Sbs "Go;dbye"
Our Litle Ganie Ct'k Goads a Big Bully _
Editorials
Woman',D*
Wor k
( 0orre osd CIel( C
A nnual Statornemel of Elect rical Workers' Benefit Assovini ion
III Memoriam-
IDheai
Claims
Official Receipts
Page
122
123
126
127
128
130
131
132
133
134
135
1;6
137
138
140
141
14!)
150
153
157
* This Journal will not he held responsible for views expressed by correspondents
The first of each month is the closing date; all copy must he in our hands on or before.
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
[nternatio nal Preaident. EUWAEC J. BwtOWN,
a shingto
, 5D..
1200 15th St,, N. W,, W
International qe.ret.ry. G. M. Buoxllz.,
I10 )5th St., N. WX Washington 5,1) .C.
International Treasurer, W. A. IOGAN. 617
South Sixth Ave,., M. Vernon, N. Y.
INTERNATIONAL
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
VICE PRESIDENTS
First District
E.lx<ci Es
R. R. 3. London, Out., Canada
Second District
JO N J. RIE{AN
Rm. 239, Park Square Bldg.,
1, Mass.
Ioston
Third District
WIILIAM D. WALKER.
Boom, 402, City Centre Bldg. I21 North
lroad St., PhiluI..l.ph
7, Pa.
Fourth District
A... ... BEN NI,ri
Room 1517, N.B.C. Blds., ('le'eland 14, Ohio
Fifth District
G. X. BARWEl
301 Woodward Bldg., fiin Uighu i3, Ala.
Sixth District
M.J. BOYLE
4300 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago 12, Ill.
Seventh Distrct
W. L. I liA)
3641 Iaugh tti
1, r,,t W,,th 4, exa.
Eighth Ditrict
II. W, SIt.
504 Dener ]heatre Blhlg.,
.r.. 2. Co
Ninth District
J. SCOTT MrilN
910 CenTra
,ower, San F~li .. 1* I dh£
Railroads
J, J, D[r¥
SSG South Wells St.. floot 010, h
6, IlI
CoA~ItES M. P1'AUISI,
Chnirmo.,,
4097 W. Cuyl(or Ave., Chicago 41, IIlL
First Di[trict
IlARy VAN ARSLALE, JR,
130 E. 25th St., New York 10, N. Y,
eer.I District
1 L- KRtqI,y
95 Beacon St., Hyde ]*ark 36, Mass.
eb-
nvisihtle ~
d c
eo
er th
little knowvn traI. lspi/ati<>1 syme,,s
,/ the
giec
world fl night andi day,
Supplies of fod. we apon.. and
. d i,dpd gnodl'
.1 ...nt tanly to ut' boys
at the front. E]vey .t.. .f t hese va.u.
able materia]s Ioist hIo packaged
p].opcrly to
OKe! V>
th~q,
Giod to
iiistlte safe anad eflieiqqec, aroivat at
Ihc (o...bat art,
Abart 700,000 diBf'rent item> ie caerledio
our boys.
Thl~vsc re all wrapped ill p.Pl'", t11
paperboard ,r hth. This means an
ll-out effort on the pJrt of civlians
to ave pal.el. E,'v,!y Aini a hou'e
wiPl ,alls
hom(! a/l article from a
stole
iil [ baskt,'
j i
nipel, she is
ahCiig te wthi t'fm't. Evrsy time any
PSOi~]rflltVItise's 0o }i a(e hi s ptlu, Cia>e
1
wrlApped . hi!
doing it,,
j
for UnIIh
Sari. The
United States is engaged
ii a tremendk)[s pa , salvag e camp)Jg, and evur....ly can help.
UI.iiS, the
Marion PnPtWV,-r
nell Eklod.
has CoG
a',vay. For
18 ytil, h e was a memnhbe of tle
EECRItTOAL
X,{)RkERS'
JOUlRNA[L
null
performed her services
jith entlustash ard elihiwt.ny. She wa
a part
of that sil..nt
I
iim"tlny of persons
t~hl'OUghit. (he Iunited States anld
(Itllu
who hl..hipe bld a boid
....
·JIIIJSNAi cvt~
1lIi,
Shet became
sick it Feb.ruar..y, 1ID19,and died a
year later, aGfeP fighting a ,ysteri%S distase. It, waliraly as she lived
Third District
W'LA" (]. SI'oRD
2104 5 Law & han ce Bl]dg.
Pittsburgh 19, i',.
Fourth Dmistrit
CF.
F.Ig.m
2025 2nd St., N. E. WashingCto, 2, D. C.
Fifth District
DAN MaNNIlNG
130 No, WeBS St., (hieago C, Ill,
Sixt h listrkti
D.. I.iAC¥
Eddlslo n.e Apartmen ts.I, iVVhillgton 5. D). C.
Selnth D ircit
200 G1.errero St,
I: hit
HAnr
S.
J FloEN
Si1 ],ranr-co 3. (Csi.,
S. t, MCRBCTID
1)E-t'i
16X
Snot.,Laboriarpe
AvWinlp,
Mum,..
Ianad.~
The *JoiNA
tinues to g"ow
I
,L'S p)seri
pion list enThis pre ents ore of
the serious piohins
to the oftic;il
seauee,
i,,nr~is .qestslir COIIlmi f. .il. all
Oil.r.es flor the
JdoWIRAL
alld1'
ai
eiit...taking
fulfill these ieqIu
j,as
litci4Itiy a
p..
i'/
e:n, stymied II I
lack f paiper, nolt by the non-will to
mg
,... I[
'ait
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
122
P.
-a ri
S
Otcr Paris
rof tops
With a
Slalt
\Ar
1
r goy
Ia
otor St ...
S
o..h of fIlagellatiim
(Il stony desolation . .
age-old sni. k '..UI
gl;txily
(.-go; Ie. child .. n
C
Carktd
beliesi
lieef middle ages
ou on a dhtioh'n
o, Irighmin
iff
Ihc
ijiol
r;¢
dvil and give
pioi
Yhltt G;Id 's Sl~it still, Iiate's I.... a'd lalg(m
lo Iriglh llu ofl IIhe
1'0
I(11
toi(
Is%¥
Viw
(It )ou fkilted
devil.
of [I"e devilish
Iide
(hemtrl qiCtil
A...l Sti
de
hIIt
ii onle
v o...
(cohultiol. because
.o.. .;tiled'.
G;;gol)[I.
Ihr
;ic
)o,
fthild of
the in/ag(
nelatmon.
the thing of FIll
01 are VOlt a shiadow ol
Waiing ftall,
1o]
ol :Ill hti
wil' sel
ian's
I sell
to(Id
htlt,
G",
THE JOURnAL OF
ELECTRICAL WORKERS AIn
OPERRTORS
OFFICIAL PUOLiCATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL
S- 't Ion s I
SCO
I iGSa
~'
1C
FO
T 1r
VOL. XLIII
OROYNAHOOD OF ELECTRICAL WORI(ERS
"I
(k o cl I, ii 7. nmt ,,c .I Ms.c i,
C
. I YZ.
SSOO I. . Th AA. IN Aw1c
a
N APRIL 20 theh,
ernathral Labor
IS erEti]c 00 V YCSI bin(s Philadelphmia.
Th fole
.
ost subject on the agenda
, th~e ,tdatiuIoship of the quarter-century
olI Iiti.er.atioIal Labor C;onlfer.nce aid
Organization to the rew world structure wiilr is Itslhmfd to be struck at
the coming of the peac.. This ronfetcure brings delegates to Phijulelphia
fromeh Chia. Russia, all th e oceei pied
countileS, Souhb America, the
C
United States andGreat. B.it. i,mt It, will
indeed be a world confeienec. No doubt
the nmewly r'..vid Bade
11iniOilS of Italy
will send delgates. Its deliberations are
of sweephin
inipoitanre and ilevitllbly
the conference will pobl£ to the day of
peace .LI will dir.ctly or indirect[y ask
the questi.n, what will b l]abo's part
i, the
of
,IakilLg
the peace?
A merican labor has been in the inlteunational family of labor subie it.s,eetiIn as a stroi.g, irganized uit. Whorl
this is sa,.h however, it should le fully
nderstood that it has lev
hbeen. an.
orthodox socialst nation, nor has the
American,
labor
,1Ovnient been an ortho
dox socialist iovemeni. Ar erican labor's
ntcin ational sis has first been based on
nlatihnalismn. It helieves in interration.Il
cooperation but. not the loss of identity
o ' a labor
.. .. eve.len t of out own (ounti~t la]
iitlvtpllilts If
other countries. It warms gen.rously to
the sentiment that
bonm.
there is a
pro
foundly deep, uniting w
orking
peoplc, as
Lincoln said, but it is never warm to the
socialist idea that thereshol..d be a.n
mternational union of labor which tubes
p.restige and authoiity away from11 the
indivdual nations, An eriean labor has
been right in this bleause all events of
the presen. era indicate the retentli.I
of strong nationalis.
Russia, which is
so foulded oIl intrnlathioII l socialislt
is probably the most itensely nationalist
country in the world.
MAKING OF TIF'F PEAC];,
As we look back to thet stirring pert ied
at the close of the first WImIld Wa. \re
become aware of the part AmmIrIcarl, Ibal.
played through Samuel Gipl[,el i
the
making of the peace. Sanmel Goipers
had insisted that there be oIganeized inI
erations of sochilist. blcruatimnales. The
blit..a..onal Federationio,' TfJ'rra deIi
'Vys ptircly IL tuiodl .,loi,
aftHii, basi]d
OH t~ait' tilh~lil ,loibd% asldjratioiisliian
philoslohy. It wits nt
cAmtrnle, d by
H,,i'JI w .1..11 teI thinkinktl l terni l "l Kiwl
San/ultl (bHin/epr
was in tifurlpc MIus.
pih';oi to th. A, istice, lie made speeches
in Belgirun, Itfly anid Kngland. lie talked
tol ihuI. alels. While lite hreLI
ree ved
a eonlhhI~lssL(n:
,
receiv
[
d au tofllIc l ann....nt,¥e.l. fi'l.
Secertary TaliiSIg
thllt PrIsident Wilson had1 ampp.in.ndl
Edward N. Hurley ef the U. S, Shipping Brlulr(] Ilnld Il ! 0il reI'presenpt the
/lnmited Staites O.
. the (Ctnml..issilmk i on
ill pl'Og1']p
iA'ghlbtttien,
Tlhe
esigrnrtijon. of this .... n.lT issh n II atssiSt th, ]le..on...gresg" nl"de it in,perative for labor to hI in a IoMuition
t, submit a nilfild progrnImI therefore rcnewieV e
ly request for agree.
ni(!ut tip(n somei definite lite of actiBn.
Thl.e Ir.ter-Alliedi co(nfiriie was
ot]
held. Ilwwveir,
...r.t~iettice
heew,,, th, Ai,6(i
dei
rlegatio.....n.id
the lt,'Igiim I dulhor org..nizatio..s was
gart i eld to till phlce aL theirh,
adqUltei~ts in B~russ4els,
tOn January 28 we met President
in hiis hImI... Muir;t Paiace. In
his first
words
of greetint he insisted
that we ake all the time. .. cessary
LoI presentatioli
ol whlevevilmitters
1
we had in Jmd
. The liscussbin was
.o...ghard emIIuu.el with a spi'it
Wilson
,. Ieep inter/st 1111(
Hbsie fo, mutual
..........
lo('})fuhless At the
l
oilIh isionl (if It h. IO ll..{. .c(. , thP
deal aiked us t~) see himu iig iid hi, th,
near future, lie elnjtsed the hope
that I wouh, acepet
the c cill ni';rbi llr F
ime of
the peace negotattns:
Euroup the J]terlnational Fedlration of
TIradle /lniJ,,is. This was to offset the op-
Iillhr
NO. 4
He cae back to PIris ath the
Samuel Gompers
played amazing role at Versailles in 1918. International
family of labor
]ntel'uritionlnl
'
At thi, tineGompers
refused to go
Io Belne to attend a socialst Heeting.
Re in the Peace?
LIIt imtuti
I0r1,ri
WASIIINGTON, D). C., APRIL, 1941
What wa LABOR'S PART
try iIi
FRII
,il~piltt... t to
'lTfE PA RIS 1'(TI RE
"Paris (uring the Peace C.O..igSS
Illot a eity but a ......m.politan
caravansary. 'Evelybody of i.mper
t.Ii.c..
was lheir aind the really who
hqpd It achieve that distinction.
There w're thousandIs o. t.osr
,ees
sary to tie
.. .c'him/ery .f trtty-nakhl/~. lhoiisitids of onhloik~rs 1111(hltl/-
was
(ls-, l
Noth..i..
was
,,
i]Or.lkl
prices
were appllindg there wore apparently
Ln
in /ying. The tension
rcstrairts
,I work ..... responsibility was so TIeise that
rhati'
F1 was Ill prop.rLion. At no tihle i.. ...y life have I
,,V,
WOrilwd harder
I or gainst such
tr
.er.lous
odds,
"There was already a defilite alignmen1 of frces which it waIs practcally
iinpussilpLI
to break-. Anliica; was the
oe power lIt the peace tabe a lien to
the dipjiomatie practices of Europe. We
hiil g
il
thŽ war with ligbmin.led
iuresis anid ahims.V
We were ..nt illtceteii territorial
aggranllizenlenlt
or alunliic( of piower, We were interested il1 OI]qH lllitieS orI
offreedom
IrW',
W, wyre inteest (Iedill ipperI unities for freedom
)
n.i the arts of
peace. In1 neariy,~ all (qoliftirclIct~
conrirll..d with the VersaIlles T'r/!aty,
A tle rita's rell'esenta tivo's f....ndI them.
selves lil Iheiqlninli'itv.''
SaGiul (lmllpOP lit this tinie beecale
aware of the great differce
between
the Aqi.eria. lado.. ov
.... e.. entan.Id the
labor
..
l...IW.I.iLM oe tlle ctillient. He
said:
"The Old Worlh was atrustomeid to
deallug with abo problels through
legislation and it was natura fro' Old
Wold rejrsentativws to think of intr
ti....onnl labor ploblmen. only in the
ter,, of inteIntti...a] Iegislatioin.They
had in nijnd the levehopient oIf a
s/Isl'-goverl..IOehnt tha s t hould
develop
st .da.Is
IIIo the workers ever'wbeie.
PROBlLEMS
"In the New Woihld, in iddif i.. to
rcg'itl'iig Iho... ]".ohh,"s as i1 [}a t
'If the eno/ic field ill wilncli methods
III ese nthl ly dfifferent frora those of
the political lJied, we had tII I, ole ns
Iaisingmou
,
i, a 'rtlit e. .o..stitnti....
(i~iI!
I'tra
Fedls
rOln of governiment.
It is very difflicult Ipr thie arverire per
1iFf ....it I
ir l...
e to, tlidelsImId the spirit nnd the iladlteall
The Journal of ELECTRIGAL WORKERS and Operators
124
methods of America. The representative. from France and Italy were
frankly in favor of a super-government
and they could not understand that the
objeeion s Mr. Re binson and I advanced
were based npon facts and concrete
obstaclies. They se.n.ld to credit us
with wilful perverseness
.
istead ef an
honest deire to indicate a real situs
tion that had to be net."
~
(iotapes eo
in
contriving
tmisslon was instrum.ental
an
International
Labor
Office as aIonditio
of the peace and
it is a hilstorical fact that Mr. Gormpers
was probably the authr oIf the International Labor Conference which meets
in Philadlplia after about 25 years' absene froe the Amerian s.e..ne. Mr.
Gompers tells of his light for the Internstionai Labor Office.
AMERICAN PROPOSALS
"The secontd big fight I made was for
the principle that the International
Labor Office or it, annual assembly
shall nit propose to any country, a
law, conv.ention.
r tieaty which contains lower standards than obtained
in that coimty, After the acceptance
of the Alelric'an proposals safeguarding the -ights of federated govern
mers (isuch as ours,
this proposal
was the crux tpon which our commissio wasa bout to split. I ann.ounced
that unless that proposal was adopted
by the commission Mr. Robinson and I
woldd be forced to refrin from signing the report and we would submit
a minority report to the Plenary Counel. We proceeded to argue this question for days and in addition to conferring with my ass.ciate, Mr. Robinson, and with my A. F. of L. associates,
I also had , conference with Andrew
Fu'useth who aided us in framing this
safeguard. }ie assured me that if our
prop.osal was made part of the plan.
he regarded the document as perfectly
se,
souid, and of great beneflt to
labor of all countries, particularly of
t
countries
hose which were m.le backward, while it would safeguar'd the
working people of the United States
from anr attempt to lower the American standards of life and work. After
the die had been cast by nay statement
to the commission, they adopted the
principle by practically a unanimous
voit, the Japanese delegation again refraining from voting.
"In addition to the draft convention
wbich provided for the organization
and operation of an International Labor
Bu.reau .and cor .re.ce.., there ws
drawn ip a declaration of labor principles to be inserted in the peace treaty.
These principles constituting a bill of
rights for labor were
to
write into
the treaty an extraordinary re.ognition of certain common principles of
relation between men in the affairs
of daily life. The btsis for this charter
was the principles which the Americanl Fedr,alion of Labor submitted to
the Inter-Allied Conference in Loudhon
iSe ltenlher If 1918. In substance the
principles to be approved by the coun.tries signing the treaty were;
"In right and in fact the labor of a
h.mana..being should TeHt he treated as
neiclieitadis or an ati.i lc .f omnwnrce.
"Enlpb...
s aId workers should be
iilowed the light of association for
all lawful Ip..rep..s.
"No thild should be per.. itted to
be enpIoyed iI industry or commerce
before the age of 14 years.
"Bitwen rtheyears if 14 and 18
gainful emjpli,yrnt permitted at work
not physically hlarmful and on condition that technical or general edmuation be continued.
"Evey worker has a right to a
wage
adlequate to
mnaintain
a reason-
able staidard of life.
"Equal pay shoud ibe given to women
and tO mIen or work of equal value
in quantity and quality.
"A weekly rest, includig Sunday,
or its
for
equivalent
all workers.
"initit, no of the hours of work in
industry on the basis of eight hours
a day mo 48 hours a week.
"The
c.niiissi.n designated Wash-
ington as the place for the first International ILaor Commissbim to be held
under the treaty and adopted an
agenda
providing
for
an
organizing
committee. The last meeting was held
on March 24.
'As soon as the work of the commission was fnished our American
labor delegation went to london for a
cozifrrerce with a special committee
of the parliamentary comnnittee bt
reach an agreement upon time and
place of an international labor conference which had been proposed for May
entd whil, we hoped to have postponed
unit Is
ome
later late, preferably Octo
ber in Washington., The cmonmittee
agreed to r'port or requ.est favorably and we left London for Plymouth,
whena we sailed
,
via Brest for New
Yo'k."
GREAT EVENTS
Mr. Gomnpers w,
lea ling with great
events in this stage of his,areer.
Of
dee, inport to American labor of 1944
is this stateInent of his position
"Without attempting to give a further outlin if the whole p roposal of
the International
Comission for
Labor
Legislation,
I think it
fitting
to quote here the preamble as it was
accepted by Ihe PlearyICouncil and
is part of the Covenan.t of the League
uf Nations of the Treaty of Versailles:
"The high contrteling parties, recogaizig that the well-binig, physical,
moral, and intelleclual, of industrial
wage earners is of supreme international importance, have framed, in order to further this great end, the
pernanent machinery provided for in
Scction I and assc iated wit that
of the League of Nations.
"They recognize that differe.ce of
dlimate, habits, and customs of ece
IOnie o ppo-toni y and
industrial tra
dition make strict uniformity in the
emnrlil ions of hlt.r ldiifirult of imnidi-
ate attainmnmt. But, holding as they
do, that laber houfld not be regarded
in only as
an art..
..
L if comnerce ,
they thik tlat there art methmls and
prImcI/,1rs fur regulating labor eonditions which all indus rial comnnmunities should endoliver
as theni
nmt.
to apply, so far
special fi,-urnstances will per-
"Among these
methods
and prin-
ciples,. the following sevm to the high
contractinOg parties to be of special
and UrgIeit importance:
"First-The guiding principhe above
enunciated that labor should not be
regarded merely as a commodity or
article of commerce.
"Second The right of association
for al lawful puirposes by the employed as well as by the eiployers.
"Third--The payment to the employed of a wage adequate to maimtini a reasonable tandard of life as
this is understeod in their time and
country.
" uFmrth The adopt ion of an eighthour dy r
a48-hour week as the
Standard to he aimed at where it has
not aheady been attained.
"Fifth The adoptiron of a weekly
vst of at least 24 hous,. which shall
include Suniay wherever practicable.
"Sixth The abolition of child lahbr
and the imposition of suhe limitations
on the lboir of young persons as shall
permit the continuation of their eduratio, and assure their proper physical
(de(Vehlpnniemt,
"Seven th -The princ ipl
that men
and women should receive equal i" mur,iati .. for work of equal value.
"Eighth-The standard set by law in
each country with respect to the conditions of labor should haVe due regard
to the equitable economic treatment of
all workers lawfully resident therein.
"Ninth--Each
state should make pro
vision for a system of inspectiom
in
wh.ich6
.'nn/..
sh.ould take part, in order to e
nsure
the enforcement of the
laws and regulation for the protection
of the employed.
'Without claiming tiht I hese methods and principles are either otmphte
or binad the high contracting parties
are of the opin.ion that they are well-
fitted to guide the policy of the League
of Nstinns; ald that, if adopted by
the id ustrial cornmunities that are
members of the League. and safeguarded in practice by an adequate
system of sueh inspection, they will
confer lasting beneflits upon thI
wag
earners of the wold."
HISTiORtY MADE
Mi. Gon.pers writes history vividly
and his desc-iption of the first meting
of the Ilternstional labor Conference
bears quiting:
"The first lnte.rnationa I Labor C,,ference under the Versailhes Treaty
was held in Washington in Octoher,
1919.
'It had ),en agreed at the Amateordamn clnfieence that the IJternational
Federation shoul have a meeting in
APR IL, 1944
WasThin gtii
simutlbJICously. At the
this wa, ari.al ged, it %as eoinhdet'l
exupected that oure SvInt would
have ratified the VersilIes Treaty and
that the United StaLes would e offically represen.
ted in the
fonfe
rence.
The Senate refused to ratify, but the
Pltsident designatLed as all nicital
'eresentat
.f
e
the I aitred States,
Seretary of Laber William B. Wilson.
Accordlig to
Literlati..Till jlwliiamen
py
I[ncted uit
See? !t vty
son"as
lade chairman of thie (onrelece. The
<onfereinc by [ilmIuitinlls vaIle invited
pI
adI di.c..ssons. hitt, of
u..s.. ,ithout the right to vote. I at tended the
ilelTIl
se~Sfh)llS lil Ltftelr I had ex
[llcssetlayisolf
fulyUp.o the prorirs l
for the adoptian of a,...
num eight
h.i,
work day. I falt dhat there was
littLe eryi e I culdd
tetde
in such
all artificial cIlpltcity.
"The executive touncil of the Aleican Federation of
[abhr pro posed to
thie 1921 eiivertion that labor call
upon lhe AIellran g..v.ii.n.e.t to take
the initiative or cooperate with any
,,itjol. or group of nations for the promotion of both milit;'y lind naval di.sstiniaiilel.t. Siiint'tine afterward, PresI
dlent ]ardins coilvetled a world conI.r....ee ol ]in'itat.ho
of arnglalent,
The issue was of secondlary
importalce
to the orgadIzil'
if world relations,
but it was evih.e..' that a orralt ideal
had b.hen plated i nxtrially in the
minds of natii.ls., I was appointed by
Preshient. Hardting IO solV' inl advisory
capaclty to the Anluricar
delegation
ill [}the
rlfcltu....
Sctaa
..
I did not
anticipate the iirg'a.
of Secretary
O..
Il ughes. I apirebhen/hd that there
w.>tdd be need for al agency through
which the views of Almlrciull citizens
,,ouhld hI hlown to oIlr
1A..i..l'icall ddeh
gattton. Acciriingly. I iitred several
hundeldi men and wumnp to constitute
Stieji
a
veluiitary
tharet
the
comiinhttee
Of Dv services.
"TI'here
arc
son.
co.ndlitions in
Europe that nmaxki it seemingly de
sirtble for thie Unied Staite
to rI uliaill aloof~' from a woHld league oi
uiternattionmal
Iassoiation,
}it such
runt hial
Ihdlty dts, ilot tcord
bal
bI kings ,td or th, blo dr
6..[.ll
"
l
i pd
L~t ...
I. ,_
lh,
I, ,
BELIEF IN THIE MONROE
DO(CTRINE
COt)-
teo ftl!nee
tiL Vt'rl
v
with iI tl$)
SIlISt If I, ty. The League
of Nations falls short 0 f the vision
whihd heartened us to strive for it.
but ift is
v('t I its ilfaney.Though
the fully developed stIl tittirit les in I he
heart o' thefulture. I alii confident
there gill be an iltuwnhithal pariaillella. that shi
n I, ntiIi tj tiC0 i
Ihe wIrd.
should
I[tah eoIn-.uctLive dcis......
The cordillrespoIn e,i to
invitation was ovideace of the siucerity of puhbic convictionI for woidI peace. The commission
organized
iL colnittev,. I sered on
the executive ..o...ittee aI
the con'milte, deallg with tile Pacific andi
FLL.r
Eastern
q.Uetto.
Secretary
Il
lhs
startledthe wrIl by an act
Ira
ght-foIwal
AmPeican diplonIty
inlsubtIittilI
Lb the
.. nferenee
a Iupiosal for Seil...tc I' duetiln in aL'are.ll.ts. The wrill was iui such dire
(!lorl...lic stttiaM
Lilteien wofesiohal
diphmldats did inot date to juggle seihtIsly
with .. o..oa. that were eSsell
tihly I..nanitatian
ijdi.I.cees.l.
At
tlhe lose of ile e.. fer let. I received
frlit Prsdet
linlinhr ias probaldy
did all serving the Aintlicat governmeritt a letter
i axpr5
pprteiation
ccl
Riice2
rhu
I iIrnlly believe in the Mlioroe
.
I.etrihe
int as,n
ept,
phse but
f:i,
I ¥ile
fOV('
inllitldidilt
an es-eil
thd]..
pme-liean
rincipl*e
lfudaltntall I...y
whuh i
have i.rsued
in the organizing f tiht, Pui-Aneriean
F'tqlpihfb1g of Laibol is hal'ip
.
]pon the
shi''iI of the Ml.hr.l'.i Doctrine, to
establish and nlailtlali tilf iti, t friend
]y I elaticih( Iap e
Vn-Amtic
ll
Il
.i.. tiIs,.
,ly
i
to
t li asp
.
pnlll'
ul]lsA.
if.
tIle! I~Iy
,Intelli
forIhI
anl
:iII
iz
itlppl
the Utitd Siilt
Nt
;I
. Tthait
oi
ill
A.... IIII.n . ite
sltsI ILIclt:\IIt
ltI
(if
Idjllstllent of
Ial iU'gILiii-ztion
that
has beell usefu,l over 2l y2 us, II
fle¥1
i.rxlu which will have tiIi
m1,1h sub2tiMrehltionship [h (iihle natis
of
th- League of Natiomn ItIal thte littr
llIlti0I
[41111i1 [' C(ofl"ie,,i, haILd in thl
ist.
Elder Worker Speaks
[lire is an (Xi'
pit1
I{, lettcl
,it
Il/
e
y t C9-,
(it.
-l I
giilee'r xvili) hIld
ilti'etl
lt
lefthis ltetllenellt Iii hip
;illel'aill [iu'dtietiO.It
l..ll]dItes the ecru.p
hite pptwttu
of r:n'l reuld and spi it as
il till, takes to hdlp Apieill :tgain-t it:
'htintils.
W' helieve that it speak- for
.....
h
si, lf thou tIild ifl are, 'vole
are
lho doing thehe' lit;
Fwer
1-29
r
i
ow icttl
[t
v lhtb dnIi
thes
,
L ..
mIIe' rLight hI.rt in
of
Jz, it tiimay prlove
f. n ithIIIg The
li'I
Thus it iI that whe
A,,eri-an.
,
]lbo
goes to the Philadia
inf.renice hi
fil-l. it will gol wilh aI lat
tradition
Ill ihety Iahfinl it. I
prblem
.,tillh
that
will IIce, thn hs i,
wil be ahvas t
lifiernt pblhenL. it will Ie aI/
will
ItI'ittxn fiora
..
val!y.
Iamibition. ..Ind
:urgi':~izenmen
'<lilui
Ih d to~ strife
!ridi waI. but if, ally}, ;Lb that hone
liuhIl fail anI abe ii
~iiolp (.til (Jo
sigl, tpo!n ail Auip IJ¢;I the 17nited
S'nt~i:{3ln the ['an Axmp iean rupublics
dhe i a }~.st~itmIll r lui hthe
e~ildshi ~t a,!griesuii
;ie
thet
i)eiqlL~e
[It
F~I~irisphert-
when it .i..;y
s Anliiussadol.'
.i....
pnItat irimtt-M (ifdiin al the
.illnjiatlon' plht! And l'nl grlatd
li,,vI
t i it ald It have It pllt ii it auI
theILecgue oIf
x A e thest luloillst
..ee:tc.
ilitaly
tsilgl
il
the eitrapee
ilt,
[I Chllit, to
is reselved foril the t
hIe
beyupie
iv (ata...
til mitil,
tIf
0 txtu 1
lad
I ileh~i.'a.
lesilutt
l~fthe \lid
-'o I ha."
supl'.ted
Id
x d
IrlWHIIItI
t
not
ui].i..g the work
I.i.I theirl ibseitive
,,
vern
A I hII;! al
vIanh. I havd
iIha'id
g-~o
uix
Ix+.
therut
"ild lIlBitran
Ilclt
gerbil
LUIt'ni
dc xs
h'fi'ti-~
alftii
ofl
nip
~iSsghli~ihixl
i
t to lV(t .1'e I
l
thi~
tonJ , i' Ia chem Cut- the
IuIKh;-adul tf every Pl'-,-A ... 'hi-n eiulit!
There , role chuhi 'I.ant. T'hat eh.
hilh
I2
oyt:
o ''a
;g, stILpI a1nd
.. Inlgo
ur ( rI iF i
* ight il
CS "I.
ttL
.
hIII.
i..
'eht,
itet
hit
Ihi
[-I3 is,
ul'
lit
illd
il
,'t go
'kaikb
mlI te
i
hlit
/! all tad Ill, hil.IIlxI it
'i'hllere
adlog the brili. Ti. ILIo%' that
b'autiu-s wtill sIiielic
n
oI their ,;'y
)[a' le peiuts /IItIilht tIi t.o
nll i,
It'd the! wi, i ooIIh( [g r terinrltz OurI
t! inxxes. Oh ye, I'nl, than.ful, too.
that
Iha liJ ;telgill iI get 1,x oil
leint
]u% in it. S]l!i'rp
a]l[ng the [,e'
tJ~ihU/DqT\
N
)](ld iin
the ciurx[(
t i[ll hlt there aIeeflmL- I fl<)
ll;,i yp ssibilith sill
,
imudiglv p-pli., lhly'
I!].FI~dltik
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
126
q&w~if BEACON in
a To4aRled ./.Nz1d
BY GEORGE BIDW~ELL L. (T No. 312
HE
purpose of this article is
Ill to the Erotherhiaod
to cona umonun ntal
dealing with the habits and acTki't
tions of human beings in a so-called eeonmieic society. The title of this test is
"The Mind and Society" by Vifredo
article
Pareto. It is hardly possible in
de.
even to ,ttteilnt
as short as this
quatoly to describe these writings, but
it is meant rather to put one in touch
with the above-mentioned works corn
prising four volumes of some 2300 printed
padres.
In a world beset by turmoil andi confusion it is doubtless a fact that th, bewildrrment among the Electrical Workers
is found in equal intensity amolg other
trade and social groups ihroughout the
opinionof the
world. Hiowever, in tile
writer, a study of the text will disclose
that there are certain beacons of reasoning to be found. Each of us has been
amazed and confused at the apparent
conflict betwveen so-called statesmen and
the apparen t lack of rhyme or teas.n
II the economnic, cultural and politica
objectives of our Allies, not to mentio,
the bewilderment in the enemy cmnps.
AN ELECTRICAL ANALOGY
The writer thinks it is wise at this point
d make use of Ln leetriral
...
to digress
familiar.
analogy with which we avemore
In the early days of applied electricity,
Ohm's law was found to be right, but as
late as 1910, there was .ome question as
to whether Ohm's law applied to alternating current circuits. The point lhe writer
wishes to make Liea is, that we did not
have under obsevation all the other eIements in a circuit, and therefore, we
falsely concluded at that time, that Ohm's
law was wrong. However, when the other
phenomena of the circuit were brought
nlder elose observation, it was at once
reestablishod that Ohm\' law was valid
srid correct. Mind you. Dr. Ohm never
had alternating crurent under Iirect obtion whell
.erva
servation, but his basic .
rcrri't lal atial
applied to alternating
right,
"The Mind and Society" will at once
nake clear that th .re ar. 1o Rcpuhblican
kilowatts or Democrat kilbwlts,. A kilowatt is a kilowatt in its owIl right and
neeis no interpretations by highly paid
commentators nor any ftree rIf propa
goida to give it poiwe as such.
Now let us refer again to the work
of Vilfredo Pareto. Ec onoists iof the
abstract school, commonly known as
orthodox, have made the mistake of ap
plying economic laws asdd sone early
students who tried to ptplly Ohn's law
to alternating curren t, S... e economirsts
Member finds
Pareto's work fundamental to
understanding of men's mind
and behavior
laed false conclusions simply
have r
because they have not had under observation all the components of the human
problem.
NOT BYERREAD ALONE
Mark well that one does no. live by
bread alone. nor does tihe psychotogiaI
and enotional appeal if sant statesm en
offer a good substitute for aIell-balanced
mnea. A quotation Drmonela of the ,oIu,,es of 'The
Atino
rd
Society" may
help to elucidate som ewhat here:
may say. in general,
"'One
and speaklng very
roughly that the g.verning class has a
of its own interests because
.iew
clearer
its vision is lessobscured by sentimenIts.
wherea, the subject class is less aware
of its interests because it vision is more
clouded by sentimtrs,'' hence, a bit of
self-analysis discloses that we soietmires
permit S,,n ti..its to obscure our highel
interests.
In the opino,
of the writel, Pareto
has for the first time succeedled in bringng under dierst ,bservation alI the facthe eCOlOlfl.it status of the
s
tor covering
various groups of society, showing their
inteidependence. the flux of their relationships, the degree of rigidity and the
degree of ilexibinlkt and has reduc..d the
;Ica
....
:'rl,,t ... : le
pattern to an
The writer might aod that when the human equation i. considried, the economic
problem may seem very peculiar and even
weird results are n ted. but seem wei
to our
only becaust hey ar. so nIe
.ies
concept of homan eng .. eerilig. sogion
called s.ci.olog.
In view of d.evelopme.nts in the trade
i...noe ent during the last few
U,,I.
for the firs t
exper icd
years. ...e hae
time in flhe Coiled Stat,, the thein iLar....ait.... heeen latecag lahbmor efforts in [Uioni .n. and conversely, by
uSinl the sen laws, to smother and
weaken the., ,endring them submissiv
reated then.
wer
wich
to the very po
TRADE UNIONISTS TAKE NOTE
nalysif the text clearly
a
A careful
trade unionists Ilist
indicates that w.
make use of the knowledge of such great
thinkers as Pateto, for undouhtedly, it
will serve oui pu.p..es in our halds
when weeoIn...lad it. Itowever, if ignored
hy us, it can be utilized by the so-called
statesmen, sociologists and, as well, oar-
VrtFREDO PARETO
ions corpiorate interests, not so nm'ch
agoainst is directly, but to leave uL
wholly unaware of the nature of the true
social Led economiLc forces and how to
utilize these forces in a social economic
malhine. Should this happen, it may
leave us far behind and thereby permit
then' to retain certain political anod eoonoo advantages.
It is quite interesting to note that the
works if Pareto have been used in for,ogn chancelleries and also have beeu
wvidly usedamong statesm en throughout
the .orld; yes, even in the United States.
Hence, it is not unusual to find seine
forms of government which praise tile
works of Pearto, while on the other hand,
thers cmuse theo of being a diabolical
plot. For example, if a mans predilections
'
run against fascisl, he will accuse Par eto's declarations of being the work of the
fascist.,
Conversely,
the
fascist
eOro-
,eotsly suspects them of being the superiiludern theories of Karl Marx, the father
of cltm nunisn. Howe.vr, Vilfredo IIret)'s assertions have torn away the screen
fton these machinations, We must leain
to umdlerstad this great nao's precepts
and power of vision. And so we find the
'winks of this brilliant author ..cssedi"
among the various groups
ali discussed
tions.
in their respectiv
TII THE AUTHOR SPEAK
Again let us return to our electrical
analogy of Ohm's law. Ohm's Iaw is valid
GIpB ritain,
in the United States. Great
many, and yes, is even used in Russia.
It is still valid the same as the works
of Pareto,
As it is not within the scope of this
artice introducing Pareto's themies. to
modify or condense, it is probably better
to hIt the author carry on in his own
words to sonic xteint as fo lowsq
'*It is no exaggeration to assert that
peopleIs civilization stand in direeet
I(intlinued on page 1,5,)
I
APRIL, 1944
127
ELECTRICITY'S 44n Ye
By HERIBERT TRACEY, of Britain's Trade Union Congress
TI
OFie ~lbiit
~supply oilduq I inBrit
,
itb
thlanl lt00 latrgI stale
unlt"rtLkigts, Is Co..red by only tWo
tr'al, tiolS. Onr, i. lar'e with nearly
HO,00} nolillbs.ellin'tcaeng all electrica, wI
es; ethe
th
he
much sm aler
witl itbitl 6,500 ntoo.xirin whch ,Ie
trjeal poiwer en/gineers arc organi.zed. ]J
is Whis sllaltr, Iii
lh'which has rpiodtle.ot
an ambitious sebt'!e for the ttehrihcil
,nId .... a ri'r[ir
tion
.... of the i.d.]stiy
as a I... bic er vie.
Its po...t"'i
hluif sserts that the ob
jtio
t ......
nnii
should be to attain both
eatal l<,htiieaI ellirihey and malinum
berefit for the comunity, consisten.t
with safegutrdldg Ihe interests of the
industry
emplIoy es,
The ioii.. .hiji
iot rIt only conerneid
with maxi..ln... otput of unit, for millhmun coAis in coal; it is possible, the
tll.iu.... p(iwit! Uo,
for electricity to hI
genePRiitrt cbliap]
.ad distrbutei wasInfily.
If the Iindtrys lnime i.u is to give
th
.co....tihit) the bus possibie service,
it is juIst as :einry,
the union says,
to ]ihr. the inluisiy's
organizat i
,flfet iy
[i
to design the separate
rtnhrtakimgs tm
tile
best technical
IinWS
PLANNING
PMaiJng for Ith supply side of tih
eletriety industry must r..cognize that
tilt productiob side is aheady undeyr con
Urd eo.ihLrl.
Generating
and transmission systems in
Great Britain are likely to pass
to centralized control
Theme is a (]ntial EIeetrlicty Board
set uip
del'r at of Parliament. Its main
rr,',tIin is to link up the giencat.d resuIiiop
of the ,uni
by men f ... in
rlalls inIstiol tinesm This syst,,i is known
[I
the gaidhIt hts proved a treinttlous
asset. says the enten, particularl
under
the /tying oditions of war. But the
(Ptilel Electricily Board is not a Iiti..il hoarid in he lull sense of the term.
Its eoit.. I >f the
industry's gzenera
.tig
resomens is not complete. The genra ttbig statlinns tl owned by svtreI kinds
1' ilrl}i.ta...
ir.ter.. sts-jpviat, pol"
eonlpaiIs,
nmuniciplities., joint
boards,
joint eleeiricity authirities, and iirnnport
Th, umtin states that if Orll bonai
oonttolh'd the
lt..e industry,,, only
getlI.I.lli..l hut transmission aril disti[nitltl, it t"ild have
ad, va ...tageS,
It teoln .n..Ird
then that all ge rru' jtig
stations should
h..de
Isfered to a single
authority. This authority. acting as
iovrl{ r, would
II
lnti I.eI the .ost {lieieeIt
slatIIbaIhw Ithey (cL be best Ltiliztd ...I
,h i c (04.1. bellinaited
hie
as inielhciet ot
II..
Th'is
i}l- rn
nI
proposal woutd transfer OWI/,sbijp
'
Ii.' (nceis optatillg abohut {.Il
I I
Ttitl,erVr
power StliLon, roodon, onI
ut the
ertl,
s
upply stationIs for the grIeat ci,
Ihe
'iii
('W
al
e rilis Irrdl,rIun.,L .SrI,
1,1I
ootlramission
nw..r,
,I I
ryh1/,
hills irolitcIuIr unit is part of the BIetieh
>rid' syItem.
ants. [Thee is no uniformity either ill
of supply or voltages, in tariffs
tinm melthlod
of charge, in facilities for
hire or hire purchase of apparatus. al
the like,
Contril of the industry by a nalionaI
hody, says the Ilion, woul.d provide much
more satitfactriy seric
Ito the.l .. .
a, eat
yelYlS
SERVANTS OF INDUSTRY
(GIs and ele.tricity. Mr. Churt'hill
saul, are thie soervnts
hi4
if id
.s
try. agrietluutl, atlni the cottage hunue. E.o..o.iie
atld ol-hr advan tage ; resulting fro...
iL..ml. cotifol including pooling the
resoures of city, urbar and rural areas,
(h, union belives, would provile an adotLlae suiply of electricity to ru 'm alt
at siliar
charges throughout the coatry, ihnolvingien increased rates to nxistbig colus;%mmnce s.
The u1tionl p lan contemplates that the
prloposed
National
Eceetricity
Supply
Board nhou ld not represent partieu Ia
itorelt
but be eo stituted by appoin nlet,. The appropriate niinistjei
weuld
fII(4Ithe appOinltmelents it onusultation
with
the ,leitcirity comtmisi.one...
A lluier of board nrnrbers wou
I.ld
appointed onmerit as technicai, C.Ini.ler.
ial Il niin inistrati e e
x pert in ti,
mind
ustry (Oth
aembers
er
wo
Ii br
pmobied .. iln, ¥I
atpr..se..l..tnivi> of
brnid interl s vitally co/lere-il ,ith the
indsttry. intAurrig the employees.
The
uillon
{If).o[tpSt' thiat the existirl,
unwliti sbould be bought out, on tihe basis
of the fair vaUt ' of their UIeIttakil<
capital cost lens depreciation. It
proloses that the board hould .oul.d
e
divla,
'
(llirnlti)[ill.ii the industry and hrov eoil
Iteol over matters beat operated orn a
la tirmaJ]
basis. including
res earch.
ex inri
in"it and
ra inring of entrants to the
i riu stly.
(ContinUed on page liOn)
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
128
0 THE Christian the goals of post
war planning can be stated simply.
TThey are two. They are Christ and
bread, But I do not wish to hide behind
such an over-simplified statenieat of objectives. I propose to break it down. see
what is in it, and hold it up before you,
Moreover, it will be necessary to reessential part of the
member that an
machinery to achieve these objectives is
itself included in the objectives. Please
do not think that I am getting tangled
up in my logic. What I an actually
saying is that an important part of the
means is actually the end. I shall explain
as
we go along.
To the Christian the first objective
in postwar planning is the acceptance
of Christ as the King of the world.
Around this notion the Christian ar
ranges his thoughts and on it and on it
alone rests his hopes for world order.
What is this notion? It is that men
accept and be guided by the concept of
society that God is the Father of all
men, and that all men are brothers
through His Son, Jesus Christ. Standing on this solid position, the Christian
finds real substance to the expression,
dignity of man. To him it m.ean.s something, and that something is nothing less
than this, that human beings in every
part of the world, have the same stature
in the sight of God that he has, are as
dear to Christ and are as capable of
eternal life as he is, because they are
with him brothers and sisters of the
Elder Brother Jesus Christ.
BROTHERHOOD
OF
MAN
From this doctrine the Christian expects. each to treat every other not
merely as someone to he reckoned with
because he is stronger or perhaps to be
plundered because he is weaker. but as
brother through the Sonship of
his own
Jesus Christ. To establish this goal is
the first task in the Christian's thinking. Surely he is not waiting for it to
be established in full outline before he
will do anything else, but reasonably
he puts it in his thinking as the first
goal to be striven toward with all zeal
and energy. I may add perhaps that
there will not be much debate about the
need of this first goal, particularly with
those who insist that it alone should be
pursued and nothing else lone. I do not
belong to that school of thought and
therefore will move into the second objective, and advocate certain means to
both the first and
be employed to attain
the second.
The second objective I call bread. Of
course I am using the term as a symbol.
By bread I mean all the things that are
necessary for man's physical life and
comfort. My thesis is that they should
be produced in sufficient quantity and
be so distributed that no one need go
without. In other words, the grand total
should be enough to go around, and it
should be justly parcelled out.
But someone will say: That is socialism. Now, frankly, I am not much concerned about names. It is what is be,eath them that matters. Besides, it
Cha" c V ant P anninf Gon
Bat~
q
Mized
a
By the Most Reverend FRANCIS J. HAAS, Bishop of Grand Rapids
Vision of
just and stable world promulgated by eminent cleric
may oume as a distinct surprise to many
to know that Pope Pius XI in 1931 declared that an ecoenomy fulfills its true
purpose only when it supplies all the
people with All the goods which natural
resources and technical skills can furnish. There is no other limit to be set
on production of goods and services.
The whole passage from the Encyclical
Forty Years After is:
"For then only will the social economy be rightly established and attain
its purposes when all and each are
supplied with all the goods that the
resources of nature, techand
wealth
nical achievement, and the social orlife can fureconomic
ganization of
nish." (Forty I'eas After, paragraph
75.)
In a word, the Holy Father says:
use all the material and human resources
you have, and stop using then, only when
the people say they do not need any
more goods or sel-dces. Now we in the
United States cane closer to that goal
in 1943 than we ever did before in
history. The volume of goods turned out
than in
was nearly three-fou.-ths.mo.e
the previous peak year of 1929. It is
common knowledge that unemlployment
is now almost entirely wiped out, and
that we have attained a virtually full
employment economy.
CAN'T IT fiE DONE AGAIN?
This of course was done and is being
done under the stimulus of patriotism
and comm..ion defense. Many are asking,
however, if it tan be done during war
why can it not be done in peace? It will
take planning, and the giving up of some
of our former procedures and even pet
theories, but the very necessity of things
will compel As to do it.
Let no one say that the need of full
production and the need of full employment have.nothing to do with the rIobI venr
lems of postwa reconstruction.
ture to say that they have almost everything to do with it,
What are these prohbems? I pass over
sone of the 1echnical1 ones, such als
taxation. war debts. plant conversin.,
and liquidatio. of war contracts, not
because they are unimportant or in any
sense to be minimized. Nevertheless.
they are secondawy to those problaems
directly affecting the great mass of the
people, who, unless they are dealt with
as people--and I say it with the greatest hsitatian and almost terror-will
see to it that it will not make much
difference whether or not the others are
solved, Conversely, if people are dealt
with humanly, justly, and Christly. there
is every reasonable hope that they themsolves will help to work out the instruments to help themselves. After all,
this is the creed of democracy. No less
important, it is basic in the creed of
Christianity that every human being
has a rational soul, endowed by his
Creator to make intelligent free choice,
and placed under divine command to do
for others as he would have them do unto
himn
With this said, I turn to a consideration of the enm.nous task ahead, now
and at the end of hostilities, involving
of millions of human
the lives of
beings. I shall use the word right in the
Christian sense and refer only to that
class of rights which a person has to
certain things because he is a child of
God. Before all else, the retuning sodier as well as every able-bodied civilian has the right, that must be guratlteed, to have a job in a useful occupalian
throughout his productive life. H, has
the right ia city or on farll, to corn
pensati. n sufficient to secure hin and
his family adequate food, clothing. sheland in addition to
ter, and medical c are,
anl increasing share of the goods and
comforts of rn'ogress directly in protion as they increase in volume. Moleover, he has the right to security against
sickness, accidents,
the vicissitudes of
unemployment and old ago. Still more,
he has the right to work and live As a
free man under a system that xlill Ier
mit him a voice in determining the conditions under which he works from day
to day. less than these things a mlan's
stature
as a Christian will not let him
accept, If through force he does accept
less, the very image of Christ in his
soul is disfigured and outraged. On the
other hand, if no man and his dpenideats are to be denied the full minimum,
can there be any question ihat Ihere
must be full and abundant production
of goods?
THE MEANS
Now let us consier the means that
are proposed to get this r-sult. coughly.
they fall into two categories, that of
private initiative and that of a demunratically organized society. By "private initiative" I do not mean the legitinate
stirrings in every man's bosom to get
1
APRIL, 19944
ahIad, but rther the modern
systeml
of capitalisni caltld
"fre etvlire..
L!t nId -y
here that p
ivate
intitive il
the flrst meanlng is something
hwholLvgood when the
ndi
vidual prlpetv
its
i an
the
int
iva'lt
iiiattve inl th?
s.enndnIluanhrig
If ...
roden
'apitalisr, while i hbas much
to coI.Intrn.d it, Is I, Hecd of
drastic overmdhaklf I dwecll ni
pbivtehinitial]e lml Ibis
oint.
bitits.. . we hall heat, lnmuchof +
ii Itrem now until the pre sirlcml
im elections inl Noven. er.
{ealistieaily, bhwever, "free
enterprise'' without a consider
Mill! I....lO~ t OIr he,
ern]ijltdt aitd
Iopkls'
['Peal
....
e
f the wavering balance
shake
It's rarely right adjusted."
This is wierly thie polo's vorsion
.. f the oWl scholastic adage,
"No, oe is a fit judge in his
"i
A,\:erdingly,
repudiate
alone and
uassistid, as tb, foiniula for
,eeonstructing
th'
postwar
worid By doing so, however, I
Itll, tot eompelled to accedethe
guild system of wes n EUr'o.Pe
ii its entirety, espeei lly in its
development after the 14th
In,
' 1 d ac,'ept certain
ftt ites Of the guild system
and should like tn lay then hbfol. yonu.
v
H1OW TO AVOD) THE EVILS?
fie then goes on to say: IWe I...
the evils of ]hea, pi-~odtucton. lIow tir,
we to avoid cointribtirg to thenl? Bil
ing dear is tiely,
but etin
..ay
ays
In unsatisfactory
ay nut of the di culty and i is
nti much, if at all. a
0101 e
oa1l
[)tr(et~line than bhying
.ow art we to kinow what is the
right price at wiebh to buy, so as nIu
to support oppleSSion rid feed on
t
inls
ciy? We don't kno,. and we don't kumow
hliven
.
I to do to is not a generally rel
.,gnized end. The moral view of so or,
I
'j"rltite initiative'
ourga-
izatlonIs cannruIot lnovile far full
pi'{..iction If <.... IilTt
n
strv
[n
ices, after the ,,rI ....
forl that
liatier at any io' in the rI tnr,. For the iu.ifiljcdiae)tres
eIt f its enough to say that in
1943 theUnitld Stajes Govern.
mert had $13 billion investe in
modern
indtlstrlal panlts.
But the q ues oti of individ
,aI enterptr.iis
ise something
bigge.
ev. than
¢ostwar planrung, and I should lil to spend
siciie more lide oli it. Back ili
18~8 E. P. DBttnn Co. published
a book ealhd C'risian E,-.omits.. . by Rv. Wilfrid RichIIoid. warden of Tel'ihty Culege, GI.nal.honld, Scotsl..d, coenaintg fo
the most part If s.i..i.ons. The firxt sei
I.on., whi,
bull
aspreached in St. Mtiry's
Catlbthllal. Edlinutgh, is called
science and Political cmoriomy' imeethe
preacber pulls hitist-<Iif tip to the prctddcrm,
looks squarely at it, and wil l,
tiintnuh of
legtet barks away fro, it. Let me giv,
you a brief .n.n..a.-y. lie piectures hin.dmlf
going cut to buy some furniture, lie
,alYS: " With a l
olr..mInable desire ti tak,
the mnost of my Vt'Imu es, I uakt fr.,
the! cheapest sh1s. [hit if I II, so, whaIt
has consIen.er
h.
, say? Suppos
I
buying furnilure. I lo not know what
hapipen s in Eldiibugh but I know a part
Of lndomn wher-,e .n. live who areh
,in'
ployed by one of tile great ealetrs in
fnrnltu,
where inder pressure.
ten
ml, iumployeld eo work 24 hou.rsfii
eind;
rind I su]ppose (viiy.iI
knowvs that .V,,work and un.d.. ay arl regllarn
,idteal
in hlheproducti o lf
c'I tap wares.' - I1i
chap.
the individual conscience 'does
mint speak." Actually, this attimfiitv cannot establish justice.
Nothing is truer than Robert
TIlE
REVEREND FRANCIS S. IIAAS
F1~k-h(/I'Ifo
GIIll(] Illids
Milli ~lll
dmiay Ia tIl.s.c.i. ri 'oC"
Itt exist. If
I want t. biy It pa'ticulr article
truminod ity, it is ,ilt difficult for' e Io,ascrLtain wht re to buy it cheatlet. m best.
or deare st; buI it is more th
i ill, Ilt
it
for
...eI
tl find out 'hilce
[ ,an buy it
arid pay the
right price for i." in, 28!
Ihe
rlight pice" for it! I'htit is the
question, Tilli ti-t, I'reaChet. falls into ia
dialogue klitI a
magilarly ... nt frint
the utiddlt afges. 'File preacher
ieo
introducec
lilt man hy saying thalt the
nmn had lived Tuldr the guild sy t'ni.
"Local.
luils,'" sid the plreaci, "sIa.Ined
at seu.linig good work andi skilled labou.
anid iIIr
eI'l;,
I laws (f allpIriiti'shi p .
Wages 'ete fixe by ath.-itatve custoni
. .'Iii
.'}ain s.
m we(le I1 l1n itleof definite
euklation,
and anl diisig of
bieni
mmld ril
ihIe!price of Ine loaf arnd
the piroioli'li
in which its sime might
vary with a good or bad harvest.' (p. 2)
Welltl this is thO ,an with
hibt the
pr acher di srusss the "r'ight p rice."
The medie,,v,
inin sav
I W:'l¥hadltl
*
authority to fix that. lie ,,lay uit ilmdays
have fixed it righl"y; but there he was."
The
in..her redplid: "ll,
we have
an au.h.i dq <rcie..e.
bielilve as we
U better authorlity in these thingrs than
external
a...
thuolity; but ou r solhorit
does not speak.- (I). 29)
Thre,. I st.bmit, is the mtqt If the
wiholt debate,. tivate initidl Id vIrlus
aln otgantriuI
s cielty. Under tim. Ilster
I.i.nu.lvldy tal}d "pirivatte hiitaLttiv,." de
('sions
"t' t.
lIe left to the in.livbiual
alone. The expeetuliI.. is that h, will act
lightly, hut the fact is flhe authity of
~.
'The system that I advocate
bt.th for .a.hI niati.n. and for all
natwos
,;'killgtogether fol
IrlhId reconstruction, is the
systent of I..l. stries aid profilssions set frlth in the Encyica'l of Pope Pius XI Forty
Yleas At/t,, in 19131. Ulnder
this
system all employers,
xlokers. professiotnl persons
al--would lie organized.
They
,uhl
ect represe
ntatives
..
from
their respective industry
r pro.fessio,
to deta for them, and these representatives with government representatives
assisting adi guiding them but not dietatirig to then, would in actual practice
operate the irid ustry or profession. Thus
the direct ion of the system would be
triprtit,. The representatiyes would be
from the lhree groups,- managem/nt,
-
MOST
SYSTEM
worketrs, a rid gi verln he Ft,
EachIitml ust y. for example, all the evmsonnm,
ii. pldoyers and employee.s alike,
in the i tfih indust. y would through their
frely elected representatives antd with
the guidane, but not diectaition of gjoeImment, dltemtmae 'ages, hours. and prices
ill tile
texitie
industry a.nd work together
for its co, lon good. The sae
would be
doIIe in steel, transportation, agriculture,
and all the lest. Finally, all the industries
and i..Ifesshs would be linked together
oI1 a tripartit- basis il a
national body.
This natil.nal body
,oubdhe made up of
repree,nltlyies
oIf manlaglent with
workers IIm the industries and professitOs. u-it h the g..ver..nuent sitting with
them Is guide anld friend to maintain,
so far ias it can be done, the proper halanice ill pic'.. arid Wag.among
s
the Iarious industries and pr resasons.
This tl'ipmt ite ysrein is more than
theely mi te IUnited Stab->. Actua ly it
is beinrg inlpi oyed wib .h.i.re than average grit eess in several indUstries, for
il
amt ple in tihe industries coning before
the wtlg. eoi..n.ittees m.derer the Fair Labor SIandrl..
Act of 1938, in the railroad
industry tiner the Railway Ifaber Act of
{Continued on poge I541
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
130
LABOR RELATIONS School
Gets backing
from I. B. E. W. local union.
Long step in advance
Famed Tower of C(oillt Unliverily
at ItMaca, N. Y.
ORNELL Universily, one of tih g Iat
institutions of learning in the United
C States, has established a School
of Industrial and Labor Relations. The
school will be spm.sr.ed by the S arte
of New York by act of the ,gislature. A
temporary board of trusteo5 will soon ble
named to wake a full report on the ,ulriculum and other relative nmatteis. Thl
school will be in operation in 1945.
The temporary board of trustees wilI
A.
have repreentatives of CIO alln
F. of L.. while capital will have the head
of the State Chamber of Commerce and
the executive vice president of the As
sociated Industries of New York State.
inc. The State of Now York will ht rPresented by the president of Cornell, the
chairana
and counsel of the Ives Committee and the com missionerof educatiLn of
the State of New York.
WHY OF THE SCHOOL
Chairman Ives has issued a statement
describing the origit of the idea and the
motive behind it:
"Unlike any other educational instilu
tiao
heretofore
existing anywhert in he
United States, this school will he open LI
representatives of both labor and mmawement or to anyone eise who mlay wish to
enter. All will attend the cane elasses
under the same instructors, all will bE
faced with common problems and mutual
experiences. This very association in itself
should go far toward increasing moutud
unde.rstasnding and respect.
"This school should help greatly in developing better labor leadership and more
responsible labor unions. It should help
no less in inmproving management personnet who deal with employees."
A tentative draft of the neasure establishing the school sets forth the objectives
in the following language:
"It is neLessary that understanding of
industrial and labor relations be advanced,
that more effective cooperation among
genemployers and employees .ore
and
oral recgniti ion of their mutual rights,
obligations and duties inder the laws
pertaining to industrial and labor relations be achieved; that meanis for en-.
eo.r.aging the growth of mutual respect
and greater responsibility onathe part of
both employers and employees be developed, and that fidustrial efficiency
through the analysis oI problems relating
to emtplayinngt be inltwed."
LETTIC[lS OF COMMENT
Williamn Sorenson, business m.natger
of Loal Uni . 215. Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
wide awvake to the deep significance or
the C ornell project, wrte a httr tg
eongratulating
the
Cornell Uliversity
school In titi, fi'oard step:
FrbteLry I,
Cgr,,ell t{lleeg.
Ithaca, N, Y.
Aaenlding
to aI
ews
19I1.
broadcas. ,
morning, on Station
heard this
University of
WABC, the great
Cornell is the first college in the
United States to include in its sebh
lastic schedule, for the year 194:ta
course itf labor and industrial relations.
As a representative of organized
labor, may I be antong the first to
coigratulate you on the progressiw,
step you have undertaken. Organi.od labor has long felt the need of
a better
2ndersta diEng betxtveen
labor an] industry. Your pi oneeri hg
in this partieular subject I am sure
will meet with the whole-hearted
suIpprt and cooperation of all organized labor,
My ongrratulations to the great
University of Cornell.
Sinere-ely.
WITLLiAM SaRtENSON
flhtsimess dfana#c"r
. n
Here is the lettel Mr. Sorens.
eeived in reply;
Febru,,r' 21 1944.
Dear Mr, S.r.nson:
Your letter of the 14th is warmly
appreciated. It is particularly pleassat coming as it does frob a representive of organized labor.
We ale, of course, deeply gratified
at the state's recent action in the
proposal fur the establishment of a
School of Industrial and Labor Rielatoris sit Cornell. It offers, to be sure.
a great challenge but I ant convinced
that the challenge can be effectively
met here. The piojeet will certainly
call uIp....t ll the resourcts
e we ar
ats yours
bring to bear, and suceh .ates
of congratulation and encouragenen
t
are nost heartening.
Sincerely yours,
E. DAy.
(Signed)
EDwARD
Since the lime that these letters were
written tih press of the city of Potigh
keepsie, the Trades and Labor Council
and all alflinted bodies have enthusiastically supported the propos(d course.
As a result Mr. Sorenson has been allpointed to the post of chaiman of th,
labor
,eromttete of the Peughkcepsi,
Postwar Eivic League.
The New Leader,
,abor-liberal
weekly
of New Yo.k, makes this comment on the
proposed school:
'The dynamic Mr. Ivts las ibltrmoded
lute the legistlatue a bill providing for a
coillge of indt,,rial and labor reiat ions
at Cornell. Actualestablishment is to he
past ponled till after the war. Blt the meastre provided for the iimmediate appoint
meat of a board of trustees An appropriation of $10.000 is to provide for
preliminary planning. And listen to this
The hoard is to be made up of two labor
men, two i.dust.ria st and too men re)labor men are tL
resenting the state,. The
he the ogfehil leaders in this commonwealth of the A. F. of L. and CIO. It
is understood that the trade union men
s
,al
have already approved the scheme
agreed to serve.
"Whether this plan goes throug'h or lnt.
it has synbilei importance. The ideas ,nare being
d(lEyin, our labor legislitio
carried over into institutional organizatiao. InlustriM 'lasses are to be represented rather than geographical sections
This is something."
Easter morn conies with a hush and a
prayer.
Beside the soft candle light
Stand tall lilies of satin white;
Emitting the perfume of theni golhdn
hearts.....
aising as fl(ense to God.
Who waits to be worshiped, everywhere.
-FnANCES
MARVEL GNASS.
APRIL, 1944
PLANS
g
131
fr
ributes 1.229.000 kitowatts of this
amount.
iNhle other ¢ompanies supply
power to the system. They are:
I. The City of Seatthl.
2. The Tacoma City Light I pa)oti.el.t.
/
a.rI'll &Isnall niurieipallil .h.its.
4. Puget
Sound Power arid ligah, Corn
and
I/a
P1watt at BONNEVILLE
NE of the geat power areas 'I
tile
Uited States lis in the Northwest
ith
stales of WasIing
ton. Oregon, Mont.a l. Utah and. Iul[hoI
wherte alnilsi IMeall c.onIit.ons
.e..it[hi?
generation
of el-ctlieitly by water pwt. r.
Swift streanms tumbling f.wn froi motllu
tiItI heights give th, troper prtpij),t1b11ii1
A ilar- cata t rophe. however, re
d tthi
art
in the yea) 1942 in the guise of I
hilikig
Mt..inor s l ca.I in bh is area
run.. i.. fro.. m 14 h ,t per enlIt b(o:qIw the
niliruinun
wiate. yen- that has i, en I,,nldedin
thehlst B? y5a7s- He\.. vc.r, tihe
gre~at toltimbih IR !,et Ltit ih( dloimmi atts li!'
iowa. fed hy ilactoIi ,> in ( tiadll,a
as r1 11liulg 14 per ceint lhove the
iiii...iu]n
Cf thie sai
57 year plrioM Gptd.oG
iiqititi- ld by waitl I 0ni the linil S e!
I
the (olani tiIRiver il Ied jd piwti thai
was fed iif tithie
parts of The ut-Iloi
where streia
Itire too low to keep
I CI ini¥ fiihl] ItlI t IhIe)- TiNt
,,
tIX
pply wa* itficn :tT \ near eatia, i
,I
avoIded.
All of this was pr't of the phIblinhit,
Of the [last 25 yitila'
IofthisI Iare a.. aI>
coliling to II.
Thu...t Ravei . aib.i.ih t r:obof of th, Bonl.. ville probjet
mItdpropIel tie,
,ch phlaniniig is zaill;, fu't-%vg d t
"e'id war cI lillt ihTrL aintl to e an t if',ili
problemtt
Ih Rar, believes that plan
ing for a g at rei.O.. like Ihe Ni.i.li
w.t
list
m
,est
}a, 25-year basi
pail) +
5
Great Northwest
development builds broadly
for needs of all the t)eople in
great area
ailvisorI
taffV
hIadi
i e (I .imp.elLd oIt i.pr't,"
esfron
Ihe
t, nI Dl)epartk
I ein,
telnor Deplartnmet. Federal Power
{
In_
N ,ithwestern Electric Company.
Perthand
'.
GenEral EMcail (ci.papy
7 \.;shiitgtonj il(>ltrna
Poweri Coin
$. U
ItaPower and Liht (..n..pany.
9. Soynar
smallr plants like Elglne
arld !e(ittalila.
On, of the i...nuEdiatl aimls If the co(rldlinakiflg aglpiiels is to create 8,000.000
'eel of addiiitiol storage spIace
whlch it. is hollered neCEssay to have iI
i iiltail
irt¢ro
the
O'V, r I X, ' va r ne e ds
on-
11/id th[e Agicultllre i)t-p~l'[ttlellt.
IhII,
hil -ole I~ h
st udies atijltn,, tl
cliliates t
i tt-i
... ,,?h
r liteu
lds.
Iiileclsl. y
[IlllShthl
C(OO(P1I.;R
Thi,
filelet
it
lp1'h,.rlht,
,, t
toot'dill tttii is re
ill i'e I..]lllj. tflo i Of
;l,OW l gtid
he
P vitir
lI' s
ŽKi th, vpsI.
poo~l
f;fill/d:bottt
;1
q a[d g-i
-}leli]
iij-[e)i s
to wels
i
ThE
lv
[i:
I 2 I Il... .......
i t I...ith.
Ie
I>~d jIi
a
Thlttt
ol
t
tyin art
i
y~t
II/.
t i[ ai L. Iriq
ttils to~
. .supi
ti
i
]
lC l
.y alldsp
ui.
-.trelgthetl inatetlall 3
the ha, it- loltnuir
of' e-,iv,.
It has
ea-atetf a I o.<<f electric etiltg fed b`
pub[Jc1 situl1[tXiliey owni'll
l lalnts. This
ttot thwtisttiiir- ezIion ctn qi SysoInu i eapae of -ippjilsirIn
appltltxii..lLtEly -2.5({It l00
kioat ,f [h'mI ......
l1. l~~i~
Ol
TIl E PtIBILIC
l.....
t/' lt
bo111i ...
I:(T.
e h5 i he \\ ar
Ih&];hgrid sy >Ielti iS
P~ot~e~iol
t}.
a
hleill
h niiaviiM phith
i
)i) vl
lpe
\X ITII
L tflniti<,l etig
t
s It '
keep
s:}]
ilh,
ral Ie th .... l/i
live
Fa te nII f 1 p i '
uhllLSllg.J
ti'
Rs) l(if
the IIti I tlctm
l Iklix tr Ichris e i t eI Iae r
ill Fhath tad Lilt,
i.itrts I ski i
f i'l.
'Ihe.
POWERt ['(I{IL
ION
I .....
)~
ah~lalJl imn
"h/:lldp
°O
I lly u :n5y pn w;,hvmb
ill
xhi uhlt
I-' l i e l v e s -hid nI-, gi.. Pr n h*, g -i 1.
heln hpihe I hol'it, s~t
oori h:"'a
]} vei ° ItT
larirad fitu . [ of
lw er il li it
Noa'th-
) ts}< prieii
le is that
,> I 'taip l l hIil
I.... ...
that inll t.e.niplt
..
II C.nt..l and regulate
wtaer for the betefit
of the Ipeple of a
rnlend
the
>piop-<f evexy area in that
reftbin. IhiuhI havr Intel benII it as the rI
aculies o? that paltilctar area indicate
C'.I1/DIIdl~ mligs, 155,
1i
hli t
Vt
voyThe shoulnd
PL'ANNING AGiNCIES
To
agencies
havebeen Il
ip tI
ftlnetiI.I as plaii... i1l g oJps in the tie tyile area. (The wlts
i,rgahtizeJtidy.
1943, as the Nortlhwlst 1).c.. Iq.ti..iit
Adhninistratio, . 'ITiga tsstii jati n, il/lgh
s
he( gIOVe-n'lM e' lhhth , M olltl... . O rIgli, W\ashirgt.onI
(d WyV'miug,
nd
technical (i),1 illee i alde ip of It...
e,,tiyives
L1o11 tll , water elg le'li lig
i111 gElijal plhanning
l
iurctions of th
vIriou.s states. Th, purposes
olf his :l
sociatiun are [(o further the hah....Il de
velopinent )if the Pacifilc Northwet and
(ohIl.bia Btasil) undIer integittlecd I/lh,
:IrId interstale (onmIjat c li])erttig :llively
with
F I*ti er aE
detvt hInIII'l
a gel i CI s.
The PacilNe Nolth*test is Inakitmc a
rlelat co.tt.ihuiot tO WIr proitctiti
tie
EalisP of plaI
aItte years ago to develo)
tower resoure(:s of the leg"oti
accotrdinln
l Ilr. Itay!l. DI. loayr believes IIW is
elilt et, ti pt] for postwar e..,thiltlalio~l
if production +... e will win the Itthy
p oldluition if tt-aIllh. P.wer iI ... . f the
r[,'test tools
In
for
orlurtior Wi have today. Surplte power -reated hy the Sts
piasIton If war piroclution wi] hE itlilzrd
by gi>"tng eivili
demands."
.
dhIi
Dr. Raver.
TlhE secondI agety rowv fllt'tiol/i/g
is the Bonnevilhl Advisory Bo
Tl.
I'hb-
TIt
t,I , I
1I-
ot,
ll
t ,wl LIi
I ]IIh
I n h a. Riv r mIorI arIId ,p III,
I I tlr at Bonn ,,LIe,
tIer I hIi
I It-I aclt
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
132
& sdde
~te
View LT
.0kcAic UTILITY Yo'adoa
tomers, 51 per cent and to all other takers
(heti, it
railroads, trauways, street
ad hirgh way systems. etc.) S per
p
ent.
Euitloyment is one of thi few iitin
, hlch
have w a pronounced
en
,clino, despite the eneral over all expaIsi, ci
toterit
lt of the power intd.us try.
DE(LINE IN EMPLOYMENT
The total Ilumber of employ..es in th
electric utility industry
..
hi its peak
Il
past half-decade has witni sseI 84gVast changes viewed
(298,000) I 1910. Five years ago it was
niicant changes in ti, gt....
ronand in 1942 (the latest fIr which
in decade. Improved relations. 270,0410
tours of the elctric utility industy.
we have esimates) it was 245,000. lqms
It has been a period of ... p.eecIted
while output has risen 86 per cent sintee
Technological changes
grow th ai d deve c'pmntt. ,,i.d pI..e.i
l'
138 and 145 per cent since 19:10, emgradual straightening out of t..ngchd nt
Idoy .e.t. (if the figure for 1942 is still
kilowatt-hours
in
I
98S
t
2176
last
year,
works of owership aid c...s.- bleads
10eresetntatiye) wvould have fiopped 10
a rise of 86 per tnt.
of i Ine locking interests.
per cet andi 22 per cent, respectlvtly.
Ite.e is the i.pressive picture of power
It has been a period of IIhrifiaeti, I
A recent study by the U. S. l a)eIa
.tme.I
growth as showl frot-.. reports of the
of the relatimships between utilitv ct
of Labor on wirkers' productivity in the
Federal Powcr .onl.niss.on.
generation
of electricity shows that outpotations and the federal, state ..t.d] II:,l
regulatory bodies which supervise IheI.
Total Production of
Electric
Energy
put r ose
from 2.7 mi lion kilowatt-hours
It has auso been a peiid of hcalthil'
per emphoyee in 1938 to 3.3 million in
for Public Use
i proved relationships between, first, th?
1942, or 22 per ent. IndoubtedlyIv it is
Ico r
Thilm in of KMVI'
cornllpanes, and thcir emph byees slid, see - 192P
higher now, with today's peak power
-95.
end, the utility industry and the [mui,.
loads and the, call of many youn.g men
1930)
88.
1932
824
A $15 billion investmint, the kcirc
fronm the industry to the colors.
MI9
I16.7
power and light industry of the United
In the face of the 86 per centt increI939
130.3
States augmented the
cpacity
,ated
of
,,ntA i power ploduction, utility rev1940
1450I
its generators by 27 per cent in this i
(lte f'oni sales of energy to tutimate
1941
1t15.1
te ryal-from 39 bil on kilow;tts at th
eonisunecrs elihnbbed but 46 per ceint front
1942
IP0.4
close of 1938 to 49.3 billion in 1943. The
$2.1 billions in 1938 to $8.0 billions In
ti$3
217.
iurnber of customers
..
rose
per cant
1946).
A natural tesit of wartime demand.
dIurig this time.
That revenues have failed to keep pare
the major i..rea.se i, hiad went to large
piroportionaely with in.e.eased kilowattindustrial power users. On the hasis of eshours sales is to be expected. It refliets,
OUTPUT SOARS
timates of demand for 1943, published by
in the first place, the nature of the inthe Eltiflexi llurtd ([anuary 22, 1944),
But output was the gra dduddy of the
dustry. which enable it to produce
sales
to
large
power
users
jumped
146
whole string of phenomel.In. l hic
u ennel..
larger bloekr of current at piogre.sively
per
cent
in
the
five
years.
inl the span of the past five yea.s. Killlower costs po unit. Electric rate schedSales to small light andl power users,
watt-hour production soared high above
ules ulniversally provide lower' rates for
the 200 billion mark fo the first time in primarily cei..e..la I establishments, rose
large power users; and Site the major
1943. Output swung from 116.7 hilion
52 per cent, to ,eide tiM and rural eus- portion of the new sales in the past five
years has gone to industrial war plants,
tht inl.en..ut has neessarily brought ill
sninller returns, per kilowatt hour, as load
developed.
T
FACTORS IN RATE REDUCTIONS
Ths
weldler us$
silver solder to face rotor blades.
elecrircal 'vo-kcr
Ther
jol,
i,
'know-how"
knah
in uilitiy
Set it, the second place over the past
15 years there has been a genuine trend
toward lower retail rates for utility services. For the last half-decade the industry
has been particularly subject to i..cr.s-.
pressures
.l.
from numerous external
forces tending to induce rate reductions.
Pironinent among these factors are:
I) Control of utEity enterprises engaged in interstate commerce by the Federal Power Commission, which hIs amnig
other important regulations sought to
halj)se a uniform systema of a.c.'ou.n.thg
upon, approximately 90 per cent of the
nation's electric utility industry.
(2) Closer supervision of companies
carrying oi wholly intra-stat o,.eratios
by state and
local
regulatory boies.
(3) Supervision of the financial transactions of utility holdming corporations
by the Securities and Exchange Commission,
which has led to the elimination
of mnny superfluous
.oncerns,
controlling
pyraided fur yars above operating
Ilevels.
(4) C.onmpetitive comparison of private
utility rates to customers with the soContinued on page 15I)
APRIL, 1944
"I reid the
.ll
133
jo, .tier
ezpe.IIe rc" d trodes-
E.g y V\'typ ,,d itn the United States
took notic rad soIn a steady floiw of ri a1
Iodsrnd
patriots hurri.d to S, i Fracieo T..
O4x.
a/ These
' iftnft m"er paced the s.r..
oh,
n..
.cos
fhr tr... ot ........
iotsbly aifl
J'aeif. 7 by i ,skcr for lttl, a,d
equipped with
ltliO tools tian lotthes
is:2] and ,ritten: about
UCH has, hct,
nalysis
Amer.
ppit.wian iaits
oly a i shn ' o praise .,I honoiH
hs beetn delefgated t to mhe Tll ITn ov{i!of war, the uniforll Iif
aili In the titt
stands out enminently,
}lr jiiliary ,ler
te aehievemnpitts of our heroes atle ILlx
,iuy read, miedials are proudly disphtyed,
assemblk, s pay public. homage ti ip,,s
gallanLt lietl.
When the phiase, 'argehal of demoelacy' WaS coined, Americans generally,
accepted ith, iOtu.u...e.eI...t asynIbol of
Oulr talelt, resOullces, an/d production.
M3aterialIs .f war began to find theh ~a
.t..l.s the Atlantic to a stijeken people
and soon g.lrious stories of historic ant
curlliL[geOilt
Di~IVtiy}
crowde.
1
our
hld
.
con liras. The 4-tcss aRId importance
od....Uctio).. is partially lost
strutieth../ . .ld I
in the hemroic stries emaciating fl... t the
by land,
cod AtIlntic Transpartatio.
s"a andi ar soars to a nw high, El,.i..itS Of da,cig.
ourage and persev.rIlice cal.I the American publie to reovli/,h
i... I
MEN w OVERALLS Powi
Y"/. PaRiD 4SEet
Biv .I. EI)WARI) SHARKEY, Lieutenant Commander, U. S. N. R.
"Masterpiece of
Workmnanship" after Pearl
Harbor
treacherouIs
Jei.
n'ady
anioxlus
alnd
to
show hat thhiryears of experince h,,d a
H r
W thie Jap
pi ace in I s wai
r'ha len ge
aci'ep]ted.
LeloiPi a nd
loved
aiLrs
iland ahead. an
behild, alt ,nkn.....
rertitil joh,. pnsble death hurking ir
e
and trio a s(tthe Pacific w IC..alities
Pearl iatbor by the Jap, was
end visil to
m a iiljt.
rain
-,m
rlv rIot In ini oss
th, cal] to Ipr..se.ve our country is
ammswerr-:d. as soiidly and as d{iete ,
Gettysbuig.
or
as the men at Lexington
as willing and unselfish as any patriot
whom o... ... u..trv ho.o.s.
HIIIT AGA.INST
--
nip. tflI lt Ine' S.
RUShI To IiEFENSEi
7, 1hi41, atgain calls adlitimiiai
Deelndbr
into.
.uifiormI. All the plans and
mrt
itparIl it hi..s of yeasl fi .llty t('rIuin alt
ill a rush ti the tiefelse of the West C last.
I ulndiIretis if ih it..n. d8 of .illitir y Imlle
fDloVe WeS, sIo,..thly quickly and
fitcintI3, aHal I'eeci'g .. pt.. aranged
rhiltils of r:rihoId. air liies, andth'ie i..iiifa, ieli.ud i,
oIt
thi I',ih to
it'y.tN
the \Wst,
¼'oI mhe 1echangic has alto
bei,,
ielIed po tihe froit.
After Silretatr
of the Navy Frankl
I~m~x ul~clt ci the PI'atl [arbor ratasrphe, and en.. inee
had a quick glnce
til t i
i*Iics: b ~attLeed o.. r the ;vitre.
im'dcts '*xee issued to restore the fleet.
more historical
a
tf there ever his heeri
¢hallenge to AnI ricln]labor, this generat
lion has yet to see it. More
signifiean
ab:, was
is the ftle!l
.h..htD Ameillcan
dielegatld the h(1.on.r of I1einlig Iut the Jlap
alee thPit th r yenis Of plancininhg, .hir
deiglla Oi d(!s ructhi /i their rlrealiiS Ill
e.q.. est.
hl d,
!iVl!
e tahken into eOlisiilvtajitin rtiolhlvir s-pee-ies of A nte-ian, the
I tistol may -ecord nlany ,itstanidi
of herolsp, ias thet
battles :.n. I 'liS
iug I.ints el Woldl War I. hut I, t histoilltis Iot
,ell short the,
tattp
i
iuerl
at Pear] II;,hf wirku..i;hip pm
ho> I n-hid the eil for Inn . cxipmiencd
tratlesnitiE. h.vtry Nn,, yard in the Unlited
,OO. ia te;tdv
Stat.s ti-k
ittie and
hulried to Sa... F.anibjts
flw of itil
patlt
-isco. '{'hotSi.d. of these
.minute
.m....
wlaitil/w for
pact-ti the Sillv'es allxlous'v
...
ross the Pacific. Th1ey
tniiltalr
,sked fir little, an.d canI equipped 'tith
'iao , lt ilPI thaln iole . Heire tl-i* I
ur lantid, biterly
fram ;ill phtOtr of
inflicted hy tIhL
stricke. hy tin-,...unds
Comanle
SI...i,
have ahleady bee li urint,,l
fl
alvagd ships, but volu..es
about the
cohld be written of the fight WiLged by
itis Alel~hi labor---light aganst ilht,,
fighi ag;'ifist honfeiickress. fight a;gtitmst
i;
stratg e livilng em nl iti i, u ctt 'i i1t'
h].;.ctc
lht.
. little or .~ lelawt C....
'eltinit
l,,ar,n." vtlilge hedelhws ma
with liaitti fo(,d. Ony lit, ietaliih ltior that grves , cou.ntry lihe mits its
Oit 'alehi oni trei Pacifie.
melilio~w history couhl have lifted those
hip,, ot,vrcou, e those obsta.l es al,, Si(-ifted hoe,. liere was Anl.Iticu. s jlrst
was living testimnuvy if our
victorv. .ere
;ahility to dig in and hit back. Herr was
la bor's anBSwer to w mr
(tmi" A ijic'baira
11I'
Many If th(se nut1sta.ling .t-it
hack her'
with us agaill, carryig oB
....
Itg.
where {hey hIft off. atll~y lg Oi..
without medal. or citatitn. Side by side
... ....
n who tb, n¢d
they labor with ths
forests illtO niilitar3
tho
eamimlpgf
rnised
war plant ila
abaidoneld lts, who little
out shipyards for the thuusalals of vi.
('es long since launched, a.d side by
side with Atelican labor which has ithcidedly gained a victory over time.
Today cur headlines eari y distract
us from resltds of the protluclitun lrile.
Politicians are hopping on hanti walgutiS
for p~residential eandlidates, or [proclaim
support
heir
for veterais' ndvanbiff t
tags. LUgging a cotuple of ciippld vets
...
ad tltin ait
mil[ Congress like a sideshow
litC, t[ar-jeqking seeis to ho tIle mediie fI.r pubhlie ills. Kith
cIthse vets a rotud,
selling, oIfer thien
iL few
h galize Jliliy
lulirh'eii dollars and they are supposed
to he happy.
hie cry is harud every
where, "t an a veteran if the last am"'
ConI..
~ soaie~''Lt sI.r dii.ger proint
I..i.
Ofl pi,,
154i
in trie far western octars
134
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
ibn anid then in the other, through Inh,
LIGHTING, Mant Qoat
1,-1Iy valpor cont:ined in the tul,b.
The resultant electric ditscharge or a-e
ppritdie~s sooltielight but many more shart
thit rvht
waves, which activat e the
Ii uflesleent chemicals coated'on th/l inside
Aahs
,Uao Q.d
Bly ('. 1,ONEY,
(O.
L_[T. No. 8t
;'.$0i£ three, uis)
[i
e
IGHT as illumination is the thing that
man has most desired since the InLgintintg of time, yet today how,many
of us COimder the progress that has
been made along this Ine since the days
of the burning pine knot, down through
the stages of the grease pot, tinder box,.
wax candle, oll lamp, gas light ,dnIfinally
the inenndescent electric globe?
Here again ,,Uh progress hasbJt'11,
made, fram iho old carbon ghlbe to the
present mazd.. lamp. this progress hi,
bheen mad ltroiit only b} designl nnd mla P-via I
of the fiament but in the lamp itsc'f,
goirig fromn the early vacuum to the gasfilled oIfs of today.
As electrtic laps ar.e devices fr transformling
electric
tnetry
into
light. mos
arc and incandescent lanps. heawve.cr-nedat. al ight only a very small pc,,lltage oIf th energy supplied ihem: a
large part of the energy is radliatd n
Member reviews
history, and gives formulae
underlying modern types
It has beel known for two cemtujit'
hr mnlret that an electric discha.rge throug~h
a tube of rarefie] gas or vapor causel the
gas to become
.
lnbi.. u s. Withl this knw] edge it hand lon g with the knowledge
gatined from the use of Ith
in ,cuy
vapor i.d Moore light. thert was finally
developed the present Hum'eseen light.
The Iluores.c.It lamp, howevrr. did net
ju st happent, but ,Iep.esents years of r-
heat.
cllh .and
.Improeent, 0Q12e Il th,
greatest difficulties was to PIidithisti..titig i.re, ..n. Ial
ways IfYr luing
this
er'e tried. fLmn apL]nitag grl'.et
e/IuW}I voltage to jmIn the gap,, tIo b ing
inn thie two electrode- tegethe, and separatihg them,
KINDS OF RADIATION
Any soIure of light ma"y 5.> eiidleT led
as iving out twro kinds of adkitii,
in tAoiiI ginld obscure. The radia ted ,n,rgy sets ip vibrti
tios in the c her and
those vibrttions which have a wave length
lying between certain limits are capable
EARLY METHODS
of affecting the eye and prioducIbmg the
)own as lig htn
One of the early method used was that
si!sation lkn
employed by the mer.ury vapor lamp, i.e,
All ribral Lions. lying above olbew
that of having an auxi iary eortainiti
hese limits are useless so far as produc,xample
r
d by tipping the tube .akipg
ing light is concerned. As a
eflhi...y of ordinary in
wcontact
through the mercury with both
the lumino.
isonl
a racione~f
electrodes andli, then replacing thle
f
.fb
racotid,
one tube
'a~clstd¢ellteI amps isamponly
its nmal pe-tg po .
oIe pe.r .e t ani that of the best arin!
The Sketh No. I gives an idea of
amp less th an 10 per cent. For this aid
avbeen d .. loped
this early method employed, and
[
einothr reason LS thereh...
dentally the method still employed by
such lamps as the Nernst lamp, by I),
the e
p.r lamp.
Ne..st, and the merc..ury vapor lamp, de,Inview of the great u.., of the tiunltiycleped by Peter Gioper He~it and
cnt lamps today ad their areater use
also the Moe, ,re lighting tube.
in the days to come, it might he well foI
us to review some of the Facts about thtis
type of lighting, thus at the same time
i
br'ing (our present knowehdge up to date.
The fluorescent lamp is an eletrical
discharge source consisting of a tubular
bulb with an electrode sealed in each end.
Each lamp electrode has ai ttIgeln filam
cathode
ten
l
aid two an tnninalik
I
ai.des,
coated with ecctroll elissiv(
*
of the tube, The ability of a gas or va;or
give off light and other tadaitit energ'y
because of the fow oIf elect..ons through it
involves a somewhat intricate theory of
the action oi atois, and it is not altogether necessary to go into this pIr tictinr
aeton in order to
lnderstamd the action
and opera.ion of these tubes.
TYPES
There are several types of discharge
lamps, some of which have been available
fora long time. Among the more familiar
if this type of laImp az, the .eO.., m. rcury, sodium and argon. With its inner
coating removed the fluorescent
.
lam. is
m(,re1y a glass tube, containlang a dl.p
of mercury and a small amount, of argon
gas and its eketrodes in each ,dl, and in
principle is quite similar to the old
Cooper He..itt mercury vapor lamp.
In the Lluorescent lamp the elements
have ,en adjusted so. as to produce very
little direct light, but are so arranged to
erow d as much energy as pIos..ble
i
n to
ultraviolet energy at (TIC speci ic wtave
length, that of 2537 angst reis. Phasplots
art, then selected for
1-e.ponse
paximum
in the regiol of this wave length. Sonie
liea of the econireit operation of fl u..respent Imnps, when their energy is co..,eelted into the proper' av, length, can
be gaibed fromn the following graph which
hans been plotted for a 15 walt I' hiaIp.
(See sketches Nos, 2 and 3)
In attempting to explain the action
of fluorescents and in oider not to go too
dee p bite the theory involved, let Is say
that the action of materials which do
fluores'e under the a ion
.. o. ultraviolet
adLinn is simply that such material
absorb energy
.
at one ...av. Legth ard
readiates it at a longer wave length
in much the s.ame .anner that one ]ny
say that a transformer absorbs wattag, at
one voltage and current and delivers this
DIwer at a different voltage and current.
The c-radiated energy oF Iluorescent
powders spreads over a considera-le
range or continuous band of visible wave
lengths. Thus we are able to prodtce
lamps giving off various colors dependmig upon the particular phosphor powdher
with which the tube is coated.
(C(ontinued or page 155)
e
,
nl ateria/.
t
i
'S
...
ec
...
C
Cv~reat
I.,
,
I*r
No, 2
,o
~,t~her
~
floa
W~t£.I d
*
Althbough tbere is no electi<al conllcetion between e.ectrod.es, eect rO llow by
gaseous conduction frorml the cathode at
Vono
one end to the anode at the other end
proper voltage is applied atnd tll]
other Ilecessaiir
conditon
tite present-
Thu
1
.....
the ciurent lows filst i one
84
4
I-
-
I
,. &Iat "
6"e,
APRIL, 1944
IR5
FREIGHT RATES kaw h
(This is th4 /rith
toI'd Ilt Io
,I'series If
t II ? ))....I,,te jIit .. I.. 's.)
Relic of earlier
conditions must be revised
if nation as a whole is to
prosper
ptleiuhli~strlill',
R[CVIOUIS aLwtiehs il t
series
his
have
the rack thlti the! eouli/
ibmv
...
iils
iill he
bita
idtvelipe
of ...ali.f..turliig l..til. iI.dulstiy .sp(ectially
iil the Siuth .,n, Wslt if the lwrsen. high
ijh~llt,
raeo
l....IIis lb(,
... lailleud.
The iletinI
,iS
if
toistiiiihiitu-h
tflia ltjtlPI% ill ile, wa, If thaet (....Ollu
niatlIll. {[in <[il{h i..slitliti ..
it hIi estJllg geilttloP
dike
illpt
of i..blstrial
habit
(tt'ehua ;[I[.gi
,I
..tuent I "knlow
the I.1[1'
.
".. I>..'
eusts
podl/tton
I-
i' m:telal Js a'ld Iu....lr) glmetlv fvor
,,,tbth',n and Wl
I..thlliatiln>
.
new indus.try art.! lII txiansiot[ (i old It0lltlesse- wl temnd Vo take place in Offitial
lt'l~itipj> /t
t L:in' '1 ~3 rIp' iih of Fir~Pisp
tOlliltae ru
Ohio }itrs rmid ea.lt <I the
Mlississippi Pifll.
In 'tler . ... It, Ofllia [{ritiWy
i
hans tdte [les (hitie to aicUir( Nlel¥ iluisiIVy )itatuse it xi, linst in
h
fiel
,;iry stjiul
hi ad hllig'ldy by Virtue of this
is g-leat' isl i(lh, rehl.
R3.ZI~ll T Ib [RI1
PI
,lIS ,dd-,
rrhlse fll("trl' lilt 11o1ll'lld detilrenits
to i/usJ< rial
vuilpru
l il: the South
West.
,iJ
i ut t. tate( al,l :ld tIll,
l l 'or ,
teWlhnPil y hls elle
. ..
at.... i
instititil.
'The sl(C,.IsfJl. 111ainr in which
wt pllant.s hIve
h
til-atilthe
~1)r'gi'Ili
r/o Pila
to reritl andd
l I.r..sa
l ... h..te
h,,ws
, that
hit~(x'-hlridie
)tuos:~ssinll
of
tindlust rut1
rvlt
rltuisiti-'. Itonitva/
pit surch pmnZiil't}
,iiMlld
ilf/lhhr4*parV
e
.rf rI. ', ti iiuiil ail ...
t.. .i.d ,
eleIopmnmle
of illiulhy nI l'eginafi ...
I freight
these
wl~etlflhrlises
i.. t
In a is-ict-lit arti(he
iese
i
actually
iiiove fellihhiJLtlell willh i'a~es. oi/
iiiv
xcxeti(potadli
>hipm
.. t. but
b
htl-h thir'
i
reu
blish tI tatke
t' If iiythimg thit might
Watin IItllllig
r ,iTele, for shimpt.e..t.
K.N( AI)Oe IRATE
s
"It r . l.. t
u, llnerst/,iId that kite tijl
road, arc
....
ired to publirh, till. andl post
for public,11ill Deerimi
'
aies
ev
ort
of atilelt which nigeht i I, Itld
for
t1O¥1Wt1,I
hetwqli ;tiny tWl
it nelrly
100.000 pumt, gid
ronsr1ue,ith in
,he
m"az of railol'pd
'ieithtrtesi
ther"
is a
piuhliskhed IaII,
llkaji l.r..is fl'r...ll ... kakee to, i; 'k,,nio.. .ir :rrlwh,,.p I,-e Al, , it1
these saTlh schei res iherr enl,-rte,s oni
pig i,. .t. l..... Mitlriai hnlirtall~s frI..i. D,'
troit, tohlle io Itt-ito. gi'a
tit ]t[ lot
t~i~lla
....
I~ g
ltll e I'l.... St. L{~i s
.i.d (IDttelj
. .lIty h.. S],hllie to
place
ill tIN t/t/itjtt Stat-s.
"That tiere shIuhi h- diflere aees be-
teen the rates cm which commerce a.
tua, I Illes
.
i...d ritles of the 'kamig.aro
vairemly is thmerpJ'oe inivijalle altd oldiiarily innoeuous.'
'Thus. Mr rRit,
. a tvnIpir tl ielse.ih it the
t-xrtmples put dliscrittnmit ion which the pro
PI.'Pt,
t
iof ..
rte
lj.itlue.tn..t,t,
r
IIlg
to
Drove thin-j ('aa!
a'ttlptnti
hy
tp show
that these e.a.. i.. es are noLt based onIactual going rates on actual manufactured
products but that they are '"kngaroo'
rates indel which no goods are atially
moving.
Case studies hine Iel, liade of }l Iun,her, of .anufactu, fi/g PlI..t.s in ..nnes..... ,
Ie
aIln
bxasM s1iSiilpil by the Fitm se¢lcrity Ad ministratpion, tile tn iversiity 4
Texas, ad the Interstate Co, n force (ornilssion which dise !ose definite rate handicaps el bobh i-boud
.. ..
anIfact ui
supplies and
intaijirs
..
aId on out-bound
finished p..dueis of these onmpanies compiling with ii...r coImpaies iOf(fllicitl]
teritot '.
UNREASONA ILE l)IS'IIMINATION
That I pmioll If freight charget
llstbe paid by.ol..((...(i
ill lIne ahald of
the final cOrlt' iliies
not le..ssarily
olean that UlnlrrtlAiled discijijPtvitp,
exists. Dislalmi
itself is a natural misCeIi.IJ.atOI
agillst th,
tIole distant
prouflee.I se.king
m
tl ty to aly
iarket.
ll~Denc the pi eStiiptiie.
tiieasotblr
dJsebimination Cn) arise ol] wh... eqhal,
it e$ in rat le[ w
distort
ullder the }
tile illst ril:
eit
rei~
ioJ itizaLill
vile is5 per (tiIt higher thanl the at(e
fronl New ]itrk Io l~ouisville though
the di'tanles
....
Ilml.ost exactly qmla;
whenl fir t-cflass a tes from Atlajita t.
(;hieargo, einl...elol
miles irom
har
'Chicago and
Atfanta; when rates l twvPie
but 401)
lPenvcr il.l
tlieal teriltor
on sulbstantially lowtr
rates (mile fll in ihethan it does w ithi i
the South and West or between the s,t]-] iloarts ' I he Soth IndIWest. Thee
t
Sounld reas01, why freight rates
IC"tll rll[ d io ptI,,r ]Sf1)
sonthernl freilhl r;lie"'disctirrilntioi'' by
exlhilriairz how an{I-s 111< Illale. 7V11.Rite,
who xs eiiiiyeIl froi, 19,
to /).P189
chief flirt, Idvisr,' i'o the So/.th I,2 GCoy
el"ir1's RhiteC(OTI re 1ce ill developimg
inId filink tt'
,11,i ild
i
in
,l th,
h ..11IthImla
(]iivol'uilr. Iil~te (rrse, was Ihr c:hief fall
Il
hast tie
hi,
Al, thilta
hisilln
1
i1mhr
uf d
nhaese., I tha, t ile M... it e
tputifaie in -tlil~lirl d' the discr~nlnnliiirh
iheol' init inl the lrticle ih] Nti
... l
1wh;]]lPaIl.tIly Ihas had a chang,
tIlstig
tei-
RAIl I ADS ARE I'Illl¥
way
1Only329 friOml
Philidelphi, ,qualize. ]ot in central iii
,ins where dis tances aeequal hut west,
(of Des MoinesLn,
U
prealn
ud(
e
,,odi ti.is
traffie 1ves w"llithti arid to and froT Of-
'niit. ...
II
I>
if rPles,
'rlle frent D[alas to louis,-
in tIe, \'riIel'I
morn,(lie nnrrijtdai lm Oiritl ih
ie
ofi
unfit,' ne
i< tIh S~ulIil
rate making is
'ttt.
it so thtIt gttt allS speaking
th
nx;umpitil
..
ih,:ch,'itiu't, whil,
e hit "Ie of
tll;IIte t...e
.
pa'iSolis of 'lie.' IIts and kangaroo
Il[esI
./.....
r.
r
eI...... '.apder' rtes; ill
e<hel; weiIs, rates oU /hirl,
eoli....odities
reh-
itneit4hly arises when as
tIIIst
eIs1
iutitnzjne' Of the Char,,II tq C....... .lllmll
[I 1,t It~li(Ihd Statt~%
lMr A, T. Pill,, rl ~I~th~ll trltflie xet
a llt ..i. ait,
(I ,ll lt
lIh ".ialllacy' of
of hitaft nriil V flow
distance
thisihips. I
TIE LIFLEBLOQD QF COMMERCE
r
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
136
old %Tt REVIEWS GAINS
Ay O4E Sai. R"OAd4,eOhi
By JOSEPH E. ROACH, L.. U. No. 39, Cleveland, Ohio
OME 40 years ago last October, I
was inducted into Local 39. It ~a
S mysfirst ,eperiencein a tradeunio,
but not in the labor anovem..ent-three
years prior to that time I had been initi
ated in the Brotherhood of Railroad
Trainmen, a new lodge just organized
for trainmen
of the Pennsylvania
Railroad.
Meeting with an accident, I found a
job at the Bell Telephone Company, and
shortly afterwards (three months, to be
exact) Local 39 was born. There was a
mixed local here at that time, and with
an independent telephone company building here, which brought many linemen
into the city, they wanted a local of their
own. They applied for , ehartr and as
of July 1, 1899, Local 89 began to function.
They set out to organize the three on,panies and needless to
mention,
met wtlh
stubborn resistance. The companies used
every artifice knownto stifle the union,
but they were determined to mganize the
new telephone company and did. After
Fought for the
cause and saw victory come. A
pleasant valedictory
a strike of several days. they won the
eight-hour day and a pay increase.
FEW OLD TIMERS LEFT
There are only one or two of those
charter memabers left. Yes, they're gonebut their work was not in vain. The old
grim
eaper has thinned out the ranks
of the ohd timers. Time and the ravages
of disease have carried them way. but
those of us left have grateful renoembrailees of them and the fine example of
loyalty and devotion to the cause they
had instiled in their hearts, to pIromote
better living conditions for themselves and
their families.
Perhaps we should not grieve too nmeh,
for many of you lived long enough to
know that the foundation you started
would be successfully carried out and the
education you disseminated to the mn
following the trade, saw unionism rise to
greater heights and better conditions fo,
the men who toil and their families.
HAPPY CHANGES
S. now, entering the field of retirement, it does make one happy to see the
change that has taken place; labor has at
last taken her place alongside industry.
and industry has come to the realization
that labor can no longer be the pawn
of selfish ..nd disgruntled employers, for
in this day, the right to bargain co]
/ectively is now recognized by law as is
the right of labor to choose those whom
it wishes to represent it. It is a power
delegated to the labor leaders by the
ranlk and file, and it is imperative that
they see that they are not betrayed ani
that they themselves do not become autocratic and abusive of the privilege assigned to thn,?. These changes I have lived
to see, and if I have contributed anything
o the cause, natr'ally I am happy, but
now for
.
.e, it ia over--ani not so easy
a matter, for I anu confronted with conficting nmotions: one, a feeling of relief
the other, If deep reluctance. I realize
fully that I shall never again enjoy the
close intimate contacts of my fellow
workers at the Municipal Light Plant,
and I extend to them, one and all,. my
heartfelt thanks and gratitude for their
mllany courtesis their kindness, andi best
of all. their respect. I would like to name
each and every one of you here, but to
do so would a!most be profane, lest I
overlook seione .. . also the boys of
Local 38, and the shopmen at the 41st
Street plant for their many kind favors.
Fellows, you were really swell to me.
Good-bye to you all!
IN TRIBUTE
I will close with this little poem.- with
apologies to Wilbur Nesbit
'As I roan] here and there e..e
m.y Ju
May I always find friends just as true,
May Dame Fortune in kindness ,y daily
path bend
To a .bunch of good fellows like you.
In this life I have found that
,! get
what we give,
We are done to, forsooth as we Io;
So my prayer is that I may live. while
I live
With a bunch of good fellows like you.
There's a glint in your eye; there's a
clasp in your hand;
There's a tone in your voice always
new;
I think paradise must be
some
sort of
alanl
With a bunch of good fellows like you.
Here's a pledge to your health, to yu,
joy, yuur success,
For the ie of your kind are to. fAw
There is something to hearten, to gladden. to bIdss
In a bunch of good fellows like you."
APRIL, 1944
131
Casey's Chronicles c-f the Work World
F. Shapland ("Shuppie") is a veteran
the Brotherhood,
oftember
Canndisn
I
ets ionirolls, His chroicles
,on on the
of line wor k, loyggilg Iand Id t...nbring in
the dilds ar enjoyedi each tnI,,'h by thou,,Ids OfJOURNAl, l'eadt,,
o,,
Qoa
Throlugh a great vaiiety of scenes, peopled with charicters deftly drawn, mores
the cestral fig,,re, TERENCE CASEY,
.
whose (biilty L
-ed1-hcded Irish man
nake friends is only matched by his fistic
prowast, demo. st.ra ted when the occasion
dic tates.
The author asserts tlht 1his hico does
not represent himself. illt an useparable
companion of his yo,,*g mlllhood. Howev~er, many of the incidents are drawn
from Shappie's own experience, and that
of his lmny .fiends.
New caoders may break in at any time
and sool will feel well acquainted, as the
"Chronicles" are a aeries of incoidents
rather than a tightly-drawn plot.
m COCK
qa
eai
a A2i BULLY
a
THE FREE-FOR-ALL
Woodsman hates a coward as he hates
diluted rye,
Stiff upper lip for lihum', stiff backbone
when yot die!"
A
was over J oe wint out
his friend. He came back
locate
to
in about a hour an' said Dodds an'
his gang was Iot..gin' aroun' down the
you
.'en
street. 'u"T is be roes' s'prise
is see de Fien' dat is wit' me" "Milcbhe
I had better lave Jules wid ye," said 1.
wid a wink to Joe. "Non, non!" shouted
Jules. "Dat dam Rodin, he is slap mah
face ... n I is sit d'own on d bhunk. but
hlah gay! Dis tam he is fin' me on mah
feet. an'. bah tonder! I is kip berm so
beezy, dat he 'ave notde tam for jooamp
F T H E R d inne
on Terry. I Vink mebbe I is geev dat beeg
beoly Rodin de mos' s'prise he 'ave yet."
"All right! ie little game cock, let's
go." I have allus been for a quiet life,
Slim, an' here, for the first time in my
existence, I was deliberately settin' out
to start a light, but the cokl-blooded way
in which Rodin had tried to kill Jules
an' me by rolin' the big skid av logs
down on us, an' Dodds, wid murther in
his black heart, had tried to smash up
Big Frank Slade an' his team, by niekin'
the snutb rope, had been ranklin' in mie
mlliK iver since. an' all I askedl tel was
juls' Wall chance to crash inta thin an'
smash thim down. "I don't think, under
the circu. mtances, Terry, a.nyone cou.id
blame uh." Jules an' me set out, an'
from the corner a. m.e eye, I
fellow
across the stiret make a
W
e
so I kmnw wed be followed
down the steel p street luadin'
By F. SHAPLAND
Another chapter re-
calling time and places when
men were men
uppercut inta his race an' a right cross
to the jaw an' he ,int down cobb The two
followei' him jumped me an' wan av
thlm managed to clinch. I drove a stiff
uppercut straight up on his jaw an' broke
clear. A short left jab, plumb in the face
drove him back dizzy. A back righthander sent the ither wal reelin'. I
jumped right over to help Jules, but that
wiry little divil was holdin' his own,. He
had lots of strengh all right. Whin Rodin
rushed himhe slipped in under Rodin's
arm and caught him in the deadly back
hot wid two urners. All he had to do was
to give Rodin the back leg to put him
down, but he was too canny for that. ie
kept Rodin between him an' the ither fellow. lie hugged Rodin so tight to him that
hands t
loose.
Iear
Rodill couldn't use his
As I made a dash fur the follow back av
Rodin, Jules sint Rodin down vid the
back leg trip anI his head struck the floor.
Before he could move Jules was kiekin'
him savagely in the ribs. There was a
shoit all' Joe an' Big Mike fone bargin'
through the open door. Joe caught ontieav
that
was tryin' to clinch wid
the, fellows
]m, wid the deadly French lash, while
Big Mike grabbed the ither wan, an' wid
a roar like a bull, raised him high in the
a, an' Brought him down wid a sickenin'
thud. The last fellow made a race for the
door but Jean coolly stuck out his foot an'
sint him sprawling. Jean only had mocasins on but he stooped down, tuck a
hand holt in the fellow's hair and bumped
face
so fiercely on the floor that he
his
howled for mercy.
THE FIGHT FINISHED
Now I niver did belave in strikin' a
man when he was down, Slim, but Dodds
an' Rodin, the bloody murtherers, deserved all they was gettin'. By the time I
managed to call off the dogs av war, they
was all hospital cases anyway, an' we cud
wipe theih names off the slate, now that
justice had ov.ertaken thim. Big Mike
stalked up to the bar an' bellowed out to
the bartender,. "These fellows army
friends av yours?" The bartender, probably used to simldar, rough-house. frays,
said coolly, "Nuthin' to do wid me. They
friends fer
musta been layin' Ier yr t
they come in here on the run an' jumped
them, but they usts got the cards mixed
when they thought they could hate up
the man that licked Big Smoke Johnson.
Well, have a drink on the house." While
we were hayi' our drinks the fellow
nearest the door got up an' made his
continued on page IS0)
saw a
signal.
ttr..d
to the
Palace
A ROUSING GOOD FIGHT
Afore we wint in I hloked back an' cud
jus' make tbhim out at the top a" it. We
win} in all' ordered drinks f ..n the big.
He had jis'
tough lookiln' bartenlde.
turned to reach for a bottle whir the door
bust open an' in co..e t the gang on the
run. wid Dodds leadin'. 'Here's the
s ." hi! shouted. I turned jus' in time
to catch him on the shil, wid .. e heavy
boot as he let go a fierce kick at me. I
thought at first his leg was broke,. He
doubled up wid pmn. I snmshed a left
Log Sawing
by Frederick
Shane
Ise
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
JOURflAL OF
ELE(TRIIAL WORHERS
IFFgAL PouSTIrA IorimATlonhit BROTHERHOOD
OFELECTRICAL WO1KERS
VOL. XtIl
Florida on
Washington, D. C., April, 1943
Labor unionists in Florida are up in arms
Make
against a proposed amendment to the
state constitution outlawing the closed
shop in Florida. This amendment will have to be ratified by the people. The gist of the amendment is as
follows:
"The right of persons to work shall not be denied or
abridged on account of membership or nonmembership in any labor union, or labor organization; provided, that this clause shall not be construed to deny
or abridge the right of employees by and through a
labor organization or labor union to bargain collectively with their employer."
It is known that many states are watching the
struggle in Florida with acute attention. If the reactionaries in Florida win, many states will undertake to
put this same kind of amendment in practice throughout the land.
This, of course, is a curious development in the
general attack on labor in these United States. It
comes from people who spout all the time about free
enterprise and private initiative. What they mean
by these terms is, of course, their free enterprise and
their private initiative, and the slapping of restrictions
on labor to an extreme degree. The fact that they
want to make this a Constitutional amendment rather
than a law is a part of the general strategy to catch
labor off guard in a war year and make labor cooperation extremely difficult by Constitutional act.
To be sure, the closed shop does not mean the union
shop. Historically, labor has never stood for the coercive closed shop, but labor certainly should have
the right to enter into voluntary closed shop agreements if employers wish such an agreement. Many
instances arise in the industrial field when the closed
shop is a better instrumentality for production than
the looser form of union shop or the open shop. To
prohibit the closed shop, therefore, is only a piece of
chicanery which should be stopped at the polls.
Health
Insurance
Health insurance is taking the center of
the stage in the great national structure
for a better Social Security Bill. Labor is
backing a bill in Congress known as the Wagner-
Murray-Dingell Bill which projects a program of universal health insurance, involving medical care and
hospitalization. Reports from labor and other sections of the underlying population indicate that the
people are generally for a health insurance program.
Monsignor John A. Ryan, long known for his sturdy
support of common causes, has this to say about health
insurance:
"Although millions of people who are gravely suffering from unnecessary sickness or from insufficient
medical attention, can obtain adequate care only
through a system of public health insurance, that
proposal is stubbornly opposed by powerful agencies.
"Nevertheless, a health insurance act could be
framed which would not injure any legitimate group
or interest and at the same time would safeguard
reasonable individual liberty. The most important
provisions to attain these ends would be: first, restriction of the compulsory features of the act to persons with incomes below a certain level, say $3,000
per year; second, full freedom for voluntary associated effort, such as group health projects and cooperative hospitalization. When organized groups
can guarantee to their members at least as large benefits as those offered by the public system, they should
be authorized to operate autonomously. This arrangement would exemplify that fundamental principle of
democracy which dictates that the state should never
do anything for the citizens which they can do as
well for themselves. Incidentally, it would go far to
refute the charge that the health insurance system
involved 'regimentation'."
Defeat National
Service Act
John P. Frey, president of the
Metal rTrades Department, American Federation of Labor, had his
finger on the pulse of American public opinion when
he made his notable address over the Blue Network
late in February. Mr. Frey hit out emphatically
against the proposed National Service Act and showed
conclusively that the National Service Act has no
need to increase production because production has
already reached fabulous levels; it would not prevent
strikes, because England under much better labor
conditions has had strikes with a National Service
Act. Mr. Frey said in part:
"There have been strikes, there have been stoppages of work on vital war production. But the essential, all important fact is that over 99% per cent
of production has been carried on without any interruption through strikes. The less than one-third of
one per cent of interruption has evidently stimulated
the call for labor conscription or served as an excuse.
Is the authority and resourcefulness of our Government so weak that it cannot deal effectively with the
less than one per cent of labor which has been recalcitrant?'* * *
APRIL,
139
1944
'Trhere are many vital questions to hi asked if
those who are advocating conseription of Anmerican
labor. To whom would it apply? Who would administer such a law, and who would make the rules and
regulations affecting those conscripted? Would it give
the military Complete control over civilian industrila
conditions, and should it be the military, would they
set np lhe hoards to hear the complaints, the grievances which dlvelop in industry? is it the intention
to militarize labor?
"Ifr labor conscription would be admiliistcred Ily a
civilian Federal agency, wolhl lhabr be given adgquote representation? What would be (done to c'orrect
t Cfin(iusthe pi'ese nt Federal confusio and confih
trial polity now bedeviling employer and employee
alike?
Is there reason to belie'e that militarv control of
ivlian lahor is advisaide in this hand of free instltutions, or that a bureaucracy centered in Washington can accomplish better results tihan thsse ecuid
through ihe splendid cooperation already est aliaished
between management and labor?-
The Truman Committee of the
United States Senate has brought a
new note of policy into Congressinnal action. in a time of great change and great
confusion, it undertook by investigation to ascertain
the facts and to give those facts wlith attedant
r,,COinmlndatioons courageously.
Laurel Wreath
for Truman
Its latest report performs an unusual seL'ice by
turining tihe face of the committee hardA against a
National Service Act. The commiltee points out that
the proposed national service legislation is a makeshift which tries to achieve results which could be
mori effectivelv attained "by other means that would
do less violence to individual fredom."
The committee's report also rightfully appraises
our mniacle of production during wartime, but points
out that now is the time for tightening Luptby the
elimbtationr of waste and the avoidance of further
hbundo's.
It malkes a plea for a sound civilian economy. It
points out that "if the home e(nonomy is permitted
to weaken and Iose the resiliency necessa3 fror quick
anid suceCssCfl ConversionI to peacetimeu otCupatiolls,
it will not he able to provide employment for soldier.s
and war workers when they are roleased fCorn their
preseni tasks."
c f
The committee differs sharply with the policy
the War Department which wishes to tcoutntenance
at the present time idle plants. The co mmittee points
ttendoeny of workerqs to quit emouit that there ia
ployvment in war industries because plants are idle.
Civilian goods should be manufactured ait once to
reemploy these people so that we will not have wartime unemployment. This will furnish a sound basis
for an elficient passage from war to peacetime
production.
There is a stirring in the field of public
opinn that looks hopeful. Out in San
Diego, a great war boom city, a new
daily has been launched which has the backing of all
labor groups.
A natiola conmmission has been set up by the Unmyersity of thicago to make a study of the frieedom of
the press.
Pressing the
Press
The
h.1/b. /ic Moth1y has announced a
conlest for
tie best article on Ihe freedom of the mess.
In short. Americans are not supine unlder the
presenit news papi r situation where canined news and
editorials are purveyed by corporation-cmitrolled
press on a widespread scale.
Inevitable, we believe, is the ultimate foutnding if
a great Iatb daily hin the city of Washington by trade
unions. There is 1io health in a situation where rows
is a one-sied proposioh)n, and labor tPlust see to it
that the infer mation that is daily received is aeMcnate,
correct and out xvritt en with a bias for iig buiIsiness.
(harles E. Iledaux, who for years Iried to
fastent a icilous speed-up system on American workers, has commnitrod sicide. lie was
inprisonedslaid about to be tried for treason to his
adopted country. Not long ago he swam into ihternational prominence by his apparent friendship for
the Duke and Duchess or Windsor.
Exit
Bedsex
Ile had a palace near Berclhtesgade, Hi tler's lhid,away. He was close to the Nazi higher-ups. His selfinflicted death and disappearance are important only
as writing finis to a career which aroused bitter olposition of the workers of all countries of the world.
Bedaux was the symbol of those forces in industry
who utterly ignore humanity. They undertook to util-
ize mechanical measures to squeeze the last drop ol
cllelgy and ie from employees so that prolits Couli
be swolhlen, so that palaces could he built i ni ou ntain
fastnesses fr their own pleasure.
When Bedaux ran afoul of the law, the Bedaux
Company, inc., New York, began to sing a different
tune. Albert Ramond, the president of the Bedaax
Company. quickly tried to adjust his company's literature and propaganda to fit the new order in America's wa-s. ]is latest speech made a plea for htlbor
management cooperation in order that full prrodu-
tion might be achieved.
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
140
YOUR GOVERNMENT BUREAU
IV
IllS m.onth we thought wE'd devote
the
Work page to that
T br'anch of the (oveiment which nost
Coi'cellis our worene.
in iffidustry an.I
woenle in general-the W..on.a.s. Burcall
of the United States Department
of
Labor.
The Woman's Bureau is that service
malyzod
A
key
ihstrume..ts,
WVORKER'S
"IFE
at hidustries. a.ircraft,
amenmunition, etc., and ad-
sted what jobs
on..n
.
u. d perform
ad IIwhIre Ihey od ak tehe place of
lien on war pu'ed..tio
lines, in laantel.ione, ii servIce and adhniinstrative
wvork. Evn in the stress of war and the
e
tinstant lush of production the Women's
of the
Bovernent devoted solely to the
il has never lost sight for a second
velfaje of women-their protection and
of the standards and working coufitions
their advancement-it is the bureau
fic,- for witch it exists, It has cnntbmed to
signed to help you and every
woman in the United States.
other
ihe Woman's Bureau was created iu
July of 1918 in the stress of World War
I and it was known at the time as "The
WXomnan in Industry Service." On June 5,
(192f. this service becam e· by Act of Congross, the pennane t Women's
..
Bureu
authorized to promter the welfare and
efcbt.. y of ,¥omen
workers
k
iTI Inteli
time.
effect on women, first-hand. Then Miss
Anderson became an expert in the field of
collective bargaining when for eight
years she worked as an organizer for
the National Women's
Trade Union
League. Miss Anderson's success story
is indeed'one of note. She came to the
United States at the age of 16. a girl all
alone, fromn her native country, Sweden,
determined to make a livelihood. Then
because of her great efforts to help
working women everywhere, she became
the first labor woman in the United
States to be made head of a Federal
agency.
VALUE TO UNION
HOW DOES IT FUNCTION?
,Just how does the bureau work anr
what does it accomplish ?
It investigates and reports on the pobemls and conditions of employed woIne
in al types of work
industrial,
business,.
professional. It formulates standards and
policies of women as rage earters to
guniatantee them lair play and safe conditions of employment.
The Women's Bureau is interested in
all women of the labor force-young and
old, single and married.
WHAT HAS IT ACHIEVED?
We'll brugin with World War I when the
bureau was set up. It made investpgatiiiii
and
.eonim.1dations
to promnote the best
use of women in war work. It set up
standards on hours, wages, and working
tend tion to safeguard women and guide
employers.
Then ii tihe yea's of peace the Women's
Bureau vwent. steadily fovward-cxpanelira, progressiung. It shaped its work te
prevent diseiination against wonlee
and to develop for them better job ollpovrtunifis and improved comditions, I
never r.laxed in its efforts to construe'
a floor foro wages and a ceiling for huu
through fair labor laws both Federal
and sate,
Then
m
anic World War I,
and
h0"
bureau,.
ith renewed vigor and enthusiasm, set oilt to do its part toward win
hing the war and at the same timh to
continue to protect and benefit its women
worhers the nation over. The bureau
learned employment conditions and their
prove the justice of equal pay for equal
",1k for woen and to seeur, satisfactory
livjing and working conditions for them lit
all times and in all circumstances.
ITS DIRECTOR
No aecolt of the lltmon rilil's Bureau
youM possibly be connplet, witoul a few
linES about the fiteleating. effaircnt, loyalto-t.e-..oil.an's cause diec tor
f thls
burh.au.
She is Miss Mari An .derson.and sih
has been director of the bureau for 2:1
years. Miss Anderson has proved an Exeellent per so for this post for shit has
had unusual
opportunity to develop an
understalidding of wome... in industrythei needs and problens, their aptitudes
adskills. Miss Anderson was an operator in a shoe factory for 18 years and s,
You ,xho are reading this page are
muoist probably union Inmbers or relatives
of union members.
Thus the
WI.men's Bureau should be of partiular
interest to you. for its work and its aims
are one with our union work and ains
everywhere. The Womatn's Bureau is intellsely interested in unions because it
has come to know that through collective
bargaining and effetive legislattiol. only,
can good working conditions for wvomen
he maintained
and improved.
The
Wor n..'s Bureau i: interested in us Is
un..ion members and is willing to help ,s
at all times. Through all the years that
Miss Anderson has held her distfinguished
position of authority, she has maintained
her ... eberh..ep in her old union, the Boot
and Shoe Workers Union whichshe joined
w]en she &as a factory employee.
At the present time, the Women's
Bureau is employing staff members sssigned to the full time jobof
surveying
unhi.nS in various bran.ches of work ill
order that the Women's Buireau cal be
of more SErvice to women members of
unions, both A. F. of L andICIO A eonference was held just last week in Miss
An.derson's office to which women represt lta tives from various local U lions werE
invited. The wontan who represenLed the
I. B. B. W, at this meeting Was most impIessed with the sincere interest take, in
the ulions and with the .ffective way in
which the Women's Bureau is organized
to help us The mahl purpose of tlie conference just mentioned. was to aid the
Women's Bureau in formulating sug
grested desirable standards, concerning
wonmen, that nay be inserted in agreemeets with employers. These standards
enmbrlaed subjects including wage rate
(Continued on page 155t
APRIL, 1944
141
4 t.ct
mie
4
cn
Executive
Joint
Conference
L. U. NO. I, ST. LOUIS. Me.
of
Southern California Electrical
S rit.lh.rn I Joi ntl
'r th I [[{l { 1{k'I
At
aiiteetirl,v
AlLentilg tlIllI,
rll
ttn t't'i
President upported, by L U. No. 3.
-.I . Nil. 28 gives some sond pointer' ot ,d inlig.
(;olden Awtieersary of L. I . No. 66.
Labor poliyby 1,. U. No. 55S.
h- 1. Nw. .353
to
talks
contractors.
An editorial is quoted by L. lY. NO.
, e ]t
ti'' t:'
IJ { i iI I f t
it *I I
hold at
h~d ta D:¢
1
~e
Allself..Io
g~athiere'l Nt distal'
i'oryehpi
bote for !hi tIO
flOW A{lia.} I Wit
d 1,
}tiut
Ih
l
I,
Editor: Ore, of these dily
we
up siih Iel
I 0
ib,
Iithl
It EA D
Worker,
'I'I~
ttsi1 ~
itr
~
icr that, it ti- td t y.
If .t...
omr jew l'resilent, is right
ltEi
Lhis "ei,
.rorLts' ti
bie oiantii
fi
h tstru {lin
IHe't.tr[IaI l 1ni of 1, I.
k
I at o ei,,IiI
)k
Lr... Lirit
>
s ioo.ls b1
St.uuis l~ythe tlext i~s,.et
wV will lie
"I'le
hi~
outilne thhms
adp1[
tIi*,rebt
ILht
I itei
of the F!rothl
hitL.,
trinstrinetii>t
tent'k
ii
acid iiitijln
$t.
Luis ilalumst
u ...
staadstill aItir.ost
1
(in the h i
a re wIrkirg ill the sIhipyards
I. t. No. 791 explains subsidies,.
A ne,
local., No. 1356, negotiates
,grneel/wt.
Progress isl recorded in these newsy
epistles from our enterprising
corres pondents.
Litle
Il'e 'ile t
II utbhl pl s ,Wa rI I, his resiilllnd (tIs gesture ol Ihe ]DDp ut' the
eIIt IIs
to thI
L
l'IInI L Irel
IL. I
iIqIil I :[tI
sibility
ee
HI8
[issiol ... .I...L1
I~~sfJ Ytal a~
hai
t'l
'Leole heIIii
Ii~r~dnuud, x"alKe
rqi~'tu[ll Iv the dele, . .te ] troLtmr
Downs. of illetishlp xwasdi, e
vice pri'st
dent w itho ut (o rlllsitjuerl. u
'FI i s ~M[~
iicil[gu,'
hi,
nliehil'
..
La .iTl
li
pei
ht i ,h
Il,,
,,
truth is thai hlz g'it'rrill hH
r,] dlit.
hreat
job J 'or
Ihtih
petitieafl[3.LLltnsL
ti
tinuLJ II Jitsi
ll, H ard
f r antly
'.. In
lo Ileat.
... ILL i
s I.O.t.e. r SlU..
... '
bueiethi
rthe ii'],[
Illis
.w ,, IhiolIy' :m d is
'Ihe
i
a~
to
ilt
rho
All
of Ih,
studio unlins ae
II
i<,i'
theti
Dart inl lhi[
ili'tt
fe
Ii l
i l~em l Lil I
(It c oh1ithe
tir t a~{'ti1Hs o' th u ~i{I io
elII
Ier
I tII
Io hIaIIe I t '
c ,'ietir LII If...
Ihe J ,l iNs
altIu
ill u n....
LI. e L h io ans I
rihe oo n~f'i'~ n''i
'I'YiattitI etII?
fl' that
o t p q
Iell.
iI,'I'e l'.,lI
Ihe olAl. s ,,ri l ri
i, Leii I]
loeal he lh
apu
'iIeL i. rerider
v- 'te ' a'
thus
a't'L a L it....(l*nt
ii , , II
. .....
etl e
I
,h,
tIfil > Ito
'hii
'' el L I hI'
i
.t
lih ii duis'
Su..
i 'tII .l. oI the ttIeelrat
iY'olli'di I ' l o;, ''il l nee aII,
rerte evhile'It'i
ii
]iie*s~iy WhiqP
il,
.(tt
pn',,;lh a pothnn tall
Wil]ith cttkel alit l~ a'l]
~
wnt f¢ush
1
fi
il,
n r
t.. [I,1!1
I~k~I 4,
LI I 'M11
tat
,' I.
whI',
u l]
ofL;IIlJ;I
tII
ill,L ,[HI
I (iliveI4h ,ro I;In',iI1, o utiiir
Ihnd t oII,hIy
I hItu,s
i il L, ll dliii
t hie
r a.,
t ~ii
la4Li I
reF tnt jpdl
v.uttlu rtl.
5 m i" tatii
ittut
ii s i tt
h t' i it t , I 1
i ~. h t y l~n ~
Cue, ¢Fte
:e
e e ti
Ihft., I tl
i ~q
b>
Im p
btuIlaI
lie,
I Ulti
tihai
uTe
thild]D thniistli&Lutltl {'{,ltltl] };e' rtisuti .ilrttr
t hL tIrh lr.:al\i
olrkers in th, entire
LII L Intr. IElt
ila
hi..w;'
d,,r Iubt,'
It L
hi,
nllnt'
."hreh ...
o ...1h 4 ,f
luatenlal
tntI's oI ' all Lil
the l etrtle l' W
i'fs
i thee
Lie imla e aw u It' i1f thL
I
lru('
a
worIk ag11trisl
btL'er hopes Iir the futur'
We
imply li tit, hove .. ;...LIli
,,I
Ilit
lin
[Hitlywotid a nilnl-poilt program has
which contains the hopes
The astute plan gives alt
eip..tunity fol rllnsideraI
l palitit'al tLadInA.
I
ve r, Howe
atny number o
aptpro'eld
iralits c'n only serve as the measure
iLy whii
we can decide just who our friends
t
ii ., A ,,y riro,
tilt,
.aiI
g t
,iit .l. ..l
hal
ap... [Ily
llo
fen th
~
tll
ILI.Hhreb.
J'Ithe 5LLt'LNP~ o{ ttie Iiatil issue
before
all
Ihie el..i..l]eI
petpile and that is-se is
Ihe eletlini of labor's friends tu osfjee.
'/lh
jtetit rnerence meetin, a1/s
lis'
ttuio¢ell it length the a liilbility of i'i
gia
ng ill slwoimepostwar plauitig f1lI
the
I.,t,,fit ,f
Southern CaIifornia workers.
There
is no ditlht that the end of the
Iar
ill evettiual
bring to our workers even
eia'Lr prolhetls
Ilhal, in otherp arts [if
Ihi'
titltItry. H[we er, the disc
'stiont was
beeLIn.. Iltined
IfI IL..t.yltyops.
1 i',
-ts!) ti'il
],oil
inl
ta vor
it'any
oif
m o}re
i
'Iriren.
uru' lii'ila l,
.sut..whth
plist he
.et
itie thell ate, were very tl-tiestid I.,
hearII bIl Lw'le exists in sitty ('alif'yrii
i
g~rlru
viiatti
.hIdle
tndhir the doubtful
cloak
unaffetedl
D
toltowett
teteh. It hiaridli
!by guards
armed
to
the
iem
possble that
,th
nli'iu' is 'LWIIh e vist in a M. it sit
ir.,
it 's u ¥,
Ii i,
ptl lt
l inb
t the ]iiilos;,pli 3
o Clie ass It etil farmers hashraped!
botl,,~ 1in He [a
I
terial Valley istr t Out'
j>Hii Le I I .enee gr..uI. vItedl $100
LirIt to
i"a} [e,
hisI distri L H> help th{'lu l~l
[}1',
itlI.er..ule voidiitins. The hypocrisy of the
tility owners
in this irligation dlistriit
i
provld wh
they sign an agreee, L
it IeI
t]exeat,
empl,
lloyeeI
s
uijlorI
. thl
f tfM. hut tefuse good Americans .',Ltu[r
righilt,
]'i'rhapus wi shoulid .'erlil a eommini
i,Ine
xie<; LI, learn how they ue it.
11 a
li,;.
Anx i ary
of
Local]lB It
serr'ed
ni
excillei rt
urkey dinn]er to the ulrlex te'
UItt thi iI gue~t,; the dinner was noneeded
Ii, [Ie ant dig the test ever servedi
to the
L il~feeL
,e
'[;[
We
w
~IK
D I,t. SN.
wo 'Litta[
to. hoar [.
.e.l..le
whILo are LI,
y ro.
.me
t. our
Iul~% Adtiress
specre1ary 4A4 1 (;[won Ave.,
St.
o, We will riad the letters
the it
Enids { [
LajItI'IL " l
Io
like IIIts i, {..oL.
t it rit Il...li
tr*i
tit
]iro
hiul~itDDtrirue arul tonhi,
llb,
iin, lml wilh t Ihe mmhe
he r s~ig
a,
All tht l],,
are tlirkim
et.linuet
lni
blhe.. mIt
All
Ileti
ILe
trix
thltk
h,okl I~nitar
e
luLx
¢ot
the[I
M a2 bh,
hoter..
thIi e
hadl
ol Ltlir SIN.Tax I S>yntax).
,tvet
iiLentitl lakes
i~1le of
rI of oenl]i
]
[
h.i ha. drltte
boIp,
tt
the
"te
fo l..
lle a
,1hii
hl
Iltter
'[e
, wvhl
hit Reillut,
tLie ARtMYNA\Y
:till] l
hipi tayre
ma '
le illtions
strive
t
hav*e
their
tirpot~at:
,
,T'
w'll
h
Leal N,
I t's
it,
hat
0I
,t ,o
No.
'Eltljij ee]L at~gits i~lih&'ti
art'
t
A
it'i;.]
I'tr i
li, f i+ I. .I
,.
i
l "I'l.l
, h "ilt,
Iorl,
rl e ,, f th,,e little
I ;[Dh.,
i; k
,f the trade%
,II. A. A....~t.
LNtEWMA1 ' II ii'
Iht,
'Ligh<
Al
Wor,.
it
~L'l~¥t~iv
it Pis
by
naiina laws
jf Len g a poitical
suhrli'ism, {iaders
iif the ln'i'riail Valley farmers refuse to
deal wi
other citizens
'f IhL
il ;
,knli
e
lt[tATEWurists',
Ior days lir
Ii vemer'
were flirted to go ah(l~lt~ their
tintulQs
a
No
T'he r a, 'ts
L
ir thai
Ihe
'VItAL
,iI I
I
tIi h &'etTI
he r iIo
L ,ll ulItit 1,IH
]by
ste h
giant
pre[lIs
Is
the Kaiiser
,
mi
soI it
it ,ly logical to use the force which
IL.tmtn.
at
wh'ih is in "[ffhlilte'" tI,/ir[
we hy.. i[n the greatest abundanc- work.
Ihih
t
hole
ItLL
ll
Ca
Liitle
HlItch
dm
hl t
ldh
Gil .
diipbi, of affectilon fitl..
he }lyI fitnk Ihi.
IIi'IlaI,L
h
t ereCur II,t'
t
i
tle
i/
¥ Ihe,,I
II
}~
,I I .
¢~t ~tIt't I
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,ti I r [i.if Il 477, St... li'li
.l .Hill/.
L...
p residot .
rhe
t
,etts
ul i.Ut.i. tIC 'iiiIk
still
'hiB~ o.ll [i Itt e
ireu ,t
hi.ue
' tL,'lt
rilmiti
4th
NO. 3, N l';
YORK. N. Y.
p lio~l~
hillp
I,1oIill
eot..
ilhuthi>n friot, BIlho,
moetberi)('to
0111
111(
[
F'ruilhrit'k \.
k.,h.
dTTItTjltttt.
a
C,,! ak
lini
ColF:''er
ii'' It
dout
' i Hou't
Ivt lH' hii e ''a''hi+~
tan'II duimt
1i ) i' llials.
ld
]St
d,,n
I
s~id[
.'
the
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k
+
>r th1
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lda'
iHZ
1,
t
<I rIo
L ' as
h
isitht d
~rmeu'[ of Pre-c
Lh
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I
051'~l,. t
t, "itw' li
resT''
i
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tU~
tluts
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d
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ikb
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ubiL,
tet I
y
¢
hout
e;l'
[¢,,~.
rv.¢
Mi eta . h
I ' L I ,'ghLr 'la' IheLI
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l '.I l[te [t is % fl'i'
hutI it ai
tilh
i'lLh
'I jinmdt'i t'
and a-' tlxvt W'h) [
the
t'alled I n1,
ii
J.YLIV,
ta'tri
ad.
vthltige ie Lhi, Oplirtillt
to
muake >tith
sohqU itl p t I, I I
,hi tihail it Will pul
.1
l
to the LIipksility rd
f.qt tI Lin i
[~r die
hecit
P',, idenL?
Chb[id [hie
tiLrd
Cu[lliwing
in,
{
lictutes
of thLr i l
llusiii's
it
lhlast(rs, by ex. ii.l.
i,lh.i1,
LihfItI
Ihminn,
aI
a
(l,{,1
]
-
The Journal oaELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
142
plished fact, they hipe to get the President's 5upprters to desert hint as a lost
cause?
For a long time now the l're.ident has
been "taking it on the Ahmn" and saying littIe in return. When it -was fosid that pernllal attack couli not swer.e hiii from hki
course a whispering carrIpagi was started
against his fainily. You all heard it and
~mnut reme'iber the oftenptfble forlns it
took. Because he wolld not retreat frol/
t is support Of the "little guy" there hasbee,
a
of mem bers it both pa/es that
taltion
have opposed every -onstructive measure
that he has proposed. The far,
orl anId
big busiess lubbiei
have openly opposed
ies
.ca
.. desi rIed to keep down bthe ,ct
of living. The 0. P. A. was hamstrung ,'
having its appropriation rut to such at
extent that personnel hail to be redureld
with the result that black markets are dloinal
I thbriving business. In August. 194I.
Cion
gress wa, asked tr extenmd the p .rid
of
al
service for all the arlned services Is nli th S
so that we might be at leasit pat.ily plopared if trouble cane. After terrific w..ngling the vote was 203 to 202 in favor.
[
his
wiih the world gone crazy and Pearl Ilarhir in the offing. In November. IlII. they
were asked to
revise
the neutrallity law so
that we might ar, our ships against atuurk
f
rom
the nazis and fascists. It waI, 6iaa.lly conpuished [by a vote of 2P2 ho tfl4 after ce,tjin Congressmen had threatened to withdraw theirl support of the Preslident unles
he cracked down on labo, as the prie of
their support. This information is takes
from newspaper rep~orts. therefre
is not
vaporing of the imagination. Remember how
tach ,liqu wanted
e
to use end-ease in.l
the opposition to it on the part of nannfartorera who were gettig exorbi ant
firiIes for nmaterial
from nations thha are
low our allies?
When th Presideit
vetied thie lax bill
there was a roar from eertain members if
Congress Ihat their intelliene
i
tegrity had been benmirthed. WIe nighl sit)
for ourselves that aft .r readling the tax
bill that if that is really their (dea of a iust
bill
their
integrity is 0. K_ tit we don't
thidik much if thir inteifigene. Wish we
had space
go into detail but as w.have n
K.
we ask that you look into it you rself :.n I yu
will
ieamazed by the barefaced
CatEring
to
"them that has" at YOUR expense. We know
wars cannot hbefought without costs tp all ill
us but we can, if we will, do something,
nes November
t
about those who would shift
an unfair share of the burden to our
shoulders. Watch out for paities] propaganda aimed at depriving us of a great
leader at a criticaltime for the soe purpose of satisfying selfish interests.
The Fourth W.ar Loan has gne over the
top but there are still plenty if bonIdis tn
he bought.
.ERKp. SILLIYAN, I. S.
L. U. NO. 7, SPRINGFIELD, MSS.
Editor: There sure.l was
g*ood attend.nce at our Irat meeting. WE had quite a
few of our out-f-town
ienmbers workini
nit the different JohIn taking in ne (if on
very nterestiing meeting,.
Recording qeeretar Scotty Jones took uip
the biggest part of the meeting readling letter, frou
our ininbers in servic to wboin
the committee sent parcels for Chrismas. t
surely feels good to hear how much they appreiate the presents. no matter how small.
Somtie of the boys have been pirnIamted to
higher positions and surely speak well of
Army life. Phil 0ollins really has his Irish
wit in his welcome letters asking for all the
boys he knows Steve Swcotchok, of Westfild.
who is now a chief petty
...er in th, Navy,
pittlag into their by laws the absentee vat
ets' section whieh will enable all of our
lme,,r, to vote by writinf to us for a list of
W A NTTED
Experiencd
.
s. tem dispatchers,
turbine operators.
firemen
and
pumpmen for immediate employ,icat at Arsenal Hill Station of
Southwestern
Gas and Electric
Company. Shrevelprt. La.
This is a modern gastired central
station on
large
a
interconn.eted
tranI..lu. ipNnm
system. Only experieneed and qualified applicants will
be crinsidered. Apply by letter
ONLY tn:
L. U. No. 329, L. B. E. W.
P'. 0. Box 702,
Shreveport, La.
and Ilarold Bnsia and Austin Dohellar who
are in the Scalaes arid other members whose
samos. I
wiopdeiful
rdoni't rememnber now, all have seial
lettrs toh the local thankinq them
for the ('hritmas
LItn
bu
presents.
riot least we had It very interest-
ing lotter froi our wande ring ex- usines
IMan ger Chnitres Caffrey. whip accordaing
his litter, has traveled many .titlE inCe leaying SprHinfteld In Christmas Day, for he said
he has beenin sad oat if three colleges inl the
lost month. Uncle Sam is giving the boy the
best of art, and he said he surely had the
meabership in lind and when he really gets
sort tied he will write qijte a few letter. to the
enpn,,lhers if the loci.l I know qitite a few of
the mmbhers would like to know his address
ao they can sent{ him letters to help pas
the time away, We all hope to be able to see
hin real ison anti hope he doesn 't stay awiay
too long.
Our new biusl.ess manager, Lnu ldlibeet.
is dinlg I wonderful job in these trying time
tryint to please theeontrartrrs. They gt a
little ru'h on and expect the huiinlss lan.
aver to rush then, a gang if pint, frr a fi,
winks. T~hn Ihe rush is over for a while
again. BuIt In su.rely iN doi
his Ilesl and it
won't be a]Iri Irafare he his the situation well
in hand and will be0l4, to stand up with the
het it~ then,, for experinc is a winrhrful
teacher.
E].MIILAtti(¥Y
P. S.~
l. U. NO. 22, OMAHA, NEBl.
Iins been a Iong tirnl snree] I-U.
Ns. 22 hIas had anything in the Wo.tat.
However, that diei not mean we do not
read it or that we have Iost interest in the
Brotherhood.
Many of our Innbers are in the armed
forEes. We are doing our part also for victory
i 'is by butying War Bonds anti by keeping
our pledges antI bligations.
h, the past two years we have obligated
]iatty new [neblhrs
into the
Hrotherholn.
Also we have peen fortunate. enohgh to setnre sveral a ilields and other gov-ernment
work which helped us flancial.y, At the prescot into work is tapering off somewhat, with
just t few converion jabs to ahld's over
ntil spiring.
For several years the loral has hid it scho, l
for the bonefit of nueapprentices who desire
to become technical electriiants. Not to ble
iundojie. the journeylen(a lie now ert sizing
It school forI he, melves. They are about to
delve hiwt the mysteries of electronics which
will be a big thing after the emergency is
dit'[r: It
For the benefit of our ~erhber, w]ho are
working in the jnrisldition of other locals
,Ini who wish otakIe in active part in thl
election (f oiffcers this spriig, L, U. N, 22 is
no ii [ni kqaa
Omaha', alcoho plant, which i supposed
1 hethe seeurd largest in th, world, will
in operation by the time you read this. We
he
lave had more than 50 wiremen working on
this lol, during the winter. This was a conier5..n
job aId most of the equipment was
procured from va- ws arts If the country.
J. M. Asnrawt P. .
L. U. NO. 28, BALTiMORE, MD.
tWthe Uncertainty caused lb
.nplplye shortage and other conditions. we
Erditor: Due
find our letters appearing in the JOUalsi
ahmos. a month hlte. Taking present conditinsinto rtonsIderati.n. such as paper short
ages, difficulties in the ,iai
etc..
tshedules,
ll of which can properly be attributed to
the war, we can consider ourselves frortuae
to reeive the Jot]RNAL at all.
it readling our daily iapers and followitg
up the various columnists, we hat the uthtie
eXpeilhret'e oIf indiig these saie gentry. who
eried to the high heaven,
at the ternific
ha ri Ito the w r effort caused ly labor by
so called absen teeisni and strikes, about
fae ng. They had us all but losing the war.
Milu[ yotu onily ]albor was held to blame for
this. NXw thissante crew of labor critics ha,
perfnrnteel sonic remarekable gymnastics an<
has gyien a beauttifrl exhiition of their
latest in flip flops, This, in the case or the presit cry for labor legilahtion or draft Iabur
eanpaign Insiigine our greatest cities goiem
all-out in their claims {hat labor performed
wni,ldrfrillv aId kept the Allies. ineludig
England. Russia and the rest, well
supplied
wiilh all 'h' needs ,fwar supplying an Arem,
nf 1) tp I2 mlln
...
arit io on. We suspect thei
a in,i this Lype of ehonge of froi are of
the ulterip variety.
9eeping the above in mind it i well,
ke lihee anid note well the warning Iptl
firth, by S,,ato Hioer t. Brine of Wasb
in
aston.printed in Labr.,
The Senat.ot
warns that big business is out to gobble
Liltsmall totpetiturs and is planning a enn
rerrttel drgive ngn innat o rganized labor. The
sicas nf this are plentiful. burt I..s. of the
planuning at presei t
behind closed i dors.
This isn't just plain pessimisn but actual
factt It I9 up to us all to look a bit ahead
t llhe fuitre and not be bliderd by a little
so-cal~led
" prosperity"' Our thief weap.n
[sthe ballot. and Biothers. IIr your futuref
sake look
eareully,
look aheapi antd make use
if the one powe-ful weapan yru still have
Ise ynur head! Use that ballot -and votenot for idle prrises hto
pt
perfrosnrrrat.
Reward labor's friends,
It scents that quite a few of the boys oer
runs-acrosthese 'lays, w
ho
thes
stug put Iut by the daily papels and radii>
and newspaper commentators. It is positively
stnrishing to note the shortness of emory
of some antI the gulliwity of
Ithers.
We
suggst (that
tore of the boys go in for our
own labor papers and really get onir side of
the sor
the real story. We pronise a real
surprise in store for those in the haiiht of
getting their vital neWS all colored ii one
shadeWo rk at pisent is tapering off a hit and
the routine has been cut cooider..lv with
theresult hat a great number
of the boys
have left onr midst. We note Sntkey Stauntlm
is also amongst the missing.
Reading the papers we note that Brother
Ed]arnlatz is performing oi the bench- Ed.
as we menti lied in a previous isue, is Polite
neiisttrte at large. ReatiemIe r the [oy is
still a Iwent
er of No. 28 and attends
tugs, Nothing too big about the hoy
plain "Eddie.'
Itet-
jusit
APRIL, 1944
143
V
At this late date it pight not be amiss to
menttion that Harry Cohel, once active in
our prgaiization, is president if the Baiti
more Federation of Labor and president of the
Teamsters'
joint council,
liary
-'
was once
president of Loal] N.. 28. lie has gone places
of late, as we note that he was given a
surprise rarty and presented wilh a hand
some pIlaque honoring hih for hiy 0 valrs
of leadership in the Teaim tee aii..I..exnon.
B. S. ROSFMAN. 1 §
L. U. NO. 66. HOUSTON, TEXAS
Editos: On the evening of Februar: HL
Loalo
Unoio . B C. celebrated its F]ftieth
Anrtive.sar . In addition t. the uIsua. IIthings
nciident to the pride and juy nf such ani
ocIcasion,. .e we
out It ac.onplpkh four
definite objeltiyes: 1) TI honor url pelnsion ileibers an,,d those haviig 20 years or
lOre con tin n~o s good standiu
inni
the
]nEW; (21 to build up a better reiatioaship between the ion union pIlblic aid the
IBEW by means
of radio, pohlicalitns and
the press, by personal invitatio,
to our
anniye sar3 thinugh PubItic appeara ncs of
our iite rritoinl t officers, and thirough firsthand information to our
.nembershipand
their families; (3) to break up the drive
directed hy sonic urserupu ns mnufeat
to rern through the "kept p
s..
sleek.
Airy polilieians," mid tih Atericna Lngion
to .aeotage
irganlzed
labor; 14 to belott
acquaint our members and officers of Local
nfiod I3-66 ald,]the local repro1entatixes Of
trade unions in this 'i'mitv 3/itlour
Iither
internat~ionial o lcual$.
The uflreerg of B-g; ald ItIcer wies
ente rtained PTresilent an (i NIrs. Brown.
Chhair
man a.nd Mrs,.
Charles Paulson. A >ten,,t
$tcrnta y of Lbor and M rs ian Tree.
V'ice President and [rs$ Lotlie Ingram. Representative and Mrs. WHitiam (el. -j,,d Relresentati'e Null at a
dinnerat the Sari
Jaento Inn. Each person present Ter noaH)
initroduce
himIelf. and the diarel
it,,
nediately transr nnl itself iitoI a ig fanily
affair. It seenlied as though someo e haid
turled the clock back 35 years, and the
crowId hecamea ilepalahly lineid with datning. hand-shaking. joking, and eal'tlg.
During the dilnlner on Wedalrsay uight.
eve rybody was ineited to the Hmsoa
ship
yards by Mrs. Dan Traey to
i
itiess the
launching of the SS Katherine L. Bates.
The affair seemed tobe strictly ]IEW inasmuch as all participating in the christenDid of the ship were nelhliers of he IBIEW.
Fine talks were made1by
Ats, Tracy. Assistant Secrotary of Labor Dan Iraey. Presi
doeut Brown, (Chairman Pol
faus,
nd Vile
Presidpn t Lul
In gram. Mrs. Tlacy, as
sisted by her matron of EuhonMrs Swa.,
clristened
tht ship with Iteo
a beautifully
'rated bottle of champagne as it granefully
]Pied illtt
the nm0rky waters of Buffalo
l ayou. shortly hlrfrre
indiuiiht Thbrsday
f,
jrlJdga
vas given our officmi
,re-akfat
fam..ly, it whieh all he{.usines
managers
of the a rious A. F. of L. organizati is wire
nyited.
h
cludi ri our good frienId
Irol, Ab
Closkey Iiespial. the Arllly, tile Nay, and
the Marines. At noon arrangements were
made whereb) our ,fficial
far., l rtndled
4everel different lheheons, while the wives
of the anni
committee assisted
.rsary
by the
president of the Ladies Auxiliary of B 66
and the
youug
lady employed by the loeal
as secretary entertained the wives of our
visiting officer aLnd
s
representattvi>.
The M3us-i Hail Is the nieeMt shoi
hell e
in the eity, and the meeting was wIll arrarigei With provi
eor the re,,r'l4nL,
foni
IfIhe entire ¶rroram fol fut.uore
eo
wolderful talkt were made by F'resident
Biow~; (hairnian nf the Executive Council
°auslenl; Vice President [ngramn
Exeeutive
Secretart
of 1he St-ate Feieraioui
.arry
Broncze
comoniul.
neaoriel plaquel propose d nd accepted by the IershIb
ipT of LToal Xo 103. to
orate the services
iederold by George F. "Sajor. Capelto, past and dpartedl
Businss Mlanager of L. U. No. 103, Boto~n. Mass,
Acrelian; the mayor of the city of Iijus
tO;
(arptin
Moss, piulic relations.
ffi
car of McCleskey
Gsl ener
}]piltIal; (apteai
Kelly, wounded veteran of Sicily; Ph.M 1/c
Jones, lneifie area; Sgt. Fitle,. most deco
rated Marine in the service; and Chairman
of tho Anniversary Committee Diale Lea
cock. Asg]start Secretary of Labor t)a'i
Tracy, wvho wa, introduced by Judge Sewall
Myer, general conunsel for the slate federa
tion. delivered the priinipal address of the
evening over a nation-wide hook-up. Plresideiii Bro',
prell....i.
IIEW service erm
bhenms to 67 menlers of L.nol B-66 who
had 20 vear£ or oui con3tilluous gooad tandlig in the IBEW.
Chirarle
M
lausen proseilted h..o.r e.
.blem
to eight
ei,,SiJrn itelnber: if
Loeal B-lLW. brother
W. L.
Goldtoth hiow
was furnisheid
tran spoFrtat ion and expenises paid fronal Los
Afngeles in o
rder that he could particpate
in this honor of the pension members.
brother R.
.luDBiAs "ho was absi-en It o
account of illness in San Bernardino. CaIif.,
.ar sent a pit attached to a nice
heek
fr in the local union. The original charter
.er.ersof Local B L6 were
.lac.ee It.
(}ei~rge,
.IL
W. HIe re ford, and P. A Peter,
al of whomt are dead. After an exhaustive
search
y our[n teriatlotnal Office, it was
foutnd that Local B-6O was chartered
lan
sry. 13, 1894, iy lh,,e throe Brothers.
Fseejptiualhly gond talks were ninIle by
,he servicoeniront the Arly, Navy. aruil
Marines and particularly rtei Capt:iin Moss,
public reAilinus officer of Mct(lsley GEl,
oia
forb canvle cen veterais
Isospital
t
II
ctted at Temple, Texas. This offier invitil
Is aid other aEo r representtive s to ¥isld
that hospital ai] we suggest that if there
is a hospital in your erivlity. visit it oftlen
andIae
.rl i te r,-s in the patients. because
there is a t.ontinuou
low of servicemen
c<in in
Iio thes ehospitals from every bat
Ile area ill the world and relurling to those
battle area.
and it
is they who should
have the truth, and it is you who should
give it ia them Through the help of these
servicenmen.
ur War Bond sIales ill
he
Fourth War Loan Drive has reached S21.500
-hich is in addition to the regrular amounts
ledged Iy our
I
embiers to individual cal
panIcs.
(hairmnan Leace.k ha. aked me to thank
the varihus local uniins a.id their altemlers
for the fine cng ratulations and good wishe,
senl II. We also wish to thank dir international ,ffels,c.
through this puiblieti.n
for the tine hi
hel.h.ave
u:
%Ie also
wantl to, thank the out ,f town nmebers
and busines repesen.tatves who aitteded
Li r annliyesaty- All he.. thing
n cntribtled
to the success of tIuI ainiversary, and helpeid
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operalors
I'M
JOtRXAL until the April ste., S. yau can
se" that news is stale by the time you read
it Si do
lo t }dame iec.
At thld tine there is plenty of sickness
arnongc ile Bothers, The folloing Brothers
arc In the sick list at thin writing, Fehrua ry 25: Brother Dave liruer, Local No. 80's
president in confined to Ihis home because
or i
spriired hack. Terry Brolsk in il the
hosp ital BIirothers A. C. T'evi and Elmore
Adams are also 1ick.We hope for their speedy
recovery.
This little bit of news nay be a little late
as I have e'plaiaed, but here goes. With the
We Launch a Ship
permission
of Brother
Fred
Russell,
"little
Freddie," as we call himlwe announced ~he
rtmrrilgt
of Iis good Brother, We were very
ouch surprised hearing of little Freddile's
marriage. o we wilsh him all the happiness
and success
I
n the warld, hut little Freddie
should not have treated his friends that way
ande not I{t ItIhe in on it. Instead he surprises all of us. But this is leapi year, anything ran happen. Brothers of L. U. No. So
extend to Mrs. Fred Russell their best wishes
for a very happy life.
M, I> MARTIN, I'. S.
On Novenibe' 12. 1!43, at the Kaiser shipyards in Richmond, Calif., the U. S. S. Geon
oral Samuel ,). Stlurgis was lunched. Fisehlhek and
oore, Inc., were the eleetrIcal contractor's on the jet naIl they inform us that this was an electrical department launching due
to the fact that the ekletrical depart.ent inade the best shoing of any department in the
yard ill connectla1 with sub sirilptlsto the War Cheat Drive recently held in the yard,
The attractive young wenmen pietured here who were the prinelpals at the launehing
are
left to right): the sponsor
i, Rio Ivanhe
electrical traiter on the graveyarl
shift; Mr's S., Stils, the wife oIfone of the forenloll and a maintenance machinist in her
own right, and Mrs. Esther Porter, intenr of the clerical force In the swiig hift.
Fisehbaek andti
Moore expresed prid in hhonor
he
conferred on its I. B. E. W. employees
and I a sitre all the B .othehood
..
i.i s hare
this feeling of pride iI the achievemeut of it,
Brother and Sister ineiilners.
to weld a elose'r teellii
Local timon B-66.
nf fraternity within
A. .1. BANNO,
B,.,,
L. U. NO. 79, SYRA(I[SE, N.Y.
Edilr:, AS we set forth our relaltins with
ouremployers we have no thought of enitiring o.. lhe plane of quarr.selslole, petulant children: *it's Ill your fault" or, 'No
sir, it is all your fault, and you know it!"
Sohlr vy: We are all taught in the nets
led quagmires of war. in
eet we are
indnuIed. Nor wnuhl we have it otherwise.
Tils talk of drafting )llo: Why, latbo
has been drafted g t'aially fIoI.. the tart.
What manner of man can bid goodbye to
, hrothe rs or even de r friend on the
,luchani niot go along with them? "We
are Ilot mad(l If su.F, slight elelelts,*
The fact that we stIitl dip for what we
believe i, right. is
illy te
,xn.re'ssin of
valiant natures. We do not propose to be-
tray our iiheritaice and trusteeship of
freedonm .4,5to any
'per, and have the very
cry ,ut, us in theease of ohil Metlin
lrees
lThou fou s!"
While the lylt{!Inatic caulpaib,,
ag:iillt
urganiizced lalior~ continues, with uaiiiliibiished
vigor, rhe Ir.teei i. e r.iem,,i'rshi, chliause go
cleionI in current Igreclients, s*enTs to he
getting special atteIItjanh.
Great
symIIpaLthy
is
shown
fIr
the
n
u-ulionworker.
The unIon i usually portraIyil as It heartIess.. racketeering entity headed by a braIen
seiot,nilre, iilh a rimtinal record Ia long
an "Kelly's lreamii
iat
the eentral inler
natio nal lI.idv cannotar or will riot do an;-
thing about it.
Now., if I was as alien to orgIa.t.z.i
labor
as the mjythieal dwt, ller o
Mrsa, reason
derides such policy.
Flrst, the peru/atet'veo ,of ally organiz-.
tiio,
be it a labeo union
or he [Ulited
illes of Amlerila, depends ininly upon
its recruits
or the geieration
If
new lfe.
The immiutable years will have their toll.
The quality of the recruit his loyalty and
usefulness to his union, his trade, and his
commrnu ity depends largely upon the first
imprcession s he rteceies fromI
his union.
(),-
viously, no more stupid policy could be conceived. Fatalism
i wri tien large ill ave
it ITf such delbauchry possessed the spirit
of organized labor, for wI, ilh I have Iufered
somIe, labred mluch and loved dIore, I would
dedicate my remai ili g (days to penitential
sa tifattinn for the dark sins of man whose
origin, life and destiy are akin to the
[)[vine.
Blut the entertainm ent of sut[
notmons
is coun ter to the lively hopes and Silt plnriplea of free governdlent. Lincoln ,as right.
The olnmon lion is usually true to his kinshil uness his
frielties are exploitedl by
external designing influences when his selfrespect goes ri h the
rind. and Ie falls
somewhat
like
Lucifer,
'never
11 Iist
attai,." So he drag ouit Iis drab. medioicre.
futile
existence, his faculties paralyzed hy
sense of loss; or, more pitiable
till sans
hlirthright; saiis selfr-re spedl saans sen se of
loss;
san
everything: IWho never knew
their
red nor fel the loss of such a thral{."
Blt the witnes of Iuan as
Ihe
striveI
and struggles, k1eat% oI freezes to leaI an
honest life and maintain a decent hone
gie; the lie to all he calunlniatprs born
antI unbhorn,
tHOMA$ DrARtlrAN, P. ,q.
L. U. NO. $0. NORFOLK, VA.
Efdit..
guess some of the Brothers of
I. 17 No 8 wonsder why news appears in this
column sol late. Well I will tell you. All oIt
respondence nlfllt he in by the first day of the
nmonth preceding the month it goes Io print.
For instance this article which is being sent i
before
M,1arch1 will
jiot allpeir
in,
he
L. U. NO. 104, BOSTON, MASS.
Edilr:
lnl't the guns nor arnament, nor the
funds that they pay,But the close cooperation that Iliakes them
It
win the day:
It
ill't the
iadividuali,
nor the army as a
wh(>le,
But the
sverlasting team work
blooming
of every
soul.
Ruidyard Kipling.
In response to the r
equestsof many Imin
bers of the local, and to Iuiet cueries as
to what has beconI of the loeal's pres
rerreltary, Local 104 will endeavor to break
again into print and try to contribute a
few, and we hope worthwhile,
toetters
thLe o'.rrespo,.dence
ldepartiment of the
lIre herh eod .s.Iuost excellent magaz ine and
uieial peeiodi cal, the JOURNAL
A few years
back thl local did
a few letters
Iontribute
to thIi inporjat
t pape.I, and the reception
if then WteS so kind and yymllathetie, that
again she [nake
hild] to venture along a
like nrse, They are oflered as a contributiol to the thought or that .....
ttan.b1er.
firtemily of spirit whose members are found
wherever
ether to
nIa,,
'ni
women
are banded
bette r the lot of their
to-
fellow
workers.
Perhaps the mist urgent need, or rather,
oIne of the most urgent need, in these uncertain and troubled tinles, is an excellent
cordial Io bolster up the drooping courage of
our bewildered and wrriled lablr men and
women. History, especially of ou laWllr organlzation+, is an extrenely superior reriver of dragging
spirits: and. the memory
f tile past. with its reords of struggle
and triumph issuing ever hi clearer light
mid wIdr kniwledge. is the ieat possible
aiii,IOt, Bt ii ait palhie and tlInest which as
sa[tli trio
llariy of US in these (lays. And
what crglvgiiition .Oldl[] lIetter be chosen as
surh It peiaacea. than the one which has just
passed its 44th annlivelsary, Laeial nion No,
10. Local l0t has a story to tell of which
its nmltu.ers can he justly proud,]t
can
justly iring wide its doors
trid ilnvite the
cngr'atalations of the labor world. It must
have had a true vitality and it must have
ra intiutered to the. cen tiaala] necessities of'
is llelhelr to have lived through 50 years
of changing seasrens, And
tivering so long a
lime with its continuous life, it has become
a hodll tO hold the years together. The
unitv of ha .... life hieh underlies all the
variety of human living is made evident by
this, One of the values that ie ill the
APRIL, 1944
145
lnbroken life o£ oir bl ovyed local is that
a'I ite ]embers, both early and late. can
clai]1 a pomonl
with one anB
.rotherhooId
uther Ad in somte subtle waV
we are
helped by that hellfd of o
h
iod
eve it thtse whot the Ilocal xil] rldsei
Up to earry on when
fCallen by the
i~ havy
waimysde. A great orgt,,f...
i~ ke a great
itill.
pIerln wirh this exeItilt..Ii
it 'a, liecnie
'flature without lIy of
tweaknesses ,if
,
lW~flg ior; It eaa reaach It is, r pere - of
afft without any ef the e"Ide noees of dle(my3
1ke
nil
llOUr
ll
.....
e.I looI I I., tho ppeedF
,,nd &'pelc es of tlh[e
zetl~erfttifh
0$f workers, and.. w it
lhe
tine
klid bleai t and the
I....e
w. se handrs nmav
ihe,
I mille to care
I
fIr L
-In exelleni
pIre.. '
.t .e...berhip.
TAM. )l S.
L. I- NO. ill. DI)ENVER. CoIl.
Kditor: Just r
ecivedn'y Feb-uary WorkI and
r i it ]rmnrlnd it
If tilb' fact that I
haven't
set in ourlet ter yet so here goes:
I ha.
heard
,f II ldI..me.. wo.ten line
men ..iLnd u
liien
. h.,
the ertillose. l
IctINre li 8-year oHI
"lek" Overman. sont
if our pzesident of [l-Ill " edl " O verman,
ti .i.. shI.,,
the <fi'l1t whie0 h
ixtermn atl
rig the yellew rats al.Ibarba.ro.us
buns
be~sidIes breaking
tIll ptodi..tiort.
eeord..
kritwnm.
] o'e joiwer to'l "Illi
ak
id all o f (tir
youngsters. /7be
vtl~,'oetiIi'poI
if "Dick"
otld
pr tl ....Sor
.It
y.
brinls to ny
Bit llt the troubles
whi li
re airt tle lile .aII eot' Jut 1hi
Oiltkpll pil alIt
iti1tleill ... T'he biggest
tr0[i
orffart1zed blht.r hag ig sqlple
..
Ie
11l i3 IAJl) ...et/i ,iId ..
erii...glh UNION
Ille* which i]Sw!'rS Il/ile.t
hle
il. why dIoes
thie lait, lI pri* cI i of l'.ss of a loealp
ill..tliers
fl lii
r
lh o hlisittess or II I al
year in an/d year Cut Jr) regul a lilfe it is lx
pil....ed as pere.nil
ell'l
getld the faet that
ttlan
A nite'Cnriy
iLt4k
til fl'ac 'y imeans
Ti'rStltl pi' ileges
ttiad
fr f'eirp
ilr
all Ilet's
'ut Olese thirte hul of mir life
so
t
tllr
Iny'; toio'l
or, figtllng for us an
Ietrcon ho e to II ileiliOerl ttii
1i'f tt v of the
fr(.eloris
illh
whichh' I
''l, Sta tes i!f Amer.
i(ll
tll,
dtr for. 1lb I Ihole a t'l still lots of
rcips iatit
lgst the %hams.
'.0,
It the i' t
,e hid thi, filsl year
fora..
liteher [','hi, A.it'liter.
IT wias ini
ithit' d eLdLocrl No . 1. I. ]II
on June
II.
lio n fin k
tiru
, o it Dlatrn can1 ha ve a ea rl
Ii t oldl li il Nt i t''} I' '- lsaN'
brun
nr
of L<'.al }l-lll
t.lrotln'r }lol'ler spelli Ilaly'
yei r. with tll ltt' lt;.h.'.. e LIW ieI
ill ant,
cut if lD. (1', a... I
well know', by thl
w poleti
[hi
iff
}
Brother Mout'" S. E Th~uiip oni, of Local
[
"~
ho is fall line
steward ffn the job
at lPa co se X[~: h .a l o ph ifl fair
"e
V~l,
isit u!t L]iri lty'' Blro ither '.M uttl
is wel kh,,wn to the. ]iys
a,e' he his
', qrked in find out 'I..
widinyra .
llrothe 'r Isll'' I Ihiwmanitit or
Inal NM 8I89
wr
'I led hollie >iiltl (' tJorttt"a io Vi the
hoiday's h y Ihe 'el'l
<f hli
rudhsr :
father. '0o
i
pasefId
r
am
tilhm
teek.
,iur
y
'e'i
ilpathtie..
llO t to Ili'tther BOWmiar
o h.
irot'' Ita 'y in wll krio'r
to
Ih* hoys here ai
ho,
wrd
pwith 'ls
niltni
tie on
lt so ei' ef t,ll W]'iin/( rh ' th e
was tl'l t ,'
we IlI UId take itl
tih
ttnpriyi 's ef thie p[it[>
ai'el'
ei},pilU
anoL ... l el~fl~ rii.]l ill ~in[ vai o...
rnatltifaietutrer.
lere. Ilir'et~if,ii , t hey hatve
htrt l eft ol [ ii the CO[
l d So, falt as 1 l
privi ices were (orl'( erre. w'e now have the
<imetrital waditer/rlat
r..
d.tillr trtlerit of the
Ri tl imr) ter A rni,, ('oon.. liy in I...
iOO
I q~
Thi, step is birtltgiir us it, new naentlIc'ls
e'.ty n/oath Wi e iti H' 'l'
hp1,e e vy riHrI
w he wllh us until they catn Ie-
polistialIt.
Ali
ware out linemen? /Al] II11 32 bohys
ill thi
serviee? Well. the F. S. aldreds, book
looks like the world's atlao.
I thy at'erttinly iattereld arIIun tlh wer](i3,1A(I ours
trly
w~Hillsoo be a ehtanzlit ill the book
i'
am
,..
.eaving sramt for Pl l italt.o.
j sIt waltin< fir m>% $w l i" ,u
I.If I It"
fn..
t one of those 5ellow ,ai.
I'll
I,'
Iite hin to {eath. So liok <ut B-11<I
Ilottolml. here'
[ m
N,. had a mal plalry here a ,hile hilak
with
.oodaIteriilnr.
And x, were happv
tf iear an addi1rets on the workins of
itheI War ,anlpower
oa.. Iv
..
I"
other (Ijir
,N\..O. i. Of Local No. iw,
ho is als.~ii t
ei,,..l
dreetpi r If hi,
lidstriet. We also
wire k.lad tlo lia't Bior
Keith S..ith,
EM I I. I. S. N. Itf ilial I.S. lHe i the
'o
f Itiepilesernali e A. L. Stith of the
eighth <ilstrietr ltroch'r >lmhl
W~as lhotoe
an well-earrt,,Id fl],,il ghi frly
the SlUtil
f iitu
t
ltr ZI. I knlow spare
CS
,ireDi lfir I in dile l OitkE.E
Ott] I alit. rt or
titled to all of it, Hpe
0I loals art dolne
ais well or better than ',e are
and
that 194,
seel thh enlld of Lth . .ar. 5ff W, Ican hkayo
OuT'lr ots back h
Si,]n
So d'I
forget., "M Y
MOiE BONDS.'
''llOW xip' JOH~N W'ttso , P. S.
v
I,, '. NO. 116, FORT WORTI, TEX A S
I will strt
this, ltter eft hy lettin..tllr
Brothers i o,
theri Tarts 'f the 0toi..'
Ilry knitI
ho ol'l o fic(,, e ,'r. l','htl lhl' nOIM..
old tilnl in ai oth e l1. t' xIIill i'ooi llt ze s111t
i ,
1ff tIn' folloewin
ilalrfn : Htlt ,hr Fried Otto,
Ig
our ¢h titlt...lL
gooIIu ueehl e, a $i ulire
shoter alld ilyl
to Ihe tlllin(i; Birther Dr P.
lti I'y, our lu d'ies. aiel
at
tL d lti,
.iI..l '
W itit IL fai' dea fo'
l
:11 lbi'ther (G ty Manor.i,
lu,' t''(i'r1g se c i't' iu , still dbiirug Ige...
jil
nurt t' 'everal yea >I in this ''fltee;
Brother
Fr'I','d CrtInewald, "'o' lin:uI itli secretary. the
;tll'l
,ho takes in the if,f tglh enlttill antI
ilwl ay ou tI, jlt: Fliiihl i]. `' Bloie"', al..
rats,
'tin.,a lBrroth ei' liked I,3 , aillI
I tint teyl eiu lIl I,, fe thr
a lyovi alr ,ady
Vn'w tltl11otuttheo txe'oL[~p~ I~luin]. atlhough ]
O L (;r,''lllIow
b/{;l flariy,. I
P
Al l'tkwe.l
]ra Miflfer
[I
lt Hy tnt Earl ]{oliu-
I w'ill ,,lenliut n' few if the ticy; riot inl oifit,,, that, helpedI Io ],aIlke Ill,aI I nhm Nl I1l;
o 'r of the l'l l: I- K ...tdrrll..
i' rtuit
Sihts J,
.
Wcee
. 31tRafr'.r.
W,
S. N,
}
,
ettrw
Zi{tilpe{illt1, ]iehard PI l dlh
]liuti [1oflruuar, II C R
Jltiv.
I. I. G ranger
iiflid f"'' .ii
{ll,
tt I
l6 y
'
$l ,
r 'cet'ttl{ '
retlen
',have
aug
ti u'q~,tIership
flOWX arnd
'I uisda;'. thougJh ''i n,'t'of the Jrothets do,'
rield fia: thel/
<<',
lL,1 I xttllt
like 1o
I,.
Wrh",pi
nf~a
IvcIneOur
,,,hpe
!,,,n't
titend lor a't<e't<
to ]
;aKu fit in te're't
/
*pi
't
0•,
et',
A
l
I
110
#~I
n
sll
ite
'
,
C.
fIll
ihi let'i~th
uc rg
i -I',n ,,i I~
all
,ieiiii
F rT.,e
Ihl~
tu Itd o'<
r,:
"("h h"
kt ,
fli-'
~
h
u~rtr
tiunes.
P pl'rh
t' '
0f them ll
I... it
i t, I
'glTn{
~>f
JIt
o"."in
tt
(fi t h
I II j
q titu ,t'.'
utl - iu u y i 'l r' , t'. " hat
la elt
r
I "
....l o,
a rt
NW. It
ar'
'ei lite se.e..
dh,
s~ 'ift'
l Itit
'If~~
~~It1il sIl% I,I I heI, t :ieltt'
h.Ia' I'u
we aie hoifir
this :dul
conflict wHil
i l h(ir over a t] i dlt..
W
will
L IiL
ll f
LIll,,
pad
Ihh,,I~r,
ftll o£Wil,
t t'uoe ti o
wi'' i iI t i, lt krmI l a0l
*l ,ilflnt~
w h oe l l
lo alnlre
iid lif a ill.
]ll , hol
m1g
11
aind sl1te of our [oys have drifted to ,r...l.r
prlstures, We hope they el'n, son return home.
VAtt"ll F, RliNsoN,
P. S,
U.
I. NO. 210, ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
E tdior: Local N,,. 211 ..... ILtlIS 58 laelleIS
iut the ainedi fee's Wi h lold re.ee.ly frnt
f nrb Diatis and lrole (tuk
wI''l i re tatitin d
nlsoewhere in the Peltif. A.ls 3Lw I luthr
who is statitineld at
illthridlge,
Nd., atid
iN 'tencling the rlio'triel schol thre'.
At this
rt
w
IIiix
had:l little news
t'rli 'tl the W ar Lalici' Iltin i
'ineoleevTtitl
lhe
,trrre.. .,ct1i sined willh, ti ' AtlatitIc Iily
1, t'etriy (!umpauly. 'Flhe I'w thbi ts tie tie 'orti
t'ered hy the M II airell Ilnill' ie ms al' we
'hould
roee e a ftqll,'ih ' an.si ,er It lie
roargl future.
1'l'e ,1s'rnlher3¢ iie ''olhiii1 incL their ser¥vie
:a'd are tlt'tirta
I fin tob i llrml
the hogl'~
/ai d liopiral fti l'atd hi 'll!ih O ' stl'.
This
work is 'i''g
<'loe fr te}l,e lanelt>
" 1i
w ,u illt'd s, tilt iers' hi' s
/luli, t:/pke Ja',te Ir a
ut i] r anly tx pfs'u' thI, ,i iaril$.
W( don't
titliy o feethe outside cur.
,trthitlor, nbp,
.mi ilal t'ttft;t attends fre
i]t'lltly
btlt we till
l[& l Al (hrist. Jim
N.e.'.mI ppill
it.il. i'ih lat athe h"L(eifl~;
[f rirli of tIII £I...tllth
hu e. aI..
. .i i. g
W'l rlute Io i
li
eI l'I otI<le
7t],2 the
W'ol f;}~l
ef~titt:'0 ' Iii r' t ' ''h
Wl
'i ii] hl~;' hInt
lend th l irlfn.r. ..rnii,~t
' h'oIroll
or n ,ie r
to$e)th, [)r(sts
tn
erilqi,1
Geerie <U'l
Missouri A,
planti. A. I ;t,['
i dour
<I1
hilt to keep , thli oi'g nmii ifii
i!f iit
K'trt~tintt' Iladl to'see Jd, &.v'
arlou'nd ni~t]
ftthe ,ilei' nt
a gaft'
jutl
vlad to~ see HI
'lruitoub'w'er ntl]c [lo(ger t','llurt > .lre 'f the tek
(lhtppe Ada muis litil,
,tiet;.l
,I Ik
ittleI;.r are . fl'TRithe I '1' Ior, ' are ahif we
nyorl e 'il rj'g I,, h *t'h S' rkli t[ ' tili[,
nImBillt \l T
re'.
tfgird:
M lriz
D(,iL "
ktrtIl
si lt for' reteirvTLt tlt
Ad(%rrillfto
t'e~tu ''era the renp lit mi it iot 'er
gold it
'laltS, [,lt C, h.. Ili
IiIo11;£i l I I..... P 5.
l.. U. NO. 212, (IN('INN VFI.OHIO
Edittor' Here in
Iiaf'Ilr'Lt[ we are ri/,le to,
I our-last
wintut
y lice, Iee
I.men what roilhL
rin' w o,
r e a t i jiti
then l
fy'tll. ii/turI'<
.
thticu~ hts of lote. etc.
Fo, II1 r ite lyh t l , tn'I
fItI'.y ti.htly turll
to,
W. ripltot the' fo~llwinUl
The Journal el ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
I41
('Co'peto l Tho..as OtGuy Inkied
States Arllly) alnd ~on of our local iresid11u,
a ni NIi s Evelyn ]iarvey were larried O,
'ebri],ry 14, I944. Qui( a nice St. Valentiaeea
marriage w..asthat If
] 11esellt, O ur s-un
dI>lV
lelkel
S., and Mrs. Mat Wirtsi
Ir- (e,
I
or, February lii. Sin to both of these
oltllt
,...i.i.ls and hlrid- w- extei mil olr entire
nie
v
ery
happy ntd pros
a
ole]r>t LeI wishes f11
i-n-ou$ iarrl'age. M*Y yno, lives togethor be
very joy ful ard loear htstitg.
we are proud to ItIrol, military ri-t
nt S.su~,lething a lilltle different to Our rIed
er
nrd. that is the hlughtLers of our jneolti
hers
ho have joined tilh various b raniches of
sevie0r, SO here they are: Miss Al.,. Mullmin
lauighter of WIt 1 ttllt1tis is ...OWa secIutll
Iieutenant
ill the .Ary Nurse Corps. If he
is as lice as her Dad leh is one swell torLieutenanat
ots., Good luck
for our soldier
Ann
Mullins,
The thor lady Il rervre i Mils Viriinia
U. I "chl.o..er Idaughter of our ].rr)y 'o]-h
She, is a ]nI-ss sergeant in ihl WAC
'0o"¢i.
ut, in. be sati. That fn, ill of us
station ed at
who klow larry nit9is Selrganet CIoe-[nowlel
all of our
reosnoihile for flood far
,,ill1]
hoo'.
union.s hbst wishes gn I. beth
I']h eil-le
l L
rlies for their fir le tr otit
of these yro' l]
spitit- We wish then.. lik and .ay (;oI keep
uiider Itis proe ction, and aLsi, ill "i
then,
litr 'harly
beloved hoys ]11 sorvier.
21. we had the iileaaOn MIondIay, FebrLary
Goerke (,on of AM'in
lire If ititiating Rogr
tin to or local unint. I know Rolme
Geike
his Dad ant{ he will
only has to copy aif,
I.e li
ood union 1u nii. G ood ourk t, soi.
Roger~
O,, sick list includes Jacob BWlatz wi]t
tot! Lawrence (rim.pni,
tiouh of artbriti-,
N-bterilng is ill at this
okay again Joilt
Slhwoeppe, Sr. ailn
writingb as is (eorgc
time
'Wee Willie Winlei-s" is ha-ing a lottgh
getoing over his bad opefrtld n.
rowabout our ai1ual inferraM rante
Anil
iven nt the Gibson Ilotel Roof Gardenr. o
Saturday. January 2JL The affair was a [re
e ,d y
r)teritrl...l sIl-ce¢.s ;ild all who attendeit
enjoired themioselves veIly touch,. The floor show.
uodr-r the direction Of Miss Ruth Biest, wil
was
really ''tops-" The mlie- by "Smn.itity's'
superh i,n ildabou.t thel .o. t r1atieeahl, l usei in
anid tli.....i this cliy. Tho souvenir program.
for which we thanIk [rolhers Elmer {aban us
Lurlhart- . was very clear nI
a.Il [:,i->' k
rI f history
very
..
ood
...
coil(s, anill gave.
of lotIl Union 8-212 from it infancy. We
the tin iol as a wh.le hark thne hard-wokunI. ei-,ilttpe for the fine eftlors which
re ulted in such a swelleviitiJog. We eirlinet
ur fii...eil[ see
..
forgel to espeeiaIly think
.r.orl,,L
fLot his ,ork at the
r-lnary. John)
doeor, and Harry Williis for his afd Bre,,
the, floor show and
nan'
wtlork ill selbct
These affalts do make better friel .s
oer-hesti.
ur Brother,- We
and lmtier feelings Itron'..
see ci those nights.inembers whlom We iol
always get the chan.ce to see at other tines.
ivts blel ;he
Then solar of o11r ... enlh..r.w
wi, us 0 f other
mel.lts and nice friendships
..re haurn that way. Thinks again to ele
ntmhersnext
lieveier.
ninttee
Arid sI 'tit
au
issLt .
once
j igah
it
IS
212' News Ilr...old
- SCHMITT, PS.
I:.
'. NO- 271, WICHITA. KANS.
ity-y /olklng
1d;Io,: B[eig in 1'on.a
under the .[uribdi n 'f loeal 144, there
sick list t Irffither Ceorge Diieclmon, who
was removed to his home from PlnrIea City
gid at
will, a severe case of pneunia l
hi, wfriing he i, in the St. litarais losplUM, Wichita.
for Lhi
bot
The rlorY thal I w"rL
til e begillnig ',f the
monlth's issu-
is .eih
wLr .... ..... l
ate H.lWe..l.
onel
,irhiat~inI ii......
thre- 'ill he e..re .f
inl till jext ihL.O LL, I
rn, wcthinr
l
Senthat
r, inLo]-
a of
lEmleL... jlsl
Hatition regarIL rig,
their. There is Ll, ftuther news ef lerest
at thi time. sO ~i]I se, yoiL foeit .. onth.
Editor it ha. beun a long time since
]eeat I biilor No 340 has had a letter in
he retr,-n for this, no .ub.
the JotINi-.
ix
that we a"e a oi-tty happy people a.nd.
dot.1 hvoe much irr-uble to tell ah1out anti
also we are not inc.lineld to I.e boastful
th
tin
ood things that we have wt' don't
brag aboutv
ery busy for
of eo3ze we have been
reasonably
Qliitt! il frly, years l1ol ae still
i
o t fronlT time
busy, hlut have a few ilno
Ln tile. Our stoly. Iso far as Ienos'trtlitiolt
as that
is ..on.erned, is very mukh the saiexistellt bin nny iarts
One of otr I..em."Rers.
the,
op
usty"
nui.rvy.
Simt-atie,
340
,ervinghis apprentieshil in tieIe
w,
llt
wheo, the '"buck teothe d lpes'* got JIln hn
they eralid lick Xnule Sam. Like a gleat. many
.
o.. g mnl . TheIiindt'ii
if our ,ther
the Naivy with lhe
proceeded to git bitt
way ho wIolld have ani
idle
that il thai
ppiuty to ge haek at theri,
titu lih Navy had anLother idea and proetivde to make an it.tret(, 'If i{ly
d tell him that he ha., to sty for the
duratio.
While. of course. this hals been
iinl.
lloifto him, at the salltl
a disaps...ti
riled
ill,
we know that he v iliolng a
whore he is.
close
Tl oldter to caIn...erve space I shall
with
h, rentrk that I errtainly enljoy
the var-lous locals
the letters freo,
,flolinrg
that tll-ontlhLte
inolurt.
W. (. STrNOjy],
to thl
i. M.
hin, t ... er anhd wire lind tIlyen.monlth old
son, inIg at 5720 N. W. With Ave., Miami.
et-n
pir
they cxI ee.
Ul.non
to
labor
a copy of the proeildoigiH
to the state contltjutioU!,
of Ill.t.dl, "outlawing the
of Lhe start
(Sie tdiclosed sh...I contract ft Flortilla
trilruil eol{uninls. ]
I trust that you sill give it very II
atill
11rgi-tlly, ald thtl thbit ltlrlatic'..al
ELdit.r: I a
the defeat of it in Florida, and warn all
other oelit unionS to bE, ol guard. linl preo defeat
pare themlsehles to every exten t
it, proposal in each arid Ie-y stae legisin at
ature. It will no doubt be Ilrlpose'
least 25 states, pol'ihly Iore, shulid it
plass ini !,lorida.
he or gret eloetfit
It WOUlil ti Be]ohl
to the entire memhoitirship if you vrnhIr en,,litnIrial in the W`rtiEiL
Lr it us an
Oir local sustaited the Mirst war easvloth,
tlaIty .ar...Itg its onel'thils in Febhrtuy
the loss f lni apfreonco.
when we suiferei
radiio tail gttioeir ill
Sill ReberL D)ePre,
traLning ait Barksdale Field. Shreveport La
Bl.l, as we nll knw hinl was killed
iln a mit-air crash of two planas. It is
W10 m.e
4md"a
A beaItlifu
~hi~te
AeaO
little F/1 in hIUe and
tiiliieI
on
tA~H* nlissined
eSlecIally for I B. E2 W,
who passed away on February
(OD
L.U1x1iar
Io',
caeab
h
Won-
$.50
;i'
mnonihership
-eetdve.
fi-,jaus
e
btefore
utl-
they are
yeou
8tpenld
it
wIth thPI.
%%ill sign offt till best wishes to all of
b[rothers and o-nuebrsr, in
otr I ra-eeli
the seriece.
Rt. C, TNIltEre, P. S.
TORONTO, ONT.
35.1,
L. T. NO.
diYo,: At a reeonot ,netillS with a coni
troittrs'
Io...iitte, we w,.e told that our
ill gin-ral would have to pull
oeks anid roll up heir sleeves
'Hoe'thers
their
uI
and other'wise start to worry about. rordi-
h
usngess.
lions in the clectrieal eontraring
The infera..
WIa., Of course, that during
the plresenlt shIelttite of u11echanles, thle hoys
en thebi
oars arid were
hibd hboil restil
spread.
[ohephone
powell alIllendnllut
of otir
is in the armed services. and that reminds
rite that it is stated from an aouthoritative
soure that unci.. men and members of
their ilmedie families have ill the aredl
sereile of the 'nited States l. $0.000l. Who
erve to keep, il, sayirg that thL,
ha thi
are to ilamle for this, that and
uitiol
the other thimg. except h, icIrks who are
tiiig
paid to say it. If wt- dlI't get out
evey vote possible. froll. here ol out andl
and
]litidjoiaS,
defeat urtion-ala.nr-hatir'g
take alt a-tive [la1't in our little oillnllniit
ffrairs. as union illenbers, an!d hei u-gri,,el as such, w- wrill have fililed liiiseral'y
ill our duty to oursel'-es and fellowI .ll.
le a uLnion watcl dog ill your JWn c1ntlliniLy and Illtt the aJaid to hbark or
'ite if .eeessarv. After all it is your mInijuey
lex-eIpiniig ''dishL
L. IU. NO. 319. MIAMI, FLA.
Vlte
news f,.... 271 at thi,
is nou .uch
bhat [ report he'
dearth
It ia wxith regret
lHenr
ah"ets father-.
of our husIlless
17th. We elenrl our sy mpathy to otr lusi
hess agent, Brother r. KEGasta son. f Oicr
leral 1..,e on hils 20th bit-lliay.
Our nest telidr symnpathies Lo outt to
Allosot 20
L. 1'. NO. 310. S 'RAMENrO. (CALIF.
L
Gustaf~ui,.
rough to even think of losing a swell kid
like Bob, having worked him a, my helper
fIe that he waI
for several
m... ths.]
a natural-born union man. and an ~xceellentl
e
outrsL
having taken a, two-year
tineihanie.i
study at Miami Technical
in e-lectrjcl
School le siteiled to have what mat aprlir0tin{s dei{t hanVt tself r....fidelt.l..) Fu
nilill services were held at the lo sI Fn-
I "'Bell
pFn hands' Itll
'
All this [ n.iht agree with if the tor;attoirs wilt share the blame. (f course
to conop.'tie
a oaiafs
bietween
the period
take
effieijenIy
ISV19.ud
row,
onr
st. During th-, IlelresI
wIo e.,rie
with
I9$19 is It.
thIe ,nly work our firms got was work to
keep the gang ,lgether. N, profits, I..
q1
n',tlly andl stual
per- id to t ravel
wiork
.n
g
llity.
A m.ai
was ex-
t,ice
greased ]ightn itg hinr-
holilrs. try
ani
eh se] a
few
hour.
the joh
. noi.ylo,,ut
extra-s il
andorder the batorial at night. This left
Loeut of the work like eleotingf the tuoney
iltrioti'r.
toe Ili
time work and monley
At the preselli
are scrce--' go what
Ute plentiful .....I ...
shoald pause
InltttiI
than a Ial,
ine- in awhile The looln,
it11L]"lake (ve',"
-Leurneto
las
,lll i, eIhes, hi blls lost that
h
hj,,,gy haggard look ai{J hi, -lest onle
L
ur con,
minT, h[S sti-trtd tI, Fill ouIt,C think
trautihl
emplo)-er rese ts this ]lyiy
ll and
.
"speed-
brmlomd] i
1
enioft
...i.
in Their
,,frler
how they ,n-e
ILL .ar.e wtotolesin
h>gt thm.,a be' i to nutdlittin, si
rkl
that they -ill I, ilble oi do twine the
theb'- cnretit('ry ie capahle of. 'To these
I woold say, Iheer urL You
.<tllm-tors
o It.uirn youlr o'er' will
at , dl in thIeIioI.[I
litkely all rtoltl into shape toglither and
ylour
t
tI i hol about,rinmIimg
illthe nIcai
,wnl sils? If you have IIee, using your
Lolull
goIn,
work it has been a
oeilN at all ti figsire
e
dull
anded
one. Your soeial staniding has
ih
oad good
willh Yr
ao1'
APRIL, 1944
147
livhig ha.
lilled yo.r itamin.i) 0 IDWtdepend
I, <omp~ee with ymr noLinittIti rival. tL~v y
head. toIl
S.ocial
MsI,[elkiu thud i ,,M
.
Birmes
s
tnniager BrBthe, Shlw hae ier
ipirositeI
to ihie rei....ah Wil labor hoar.I fIIr on
tarl..
hope hi ,lpesn
~hi>Ct'ttlihtuste; itir
on spIed atore
[itither
ri
13'is
lIt
3. V. Nivr~li
her , l
iolil'ts an~ i1
C It,
LL: lite~ne
ll ill r 1hi,
th We. 1 .. I'. i
III
tltlids'ti"Iig
.... liltiisp
Brciwn, If, Ilnoi
liskt
injuirred stic
iiiN
o~ili'iit
hi
wlin
,
iom
rritI
IM
ilo ier',M A,
artel, I
ni]l
El. PriIe ,irt ot}It
fTt]qirlltst ii
troL~lle 'tilh hi' si<.kt ,iiniittioe. lie
gt I
r
,p..io tiri.r a
iI
tkh
QI'tt 'hirrth] Il iic t
sVl I-. up Ln
that hapjiemd Iwo= ninths a~,.
Fieports
We exOC
this i
aller wvill .. lear ilself
ahout the Ii le they twi ratiotitrg heerl
Nlk, a' I hale
tobie
half>itIn 1
n
tlI, hl%0 l . "rri
. t mO1, " I;,I
4~1
a'l,l t ... Il
my wieh and t lnd Ite irlswc,.w Iss,h
h
m/yl
v
til]<nl
aoneg wiet.
riiyi hhnj, thai
is tifl hi' Iiittr~with
h
v(ltiltTt
I ill b
fnLehdi
3, NTrrT tNE) /. S.
i[n~
j."
w,~
~tehat
U
lI.N.
II, I-ON(A
CITY,OKLA.
I ws inmluded in aIroti
of jobl stewardV
wh, with I n ternatio l
Rle presen-tative
reeIlrt1 aid lusiness lltnn.gr' Jciksern, attended
it.1tetill, with offitiil?
I h,
Fint: ee VIIII
y
Authrity antI hear
thIe iniitlity't
fetinitiori of its new ''labor Tlley." 'he follnwsni
I, till,
the ' nit.... lih lsi,;u , f/ ifi',
as g It[,y TI V A
't&'uigl
ltor Ae
.o.dli'
Ii Slpport of, ¥1and
]alIl~l~url ]
in,
stliqlilt
Ln h
itr
Manage
,itlitt
Relationships
ut,the Part oil E hloyeys,
''.Tl'ritl~ aIbu-rrittl"ulgietlt~ piegraiiii are
Ibli.ved to heit It it sk 'Liei
l
tI{tlililltien
Il j0ph ~il ertiys
ilti-redit% stllitvis,0rs
nIllt ge
rpettgltiiitli twt<I'i) W,rtof. aii
tutuh[/atili ir.. vrtAili$iet't th,
mail-1s
aeirti'ent relatiortshils in tlht part of
,imployties 1(It
of tht pnisti~
taetols,
hit.i a reI/liiile faitrI' of
lerit
lil<i e'fle5'y
eoltsiteru] it eeIein
of
it
for pront<H oL. trarIsfer tr r
ttqdltn in emnopls flet. 'hi;is means thait
im s.eleciting
eitijoyr't
fur jprotutoti.
tiiiiisft'i
Or rtenet~uitt
mit tirme of Ina'
oif. supe.rvisors ainal ]tt~-rouili(et iffleers wilt
cosff
derI -upe
....... Il~h~ie
waiolln
~hoees
i'stlhlthe,
lahotir11 .. ist'it'iletihIll
eI
'hips, Is iti, or 1h, facitoirs to he, talkel
]ile
lidisir.eraltl
lotig wilh at l thll
rleIvan
factors, sueh as abilit.
cx
pe Il I,
liltnlI tairdil.
....
uhilletir WasIgIUlgi[I I at great It **t
ati
telidsti'ibuiieu
lirtougloinit
the
tldfl ... I teito a k tlo 'vrirkin/r uttll[ ilel,
i'i''ittton
t;
[Lerl Nri 411, I
iF Ased IhV
l hils
tintt hi
hJiitg of aI ,itlr'
lit th - {i*Ai .,5 OI
..
+*rie:i
rit< to hI].tji I i
tilu F a... W(.k[..i.
t
)nI a (100,-o il, la~ l~ l tu e
h~, Silt!~ ~ ....
If .1 I. Ie (,ro,uG
. el7 l'ic(i'teI
m
li
I , hl 'I
i(NI ~ Ian, lui
Ird IItigL 1.04 ad hi, tilla
Hal
hit
hgila]
the
Viu
f
I...
l.i...
I'U.,, II ,
a itt
r o)f tilt' r. BI. 1'. W .
hi, eld wg
~ith
NI<,uN51- I I,iL0h
hat I hhiae i"lr
'otkte
''I'h
t irei if rre than thit ..in this jIlt.
'llpn
replreseil
< ,eral
diffrl~e'IIt
ltidi
'Mr., Murphy.
tll king lit the foreiiteut.
;diI 1hat the qnti
otinIof ItmL it fi...
ltti lie
;~mitt-,Th antI take itctive ]ta, inl the Orion?'
haul bliT1xit
"; h
e
'¥ii ¥,, tuntdIle h,
tp
mle eilal~iv Iof ..In a..etttll
anit still ko
a er1]'he of tIht~ oidmn au1d jitH be artiye.
A% no
h t eleII
thIt vt,
dittie, as a freNH1ill, il1 Wll it,}
iii
as-irfire
5I m'ti'e
hitqiiiher •tf Lhe tliuIort·.
'31]. Shatrp anit MI'. Murpihy eotnplimtenittl
M I. eiann
[
,it litl.trahattouin
his
their
i'.
woIk Mr.i.i,
s'iiimed the puolicy iutu
li 1 Saloyig that Pihe wihule* s~eress or failure
o( the oili'y vith thle rrlutles arid Labor OonPl,
t lnud TVA is that as hlig as we have [Ii
',oulhith
atud
32} ini yM we will hhveIi,.
hie
'hl.er
.nlt .*.e a]
dt
d]
W,I
nikuhi,
Ftt"oli of tIhu
'hiee Il..r.IIni
IIIfheeneiln
se'ilhl,ir
rioi'tal
Sloth
WI'rl.
[IS.Lt..
ae
f7utl tis
he IpIliy is eKeepllonally
id view of the faIt that
sii
g....ernViiueit
ag('tie' f'ri ente'r intio i Iitsedl shopi agr~eeitu1n.
]tt' a] NIo 55 Itow h.. .4....{'t thin, 170 of its
sitibe-r, ii the variq... Ie..V.ieS.
fACiuut 'I t P. S.
W,
At thit time thiere I., 1i25 m i, mphted
here Cti-.ie ltHidn i'
li, 1,ileutt
;hrof I.t.a.
N<I 144'. 3m
h k l, 'ihi'ItI
i. hllui e ttia!i un '.
1hal CI I'.,.
N j3,1 l''aew
1.
,
I. U. NO. 611. XALItUQtI ERQUL[E. N. M.,
I,jI has e,,nie am lln Way in the past yenu
PWilts,: Il',he ({lt~owuim
pdi'tlittrat
lt i,
frthI
'a''vnIt 4t
of i]ilhzetl l]itbor 1h,,
in:LIb
umlnted bt 'l'Ptit
t;*h Lni,'; anli
h... . . ig na. d a btiuthiit
iratde
<'oii t
,
ltitig
inle ei'aift,. This ll[oil hais
tki[;
tt!r DU lhiu[*lu a[I the ,llhutqu/qte''j'
F, Hutoe. a ~Scripps N.trtd iie paper.+. lI
iIorkedr faihfuly :l'Id uiil
I ...
]ght add
l,[,ritI,'y Ii. at the riqu t of Mru. 1 N
,haIt thI job hIt, rol din a niia 'tale f, r thi
,p ,I.
Ie IIp itn IIIl , ,IIl. Ih., V.xfe
I .i l<o1d
,r/ this jl[I has brIlt e.e...Iiuhalll
..
o.., Any
We thinlk it ...elts II place in
i the AJlth NAL
ill th. wrhl
t. set kiled.
vi'd L is
[ [hII
I.o.al ii
,Irtelili its Iitb ilia i,
itsi thu Ihtt1IR LlA Mt
hem~ it'l,~
h u t I i' eviq'v iitfili on1 ih[i, jiuli.
Wi
hettel plaie
I atim
tit1
tIutu
ih.lli.
tisit IIr N,
I. 1. NO. 55S. SUIIEFFIELD. AIli.
lrell ott~PI
Thl
£ntioiir
liloruirI e..
Ihis rpU~
I.tir
finid,
LWIiP.im
L. I
Nfi
N',wsprTpers have hi.on giving eonlaheta
,nvetart
to the , Iillr...r
,wuuker,` wage l'¢rEIrtervy rnt] its te(/nlihinr strike siiloOl.
bi. the Pal] 'lisit
foIr lie
i
tk,
er <(uterullelat~yi'up..esie.. exepltt il III
'i'e
lidlimr
t...
Those t'el
' are
ii
quite [i1ptle
[Irul
I The
i'maiII wurker
hae
wn,,hild rll1roril pl'oilts limb to tIe hiighcsi
elin
railroad hi t,>y: they
hiae wahedI
55,,
',~e fill
[tn "¥Hes oi,
J<
"d11
The
e'aelir
hsrattoo>,
nIlt. int
n,,.
Idi' b.1 itk iuo' i itm I
I ruinii' h,'
in Slflirld.I
Ii,tl
Jleintru it? needtitd ti&,'as~lolI]~
utrIIH
rriuch.
ih(
OLnllrit
}la; ev'r knvwn,,; they Isve
b
,vazlth'l
fthdsI
$£,ies
otf eythleurve
~, [
Io I.lu Lhh eltltr
plit.I;
theyhIsv
seen
Lb. raitronul wvrk'r u'll'rrx
llg the iras
intl'~
heary Ioad]tif ,rIdInv ,intil Iuuinfr
h,,ir~~~~~
,TyEI ,
i pH
I
I m
,T~, 1d
I iltIkr
he
thil lily 'IlI
The iI i a'tnII pIllrt Is
t
11 II I
Alt.r..aIrml the W'rktr i'lig
rus ts sa red.
''Antlo'h'r thihig iii iriuil' renittuluher ' rthit
"JIFFY"
SOLDER DIPPER
Swinging cup wont
spill the solder.
Uses
mYiflinltint oit each joint.
Solders 50 to 75 joints
with one heat.
SPECIAL TRIAL OFFER
Send $1.50 with this ad to
CLYDE W. LINT
100 . Jefferson St.
-Th.e Original
JiLf
CHICAGO 6
Lne"
Money Back if Not Satisfactory
,he raitlr..i<I ulMItit..
tut
thenleaders reIteat high tvpe ,of citerlt ¥'e orsgmll it, o.l.
Iid leadlershipi. TIII new sII'.aozlayed
up
frttqmuenlty in thue pue's~,i
that they art,
.elfish trouhalesomnte woMAker with ii.t..rupuhuiu, ladules, hit +
Is falSei mi..i a, unfair
.1 i[i is oatlrute
"like the rieal lilar>.
it
workers'
idi
II , 'twyis biins, si,, ..... sed itd fnhifitd
beifore he pthlii, Ii'
inistance, there is the
(.0]sti..it repIttittol
in th' piests of letters
ft I ... nIll
tihe, iill suIryice who write back
strike I. 1Dn..s'.I it ev.r
.
(.1i
4n
utilt
tl/kii.' f£tmhilie whih.h nrI a~oeited
with lhe raultiitl,
l
ttiiv' Tmii sol]hs, hale
{'ttulilttiliiiing
tiore bhys ii Ioifsim,
thl'i io
the repre
sltativi'> £f the "ois,
fIIl..i. e 'thhose
,on
write home eoilh&i'till,
lhul,,r's ieman
d
?
No .,i
ever puishe'
the hIttr.is If the
I..
i I,!.h ci al is itie
...'r I
or railrttu ,.l her
(atherwhi'h Ia¾y..'Fight i. m]i vtith iher
f[si, V
Vr i Iu.. I't lh it ,,nw. 'hhelt
I get
Ihark itnd want a jub we nusu
ot, have t
.wa
etitauiuh
those %Itrs
A (i.la
mini hillt "sen t
W. zuskeil the edIto,
hiyhe didnt puhi
li> it. I
;n
e limit ii,,on
thiruk I
ion.. c.arvti We ji'> I.i..ghitd. fi, w , uither
, ,1. Th'lI ltewniirtpap
,
w,, ,,wrt'
by ibli,
vuilitl ctinneteid with Ihe Ml ifana Links ihiI
W1iul St l't
whit (rntl
the corporations
whl1.,h oXwt the Olds I, lithat area
llut, f
course.
i
tl,t
t tthe [pnti dont0 know
Iriheu
Ill
iil
II. Ittiilr''
lettelr
tte''
that.
"High
tax fil;- aIrv riot kept big profits
frolnt piling up. The ,'h,,Iaid
le,,ictly rilalt
th
are ung
these gl'l't profits tO ,tip.l
,int old indebt',e"s aid tI prepare for the
foIoc-e transportation ui,-eth of the country
itth
wtrkers reply that the}y also hbl.
!Islts and t ful ure ho woirryallut. T
wtkter s iv[*.. ...... h'ie grosn mchl fut
rIIItn his wages
1.V
MiS MI
rRRFIF]LD, P. S.
L. U.NO. 702, WEST FR ANKFORT, Il.L.
Springfidd. Ill, Branch
I'thi:
W, have listenued I.,
very popLIca*
I
ell s etttIitiiit~lltor. onl sevwrat iieeasiocsi
Uttuitltl B tilfln 1he plidht of th, whmte-e/[
l
wv
'r ui~de' *ti'si'te tI living iO..h.itions. }It
t't1/S to thin)k
the whil []l r
,'kur is
utliv,
the small end of It' deal.
Perhaps that
e<tcut'I. . lui. in all hlue
rsla..t for these ''ttrkers
i
itl think ilty
shoiyh]i hi,ure <atli&'t''.t>Kl
tgher
enoug*h eluun ag('
.ini! ''ml Itl ) nit tll 'nil, at I hill Orti.... alil
thiecl!' hL¥
.. ' ill'.
in a
)iciJI> .'ernl
.
eul-.
>1~~re
o:~ for Li}M,:i'll i¥1 l'u'ort
w'lrkiul',
~.~,~~~5
~
hi -.. h~hi
mw
ati
,hmtptilt~r
re jihri it p',uI,t lminiut(,rglllizat[The 3 wor to el-h,< to the(illerattot
At hiust weC be;
that ih'- ftsrnler'hiIc Hitlisekt,
tithot the utttrkers.
.
tien i
o]eruLaor's
tieover an organilZaIorker
I
The Jourmal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
148
tlon thlat has good prospects iofgottig nlore
nloney out of their treasuly, imnmediately
they throw up their guard t o oppose.
an icrease in
pay roll
the via th wagre scale
The white collar worker sit, rihl ll witih
the hig
esses.somneti mes a personail sec retary,
and
of course
for
him
tip di, sonle-
thurig his boss droi rot like requires more
grit arId c,.urage than, it does fur workers
· ho are iiwa> f
the iintieiliite vicinity
Cn
of the operators.
Iluan nature being what it is, the only
way or all workers, white-collar and all, to
get the best possiblle wage scale
frol
their
employer, is to depend upon a good labor
orgartiiation to help them hilt.
Organizatio, is the safeguard for everyone
n the fthulre. The operators ha.e lheir or
ganization to maintain their prices and protent their business interests, The farmers
have their oragnizatiosi through the farm
bureau to look out for their interests, Tho
government
an
is
organization
to
gaiutain
law and order and give us all protection
against rggressors.
Therefare all workers must be barded together to show the other Crganizatinns our
side of the argument and through a strong
union obtain the best pussibl
working
coiodtlloiis. This is not a hostile jil/evo. but
one to protect everyo ne's own intlrest agtnst
oppression and to get aIeasure of the thigsi
wI Ill want.
Si again we sy hlt the white-collar workers ha ord together and take a hit, from I, I,
No. 702 and all other good local unilns,
ours for m
organization,.
ore
ChiAs. MiLI, P. s.
C. Ui.NO. 716, HOUSTON. rEXAS
Edilor: Greetiigs from Local Xnioi No.
716.
sary that all local iu ions t
the en tire
BrotherhoodcItopera teo 1101per cent. Mary
nIemers Of the smaller local ui ons are
forced to seek wok
s h
..I to have
the names of townsI where arditilnal men are
neehled would certalnly le of great valu.,
This, of course, is only our thnoght, and
whether it
tould
peworked ,ut remains to
be seen,
vaijl,
.Vile President DIIffy gave n very
,spirig talk, going into dotail to exprlain the
wage questio.
In Inl
hislife ill Wage ton
rowersy he has never eneoun tered anything
to equal this one, and judging frnit the,
attenAticon he received
from
the
membihershitp
,luring his talk he seemed to have left a good
i
prrssion with them.
laVing read the debate
on
subsidies
for
Brother E. P. Molroam, a metber of Local
Union No. 1, finished hi eh I ricai career (i
the Brooker engineering jo1 in Houston.
Brother MeCIroom is a vetoeAn of the Brotherhood and has been eligible for a penmieon fo
many years. Hi h"a 1howretired an a farm in
and against, it seems to ae that it lay hoe
useful to clarify the real issue and to treat
Arkansas and we trust that his future on the
farm will be as pleasant as
relations
our
to-
arounses so Citny
us from thinking
The statistics
irogr.. i. are so
gether have ben.,
Members of the Brotherhood in the jurisdiction are still going strong on the toIri
old U. S. War Bonds. The Goodyear plant
on which BreCker Engineering Company had
the contract ha. just concltided anlother eond
drive. This jod carried Il
nmeimbers of the
Brotherhood at peak, and between Septemlber
I and December, 1943. these mIenmbers pfr
chased $48,750 worth of War Bontds without
any pay roll deductiont, They sponso red
eight jeeps and the plaques will carry insrliptins showing who gs.pi soired them.,
the matter as an elemenotry proole'
in the
realm, of economic science. In the first pluce,
the word "snnlidy" is on, of Ihose words
which means so many different things and
aill praetical
emotions a that may p re...t
dearly and relevantly.
and the procedure of Ihe
cormplicated that it is fir
purposes as impiossihlue for
the
laynii
to master them as it would he for
him to
go aboard a modern
battleship antI
know ho.wto operate it. Yet it is essenIlla
ltit we should u
,ndersttnd
elenmentary prin-P
riplea suffiiently test we nlow make an I,rpatrah
e and dagerous mistake
ieair by the elemoentary fact?
it is generally forgotten that
lroducers imore to produce
eihers, This is the pll ram nLut
What do I
In the deliat
it cost~ some
than it cost'
frt which .e
L. U. NO. 772, COLUMBIA. S.C.
have I. ,ix Ib
our mins in cirder o
IIr
drI,
stand thle rel] issue ill Congress. I'lless we
ix
this
fact in our ninds we shil]i .eve
everybody, this is a iew voice
joining in the chorus of
organized
labr.
The results of nur first lfforts to orgoritz
were very d
isheartening, but we never gave
up. and today we are proud of Local Union
possihle, let is suppose that there iro in
the coinmuriint three
. nten who can p roduIice a
partiru kr gadget. Ff4 exaniplo say John
L. J, GALMiCiHE, ]* S.
Editor: Hello,
No. 772, C(olumia.5,
C.. with a rniemie.rhil
of 300, which is not had, considering
we are
,Uly a few months old.
Toternation al Representative T. f. Payni
(the best ther
is) guided us through the
snares and pitfalls if our first rot ..
rae
and Consequently we have an A-I zreenment,
which includes such benefits as ailIy over
time, sick leave and heCk-off system
The officers of L. U. No. 772 ure I.1.
Wi/ndhan, president; A. C. Gantt, vice .resi
dent H. E. Gardner, fin.anl
secretary: M.
E. Shealey, treasurer, D).B. }lolland. b usil
manaiiger an.. reeorldiri sec re.inry.
The eixecutive committee are U, . EMilli.
Due to the Xmlas rush and the
inflounza
cases exlsting in the person ,nIof this otle
urinig the holday season. we wera unrItle to
crniplate
o
tr articl e for last. nio..h.
Dlefense
pojCets in the lloulton area are
fiiishingup very rapidly. and we ere dhaily
m lising our members in the cnnstrutionl
branch of the trade to get
f
ir,to lhese plants
(in maintenance. The purpose of this is threefoluli first, the advantage of hai in, our met
T. C Chaoppelle,
, B Wicker. J, L Casteron these jobs, and seonemly. the eoihning
,liue, Ira Wootiham and J. II. SkIll.
CortunIity the jobs will otfer aiur jrnethers
In closing I would like to say that if
when this work is finished: last. bit C ot least.,
RobFert
Fulttn, ElI Whitney or son
of
it is our petrieoie luty to nmanIhese jobs
the other great inventors hard to contend
hith lien who are, capahbe 1 handling them
with such lost motion, or lack of motion Is
We feel that there is hound to hIe ia rewe do in the"Wa Labor tinned, this old woll
adjustment period, there will be some little
would he in a worse condition than it
tilne before material il ally large amont,
today,
,vi l he available to contlaetors to d2o the
D, B. itLAND, KS.
work which ihs accumuilated tde to ahortage
of
materials, which would alspo idicate that.
L. U. NO. 794. C(HICAGO, ILL.
apiparen tly some of our neia
.. rs will
,
e
loafting ]his area will have somhi
Editor: Greetings. At our last reghial
nlice plants
in operation in the near ftare, and
meeting held Thursday, February 17,i, or
Innhmbers iI this locality
ill have it{ opvery important questions were discussed.
portunity to man theIn' in mtot iutane,.
After hearing report
of
too.i.tee
frun
.
duemostly to the fact that they are familiar
variou. points we passecd on to unflnhet
with the installations, having worked on the
business. Among the runy qhuestions of iln>
pilir froin the beginning of c
onstruction,
poirtanll
was the IlargC Ie ..een iage of decThese jobs will also
aforda Ilvilihood much
trical workers present fron, the A, T. and
onre it tr tive to our menles than inl the
Santa Fe I. be ahligaledl ] riltroiatlor.l..
Vill!
past.
President J. . Dyuffy, who was present, reap]
Uion No. 71 has beeC, giviig the
ULvcal
theobhligation and welcoreId tooe aw m.m
... .ers
into cur organrlatlon,. Tllewew
work problem much thought. We rre re'suidra able diseusslon on Ihe re..rpts trike ballot, XXW
eeiliillg
.niytelegrams reg arin gwork frora
mnem baers
of the yhH.o s lop, throusorhout the
Hartzhein, international
represeitative.tu
Slate,. It has occurred to us that if the
the floor to explain aI nnl,her o qluestions
that
JOURitAl, would carry I ualkthi, rlte fur
were
asked him from a lrge section of Fth
membmers
relative Io. the wording of said strike
ptauces where work might be available, it
wuhld save members of he llrothlerhood
ballt. Some mnember
contended that (li.re
msan up necessary trips. telegrans a d telewere two different statements o,, the ballot.
and frt
the tone of the discussion it was
Ihone calls, which are ill very costly. Of
lcou ei, we realize that ftor the JOTItaA tCo evident that many of the hm,,hers accepted
render thi service i would he n 'ery iecesBrother Hartahein's explanations with reset-
unp.lersltanrd the subsidy issue.
NOw to moke the arithmetic
Smith
tan
prhruce
it
arid
sell
is,imple
it
il
for on.
dollar nod still nake a profit,. Irown
Pilort.e i antI sell it f.r two dollars Il/
nipake
to Iroit,
Jones can preorlur it for thiree
loIn .rrId .make a pIrofit. Suppose the IComaUpity wants all tha. Soith. BIown and .on.e
can piriii.racn, what will be the price of the gaI
g:ei? It will I, Ja..s' price
hat is lhree
idol-
IIna, Ni,, if the 'omnmulity doites uot
n(e
,ines'
..
thl. UUti n o,
and pan gut oliing with
what
hoie-l)llarSithandTwo-[iDllar I ow
liai im iuke whumt will he the price
?Ofcourse) it
will Ill Brown's price- that is, two dollars
uplone~
a~ n, thApree
d6llar will not get ane
lbusiness,
Nl, this being wartime whetl he
.oim. irpit. w irts all that can
.t.poUte
i,
.In
' prodl lctirin is needed. Rend earefurl~
you
ae if latli plrloducer got what
e really
nieedeI.t Smith wouId get one dllr,
Iro.,
tIo dollels aId
... irhe three dolars. ThI ll
cost Of he whole supply of gadgets wouldt ol(
one doll]r plps two dollars plus three dlth1r
oi six duillsrs altogether. This is where it
XW.S.
MCLAituN,
P'. N
(Te
.e Tonlinuedl
L. I. NO. 1216. MINN EAPOLISST. PAUL, MINN.
Erill..
Timnl* p; SC. fast and here it is incoui.etax
CIgur~ing Cgain. New rorni
arc no,
nearly so haod to fill
out
once Noll get ilown
to, doing it It's that first rough zlanee IIU
Cl
thlal
hat scares one. They ligupr
a
bit hirier this yelar hut then T guesa we le all
,]., to do(p.,
bpit. Still think that we oould
,!e t'hag with less of a holoausht Oliq veto,
itmg of liht taC bill caused. Still think that ii
should have stayepi
vetotd lIerI that it is iil
odrdr C.r ap pies scretary
to Qxir...s. hi, T"
sonjial tu*,biipun.
WXii N Hrot her, report that they have
hooil fron
lirother ('lyde C(ron, liiette pnltl
I[ [q. ArI
yAir ('orps, sigral .ecthi.n, a
th, Ih is anw regional inspector of the First
In(ollH lnlcahtons R[egion, in charge of all Ith.
oIcul imllpiion and he kole
cothidcleralbl
tveiorm I, plane f.um onejoliot to another
<Citngta~uhuu~io~ns to Brother (:reen a.i(.
.. li ces
in hi, new restonsus ilities.
APRIL, 1944
A new ni l-laet ha1 been signed at WLOL
which inteo rpol-ates t.i e new wage sale ap
proved by W1i,1 ani specilic stilpLtatLons
zregatrtlnig s~txpeei'ikiors at lbnth tratis~ilittr a1,1,
stuidio. Additior'.:
hoidalys .1]sl
illal-id.
Brloth, J,eIc(uowaLn wasin
tow,,"
or uL'ro
tai...
o etntrat
at the tile tof
,lr lbst
ueeting so we 'Vera glad to ha, him, aide tI
attend tha ate.
'[Th
S''P contract
is still .,,dll tln&r+ ea
thi altoilih \VLB
lita
aprirove.. thir superVi[i,
pay cnaus'Brother Art Late [
reporttd etLlNi]lg in the [. . N.av, shp re
o,,,,tlLN~ihn p
KSI[P "[Radii"
kgu
fIO
sIId.
.. arH
to [u (Hite'<
aM
.r..lartli
a,
I9]t
Quite art eflabortite set-u
i VO
with
iirmeet
Ihe old Mli,,nmsta Iheatre ,i h
[[[ i,
kniowi
IT thl JU
LiUtr as ilit
tl
lk,.
Oe Wi...nert ;'het it is :.n..I niipo, tile
fifr eopht ,I itn tII a t c iln, tulhu, f,,r heir
sets and all 0oidtiiLtties 1(Er 'lctitd
[Pe
[l"
itrh e; ervoie beiln urgedi [ot~ot,>e
I
.,I"
it Is pI i'{de fIat what appela tO lie i' the
neighbolhotE* I of a $5I0000 prject
ati P"
approxed.L 0lperin, o~ th- Ialb
e~hthihh iabeen coseld filo the pa-I s-ve ,a /
e,
lhich is sup,p-pI
to, Ie the fifth latgI ln
the tar<* will Ie ceteloateld along 'lth the
C. I 0. and was certified as bole bargaining
agency by the NLRB.
Under the able guidance of InternatioiaT
Replesentative Willbani Beedle.we sueceedled
ill negotat in, a closed iInion hop., dues cheekoff, all paid holda3 . upt to two weeks' vacation, with pal, [ek lea'e, tiCle lidione-third
torytIthus ll inlIlve. 10 plt Ieet/
night Shift
ho"tOl,
ll'[ all iither tarrlard /lnrt elaiEses,
Ai our fir t tt~le...rrtctt is well nigh pertt
wIH
age :ijsthter'> we i- apptro,\et
[by
the .l IA on 1ce3e 'nber 7 1943. I, be reteac,ill to JN, 4.1'.;,
and pr'Aille for
Iereases
lronl Irete centA per he.r up to n) teits lulr
hour.the
are ertalnlzratifing and due
t.u
R
ep
I tilve
I
etdite
hho .ls.I.p/i%
iln td
eul
hIlvoar,[ ,ttitnglflor hi,
tnwIe.
fl[ pllresnrattiot
f the ease
B I3ll; is pe
nl,[ o,-ganijrg t h:boraLrialgelnent v[,torY etuitatteel.
fad nf corse
[e are enigaigel
,
n wa ptidldelon, lnaking
a ,levkc- for ai .. t. Wet
W,
e utde contratr
n
with tht Baiis 3[anufattirli,
(G lnpany and
have approi-xnu te!l4
n311,olners
Our job is o dmuteit o[r memtabers i the
unAin ttnyeitertt
e
to
ka n actE'e ixere<
d(eidicationi of KSTP's "Radio City," Television
demons trlation along with the transferring or
all local olrgirhtlozis to the new point will
probably mark the big day. At
ny !ate.
1hat (Itl
havinig passed by the time this
readis print, it w have ill en
uan
f
[I isalwa inyhterfsting hIomlake several visits
Ahilt i
new pI.ce is Being roughed in and see
it inllisheI. FirLlhers [lugahd Martlnsoni
ill
tulledl the ti/e'[lvulotniotto, and four l
tr%
ftot tli' dlena..nstraiui,.
Ye tlI/eW [.o,,/ the WMIN, Wr4y or WC':(}
rdauui this time. Eervl-yb~otl'
antk
hor>
at all pale', and sI5 no time fr
idschief. IIe
alls e good tirnotis at oar nee~ting
ant it
as though there has been In
untIuual ai'nauit If lutisles at the last ilo
Ieti,-s
All far the od of the tinh
GENE 3iRA, T"Al,
IC
IP S.
L U. NO. 1:356. WEST ORANGE, N.J.
fdifeI:
One (if the newest loals of
I. iC E. IV.. B 1356, West O(range. N. J.,
miake
its debut. Our local was organizedl
anti tlharlered in July, 1943, aftel- slceassuhl
coliljattingr
the independent Uniin .nd the
ICrfIinuld orl page ].4i
ANNUAL STATEMENT OF ELECTRICAL WORKERS' BENEFIT ASSOCIATION
In
oIlpltoitoe ,ithI the requlren.,..t, of the Fr -ate'thal Act
[{Itu
Al
of val-ut
stat es, we al-e publishing
bw ihfor, It1111
~
tatned in the annual statemien t of the Electr cal W<, rkes Belle-
B
fit A .. ociat..on for theyear ending D eembern bn i1. -kers
194}-.
ASSETS
e
$8,IAJ149597
Bon ds
Unitedl StIAtes int Canadian Th'ernn ert.
St"ate. proli nec
and C(ities
$2,2;T,89K77
Public I ilt:hiea
791,67.20
ndustriat and
'I
iselaneous
11t,730.,0
'Ihose subject to
values; those nIt
amortizau on tairrri
at ami,rtlmld
subject"arrhd a{ market values.
216.270.31
$J 2QP3&1.25
MS}.5o/;5{
64,324a0g6
Public
t ilithe,
Ballks anI Insurance ('0nlpani)
lailusrIa[ arnl Nieehlan eou
CarrieC at M aket Values.
tira{ ?.lortgsage [.[aris
Lea21S .l..tariTig in three years or less
FederaPl lOurins
I...ns
] e .ots
Monthly .Atnortized loans
4.329,25598
$2I...
31.4Al
1,$37.727.2I
2,2611,01.074
Collateral Loan.
Real Estate Owned
lie
Offime Building
Other Ilea) ltate
( arited
Mu
IrheValues.
Cah in Bahnks and Ofice
Interest and Rent
Ac.nuedl
Other Assets
Total
Admitted
34.0(10.00
569.f8i 64
$860,572 25
9.00
92,031 14
l,0.00
1 1,AfitaO0
1,5613(I0
2.302.19
2,013.79
62.00
404.4g
2-477.76
7,2,038.66
90000)
S.1All57
7416 05
8.3,81.15
12,340.669
062.57498
$1 061,57 541
Exess of Illcome Over
isbu
rseme-nia
$1.19 455 .42
Exhibit of Certificates
$522,18Ill4
48.50)00
1,174.541.36
lBeNefit ( e-tifeates ini force December1,
I 942 160.291
,1,367.78 Benetfit Certificates written daring the year
48,239
1`2,i919.6
Benefit C
etificats
revived dulrig the yeaIr
-41.
Beneflt Certificates increased dluring the year
$85,301, 350.00
271 ,50,1t}
I9,567,450,0
Assets
Dea
due al
]i daat
unpai s d
Dealh I hliit
incurre.d in current
inhil foli
owhig
yelar
. Flv
ee As ses.,n. ents
Other LiahJlitie,
Total
Benefit Certifieates termi nated.
transferred luring thie -ear
48.525 00
15,372.00
4.369.2.3
$1142.88793
INCOME AND DISIBURSEMENTS-1913
$105.1 40,650.040
20,17.;
2,973.175.00
Beintutaieltur it
Mo.rt.ga.ge Loatn
Interest. lontd
Inierest, Collateral Loans
Divte nds on Storks
Rents
Profits on Sale orMaturity of Lrlgtt Assets
Olher n I eerile
Total Benefit Certifieates in fore Deeember
188,795
31, 1043
Benefit Certificates terminated bv dealh reported during the y3ear
1,I47
Benefit Certificates ternlate d by lapse re
ported during the year
19,029
(I 2 IlUns~npaid ]eeember 31,
Fees
$102,167.475.00
$875.5 0.00
$2,097,825.0(0
Exhibit of Death Claims
Incom e
Admission
ad
20S,071
lei...eased ToI
$74,621.70
3eIar and not reported
'Ttal LKi bilities
Intest
D.eeth Claims
salaries of Trustees
Salaries of Employees
Insurance Department Fees
Rent
Printing
. Stationery and Suplits
Plostate. Express, Telephone and Telegfraph
Insurance and Surety Bond Ireinl-hnl
bi'lications
Expenses Supreme Lodge Meetings
Legal Expenses a]d Fees
Taxes., Repairs and Other Expenses I, Real Eatle
Auditig
Taxes: Federal.
Personal
Property
. etc.
linvestment Expense
LosseAs on Salte or Maturity of Ledflr Assets
1) epreeiat is I
Furniture and Fixtures
Misellanenus
Total Dishursements
LIABILITIES
Mlhemberships,
Dibursement s
17 89,730,s80
194,AS5fA9
87,627,38
2,269.85
17,444.91
72,9133 40
6Ž8,497.9.
0.86
$2.233,064.67
1942
the year
1.1 47
$59,543.95
875,350.00
1,230
1,007
$935,19395
860,572.25
Balance
(laim ..s rejected during the year
2Ž3
Il8
$74,(;21.70
C1iams unpa)id December 31, 1943
105
$74,621.70
Claimfs reported dtlri-
Total
Clal ins paid during the year
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
l0
a
mnxI
INIM R
Roland R. Collins.,
H.enry Hodurn. L. U. No. 110
/lnitated Aotiglt 23, 1912
It i
with deep sorroW arid regret 1hal ;e
the members of L. U. N. 110 record the pastog of our Brother, HMnry Hodurn: therr.ili
be it
Retilved, That we ITiy tribute to his rne n..r"
by expressing to his flmily o.r sincere ss iipatbOh and he it rurtier
Resolved, Thait We dape olr hliarter
f" r
period of 343days. ltat , copy of these. it,, Iutions be spread
nnt
the minute, of uIt
ooLling, tilla a copy hi sell to the offiial
Iourlal of bhe B~rolherhdod for piblioklea
L
that a copy be sent to hisImmiediate J...iti
arid thai the meothers stanld for one liltbi
in silent tribute to hi, memrnoy.
Dur log the 3] yeaTs thlt Brothler HcdtiiI lIeh"uudi Iol 1hi
gtnizatin
he uade a Tlis
of friends and %as at alt lhmes a
rulit arid
loyal
iinhP to the local unilon and
hlii
I B. E. W.
E. LAWRENCE DUFFY
JOHN HOY,
St Paul, MiVi n
Con Iltie
Wan.. L.LU. No. 1347
·%itial
Ma., I 1943
It is with ne cc c feelings of sorow aim
egilet that we, lhe ieneiers of L U. N.
1347 reoard the 4,assln' of our friend i
BrotherH Snmue
, Evans
on January 8, 1944:
therefore be It
Resolved, Thai t
as a body in m¥reiilt$
assembled. stand Ib silence for one minute as
a li bate to his
nentory; &ndd be it £ntlhei
Resolved. Thai we drape our charter for
perJod of 30 days and that a copy of those
roliitilos he $piead .n. the dinutes of nur
inil!li.t
and a Copy be sent to the offtital
Jow nal of the Ilrothei
h
ood for ptiblieMion
RAY F, GREINER.
Cincirnnati Ohio.
Recordhig See' eai
Samuel
Clarence D). Bryan, L. U. No. 1339
hizialelf J'm..ano 2, 1943
We of L. U, No 133 of Buffalo, with dcep
sorow and regret record
tleDassin, of .....
Brother Claronce D. B. yan; Ihhereome oe it
Resolved, That we pay t1i'bute to his ]neuo
by expressin
~T his aIlnily our sineo,, swilpalliyl and be it furlher
Resolved, That a copy of hele resoltion'
e spread upon the minultes of our
meeting
and a copy lie ent to our official Journal
for pu1blication; and b{ it f.lrther
Resolved. That olr charter Id draped Ilr a
period of 30 lays in tribute to our ate Brother.
H E. LEE, Recording Secretaro
V, WALSH, Vice president
Butlalo. N. Y.
Charles
Albert (. Cont.
L. U. No. 625
nit/iiated JUl, 81 942, in L. U. No 404
It is with sincere (eetil$ oif o+rrow that We,
lhie enibes of L,. U No ITS. record he passi
hig of our late Brother,
ioland
R. Colilns. who
dield Jaln.ry 13, dle to a fall; therefore b, it
Resolved. That we drap, our charter for 30
days in tribute to fits nerlory. and that we
extend our sympathy to his family: and be it
f~r ther
Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions
lbe spread oi our minules ard a copy sent it
the official Journal for publication
A. WILLIAMSON.
Hahifadx N. S.
Recording Seretqary
litlfier, L. U. No. 595
Rerltliated March 15, IS9, in L. U. No. 1$0
In memory of Charles mtler, a sincere anrid
loyal memnber of th International BroDher.
hio.id of Electrica
Wotrkei, husband of Mrs
Sophia Btiler and lather of Lieut. toeri
Buter. U. S. N.
Brother Butler was Initiated in L. U. No
36, Sacramento CalIf,. August 15. 1911, and
since that lim,
Iblonged to L U. N'o 372, No
50. No. 50 and No. 1245.
At all times this worthy Brother was a
staunch supporter of the principles set billt
by the V. B. E. W. and by Iis exemplary condcht he jnsp~ii( tn niny to carry on those
principles.
We indeed mouir
the passing of Bf olher
Chiarles Butler, Card No. 245215.
M T. STALLWORTH,
Oakland. Calif
FInancial Se.et ay
N
I0
L, U. No. 224
tnuldoeld JonucrH 27, 1941
It is with sincere teeuirl
of sorrow.
nd
leglet that w.
lie iiellnleis of L U. N.o
B-24 record the paIsirw of our friend and
Brolthe, Albert 0 tortii
hlerefore be it
Resolved. That
..
pa tribute to his ilelnt
Pry by expresIin
to his faitily and friends
our s'Inee
dsymlpthy in their hour of .nrroT
and be it further
Resolved. Thin
vie drape our charter for a
period of 30 days, and that copies If these
resolutions be sent to his family. to the Journal
Ior publication aind a .....
ente red ubidA I~h
ininites of our loal titinn.
itE*'£R ADAMS,
President
DAVID BEGNOCXI.E
ricer President
NORMAN SEGULN.
Ne. Bedford, Mass.
Recording Seeleiary
William J, Thihideau, L. U. No. 10I
nitirrted J ....ar.. T. 1Q19
With sorr'ow arid teglI ,e, the rmbelbics of
L. U ilO. 104, record hIe death of our Isla
Tii, nd and Brother Witlion 3. Thibldeatm
Reolved, That we. lre ni.
fl.ier
L, U. No
104. in ] .eeting h, e nss'roi bled, siband fearp ile
DOaluto in silent meditationi
as a tribt
to hIus
m emonry: a. d be it
I u I.he.
Res olved, That a (... ny f liege resonit iiits
he .senlt to Iis boreaver famlily with Till dteepest.
Tpathy, aim I hit
ii
a cop0y be sprd ad (n
tle mninutes of L. U No. 104, and that a Iopy
ti sent to the oflicial fltbinai for publicatiol
KIENNE7F( A STILES,
HARRY A. IAMACHER,
]ostnu, Mass.
Ci...l bie
IL. F. (I)an)
Chitwood, L. U. No. 627
Tnztlated Jute 14, 1914, If L. U, No. 584
It is with sincere feelhins of soriow antd ie
giel that we, the Ite.it...ers of L, U. No. 627
record the passing of onr fliend and Brother,
D F. (Dan Chitwood tlherefore be it
Resolved, that we pay ribute to h S
t
by expressing Ini Imd faily and friends , FI
sIIwe sympathy Ih theni hout nf sorrow: ard
be it further
Resolved. That wre dftaf our charter for a
period of 30 days. and t hit clHopies of liege
re~solut'ons be sent In, hiii fauily, to the EkccIi cal Workers Joiurnal for pulblicaion,
aIt.d
a Copy crtered O hil
the
niutes of o/r lI..l
Fort Pierce, Eta.
J B. [{UMPHRYS,
Recording Secretary
Robert 'on Neida. L. U. No. 7.13
tidtiated Norletiboe 9, 1923, in L. U No. 686
Whereas Ab¥ igbly ind in HTo ininimiit
widonl, on Decemlbel a I943. called tO eternal
test our worthy,
anli
cial
,ecretary- 1Iothii
Rlobert
on Neida; Il erefor be it
Hesoloved, That we pay
tribute to his nali
ory by exprsing
0hs
rliae
¥
our
U Id I tilt sympathy In the loss if their loved one
and be it BuIrlier
,Iesolved. That IIaop
of these
ideiol
inn
be spread upon the n ttin tll, of our heeting, a
copy be sent to his aililty a copy b, detto
our oftiial Journal for nUblinalion, and ouir
chatler be draped for a period or 30 dafs, and
be
it
further
Resolved. That tlhe rdlenlrs stand in silence
for a period of onLe in liet a a tribute tO his
Readin,
HARRY M LONGENECKER.
al.
Reciording Secretn]l
Arthur John
%lolligan. L. U. No. 25
bNlfnted Au~U.t 30. 1f21. In L. L No, 3
it is with deep sorrow and egr'et thai we
the rnenlters of L, U. No, 25. I B, E, W . eordl Ihe passing of our Brother. Arthur b]rhtil
Mulligan,
Resolved, That we pay tribute to his enhiirtry
by expressing to hI wife and familly nor ntos,
sincere sympathy An their hour of sorrow, and
bie
It
fiiitlei
,qesolved. That a copy If these resnlutinns
be sent to his family and e entered inlto the
miuites of the local union and a copy be
sent to the Electfical Worke,,s
Jo
[o
f..nat
pIimcalion; anld be it url her
Resolved. That ur
barter he draped fol 311
days in his memory
WM N IIALLERAN,
Long Island. N. ¥
reciding Seciectdy
(har~ks YeIWer, L. U. No. 713
Ililtoted February 2M, 104. ill L. U. No, 325
Whereas Alirhi, Gli , n His infine Wisdolnd. ... Jallua y i18 1944,
,alled to lqriaotl
lcst nor w i yvrI flinther, Charles Veolet:
hliiefol be it
fesT,I'ed. That we pay tbtute to hIs mmlnd,
by expresin
to his relatives our heartfell
Sylpalt,] in tle ]ol, of their loved one; atn
Ie it further
Resolved That a copy of these resolutio,
be spread upon the minutes of Our tneeUn, a
copy be sen o his
amly, a copy be sent to
our offic/al Journ)al lot publoiatin,. and /lul
charier lhe draped for a period of 30 days; and
Ie It Hurtte,
Resolved, That ihe members stand In siIener
for a period of one minute as a tributr
to Its mnemory
HARRY M LONGCENECKER,
Reading, Pa.
Recording Secrer'
F.C. Simpson, L. U. No. 77
Retsirioted Au9ost 4, 1936
It is With deep ..orro
and reg'et thao
iw,
the inHlb.r.. of 1. U. No, 77, record ste deatl,
liebrluary 13, 444, of or
lat, Brother, F, C
Sbnmpon; therefor, be it
Resolved. That we ipa
tiute n }is fato..
ily by exp.ressing (ir sinere symipatliy;
he it futtiter
ReIolveL That a copy of these re'oltit..ns
be spread o. 'h
moinutes of this mneeting
a
copy
he sent to the offilial Journal for pIIh
Ileatini arid a '.p) he senlt to his faintly
aId he it fulthlr
Resoled, That4 flth chalter he draped to
a period of 3 days
J
Wv,GOROVER.
J. NEWSTROM.
VICTOR PARKER,
Seattle. Will
CnIllii
iel
Ward Hamilton,
[L.
U. No. 861
liitllltd October 4, 1935
it is with deepet,sOrilOW and -egi-lt thi
'e, the nenlbeis of L U. Noi. a". record Ille
passing of Blorther Wald HanIlton.
Whleieai we Wish to expless to lhis i fanI
and relatives on, (deepest sympathy: tienefoi
ble
Resolved, t'hat a copy if thilese resnltiuic
lie sent to hi, £alil] nod i copy be sent tol ITiT
El~etrical
Workers
JJiirIIal for Publieatoin
and that a Idt,
he ipread on the mmnteit
ald be itu hltier
RNslved. That .ill charter he dirped tI.
a period of 30 days II lribute to his, itenmn0
M HEALEY.
H. (4 HOPPER.
ALBERT ROSS,
FREDERICK ALLEN.
Sc,se3 City. N. J
Coinuiltet
Edward White. L. U. No. 9
InR ditc4 M ai ±3, 1934
Ll l
IY
Union No, 9 (I f the
ntern ai' oDi
Brothe.rhood of Electrlcail Workers .o..d
with profonnd sorrow Ole death of It
Brnliei
whose name Is m
.en,..d above,
Brother White was <nown by the nroiaber
of L, U. No, 9 fir Ihis Zhal in our canse ,ini.
f.
hits
ialitios asa man,
The
Ireat .Iterestlow
bnh int
.nnu
problems pre.ented a good example for al
nW nur menb*.r of I'
local anId they Mit
hon' remeinbe
hin lot
his enconragereni I
and work in beal~af of our union
W hereas we deem It1 fiI lug and proper tia
Ole nmemberb of L. V No 9 offte their I Uibt.
diei, moc 0ry ni i, r deIp irt d B Uthlc fT.
his Ioyalty to our IlotheTh'od and count,
i., it theiefore
Resolved. That the sincre symlpathy of thd
rliemnbrship of the Ii tennt ional Brollerhnio
of Electrical Workers be hereby estendiod
his bereaved fanily.
CHARLES LAUER,
ERNEST MANN
HlARRY SLATER,
hiceago, Ill.
Cn mlltt
David Kinniburgh. L. U. No. 1096
tzltiafed Septemnber 30. 1943
It is with deep sorrow and rebret that Ie
the mlembers of L. U No. 1096. Iecord Ili
passil g o our Hi othr,. David K*mnibugh;
Iii ire fore be it
Resolved. That we pay tibute to his idoll
ory by expresnfg to hit fSilily our $iiwole
sympathy: and tIl it furihll
Resolved.
That We drape ou
charser for i
prkRd of 30I das. that a cop, of these rselhiboots be sprea. at the i.lntliles of ourt mle i.,. a,,d
copy be sent to oti official To.....a.
for publica lion
HERBERT S. SPURGEON
Pa.wiuckiet R. ],
pi .J(lh
APRIL, 1944
151
Geor..e Finn, 1.
1T.No. 215
ieu
fit to f.all from
our
mnidst or
c.fitiemed
and worthy BA..thr. George Film, who h.a
been a io,
ber of L. U. No., 215: aind
Where,
Pin hit, IhR, L. U3. No. 215 1ha Ins
the Services o a Itre and loyal Biotlier: be it
th~erefore
Riesolved That we pay tribute III hi, TrilTmury
by eXpieSSIng
1o Ils family and friends our
sincere s m]ati:hy; atnd bae it fui llbI
R cSAOlvd, f ith ,t a Thpy of th LON ..
tu iltittii
by litit t, th
tNily oIf
t,
lAte deparhed
Brother, thlat theI be preald ii [jill iit..n lhe
minutes of 1.. U0 No. 215. and
n ip 'It seni
tip the, Elr ' ril
W.ork e. J ot"',110 fi..' . .Iubt
cation, aid tihat or ,]hartei
bil dDpej for
3(0
InII Mae lleidelann, Il U. No. 1061
Daniel L, Macjionald, L. U. No. 101
Ilirti'Lt(1 September 12 Ill'
Wlwreas Aflm
ht Cod i, Hill wid n... I...
N.itlatea J3hi I, 1920
With sorrow and re ret, we, lie memb rs of
L, U. No 104, record the death of our hat
friend and Brothr, Da~niet L, McDonald
Relolved, That we, thin nocubfers of L U. STN
1114, In nertiug h',re
,ssDhbled stand for' one
ii1ini/tp,
[it s~lent
roleditaltant
S trtbtme
as
itl
hit, oincror;, and bte ii further
Re1i lvycrI That a popy of Illese r¥solfbInlns
he sent to his bereaved fintly with our deepust
ympaltll;
Illnt a COPY be spread ol
.
i..
flites
id L, U. No. Id. and tihat a clpy hI'
9ertt c I,c
1' nflthicr Jrp..IIrn... fo
,,hitibroln..
IXNNNTIT
A STILES.
11AI]Y A. HAMACHER,
days.
Po glt eop'ie,
N
ADELBETERT (T]yV
Y
Hoci,, ( 0
'Y
retai
..
Willia,
Picton, L, U, No., 50
Rennhthitnt
Joseph F. Small, L. U. No. 501
Li~Jtillel A rIrD 13, 19i2
Thc ~Izdden death of fl'othc.
lo rdl, F
Small. 'e~uttirigl ijuputi ito autc~1ntil)biti
itei~deiit
on ,Saniual / ' 15. t'aine as a gi('.[
to his
±malu l [iend]
ISrot elraS mall anl Yve-sc IT vCteTa nl of thu ih[ t Win a Wit*'l
l I o. .p
pit til/
s.ven mh rori Ji
Il , on June 0). 1910.i signed
tlhel "Iailil
fiil tlr( eheati/mI if L U) Nt, a ,,
Oil ith, Pib .nd
at tihe r,,ri'li1g Pall TOi
~huuk
VcT
n" " I
y wie
J o ur nal
~
V onki s N , YV
John Francis
].
.FF
S eti (liai
Biurt, I.
I'. No. $S8
Ws L, U, N,,
V]I NoiisTtte
I
,I l-
these
ma i hip li
resolmItll ,n
f or
i he.
"iTih
JIGAR S HURLEY,
GEORGE WAGNER,
WM
MIAY JIILL,
il,reby
JOHN W IIAD(I
23, 1941
~ifl
hIs T Ii I . '¥P lt ind e, Otis
~ii ~,
< it.
in hi
,how of tP eielvt ... itt . a d f .p to llci p
lIeoat~r, 'T it on.T 'lcaIter hill itn
(1 o1< I
priod If 30 lll~! an.d be I, bw
Illie• b el.h 'I tillt a co p; if "i I
u'
uu
iii" 'Ji< tet ari a th
o
eot to tI '
aI ll t
oatt , piyliutiu,P
P t Il
fi i lu
~ka~t
Dxl~ l
£of o0 faldI
dal's dapit
tii
.
btse~ril
I ..
til[ia [ ion
Loenl.
to
mi'1r
nl{]l~ial
Jittinlal
J
a n dl thi 'ilaph
a oc~ p$W.
of L p n
lOrt5
ard(el~
V.iz, L.ti! U.
No.
569toi) l
l~iftniemtl .fmirat
27. 1941
L ocal t ilt ti l No. ~I' ll, I i 3li I9 itern iip c m
l ii llt.)h..od of Ehle,, irt
Woriker%,
fi'ctd
[tmi 1r piw the d Thi if Birothici Jo.. Jli[, W ,
V,,,,
W ill, t'as w e dci ln it filig
and lo
ar tht
Tillu p i ll['m
ei
f Iy
xo
5"S ,,Ihr
lili4i9
PlPI T' rIh.inIcir, olf ot, dIli arted B l mP,,',I themII
William S. rih]. L.
~
I
t i, n clout)
Fow
it id,]('i!
i J nitll
'
lth,
illfnli
.. i
"fI L U. No. 1bf,
cortId ITT
li al i flg II , i n
is er
An i
r on,l
t he,
fore be in
leso/Ived, T[hat
,epay tributlll to 1,, I
ory by espi
IId to her fa liby out' nnecru
' ip atli
T...Id Itll it fairl'it r
Resvd, 'that we drape nIp, chumpI.c for i
elriod of 30
aIsll. 1hit a copl Ill Hill... .. .oltlio nsi be
P.
irc d .i.. tIh,:
c
ibltit(S of p.I. I .elI,ir,. onhl a chiii
sN( t to oITT ogilclt Jot.i.l.
.
it
U'.No.
569
.'otnl er1IiOOtA~
12. P94I
l I, ili[
ni o n Nlli 569 if lil, I nte n mtI.
llonal
rI~
Ithit'iltlm 1 Tfo E lul i
u W orker,,
r,' , d
pi ¥Jal,-Ti ri, trki dt ah of 1E',me lr w il ostin
S Slvpt
Illcre , we d... i l it tmlng aid tlrl irr thiat
t he ui ei it er o L , I T N o, $69 ott
ti,1 i jt
t I I'f l liti ic 'i-o
r of o T~id p r e B i lo l e r li e n
l beiit
Piesol
That a c'oaiy lit his Tr,,,, ition[ It
-lip i d tipot PteT it.. Pi... i thle il ,oc ..imui .rtI
C
wli t ti
fa intly I f ithe clhepau d morn..
ll, a ll A *Od
P
'o ui "I time olh1 i J J itPlioiia
I., C. NMDONALD,
HIERBERT J. SpUUROEON.
L
J oi
tii m e
E
Wit', a i ...L... fit t ing of ...rr w arid jegrel
Il., tile Thyi htl~ oF Oa lesbu/rg [r~ iitct Local
Union No. 7(}y I B E W . r.o
tt... p i$g,
oif our Biothir,l Rill,s Lucas: thiemufumi tIu it
liesolved. T lust t
lay triii...
to his m mnory by exThuss,,tg to his fameiy ouTr $ncere
:sympathly in thlci' hour of sorioti
mtd le it
ttprthei
Resolved. T lit a r'ip.y of ripest t*,o]Itiiols
l 'i,.s
n to t hn' El ectl i,c lf wWi r
'i ' ,F',iimmi l a,,d
LaIlba'
pl e a t
t ,'rr i w
%r
1%t Frood
[,;on te(
'VlfrriiIherfirh,'m
Re s ol v e~i
d , ip'tt
th e lt' iitx'
fuirhr, :l'
Ti col
f a 'n lh
N n'w,,
Jo"
pililteal imlln
a*ssembled, stand tn sihur~I
hi,
dilirtli~ui
lnti
fI
h]AR*RY ANJ]3 IFSON.
core
S~t
-m
Xc'a.181
pict li e~
dl £ orth
t ih
iSmithmL
.
~ ..c x
Did ,
a
mT,,
fl pr
tI~
a
hIii
c
No. $71,
a li t s s m n alvTi
Ii
,T
',T
,,n,
,b e i
l'u,1 s ntl ici t hel rifltheinl J o ur n Ll
A mi ti it r ti t h
~
~
fur~
I ndi aiia,,p ilis,
Sl
o,
JACiON
ROY (REASSY,
FI'llaime at S e re a
li d
I
uitil
i Fret!
ii,,[) N![Cugene
Y'11
~ * Sm~ith.
PI't
t do t
th
iiliC.
I. Farim
ith
'ist]cla
DON QUON,
CIEXN IMtIIIIC,%
ll
I ,lII II I
Ptoil
if . K y0 da....i.ne
~ 910
l [
fJohIlli'I of t
¥e
"I][ an4
Res11i1v,1dtIlhat we ,xlns to, Ii.' famtit
ourh -mpite
svmtihi'tah,
and bet It ftop Ii.
R~estov¥r
es.aiod imtitiom
R es l, 'hi1ti
T hat a,itircops
chha't,olitis,
hrti
d to,
pe r ..
iod of, l ) J ha.. i n i m u e t
i
,e o
and Te it . I l
Ril
lsi
' r T h at a coii , of t r e r s l i i m
be, sent tp. il l' fa Il , a " opy sI nlad ... cII..
.
ninhites.
arid
coIp sl Fs 'ill
J~
ille E lecti ca
I nill('i,m
0' f' JACKSON.
,JOHN MVhli
C 1I SCAlON,
iimib ,
No.
Pi16,
. . CalWif.$
"'or t IW
.. .....d T~ r t ill,
rile
PLyI,I', a ,tcr p
fIuT
lmR1,IIIIICI the1 ('IiiI.J [ PcirrTI
Ire
ne',brsI.P f II. a,
NIT..'TIIiiM
ieeucli'1
the passhing of Tr...lber
RIT"'
U,I.....
11T11
.F u.i..
] lqu,]
rtby od
' ,;T~ail
(J4 ,n
t 1bmt1o[~ybil
] 2I,
ly
... 1 lI
,4STih
IP /,,4,L l '1q
] NTli'
l!,lmoel[10
(it, IlOldlee
l
iOIi/
Jl
lk I/,lll
ilgl
oft
l t ih.
aiuT
hartfl
D te}le
ill
... th
Mrivilge Fof~a
woring
wit Oil. iell
theJ imiss
1s1itiri 4u1tiY', Optdei t P iji th ur
. t'oilt5
U il 171
ttc c2.
U. IU.
No.
S
mith. tthi o' cl rl
ll dF.i. m liPile
i
tIlh l' i, t u h o me's of t htt"is
r, u
tl ei enu m p
A~P
, FLAHEIITY
hr, U U
.
cl b o 2 , 104±
s j~ mn'iep osrm$'
s j lJr
t ' i ilr ~22.
]~Itt
t .
ll Ih " J
Le s .e r( rb tt, U. '. N om
. 90
Ic mitm',t., )r 'v m er 2 , 1.25. cIT L . Ill N O, &2
it ill t ill, d u, post Isu i iri w l
. Jri, 't th a w el
''i
the yuheihulim
if L,.
NItl. 941, ,Iri ntwionia
411Ij5,ii
of lirti hiI', L e st er C ci' butt wt ot d 'it'i
tIIIetir i'i .iii Januaryl 14, 15414,
w hiereat
ill 'uish to, I ...
it .. Pii lu, faintly
P esll v eld,
senti to
E l ecti'j ,al
a ild lie ii
RI l tveI~t,
ITe
W~ El
F ,iI lii I]I I
l"
'Ir nge , L, I'
th c 'i
ALT.. ..
t~ i l.
2iiotiid Italy II, 114,
uil/ hor
Oif (smil
fth IIo u1
li p. 'ofi ' . No,[
*ll1 i, B
'V/ .
i A T ih i, fee t tii, nil i i t{ali t
c. r el , i T r u
t he'I
.... P u r of B i d i ' 3 1
RIlss ICas, L. U. No. 702
Pic it
e,,'
P~... itdl,"
E,
Fi f~h.
IT
Ga1eshm ,r
o
wp
T'/,i 'at
~
foi pulblteatiuin.
}t
Reumilynd
11111~1fintinted
I"
Amne 'Iqncr. L. U. No. 1096
Iiiti tlrtI
A llhL 29. 1942
P.,',~IaiPIl
W ImI OILM.1R T4,
lfanger
,
I,.IEAnI'O
I, o,IIgll.I
ELMER
F'OYD Wr,CU'TI',r0
R.lol
...
for
I'XECTIlV]; BOARD
Masst
P aillty tip thp'D a il c iTh
i nt IL oi ' 'i.
I " Op; tie un
t lt olloci
il 'i I .1....'n t f..
P.1,b
I'. I'adayLOY
D.....
[{iesO]ato
t
oumi
clap,h pr ti Tld rape I
C
..p..n...ttc
wp i(,rthed
Joipi
M
il1, of Olr B roth e. $oh1n F'ah
8il,I T
l lewFtes plvu'l" [' ha t a OTIi, ' of Ili t r o t t o u
fore be it
Reso]."ed. 1hlil in triEbute tIl his m
. iiiii
th
nlthiut('
itp the, lcal iTilit,
oI.....', ..ir 'ad..
a it;'
lie s e ntll P I fi>
h W ...ii ly f trio el i rt
rriciutre... IId a COfN Ii
cit 01 tue, othliup
loa,
;
D ,I'ha
,lmp......m If f.. ptubil .......
we extend
,
outh dcj...l st·i'
x
pothy t I'll iil y arid r
iti¥,v, ,, I..
Oate
I_, G, MvDONALD.
rwNarte~ld itu ir,, and be it fort Icr
I S ADY'
Res oWlv d . T h al t
ceti, of tit
,leye'
o utto n
IL A FLAHERTY.
be
l I eTrl to i:Iu b rea% d fa il
a '.
S ill m t C alif
C ..
ir.i. .mtuc'
Ilpon the r ...
iite, of this
etl i l a ti tutu aI
C o~p
of is lire
i i' land in it P'it lii,
R,1] ved,. Jilta a copy
I
i, , ife
,so titrohl
he sun t I fimt finmily and a ,(ip, be Ient 'ci
dti Fi~l lrcaL WXorkers' Jio uihal for publicaltioln
CIHA[IMAN OF TH1E COMMITTEE
Cincilnniti. Olii,
TIh
mintlnehy PIassig if William Pico..
hrllups to L U, SO, 50 aThd its mentors
Joseph It. Willi,, L. U. No. 1249
whc
g as
goo
I ii i tint S cp te ,W i, 7, 1942
mem.h er, a' wa s ' ep i i P a t...
, id tip avid
>'rd hi4 lshv of
he tin Ion
t if; ' ill', I* lm
tp
iT'' r' V a n ,e g ..t Pt .it wc
theefrire be it
Il e'r r r ie . it 1. U
XN" 1249, re or
thi
hiekolvtd. That
dealh),
t"Irotn ,
ih'm'ougll, thle
Jo pt
W ,
lcsnilutinin
tifer f on
a,/e pIa a b ut e ...
y I rt'laeet Lo
hisi n (' io'r
PIe it
PI exrit ming to ills
aWll
fe ari fa ily o r sin.... Joseph
pTo.
thy; a d be it fii ti r
I11r11Icd, Th.t ouroilicill
<tie dMaped f-r a
l
'r ,
pi t
July
.i1tiat£d Jam.e 2, 1937
It ti wilth deepest Jon-ow and refret tiat
we, the moeabehls of L. U. No, 06M . of the
Intetiatinat] JIrotherhood of Electrica Workers. 'eordl
the ntlath of cia,' est1e med and
worthy Sisrr'r. 1maMac I- ibdlinai.n: nId thili
fore be it
][ esolve . That sel thle
en ityr J or L U . N ti.
1061, p.,y li'hatt to ]iy
mTem
.ory
by expre s. i
In hler rehat]¥tv
our hea, tct iP 'ilnp hy in
tils hor. of sorrOW: ajid be It further
Resolved. Tlat tile
itemlpi'TsT,
i
n
ar
...Pim~
ll,
th atl a f oll of tI u' v res o luti ons
hums
bliniLv. P l.ip, Iti aent 1(1 brI
Wuut'k lr J uIer ma fur riu bluca iiti,
i l
Th t
u c i i c lie dr ap ed f or 1
~
T W, BRI1NKLEY
PIAY S. SPETARD
TIOIIF1RT
N ew 1 la y,'iu, ( u nit ,
E. FLtAHERTfY.
R il ,ui' I mg Se re ni y
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operalors
152
WaiTer Reed. L. U. No. 1326
Initiated Ayril 17, 1943
Ii1 I]
-lb
deep
oilr.d
an.d regret ihat we,
the members of L U No, 1326 ofilhe . B E W,
record the dealI of Brother Walter Reed;
therofort he iI
Regolved Thai .e tdmder our lincere sympalkv to the family of Oir Brother in this
tijle of gret soiri.
a]d bt it further
RItecxltd. That a coi)Y 'If these resf llb onl s
Ibe spiead upoll the bimltIes of our
lleetin.
and a copy serifI
hle,Electrical W!okeis'
J~olu]n]l for pub caloI., aTnthat our ehilrter
he drla(I fillt 30 dlays
]LO G0 PORTFR
lanigor Moille
]Lr2cod Ilg seclrtary
Walter I. liedmall, 1. U Nd. .31
IImtiittcd LJiY l, 1937
It is IUt deep sorrow and regret that we,
the
hleombr, of L. U - NO. 31, recird Ih1 polsIls of our Bl'othe, Walter RfolandI lied..a.t
therefore be it
Resolved. That Ie Pill tribite to ]MSiilenory
by Ixpressing to his Family our sincere syrIl
payth: and be it futfIer
IlusolvIid. Tbaf we dlrlop
our clIatte for a
period or ao days. a/i
that a copy of these
resniulinris be spread out the
Idjittifes of Our
meeting; that a copy be senlt to ouir ofc
Journli for pubbecalior.
anid that a crips he
/lit,
his bereaved fanlily
E $, WHTThICV
Recording Secretgry
Ditirill,. ~[min.
I!. Eugene Williams, L. U. No. 175
Initiated Jul, 15, 1936
Whereas it is with 1the deeest sorrow that
we, the mnermbers of L, U. o. I75, Inernational Brotherhood of Electrical Werkers,.
ay
our tribute of respect to the memory of our
]ate Brothlt. H. EugenI, %viliars, w.hom. C-d
In H/is Inlinto -ilsdod, Sa. fit to rellt/bve from
our] rillst; an4
Wheleas we wish to exteld to his fidtly
a] relatives our deep and heart lt
syIptli y;
thbelyfove be it
Re.olved. That we, in
leeting assembled.
stauri JIoi
in silence
one minute as iI trib
,te
to his memory; and be it further
Resolved. That a coy of these I$ohtfilons
be sent to his bereaved famJiy, a copy spread
uipon the mliutes of this meeting, a copy sent
to tbie Labor World and to the Electrical
Worker Journal for publication, and that out
charter be draped for Ia perlohd of 0 days,.
J. H GRIFFIN.
W. C. HARRIS.
WM L. WILLIAMS.
Cha lhtaooga. Tern.
Colmrifttee
William H. Galligan. L. U. No. 1268
Pitiatud Attgst I$, HlI42
It is with sincere feelings of sorrow and
re e7 e that ,e. the
Initbiers of L. Uj.No. 1268.
iecoid the pa.sig of our Brother.
Williat H. Oalligan: therefore be it
Reilvl.rl, That a copy of these resolutions
be sent to the family. also to thie]eetrial]
WorkIIs' J.,I~%ld R, yriblicalion.
WrOflN E HAWES.
BosIon.
Mass.
Financail S'cretary
Alfred Rosenberg, L. U. No. 276
/ei~ndoted Jdyid 1, /919
We, the meber oftL. U. No. 276, 1. B. E. W..
with a sincere feelig of sorrow a..d rgret
record the pssing oif Brother Alfred Rosi,,berR: therefore be it
Rieal veId, That we Ix press our synpatlthy to
the falily who nlourl his loss; aldd be it
further
Reolved. That a copy of these resolutions
be spread upon the minutes of this meeting.
a co1y sent to the official jouirnal Hot pblicatilo and a copy sent to thle bereaved failly.
R, E, OLSON.
LEO ]i IITEY,
ERNEST RICHA/ADSON.
Sueior, Wis.
CommitFtee
Thomas J. ]louck. L. U. No. 180
Initiated fecetiber 28, 1918, in, L, U. No, 302
I Is , ItD, deep sorro' and regret wf record
the pavitzlg 1Olm ou.r midst oIf Brother Thomas
J. HWIuctk; therefore be it
Reso'ed., That we pay
.ribute
ho
hIs riri'or
by expresing to his famlily our sinkcere smpathy: and be it fIurther
Il..olved, That we drape olr charIer for
0 days and that a COpy of thesi resol1tiot.,
be spread on1H
tHie .. nnies of on, meeting
anid a copy be sent to the official Solrnal for
Vallejo. Califf
SAM BREEDING,
WILLIAM GREEN.
ANDREW LOW.
Cootmifelle
Frdlrick Soulbcombe. L. U. No. 65
Eugene ¥. Mitchel, L. U. No. 121
Ihu atled J !/ 24, 193t
]It
with dee sot row and regret that we.
the iFne ers of . tY. N ' Sl, re-,. r. i 0 . .asig of ]:t [1thei
Frocle
Soutllcotnte, .Janna., 3. 1944,
Whp'/~ea; wue ;, sr fri 'pl',u
fri nil famin,
illr sinoere , r1 J l i ,dJ5;
I .elefo 1y, h1 it
Rfes lved, Tilat cO[M I
b x I innl
Irl d fo r 3
dat>+ a irlpy of f~lies, resoluluin~s li sp~read
oil the nIAutI Of
rill k~al
c union. a COpy be
senIt Io Is faly... ,,id a eopy bie el
...
o our]
oIliel"I
oui al £ot
.. ]/Ihlicatidi,; ;ltid1 h, it
fft t it,,I
R r'solvt'd, That [is ii, it1,Iei s Iiid ii, 'iletit
nIedititlol, for (tnr Wnil/lte ill r 1 'l ct to the
rneii It y of ,i ir
l at'r
aid B roi- tu,
CHARLIWS A, PHILLIPS.
W WENIWORTHI IIIGMAN,
A. R. ATKIN,
ButtM. M ont.
emilttee
Ifitilzted Ju?*e 24, 1937
WhVereas it Is with sinceere sorro. and re,.,ll
1hat we, thl nember,,
of L
', No
124,
reorld the paslsng of our wo'thy Brother,
Eulgene~Mitel:le therefore be it
RIsolved, That
h.is local
lxpriss its sybna y o our departed Brol hers im oediate
rirlliy and to his iriends; outh Pie it fiurther
Resolved Theft a copy of Itese resolutions
hi spread oil hI"eiiutes of Hiis vg,.nzatiof.
a copy sent to tile Laidy of our daepallted
BrIot he and a copy sent to IIha I]leclrical
W*o]rkrs* Journtal for pUbhfeatielt
C, K, PULLINS.
DON MURIPIHY,
J. F. McINTYRE,
riIasg$ City, M ,
Comr ittee
James T.
Logs,
I. IT. No. 213
Ill itited No, emtb
1, 29Ž6
It Is with the d epest
.
orrow~ itid reaet
thiat Ie
tile tiidtel
tf L, U. N, 213, re
card tile dleatl oi ni/] et.eened 1totherf, J1mes
T. Su*: therefo.r in. It
Reeltved. That a copby of these redsolul ilol
be sctt t to his fa]in y. a [iopv i]cordedl in1 h[e
minutes of fite Ioeal. aild a coip.
c¥ii to the
EZiretrica l %%
n,,k e n' j o~urn al for~ ptib lie at~io ti
and he i further
Ha.slved, That i, his mI,
emory Or charter
be draped for a pp. stot 'if .
days.
W. FRASER.
It. W. WArTs.
E. A. KNIGHT,
Varieo
... re, B C
Colnmittee
/Initlrte~d Miry 13, 1935
It is with Ilht dee ust sorrow that we, the
nu ,ibers of L, U, o. 306, mou. n the seemigly uintnlely patssing of our Broter,. William
W . A d amsO.S r. Br oPther A d ams. wa
,ivetera
of the first ¥orldl War and his two sons are
Im tie present war
He was a Idyl",
o
IE,
W
membetr. Brother., and a dependable frIed.
WIhIIereas. we wish to express o, his faitily
and relatives our deepest sympaithy: Iherefoic
be it
UIesoved. That a copy of these rsoltltions
be sent to tile bereaved fainly. aid a coP, be
leeor.detd Im he rniaute.s of ou.r meeting. also
that a copy be ellt to lbe Electrical Workers
leitrnlal for publication: and be it further
Resolved. That our charotr be draped for
a )eriod of 30 days, aind that we sta1nd for one
litflute in lent tribute in honor o our late
Brother.
SAMUEL W. OAKS.
WILLIAM G. STUIBER.
ROY A. SWIS{IER,
Akrob,
Ohir.
Committee
f'rank Ilavik, L. U. Nd. 115
Reifuitctid OlciDer 12, I27. at L. U. NLo 22
It Is with deer .. rrow anid eg'elI that we.
hle neritbets of L. U. No. 145. recod the plassngi of our Bi'otht,. flank HIavlh: thelefore
bet It
Resolved, That we payt [bitte
W
o I,, , mo
cry by expresing to kits faitly Oar sinaire
tyupi]thy; and be it further
Resolved, That We Irape our i hater for a
pe rind oIl0
days, and that a copy of thes
resol tions be spread on the ml ntes of our
eieitlln that a cop' he sentf to the official
Soltrial of the BrleflCr hood for putbiCat on,
and Iltat a copy be sent to his bereal ed family
ROBERT J WINTERSOTTOM,
J. E. WOOD,
C D. CASE.
Rock sland, EIL.
(ommittee
llenedict Zobrist, L U. No. 145
hIritiileCl Oct~.,er 24, 191Hi, i L, U, No., 45
It us with, dee>, sorn~Jw and regret that we.
the llenhers of
1. U. No 145, rtecord tule
PassIng of our
liother. Benedict Zobrist;
thier'frOe be it
Resolved. That Ire pay tribute to lis ;ieniory by expreimng to Ihs family OUr sincere
sympathy: and be it flirther
RIesolved. That We drape Our charIer for a
period of a0 days. an[d lhat a copy' of hese
reolutifons he s
on pread
the minutes oI our
neeilng. and hiM a copy be sent to tile of§clal Journal of the iBroiheh.ood fillr 11blicttion, and that a copy be sent to his bereaved
dabfllly.
ROBERT J. WINTERSOTTOM,
J. E. WOOD,
C, D, CASE,
Rock Island, Il.
Ch ldlmittee
Gikes Mle])erimtI L. U. No,. 179
Initiated April Ž4, 1939
It is with deep sorrow andb r rrcd that we
the IlemI bers of L, U3 No. 479. lerior
thle
deallh of oIe f oudr fly a and failhful mIernbes,. Gites McDermott.
rr, ihr McDenott lost his life while servire his count r. n tePcI c
airea. May his untimely death lead is to furthlr 'rdlrstanld
hie sacrilees beind made by ofhers.
W e share thie grief of tibs loved
Phis
andl
exteynd io them tihe harlfelt syinpo thy of true
frlenldilip and tile coitolatiorl of , kindred
sorrow,
Resolved, Liht a cell, of these r~solrWti.o.
be spread upon the mit/nhltes of oulr
cerirg, a
copy Ie sent to the amily, and a co'y bhesent
to Iet, Electrical Workers Jouralt
for pubIcation: and be it flither
Resolved, Thai
nil charter he udraped in
mourinlg for a period of 30 daly as a tribute
to bts memory.
ED
[email protected] uml~oat, Texlas
"hEAT.
FLOYD NALL,
R. R, PALMER.
Coimit
tee
William W. Adams, St.. L. IT. No. 306
Joh.. Cievenget,
L. U, No. 1289
Initltedl JSu, 6, 394*
It is with deep sorrow and regret that we,
the mlembers ot
U, No, 1289 record the passing of our Brother. John Clevenget; therefore be it
Resolved, That Ie pay triblte to his memory
by expressig to his family out sincere sytnpathy; and be it further
Resolved, That we drape our chatler for a
priodI of 30 days, that a copy of these resoltions be spread oId the inuftes of our meeting and that a copy be seNt to the Journal
or Electrical Workers for publication.
W, B, DOYLE.
Lakewood, N, J,
rresident
Carol ]fanning. L. U, No. 1041
Reitliialed Dece1nber 8* 194*
It is with deepest
,orrow
and refrt tbhat We,
tile members o L, U. No. 1041, 1 .
E, W,
record the pas.ing of Sister Carol Hanling.
whose death ouberred on J b ualt y 15, 1944;
therefore ,e it
Resolved. Thit we pay
tribute In her meneniy by standing in hilence for one minute at a
ineetuig of the ioca and by expressing to her
family our sincere sympathy; and be it further
Rlesoled, That a copy of these resolutions be
sent to her farnil
a copy be entered Into the
bnhllitlts of the oeal uniong nd a copy be
sent to the Electrlialm
WorkeIs Journal; and
be It further
Resolved,
Th]t our charter be draped for a
period of 30 days in her memory.
FRANK A, DIANA,
S Pralnfield, N. J.
Buslines Manager
Chester A. Brown, L. 1'. No.
849
Initiated Jnlar yd 6, 193*
It L, with dl,, srrow and regret that we.
the memlbers of L. U No. M49. record the
passig of Brot.erz
Chester A. Brown on
Decembaer 22. 19)43; therefore
,eit
Restolved, That we pay trihute In his memcry by expressilg to hia faLily oulr slcere
symlpathy; and be i fther
Reolved, Thait cop of these resolutions bhe
s.read on our mInti
lutes. a copy he sent to his
fartly. a copy sent to the ElectrIcl Workems Journal for ptublication; and be it furtther
lesolved, That in his mb/eimory our charter
he draped for a period of 30 days,
ARTHUR A. DONELSON,
DONALD W. pARKS,
JOHN F. MANNING,
s 1iw ,bure Falls, M ass.
C£om mlittee
APRIL, 1944
153
Joseph W. IBraIcy, L
E bostoln,
~
Mass.
EDW ARD MA R'IN,
CHARLES MYV~lltiFF.
ALVIN HAMM.
DEATH
1)
CLAIMS FOR THE MONTII
OF FEIIRUA RY, 1911
*i~
BNolhdl.
E.dward Ill O'NeL (}i JaT uary 22
I94 ; hthtreCo
h"I I;
Resolved, TIHu I
tl,,,vst~i ,fllldi]
ll
bIe
i to tIh oapoil' A.pd also to th¢ Electruts[
Workers
1
out fB4alfo pudlicat on.
ISRAEL SKIRIALL,
JOHN KEAIFING.
FIIANK WEyYMOUff'T.
INt .itt1e
el Res..l.t;ion
W. VantVeild, L. U. N.. 397
Inl ated Aumalt 2I, 1923. Ir I U. No. 677
It it with dee D s
folrw
ild tcgt
that
,e.
thle inr..bers of I U. No. 397, I o..n the death
of Brothelr W. V..ittVcld; Nheefole be it
Resolved. litht f
pall tribute to his mem.
cry by
i,..... Sil~g lo his £3fni'lv our sincere
synv)itby;
he it (~Lu hor
'1a. I I c opy Of 11*50 iesoltuons
icsolv't
bie sIet To hlis f;liily, I coply br spread upon
on] ±ninUttts arid I, qpYybt .e.I t the
o Journal
of E~ecIuic:) W~orkirs (III pI..l)IieR ...r, tolid be
it further
Rfy lverd, I[lh rt le charter
h
If this local
tnion oe dina...
foI a icriod of 30 dayh w
W. P. QUINN.
"~T (OATLEY,
J. T. DYER,
fI]i ..lla.
Z.
c mrnmittce
~ittil
Fran] Schalt. Ir..
L. IT. No. 276
tlioi~(*[dlfI~
11111,11
143
]~
It is vIlh d
I.h
ii>w
... .... I
ie'rt
that
1
we.
the pi-vi l ct ,,(if L U No, 276, It-cod t] he passing oIf iolllhiIv Frank Seller, Ji.: thielfo e
be i.
Ry~s.ved, TINt We in tiobute to his yn ictly,
as a Iod. Imfltect~ipi
;sse...bi..rt. stantd I0 sileri for a pcripirl of ....
i..Ill."ul and Ie it
fui thier
Rsldv,(L Tiiat ye extnd our deepig.t symlpatly to th, fantlif, ly d relatives of or
late
depa, te rt Iiioil itr. a n l ,ie ii fr lIt or
csrlved, ']'jht a to"py
ihese
td
rcs,1utions
be se!ltl "tI lif fa;1lil] of the Wte Itii/ther,
ilnt a ......
spre gl'd 1 bpl 1he rniiii.les of
L V.l N/,. 2?61 ;red
.opy i
cuitl to Ili ,flrMial
Jolot...ril I., pyubldation.
ERNEST RICHARDSON.
RICHARD OLSON
["E' DIIHIIEy.
Snperior. WlI(
Commirttee
Mefoxin It. (oiler. L. I . No. IS
lfieiiiated Octoder ½5
1942
W i.,,,ts Aloli't
Gold if
s inmfintte 'isdtim
has
tori Il ott take fr¢i¥
..
. r midst
B ri- I
MII-wxt0 It Tllo u: atId
II, his
WI....I, "tp"iitgo
of tId,~ f'iil
etqrnal rl%d
aH d leprived L.. V. No. 13 of a
Ioya
i nd] it 1t'p t '(t[ tT"IeT]l) [i SlO tht.rt tore
lbe it
~~
tl .... 1,
t
,, il
bd, It fn....er
tlo,tlibt
l iarteIf i
tlid IIr d
ord
he y ,I - fi'
l
IT .... lvy,
"[h ;. ;h v ...t this tife e, fpre.. (Fur
ct'rlipolp,,I io iIl IillttIrIttes of the fanm]v
ld
and IL
RrosY-i C(dln
mi flirt t-hvenmoit.
it r[rll"Imi
R rtnilv:d.
[h;d r4 iop v of thr,~-e rry~o lutio n'
Ir ip
rlt4iporjliit 'ri lit- iinitte, ot thif local
t;,/g~n
. i ;
.
tD the~f;#auiiiiv
l
iiy the late
Iot
,d , If'llk ' I.;pn
" uI'il',
rI'lr,
T ,al l Oft i
URii , I
lI
.
4rp
II ...
(ti
llri p..h.licatii,
Iti
(li
1,
I
ill itit E/e
t r a
rleal
~.
oft heim
.[p ][
L. U. No.
I7, 190
tes.
1,rtiaid DTc),,,l.c.
cord
fill
Vo .-
aI
tIi n , ,t i t t
an(d hr it ftpttIh,
Al, tRIt[
J1 IOM)B.
A REED
I1 0
I
Charles F. Olhixr. II. I.
Inlirlo. d5ll
;
:
Iail
CI/at ll
F. OhP '(!
For the paIl 40 idd ,rati
UiI
I~~~~~
]I~0
m in tof,
f l
woe
trIt, iti
a
furl Tlie
hatl titt
tI
(F l
e nttf
Sllit
I
....
I
II
II
it
I l"II
IT
II
ii t
II
I;h
2, 1p
]~¢;"IllI
2;
Ill
fI
;
I
1 . . 1
r;I
A
t
I I:l
~
.
.1 1
I& f odollil
fl
n
~ .11
It
"7~~~~~;
(!atl
Id
l[ I{~l i; diF
I. lo(n-nuts
Id
4',
-
U
V
Isf;I~; !fI
]IF i
T oKF
I
.
,;,
ii
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S't
e.;I
~~~
nd~~~~~~~
~~~~
~~~~~~~n i
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I'
~~~ ~ ~i0~f
~ ~ ~ ~1. ,~i,;
,'rs~
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~f
~
tipt
[ trI
of
mo
~[JDI
I
i ll I
t i.v i . if ti I. . ...1i In
n atto n al rIt il
(Ii "~I hl U
W... li
I
oi
~~d
r~
r;ic ms i]Di
latin
a >d,h~i,~
to his ittiboti %%¢
(r n
oe¥
l vte.l .
tH11II1~~
I
I
7"I
Fri .
is? F) t
AUD.
t
i[nlet nattnild ni'li lh ..ot.dI
He
c uter C;1t if( ...I I I /
i ifl
( S
oaro~llll)'
I o f~
of 'tars who,
In- faid1d toI atr dol
r,, e l tiits
til e l,
m' ki
...
pI...
l lt hits 'I IIl l
ri t e b iId
l ull ( ,
Rce-olve. That
U ,i
,I,15
N
29,i,
T IS"9.
s;tlt"i
If
]
IIitIfII¥IIll,; 11 I IT
IVI
1I71 POrmtr
i 1 ,I I
Rllll~N x,
fieeliti,
,
,
! HyIIJ{1II~O~f
of thIte
a cifnj, Ile ltito
to, hlt thei cavd fa,
e, . .. f i hI our iouI. ial (,0 tttllit,
W ill, I
Ut
m
{r
.
t t. tl e' tnt l Ii
ITha" a eopI
Resoplved,
~il ,
i
;T
cii
deftli of op, Bliuflt . Gtlo ,, WtphAt
Core be it
llo~,ReIdved. Thatit I ,i Iht~ITI I. IT lIr lth,
fi...fld t e
f i pr
IIt
Al,"
U.oy~ollndI (} (I'll
Ihi f , . III
hjt1t tIt tio vi l,
It t ~tmImit l, a. eidol it I ;
ir g
n~
f
DI
IkO A;~ k ....
Tmtu
~0 {l
01''~,~.1 I
in
~it
phis
The above emblems, designed f,
W. mereber, having members
family in thE serviee, re ma.dei
with celluloid lipel button, ad for our
womoe n.en.bers there is an lrd mar..y pi,
attacbed, for faitlning to the
The scarcity of metals for war Use2s has
made it .. e..SsUIy to manufaeeture tim
W.
e,can
emblems of the above material
furnish them with one, two or Ih -ree st ars,
and the price of the emblem is 255 cents.
(;rove Algh
I I
~Na~e
v.
;]II
WEAR YOUR SERVICE SSTAR
C.'
; T iii " "'
CHARLES 0. ECKLES.
;. A KOEPiE.
I[INRy ft. ZUNKS.
:f~
o
/ll te
176
hlitilited M.], l?~ I90
It
is
with a sincere feeling ouf orroow and
regret that we, lit rlolrl] Id T. 1] No. 176.
Jolint, i1.. recold ;bhe paosllg oR iur fip d
and Bothel.oo, Willil1 ]Re.Inlts therefore be t
Resolved. That IIe ]1;i. tIi thlut To his [ii]rel by e .p.essingto his flydd
nd li,,ends
...
0 1 S O Te
sTic... IIIy I
...
e
i il of slr] ow
and be it turh Cfr
Reodyyed Thai we iillapt tIut chat-itot lot a
period o, 30 dim, mid thIsI. op..t.. oh ihie'e
us,
o l nitto n, I .F. lI I tI lip.
.. t itt 'lv , toe J fiii
nat for pltlIldi,]mirnt, tu ] a II.",
I tltild tipitit
EdM aId II. O Ncil. L. U. No. 1252
/ni ated 00oher 6. I943
It is ` ith sipleci, ftplinji o(f S it o
1(]
regret 4111 le, th1
e oiptlbni
of
If M i,, . L ocal
ii r
Jlenninus, L. U. N.
William
V. No. 1252
Itnidatd Sepitehibcr 7, 1943
anld
it s wlinth sinci,
Klou.I g or sorrow
N 1252.
regret thNt W, the ,m'rhlylb , If t. U Ii.
T. 3. E W.. ioew
lie passing of our late
Brother. J/seph
ltawley, a cAirct, ilrelliber,
on Decebller 3. 114a; thoterole be it
Re.l.ved. TIllat a copy of these resolutions
bElIt nt it ti nl tn.Itily, andl also to, I'll rE cltri
IaI VWorkei ' Juiltil for ptpt,lillt.oti
ISRAE[, SKIRI]ALL.
JOHN KEATING.
FRANK WU
VEy MO[TI] -
~
e p1
I
t
th~}e inter-k
iiMI I
i TIt
MYTlaI'tIY.
IAM S,
o~
~~~~~~~I
I;rkbi~tl
I 4+ +lt
<t~ip
h
~,,~
;
rIt
4I
,
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
IN*
Memhers'
to a goas, but
goal itself.
ial sense itIs a
explain. RecalI that the
i triartiteIt fun..t..ns through
system
rtq1"osentatives
Leather
Pocket Holder
S,
Name
I I
11
I ta
I
...
2II
iI
Itt
-Ii
IS
it
1 11RIi-,
slili-rultI
RolIInher .
MmIT , 11 Li
rlilaI,, I
'I,Jvti,r V t.a&
n ver,
.
m
erit,
manlangrement
a
durable.
of three Patties, manager
govern rent...Now
t
Id
Jgovcrnnenl.,
there is
not muchi difliculty, ei1thr to> get them
or to get thensnr(tOgaliitth.
u wt Ih
handsome
we
topres.! tkers'
taives th, matter is
folder
utite differeit. Generally, throughout th,
tontain
nations of the werhd and I stress the
Official
word gen ra
4Is com bination of eaReceipts,
ployers and govternmenlt have prevented
brown or black
workers fromll organiin
into flion,,
with the 'est, that Unions become so
135t'ntS
weak that either they hav
no lprentativts to send or if they do send them
they arnot recognized. ObvMiusly, a
tripartite system cannot operate as such,
AImou.
if one of the three parties is not present.
In connection with the necessity of strong
.
unions for proper functioning of the
tripartite system, it may be pointed out
1u Doo that ill the United States even with the
vigorous
l
onfo..e......
of the National
iO....
Labor Relations Act which has taken
leD place since 1935, the total n umber
of
n,oot) workers in bona fide UaiOnIs is still CosouinO
siderably less than 25 per cent of the
entire labor force of the country. Aecerd,
.ingly, the place to begin to make the
,.. .. . .
ul,
s*,
t
ripa
r ssty tite
...
..
ith
success
in
the home country and in international
elin
i, to ate inte ong of the
three
.
n...bers of the tripartite system
he e*stibates i ade ill 1797 that "threefourths of the people of Asia and the tropics
sad I fourth of those of the United Stat.s
hart, f]iels blIlow the standard of health,"
, p. 731, a ad analyle, with a hit of tunating
the eiais of the [Tot Springs, Va., Food
Colfereice of Mtay, 1943, that the conference
wIs laolinatid Il a strong scientific outlook.
i l says Io the point that scientists are not
trsllto 'sa"andgetting food into higry
.ti/O
Ihl;
in the next 10 y'aas i, in operating
jobMt (p. 807).
Aln oiloat ing job fui-sooth Who are to
be thle oreratuf a, ani what Iu.l.i.is will they
bling to their tasks? In my judgment the
pattern for their selection, not only for fool
didtribuiionn but for all 11ostwar activitiesr
shouhl Ies one ther than that of the Itternatiunal
labour Offce,. The iLO functionod
as a tripac-id body made up of replrosenta
tives of the thres great interests -employer,
worker, and government -a]d although it
had onlY lirited powers it ilade a remark
h
itle record of progress. Il like manner
the
free natlolls should mleet through the rep
resentatires of the three pojor interest,
aiplpayer, worker, and governmenat- and delegate to then, he task of postwar eo-nnomnic
planning. These lipreselitatives freely chose.l
by and froi their principles a[one can be Ix
peeled to bring a measure of order ou 'if
chaos. If they adiress themselves to their
tasks with the teaching of Christ in their
[nt"is aadin their hearts they can he counted
on to help bkilg Christ's peace and order
nearer to our war-tori world.
MEN IN OVERALLS POUR INTO
PACIFIC AFTER DEBACLE
'Continued front page 33)
1e,
-o
To Caholaics, oth wIikers ai ellpoyers.
Wi~llm I's-tot
thefin should he no difficlty about the rioht
It seems, to me that if all these so-clII
of workeIrs to organie
lit
in oof
their .wn
leader's who claimed to have punched
II ot
choosing. tn IS91 PlopeLeIo
Xill eaIlhd thil
it out with the kaiser, in the last war,
ItK'
right a natural right, that is, solething that
t m
oo
n
m
any} niuly simlly becausihe heis a really put on the ginyes, then we surely
had eithet- a ha, outfit, or the show was
$95"I It
Ianc ( iar. 721. In 1931 [Qluo 1Pus X/ repatedl
carried the full 15 rounds to please the
this tealhitlrg (Pars, t, andat7) and Ideti il as
kht
ller$toe
.. of his systen If indnsL,-ne
gamblers.
ani p rofcssins. Thius it mius be clear that
CORlESl ONDENeE
It could happlen that a lot of feflows
rLnpage149)
Catholiumpinyors aninot without flyinm in
(s£ tiut, dI f
niamed
"Soe"
are now on their uppers.
the face of Catholie teachin *deny workd,'s
bht Imoslt of themti are asking for jobs,
in the hocals affairs. Wsearc glil we C ut
tile riihtt to loat u n f their awn eho..sand principally industrial
nar. place ini the
.W
an certainly
o1 B Ework. A new
in Ind feel, it is the duty of Catholic sol obtained immediate re esults anii henefts, and
ployers not
b lnly to refrala (ro, interere inta
sense of value will prevail in American
it .asgratifying to receive the Eltr.eT[CALwith workers who wish to orsanie, hut ;dso, labor when our.. ranks are opened to
Jot aisALto dial with the representatives they choose,
these most worthy mechanics, who have
Sell wishes for 19-4- from a new 1. B. E, W.
anI deal with them freely, fully and in good
no desire to pose for sympathy or to
baby.
faith as hrothers in Christ anS
pis
to.sessiaL
make forced speehes in Congress. just
JAM9ES [)OYL.,.
-$
the same riht ais themnselves to etern a lit.
to satisfy some flash-in-the-pan patriots.
In this way they wil help 1I hri
the goals
Here is new vigorous blood that will
of Chirstia jutice nea,ret to their
,wn
trickle through the veins of .ur
tired
country atn to the
(CHURCII WANT! PL ANN ING ON
Los nti,
brrhl.
labor front, men who will absorb the
El) E(N)N
O~I ~
N eed less ti* alt.d I eo
ca reu sJlor
Iig.
BASIS OF MIN XED) ECONOMY
N,1111Ii
..ldniidb ohl
~,
spirit and skill of American labor and
1ott rests with wu rkers. IHayi,
riht tI
{coattigoo L]lori page 12'p
oirganie anld har-hni)] cuelledivw tilt*
y though
carry on its tradition, who wi I be ready
1936. in agriculture
uionsthe Agricutu, it
unos
f thoi
owgn choosing, thty have lht,
f
futinal PFaril Harbors.
1938.
anti
perhaps
Adjustment Act of
tuty to carry out thecootcs iadifur them
We're
still the greatest oatien on the earth.
more dranatieally under the National
by the trn-........t
avoa tity, ele"let, and in e,,ry
Ta aI I., p he of years we have wylded a mLoeWar Labor Board. I a -a addriss in New
way ta respect
. Ilugitlato
he
rights of naneali tinatiI ant fighting outfit together that is
lgemeat
antI
t
he general pulbihul Wirkers
York on January 20, 1944, ('hall ian Wi] tow ii thtre pitching mindseason curves,
National
War
abtr
....
i..
less
thatn emlyers have ohliations Ils anid that, toL, igitlldat a couple of lubs that
lanm H. Davis of the
4 (....h.st rLa I Lto msake the reign o Christ a haie b en preparing andI tealaring for high
Board asserted "Withat vr, m......
success we havt hat I with thse coItr. ols,
ILit.
stake, ove r II porird of 10 yeais. A rena
In pust.ar Palianlng it is one thing to
letter to me from a brolther officer described
(over wages and did )utes has beenduine ,
thinga:
on
the
kry
I
Lw
.,
I,
li.,
.n.I
qui,,
anoher
thing
it
hi, I olil[
with lt. Jap tlee.HIe si-i in part,
my opinion, to two
ein it. The list of er'r
et iepousiwr thiar
"We're con.-ineeti that we can ik them no,
great pressure of cot tintor p urpose to wit
IIi to1, is abl st s.ltit gerini
feled ng. ti-an,miatter what the odds. Tha outfit is good the war, and two. thu tipar-tite halaetr
pirt..tl.
ln, adins,,santato,
.. rre..- exhe 'hip,
t
are seat and wellhIuilt. and if the
of the National War Labor Board. I douht
change, and a score of theri. Ila i lenrthy
(olk& bak ho.eI could only enaIiz what a
whether we could ha ye attained anything
-rtice on the instrnatinnaIfood
I.ovemea
-onhili nation this is, why they would build
like so much sue.es *s if either of bohest in the Anlerico.
tErarmir
.
a t rie, of De'hipsso fast iL woulld make their heads
gcentir.
194
Prtfsir
John
Ii.
Black
of
ii. I gueSt the ships are cbolag out as
factcos had beer, mi
L
HIaT.va rud revlews one of the.utr ..
logu
Fast
they
oan, hiut
not fo
t nough for
I set up the syste -Is Of i ldUat-i S and
job, ill w orld
reci
.. struction.
gerttig food to
bs" American labor is still being challenged
professions of Pope Pius XI as a nears
the hungering nillhion of the world, Ile ites
ol will centtila,
to ie until this war is won.
xll
labor'
toronnition
APRIL, 1944
A new
155
m,, t,1 bluild 65,001)
,I.ra..
veasel,
(Ir
1
If .h(ljIsTilLlt,of employeet.
teds
We
may
thilt i t
IiOtc hi!-r
Iooneof the LST'-,
i/ltldinW shis-,,
rIk..
<o
1I12 se llerate
h2ctie
rerii
as iantfig
tn. i 1.
0 horIep
o
wer ,lwrI t.
Ihot o if at (l;~tiutii
l size. W het
We IUlld ti p
t h,
tll ithllu t w. rirlur
for
sI1,rhl11
mIId ,01
tm s. l -i pi-ti
rxr . ... to i tl
ii..
t IIII,
hirvahe p ip)Ii..tions, Il t labor d.I< rl Tt hink
rrIl
theI task. Ili, labor kno
Is
thaI
1h
situ -, --[ hI.
VL,,tsl 1 in
h b th ese
hi
l l
will Le. ...l. . I l
l.tI
III tIvII
lwull Inb~
their
NtiLi
.... i I.n.d the s on " they ill
tn
it If tm I,
i
.VI
.aT
..il[ ite ,ve -. The -t
ILL
. , L tIi roe" 4I
'SI
s
ioIeu
WA.Ik ea
al1 4~l
,,,I
Ia
ii-t
the
b0
k,,y
or
whrn
h]rt A, Vi L vit
hen,
ne./ w.s
. ti , IeVl.
ll Ill,
recked LIhr
I to....I
o, tooI, riiw fl[ - A .l..r.I
ii
IIaV,,rp L
1 ib
Ih 0 , Job
A L
Mine oIl lhe Victugl
y o u rh' (2 gc¢stio n nt~IC¢ to IVrOIN
. . 1.II
ail,
f,,, the 'yorku'r
if ...uf niation to set
Iilt
!gainr
Thi, prlirgltn tails for the intellii-reae, hkil, inuldhstry, brair
am brawn of
Lpilrl
ihilLmthl y
Iomractore
o4,
ntH1
Mli
hul-
i hi ll] I wg.
;Iit
iti . ?
lV
0
,'
iitr[se it
Svnndord ,nd Srheduded Il}.nl;
f/t' ;lromttn in Itmltu~try.
1,Il'k
of
A frie complete list If puLiLetiorts
Ill
be hInd IoV tIhe askIh,,
I I 1sing,
II
l page IL
noth IL
m o t to
tIIill y... I
InAlar
coined ll thL Depaut;t, I T ,T La IiL
I1 s t t IeVrs
I ~'y. It wIs AiA r!It Il I. be
sI"I"
:ts hI r wIe TInI
'
WitUollio
h
,
tvll
utierlu
dilva ithlges
a
r i Il
[n± opiTjortrttrtities of tod~ay
air,] ~
nmu> t I:ski-Il'antae
o-ti, iheI.. I.,
have a
tI.4hiinr hArHl eI, tlo i l, ;TITIIr t Is tip I
LU, h IIT I eet t
elLLua lt.
I
Ml~ll
iiss Auiler
oL lII
;
l ldz
I he
r hInue t,I
6rea
r eOdinbefore
IL i ~( LIeI
AIImriciIan
'II~ U
hemo te ae
ILdV
l
a
LIT r
tl Xn
;H-~, if
wotmen i.
little
to
.. i..
reoaty
M I: hrtier
to
thi-
jl Il
<hill..h..e. I helieve they will do the, ptnt
if
til (Lance
IhVri
Li help anake
this IL ,
,h IlI [he bhl]
.nl grief bernf pld
[,,~ s the lirice for a flee ittl fllq illv%-
,o, tro/
ilf
phosphor
enow
Eitgeutial use) will givll a fair
pirttue of what has been a.e.nIplishd
aJt it st~ aDle thught of what 111 f41
itllf .li.1
........
IlT RATES NOURISHI. STARVE
INI)TSTRIAL CENTERS
IRE
I
(bill.gLb
Conititimed
to
page
United States ar
fou.nded on t.I
arid Ii'v-nsit& of it, errol ihten tal
ftrade
area. Any iLterf"rence with
ils fill,
trade
whether b fieegh, OOat
(lkiEu'tijds or uther ILnk of inlhrrtae
htib tiers is defilitely /1ti[
ilhe ptblie ihi.r
t i-est,
Yhllwe
ZinleiI
Hieflte
eli
Lu !t,< ir tt
TI ldkllJlnhorate
fithu'
The /utrutInt Of .Iii e r elw c b ,'tw -i -n! thi-
ultra
higher and lowtritransportation
...r cInis
which ,m [t be absorbed in iay tOif.Saeth 1i
is r,tnl a L ai ll I.t.i.t rr ( I thli 6 il
t-hail or wholesale price am deqilirtiloL
BhO it ....
be rememiberedi that tbe pronfit
in Iadittni tL the above there ateI Il,
the
h - ,.
wntillois.
i
i
WI)OMAN'S
irorieni
WORK
rion,
page
tut.. is 111
409
Illts
...[r I sil.ls
...
relating to lunlh arid
t'fst poliodig
niaternity and si-k
leaveclause. It was the thought of the
Wu...I... ILT.reau. to foriulat suc stant].
airds
hit ;lid ill
t
w o ien ill til
hit'gotL
u-o titriicis. T h , \\o l u n 'y
Rurt'uiii
s
if
li ...
that the won.en 1.1..ri.
take II .l. l
acIif v
palII iii ... iun. activities aeting ou,tot,
is IIrDe
Iivoeatir
Ie., S (tf
ihitt.et.
I :irk
ulnur..ls
Telvni g
,Ilcers
of
in thil- way tinn they
i(
th eir Ot[I ] itiede ..+.<
T h~e
\V hulfto ul'
Btn
for it is only
an btest I..ok ItfI tl
n-ct'l
rflUIii\
Ib
ubOitained fi]-u(
f tb ltse
hy
lilin, hI the \Vomnen',. BL)i(aiu. Ill
l}J, I.... T. i d ITAI
Hl , WV a hiiitot,,. i1 C
Thle ire bin ni.. e qdsof tho r hin LL w ,
llst lui jlSi it few w hicbh m igftlt be @fp[ l ,if' whifll Bit
fIblubdl
rItl
I I,,,/*>
hil
)II
t t iit/
II
Vw ll/
[1(
T '
,It
fe
I
II
~
flcceihiailoitI
e rviii
nit
' t,
kur1•:pleI L tI ,Il
?~if TItLIlt,lfs1nci
,q t irld uirrd I.ti f--.
rh IL~~S t...lI,,,
dIS
IT
i.I .. ,n .Lsafet,
T...1//I
j
Ilth f
a Silall fra.tion of ihe t(,h:il
mince it comes o1l5 after (very
... .... st anId
e~eiinue hats heen!
InI heit Ith
I TV....L
i*Ltinnel
ul
l;.lxt;
1 ,I
re
Wullr ii i 4
I
I
IT - 1
itt tilts
@v, iry
tit
,r
laIp1
Ii)
ti fled. ..
Atturrpiti,,
of freight uhurgvs may:. cult
tll,t ei
olluir .rom
t eveI
Ue
, a trOnI at
by eIly one per
I T nt utit if thu silhu U nti
i
lielt l.'eraltes ] per cent lf reverue.
whk
il 1t,0 bm, it high for ltlolllnflfi thrill id
t
,
;
:I
IN I
...ho]e,Ihen
WT,eIie
p1Er I
,le t"Llp-
l1 pur cee t inIptiimi
Ilt of rL..fi -:.~e ,,tmie]vs
iilenhion(-I ahtovte pp~v
h
tihl
IinIhii-ttd
r
le$ erat ig iii 1d
otl, hei, I ll
rith
HIP
estli locaLloio s
1u has at
Tmmlih qts nuid .. ulletins tv]ieb rini ht-
eOe
/
I
l~ )~t.~ h~u ,u
( (f p): );
Ii
Ilevelli
are
suIferin-Iij
%ait bgit- which winlid hnt exis
I1
n'llI
111[i{Lile]l
Mi-ss, a producer's (&u,{411,t div.starch iro n 'w'veet petalis for
iH
11:,1di ild ustr~ai tst'
Fritii L I-he
of /iew II, OIrdla tin
econom ic p yilit
III
vuoplent IS a i , I -r
mutch
Ifn
-tuirt i -llui
nI PLThe
hrIied SIft il h as trtvuItil y ILtI
I il r11
enf heavily or i m~ports fro,,, due ~%t
i.ril pan-nbc wair zoiie for £tarelhes IIIon
piloroh), ,Iu].tl, A
eIed
for the prOdli. phinl,
~u
124 pIr cent in.-
ahd lonr polish.
ni of the cmi binel
tltt
t.d hlunit
m:.bilth hui-h iundan} out hounnd frrihl wau..i
pluluvt
prmritted
,Ia A hille reductonu
of 7 per (,tI t
firnished products, or
An increase of p ,uiti,
t
2lipr cPnt retlurt
plus, tn
the
ti,
*'t nnitihniI thlu
tllo[ uu;JI/L]L
Ie
Al i uimrpse of 117 pil
fa -tinll ,gm w agp,
es
til
Stoop
Tlnt
nniti Sni
ii ititigtt
com binationl
of th ..
lei ltefil,
rerr
suIdfed wIllas
j]e
'
Ihi I C lli ia y of Austirt, Tu-s*I,. i
CI,
AnIther
At 1
leadhilt canner of chili.
This
tirtn
dies a
ui~tionail [rui nes
cottnpettinsf ''hhI
pm kehw
locuittil in Chila Ia...
,
...... (i /
rid St
JL, ir- . iiiit- iii b und tra afic if rII .~ i.ut.-. ti
aIlll eurtainer$
t
Thi s ollI patily pall
ift'i-gh l
hrlIes 2I per cent in txrpes of wihat thOy
wouhl
have been at the Oflicri
eel
.
...
Ill irtt- <,rlpd freight 34 per cent ill e.. ..
'ThL entilhiiiem e cd ss charges iiitlit[inti-t
ti
Iun. 2y pc1 ceinl of 19tI tie sate
.
bill ith
ILI'..tit ',;oI(l haIe provided II 7l
j cI tt
-at~ek.
S Ihe
...,ilst,
rufacttrhi fL IIri uiiItty ICf[)a
hIr. R ,h III
'0
t- < .....
ou pi aA
rtu
f
il
c u rl hi l h u kI s iT..
.. yI TV.jI at T,hu ,C ri l ton yea..
.If
This IoLzIi
y
eels St rolig
oo
tI.., ....
IIt in
liua~i
iin aILiis. t I Ie] i I -kILt. AI'
ow
jmp'
t
III I
y uroT
dllc
chnurg e- in tiArrt-< biy 11
ILL,
kIl .,e
-1- tI r I -zIt h igher ih.. T
woulld ha.e heeu' if e-In
Lhlpnt hInI
freight
t l
IujiI% .hn
tie
the
t
I' ll
aunt-
ediItatIce
oI l
plih(Mde i: IlLi-l terrILL ry
il ,:
I
the
I I
]his
r eli,
es.
lIt
iN
ui rIth III, I II IL I , Ik
-P h
aILL, I
l
Iid
.
. .
lt~T
rbe
cen~
.tO iinttfatrtuiiiw t ~8%;e
;}IS pei ee(11 6f IIdee 14h,
2
...I
...
hI 1iu
I. pen
lit return Ltu v-q t tl'i
l 1LOt-l
t\ic[g had bl e
Inl
t, i.:}y
,, Jluh r it
I....d .uiurt 1 rrmlictl met, .perI cc..i i the
O
t
eern
ai r
at.(tIL
/Ih u
ite -u-e that IIhtI lutirI ,i of
I
rIIe I n
equwrrl iit
o n t hese so u th e.rtn ¥niti i j rr-.'
a
I erl5
ai elnI>
eruild he {t,e.
Ih.
foi te" i
illusttratihrm
ptrovide inidisIputrblh,]{ihle
iht
srtnnl rither hbtroid c-Ias ei-I
Of .Ii lITlbrii
Iral
we-tern
nanu ae tuu-e L i
-c1
I
gI
rat, hL ..i. lar,p iai. hi-ls vLi I ..i iIhlq
Iscei LirLige
rilk (Ilnilal irol, Itin tlettnts ni Ino w
hlli -sl esI in thes.
rlIes it
1
ih ltly
'hifi
iOthrr
t h,
,e
itlli
aspI rati,iis
Ih ,dt e
-TTl;AIl
L tigI II ' :I t
trlloI Io t-ll orill' 1r dhk of
it
If
l/~
lsa
if all prit'-
the
linitti
enjoyed the
ili'
lev ld Elf
1i cethat (fliO
f ial Ii-rritorv nlo . Fir e't nIi hi,
.\tu lhtl
rtk, paste
p-elitr;tons,
eIirninati
r-ichnessV~
Pho.phor
rates, or a
rtelurn on tile capital
f35a
hotlhlli wive special
,il1Oteeliou. tol Pittsburfin ol 'ttanta or any othtr part of
tbu I.tt...t-y. The wealth arid
ow..r of
ILI
LU
It fL (~etoeral
I 'L uil 'Il I (Xnuor
L t, ,h . 1
4 M111
1 j t u~U t
wage
ill the
10 pim
Cr UESU ill let profits.
Ii the ease (If the Superior Flrojtrt, I!oIll
ipi
if
Dallas.
uanufaturers
tif Wllet
nffored
LI~IHTIN(;. MVN*S GOAL, MAKES
GRIAT PROGRESS
l I itrlil
ho t.r.]
.. ,,-tatid tll
color gilvn tir, a [st of the
i teIen e of ahlost
per cent
ice paiiI fr sweet [inttnes. or
I
tomy
al
imiprtanhe
larger
in thie
'mnii trn-s
wiv~i
regi InIl
lOlO
... y
cre.iiur
Th nt'
sinai)
r11-n io~rdu
rti
c'uldt b, the nu ¢]ieu ~
for irti ll utnt'e divers itied
rll
al
n lhe
high,-I grild
ni,,rifacV,
riiig aBl lii- Soulth
ninsT hayVe 1rtpn h..ifor
it inn, Ithe ils yeLIlL,,(l
to the
Il
. atiar
tniv i' a t
IlkI, itfrill Iluiltihliton it
ihe iintt iela itioml
hif.e
the
hiiart
it.TiindlIrtl nf ils 1Ivtpll
etiI
i k eahD"'e p"¥er
}1ltv ITT,
hi
s
K,xI[{q ialIf
tv T, h;Ttx
third urIe >
I Ihe
, rn iI*
Ith, Vill
and] depletV the IrIrestsI.
Itl.,
)t
II i
I Olll......tiOj~i
with[Lotrhl i.,I
Ilu -l tI .nI tfv -Iutrer, thil
i cmit]leflh ivf
pa is 1i1I ,?Xt{S of aeIVal freight ehairgrs <ivei
Tht Offrii Lerrito.y basis.
, 0TTYlti l (I 21 8
PLANS POR WAR AN]) [OST)AR
\
Ipt
PiTL. This ilfferene Ieemsb sriIlil, ],eing
only two i III oilI hillf pIIe e ,It of the otuil]
lii
sLa1
o I if Tll,
itt r an
.hInt if
is sti vitur
hII I been
l . l l...i
nil. the nhktIluFiiIdto er l rla
T~lllif tll it by
hI i int.:nirin f th
d
e
eTluu
bu iverei
cl,, of thle p
rudt
it wtW
ui/l h vn lierijttIei
they
'\ '
BONNEVILLE
I C(oni tIred
shtoull have in1
I]ITll, p
- 1:31 T
Illuett il,
wi IllII
nivtt-ill-h
(levelojnt~eilU
2
,,qhe
second hIa-ic pt dinI
ilp e mould
into aeecooii the 1.ights ;znd4 intleresis of
)I
h
stat, hd a,,, a. The n'eehs o~f a polle otf .
u -iao a... biest kynwn
the penple tll-1t
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
188
"The trantsfr of eco..o.mic values.that
results from attacks on property nay at
times have the effect of increasing production. That is the case when the resources pass from the hands of peopld
I 41I
I
who are unable or unwilling to use them
to the best possible advantage. iaint
the
hands of people who nlakl betht', ile Id
them. But most oftn the pI'o..e.ds Ief
spoliation are wasted, thi way hb gatn1ber wastes his winnings at play nin the
ultimate outcomn
is a destruc tion oI
ITHEI AUIEI"
&CO., 4I Wet 23rdst.
N. Y.
IS
I[
1 1 ~,,i7t,
IIIa
.
I Eu
I..
IIIb MImt Ba
'r E ,~
£Ey the,
i
t
a(I ~r
........
oI$1e Is, r ai1dI ItiutinhivhrII...
l r. I Iit I.~. , I
'l
Iaii,
I
-~
~III.1,~
II
A ,iri, r ---
II
ttlrrk rI
'l l
---
LIE
E
selves and the stats should lead in formulating an over all I..}raii.
3. The third basic prineiple is a developaIreit of a program of multiple use ef thI
water for economicn i.
navigational, power aT
onnd costrol purlloses. All the so pitrposes
should be mutually IppIIrted and wrrkod
tne tbos. Water 'an ie used for
ititigation
without
loss to ceonI oln dlevelepmen ts anid
use for lpower.
4. Fourth and most important basic prinip]e is that best uses
aad
particularly idiestic uses lust be letefrainbed by servIe
ndJ tChlose uses ]ol
Uelhtitd.
Undei such a ph1r.
states reserve the' full water rights id
other municipals their rights for thu use
of water.
5. The permitted ad repeatrld use (F waite
as it p[asses downstream is a wide henefit
to the whole regisna Iand a high priority nust
be given to theioe bt,nIAicial rights of those
livrig along the strea m. Availability of low
i,,st tleLrmicity iIa MIll arts of the reagi,
is
lf prime in, portan ce.
C. Sound econ, ... . ... s
truction
intt hIe
nil ertake.I in adfvanceO thes arket
Plans
nust be made for 20 to 25 yeasshearl.
GLOWING BEACON IN A TROUBLED
WORLD
(cotntinued Trai tage 120)
ratio to the quantity of savings that it
possesses or Puts into use. If economic
prosperity increases, the quantity of savings used in production likewise increases,
If economic prosperity wa nes,
there is a
decIrase
in the quantity of savings devoted to productin."
wealth."
"In politieal e.ononly and soeiology
h
man engineering),
therefore. it is ,ndhs,
liensable to consider many different elements
in the complex phenomena that are
,,iretl
reorirded by obserati... The mipleIt thing
(oC can say in eC onmics is that the ..-.nomic equilibriumn results from the ruanliet
between tastes and bstacles; but the!iJplicity is only apparent, $irlce one then lin,
to go on arid take account of an intricate
variety of tastes and obstacles, The comtpicaLlons in scioogy (hunan engineei g)
are greater still and by far. There,. in aditie, to logical conduct. which is alone
e
nvisaged in economics, one has to deal with
non-logical conduct, and then again, ill addition to logical thinking, with derivations,''
The writer would like to ,rake ,oic
recommendations, with regard to the study
procedure, to those whIprocure the foui'
vlu me. As in all in vol ved material, it is
necessary that the etlementry or intt.od.We
tory volume be carefully digested, thereby
conditioning ones mind for the iewehannel
af reasoni g so necessary to the asshnin. latio,,
of Pareto's reasoning. In t vyirig h, fiirs
volume it is suggeste, that one ns 'l each
page or passage with a number, indicating
its relative value in tomIrs of the iea
appraisal and continue this method through
to the fourth velurni Then ia reviewirg, it is
advisable to recheck the number, thereby inieating what really has boeen learne1d ainI
digested by studying the four vblllmns.
'The Mind and Society" i nt
o the tpie
of text that will pet Iech individuals
ego,
but will be found to be most il]ut.iattin,
and will disclose many iew h
orizons,jagged
peaks and prelipices in one's
c
oncept of
c~mpanies
cointedetr
d Ihat
returns
shiluld
(and consequently
[a ba~sed ulaon the cuirruti
[luciuatin)
coast of re-roducing its facilities
ew know as th 'fi
theo ry.
The present decisionk elrifles a rulintg
hirnedd Rdown by the high court in 1942 in Ia
ase involving the Natural Gas Pipe int
(oiiiDany, ali whiel, lme the' court stated that
utility preperty valuatio
for ate-niaking
[nmruposes is thir ri]slla ibiity of he experts
ua[poinlted to the regulatory bodies, and that
those bodies aire free' to adopt any valiial[ i
Formuah
or CO...[Ii...tion
.If
etel a proper
,Ia:tl
formula
whilh
ineilg eft in v.esijits'
}lild
eon st rers' inteo
ets,.
The new decision goes.
steip heyoad i
s1LyinIg that unless ail arier of a
gU.Ltoy
..
body can le dlemIstr.ted to be "'unjust inti
unroasoniab:'' in, its "telIl effect." it is lit.
a subject for frliher jiiiialI review.
"It is not the Iheory
rate order wh
but the impact, nf a
ich coon ts-," Hilecourt declatired.
"We are of the view that the end reIslt
in this case c
ndlnot
be condemned inder
the act as unljust tal un.reasonable from the
investor of eoalrPany viewpoint.
`*
* Rates
which enable the COilpl ny to operate successfully, to iaintau, financial integrity, Itn ttract capital and toIomptisate
its investo-,
for their risks assumedl ctrLainly Oiln riot he
condemned as ilvalid, eyen thouh they
ight
produce
a
eaeger
return on
I h,
so-
ellled fair value' rate boas
Thus the court ovrt oris, in practtie
i,
nearly 50-year oid interlpretalion es to p roper
valuation procedure, laid down in 1,898 in the
Sinytyi vs. Anes
.
Iase', wherein it haI or.
laineil that a utility is entitlen to earn %
fail return on the fit vliue" of it, iroperty
(To II continued)
*Frotn "The Mind Ind SOCiety by ViD)rIdo
Patoi, copyright. 1135. by Ilatcourt,
ltace
and Company, lne.. New York.
BIRDSEYE VIEW OF ELECTRIC
UTILITY INDUSTRY
(Continued from page 132)
called "yardstick" rates of majr go,,ernmental power projects, such as the
Tennessee Valley Authority and boneville Power Administration.
(5) Technological development, expansion and improvement of physical
plant
and equipment in response to
national defense requirements.
Moreover, the trend ttoward iredu.ced
rates for electricity is likely to in caxe
rither than dininish.
In a sweepirig ~erision at its optiaig session in 1944, the S prome C(ourt of the Uniter!
States set the utility world or its ears. R,versing a ruling of the fith circuit co.It
of appeals in the [lope Natural Gas ('o.iany case, the Supreme Court susta intd IhI
Federal Power Comemission in its lonsstand
ing fight with the utility industry.
The commission held that prmIsrsible caintags of a utility should tie based u.pon.
. , b,
actual, legitimate, original cost of its usaile
facilities, with due allowate s for improve.
ments and depreciation -i. e,, the "prudent
in vestment" theoy
i
theo
YIou want the dOUIINAIA!
have the JOURNAI!
When you mov
III resihenc, at
Nale .
notify
,
us nf the
hange
[lite.
....
Local Unin........
New Address
WI' wta;t 5i/; tI
...
.......
......
ZONE NO.
Old Address
INTERNATIONAL BROTHIERHOOD OF
ELE
STRICSAL
0
WORKERS
[200 1.5~11
SI,
NW
W,,
W1ashal,,o, 5. D 17
APRIL, 1944
157
LOCAL UNION OFFICIAL RECEIPTS FROM JANUARY 11,
A
24
6-2
I15
74-
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tonew, cnsupply i irftiually It mono..poly, it iI ...... body
till Otht tights and] lifteres.ts Idf al
smiesli the
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safeuared.It
poposes, then Chat in, eah
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Ala £41 Yon ia~e Vaale4
Arrears. Official Notice of, per 100____- $.50
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ok...
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est lotI, 50.........................
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Reinstatement B
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ere wilt
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Mm Mo.
Vttv
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The great law of Christian life is Christ's law of love of
God and love oftour neighbor, The New Year summons us again
to what should be our sacred duty, the fulfillment of that divine
law. Like God's great mercy, Christian love is boundless; it
extends to all our fellowmen. It does not ask their nationality,
race or social position.
Inspired by this magnanimous concept, the Constitution of
our beloved country protects the personal dignity and the
equality before the law of every citizen. Hence racial anta
onism or lack of mutual respect of man for man offends both
the precepts of the Almighty and the traditions of our beloved
nation. Petty bigotry, of whatever kind, contradicts the teachings of Christ and the guarantees of the Constitution.
It is the prayer of all men of good will that discord and
intolerance, so alien both to the Gospel of Christ and to the
democratic spirit of our country, may never gain a foothold in
this land. By fidelity to its own heritage of broad understanding
and harmony, our country, while fully respecting the worthy
traditions of other nations, shall continue to be a blessed example to all the peoples of the earth.
4
WILLIAM CARDINAL O'CONNELL
Archbishop of Boston
BISHOP G. BROMLEY OXNAM
For the Massachusetts
Council of Churches
I
Highs

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