West Branch Section - Susquehanna Greenway Partnership

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West Branch Section - Susquehanna Greenway Partnership
May 2009
John Veverka & Associates
Susquehanna River Trail Interpretive Site Inventory
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Interpretive Master Plan
West Branch
Table of Contents
page
Introduction
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Inventory of Sites Visited/Assessment Forms
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WB – H-9 Packwood House
WB – H-10Dale Engler/Walker House
WB – H-11 Slifer House Museum
WB – H-12Little League Baseball Museum (Williamsport)
WB – H-13 Millionaire Row Historic District (Williamsport)
WB – H-14 Thomas T. Taber Museum (Williamsport)
WB – 5.8 Chillisquaque Access PFBC
WB – 11.4 Milton State Park Access
WB – HC – 1 City of Milton Heritage Area
WB – 15.6 Watsontown Access PFBC
WB – 15.9 Watsontown Boro. Access
WB – HT-1 Canfield Island Native American Trail
WB – 37.3 Greevy Access PFBC
WB – 42.1 Susquehanna State Park Access
WB – 70.8 Lock Haven Municipal Access
WB – 90.8 Hyner Access PFBC
WB – H-18 Western Clinton Sportsman’s Assoc Environmental Center
WB – 94.5 North Bend Access PFBC
WB – 97.3 Flaming Foliage Access (Canoe)
WB – AT-1 Bucktail State Park/Scenic Auto Tour (Rt. 120).
WB – 132.5 Karthaus Access (Bureau of Forestry)
WB – F-1 Reliant Energy Electric Generation Plant (and Dam)
WB – 174 Lower Witmer Park Borough Access (Clearfield)
WB – 185 Irvin Park Borough Access
WB – V-3 Curwensville COE Vista
WB – 187 Curwensville Lake Access (COE)
WB – 209 McGees Mills Access and Covered Bridge
WB – 217 Burnside Municipal Access (future)
WB – 227 Cherry Tree Borough Access
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Site Assessment Summary Matriices
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WB – Site x Media Matrix
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WB – Site x Topic Matrix
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WB – Implementation and Operations Matrix
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WB – Driving Tour/Linking Route Recommendations
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WB – New Interpretive Site Accession Form and Directions.
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Introduction
The Susquehanna Greenway is a place that connects people and communities to the Susquehanna
River. It is an effort to renew awareness of the river’s distinct scenery and its natural and cultural
heritage. The Susquehanna is a river that has been shaped by diverse groups of people providing
a rich history that bridges the gap between the river as a place and a story. Through
implementing and promoting the Greenway, a new realm of open space, recreation areas,
facilities, and connecting trails will aid in improving the character of communities, the economic
prospects of people, and the quality of life all along the Susquehanna River.
The Susquehanna Greenway and Water Trail is the next chapter in this story. Managed by the
Susquehanna Greenway Partnership, this project is an initiative which brings together:
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Recreation-Planning
Watershed Stewardship
Heritage Preservation
Downtown Revitalization
Economic Prosperity
Opportunities for Healthy Living
The Susquehanna River is an American treasure reflecting the unique peoples and places that
comprise the Pennsylvania heartland. Once traversed by Native Americans and later by
European settlers, the Susquehanna River connected people to the Chesapeake Bay. The region
became even better connected through extensive canal and railway systems. Today, the region is
laced with highways and road systems that have replaced the canals and much of the railroad
use. The connectivity of the Susquehanna River Corridor has the potential to shape our future
prospects in ways that we can only begin to imagine.
Note: The interpretive themes and objectives for the total Susquehanna River Water Trail and
Susquehanna Greenway Interpretive Master Plan, interpretive policies, and related materials are
provided in the “Administrative Section” CD for this total master plan. Thus they do not appear
in the West Branch Section Interpretive Plan.
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Individual Site Interpretive Media and Services Recommendations - Constraints and
Managerial Realities.
In making our recommendations for new or improved interpretive media, or services at the many
sites we visited within the Susquehanna Greenway, the managerial realities of individual site
managers came into play. There were often restrictions to our recommended media options
included in this interpretive plan. In discussions with numerous PFBC staff members, it was
recommended not to include any interpretive media or services that would require any
maintenance or other services to be provided by the PFBC as there were no staff or funding
available to provide those services.
Any interpretive media or services within the PFBC sites are not recommended, such as river
viewing platforms or watchable wildlife platforms, due to:
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Changing river water levels and potential ice flow damage.
Lack of staff to provide any maintenance services for such media.
Lack of funds for any cost sharing work.
This essentially left interpretive media recommendations for such sites as:
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Interpretive panels (update existing panels or add new ones).
Having the site as a stop for a self-guiding driving tour or interpretive led program.
Having site interpretation via a website experience.
Cell phone interpretation
Interpretive Site Selections and initial site inventory
In conducting the initial inventory of sites to include in this planning section, site selections for
on-site visits were made by Greenway Staff and Regional Representatives. There was not time
to visit all sites within each Greenway Section, so Greenway Representatives were asked to
select for us sites to visit that had the best interpretive potential, highest visitation or other major
contribution to the Greenway Interpretive Story.
Recognizing that there were many sites not included in this initial planning effort, provision is
made for sites to be added to this document after this initial plan is completed. A planning form
for adding new sites or resources to this plan is provided, along with instructions, is provided as
an appendix to this section.
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Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: WB – H-9
Site/Facility Name: Packwood House Museum
Location: Lewisburg, PA
Current interpretive theme or focus:
The main focus is on the Fetherston family and the history and architecture of the home.
Main Interpretive Stories or topics.
- Historic persons (John and Edith Fetherston)
- Historic Home/architecture
- Changing exhibits (textiles, Porcelain, etc.).
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
Changing exhibits – listing can be viewed on their web site.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
Interpretation and exhibits are managed by the museum staff. Due to current State budget cuts,
this site may have reduced hours or be temporally closed.
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Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This is one of several heritage sites in the Lewisburg area and an important element for
establishing Lewisburg as an important Greenway hub site. This concept should be further
developed under a Greenway marketing plan.
From the Packwood Museum Web Site: www.packwoodhousemuseum.com
Packwood House Museum is among the oldest log-built structures of its kind in Pennsylvania,
originally constructed as a two-story log cabin between 1796 and 1799. As a tavern and hotel
throughout much of the 19th century, the building served travelers in the Susquehanna Valley
until 1886. In 1936 Edith Fetherston, a Lewisburg native and one of the first woman graduates of
nearby Bucknell University, and her husband, John, purchased the 27-room building as a
retirement home, and began to fill it with art and antiques from Pennsylvania and across the
world. They named their home "Packwood" after a Fetherston family ancestral home in England.
The Fetherstons had no children, and left their home and collections in a trust to create "a Public
Museum for the educational benefits of all persons." John died in 1962, Edith died in 1972 and in
accordance with their wills, Packwood House Museum opened to the public in 1976. Today,
visitors see not only the historic building, but the Fetherstons' treasures of glass, ceramics,
textiles, furniture, paintings, Pennsylvania German decorative arts, and Oriental art. It truly is a
world-class museum in a small town.
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Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: WB – H-10
Site/Facility Name: Dale Engler/Walker House
Location: Just outside Lewisburg off of Rt. 15 (sign posted)
Current interpretive theme or focus:
Main interpretation focuses on the historic owner’s participation in the earliest Pennsylvania
institutions including slavery and the Underground Railroad.
Main Interpretive Stories or topics.
Slavery and the Underground Railroad.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
This site has limited hours of operation. The main delivery mode is by tour guides. For more
information visit their web site at: http://www.unioncountyhistoricalsociety.org for events and
other scheduling issues.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
No additional interpretive services are recommended at this time as we were not able to meet
with the site staff to discuss their interpretive needs. This can be addressed in further updates to
this plan.
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Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This is one of a number of heritage sites in the Lewisburg area that can be developed into a
regional driving tour and benefit from Greenway marketing.
Its current limited hours of operation make marketing of the site an issue.
This is one of the best sites in the area for interpretation of the Underground Railroad story.
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
Site brochure is attached. Visit their web site at: http://www.unioncountyhistoricalsociety.org
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Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: WB – H-11
Site/Facility Name: Slifer House Museum
Location: Lewisburg, PA
Current interpretive theme or focus:
- Home of Colonel Eli Slifer (local and national historical figure).
- Historic home/architecture.
See the attached brochure of visit the home web site: http://www.albrightcare.org/slifer-house/
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
This site has limited hours of operation. The main delivery mode is by tour guides
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
No interpretive media are recommended at this time as the home was closed during our research
time and we were not able to meet with staff to discuss their future interpretive services
development.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
The historic home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is one of several
Lewisburg heritage site assets that can be grouped and marketed together and help make
Lewisburg a central hub for the Greenway.
This site could also be part of a Rt. 15 Greenway Driving Tour as well.
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Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
The following information is from their web site: http://www.albrightcare.org/slifer-house/
Slifer House
Eli Slifer was born in Chester County in 1818. He was the third son of Abram and Mary Coulter
Slifer. The family moved to Union County, during which time Mrs. Slifer died and Abram
remarried. In 1831, Eli lost his father and stepmother, and was sent back to Chester County.
He returned to Lewisburg at age 16 and was an apprentice to a hat maker, but soon turned to the
canal boats of the Susquehanna River. While working this trade he became acquainted with the
Frick family, including Catherine who later became his wife, and William, who became his
business partner in a canal boat building venture. Ultimately, he formed a successful company
that manufactured farm equipment and machinery.
As his businesses prospered, Eli’s political interests grew. He served as a member of the
Pennsylvania Assembly from 1850 to 1851 and as a state senator from 1852 to 1854. In 1855, he
was elected Treasurer of the Commonwealth; a second term beginning in 1860 was interrupted
when Governor Andrew Curtin asked him to serve as Secretary of the Commonwealth for the
duration of the Civil War.
During the early days of the war, a country home was completed on a property known as Delta
Place, on the outskirts of Lewisburg. This remarkable Tuscan-style mansion was designed by
eminent Philadelphia architect Samuel Sloan, and was featured in Godey’s Lady’s Book, a
popular magazine of the day.
Eli lived in the house until his death in 1888, and his family continued to live there until 1908.
The house was purchased by Dr. and Mrs. Lamont Ross, who in turn sold it to the Evangelical
Association in 1916. The Evangelicals regarded the house as a perfect location for a home for the
aged. Dormitory wings were added to the building, and in 1926, the Evangelical Hospital was
founded within the confines of the structure. An orphanage was constructed on the property in
1921, and in time, residential and nursing care apartments were constructed, as well as a skilled
care facility. Thus the complex now known as RiverWoods was begun.
Today, the museum is owned by Albright Care Services, and is overseen by a voluntary
Advisory Board. It is staffed in part by residents of the retirement home community.
The Museum relies on public contributions, membership monies and donations of appropriate
furnishings to continue its dual goals of preservation and education. We hope you will consider
joining the Museum as a member. Please call (570) 524-2245 or e-mail us for information
regarding membership or donation of items. You may also fill out this PDF or apply online for
memberships.
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Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: WB - 12
Site/Facility Name: Little League Baseball Museum - Williamsport
Location: Williamsport, PA (see web site for details).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
Little League Baseball. Visit their web site for details.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
Extensive museum exhibits and collections on Little League history, key figures, and current
activities.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
NA – all exhibits are developed and managed by the museum staff.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
There is a large following of individuals and families in the Little League sports venue, and this
museum is a major museum in this field. It is an important asset to be added to the Greenway
menu of heritage activities and sites.
Information from the Museum web site:
http://www.littleleague.org/Learn_More/museum.htm
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Museum
The Peter J. McGovern Little League Museum is all about the
excitement of Little League Baseball and Softball. From its
humble beginnings in 1939 as a three-team league in Williamsport
through today and millions of participants in scores of countries,
the museum is a tribute to Little League, past and present.
Part of the museum is the Peter J. McGovern Little League
Museum Hall of Excellence. This is where Little League graduates who have gone on to
distinguished careers as adult role models are permanently enshrined as recipients of Little
League’s highest honor. You can read about those who have been enshrined by clicking on Hall
of Excellence.
The Little League Museum is full of pictures, displays, films and
exhibits about the players, equipment, history, rules, the allaround fun of Little League, as well as information on issues
facing children today. This combination both entertains and
educates visitors.
Watch the actual growth of Little League throughout the world on a fantastic fiber
optics map. You can "play ball" in the batting and pitching areas, and then watch your
form on instant replay. Experience the "hands-on" components of the museum such as
the running track, push-button quiz panels, and the opportunity to do your own play-byplay commentary on a World Series game. Learn about nutrition that will help you play
your best. Watch videotaped highlights of the most exciting moments of the Little
League World Series. There’s so much more to see and do!
If you are a Little League player of today or yesterday or a
devoted fan of Little League, the Peter J. McGovern Little League
Museum will be a special place for you.
The museum is located on U.S. Route 15 in South Williamsport,
Pa., next to the Little League International Administration
Building, overlooking Howard J. Lamade Stadium and Little League Volunteer Stadium, home
of the Little League Baseball World Series each August. Visit us soon!
Admission is: $5 for adults (and children ages 14-17); $1.50 for children ages 5-13; and $3 for
senior citizens (62 and over). Children age 4 and younger are admitted free of charge. Group
tours and rates are available. Call 570-326-3607 for more information.
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Hours of Operation
Memorial Day - Labor Day
Monday through Saturday
Sunday
10am - 7pm
Noon - 7pm
Labor Day - Memorial Day
Monday, Thursday, Friday
Saturday
Sunday
10am - 5pm
Noon - 5pm
Noon - 4pm
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Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: WB – H-13
Site/Facility Name: Millionaires Row Historic District
Location: Williamsport
Current interpretive theme or focus:
Historic Architecture and personalities
Main Interpretive Stories or topics.
None at this time, however some of the homes’ owners will provide guided tours by
appointment.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
No interpretive media are available at this time.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
It is recommended that the Greenway work with the community to develop some optional
interpretive media for this Historic District:
- Self-guiding walking/driving tour.
- Cell phone interpretation about the buildings/homes in the district associates with a walking
Tour route.
- Interpretation of some of the key buildings at the Greenway web site.
Walking tours of different topics could be developed and made available on the Greenway, or
community web site.
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Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
There are numerous historic walking tours, historic districts, and historic homes located
throughout the Greenway corridor. This historic district is a valuable asset to that heritage
inventory and could be a key part of an architectural driving tour of the Greenway in the future.
Information for Williamsport website:
The Millionaire's Row Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in
1985. Portions of the text below were selected, transcribed and/or adapted from a copy of the
original nomination document. [†] The Millionaire's Row Historic District is an irregularly
shaped area, centrally located in the City of Williamsport. The District represents a contiguous
residential area exhibiting almost no topographical change in its land area. Evident at a number
of junctions in the District are small (two or three buildings) concentrations of commercial uses.
There are 289 total buildings in the District (102 significant, 161 contributing and 26 intrusions).
The District is almost entirely residential property of Victorian style architecture. Nearly all of
the streetscapes are intact throughout the District. Most of the intrusions are in the form of
modern infill construction necessitated through the years by fire and other causes. The
percentage of significant structures in relation to total structure is very high. One significant open
space, Way's Garden, is an excellent contribution to the District in its appearance and location.
Way's Garden was created in 1913 as the result of a demolition of a large Italianate-Gothic
House and the new park was donated to the City The general condition of the District is
deteriorating. The majority use of the buildings has become multi-family rented property. This is
due primarily to the size of the former single family houses that predominates the building stock
of the District. Unfortunately, this change in us has fostered a maintenance problem with respect
to the District. This problem is beginning to turn around through preservation, education,
financial, and technical assistance.
The specific styles of architecture apparent in the Millionaire's Row Historic District are all of
the latter half of the 19th century and early 20th century. Reflective of the times of the most
prosperity, most structures were built between 1860 and 1920. Clearly, the distinction of the
District lies in the presence of a rich variety of carefully designed and constructed mansions for
the wealthy. The famed architect Beer Culver and contractor/builder Peter Heroic designed and
constructed the most imposing and bold Second Empire homes. The boldness and power they
display seems, not accidentally, to mimic the powerful financial empire and personalities of
those who lived in them.
The Victorian Gothic style structures within the District tend to be eclectic, with definite
exceptions: the magnificent Trinity Church and Parish House, the massive Wightman Block,
both demonstrating the dynamic genius of the Culver/Heroic tradition; the Grace Church at
Grace and Campbell Streets, and the First Church of Christ, Scientist on Maynard Street.
Twenty-eight Queen Anne and Eastlake homes are in the District and adjacent areas. The
asymmetrical composition varied decoratively rich style displaying a variety of forms, textures,
materials, and colors including several tall thin chimneys, projecting attic gables, and stained
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glass work produce an exuberant visual display. Noted examples of this style are the Walter
Bowman House, the Emery House, the Ulman-Snyder House, the A. D. Hermance House, the
Fredericks-Gleason House, the Clark-Redmand House, the F. R. Megahen House.
A good example of the Italianate a popular and impressive style of the Victorian era, is the home
of the principle Williamsport builder of the period Peter Herdic. Designed by Eber Culver and
built by Herdic, this 1856 Italianate structure was nearly destroyed by the removal of porches,
addition of a commercial front, and utter neglect. It is now undergoing a complete restoration.
Another fine example is the Herdic House, later Park Hotel, now Park Home. Originally a
magnificent, almost legendary four story hotel produced by Culver and Herdic, the top two floors
were destroyed by fire and remodeled in 1940. The house's ornate porches, wide eaves with large
double brackets, rusticated quoins and tall windows with arched heads produce a rich visual
display. There are two examples of Colonial Revival, a style seldom seen in Williamsport, on
West Fourth Street. They are the McMinn-Bowman-Mosser House and the H. Mellick
Foresman-Dr. Brier House. The latter ostentatiously projects a two story portico with colossal
column in the Ionic order while the former shows the broken swan's neck pedimented large
central dormer typical of the style. Both combine various contemporary and Colonial elements to
add a conspicuous change of character to the community. Neo-Classicism, a style based on
primarily the Greek and to a lesser extent, the Roman orders, finds expression in the J. N. Kline
House at 519 W. 4th Street. The symmetrically arranged structure with colossal portico is one of
the few examples of this design in the city.The two fine examples of the Victorian Romanesque
are less than a block apart: the Foreman-Kay-Costello House built by William Emery and the
Covenant Central Presbyterian Church. These massive and elaborate structures are a credit to the
artists who designed and built them. Both are in excellent condition and integrity both inside and
out.
SignificanceThe Millionaire's Row Historic District represents the pinnacle of Williamsport's
social, economic and cultural history. The district was constructed during the most prolific
economic period in the City's history and capsulizes the City's built environment. The size,
scope, and elaborate workmanship apparent in the structures of the district are excellent
reminders of the 1850 -1920 era of prosperity.Williamsport's strength was founded on the
logging industry in the late 1840's, however before this era, the town existed only as a crossroads
community of less than 2,000 people, as a stop along the Pennsylvania Canal and as a marketing
point for the numerous small farms of the area. In 1847, the potential for the logging business
took a great leap forward with the establishment of the first "Log Boom" in the Susquehanna
River. The west branch of the river from Linden to Halls Station was referred to as the "Long
Reach," which was an area of almost no fall in the elevation of the riverbed. This provided an
ideal point to locate a log boom, which was a series of river piers with heavy chains strung
between them used to catch the slow moving logs as they came down the river. This fostered the
development of an entire series of related lumber processing sites in Williamsport that included
log cribs and ponds, sawmills, storage and rail yards.The lumber industry began its significant
growth in Williamsport during the 1860's, as the city began to exert its location dominance on
the timber resources of the West Branch Valley. The
impact on the town was dynamic; between 1860 and 1870, Williamsport's six major railroad
lines arrived and the population tripled. By 1886, there were 28,000 inhabitants of the city.
Various resources and industrial reports also reflect the growing boom in the economy -- in
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1862, 196,953 (37,853,621 board feet) logs were brought to Williamsport, and by 1891 that
figure had jumped to 1,816,562 (262,017,394 board feet) logs.
It was on the base the "Lumber Barons" established their fortunes and subsequently built their
spectacular homes. There were two main locational cores for these homes; along East Third
Street (from Mulberry to Penn Streets) and along West Fourth Street (from Elmira to Seventh
Avenue). The West Fourth Street area and its adjacent neighborhood along West Third Street
eventually became preferred over East Third Street, as the land lots were bigger and there were
more available land for additional residential expansion. The East Third Street area remained a
fashionable neighborhood well into the Twentieth Century, however, numerous demolitions and
commercial development has nearly erased all vestiges of this former use.
West Fourth Street developed along what was known as the Jersey Shore Road, which was
largely farmland before the Civil War. There were a few large farmhouses which fronted the
road at this time, the best known, perhaps, was the residence of Judge J. W. Maynard. This was a
large, brick, two-story vernacular-Georgian house, with a recessed two-story porch along half the
front facade. This structure was destroyed by a fire in 1960 and the site is now occupied by a
modern building belonging to the Lycoming County Historical Museum.
Homes belonging to the Williamsport elite began appearing along west Fourth Street in the
1850's, the first of which was an Italianate-Gothic house built for Judge James Armstrong,
formerly located in the site of the present Y.M.C.A. (southeast corner of Elmira and Fourth
Streets.) However, the earliest surviving residence from the lumber era is the Italianate house of
Peter Herdic, built in 1855 (407 West Fourth). Herdic himself was one of the premier influences
on West Fourth Street and Williamsport in general. Along with his architect, Eber Culver, Herdic
was responsible for such structures as the A. D. Hermance House, the Weightman Block, and the
"Herdic House" located at the intersection of Campbell and Fourth Streets, which is considered
the center of the district. The Herdic House (now known as the Park Home) was a four-story,
brick, Italianate Hotel that served the well-to-do guests of Williamsport. Directly behind the
hotel was the Pennsylvania Railroad Station, which Herdic was able to locate there in order to
service his hotel and restaurant. Culver is Williamsport's best known architect. He arrived in the
city in the early 1850's and worked as builder/contractor and remained there the remainder of his
life. Culver designed a great number of homes in the historic district, among the better known
include the Hiram Rhoads house (522 West Fourth Street) which is a superb Eastlake home in
excellent condition (c. 1879); the '"Embick Cottage" (531 West Fourth Street) remains most of
its eclectic stick style detailing (c. 1880); the Emery Home (535 West Fourth Street) is a
handsome Queen Anne home (c. 1865); the Rowley House (707 West Fourth Street) is one most
intact 19th century building in the city with outstanding Queen Anne design (c. 1888); and the
Mary White Gamble House (835 West Fourth Street) is a completely cut stone Romanesque
structure (c. 1889). Among the lesser known architects working in the district include Amos
Wagner, a local architect, and Isaac Hobbs of Philadelphia. A well known Wagner building is the
large Queen Anne style house at 335 Maynard Street (c. 1885). Two surviving Hobbs buildings
are the Smith-Ulman House (634 West Fourth Street), which remains its original Second Empire
detail, but has been severely damaged by sandblasting and the Mussina House (1022 West
Fourth Street) completed in a very modest Eastlake style. As a whole, the Historic District was
never exclusively residential or totally upper class. Indeed, Fourth Street, which was dominated
by homes of the Millionaires, was a mixed bag of uses that include the previously mentioned
Herdic House and Weightman Block, the August Leadlein Confectionery Store (Fourth and
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Walnut Streets), a boarding house (Fourth and Locust Streets), Chaapel's Florist Shop and
Greenhouses (906-912 West Fourth Street), and a number of large churches. Generally speaking,
houses located on West Third, Grace, Vine, Park, Maynard, Campbell, Walnut, Locust, and
Center Streets were smaller and were not as embellished in their architectural styles as those on
West Fourth Street, but nonetheless, contained many families of note.
The building stock within the district is almost completely of Victorian or post-Victorian
extraction. Earlier Federal and Greek Revival styles are non-existent, although the adjacent
downtown business district once contained a good sampling of structures from these eras. Very
few houses can be purely defined as a particular style, as most are eclectic forms that derive
elements from two or more styles. Among the more pristine examples are as: follows:
•
The Hermance House (405 West Fourth Street) done in a Romanesque style. The house is
constructed of gray limestone with a red slate roof. It was built for the Williamsport
industrialist, Albert Hermance, who established his fortune on manufacturing woodworking
machinery.
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Peter Herdic's classic Italianate home (407 West Fourth Street) is constructed of brick
and covered with stucco, and has highly unique porch columns done with Lotus Petal motifs.
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The Rhoads House is one of the best preserved homes in the district (522 West Fourth
Street) and has Eastlake detailing and red slate roof. The interior retains its stained glass
windows, mahogany woodwork, and winding stairs. Hiram Rhoads was a local entrepreneur
who was instrumental in local telephone service and developing several electric enterprises.
•
The Queen Anne House of E. A. Rowley (707 West Fourth Street) still sports its original
design and the interior has had its marble fireplaces, stained glass and woodwork well
maintained.
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Perhaps the best example in the district of a Second Empire building is the John Reading
House (1025 West Fourth Street). The mansard roof and cast iron cresting have been well
maintained. John Reading came to Williamsport from New Jersey and invested heavily in the
lumber business.
The decline of the West Fourth Street area can be indirectly traced to the decline of the lumber
business in Williamsport. In 1889, the Susquehanna River flooded its banks and caused
considerable damage to the lumber facilities located in the city. This, coupled with the declining
timber resources, signaled an end to the traditional economic base, although the lumber business
remained until the early 1900's. Many "Old Line" families continued to live in the West Third
and West Fourth Street areas well into the twentieth century, although a definite migration to the
Vallamont and Grampian Hills sections of Williamsport was starting to occur. A severe impact
on the Historic District came about after the 1936 flood of the Susquehanna River, which
underlined the vulnerability of the area to natural disaster. This, added by the demand for
apartment space created by the establishment of the Williamsport Technical Institute (now
Williamsport Area Community College), in the 1940's. (Located on West Third Street), caused
many large homes to be subdivided for rental space.
21
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: WB – H-14
Site/Facility Name: Taber Museum
Location: Williamsport
Current interpretive theme or focus:
Native American History
Regional History
Rail Road Heritage
Geology
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
This is a typical historical museum with permanent exhibitions (see attachment).
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
Exhibits are developed by museum staff, and operate on a modest budget. No new interpretive
programs, exhibits, or services are envisioned at this time.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
The museum is another heritage asset in the Williamsport area that adds to the interpretation of
several main topic areas, such as Native American history. It can easily be linked with a driving
tour to the other heritage sites in both the Williamsport and Lewisburg areas.
22
Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
Information on tours and tour topics from the Museum web site is provided below, and attached.
Site
School & Motor Coach Tours
Museum School Tour Program
With expert staff, fine collections, and fully accessible facilities, the Taber Museum designs and delivers
educational services to thousands of children and adults annually. Engage your students in the excitement
of learning through our curriculum-linked programs. The General Highlights Tour guided tour takes
approximately one and a half hours.
Plan to bring a lunch and spend the day immersed in the history of the region.
School Tour Admission Fees
Students: $2.00
Teachers: Free
Adult Chaperones: $2.50
Special demonstrations and hands-on activities may also be scheduled for an additional fee.
General Highlights Tour
American Indians in Lycoming County
Discover the changing cultures of the region's first settlers beginning 12,000 years ago. To enhance their
experience, students may step inside an archaeological excavation and climb into a replicated dugout
canoe.
Frontier Life
Pioneer times come to life in the Frontier exhibit through the many tools and house wares on exhibit.
Learn how these early settlers coped under harsh conditions and with limited supplies.
19th Century Lycoming County
Peek through the windows of a re-created general store to see some of the things people needed, wanted,
or thought were extravagant. Visit a one-room school to view a collection of inkwells, slates, and books
that illustrate children's education at the turn of the 19th & 20th centuries. Get a glimpse into the homes
of 19th century residents through the Greek Revival and Victorian Parlor period rooms.
23
The Lumbering Industry
Lumbering was so vital to the region's growth and prosperity in the 19th century, Williamsport became
known as the Lumber Capital of the World. Learn the importance of the Susquehanna Log Boom, the
process of lumbering, and the devastating effect it had on the environment.
Hall of Farming, Crafts, and Industry
This hall presents a timeline of local industry from pioneer times to the 20th century. Highlights include a
wood worker's shop, a grist mill, and a blacksmith shop. If you like old tools, implements and machinery,
this room has them all.
Larue Shempp Model Train Exhibition
This unique exhibition, one of the finest in the U.S., also features two working layouts for visitors to
operate and enjoy.
Motor Coach Tours
Explore the history of north central Pennsylvania and discover the major events of our region's history
while learning about everyday life. The story unfolds through exhibits, galleries and period rooms on the
museum's two levels. Tour guides are available to provide a structured tour or just to answer questions
and our staff can work with you to develop themed tours. The Museum Store offers a nice selection of
keepsakes at affordable prices.
Special rates are available. Call ahead for group reservations. We hope to see you soon.
Handicapped accessible.
24
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: WB – 5.8 Chillisquaque Access PFBC
Site/Facility Name: Chillisquaque Access
Location: See WB Sec. 16 Map – West of Lewisburg
Current interpretive theme or focus:
One dated interpretive panel on a general overview of the Susquehanna Water Trail (photos).
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
One dated interpretive panel that needs to be replaced.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
New interpretive media could include:
- New River Trail Orientation Panel. $3000.00
- New proposed Greenway orientation panel. $3000.00
Note: PFBC has stated that due to lack of staffing and budget cuts they are not interested in
more advanced interpretive services being planned at PFBC sites, such as self-guiding trails or
river or watchable wildlife viewing platforms. Thus we are limited to the use of interpretive
panels.
These sites could be interpreted via self-guiding driving tours, or with interpretation via the
Greenway web site, cell phone interpretation or other regional guiding material.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
NA
25
Site Photo(s):
Main entrance sign to the access.
26
Main access area.
There is one old interpretive panel
on the site (photo) that needs to be
replaced (close up on the
following page.
27
The old panel has both surface damage to the fiber glass top and damage and weathering to the
frame. The content is in need of revision as well.
28
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB – 11.4
Site/Facility Name: Milton State Park Access
Location: Milton, PA
Current interpretive theme or focus:
No interpretive theme or focus.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
One basic River Trail Orientation panel (photo).
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
Possible location for a proposed new Greenway overview panel to complement the River Trail
panel.
Potential interpretive panel on bird migration (stopover for migrating spring warblers and home
to a maintained bluebird trail)
Watchable wildlife viewing areas for potential development.
29
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This site has potential heritage tourism develop for marketing its bluebird trail and watchable
wildlife attributes.
There is a potential interpretive panel and interpretive tours for bird migration through the area
as well.
Many of the boating access sites could have potential watchable wildlife viewing areas
developed and marketed as a new tourism product.
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
30
Information from the North American Bluebird Society
http://www.nabluebirdsociety.org/gettingstarted.htm
Over the years, land has been cleared for housing and industrial developments, shopping malls,
highways, and cropland; many old trees have been cut down for firewood. Wooden fence posts
that provided nesting cavities have now been replaced with metal posts. With modernization, the
supply of natural nesting cavities for bluebirds and other native cavity nesters has been greatly
reduced.
Compounding the problem of habitat loss has been the introduction into North America of two
imported species - the House Sparrow and the European Starling. Both starlings and sparrows
are cavity nesters, and both are very aggressive. House Sparrows are small enough to enter any
hole that a bluebird can, and are so aggressive that they will chase away the more timid bluebird.
Starlings can be excluded from bluebird boxes by using the correct size entrance hole, but will
out-compete bluebirds for woodpecker holes and other natural nesting cavities.
During the summer, bluebirds feed mainly on insects. In the winter, bluebirds depend on many
kinds of wild berries for their food supply. However, the supply of wild berries has also
decreased over the years. The few berries that remain are often stripped quickly by large flocks
of starlings.
Even though the bluebird population has greatly decreased, the future can still be promising for
them. The most important step we can take to help bring back the bluebird is to provide nesting
sites by setting out a bluebird box or starting a bluebird trail. A bluebird trail is a series of
bluebird boxes placed along a prescribed route. In areas where nesting boxes have been put up in
suitable habitat, bluebird populations are increasing. Bluebirding is a great environmental, handson project that people of all ages can enjoy. By following the instructions below, chances are
good that you will be able to attract and enjoy bluebirds.
Susquehanna River Water Trail
31
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB – HC1
Site/Facility Name: City of Milton Heritage Walk
Location: Milton, PA
Current interpretive theme or focus:
These historic industries and sites are part of the walking tour and interpretive panels at select
locations.
Settled in 1770, it was incorporated in 1817, and is governed by a charter that was revised in
1890. Formerly, its extensive manufacturing plants included car and woodworking machinery
shops, rolling, flour, knitting, planning, and saw mills; washer, nut, and bolt works; and
furniture, shoe, couch, nail, fly net, bamboo novelty, and paper-box factories.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
The city has newly installed interpretive panels and developed a historic downtown walking tour,
with brochure to accompany the panels (see photos). These materials are all of high standards
and quality.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This is a potential site for a new Greenways River Town kiosk. In addition, the town could also
benefit form a Greenway cell phone interpretation option. The history of the town can be
interpreted on the Greenway website as well.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
With its developed heritage walking tour and interpretive panels, this would be a good location
for a Greenway River Town Kiosk.
32
It is a good stop over spot for heritage travelers driving the Rout 15 driving tour, crossing over
the river and over Milton State Park access as well for watchable wildlife.
Site Photo(s):
The city developed a heritage wall mural (above and following photo) to go along with its
heritage walk. The heritage walk consists of numerous interpretive panels about the history and
historic buildings of Milton.
33
New wall mural with painting in progress.
34
One of a cluster of interpretive panels near a canoe access site in the City of Milton – panel close
up below. This is part of their historic downtown walking tour.
35
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – 15.6
Site/Facility Name: Watsontown Access PFBC
Location: Watsontown, PA
Current interpretive theme or focus:
None at this time
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
There is an old and outdated River Trail panel on site (see photo) that is in poor shape and should
be removed.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
Interpretive panel for the New River Trail program.
Potential interpretive panel on the Sport Fish Restoration Program
Note that the PFBC is not supportive of more extensive interpretive services such as viewing
decks or self-guiding trails, at their locations do to staffing shortages and budget cuts. There
would be no maintenance of these services available. Thus our on-site recommendations focus
mostly on interpretive panels.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
No development considerations at this time.
36
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
The main view and access for the site (top photo). The existing interpretive panel (bottom
photo) is old and in very poor condition. This outdated panel should be removed and replaced
with the current River Trail Orientation Panel.
37
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – 15.9
Site/Facility Name: Watsontown Boro Access
Location: Watsontown.
Current interpretive theme or focus:
No interpretive focus, media, or any signage at this site.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This is a put in for canoe launching (as you can see from the photo). There is no signage here at
this time.
Potential interpretation could include:
- Current River Trail Orientation Panel.
- Interpretive panel about the bridge seen in the photo.
Due to the minimal use of this site, other interpretive services such as a viewing deck or
watchable wildlife area would not be cost effective. It can be further interpreted via future selfguiding services like an auto tour route stop, by cell phone interpretation, or by a web site
presence on the Greenway web site.
38
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
None at this time.
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
39
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG - HT-1
Site/Facility Name: Canfield Island Archaeological Trail
Location: Located near Montoursville, PA (see Map Section 13).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
Native American History – see attachment about the trail and trail theme.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
The site has a well planned out self-guiding interpretive trail with panels at select stops (see the
trail information provided on following pages).
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
No new on-site media at this time. Current interpretive materials are sufficient and well done.
Additional interpretation can be provided via a self-guiding auto tour stop or by a Greenway
regional cell phone interpretive service. The site an also be part of a new “Native American
Heritage” self-guiding auto tour.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This is an important heritage tourism stop and a key site within the Greenway for Native
American heritage interpretation. This would be a good partner site with the Greenway for
future marketing and perhaps development of a Native American Experience Driving Tour
Route.
40
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
The heritage trail head panel and one of the interpretive panels.
41
Information from the Canfield Island Web site.
http://www.lycoming.edu/arch/namer/canfield.html
Introduction to Canfield Island
Investigated by the chapter for several decades, Canfield Island is considered an
archaeological site of great value, for in successive layers of village sites prehistoric
cultures left their record in bone, stone, charcoal, and ceramics, which reveal a story of
human development. In May 2003, students of Lycoming College participated in the dig
and subsequent laboratory work. Their research is being incorporated into a report on the
site.
Lycoming College students (North American Archaeology) and Professor Robin Van
Auken conducted a May 2003 field school on Canfield Island assisting the Lycoming
County Historical Society and the Archaeological Chapter in excavating a series of 12
excavation units.
If you like learning about archaeology, American Indians and their tools, then the North
Central Chapter of the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology would like to hear from you.
The chapter, which meets monthly at the Thomas T. Taber Museum of the Lycoming
County Historical Society, seeks new members to help with its mission to discover and
preserve the region's American Indian heritage.
The chapter provides archaeological excavation training sessions for new members and
teachers them how to identify artifacts. This season's archaeological dig, which is
tentatively slated to begin in May and continue through August, will return to Canfield
Island in the Loyalsock Township.
Chapter meetings take place at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month at the museum, 858
W. Fourth St. More information is available by calling 326-3326.
Riverfront Park Honors Bressler With Heritage Trail
By Robin Van Auken
42
Even on a gray afternoon, with the rain misting and a chill wind blowing, a stroll
along the James P. Bressler Heritage Trail is invigorating and educational. It's also
tranquil, this quiet spot along the Susquehanna River's West Branch.
Completed in September, the trail is part of Loyalsock Township's Riverfront Park
and is dedicated to James P. Bressler. A scholar and educator beloved in his
community, Bressler has carved a niche for himself in the region's prehistory and
history books with his archaeological investigations.
"That is, in my estimation, one of the best-kept secrets in the county," Bressler said
about the trail. "This is a unique attempt to integrate a number of different things. First
of all, local history is really not being taught in our schools because there are too
many competing things to teach. I understand that. But this is a unique way to
combine a pleasant walk, a history lesson, and nature study. It's just a pleasure to walk
around there."
Excavating Native American sites for the past four decades, Bressler has led several
digs on and near Canfield Island, a small spit of land turned into a man-made island
by 19th-century lumber mill owners. Publishing his findings in a series of books,
Bressler and volunteers from North Central Chapter No. 8, Society of Pennsylvania
Archaeology, have added immensely to the area's knowledge of Native American
culture as far back as 5000 B.P. (Before Present).
"The story of how it (the trail) came about is interesting," he said, chuckling. "Some
years ago, about the middle '90s when we were working on the Ault Site, call it
inspiration if you like, I thought it would be a good idea to put together a synopsis of
the events that have occurred in the area of Canfield Island. I call it the 'Loyalsock
Historic Complex; A Rationale for commemoration.' It's a synopsis of many things,
historic and prehistoric.
"It gives you a background of the area, of its importance in the scheme of things. In
archaeology, it's up to the local people to safeguard and enhance their own concepts of
what's important."
It is a tribute to Bressler that the township acknowledges his expertise and the
significance of his archaeological research. And Bressler relishes the gesture.
43
"Seldom ever, in my life, has a dream come about as this one has. This whole thing is
an answer to a dream," he said. "At that time we did not know that it would be a trail,
but one way or another we ought to be proud of what we know of our history. How
we were gong to do that, I had no idea. After that, things just fell into place. The
island became available, Loyalsock Township recognized, 'Yes, indeed. Here's an
opportunity to put up a park with river frontage, a beautiful spot.'"
But the park has more to offer than just scenery. Plans are to include a tree
identification area, a butterfly habitat, and eagle nesting towers. Owl boxes in the park
are already being occupied, Bressler said.
"It's very important to everybody. In the fist place, the Susquehanna River, in my
estimation, is one of the greatest assets Pennsylvania has. Fresh water flowing by your
doorstep. But if you have no access to it, you're limited in how much you can enjoy
it," he said. "This park is part of a much larger, long-range plan. They're talking about
a greenbelt the entire length of the Susquehanna. And also river floats are becoming
more and more important. But you have to have places where you can get on the river,
or off of it. And this is one of those exit/entrance points. "
In his honor, Loyalsock Township, assisted by Creekside Creative Media and Lock
Haven University students, helped Bressler develop the one-half-mile walking trail as
part of Riverfront Park Phase I Development.
Interpretive displays researched and created by Creekside stretch along the trail,
sharing some of Bressler's findings about prehistoric life along the river, as well as
events from modern times.
A "Welcome" sign acknowledges trail underwriters and orients the visitor.
The signs use photos, maps, illustrations and text to help visitors learn about three
archaeological sites, The West Branch of the Susquehanna River (Otzinachson), the
Sheshequin Trail, the Canfield and Colton Sawmill, the death of Capt. James Brady
during the Revolutionary War, Cannon Hole and events during the lifetime of a 200year-old red oak tree.
Township personnel worked with Bressler and students from Lock Haven to select the
subjects, do research, and write preliminary copy. Creekside was hired to refine the
44
copy, carry out further research as necessary, find or create all visuals, write captions,
design the signs, supervise photography, create final artwork, and consult with
township and sign manufacturer on sign frames, color scheme and panel production.
Creekside, which consists of the husband-and-wife team of Mark Canouse and Emmy
Award-nominated documentary filmmaker Karen Frock, worked with Bressler, the
Township, the Lycoming County Historical Society and the James V. Brown Library
to finalize sign content. Accuracy is critical, Bressler said, because the information
associated with this important archaeological site is all that's left. Working with Frock
he said, was a pleasure.
"I am in awe of what she does," he said.
He said he appreciates her enthusiasm as much as he does her energy and appreciation
for history.
"It's all a part of what we call heritage. This is what everybody inherits. But few
people know about it. What good is an excavation, for instance, if we don't issue a
report and say, 'Here is what we found. Here is what it means.' Unless you say that,
what have you done? Nothing but vandalism. Destroyed an irreplaceable resource,"
Bressler said, adding, "So if you undertake doing a dig, you also undertake the
responsibility of doing it in detail and making it part of the permanent record. That's
not a sermon; that's a doggoned fact. That's why I'm doing it."
It is primarily because of Bressler's research that Canfield Island was named to
National Register. His research and excavations were, Bressler said, "The Alpha; the
trail is the Omega.
"But by itself (archaeological research), it is incomplete. It has no means of
expressing itself. It's manifested in the trail. There, you're touching the past. And if
you want to know a great deal more, you come up here (the Lycoming County
Historical Society) and flesh out your interest. It's all part of a larger effort."
The James P. Bressler Heritage Trail is open to the public, located just off the Broad
Street, Montoursville, Exit of I-180, near Williamsport.
45
Summary of Interpretive Signs
The Canfield and Colton Sawmill -- Constructed in 1850, the Canfield and Colton
Sawmill operated on these banks until 1889 when the "Great Flood" destroyed it.
The Canfield Archaeological Site -- The North Central Chapter of the Society for
Pennsylvania Archaeology unearthed evidence of human occupation dating as far
back as 5,000 B.C.
The Cannon Hole -- A deep water hole near Kremser's Landing named from when the
French dumped their cannons overboard after an aborted attempt to take over the
British fort at Shamokin.
The Murder of James Brady -- After returning from Fort Augusta to harvest the grain
left after the "Big Runaway," James Brady was fatally wounded by a Native American
war party.
The Otzinachson -- Native Americans referred to the West Branch of the Susquehanna
River as Otzinachson. This word translates to "People of the demon's den."
The Ault Site -- The Shenks Ferry people built this village sometime after 1200 A.D.
upon the site of an earlier culture, the Clemson Island/Owasco.
The Sheshequin Trail -- The Sheshequin Trail was an important thoroughfare for
Native Americans living in the northeastern region of North America.
Shenks Ferry Wigwam -- A bark-covered structure 48-fee long and 17-feet wide with
rounded ends and an arched roof once occupied this area.
Significant Tree -- This very large red oak tree is at least two centuries old.
Any questions or problems e-mail [email protected]
Copyright © 2003 Lycoming College
46
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB 37.3
Site/Facility Name: Greevy Access
Location: S. side of 180 right of way (refer to map section 13.
Current interpretive theme or focus:
No formal theme or focus.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
This site has one of the older blue River Trail panels. As can be seen from the photos on the
following pages, this panel should be removed and/or replaced. It is falling apart.
The site does have a newer River Trail Orientation Panel.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
Due to the closeness of this site to Canfield Island and its interpretation of Native American
heritage, it is possible to have a follow-up interpretive panel on the Native American legacy and
use of the river as a traveling and commerce corridor.
This is a smaller site, with a smaller land base, so additional interpretation here is not warranted.
The Susquehanna State Park access site is located near-by with more interpretive assets
available.
47
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This site could be marketed as a rest stop and river viewing area as part of the greater interpretive
resources associated with Williamsport.
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
A general view of the Greevy boat access. The newer river trail panel can be seen by the trees in
the background (orange circle). The older interpretive panel in the yellow circle.
48
The older river trail panel is falling apart and should be removed or replaced.
49
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB – 42.1
Site/Facility Name: Susquehanna State Park Access
Location: Access off of 180 and 15/220 (See map section 13).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
No interpretive theme of focus.
The main parking area for the boating access was fairly busy during our visit. We observed a
wide range of user groups including people there for picnics, dog walking, shore line fishing, and
boating.
There were no River Trail panels or any other interpretive media at this location.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This location would be a good site for:
- Current River Trail Orientation panel.
- Proposed new Greenway Orientation Panel.
The PA State Parks is facing budget cutbacks and are not in a position to add more elaborate
interpretive services, such as viewing decks, to their site.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
As a major recreation asset within the Greenway, this site would be a good partner with the
Greenway to help develop and market the regional interpretive experiences and opportunities.
50
Site Photo(s):
A general view of the boat access ramp. The kiosk by the ramp (top photos) could be used for
interpretive messages or Greenway marketing messages for the region.
51
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB - 69.9
Site/Facility Name: Lock Haven Access
Location: Lockport, PA (refer to map section 10)
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no interpretive theme or focus at present.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
There are two panels at this site. One is the typical older blue river trail panel (photo) and one
historic marker (photo).
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
When we visited this site there was a lot of construction going on. Due to the closeness of an old
canal lock and lock tenders house (restored) adjacent to this park and access, we recommend the
following signage:
One new River Trail Orientation panel.
One proposed Greenway Orientation Panel.
One interpretive panel on the canal system and canal remnants that can be seen at this site (on
private property).
52
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This site does have ample resources, or near by, to be an important heritage tourism site to visit
and a potential Greenway partner to help develop and market the West Branch interpretive
experiences.
Site Photo(s):
General view of the parking area with construction of the access ramp modifications underway in
the background. The private property with the canal remnants is to our back.
53
Current panels/markers located at this site. The old blue river trail panel, which needs to be
replaced, and the historical marker (bottom photo) which needs to have the bush in front of it
removed.
54
Part of the old canal system and keepers house. This is now private property and the landscape
for the canal structure and home have been renovated. Note the “private property” sign posted
on the tree.
This location would be a good site for an interpretive panel on the canal system and the canal at
this site, as well as developing a barrier between the park and the property, such as a split-rail
fence.
55
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB-90.8
Site/Facility Name: Hyner Access
Location: Off of route 120 (see section 9 map for details).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
No interpretive theme or focus
The current river trail panel is out of date and should be removed.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
Due to the lack of use of this site, no additional interpretive media are recommended as it would
not be cost effective.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
None.
56
Site Photo(s):
This is a very small site with virtually no parking. The river at this point is very shallow and
rocky. There is only access for a canoe or kayak.
57
The old blue panel is outdated and should be removed/replaced.
58
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB – H-18
Site/Facility Name: Western Clinton Sportsman’s Club Environmental Center
Location: Off of Rt. 120 (See section 9 map).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no formal theme of focus. From website searches, and visiting the facility, it appears
that the building is used to host a variety of venues from workshops and seminars to a variety of
environmental education classes
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This site and organization could potentially become a Greenway partner in marketing the
heritage resources of the region and hosting regional Greenway sponsored workshops as well.
This potential partnership can be explored at a later date.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
None at this time.
59
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
The entrance to the environmental center (top photo) and the facility itself, mainly set up for
meetings and workshops.
60
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB - 94.5
Site/Facility Name: North Bend Access
Location: Off of Rt. 120 (see section 8 map).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no current interpretive theme or focus. The site does not have a new River Trail
Orientation panel, but does have one of the outdated blue river trail panels.
As seen in the photo on the following page, this panel has been heavily damaged including being
hit with shotgun pellets.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
The existing blue panel should be removed. Due to the nature of this site, no new interpretive
media are recommended. The PFBC is not able to provide any maintenance or budget support
for other interpretive facilities such as viewing decks or trails. This site is in rough shape with a
vandalized panel (photo). It probably gets mostly local use so any interpretation would have to
change regularly, which is not cost effective for this site.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
None.
61
Site Photo(s):
There is an older river trail panel here that should be removed as it is dated.
62
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB – 97.3
Site/Facility Name: Flaming Foliage Access
Location: Off of Rt. 120 (see section 8 map).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no theme or focus at this site.
However, there is a visitor center operated by the Flaming Foliage Association adjacent to this
access. It was closed during our visit, but may have the potential for having exhibit panels inside
and/or Greenway Orientation panels located outside near the parking area.
This is a potential Greenway partnership that can be explored.
Likewise, the Auto Tour for Rt. 120 is another potential opportunity as Rt. 120 is the main access
route into the town and access site.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
There is a current River Trails Orientation panel at this location.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
Working with the Flaming Foliage Association there may be the potential for developing
historical exhibits and related river interpretation at this site. This can be explored in the future.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
63
There is potential for Greenway heritage tourism development by working with the existing
organizations here.
Site Photos:
64
The access route to the canoe/kayak put in area.
Some close-up photos of the river access (very shallow and rocky) and the scene looking to the
west, with the bridge being the main feature.
65
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – AT-1
Site/Facility Name: Bucktail State Park/Scenic Auto Tour (Rt. 120).
Location: Following ST. Rt. K120 (See Section 10 map)
The 75 mile route along Route 120 goes from Emporium to Lock Haven.
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is currently no interpretive theme or focus.
Potential interpretive topics can include:
- Native American History (this route was originally a Native American Path).
- Settlement and pioneer history.
- Natural history and watchable wildlife interpretation.
- River Geology and Watershed
- Historic communities
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
There is currently no formal interpretive media available. A book, Along the Bucktail Highway,
has been published and available (see attachment from Amazon.com).
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This would be a great Greenway initiative to partner with the State Park or other partners and
create a self-guided booklet for the Rt. 120 Scenic Drive.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
66
This experience is currently available with the driving route established and with limited
marketing. With further development and additional marketing with the Greenway, and
development of a Greenway sponsored interpretive driving guide, its heritage interpretation
potential, and heritage site formal linking system opportunity, will be greatly enhanced.
This could be a project for 2009/2010.
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
Information below from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Route_120
PA 120 in Clinton County, at the western end of Bucktail State Park Natural Area.
In much of Cameron and Clinton counties, PA 120 is a scenic drive designated Bucktail State
Park Natural Area. Bucktail State Park Natural Area runs 75 miles (121 km) from Emporium to
Lock Haven, and is named for the Pennsylvania Bucktail Regiment, who came from the area
during the American Civil War. PA 120 and the park run along Sinnemahoning Creek and the
West Branch Susquehanna River and also pass through Renovo (in Clinton County).
Bucktail State Park Natural Area was established by the Pennsylvania State Legislature in 1933.
It includes 21,039 acres (85.14 km2), of which 9,239 acres (37.39 km2) are in Cameron County
and 11,800 acres (47.75 km2) in Clinton County. While much of the land is state owned and part
of the Elk and Sproul State Forests, there are also many tracts of privately owned land within the
official boundaries of the park. The law establishing the park defined its boundaries as "all that
area of land extending in length from the western city line of Lock Haven, in Clinton County, to
the eastern borough line of Emporium, in The County of Cameron, and along the course of the
western branch of the Susquehanna River, and its tributary, Sinnemahoning Creek, in Clinton
and Cameron counties, an estimated distance of 75 miles, and in width from mountain rim to
mountain rim across the valley."[1] The park is primarily dedicated to wildlife viewing, especially
elk.
Pennsylvania Route 120 follows an old Native American Trail, the Sinnemahoning Path. This
trail was used by Native Americans to cross the eastern continental divide (specifically the
67
Allegheny Front) between the Susquehanna River (which drains into the Chesapeake Bay) and
the Allegheny River (which forms the Ohio River with the Monongahela River at Pittsburgh and
eventually drains into the Gulf of Mexico via the Mississippi River). American Pioneers also
used the trail to make their way west and it was also known as the Bucktail Trail
68
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG- WB-132.5
Site/Facility Name: Karthaus Access
Location: Karthaus, PA
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no formal interpretive theme or focus. The site does currently have one of the old blue
river trail signs that have been recommended for removal or replacement.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This could be a location for a new Greenway Orientation panel in the future.
Any additional interpretive services or structures, such as viewing decks or interpretive trails
could be developed here, but would have to be guided and cost shared by the State Forestry
Division.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
None at this time.
Wouldn’t there be value in presenting the environmental legacy that we were left with after the
mining in the region. Abandoned mine drainage (AMD) continues to pollute the water, but
progress is slowly being made. It would seem prudent timing to reflect on this in light of the
potential gas drilling that is proposed for this region. There is a Chesapeake Bay connection that
could be made here – where people generally don’t relate to this water being part of the Bay.
69
Site Photo(s):
70
This is the access for the West Branch – for Canoe or Kayak. The water is very shallow.
71
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG - WB – F-1
Site/Facility Name: Reliant Energy Electric Generation Plant
Location: Along the West Branch near Shawville (see map section 4).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
Information from website:
Shawville, Pennsylvania
The Shawville Station is located on a 947-acre site along the West Branch of the Susquehanna
River, 10 miles northeast of Clearfield, Pennsylvania. The plant’s four coal-fired steam units
(566 MW) and three diesel units (6 MW) have a total generating capacity of 572 megawatts. Of
the coal units, units 1 and 2 began commercial operation in 1954, while Units 3 and 4 started in
1959 and 1960, respectively. From 1993 to 1995, low NOx burners, environmental equipment
designed to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxide, were installed on all four units at Shawville. In
addition, the station uses electrostatic precipitators to control particulate emissions. Units 1-4 are
base load units with regulation capability. Diesel units 5 through 7 are peaking units and provide
black start capability.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This is a private site, but the power plant is an important site that should be interpreted. An
interpretive panel on the power plant operations and better interpretation for boater safety could
be placed here. This is a good site for cell phone interpretation or a stop (or drive-by) for a selfguiding auto tour route.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This is a small private site with limited parking. Any future interpretation would have to be
coordinated with the site owner.
72
Site Photo(s):
There is a small viewing area (photo) for the power plant with warning signs. This could be a
location for the Greenway to partner with the power company to develop an interpretive panel
here on the role of the river in power generation and that affect or impact on the river ecology.
Also better interpretation for canoe or kayak user on the safety issues here and by the dam.
73
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB-174.8
Site/Facility Name: Lower Witmer Park Borough Access (Clearfield)
Location: Clearfield, PA
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no formal interpretation at this site. However there is one of the outdated Blue River
Trail Panels on site that should be replaced.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This location is an important one for visitor contact about the river history and the Greenway in
general. At this location it is recommended that the Greenway work in partnership with the
Borough to develop several panels for this park including:
- One proposed new Greenway Orientation panel
- Interpretive Panels on: the ecology of the river, the watershed (where the water flows to the
watershed, etc.), and local history and industry uses of the river.
The park would be a good location for a River Town Kiosk as well. This would definitely be a
stop for a self-guiding auto tour and a good site for regional cell phone interpretation.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This would be an important heritage tourism Gateway site for the west branch of the Greenway.
Tourism development could include new marketing of the site via the Greenway web site,
Greenway River Town nomination and perhaps the starting point for interpretive linkage tours
for the West Branch.
74
Site Photo(s):
The old blue panel should be removed and replaced with new interpretive panels that can
be mounted on the railing by the river (top photo)
75
This park receives a lot of active use being part of a residential area. Interpretation at this
location would generate thousands of visitor contacts about the Greenway program.
76
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB-185
Site/Facility Name: Irvin Park Borough Access
Location: Curwensville, PA (see map section 3 for details).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
This is a Borough Park with limited access – for canoe and kayak only. There is no current
River Trail panel, but the site does have one of the old blue panels that should be removed.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This would be a good site for a proposed new Greenway Orientation panel. No other media is
recommended at this time due to lack of financial or maintenance support by the city.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
None at this time.
77
Site Photo(s):
Main entrance to the park.
78
The main access to the river for canoe and kayak users (top photo). The site has one of the old
dated river trail panels that should be removed or replaced.
79
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – V-3
Site/Facility Name: Curwensville Corps of Engineers (COE) Vista
Location: At the Curwensville Dam site off Rt. 453 (see map section 3 for details).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
The Corps of Engineers vista site by the dam currently has a nice kiosk with interpretive panel
and map. The interpretation here focuses on:
- Why the COE built a dam here.
- How the dam operates.
- The benefits of the dam.
Inventory and Analysis of current interpretive services/media:
This vista location currently has one large kiosk with three panels (see photo on following page).
These are of high quality, and the vista provides a good experience for visitors.
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
No additional media are recommended for this site as the current interpretive kiosk and signs
work well and fall within the COE’s interpretive guidelines.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This is a nice site for visitors in association with the formal boat access site. The vista gives
visitors a good overview of the landscape and can be successfully marketed in partnership with
the Greenway.
80
Site Photo:
The kiosk by the dam (seen in the background) and vista (off to the left of this photo.
The vista for the COE dam and Lake
Curwensville. There is limited
access to the dam area (red sign) for
security reasons.
81
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB - 187
Site/Facility Name: Curwensville Lake Access (COE)
Location: Curwensville Lake (off Rt. 453 – see map section 3 for details).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no formal interpretation at this site. There is a new River Trail Panel located in the main
parking area by the restroom access (photo), but mounted a bit too high.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
There is one of the old, outdated, blue panels located here that should be removed.
As there is no formal interpretation at this site, it might be a good chance for the Greenway to
partner with the COE to help develop interpretation here that could include:
- A proposed new Greenway Orientation Panel.
- Interpretive panel on the COE management of the lake.
- Interpretation of watchable wildlife and COE wildlife mgt. programs (to be cost shared with the
COE). This could also be a stop on a self-guiding regional auto tour, and also a good site for
cell phone interpretation.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
No additional recommendations at this time.
82
Site Photo(s):
83
A general overview of the main COE boat launch area for the lake.
84
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section:
Index Number: SRG – WB-209
Site/Facility Name: McGees Mills/Covered Bridge Access
Location: Off of Rt. 219 (see map section 2 for details).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no interpretive theme of focus at this site. There is one of the old, outdated, blue panels
located here that should be removed.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This is a privately owned site, but would be a good location for an interpretive panel on the
history and construction of the covered bridge. We would have to work with the Covered Bridge
Association for further discussions about the site use and development.
As this is a small, private site no other interpretive media are recommended at this time.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This site is difficult to find and a private site as well. No tourism development for this site is
recommended.
85
Site Photo(s):
The West Branch Covered Bridge
Privately owned; they do allow canoe and kayak access at this location.
86
The main river access point for canoe and kayak users. This site receives little use and has no
parking available. The blue panel (top photo) should be removed.
87
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB-217
Site/Facility Name: Burnside Borough Access (under development)
Location: In the Borough of Burnside (see map section 1 for details).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is no interpretive theme or focus. This site has no signage at all and is not ready for any
marketing at this time. It is a put-in for canoe and kayak during high water and most of the time
the water is too low for boating.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
None recommended at this time.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
None at this time.
88
Site Photo(s) and existing brochure (attached):
This is the Burnside Access. There is no signage indicating that this is a public assess site or any
other signage. This site probably receives very little actual use at this time and its use is
probably dependant upon the water level in the West Branch this far up stream.
89
Susquehanna River Water Trail
Susquehanna Greenway
Site Inventory and Assessment Form
Section: West Branch
Index Number: SRG – WB-227
Site/Facility Name: Cherry Tree Access
Location: Borough of Cherry Tree (see map section 1 for details).
Current interpretive theme or focus:
There is currently no interpretive theme or focus here.
There is one of the new River Trail Panels located here. There was one of the old outdated Blue
river trail panels here but it has long since been lost and only the stand remains.
Recommendations for interpretive media/ services upgrades or additions:
Interpretive Media and Services (outdoor exhibits, signs, demonstration areas etc.) and
estimated costs:
This little park is well kept and could be the location for a nice interpretive kiosk in partnership
with the Greenway and Borough. As this is the essential beginning of the West Branch of the
river, it is a good location to interpret the route the waters of the West Branch take, making its
link-up with the North Branch and eventually flowing into the Chesapeake Bay.
Heritage Tourism/Interpretation Development Considerations (recommendations for
general or specific additions, changes, improvements):
This community could benefit from marketing this site as the headwaters of the West Branch.
This partnership might help pick up tourism to this site for self-guided driving tours or other
interpretive activities or van tours.
90
Site Photo(s):
The main entry to the Cherry Tree access site. It is interesting to note the West Branch of the
Susquehanna River seen in the background (you can just walk across it).
91
A main view of the small park and canoe/kayak access. The water is so shallow here that it
probably receives little use for access, probably more use from day visitors. The old panel seen
in the top photo has been lost and only the stand remains.
92
93
94
95
Site Index
Interp.
panels
Orientation
Panels
Kiosks
Museum
Exhibits
Web
Site
Walking Driving
Tours
Tour Stop
Live
Programs
Cell Phone
Interp.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WB – H-9 Packwood House
E
E
RN
E
KEY
WB – H-10Dale Engler/Walker
House
E
E
RN
E
E – Existing – OK
WB – H-11 Slifer House
Museum
E
E
RN
E
ER – Exist should be
Replaced
WB – H-12Little League
Baseball Museum (Williamsport)
E
E
RN
E
R-
WB – H-13 Millionaire Row
Historic District (Williamsport)
RN
WB – H-14 Thomas T. Taber
Museum (Williamsport)
WB – 5.8 Chillisquaque Access
PFBC
E
R
WB – 11.4 Milton State Park
Access
WB – HC – 1 City of Milton
Heritage Area
RN – Recommend
New Media
AG – Add
Greenway
Orientation
E
RN
Review the
interpretive plan
form set for details.
E
E
RN
Remove
E
Key: 1 = Tour Bus Ready; 2= Can handle up to 30 visitors; 3 = Less than 10 at one time; 4 – Not tourism ready via policy.
96
Site Index
Interp.
panels
Orientation
Panels
Kiosks
Museum
Exhibits
Web
Site
Walking
Tours
Driving
Tour Stop
Live
Programs
Cell Phone
Interp.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WB – 15.6 Watsontown Access
PFBC
R
KEY
RN
E – Existing – OK
WB – 15.9 Watsontown Boro.
Access
RN
ER – Exist should be
Replaced
WB – H-17 Muncy Historic
District
RN
WB – 27.8 Muncy Access PFBC
R-
E
Remove
RN – Recommend
New Media
WB – 35.3 Mountoursville
Municipal Access
AG – Add Greenway
Orientation
WB – HT-1 Canfield Island
Native American Trail
E
E/AG
WB – 37.3 Greevy Access PFBC
R
E/AG
WB – 42.1 Susquehanna State
Park Access
E
E
RN
RN/AG
RN
RN
WB – 70.8 Lock Haven
Municipal Access
RN
RN/AG
WB – 90.8 Hyner Access PFBC
R
E
Review the
interpretive plan
form set for details.
Key: 1 = Tour Bus Ready; 2= Can handle up to 30 visitors; 3 = Less than 10 at one time; 4 – Not tourism ready via policy.
97
Site Index
Interp.
panels
Orientation
Panels
Kiosks
Museum Web
Exhibits
Site
Walking
Tours
Driving
Tour Stop
Live
Programs
Cell Phone
Interp.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WB – H-18 Western
Clinton Sportsman’s Assoc
Environmental Center
WB – 94.5 North Bend
Access PFBC
E
KEY
R
WB – 97.3 Flaming Foliage
Access (Canoe)
E – Existing – OK
AG
RN
ER – Exist should be
Replaced
R - Remove
WB – AT-1 Bucktail State
Park/Scenic Auto Tour
(Rt. 120).
RN – Recommend
New Media
AG
AG – Add Greenway
Orientation
WB – 132.5 Karthaus
Access
R
E/AG
WB – F-1 Reliant Energy
Electric Generation Plant
RN
AG
RN
WB – 174 Lower Witmer
Park Borough Access
(Clearfield)
RN
RN/AG
RN
WB – 185 Irvin Park Borough
Access
R
RN/AG
Review the interpretive
plan form set for
details.
Key: 1 = Tour Bus Ready; 2= Can handle up to 30 visitors; 3 = Less than 10 at one time; 4 – Not tourism ready via policy.
98
Site Index
Interp.
Orientation
Kiosks Museum
Web
Walking Driving
Live
Cell Phone
panels
Panels
Exhibits
Site
Tours
Tour Stop Programs
Interp.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WB – V-3 Curwensville COE
Vista
KEY
E
E
E
RN
E – Existing – OK
WB – 187 Curwensville Lake
Access (COE)
WB – 209 McGees Mills Access
and Covered Bridge
ER – Exist should be
Replaced
E/AG
R - Remove
RN
RN
WB – 217 Burnside Municipal
Access (future)
WB – 227 Cherry Tree Borough
Access
RN – Recommend
New Media
AG – Add Greenway
Orientation
RN
E/AG
RN
Review the interpretive
plan form set for
details.
Key: 1 = Tour Bus Ready; 2= Can handle up to 30 visitors; 3 = Less than 10 at one time; 4 – Not tourism ready via policy.
99
Site Index
Historic
Home(s)
Historical
Person
Architecture
& community
Canal
Revol War
History
Civil
war
Native
Natural Industry
American History Heritage
Other
Topics
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WB – H-9 Packwood House
3
3
3
3
WB – H-10Dale Engler/Walker
House
3
3
3
3
WB – H-11 Slifer House
Museum
3
3
3
Slavery
3
WB – H-12Little League
Baseball Museum (Williamsport)
Baseball 1
WB – H-13 Millionaire Row
Historic District (Williamsport)
4
WB – H-14 Thomas T. Taber
Museum (Williamsport)
1
4
1
1
4
1
1
WB – 5.8 Chillisquaque Access
PFBC
2
WB – 11.4 Milton State Park
BirdsAccess
2
2
Key: 1 = Tour Bus Ready; 2= Can handle up to 30 visitors; 3 = Less than 10 at one time; 4 – Not tourism ready via policy.
See form set.
100
Site Index
Historic Historical
Architecture
Canal
Revol War Civil
Native
Natural Industry
Other
Home(s) Person
& community
History
war
American History Heritage
Topics
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WB – HC – 1 City of Milton
Heritage Area
1
1
1
1
WB – 15.6 Watsontown Access
PFBC
See plan
2
WB – 15.9 Watsontown Boro.
Access
WB – 22.8 Montgomery PFBC
WB – H-17 Muncy Historic
District
WB – 27.8 Muncy Access PFBC
2
3
3
3
WB – 35.3 Mountoursville
Municipal Access
2
WB – HT-1 Canfield Island
Native American Trail
1
WB – 37.3 Greevy Access PFBC
2
WB – 42.1 Susquehanna State
Park Access
WB – 70.8 Lock Haven
Municipal Access
2
2
WB – 90.8 Hyner Access PFBC
Key: 1 = Tour Bus Ready; 2= Can handle up to 30 visitors; 3 = Less than 10 at one time; 4 – Not tourism ready via policy.
See plan.
101
Site Index
Historic
Home(s)
Historical
Person
Architecture
& community
Canal
Revol War
History
Civil
war
Native
Natural
American History
Industry Other
Heritage Topics
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WB – H-18 Western Clinton
Sportsman’s Assoc
Environmental Center
2
WB – 94.5 North Bend Access
PFBC
3
WB – 97.3 Flaming Foliage
Access (Canoe)
2
2
WB – AT-1 Bucktail State Park/
Scenic Auto Tour (Rt. 120).
See plan.
WB – 132.5 Karthaus Access
(Bureau of Forestry)
WB – F-1 Reliant Energy
Electric Generation Plant
(and Dam)
2
3
3
WB – 174 Lower Witmer Park
Borough Access (Clearfield)
2
WB – 185 Irvin Park Borough
Access
3
Key: 1 = Tour Bus Ready; 2= Can handle up to 30 visitors; 3 = Less than 10 at one time; 4 – Not tourism ready via policy.
3
102
Site Index
Historic
Home(s)
Historical
Person
Architecture
& community
Canal
Revol War
History
Civil
war
Native
Natural
American History
Industry
Heritage
Other
Topics
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WB – V-3 Curwensville COE
Vista
See plan
WB – 187 Curwensville Lake
Access (COE)
WB – 209 McGees Mills Access
and Covered Bridge
1
3
See Plan
WB – 217 Burnside Municipal
Access (future)
WB – 227 Cherry Tree Borough
Access
3
Key: 1 = Tour Bus Ready; 2= Can handle up to 30 visitors; 3 = Less than 10 at one time; 4 – Not tourism ready via policy.
See Plan
103
Index #
WB – H-9 Packwood House
WB – H-10Dale Engler/Walker House
Media/Services
TBD
Develop as a potential stop on the proposed
new Greenway Driving Tour. List on web site.
TBD
Same as above.
WB – H-12Little League Baseball Museum
(Williamsport)
Same as above.
WB – H-14 Thomas T. Taber Museum
(Williamsport)
WB – 5.8 Chillisquaque Access PFBC
Cost Estimate
Develop as a potential stop on the proposed
new Greenway Driving Tour. List on web site.
WB – H-11 Slifer House Museum
WB – H-13 Millionaire Row Historic District
(Williamsport)
Year
09 10 11 12 13
Develop a partnership to develop a walking guide
Or driving guide for the District. Have the district
Listed on the Greenway web site.
$8000.00 est.
Develop as a driving tour stop. List on web site.
- Remove old blue interpretive panel.
- Add River Trail and Greenway panels.
$6000.00
104
Index Number
Media
WB – 11.4 Milton State Park Access
Possible location for a new Greenway orientation panel.
$3000.00
WB – HC – 1 City of Milton Heritage Area
Possible partner for Greenway orientation panel.
Possible partner for Greenway River Town Kiosk
$3000.00
$15,000.00
WB – 15.6 Watsontown Access PFBC
-Remove old Blue river trail panel.
- Add New River Trail Orientation panel.
- Possible location for interp. panel on Fish Restoration.
$3000.00
$3000.00
WB – 15.9 Watsontown Boro. Access
- Consider adding a new River Trail Panel.
$3000.00
WB – HT-1 Canfield Island Native
American Trail
- Consider adding a proposed Greenway Panel to park.
$3000.00
WB – 37.3 Greevy Access PFBC
- Remove old Blue river trail panel.
WB – 42.1 Susquehanna State Park Access
- Consider adding new River Trail Orientation panel.
- Consider adding proposed Greenway panel.
$3000.00
$3000.00
WB – 70.8 Lock Haven Municipal Access
- Consider adding new River Trail Orientation panel.
- Consider adding new Greenway Orientation panel.
- Recommend new interp. panel on Canal history here.
- Remove old Blue river trail panel.
$3000.00
$3000.00
$2500.00
WB – 90.8 Hyner Access PFBC
-Remove old Blue river trail panel.
WB – H-18 Western Clinton Sportsman’s
Assoc Environmental Center
- No recommendations at this time – see plan.
09 10 11 12 13 14
Cost Estimate
105
Index #
Midia
WB – 94.5 North Bend Access PFBC
- Remove old Blue panel.
WB – 97.3 Flaming Foliage Access (Canoe)
- Potential new Greenway Panel by visitor center.
- Potential for exhibit in visitor center/ web site access.
WB – AT-1 Bucktail State Park/Scenic Auto
Tour (Rt. 120).
WB – 132.5 Karthaus Access
WB – 185 Irvin Park Borough Access
Cost Estimate
- Develop a self-guiding driving booklet for the tour route
Photo-ready master copy on CD.
$8000.00
- Remove old Blue river trail panel.
- Potential location for new Greenway panel.
$3000.00
WB – F-1 Reliant Energy Electric Generation
Plant (and Dam)
- In partnership with power company, develop two
interpretive panels – one on power production, one on
river ecology.
WB – 174 Lower Witmer Park Borough
Access (Clearfield)
09 10 11 12 13
- Remove old Blue river trail panel.
- Add new River Trail Panels.
- Add proposed new Greenway panel.
- Potential for 3+ interpretive panels (see plan)
- Potential location for a River Town kiosk.
- Remove old Blue panel.
- Add new River Trail Panel
- Add proposed new Greenway orientation panel by
parking lot.
$3000.00 ea
$3000.00
$3000.00
$2500.00 ea.
$15000.00
$3000.00
$3000.00
106
Index #
Media/Services
WB – V-3 Curwensville COE Vista
No additional media required.
WB – 187 Curwensville Lake Access (COE)
- Add proposed new Greenway Orientation Panel by office.
- Remove old Blue river trail panel.
WB – 209 McGees Mills Access and
Covered Bridge
WB – 217 Burnside Municipal Access
(future)
WB – 227 Cherry Tree Borough Access
09 10 11 12 13
Cost Estimate
$3000.00
- Remove old Blue river trail panel.
- Work with partners to develop covered bridge panel.
$2500.00
- Potential location for new River Trail Orientation panel.
$3000.00
- Remove old Blue river trail panel frame.
- Add Greenway orientation panel.
- Add new interpretive panel on WB of river head waters
and Chesapeake Bay watershed.
$3000.00
$2500.00
107
108
Community linking System – Greenway Connections West Branch
Driving route #1
Route 15 to Route 405 to Rt. 220
Lewisburg to Lock Haven Route
Interpretation for this route including stops listed in the interpretive plan for this section could
include, but not be limited to:
- River Towns
- Museums
- Community historic districts
- Revolutionary War sites and history.
- Canal History
- Railroad History
- Native American sites and stories
- River Ecology and Geology
- Historic Homes and Personalities.
- Natural history and watchable wildlife sites and opportunities
Recommendations:
- Develop an Interpretive Master Plan for this Driving/Linking Route. $12,000.00
- Develop an Interpretive Tour Booklet for this section of the Greenway (photo or production
ready). $6000.00
Driving Route #2
Bucktail Auto Tour
This is an existing marked scenic driving tour (see interpretive plan copy), but has no formal
interpretation media associated with it.
The auto tour route goes from just west of Lock Haven to Keating at the junction of the
Sinnemahorning Creek and West Branch of the Susquehanna River. At this point Rt. 120 goes
north (see the interpretive plan) away from the WB to complete the tour route (75 miles in total).
A “postcard book” on the Bucktail was recently published noting the Native American and other
natural and cultural features that can be seen along this route. In addition, there are many
watchable wildlife opportunities along this route as well.
109
110
Susquehanna River Water Trail And
Susquehanna Greenway
Interpretive Plan Site Accession Form
Instructions
When the initial interpretive planning process and inventory of interpretive sites was conducted
in 2008 it was realized that, given the time frame for the project, it was impossible to visit and
review every site within the 500 mile long corridor. So only the main sites, recommended by
regional river trail and Greenway staff, were included in the first inventory.
This site accession form is designed to have any regional river trail/greenway representation or
other stakeholders to recommend other sites to be added to the interpretive master plan.
Criteria for sites to be considered for inclusion into the interpretive plan:
- Sites are owned or managed by a non-profit organization.
- Sites are owned or managed by a government agency.
- Sites that are facilities have regularly posted hours of operations.
- Sites that visitors can access at any time such as scenic overlooks, self-guiding auto tours or
historic district walking tours.
To recommend a site for addition to the Interpretive Master Plan, please complete the attached
site accession form and forward your request on to:
Susquehanna Greenway Partnership
201 Furnace Road
Lewisburg, PA 17837
(570) 522-7211
The form set can also be faxed: (570) 524-9190 or sent by e-mail:
[email protected]
Feel free to call if you have any questions.
111
Susquehanna River Water Trail And
Susquehanna Greenway
Interpretive Plan Site Accession Form
Name of the Site or Facility to be added:
Location:
Main interpretive theme or message this site presents or illustrates (i.e. historic
architecture, canal era history, river ecology or geology, industrial heritage, etc.).
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Existing interpretive media or services (interpretive panels, self-guiding brochures,
exhibits, etc.).
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Recommendations for new interpretive media or services that could be developed for this
site in the future.
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Any management issues associated with this site (parking, safety, orientation signage, etc.)
or site improvement needs?
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
112
How will/does this site contribute to the interpretation of the Susquehanna River Water
Trail and Greenway?
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Any other comments:
Please include site photos or existing printed material on this site that supports your
request for its addition to the Interpretive Master Plan.
_____________________________________________________________________________
Your contact details:
Name:
Organization and address/phone number:
E-mail:

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