Allure - June 2016 USA

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Allure - June 2016 USA
THE BEAUTY EXPERT
JUNE 2016
The Delightful,
Complicated,
Expletive-Loving
Elizabeth
Olsen
FRAGRANCE
LESSONS
From the
Chicest Women
On the Planet
The Ponytail
Gets an Upgrade
RS’ CH
E
R
RE
E
IC
A
PLUS
DE
O
AW
The New Face of
Gender Politics
A
WHY SO
ANGRY?
RD
WIN
N
READERS’
CHOICE
AWARDS
Serums, Shadows & More
JUNE
IN THIS
ISSUE
BEAUTY
REPORTER
43 Look We Love:
Model Lineisy Montero’s
Natural Beauty
44 Editors’ Favorites
46 Seeing Stars
• Product Review: A Hair
Re-Styling Cream
48 Directory: A Salon
Where You Can Shop the
Decor • A Foolproof Gel
Manicure • Color of the
Moment: Pale Lilac
50 Nars’s Cool,
Bright Summer • Vacation
in a Candle
52 Cult Object:
Rainbow Mascaras
NEWS & TRENDS
READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS
You voted, we noted: The 81
beauty products Allure
readers can’t do without.
32 Hair Inspiration. Braids
to Waves. These
cool Dutch braids unravel
into a whole new look.
Depending on your natural
texture, you’ll wake up
with either smoother
curls or newfound waves.
By Chloe Metzger
34 Beauty School.
How to find your perfect
nude lipstick, upgrade
your ponytail, solve your
concealer problems, and
more. By Elizabeth Siegel
6 Allure • June 2016
JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
79
28 The Makeup Pro. My
Muses. By Jillian Dempsey
JUNE
69 The Lazy Girl’s Guide
to Curls. It’s an irony we
wholeheartedly embrace:
Your curly-hair styling
routine is about to become
more straightforward.
By Lexi Novak
104
79 Readers’ Choice Awards.
The 81 hair, makeup, and
skin-care products that Allure
readers swear by.
SCENTS OF PLACE
From South Korea to Cuba,
nine women discuss
the relationship between
fragrance and culture.
91 Readers’ Choice
Breakthroughs. We asked
you to pick the best beauty
innovations of the year, and
boy, did you deliver. Here
are the five new products
that have truly changed
your lives for the better.
By Liana Schaffner
FASHION
55 Gleam Catchers. The
spring runways twinkled with
sequined numbers.
56 Round Trips. Sunglasses
with architectural frames and
unexpected details
58 Ring Tones. Sea-colored
cocktail rings plus the perfect
nail polishes to show them off
a permanent place in how
we judge each other. We
investigate the cultural
phenomenon of the condition.
By David DeNicolo
Style blogger Jayne Min found
a few easy ways to mix it up
with a billowy Ellery blouse.
By Chloe Metzger
64 One Love.
A classic Valentino bag in
Rastafarian-colored tie-dye.
By Amber Angelle
FEATURES
96 The Bold One. Of course
you recognize the last name,
but if you think you know (the
candid, funny, occasionally
foulmouthed) Elizabeth Olsen,
you have another thing
coming. By Elizabeth Siegel
to simpler, more peaceful
times. The connecting thread?
Scent is a form of selfexpression. By Liana Schaffner
104 The Culture of
112 Step Into Liquid. The
coolest makeup of the season
is here, and it’s made for
getting wet. And maybe a little
wild, too. By Chloe Metzger
Fragrance. For some women,
perfume represents a leap
toward independence and
prosperity. For others, it’s a link
120 Resting Bitch Face.
It’s offensive and ridiculous
and seems to have found
ON THE COVER
Silk dress by Edun. Olsen’s look can be re-created with the
following: Artist Shadow in S-234, Aqua XL Eye Pencil
in I-24, HD Blush in 320, and Rouge Artist Natural lipstick
in N18 by Make Up For Ever. Photographed by Tom Craig.
Hair: Serge Normant of Serge Normant Salon. Makeup: Hung
Vanngo. Manicure: Sheril Bailey. Prop stylist: Jill Nicholls.
Fashion editor: Rachael Wang. Details, see Shopping Guide.
8 Allure • June 2016
124 Body and Sol. Throwback
bikinis, unexpected knits,
retro prints. If you want to get
on island time, an eclectic mix
is just the ticket.
REGULARS
18 Contributors
20 Cover Look
24 Editor’s Letter
30 Beauty by Numbers
134 Shopping Guide
136 Autobiography
Allure Regrets
In “Portrait of an Artist”
[May], the fashion editor was
misidentified. Ellie Grace
Cumming was the fashion editor
for this story featuring
FKA twigs. Allure regrets the error.
FROM TOP: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (2); TOM CRAIG
60 User’s Guide to Style.
A L LU R E .C O M
L’Oréal Paris
Infallible Eye Shadow
in Silver Sky
SUMMER
BEAUTY
INSPIRATION
Find nonstop hair and makeup ideas, discover new
trends (like fresh ways to wear silver), and get
breaking news about product releases. It’s all on
Instagram—follow us at @allure!
KEEP YOUR COOL
Getting gorgeous when it’s 90
degrees in the shade is no easy task.
But we’re here to help. See our go-to
frizz fighters and meltproof makeup
picks at allure.com/summer-beauty.
Givenchy Rouge Interdit
Vinyl Lipstick in Moka Renversant
10 Allure • June 2016
WITCH
Did you know that Marvel’s
Scarlet Witch can stop a train
with her mind? Elizabeth
Olsen, who plays her in Captain
America: Civil War, gives
us an education on how the
villain eventually became
a hero. Watch the full video at
allure.com/elizabeth-olsen.
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
THE GOOD
EDITOR IN CHIEF
MICHELLE LEE
D E S I G N D I R E C TO R
RENEE RUPCICH
E X E C U T I V E E D I TO R
M A N AG I N G E D I TO R
DANIELLE PERGAMENT
AMANDA MEIGHER
E X E C U T I V E B E AU T Y D I R E C TO R
JENNY BAILLY
E N T E R TA I N M E N T D I R E C TO R
MARNI GOLDEN
D E P U T Y B E AU T Y D I R E C TO R
ELIZABETH SIEGEL
S E N I O R B E AU T Y E D I TO R
JENNA ROSENSTEIN
THIS
B E AU T Y E D I TO R
LEXI NOVAK
A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R
CHLOE METZGER
IS THE
FA SH ION D I R E C TO R
SUMMER I. . .
RACHAEL WANG
AC C E S S O R I E S D I R E C TO R
NICOLE CHAPOTEAU
FA S H I O N A S S I S TA N T
JENNA WOJCIECHOWSKI
“
P H OTO D I R E C TO R
RHIANNA RULE
RO PENULIAR
S E N I O R P H OTO E D I TO R S
JEREMY ALLEN, HOLLY WATSON
A S S O C I AT E P R O D U C E R
Learn how to tie
a sarong like a local
and wing my
eyeliner like a pro.
“
B O O K I N G S D I R E C TO R
BROOKE LUNSKI
P H OTO AS S I STA N T
MATHEA MILLMAN
S E N I O R A R T D I R E C TO R
NICOLE ARGENTO
JUNIOR DESIGNER
BRIANA MARSHALL
COPY CHIEF
CATHERINE GAMBRELL
“
R E S E A R C H D I R E C TO R
LORI SEGAL
C O P Y E D I TO R
R E S E A R C H E D I TO R
AURA DAVIES
AMBER ANGELLE
A S S O C I AT E R E S E A R C H E D I TO R
SHYEMA AZAM
Will make a
solid attempt
to shave my
legs more.
P R O D U C T I O N D I R E C TO R
HEATHER TUMA NAPOLITANO
P R O D U C T I O N M A N AG E R
VALERIE THOMAS
P R O D U C T I O N A S S I S TA N T
EMMA LOUISE JOSLYN
“
D I G I TA L D I R E C TO R
MILES STIVERSON
S E N I O R D I G I TA L E D I TO R
LAUREN CARUSO
D I G I TA L D E P U T Y B E AU T Y D I R E C TO R
SOPHIA PANYCH
D I G I TA L E D I TO R , S P E C I A L P R OJ E C T S
CATHERINE DEVINE
D I G I TA L P R O D U C E R
MONICA PERRY
D I G I TA L B E AU T Y E D I TO R
KRISTIE DASH
D I G I TA L A S S O C I AT E E D I TO R S
RENEE JACQUES, STEPHANIE SALTZMAN
A S S O C I AT E S O C I A L M E D I A M A N AG E R
DANA BURKE
D I G I TA L A S S I S TA N T B E AU T Y E D I TO R
MADDIE ABERMAN
S E N I O R P R O D U C T M A N AG E R
RANDI EICHENBAUM
A S S O C I AT E D I R E C TO R , AU D I E N C E D E V E LO P M E N T
LINDSAY SANSONE
M A N AG E R , D I G I TA L A N A LY T I C S
CHRISTINA SOTTO
S E N I O R P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S D I R E C TO R
ERIN KAPLAN
E D I TO R I A L B U S I N E S S M A N AG E R
RORNA RICHARDS DINNOO
B E AU T Y A S S I S TA N T
KATHLEEN SUICO
A S S I S TA N T TO T H E E D I TO R I N C H I E F
KRISTEN NICHOLS
C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I TO R I A L P R OJ E C T S D I R E C TO R
PATRICIA ALFONSO TORTOLANI
C O N T R I B U T I N G P R O D U C T I O N D I R E C TO R
GRETCHEN VITAMVAS
C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I TO R S
TIM HOUT
JILLIAN DEMPSEY, DAVID D E NICOLO, MEIRAV DEVASH,
JOLENE EDGAR, FRANCIS KURKDJIAN,
BROOKE LE POER TRENCH,
CHRIS M C MILLAN, JUDITH NEWMAN, LIANA SCHAFFNER
F O U N D I N G E D I TO R
LINDA WELLS
ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
ANNA WINTOUR
June 2016 • Allure 13
PUBLISHER, CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER
AGNES BOGDAN CHAPSKI
HEAD OF BRAND MARKETING & STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS
JILL STEINBACH FRIEDSON
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FINANCE & OPERATIONS
KEVIN DONOVAN
A DV E R T I S I N G
E X EC U T I V E I N T EG R AT E D D I R ECTO RS
MARIA GARCIA, KIM CONWAY HALEY,
LAUREN DECKER LERMAN, SANDRA MAURIELLO
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR–FASHION, JEWELRY, AND WATCH
SARAH YORK RICHARDS
I N T EG R AT E D AC C O U N T M A N AG E R
ALEXANDRIA HAUGHEY
EZRA SEAN ALVAREZ
323-965-3564
E X EC U T I V E M I DW E ST D I R ECTO RS
CHRISTINA KROLOPP
312-649-6731
ANGIE PACKARD PRENDERGAST
312-649-3509
THIS
I TA LY
ELENA DE GIULI
011-39-02-655-84223
IS THE
SUMMER I. . .
PAC I F I C N O RT H W E ST D I R ECTO R
NATALIE BANKER TAQUINO
415-955-8280
N E W E N G L A N D/ D E T RO I T
KRISTIN HAVENS
585-255-0207
D I R ECT R E S P O N S E
REBECCA VOLK
800-753-5370 ext. 489
U. K . / F R A N C E
SELIM MATARACI
011-33-1-44-78-00-62
S E N I O R B U S I N E SS D I R ECTO R
SHERRI GINSBERG
“
“
E X EC U T I V E S O U T H W E ST D I R ECTO R
Plan to surf
every chance
I can.
DIGITAL
H E A D O F D I G I TA L R E V E N U E
NICOLE AMICO SMITH
D I G I TA L SA L E S D E V E LO P M E N T M A N AG E R
SAMANTHA DANA
D I G I TA L S A L E S P L A N N E R
ERICA CHEUNG
CONTENT MARKETING AND PARTNERSHIPS
D I R ECTO RS
DAVID OLESNEVICH, ALEXIS WALL
M A N AG E R
KATE STEEN
INTEGR ATED MARKETING AND CRE ATIVE SERVICES
E X EC U T I V E D I R ECTO R
ERIN BRENNAN
S E N I O R D I R ECTO RS
STEFENI BELLOCK, SHARI SOBINE
D I R ECTO R
JUSTIN REIS
“
“
Will up my
mani game—
good-bye, nudes!
M A N AG E R
MALLORY MILLER
MARKETING SERVICES
E X EC U T I V E D I R ECTO R, M A R K E T I N G
GERARD FARRELL
S E N I O R D I R ECTO R, M A R K E T I N G I N T E L L I G E N C E
JENNIFER FRIEDMAN PEREZ
E X EC U T I V E ASS I STA N T TO T H E P U B L I S H E R
CORI MOSCOWITZ
S A L E S A S S O C I AT E
ELIZABETH MILLER
I N T EG R AT E D C O O R D I N ATO R
VINCENT KEEGAN
I N T E G R AT E D A S S I S TA N T S
JULIA BROKAW, KAITLYN DILLEN,
ALEXANDRA KELIKIAN, CARA KURICA
P U B L I S H E D BY C O N D É N A S T
Chairman Emeritus
Chairman
President & Chief Executive Officer
Chief Financial Officer
Chief Marketing Officer & President–Condé Nast Media Group
Chief Administrative Officer
EVP & Chief Digital Officer
EVP–Consumer Marketing
EVP–Human Resources
EVP–Corporate Communications
SVP–B u s i n e s s O p e ra t i o n s
SVP–Corporate Controller
SVP–Managing Director, 23 Stories
SVP–Network Sales & Partnerships, Condé Nast &
C h i e f Reve n u e O f f i c e r, C N É
SVP–Financial Planning & Analysis
SVP–Strategy, 23 Stories
SVP–Ad Tech
SVP–Licensing
SVP–Re s e a rc h & A n a l y t i c s
SVP–D i g i t a l O p e ra t i o n s
S. I. NEWHOUSE, JR.
CHARLES H. TOWNSEND
ROBERT A. SAUERBERG, JR.
DAVID E. GEITHNER
EDWARD J. MENICHESCHI
JILL BRIGHT
FRED SANTARPIA
MONICA RAY
JOANN MURRAY
CAMERON BLANCHARD
DAVID ORLIN
DAVID B. CHEMIDLIN
JOSH STINCHCOMB
LISA VALENTINO
SUZANNE REINHARDT
PADRAIG CONNOLLY
DAVID ADAMS
CATHY HOFFMAN GLOSSER
STEPHANIE FRIED
LARRY BAACH
DAWN OSTROFF
JOY MARCUS
SAHAR ELHABASHI
JEREMY STECKLER
MICHAEL KLEIN
JOE L ABRACIO
AL EDGINGTON
TEAL NEWLAND
C O N D É N A S T I N T E R N AT I O N A L
Chairman and Chief Executive
JONATHAN NEWHOUSE
President
NICHOLAS COLERIDGE
Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets.
condenast.com
condenastinternational.com
14 Allure • June 2016
TIM HOUT
C O N D É N A S T E N T E R TA I N M E N T
President
EVP/General Manager, Digital Video
EVP & Chief Operating Officer
EVP–Motion Pictures
EVP–Programming & Content Strategy, Digital Channels
EVP–Alternative TV
EVP–CNÉ Studios
SVP–Marketing & Partner Management
C O N T R I B U TO R S
ELIZABETH SIEGEL
Allure’s deputy beauty director interviewed
Elizabeth Olsen for “The Bold One.”
I wish I had asked Elizabeth Olsen: “For her
number. Kidding! Kind of.” Product I hope
never gets discontinued: “M.A.C. Ruby
Woo.” Best way to end the week: “At a quiet
restaurant—preferably one with pizza—with
my fiancé and a rye on the rocks.” The most
recent lie I told: “I’m pathologically honest.”
ALICIA YOON
The founder of Peach & Lily shared scent
memories for “The Culture of Fragrance.”
Weird smell obsession: “Chlorine. I used to
be a competitive diver growing up, and the
smell hits me with a wave of nostalgia.”
My favorite dish in Korea: “My mom’s beef
brisket with special sauce and soybeanpaste soup.” And in New York City: “Mulled
cider donuts at Underwest Donuts.”
BEN HASSETT
The photographer captured glossy beauty
looks for “Step Into Liquid.”
My first camera: “A 110 I took on a school
trip to a butterfly exhibit when I was
eight.” The museum I can spend the most
time in: “The National Portrait Gallery
in London.” The movie I’ve seen the most:
“I wrote my college thesis on Scorsese.
I must have seen Cape Fear 14 times.”
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
KAI NEWMAN
The model slipped into colorful bikinis
in St. Lucia for “Body and Sol.”
When I’m at the pool, I’m: “Listening to
music—anything dancehall.” Summer
beauty essentials: “Blotting papers and a
refreshing face mist.” What I love about
my home, Jamaica: “The amazing beaches,
food, music, warm sun—and warm
smiles.” Where to go: “Montego Bay.”
18 Allure • June 2016
COVER LOOK
ELIZABETH
OLSEN
Left: Make Up For Ever HD
Blush in 320. Below: The
’70s-inspired clothes;
shoes by Rodarte. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
The scoop from behind the
scenes at Allure’s shoot.
Beyond the Cover
O
Dress by No. 21.
Details, see
Shopping Guide.
h, my God, she’s so nice,”
whispered exactly 11 people on the
set of Elizabeth Olsen’s first Allure
cover shoot, photographed by Tom
Craig. The actress discussed
the shoot concept with the crew
and pored over racks of ’70s-inspired gowns.
As Olsen settled into the makeup chair for a sheet
mask and a manicure, the prop stylist constructed
a retro living room in the middle of the New York City
studio, nailing together wood-paneled walls and
arranging peach and turquoise love seats.
During breaks, the actress—who balanced on
six-inch platform heels throughout the shoot—
stretched against a chair and showed off the bruises
that she got from mastering the crow pose in yoga.
Once the final photo was taken, Olsen
stepped out of a red Emilio Pucci evening gown
and into her own black turtleneck and skinny jeans.
A few good-bye hugs later, she and her publicist
disappeared down a stairway while the Monkees’
“I’m a Believer” played in the background.
—CHLOE METZGER
CHRISTOPHER DINERMAN (4); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (BLUSH)
Olsen stars in Captain
America: Civil War,
in theaters now.
COVER LOOK
Dress by Edun.
Bracelet by
Jennifer Meyer.
Details, see
Shopping Guide.
BEAUTY
LESSON
Hair
To give Olsen’s waves defined,
face-framing bends, hairstylist Serge
Normant blow-dried her hair with a
round brush and then wrapped only
the midlengths around a one-inch
curling iron. “Keeping the ends more
or less untouched gives a natural
effect,” he said.
Olsen’s look can
be re-created
with the following:
Artist Shadow
in S-234, Aqua XL
Eye Pencil in I-24,
HD Blush in 320,
and Rouge Artist
Natural lipstick in
N18 (also at top
right) by Make Up
For Ever.
22 Allure • June 2016
CHRISTOPHER DINERMAN (OLSEN); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)
Makeup
“This look was really meant to
be a statement,” said makeup
artist Hung Vanngo, who chose a
palette of turquoise and blue on
Olsen’s eyes to play up the shoot’s
’70s theme. He rimmed her eyes
with teal eyeliner, smudged them
with a brush and matching teal
eye shadow, and blended a lightturquoise shadow over her lid
and crease for a soft, elongated
shape. Vanngo then swirled
champagne highlighter and pinkishpeach blush on Olsen’s cheeks
and topped her nude-lined lips
with sheer nude lipstick.
Sunny-Side Up
Friends and acquaintances kindly offered to loan me
emergency items. But I decided it would be more fun
to see how far I could get on my own. I walked to the
local supermarket, Publix, and picked up some skin-care
and makeup essentials: Neutrogena Fresh Foaming
Cleanser, Olay Complete moisturizer, bobby pins, and
Maybelline New York Big Eyes mascara among them.
A $10 pair of black leggings to sleep in? Check. Next,
I went to a nearby mall to unearth some inexpensive
but presentable outfits. Jumpsuit ($37), white tee ($5),
and floral skirt ($27). Check, check, and check plus.
The grand total for all of my discoveries: $108.
With my flatiron MIA, I kept my hair under control
with four gold bobby pins lined up like stripes on one
side and MacGyvered some Aussie Men’s pomade into
much-needed brow gel. I knew I’d done a bang-up job
of making style lemonade out of lemons when someone
asked if my $27 skirt was Gucci (score!).
Don’t get me wrong: I was beyond thrilled to be
reunited with my Valentino dress and Marni shoes when
my suitcase finally resurfaced several days later. But my
under-$150 challenge was an eye-opening experience
not only in terms of frugality but even more so in terms
of positivity. I’d managed to quash my initial feelings—
nearly paralyzing jet-lagged anger and frustration—with
something far more productive: resourcefulness. Which
is something I will never lose in transit.
Michelle Lee, Editor in Chief
@heymichellelee
24 Allure • June 2016
COURTESY OF MICHELLE LEE (4)
You know what’s not so fun after a long trip? Staring
at an empty, churning baggage carousel. Granted,
baggage claim isn’t anyone’s happy place to begin
with, but an empty carousel can mean only one
thing: You won’t be sleeping in your favorite T-shirt
that night.
That was me recently at JFK airport. I had left Milan
fashion week a few days early to fly to Florida for a
conference. Before my connecting flight, I waited at
the baggage carousel. And waited. And waited. “Make
a claim when you land in Palm Beach,” an airport
worker told me, urging me to catch my next flight. So
I found myself plopped in Palm Beach with only my
handbag and the clothes on my back.
After many frustrating phone calls long into the
night, I discovered that my suitcase was in...Milan.
And no one could tell me when it would be able to join
me. The next day, I would be in a speed-dating-like
marathon of meetings with beauty-industry executives,
and my travel outfit—a white tank top, black jeans, and
black boots—was not going to cut it.
The airline told me it would reimburse me $150 for
anything I had to buy as a result of the inconvenience.
So instead of using the situation as an excuse to go
on a shopping spree, I turned it into a challenge: I
would spend only that amount to buy beauty supplies
plus any clothes I’d wear during my trip.
THE MAKEUP PRO
My Muses
By Jillian Dempsey
Most people remember story lines and soundtracks.
Filed in my brain is an extensive collection of makeup
looks from some of my favorite movies. My inspirations
are constantly changing, but these women—and the
looks they immortalized onscreen—are often a starting point.
BRONZE SKIN
Brooke Shields in
The Blue Lagoon.
Since a real
tan is out of the
question, buff on a
foundation that’s
two shades darker
than your skin
tone. Then dust on
a matte bronzer,
add a touch of
highlighter, and
layer on a warm
cream blush.
WILD EYES
Natalie Portman
in Black Swan.
A modified version
would be very chic—
and easy. Just don’t
draw it out as far. I
love the crayonesque
Laura Mercier Kajal
d’Orient Eye Liner.
THICK BROWS
Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina.
I mean, does it get any more
beautiful? She’s an endless
source of inspiration. I’d use a
brow liner to fill in spots with
hairlike strokes and thicken
with powder. Keep the tail thin.
SOFT SMOKY EYES
Freida Pinto in Slumdog Millionaire.
This look isn’t just about Freida’s amazing
bone structure. This is a very smoldering
look on anyone. You only need one
truly awesome palette. My favorite is Tom
Ford Eye Color Quad in Cocoa Mirage.
DARK-RED LIPS
Uma Thurman
in Pulp Fiction.
For every red-carpet
look I do, there’s
a conversation about
whether or not to
do red lips. There’s
no more iconic look
than that. I like
the deep-brick matte
version that Uma
made so famous—
it’s a little more
subversive, and that’s
always sexier.
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
CLEAN AND SIMPLE
Alicia Vikander in Ex Machina. Alicia is the
quintessential natural beauty—even when
she’s a robot. This look is a reminder to go easy
on the makeup: a light wash of foundation,
translucent shadow, curled lashes, maybe a
swipe of brown mascara, and that’s it.
BEAUT Y BY NUMBERS
BIKINIS
It might be the most loved and loathed item
of clothing. For such a tiny garment, the bikini
has a big place in history. —MADDIE ABERMAN
Left: Missoni bikini,
$565, at Missoni,
N.Y.C. (212-517-9339).
Below: Eres bikini top,
$230, and bottom,
$190 (net-a-porter.com).
67
PERCENTAGE OF
Sports Illustrated
swimsuit editions
that have featured
a bikini on the cover.
SQUARE INCHES OF FABRIC
that were used to make the
first bikini in 1946. It was
advertised as “smaller
than the smallest swimsuit.”
305
0,000
FAN LETTERS MICHELINE BERNARDINI,
a 19-year-old French showgirl, received
after modeling that first bikini in Paris.
YEAR A 22-YEAR-OLD
woman was arrested in
Myrtle Beach, South
Carolina, for indecent
exposure after refusing to
cover up her thong bikini.
47
63
HELEN MIRREN’S AGE WHEN
she caused a stir by looking
amazing in a bikini on an
Italian beach vacation; the
pictures quickly went viral.
30 Allure • June 2016
LIAM GOODMAN
AGE AT WHICH PEOPLE
should stop wearing bikinis,
according to women polled
in a British survey.
H A I R I N S P I R AT I O N
A Muse
Karlie Kloss’s
double Dutch
braids in London
THE
BRAIDS
Braids
to Waves
Next-day hair is usually just a tousled
retread of what you went to bed with. But
these cool Dutch braids unravel into a
whole new look. Depending on your natural
texture, you’ll wake up with either smoother
curls or newfound waves. By Chloe Metzger
1
DAY
2
Rake a palmful of mousse (like Pantene
Pro-V Volume Body Boosting Mousse)
through your hair when it’s 80 percent
dry, then part it down the middle. Starting
at the hairline, make a three-strand
braid on each side, crossing the hair
under rather than over. Calm flyaways
with hair spray (try Big Sexy Hair Get
Layered Flash Dry Thickening Hairspray).
Revel in compliments all day, and
leave the braids in when you go to sleep.
Undo each braid, shake out your hair,
and—if your hair is naturally straight—
mist it with a wave spray (like L’Oréal Paris
Txt It Tousle Wave Spray). Scrunch gently
to perk up limp pieces, and lift your
roots with a texturizing spray (try Garnier
Fructis De-Constructed Texture Tease).
If you have curls, smooth them with a dab
of oil or serum (we love Dove Quench
Absolute Supreme Crème Serum).
THE
WAVES
Hair: Jennifer Yepez. Makeup: Morgane Martini.
Manicure: Holly Falcone. Model: Caroline Kelley.
Fashion stylist: Marion B. Kelly II.
PHOTOGRAPHED BY JASON KIM
32 Allure • June 2016
MEARA KALLISTA MORSE (KLOSS)
DAY
GETTING THE
PERFECT NUDE
NUDE
LIPSTICK
Peachy pinks and warm caramels
that deliver full, sexpot lips.
1
Pick a nude that’s sheer
and two shades darker
than your own lip color to
avoid mannequin mouth.
2
Avoid shimmer, which can
look frosty, and high shine.
Creamy and demimatte
finishes are sophisticated.
3
Don’t swipe straight from
the tube. Press the
color on with your fingers
for a poutier effect.
From left: Try Tom Ford Lip Color in Vanilla Suede or Gucci Luxurious Lipstick in Carnation for
fair skin, Butter London Plush Rush in Free or Giorgio Armani Rouge d’Armani in 200 for olive
skin, or Bobbi Brown Lipstick in Suntan Pink, Rimmel London Lasting Finish by Kate Lipstick
in 48, or Maybelline New York ColorSensational lipstick in Chocoholic (out in July) for dark skin.
34 Allure • June 2016
Left, on Tassia Boatman:
Color Design Matte Lip Crayon
in Nothing to Wear by
Lancôme. Right, on Pamela
Ramos: Infallible Pro-Last Lip
Color in Neverending
Nutmeg by L’Oréal Paris.
PHOTOGRAPHED BY
ANDREW STINSON
JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE). MAKEUP: JUNKA KIOKA. HAIR: ZAIYA LATT. SITTINGS EDITOR: DIANNA LUNT.
BY ELIZABETH SIEGEL
Beauty School
T I P S , S H O R T C U T S , A N D S T E P - B Y- S T E P I N S T R U C T I O N S
BEAUT Y SCHOOL
The master of
sleek, structured
ponytails
THE
NEW
BROW
RULES
Full, boyish brows are
trendy, sure. They’re
also really flattering
when done right.
USE A SPOOLEY
Brushing your brows
up is the easiest way to
make them look fuller
but not prim and polished.
FILL IN THE ARCH
Turn your summer ponytail into
a cooler segmented one. Three
elastics and a little gel are
all that stand between you and
Rooney Mara–level chicness.
Abergel uses
Gorilla Snot
(actual brand!)
Hair Gel and
thin Scünci ties
to get this look.
36 Allure • June 2016
1
2
3
“A reflective finish gives this
look strength,” says hairstylist
Adir Abergel, who works with
Mara. To get “great shine,” run oil
through dry hair, break out the
flatiron, and don’t unplug it until
“your roots lie very, very flat.”
Lightly coat your fingertips with
pomade or hair gel (it’ll make your
hair supersleek), and then section
off the top of your hair as if you
were styling it half up. “Tie that in a
high, flat ponytail right below the
center of your crown,” says Abergel.
Go back for more gel, and tie the
rest of your hair into a ponytail
that’s the same height as the top of
your ears. With a third elastic, tie
the two ponytails together so they
lie flat against your head. Smooth it
all down with a little more gel.
GET A POMADE
Brow mascaras and
pomade crayons bulk up
individual hairs better than
pencils or powders. Try
Maybelline New York Brow
Drama Pomade Crayon,
Rimmel London Brow This
Way, or Glossier Boy Brow.
CLEAN UP
Tweeze the outer ends
to a clean, tapered point
so brows this full don’t
overwhelm your eyes.
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
THE 1-2-3:
ELEVATED
PONYTAIL
Straight-across brows
have an androgynous cool.
Let the hairs under your
arches grow in. Once you
have a few strays under
your arches, start filling in
the area.
BEAUT Y SCHOOL
GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR
CONCEALER
Your eyes will look brighter,
bigger, and younger.
DARK CIRCLES
REDNESS AND SHADOWS
PUFFINESS
Creamy solid concealers cover
pigmentation better than liquid
ones. Keep yours from creasing
by dabbing it on with a damp
makeup sponge and stopping just
short of the lower lash line (where
even 14-year-olds have wrinkles).
Most of us have redness or dark
shadows around the inner corners
of our eyes, so tap concealer
there, too. Blend it down the sides
of your nose so it’s not obvious.
Don’t put concealer right on puffy
under-eyes, since “anytime
you brighten skin, it appears more
prominent,” says makeup artist
Pati Dubroff. Draw liquid concealer
in the crease below the bag
instead and “the area will look
more uniform,” she says.
3 EASY BEAUTY HACKS
WHAT
YOU’LL
GET
A CRISP DIY
MANICURE
THE SPEEDIEST
BLOWOUT
EASIER MAKEUP
REMOVAL
Elmer’s Glue
Paper towels
Scotch tape
Squeeze the glue
around your cuticles. When
it’s dry, paint your nails,
then peel off the glue along
with polish smudges.
Blot your hair with paper
towels to soak up enough
water that your hair can
be blow-dried (or air-dried)
at least ten minutes faster.
After shoots, makeup artists
use Scotch tape to remove
fun and trendy—but
also very stubborn—glitter
eye shadows.
WHAT
YOU’LL
NEED
THE HACK
38 Allure • June 2016
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
What you call household staples, the pros (with perfect manicures
and smooth blowouts) call beauty essentials.
Flashing a
contagious
smile for a
Vogue shoot
Topshop Unique
Spring 2016
A vivid berry lipstick,
like Shiseido Veiled Rouge
in Carnevale (shown),
makes Montero’s skin look
even more radiant.
LO O K W E LOV E
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’
CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
Lineisy Montero
hen Montero first stepped onto a mintgreen runway in a yellow Prada trench
coat, she was an anonymous model—
but it took about half a second for that
to change. The 20-year-old walked in
59 fall shows and has utterly charmed
us with her sense of style and her humor (off the runway,
she can pull off a jacket full of pins or a panda backpack like
no other). “Lineisy is so natural and relaxed,” says Johan
Cewers, the New York City agent who discovered her in the
Dominican Republic. “And her diamond-shaped face and
bright smile always stand out.” —KRISTIN PERROTTA
W
Beauty Reporter
T H E B E AU T Y N E W S YO U N E E D T O K N O W N O W
BE AUT Y REPORTER
Jillian Dempsey Lid Tint in Lilac,
Peach, and Plum. The mirror is
superfluous. These organic cream
shadows are as flattering as they
are un-mess-up-able. $28 each.
Giorgio Armani
Lip Maestro
lip color in 511
and 512. No
risk of cracking
or fading—or
going unnoticed.
$38 each.
EDITORS’
FAVORITES
ALL THE NEW STUFF WE’RE TOTALLY
GROOVING ON THIS MONTH.
Maybelline New York Face
Studio Master Strobing Stick. The
glitz of a powder highlighter in
a targeted, creamy stick. $11.99.
Kate Somerville
Goat Milk De-Puffing
Eye Balm. The blend
of peptides and
goat’s milk minimizes
puffiness and circles
faster than you
can say “bleat.” $38.
44 Allure • June 2016
Caudalie Vinosource
Moisturizing Mattifying Fluid.
Grape water soothes, tea extract
mattifies, and your makeup
goes on like a dream. $39.
JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
Bottega Veneta
Parco Palladiano
IV. This is how
summer smells to
chic Italian ladies:
azalea flowers and
chestnuts. $295
for 3.4 ounces.
BE AUT Y REPORTER
From left: Givenchy
Healthy Glow
Powder in Douce
Saison, Extreme
Saison, and
Moonlight Saison.
O U R H A P PY P L AC E
Twinkle,
TWINKLE
Givenchy Noir
Couture Mascara
in Black Satin
(below) and Almay
Powder Blush in
Pink (right)
Ground control to Major Tom:
The latest runways were a starry
glam-rock dream. Dresses sparkled
like the night sky at Alexander
McQueen, manicures earned gold
stars at Jenny Packham, and eyes
were encircled by constellations at
Maison Margiela. Even summer
fragrances and makeup are getting
the “Space Oddity” treatment:
On Mugler Angel Muse, a mascara
and bronzers from Givenchy, and
Almay blushes, the stars look very
different today. —KRISTIN PERROTTA
Freehand nail stars (in
Essie Good as Gold) at
Jenny Packham
P RO D U CT R E V I E W
Kérastase L’Incroyable Blowdry
What it is: A lightweight blow-dry cream infused with flexible, heat-activated waxes
What it does: The waxes heat up, then reset as they cool for a style that’s lasting and malleable.
How it looks/feels/smells: The thin, slippery cream has a lingering (and strong) floral scent.
Why we like it: On day one, it helped our fine-haired tester’s curling-ironed waves stay intact
for a solid ten hours—without any additional products. On day two, she could refresh those
bends with a few twirls of the iron and not a single spritz of hair spray. —STEPHANIE SALTZMAN
46 Allure • June 2016
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
Alexander McQueen
fall 2016 (above)
and Mugler Angel
Muse (left)
BE AUT Y REPORTER
D I R ECTO RY
SALON
RUGGERI
New York City
hen hairstylist Gregorio Ruggeri and interior designer
Craig Longhurst brought their salon from Australia to
Manhattan, they decided to sell more than just blowouts
and blonde highlights. “People would always ask us,
‘Where did you get this or that?’ and we started thinking,
What if you could actually buy everything—the artwork,
the couch?” says Ruggeri, who now sells vintage
jewelry and pricey housewares almost as often as haircuts and balayage.
On a recent visit, I waited for my appointment on a Louis XIV painted
fauteuil ($1,800) that sat under a black-and-white print of Anna Nicole Smith
by photographer Daniela Federici ($2,500). But if you visit the art-galleryesque space (and you should—my blowout was shiny and full, and every
blonde in the place was buttery perfection), don’t expect it to look the
same twice. The Technicolor floral Missoni rug I was eyeing is already
gone, and there’s a Kandinsky-inspired Nourison in its place. —LEXI NOVAK
254 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. (ruggerinyc.com).
COLOR OF THE MOMENT
PALE LILAC
At first it seems like a bad
idea: violet lip gloss?
But then you swipe a sheer
pinkish purple, like Dior
Addict Milky Tint in Milky
Plum, over a darker lipstick,
and it adds light and
moisture. Or you wear it by
itself for just a hint of
glossy pastel. And then you
think again: violet lip gloss?
Hells yeah. —JUDITH NEWMAN
Gel Oh
Cancel your next manicure:
Essie’s new gel polish, Gel Couture,
goes on clean and glossy.
The formula: There are two steps
(color and topcoat) to this gel manicure,
which cures in natural light and lasts for up to
two weeks. (Ours started chipping a little on
day seven, but we’d really abused it.)
The brush: It’s curved at the bottom, and
its twisty stem deposits the perfect amount of
polish. Even Allure’s least-skilled manicurist—
ahem, me—couldn’t mess things up.
The colors: You won’t find Ballet
Slippers—all 42 shades are new. The
shimmering lavender Labels Only
and opaque peach Sew Me are
our new summer staples.
—ELIZABETH SIEGEL
48 Allure • June 2016
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: COURTESY OF SALON RUGGERI (2); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (2); LIAM GOODMAN
W
BE AUT Y REPORTER
Heat
Wave
ou may not be able to spend the entire
summer on the Riviera, but your makeup bag
can. Greek artist Konstantin Kakanias, who
has frescoed a Spanish church and designed
Yves Saint Laurent fabric patterns, adorned
Nars’s summer makeup collection with
cheery illustrations of the south of France. The colors
inside—including a tawny lip gloss (Overheated) and
a shimmering blush (Liberation)—are just as beachy and
sultry. When we’re going heavy on the sexy, we reach
for the crimson lip color (Members Only, right) or the rich
turquoise shadow (Deep End, above)—smudged along
the lash line, it glitters artfully in the sun. —ELIZABETH SIEGEL
New Flames
Do the palm fronds and blue waters above have you refreshing Expedia? We
have six more ways to escape. Any of these new candles will transport you—if only for a few hours—to vacationland. —E. S.
For a trip to...
MARRAKECH
NICE
MEXICO CITY
BALI
POSITANO
STOCKHOLM
CIRE
TRUDON
CYRNOS
PADDYWAX
SALTED
GRAPEFRUIT
D.L. & CO.
JASMINE
SLATE
JONATHAN
ADLER MUSE
D’ARGENT
D.L. & CO.
HARVEST
MOON
Light up...
ARQUISTE
ART DECO
VELVET
50 Allure • June 2016
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF NARS; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)
Y
BE AUT Y REPORTER
Yves Saint Laurent Vinyl
Couture Mascara in (from
top) I’m the Fire (gold), I’m
the Madness, I’m the Clash,
I’m the Trouble, and I’m the
Excitement, $29 each.
C U LT O B J E C T
It’s that time of year: Fabrics are lighter, pedicures
are brighter—and lashes are getting a whole
lot more fun. Yves Saint Laurent Vinyl Couture
Mascaras leave ultrasaturated color behind. These
are no wishy-washy tints. Velvety forest green,
crisp raspberry, glittery gold, cobalt as playful
as finger paint—all nine shades are perfect
(for lovers, for dreamers...). —AURA DAVIES
52 Allure • June 2016
LIAM GOODMAN
The Rainbow
Collection
The spring runways twinkled with
sequined numbers, like this bold Altuzarra
top. Keep shiny disks from going too
disco by adding texture (say, a crocheted
skirt) or casual elements (like flat sandals).
Fashion Notes
Gleam
Catchers
Top, skirt, and earrings by Altuzarra.
Sandals by Jason Wu. Makeup
colors: Eye Shadow in Amber
Lights, Powder Blush in Melba, and
Lipstick in Pink Plaid by M.A.C. Hair:
Jennifer Yepez. Makeup: Morgane
Martini. Manicure: Holly Falcone.
Model: Carey Murphy. Fashion
editor: Rachael Wang. Details, see
Shopping Guide.
LIAM GOODMAN
PHOTOGRAPHED BY JASON KIM
Top left: Make Up For Ever Glitters
and Strass.
June 2016 • Allure 55
FA S H I O N E X T R A S
Round
Trips
The lenses may be a nod to
John Lennon, but the architectural
frames and unexpected details
(suede?) are pure 2016.
PRADA
sunglasses, $300
(sunglasshut.com).
FENDI
sunglasses, $535,
at Solstice
Sunglasses stores.
WESTWARD LEANING
sunglasses, $295
(westwardleaning.com).
MYKITA
sunglasses, $449,
at Mykita, N.Y.C.
(212-343-9100).
56 Allure • June 2016
LIAM GOODMAN
MIU MIU
sunglasses, $390
(sunglasshut.com).
FA S H I O N E X T R A S
2
1
4
3
7
5
6
Ring Tones
1. Cartier lapis-and-chrysoprase ring, $38,100, at Cartier
stores. 2. Dior Fine Jewelry chrysoprase ring, $18,000,
at select Dior stores. 3. Irene Neuwirth opal ring, $20,820,
at Irene Neuwirth, West Hollywood, California (323285-2000). 4. Bulgari topaz ring, $4,750, at Bulgari stores.
5. Chanel Fine Jewelry aquamarine ring, $79,200, at Chanel
stores. 6. Jane Taylor tourmaline ring, $5,810 (janetaylor
.com). 7. David Yurman tourmaline ring, price available
upon request, at David Yurman, N.Y.C. (212-752-4255).
Nail polishes, clockwise from top left: Jinsoon Muse,
Tenoverten Jane, Butter London Teddy Girl, Formula X
Dollface, and Marc Jacobs Beauty Resurrection.
58 Allure • June 2016
LIAM GOODMAN
For every sea-colored gemstone,
every diamond-encrusted
setting, every golden...frog, there
is a nail polish sweet and
subtle enough to show it off.
FA S H I O N S E N S E
Neoprene pants
by Joseph. Canvas
shoes by Vans.
Makeup colors:
Afterglow Blush in
Indecent and
Revolution Lipgloss
in Kinky by Urban
Decay. These pages:
Hair, Sylvia Wheeler;
makeup, Mia Yang.
Fashion stylist: Gena
Tuso. Details, see
Shopping Guide.
PHOTOGRAPHED BY
BRIGITTE SIRE
“For me, it all comes down
to comfort,” says Jayne
Min, lounging on her bed.
“Everything I own you could
fall asleep in.” Which makes
the billowy Ellery blouse
on these pages a natural fit
for the stylist and founder
of the website Stop It Right
Now. Min found a few easy
ways to mix it up. Silk
top, $1,190 (elleryland.com).
By Chloe Metzger
USER’S
GUIDE TO
Style
“I like pairing opposites, like track pants with a
dressier blouse. The outfit has a Nascar vibe.”
60 Allure • June 2016
FA S H I O N S E N S E
“Any variation of a white blouse
with blue jeans looks good—these
are actually men’s Levi’s 606.”
“ The little sliver of skin from
this Acne skirt balances the fact
that I’m so covered on top.”
“If a color or pattern is bizarre
enough, I’m drawn to it.”
FAVORITE THINGS
“Vans for every day, Céline and Margiela when
I’m not lazy.” JEWELRY: “My gold chains and signet rings
from Los Angeles designers Grace Lee and Jess Hannah.”
BAGS: “Mansur Gavriel, Céline, and Acne.” JEANS: “Levi’s
and J Brand.” LINGERIE: “Calvin Klein and American Apparel.”
HAIRSTYLIST: “Claire at Kim Sun Young in Los Angeles.”
LIP PRODUCT: “Vaseline forever!” FRAGRANCE: “Byredo Mojave
Ghost.” MASCARA: “Shiseido Full Lash Volume Mascara.”
SKIN CARE: “Aesop, Tatcha, and Shiseido.” VACATION SPOT:
“Sydney. It’s the perfect mix of beach and city.”
SHOES:
Clockwise from top left: Denim jacket by Levi’s and leather skirt
and shoes by Acne Studios. Jeans by Levi’s and leather boots by Louis
Vuitton (both Min’s own). Silk elastane pants by Acne Studios and
suede boots by Emporio Armani. Details, see Shopping Guide.
62 Allure • June 2016
F A S H I O N C U LT O B J E C T
One
Love
The gold hardware and signature
studs give a little edge to a classic
Valentino bag, but it’s the
Rastafarian-colored tie-dye
that truly makes it sing.
Valentino Garavani leather bag,
$5,245 for similar styles, at
Valentino, N.Y.C. (212-355-5811).
64 Allure • June 2016
LIAM GOODMAN
—AMBER ANGELLE
PATRICK DEMARCHELIER
THE LAZY
GIRL’S GUIDE TO
CURLS
It’s an irony we wholeheartedly embrace: Your curly-hair styling routine
is about to become more straightforward. By Lexi Novak
June 2016 • Allure 69
T H E L A Z Y G I R L’ S G U I D E
S
omewhere between the third round of
conditioner and the first 20 minutes under
a diffuser, your arms start to shake, your
brow starts to sweat, and the whole
operation seems very much not worth it.
You know what is worth it? Cutting out all the steps you
don’t need. Consider this the CliffsNotes to great hair.
WASHING
Lazyish: If you understand the time
suck of raking shampoo through
matted, snarled curls, try switching
the order of your shower lineup.
“Condition the hair from root to tip and
let it sit for five minutes before you
shampoo,” says hairstylist Kim Kimble.
“It makes things easier.” Run a leave-in
through your curls after showering if
they tend to be dry or frizzy.
Lazier: As with brunch and sexercise,
sometimes it’s more efficient to
combine activities. Co-washing means
folding shampoo and conditioner into
just one lather and rinse. Take your
co-wash (cleansing cream works, too),
smooth about eight pumps’ worth
over soaked hair, and rinse after five
minutes. You should skip actual
shampoo for only a few days, though.
Once or twice a week, your scalp and
hair need a sulfate-free shampoo to
remove dirt and buildup, says Kimble.
obvious choice here, but it’s not
going to do anything for your curls,
which may need some reshaping
during the week. Mist them with a
curl-refreshing spray, and scrunch it
in. Or DIY your own by mixing four
parts water with one part conditioner.
For loose, wavy curls, braid your
hair into two to four sections before
dampening, says hairstylist Mara
Roszak. By the time you get to work
and take them out, you’ll have a
refreshed wave pattern.
70 Allure • June 2016
PATRICK DEMARCHELIER
Laziest: Dry shampoo is the
T H E L A Z Y G I R L’ S G U I D E
1
DRYING
Lazyish: It can take a long time
to blow-dry curls with a diffuser,
so speed things up. After applying
styling cream or gel to wet hair,
squeeze out as much moisture as
you can with a microfiber towel, then
blow-dry with a diffuser using
medium heat and airflow. (Don’t crank
up the settings to save time; that’ll
make curls frizz or lose their shape.)
2
Lazier: “Spend three to five minutes
with the diffuser to get your hair
halfway dry, and then let the rest
air-dry,” says hairstylist Jen Atkin. You
just want to set the initial curl pattern
with heat for definition. Focus on
the roots if you have kinky curls and
on the ends for looser spirals.
3
Laziest: You guessed it—air-dry.
Scrunch waves and ringlets
periodically to encourage fullness
and shape. And section tight
curls that are still damp into Bantu
knots (small twisted buns) before
bed. “The roots will dry really well
overnight, and the rest will dry much
faster in the morning,” says Kimble.
STYLING
4
If you have loose waves: Define
If you have ringlets: Shape
them while you sleep. Pin spirals
up on top of your head at night,
and they’ll look defined the
next day. If any pieces need
extra help, twirl them around a
curling rod that’s about the same
diameter as your natural curl.
If you have coarse, tight curls:
Twirl damp hair into small two-strand
twists (you should have about 16
to 20 twists total). “It’s a cool, classic
dreadlock look that you can leave
in as long as you like,” says hairstylist
Chuck Amos. When you take it out,
you’ve got defined curls.
THE BEST
MULTITASKERS
If you’re tired of your seven-product styling routine, scale it
back (way back) to one—or maybe two.
1
2
3
4
Living Proof No Frizz Nourishing Oil. Most oils temporarily
control fuzziness by coating hair. This is a blend of oils
that mimics the natural fatty-acid makeup of your scalp’s own
sebum, so it tames frizz and conditions.
Bumble and Bumble Curl Custom Conditioner. This triple
threat is a conditioner, co-wash, and leave-in that fully delivers
on all three counts—it’s up to you to choose how to use it.
Kinky-Curly Gloss Pomade. This small tin contains a mix of
oils that seals split ends, shapes curls, adds shine, and
even works for edge control (smoothing frizz along the hairline).
Garnier Fructis Curl Stretch Loosening Pudding. Despite
being surprisingly lightweight for a hair pudding, the cream
moisturizes and defines thick, tight curls. It contains an ingredient
called ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, which is similar to a UV filter
in sunscreen and protects hair from the drying effects of the sun.
LIAM GOODMAN
your bends with a flatiron. Hold it near
the roots of a small section, and as
you glide it down, rotate the flatiron
out and away from your head, says
Roszak. An inch or so farther down,
twist it in the opposite direction,
and repeat until you reach the ends.
E
AW
A
R
RE
E
IC
A
RS’ CH
O
DE
RD
WIN
2016
N
READERS’
CHOICE
TXEMA YESTE/TRUNK ARCHIVE (2); JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFES)
AWARDS
You know that friend
who has volume
but no frizz and always
pulls an amazing
lipstick out of her bag?
Multiply her by a few
thousand and that’s the
magnitude of the
beauty savvy you’re
about to tap into.
These are the 81 hair,
makeup, and skincare products that
Allure readers swear by.
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R E A D E R S ’ C H O I C E AWA R D S
When lines, roughness,
or dark spots emerge, these
are the serums and creams
that send them packing.
1
Facial Cleanser
Drugstores, Discount Stores*:
Neutrogena Fresh Foaming Cleanser
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons**: Philosophy
Purity Made Simple One-Step
Facial Cleanser (4)
3
Facial Scrub
Drugstores, Discount Stores: St.
Ives Fresh Skin Apricot Scrub (3)
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Clinique 7 Day
Scrub Cream Rinse-Off Formula
2
Facial Moisturizer
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Olay Complete All Day Moisturizer
Sensitive Broad Spectrum SPF 30
Anti-Aging Product
Facial Sunscreen
Drugstores, Discount Stores: Olay
Regenerist Micro-Sculpting Cream
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry-Touch
Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 45
4
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Coola Mineral
Sunscreen Cucumber Matte
Finish Broad Spectrum SPF 30
9
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Estée Lauder
Advanced Night Repair Synchronized
Recovery Complex II (5)
bottles of
Estée Lauder
Advanced
Night Repair
are sold
every minute.
Face Mask
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Freeman Feeling Beautiful Charcoal
& Black Sugar Polishing Mask (1)
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: GlamGlow
SuperMud Clearing Treatment (2)
Eye Cream
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Olay Regenerist Regenerating Eye
Lifting Serum
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Clinique All
About Eyes (6)
5
6
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JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons:
Clinique Dramatically Different
Moisturizing Lotion +
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Drugstores, Discount Stores:
L’Oréal Paris Infallible
Matte-Mattic Eyeliner in Ultra Black
The glosses, shadows,
and BBs that make
every feature shine (and
every flaw vanish).
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Urban Decay
24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencil in Zero
8
Lipstick
Mascara
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Revlon Super Lustrous
Lipstick in Black Cherry
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Maybelline New York Great
Lash Mascara in Very Black
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: M.A.C.
Lipstick in Ruby Woo (7)
9
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Benefit
They’re Real Mascara (12)
Lip Gloss
Concealer
Drugstores, Discount
Stores: NYX
Cosmetics Butter
Gloss in Crème
Brulee
Department
Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons:
M.A.C. Lipglass Clear
Drugstores, Discount
Stores: Maybelline New
York Instant Age
Rewind Eraser Dark Circles
Treatment Concealer
Department Stores,
Specialty Stores, Spas,
Salons: Nars Radiant
Creamy Concealer
10
Lip Crayon
BB/CC Cream
Drugstores, Discount
Stores: Revlon ColorBurst
Matte Balm in Sultry
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Maybelline New York Dream
Fresh BB Balm
Department Stores,
Specialty Stores, Spas,
Salons (Tie):
Clinique Chubby Stick
Moisturizing Lip Colour
Balm in Super Strawberry
and Nars Velvet Matte
Lip Pencil in Cruella
Department Stores,
Specialty Stores, Spas,
Salons: It Cosmetics
Your Skin But
Better CC+ Cream
11
Blush
Foundation
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
L’Oréal Paris Infallible Pro-Matte
Foundation (10)
Drugstores, Discount
Stores: CoverGirl
Cheekers Blush
in Natural Twinkle
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: BareMinerals
Original Foundation
Department Stores,
Specialty Stores, Spas,
Salons: Nars Blush in
Orgasm (9)
Pale Nail Polish
Drugstores, Discount Stores: Essie
nail polish in Ballet Slippers
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: OPI
Nail Lacquer in Bubble Bath
Eye Shadow
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Maybelline New York Eye Studio
Color Tattoo Eyeshadow in
Bad to the Bronze (11)
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Urban Decay
Naked palette (8)
82 Allure • June 2016
Bold Nail Polish
12
Drugstores, Discount
Stores: Essie nail polish
in Wicked
Department Stores,
Specialty Stores,
Spas, Salons: OPI Nail Lacquer
in Big Apple Red
JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
MAKEUP
Eyeliner
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BODY
13
Your desire for perfect skin doesn’t end at your collarbones.
These scrubs and lotions make every inch bare-able.
14
Body Scrub
Drugstores, Discount Stores
(Tie): Tree Hut Coconut Lime
Shea Sugar Scrub (16) and
St. Ives Fresh Skin Apricot Body
Scrub (15)
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Bath & Body
Works Japanese Cherry Blossom
Foaming Sugar Scrub
Body Lotion
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Aveeno Daily Moisturizing Lotion
15
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Bath &
Body Works A Thousand Wishes
Body Lotion (13)
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Neutrogena Beach Defense Water +
Sun Protection Sunscreen
Spray Broad Spectrum SPF 70
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Coola Piña
Colada Sunscreen Spray Broad
Spectrum SPF 30
Self-Tanner
Drugstores, Discount
Stores: Jergens Natural Glow
Firming Daily Moisturizer (14)
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: St. Tropez
Self-Tan Bronzing Mousse
Deodorant
Secret Clinical Strength Invisible
Solid in Completely Clean
Tooth Whitener
Crest 3D White Glamorous
White Whitestrips
Women’s Fragrance
Chanel Coco Mademoiselle
Men’s Fragrance
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Giorgio Armani Acqua di Giò
1
There is cup
of sugar in every
jar of Tree
Hut Coconut
Lime Shea
Sugar Scrub.
JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
Body Sunscreen
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R E A D E R S ’ C H O I C E AWA R D S
The frizz-fighting,
volume-boosting,
curl-defining
wonders you reach
for again and again.
17
Shampoo
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
Pantene Pro-V Daily Moisture
Renewal Hydrating Shampoo
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Redken Color
Extend Shampoo
Conditioner
Drugstores, Discount Stores (Tie):
L’Oréal Paris Advanced Haircare
Total Repair 5 Conditioner and
Pantene Pro-V Daily Moisture
Renewal Hydrating Conditioner
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Redken All
Soft Conditioner
Volumizer
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
John Frieda Luxurious Volume Root
Booster Blow Dry Lotion
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Bumble and
Bumble Thickening Hairspray
14
Number of years Allure readers
have voted John Frieda Frizz Ease
Original Serum best defrizzer.
Defrizzer
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
John Frieda Frizz Ease Original 6
Effects Serum
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: Living Proof
No Frizz Nourishing Styling Cream
Curl Definer
Drugstores, Discount Stores:
SheaMoisture Coconut & Hibiscus
Curl Enhancing Smoothie
Hot Tool
Ultra Chi Ceramic Flatiron (17)
Home Hair Color
L’Oréal Paris Féria
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JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
Department Stores, Specialty
Stores, Spas, Salons: DevaCurl
SuperCream Coconut Curl Styler
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Facial Cleanser
Josie Maran Argan Cleansing Oil
Facial Moisturizer
Josie Maran Argan Oil
Facial Sunscreen
Josie Maran Argan Daily Moisturizer
Natural Broad Spectrum SPF 47
MAKEUP
Lip Color
Burt’s Bees Tinted Lip Balm (21)
Blush
BareMinerals Ready Blush (23)
Eye Shadow
BareMinerals Ready
Eyeshadow 8.0 (22)
Mascara
Tarte Lights, Camera, Lashes
4-in-1 mascara
Concealer
BareMinerals Blemish Remedy
Concealer (20)
Foundation
BareMinerals BareSkin Pure
Brightening Serum Foundation
20
22
18
19
HAIR
Shampoo/Conditioner
Aveda Invati Exfoliating
Shampoo and Aveda Invati
Thickening Conditioner (19)
Styling Product
Aveda Pure Abundance Style-Prep (18)
BODY
Body Wash
Every product on this
page is free of
parabens, phthalates,
sodium lauryl sulfate,
triclosan, talc, mineral
oil, petrolatum,
formaldehyde,
toluene, and chemical
sunscreens.
Dr. Bronner’s Peppermint PureCastile Liquid Soap
Body Lotion
Josie Maran Whipped Argan Oil
Body Butter
21
Body Sunscreen
Alba Botanica Very Emollient
Mineral Sunscreen Fragrance Free
Broad Spectrum SPF 30
Deodorant
Lavanila Laboratories The Healthy
Deodorant
* Drugstores and/or discount stores: This includes national chains
such as Target, Walgreens, CVS/Pharmacy, and Walmart.
** Department stores, specialty stores, spas, and/or salons:
This includes Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s, Neiman
Marcus, Nordstrom, and the like, plus specialty beauty stores
such as Ulta Beauty and Sephora, direct-sales and online companies
such as beautybar.com, and spas and salons that sell products.
23
88 Allure • June 2016
GO TO ALLURE.COM FOR IN-DEPTH REVIEWS OF EVERY
WINNING PRODUCT ON THESE PAGES!
JOSEPHINE SCHIELE
These products give
maximum results with a
refreshingly minimalist
approach. (See right
for the ingredients they
don’t contain.)
NATURAL
R E A D E R S ’ C H O I C E AWA R D S
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Breakthroughs
When selecting
revolutionary
products, Allure
editors have one
huge advantage:
Allure readers.
We asked you to pick
the best beauty
innovations of the
year, and boy, did
you deliver. Here are
the five new products
that have truly
changed your lives
for the better.
And really, isn’t that
the point of every
beautiful friendship?
By Liana Schaffner
June 2016 • Allure 91
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HAIR
Living Proof Perfect Hair Day
Dry Shampoo
Someone finally realized that we want
dry shampoo to make our hair not
only look fresher but feel fresher, too.
That someone is a team of biotech
geniuses who worked for six years
perfecting this spray. “Regular dry
shampoos leave oil-soaked powder
at the roots,” says cosmetic chemist
Jim Hammer. “This is the most
innovative one I’ve seen because after
it soaks up the grease and sweat, it
lets you brush that stuff out—while a
few weightless ingredients remain
behind to smooth hair and eliminate
odor. It’s very cool chemistry.”
SKIN
Olay Regenerist Luminous
Overnight Mask
Can a mask be called a mask when
it goes on like a regular night cream
(no rinsing away, no layer to peel
off)? Totally. “Technically, a mask is a
product that delivers skin benefits
for the length of time that it’s on,”
says Hammer. “This one forms a thin,
invisible layer that provides high
levels of humectants while it’s in
place.” Meaning all night long. Rather
than just hanging out on the surface
of your skin for a few minutes,
this cushy gel absorbs on contact
and hunkers down, releasing a
steady flow of moisture while
you sleep. Come morning, you’ll
wake to dewy perfection.
NAILS
BODY
MAKEUP
Essie Gel Setter Top Coat
Aveeno Daily Moisturizing
Sheer Hydration Lotion
CoverGirl The SuperSizer
by LashBlast Mascara
This weightless, fragrance-free
moisturizer turns skin supple, not
slippery, thanks to the ingenious
addition of oat flour. The fine-milled
grain leaves behind a near-matte
finish that veils skin in softness,
quiets itchy patches, and prevents
water loss. Glycerin, proteins, and
antioxidants deliver enough moisture
to soothe even scaly knees. Another
advantage: The formula won’t go
slimy in the heat, no matter how
much you heap on. “The emollients
don’t feel greasy, spread quickly,
and absorb fully,” says Hammer.
It may have a supernarrow brush, but
this mascara won by a wide margin.
It’s easy to see why: “It comes into
contact with every lash,” says Hammer.
“Tiny bristles at the end of the brush
coat the base, while the ones up top
comb through the lengths.” So instead
of focusing volume just at the roots
(as most mascaras do), this one hugs
the tips of the lashes as well for the
longest, most uniform fan imaginable.
And because the formula contains
flexible polymers that take a couple of
minutes to dry, you have time to sculpt
and coat to your heart’s content.
We’ve seen at-home gel polishes
before. And yes, they’re awesome.
They provide the glassy finish and
durability of a salon treatment without
the UV light cure or harsh chemicals
needed for removal. But this clear
topcoat truly shines in terms of
versatility. “It can be used with any
regular polish to give it a deeper,
more gel-like appearance,” says
Hammer. “Other topcoats adhere to
only certain types of polishes.” A
single layer gives any color on your
shelf a plush, chip-resistant finish,
and the polish comes off just like any
non-gel formula. In a word: brilliant.
92 Allure • June 2016
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The Bright Side
Sun in your face and color on your lips can only mean one thing:
Summer is here. Get ready to shine.
95
96
Of course you recognize the last
name, but if you think you know
(the candid, funny, occasionally
foulmouthed) Elizabeth Olsen, you
have another thing coming.
By Elizabeth Siegel
Photographed by Tom Craig
Embroidered georgette dress by Emilio Pucci.
Makeup colors: Shimmering Cream Eye
Color in OR 313 and Veiled Rouge lipstick in BE
301 by Shiseido. Details, see Shopping Guide.
97
e’re at the wo
orst tab
ble in
n
Brooklyn—or att least, the worstt
table at a small Moroccan restau
urantt in
Williamsburg. A few feet ov
ver and
d we’’d be in
g the ic
ce by
y debatin
ng
the kitchen. We’re breaking
whether scotch has to acttually c ome
e fro
om
Scotland. And if my dinne
er date noticess our
ent lighting of the
e
proximity to the fluoresce
ng
prep stations (or if she carres), she’s not lettin
on. It’s my first indication that Elizabe
eth Olsen
is chill—or to use one of her favo
orite worrdss,
fucking chill. (More on tha
at in a minutte.)
o fame. The 27-yea
arOlsen isn’t exactly new to
old has starred in big-budg
get pro
oduction
ns, lik
ke
nd God
dzilla.. An
nd no
ow
Avengers: Age of Ultron an
she’s reprising her Avenge
ers role as the mind
dreading superhero Scarlett Witch in Capttain
n
America: Civil War. But for the mo
oment, Olssen
has managed to hold on to
o an im
mpresssiv
ve
ative an
nony
ymitty.
amount of privacy and rela
98
Silk blouse by
Red Valentino.
Denim jeans by
Gap. Diamond-andgold necklace by
Jennifer Fisher.
Rouge Allure Intense
Longwear Lip Colour
in Foudroyante by
Chanel. Details, see
Shopping Guide.
99
Tulle dress by MSGM.
Makeup colors:
TruNaked eye-shadow
palette in Nudes and
Oh Sugar tinted lip
balm in Caramel by
CoverGirl. These pages:
Hair, Serge Normant of
Serge Normant Salon;
makeup, Hung Vanngo;
manicure, Sheril Bailey.
Prop stylist: Jill Nicholls.
Fashion editor: Rachael
Wang. Details, see
Shopping Guide.
100
When you think of Elizabeth Olsen,
you think...she’s got the best loose
waves in Hollywood? She was
awesome in Martha Marcy May
Marlene? She’s the Olsen who’s not a
twin? Don’t worry, she’s hardly
offended. “You know you’re going to
be compared [with them] for the rest
of your life,” she says. “You grow up
and get over it, and you love your
family regardless.”
Perhaps as a counterweight to all
the blockbusters, this spring Olsen
also starred in I Saw the Light, a
smaller film in which she plays the
wife of country-music star Hank
Williams (“It’s a fucked-up story—
she had a really shitty, difficult
experience with her husband,”
says Olsen).
n a balmy Thursday
night, either our fellow
restaurantgoers are playing it
supercool or Olsen has
successfully shrugged off her
celebrity for the evening. Sure,
her siblings may be famous
(OK, really famous) and rich (a
few more reallys), but Olsen is
not to the manner born. She
swears frequently and casually,
like the world’s cutest sailor,
lip-synchs to Blues Traveler
in the car, fiddles with the sleeves of
her sweater (a gray scoop neck
from The Row), and piles her hair on
top of her head “like a fucking shih
tzu.” And while our waitress regards
Olsen with more interest than she
does me, I can’t tell if she’s registering
her as a Hollywood player or just as a
really pretty woman.
The fact that Olsen is easy to look
at and hard to place makes her a
casting agent’s dream and
consistently lands her plum roles.
She’s currently filming Wind River, for
example, with one of her Captain
America: Civil War costars, Jeremy
Renner. “She’s constantly surprising
me,” says Renner. “[While filming,] we
have dinners and wine and good
chats. I’ve peeled a lot of layers of that
onion, and every layer is interesting.
She’s smart. She’s strong-willed. She
has an old soul.”
Yet it’s Olsen’s blank-slate quality
that makes her so appealing. She’s
pretty but not intimidating. Kind but
not boring. Intelligent but not a know-
it-all. Fame, to her, is something to
handle with respect. When she arrived
at the crossroads where celebrity
usually intersects with scandal, she
took the high road. And you’re not
going to see her on Snapchat anytime
soon. “Being a celebrity for not doing
anything, I don’t understand that,”
says Olsen over the din of glasses
clinking and hipsters chatting.
Watching her older sisters’ lives—
especially their personal lives—play
out in the tabloids has made Olsen
wary of public attention. “I won’t go
to certain restaurants because I don’t
want to be photographed,” she says.
And when paparazzi started camping
out at her farmers’ market in Los
Angeles, “I had to find a different kind
of sauerkraut.”
It’s not just that she’s not savvy
about Boomerang and doesn’t throw
out clever-isms on Twitter; it’s more
like her social-media skills are on par
with those of my 65-year-old dad.
Actually, his are better, because he
has an Instagram account and could
maybe manage a selfie. (Olsen
doesn’t and insists she couldn’t.) If
she were “spending five minutes
trying to look good in a picture [every
day], I’d be like, Who am I?” she says.
“I’m distracted by other stupid shit
[without thinking about Instagram].”
What exactly is that distracting
stupid shit? Industry cocktail parties,
for starters. “I’ll find a sofa in the
corner, and I park myself,” says the
woman who calls Hollywood “a weird
circus.” Plus, “I’m allergic to small
talk.” When she met Taylor Swift, for
example, Olsen tried being “cute
and funny” and then quickly blanked
on the name of a T-Swizzle song
mid-conversation. “It’s still horrifying
to me,” says Olsen, who recounted the
awkward exchange on The Late Late
Show With James Corden. “I didn’t
realize it would be the most talkedabout thing I’ve done in my entire life.”
Then there’s the issue of photo
shoots and all those red carpets. “The
clothes we’re expected to fit into
aren’t sizes; they’re samples. They’re
not made for chicks with boobs,
so I’m very self-conscious about
having them,” she says. “I have fun
choosing an outfit for my best
friend’s wedding, but not [something]
I’m going to be judged in.”
101
102
2005
2004
With her sisters, Ashley and Mary-Kate
Olsen, mother, and brother in Los Angeles
“That was a great day. I got to leave
school to watch them get their hands in
the Walk of Fame.”
At Campbell
Hall school
in North
Hollywood
“I’m really
proud of how
good I was
at volleyball.
I was this
14-year-old
girl winning
the court.”
2013
With Samuel
L. Jackson at
a screening
of Oldboy
in New York
City “I just
feel really
cool that
Sam Jackson
knows who
I am. I really
like that
man.”
2012
With Dakota Fanning filming Very Good
Girls in New York City “I had a lot of
fun shooting this movie. There were just
so many paparazzi in Brooklyn.”
2014
At Miu Miu’s fall 2014
show in Paris “Lupita
[Nyong’o had] just
won an Oscar, and she
was so composed. I was
saying the stupidest
shit, like ‘Tell me how
crazy you feel!’ ”
In Avengers: Age of Ultron “It was the first week of
filming, and [we were] shooting something at the
end of the movie. It’s weird because you haven’t
even developed the character yet. But I always felt
really alive and empowered at the end of the day—
I was doing physical shit, and it felt really good.”
2015
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
During fashion week in Los Angeles,
when Olsen forgot her parking pass
to Saint Laurent’s fashion show and was
turned away by security, she was
upset about one thing: Her friend Clay
Hawkins had done her hair and wouldn’t
get a shot of her for his portfolio. So she
did what any Hollywood actress would
do—OK, not really. There were no fits or
calls to agents. “We were like, OK, we
didn’t get in!” says Olsen. “We were
going to have sushi an hour from now,
but I guess we’ll have it now instead.”
So she drove to a restaurant in a mini
mall where “you don’t have to say hi to
people who make you uncomfortable.
[At the show,] Lady Gaga would
be somewhere nearby, and you’d be
like, Where am I?”
The conversation pivots to Olsen’s
experience growing up in southern
California. She looks down at the
recorder on the small wooden table
between us—and keeps going anyway.
“I’m thankful that I didn’t start working
until I got older,” says Olsen. “I was
confident enough to know who I was.”
And by “older,” Olsen means 21, the
age she was when she filmed her first
two movies. (That’s assuming you don’t
count her turn as “Girl in Car” in her
sisters’ 1994 TV movie, How the West
Was Fun.) Cameo aside, her early roles
required acting chops. Olsen starred
in the indie thriller Silent House and
the critically acclaimed drama Martha
Marcy May Marlene. She blew away
critics at Sundance with her portrayal
of a disturbed cult escapee in the
latter. “People kept saying, ‘Your life’s
gonna change,’ ” she says. “I wish I
took it a little more seriously because
I could have made smarter work
decisions after the fact. But the way
I’ve always functioned is that I
don’t listen to noise. It’s a defense
mechanism. Like, Yeah, this is all
fake. All of my friends’ families
[worked in Hollywood growing up],
and I didn’t want to give it weight.”
Our date is wrapping up. The
waitress clears what’s left of our spicy
carrots, baba ghanoush, romaine
salad, and tabbouleh (Olsen has the
appetite of a Middle Eastern rabbit).
We finish our drinks and walk out
into the cooling evening air. As we
approach the trendiest hotel in
Brooklyn, the Wythe, we see a line of
people waiting to get inside. “They
told me I’d need my room key to get
into the bar,” says Olsen, clearly
amused by the idea that grabbing a
drink could be such a scene. She gives
me a quick hug good-bye and slips into
the hotel lobby—just another young
woman disappearing into the crowd. ◆
2011
With sisters Ashley and Mary-Kate at The
Row’s launch party in New York City
“You forget that outfits get photographed!
I guess I wanted to make sure I was in
enough Elizabeth and James or The Row.”
You don’t want to play a game of What’s Your Favorite Salon with
Olsen. “Mark Townsend did my hair for my first high-school dance,”
says Olsen of the hairstylist, who works with Rachel McAdams,
Dakota Johnson, and all of the Olsen sisters.
2014
At the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume
Institute Gala in New York City “That was my
first [time attending]. I’m terrified of groups of
people. I wasn’t confident at that very moment.”
2015
At the Tom Ford fall 2015 show
in Los Angeles “That was my
version of Michelle Pfeiffer hair
from Batman—didn’t work so
well, but I tried.”
2016
With Tom Hiddleston in I Saw the
Light “Aw! I’m proud of the work that
Tom does. We all had the best time. I’m
excited for this movie to come out. It’s
taken forever. It’s been so fucking long.”
Do you act differently when
you’re a brunette? “I felt really exotic
when I was brunette—I don’t know
why I’m whispering. I got nervous!
My humor works better as a brunette.
But I wear mainly black, and I don’t
want to look depressed.”
Any secret to your color?
“Oribe conditioner is the best thing
in the world.”
What tricks have you learned on set?
“Use green-tea bags steeped in
hot water and then soaked in ice on
your eyes. I’m lucky—I have good
skin. I drink a lot of water, and I use
a lot of products.”
Don’t hold out on us. “I’m digging
this 111Skin serum. I was in Barneys,
and my hands felt really dry so I
started pretending I needed a
sample. [The salesperson] gave me
these packets. Apparently, a plastic
surgeon and some space scientists
got together to make a really
expensive product. I bought two—
morally I feel like I shouldn’t buy
more. I also love SK-II and Dr. Colbert
masks, the ones that make you
look like a serial killer. And Kiehl’s.
And Kate Somerville. I like Chanel
mascara and Dior mascara, and Nars
[lip crayons]. The one that I have looks
like Spice, that M.A.C. color from
the ’90s—it’s amazing. I use Chanel
Vitalumière Aqua when I’m filming.
It’s light, and I tend to play characters
that shouldn’t look like they’re
wearing makeup.”
What’s the worst beauty advice
you’ve gotten? “Put toothpaste on
pimples. The only time I’ve successfully
used toothpaste was [for] covering
up a hole in the wall. My friend tossed
a pool stick to me, I dodged it, and
it put a hole in the wall. We didn’t want
to get in trouble, so we took Colgate
and stuffed it in—and we did a really
damn good job.”
What kind of exercise do you do?
“I work out a lot. I do three to
four days on and one day off. I take
Muay Thai and ballet and do regular
gym stuff. Yoga class is my favorite.
I always have to go on Sunday if I’m
in L.A. It’s like yoga church. If you’re
having a shitty week, it’s a great way
to recenter yourself.”
And finally, injections: For or
against? “You see young actresses
with shiny foreheads—it’s a little
disconcerting. Sometimes it makes
you look so much older, and it just
goes wrong. It’s a very strange world.
I get excited when I start to see little
lines on my forehead by the end of
the day. I don’t know what my face is
going to do eventually, and I’m kind
of curious, you know?”
“You see you
ung actresses with shiny
foreheads [fro
om injections]—
it’s a little disconcertin
ng. Sometimes
it makes you look so much
h
older.... It’s a very strange worrld.”
103
The
Culture of
Fragrance
When someone insists that a
perfume has universal appeal, they are selling you a
line. And probably a perfume. The truth is our scent
preferences are too emotionally charged and deeply
rooted to win favor across the board. And that is
exactly what gives perfume its mystique. When we
interviewed fashion and beauty experts from around
the world, we discovered that fragrance is pretty
heady stuff, with potent connections to spirituality,
geography, and history (personal and otherwise).
For some women, perfume represents a leap toward
independence and prosperity. For others, it’s a link
to simpler, more peaceful times. The one connecting
thread? Scent is a form of self-expression, no matter
who’s wearing it. What could be more beautiful,
or honest, than that? By Liana Schaffner
COURTESY OF WATERHOUSE & DODD, © KIM KEEVER
Take note:
MIDDLE
EAST
FROM LEFT: COURTESY OF SENTEURS D’ORIENT; JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (PROP STYLIST: JOCELYNE BEAUDOIN/ART DEPARTMENT)
Sarah Akkari is the CEO of Senteurs
d’Orient USA, a Lebanon-based
company that makes handcrafted
bath products.
My mother is
Mediterranean, but
she was raised in
Japan. My father is
Lebanese. I was
born in Canada but
grew up in Paris
and Beirut. So I
can relate to several
different cultures. In terms of
fragrance, though, I identify most
strongly with Lebanon. I think this has
something to do with Lebanese food—
it’s so rich and diverse. It incorporates
spices like cardamom and cinnamon,
rose water, fruits, and pistachios. At
the end of every meal, we drink orangeblossom tea, which we call “white
coffee.” It has a beautiful, uplifting scent
that relaxes you all over. A meal is a
multisensory experience in Lebanon;
it broadens your appetite for complex
aromas. Maybe food has something
to do with why, in my experience, a lot
of people in the Middle East embrace
fragrance instead of tiptoeing around
it. My company is based in Lebanon
because soap actually originated in the
Middle East 6,000 years ago. I think
a solid soap has a wholesomeness that
you can’t duplicate with a quick spritz
of perfume. When I combine the
steam of a shower with the softness
of lather and the scent of essential oils,
it suspends time. My favorite soap
is Senteurs d’Orient Orange Blossom.
Maybe it’s because of that orangeblossom tea, but for me, using it feels
ritualistic, almost spiritual.
When we think of Middle Eastern scents, we often think of oud—
the dark, resinous note that makes a fragrance instantly opulent.
On the Arabian peninsula, it’s so mainstream you’ll find it in detergent.
105
RUSSIA
I grew up in the last
years of the Soviet
Union, during a
time of economic
crisis. Fragrance
was considered
an extravagance,
so I rarely saw
fragrance bottles on
my mother’s or older
sister’s vanity. The first time
I actually smelled a perfume, I was 14 years
old. Around that time, Kenzo launched
L’Eau par Kenzo, and it really took off in
Russia. It was so light and splashy that
I could wear it to school without my
teacher noticing. To this day, I love sheer
fragrances—I associate them with my
childhood and the excitement of owning
my very first perfume. This makes me
a bit of an anomaly in Moscow, though,
where women favor powerful, assertive
perfumes. But Russian women are drawn to
scents that evoke memories; we’re
very nostalgic. The most popular fragrance
in Russia is Lancôme Climat; it appeared
in a famous Soviet film, The Irony of Fate,
or Enjoy Your Bath! In it, the main character
gives a bottle of Climat as a New Year’s
present—in Russia, it’s still a huge
tradition to give people perfume at the
new year. Fragrance is considered a
wonderful gift in my country. And Russian
men usually wear what women choose
for them. I have it easy: My boyfriend and
I wear the same scent, Comme des
Garçons Incense Avignon. It’s a Russian
favorite because the subtle incense
reminds us of the Orthodox Church.
Russian women spend 20 percent of
their total beauty budget on fragrance—
nearly twice the global average. —Givaudan
106
FROM LEFT: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (PROP STYLIST: JOCELYNE BEAUDOIN/ART DEPARTMENT); MAX AVDEEV
Ekaterina Danilova is the beauty
director of Russian Allure.
She lives and works
in Moscow.
92
percent of
Russian
women wear
fragrance.
COURTESY OF WATERHOUSE & DODD, © KIM KEEVER
—Euromonitor
107
AUSTRALIA
Candice Lake is an Australian-born,
London-based fashion blogger, style
editor, and photographer.
I live in London now, but I’m Australian, and
I believe that’s where my minimalist approach
to fragrance comes from. I love the smell of the
ocean on my skin, or just a dash of patchouli oil on the
nape of my neck. Where I’m from in Australia, the air
is so rich and heavily scented with gardenia that perfume
can feel superfluous. I wear Hermès Eau Claire des Merveilles
all year round. It’s incredibly light and unassuming. I always
get compliments on it, but people are never quite sure if it’s my
perfume or just my soap. It’s that subtle.
SUDAN
Model Nykhor Paul fled her native South Sudan as
a refugee and now brings awareness to the crisis
there through her campaign, We Are Nilotic.
My first fragrance memory is of my mother mixing
cow fat with wild plants to give it an aromatic scent.
Although we didn’t have perfume where I come
from, African women wear a lot of essential oils. I still use
scented oils in my bath or apply them right after I step
out of the shower. They form a base for everything else; I
think they complement the natural scent of my skin instead of overpowering
it. My favorite essential oils are lavender, sandalwood, eucalyptus, and
anything that has the smell of wildflowers. Once I’m dressed, I dab a bit of
perfume on my wrists. My favorite right now is Thierry Mugler Angel.
KOREA
When I was 12, my family moved from the U.S. back to Korea—
a huge shift, not least of all in the attitudes toward fragrance. In
America, I would walk onto the subway and immediately smell
trendy fragrances, like Abercrombie. In Korea, people are far more
reserved about scent. When you visit the flagship Olive Young
store in Seoul (it’s sort of like Korea’s Sephora), you have to test
perfume in a giant walk-in tube to prevent the particles
from dispersing into the air. It’s not that Koreans don’t
enjoy fragrance, but we see it as something
more intimate, part of the bath regimen. When
I wear perfume, I spray the teeniest bit on my left
wrist, then use it to dab my other wrist and collarbone. I adore
Dolce & Gabbana The One, but if I accidentally apply too much,
I can almost hear my mother saying, “Oh, I have a headache.”
108
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
Alicia Yoon is the founder and CEO of Peach & Lily,
an e-commerce site that sells beauty products
from Korea and Japan. She splits her time between
Seoul and New York City.
LATIN
AMERICA
Genesis Rodriguez is an actress and
a brand ambassador for L’Oréal Paris.
She was born in Miami to a Cuban mother
and a Venezuelan father.
I come from a rich fragrance culture that leans
toward lush, floral scents. The first one I remember
smelling was agua de violetas—violet water. It was
so fresh and light. My favorite floral scent today
is iris, which has that same subtle quality. As I grew
up, I started to experiment more
and moved away from flowers
toward clean, fresh, citrus
scents. Perfume is still the
sort of thing that a loved
one will give to me, so I wear
it with pride. I always apply
perfume on the insides
of my wrists and both sides of
my neck.
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
The much-obsessed-over
scent of Oribe’s hair
products is heavy on
la mariposa blanca, the
national flower
of Cuba, the hairstylist’s
home country.
ETHIOPIA
Maya Haile Samuelsson is a model from Ethiopia. She and her husband, chef
Marcus Samuelsson, support entrepreneurial efforts in Ethiopia through their
organization Three Goats.
Ethiopia has many tribes, with different languages and traditions. I think the one
thing that we share absolutely in common is fragrance. Everyone in Ethiopia burns
frankincense. I identify so strongly with it that I’m drawn to perfumes with woodsy, earthy
notes. I love Tom Ford Sahara Noir. I have three bottles because I don’t want to run out.
[Editor’s note: A wise move—the fragrance was recently discontinued.] When I travel to
Ethiopia three times a year, I always bring frankincense home with me. But it’s never enough.
109
INDIA
Bhumika Arora is from a
small town in the state
of Haryana, India. She
is now a runway model,
working at fashion shows in
New York City, London, Milan, and Paris.
Where I grew up in India, you weren’t supposed
to put fragrance on your skin because people
said it would attract unwanted spirits. Because of
that, my first clear memory of perfume was very
recent—only four years ago. I smelled a perfume
on someone for the first time and went absolutely
crazy for it. After that, I became obsessed with
fragrance. There are many scents that I enjoy, but
I use only one on myself: Narciso Rodriguez For
Her. I really think it expresses who I am—not too
strong, not too light, soothing, but prominent.
“India has some of the
most beautiful and alarming
smells,” says Byredo
perfumer Ben Gorham of
his mother’s native country.
One of his standout (and
Best of Beauty–winning)
fragrances was inspired by
his cousin’s traditional Indian
wedding. “The vision of the
bride’s head completely
covered in flowers inspired
me to create a floral
scent,” he says. “I had always
stayed away from florals
because I felt they may be
perceived as too traditional.”
The resulting fragrance,
Flowerhead, is anything but.
A fantasy of rose, jasmine,
amber, and splashy lemon,
it’s the perfect marriage of
brightness and intensity.
110
CHINA
Model Sui He is from Wenzhou, China. She’s a face of Shiseido.
My only exposure to fragrance as a little girl was the laundry
detergent my mom used, which had a vanilla scent. I first
became interested in fragrance when I moved to
Beijing and went to department stores for the first time.
I realized then how scent can affect your mood and
represent your personality. I think East Asian women in
particular are developing a new interest in fragrance
and using it as a way to express themselves. My favorite
scents are citruses or light florals, like Jo Malone Red
Roses. I layer it over a lotion, like Shiseido Replenishing
Body Cream, so it lasts longer and has a little depth.
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
In Full Bloom
COURTESY OF WATERHOUSE & DODD, © KIM KEEVER
In southern
India, women
adorn their hair
with heavily
scented jasmine
flowers.
111
You could dip your toes into summer with a dusting of bronzer
and a swipe of waterproof mascara. Or you could really make a splash
with silver eye shadow, high-shine lips, and glitter that shimmers like
a sunset on the Pacific. The coolest makeup of the season is here,
and it’s made for getting wet. And maybe a little wild, too.
By Chloe Metzger
Photographed by Ben Hassett
PRETTY SLICK
To create the high-impact lips on the opposite page, makeup artist Georgina Graham filled them in with a red lip
pencil, swiped on a matte red lipstick, and then sealed it all with a generous coat of clear gloss.
Makeup colors: Eye Shadow quad in Breathtaking Blues and Colorlicious lipstick in Seduce Scarlet by CoverGirl.
SPLASH!
For waterproof eye
shadow that sticks, look
for a formula packed
with shimmer and
be sure to apply it with
a brush instead of your
finger, since even the
tiniest amount of oil will
cut the endurance time.
Makeup colors: Artist
Shadow in M-820, Aqua
Matic Waterproof GlideOn Eye Shadow in I-22,
and Pro Sculpting Lip in
50 by Make Up For Ever.
BLURRED LINES
Take a closer look. That
rippled design isn’t from
the water. Start with two
coats of white polish,
then use a striping brush
to paint navy, aqua,
and fuchsia squiggles.
The smudgier the lines,
the cooler it looks.
Makeup colors: Hard
as Nails Xtreme Wear Nail
Color in White On, Pacific
Blue, and Fuchsia Power
and Complete Salon
Manicure in Dark Huemor by Sally Hansen.
BRIGHT EYE
Keep glitter from
flaking off by mixing
it with a waterproof
liquid adhesive.
Makeup colors:
Infallible Eye Shadow in
Liquid Diamond,
Infallible Matte-Matic
Eyeliner in Ultra Black,
and Infallible Pro Matte
Gloss in Forbidden
Kiss by L’Oréal Paris.
PUCKER PUNCH
This is exactly what we
imagine a mermaid’s
lips would look like:
shimmery, metallic, and
a little magical. To
get the look, press a
metallic copper eye
shadow over red
lipstick with your finger.
Makeup colors:
Pigment Colour Powder
in Copper and
Lipglass Clear by
M.A.C.
SILVER MOONS
When it’s hot, no one
wants to wear a full
face of makeup. A cool
metallic shadow in
a strong graphic shape
looks smart and
stylish all on its own.
Eye Studio Color Tattoo
Eyeshadow in Too Cool
by Maybelline New
York. These pages:
Makeup, Georgina
Graham; hair, Christian
Eberhard; manicure,
Madeline Poole. Model:
Sunghee Kim. Prop
stylist: Nicholas
Des Jardins of Mary
Howard Studio.
It’s offensive and ridiculous
and seems to have found
a permanent place in
how we judge each other.
David DeNicolo investigates
the condition known as
RESTING
BITCH
FACE
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HAPPY
AMUSED
OK, MILDLY ANNOYED
EVERETT COLLECTION
BORED
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w
e’re only saying
this once: Resting Bitch Face. Given the intrinsic
misogyny of the term, and the fact that it’s most
often used to describe to women, we’ll call it RBF
from now on. Not perfect, but less offensive.
Though it probably goes back to our primate roots
(ever seen an artist’s rendering of a Neanderthal?
major RBF), it appeared in its contemporary iteration
in a parody PSA posted to YouTube in 2013 and
metastasized into scores of Internet memes. In
case you’re not familiar, RBF is that subtle
look of derision, disapproval, or superiority that
we all recognize when we see it.
The name—and the concept—caught on like an
Adele single. (And just as with the latter, you may have
wanted to whisper, “Please not again.”) Anna Kendrick,
Anna Paquin, and others have joked about having
one. A big slice of the Instagram universe scrolled
through their posts and wondered aloud if they, too,
might have it (and if it could be “cured” with surgery,
injections, or lasers). It became a sport to spot it in
others. But despite its roots in humor, RBF seemed to
Women are
expected to appear
friendly, cheerful,
approachable.
And if they don’t,
they can pay
a familiar price.
122
become just another reason to be mean about others’
looks—and insecure about our own.
Enter Jason Rogers, a behavioral neuroscientist
and senior consultant for Noldus Consulting, one of
the companies behind a software called FaceReader.
Rogers was at a school cross-country meet talking
to another parent who was lamenting the familiar
trials of raising a teenager. “To add insult to injury,”
Rogers recalls the mother saying, “she’s throwing
shade at me all day with her RBF.” The next day,
while on a run himself, Rogers had a eureka moment:
“What if I could use FaceReader to identify RBF?”
FaceReader maps the 500 points on the face that
generate what Rogers calls “action units.” It’s all
based on the pioneering research of Paul Ekman,
begun back in the 1950s. Ekman theorized that facial
expressions were universal and unconscious—
and could be measured. He developed a system to
codify six “universal expressions” (of sadness,
happiness, fear, disgust, surprise, and anger) as they
manifest on the human face. Using a slightly
different algorithm, FaceReader does the same thing.
The software is typically used in advertising or
consumer testing, where it picks out fleeting, almost
imperceptible reactions in subjects. (A recent Ohio
State University study used a similar technology
to identify a universal “not face,” an expression of
negative emotion—distinct from RBF—that is
consistent across cultures and languages, even
American Sign Language.) Lora Becker, an associate
professor of psychology and the director of the
neuroscience program at the University of Evansville
in Indiana, uses FaceReader in her research. “You
can pick up people’s reactions that they don’t even
have the words to explain,” she says. “I love it
because it goes into micro expressions that we don’t
have control over. It reads subtleties that we can’t
always perceive visually.”
Armed with this potent tool, Rogers scoured the
Internet for images of those people commonly
thought to have RBF (Kristen Stewart, Victoria
Beckham, January Jones, Anna Kendrick,
Queen Elizabeth, Kanye West, et al.) and ran
them through the program. Though this
wasn’t exactly a rigorous scientific study
(the sample was small and obviously quite
subjective), a pattern emerged. The faces
associated with RBF registered “subtle traces
of contempt,” says Rogers. “There’s an air
of superiority or judgment conveyed. It’s
nothing overt, but the software, as well as the
viewer, picks up on it.”
This point is key. RBF is present in
otherwise neutral faces. Those with RBF are not
consciously contemptuous and indeed might be
feeling perfectly happy—or perhaps feeling nothing
at all. According to Rogers, some behaviorists
theorize that RBF may be a sign of introversion or
social anxiety, though the evidence is anecdotal.
To be clear: An obvious snarl of derision or smirk of
MANUAL
The cultural saturation
of RBF is not lost on those
celebrities who supposedly
have it. Whether they
embrace it (with tongue
in cheek) or reject it
altogether, they deserve
to have their say.
Anna Kendrick
“Is there a filter on
Instagram that fixes Bitchy
Resting Face? Asking
for a friend.” —on Twitter
Anna Paquin
“[RBF] basically means
if you are caught off guard
and are not smiling, you
look like you’re a giant bitch.
Apparently that’s how I
come across. I’m really
happy [in reality]; my life’s
good. My husband has the
exact opposite, Happy
Resting Face, which is kind
of annoying.” —on Jimmy
Kimmel Live!
Kristen Stewart
FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ CREDITS, SEE CREDITS PAGE.
“The whole smiling
thing is weird
because I actually
smile a lot. I literally
want to be like,
‘Dude, you would
think I was cool if you
got to know me.’ ”
—in British Elle
Victoria Beckham
“I kind of created this
character [for] the Spice
Girls. I didn’t smile
very much; it was quite
pouty.... I look at the
pictures and think, Oh
God, you look so grumpy.
The ironic thing is that
I’m actually not. I have a
very British, tongue-incheek sense of humor.”
—in Allure
sarcasm is not RBF. RBF is when you think someone’s
sneering at you but they’re not. Which may explain
why those who believe that they have it, or have
been accused of having it, often feel misunderstood.
“Emotion generates from the limbic system, which is
an older part of the brain,” says Becker. “Even though
we might not have words for certain feelings, they
still affect our interaction.” In this wordless matrix of
communication, messages are sent and received at
lightning speed. Our cerebral cortex is convinced it
has registered bitchiness, and our limbic system is
off and running with the idea nanoseconds before
we discover that we actually like the person with the
downward-turned mouth.
Rogers’s little experiment clearly hit a chord. After
he blogged about the results in a post coauthored
by his colleague Abbe Macbeth, also a behavioral
scientist, his company’s website received more
traffic in 48 hours than it had in the entire previous 12
months combined. So what are the telltale physical
signs of RBF? “Most of them cluster around the
mouth,” says Rogers, “and have to do with that old
nemesis, asymmetry.” One corner slightly upturned
or down. The dimple area elevated on one side
but not the other. The eyebrows can also play a role,
especially if one is more arched than the other. A
slight squint or narrowing of the eyes is sometimes
added to the mix. Rogers stresses that these are
very subtle signs. Stephen Colbert theatrically
arching one eyebrow for comic effect is not RBF. It’s
too obvious. And given that fact, attempting to
use surgery or injections to combat RBF is a little like
using a chainsaw to trim a hangnail.
Though Rogers recorded RBF in male faces,
the stigma generally attaches to women. “What this
really comes down to is social expectations and
cultural norms about the role of women,” Rogers
says. Women are expected to appear friendly,
cheerful, approachable. And if they don’t, they can
pay a familiar price: “You look prettier when you
smile.” “You’ll catch more flies with honey.” (Side
note: Who ever really wanted to catch flies?) “Cheer
up, baby.” These types of patronizing comments
are pretty exclusively directed at women. Though,
as Rogers points out, smiling has been shown to
improve the mood of the person smiling and elevate
the mood of others, there can also be an element
of submission to it. What’s more, some women—
including some beautiful and famous ones—
may smile less frequently because they are selfconscious about their teeth or they don’t like
the way their eyes squint up or their nose flares.
Unlike actual scowling, the absence of a smile
is not a reliable indication of mood.
Perhaps behavioral research into RBF will help
bring attention to what is still a pretty glaring double
standard. It’s almost certainly healthier to rally
against appearance sexism than to worry about or try
to “correct” RBF. It’s not a deformity. In other words,
bitch is in the eye of the beholder. ◆
123
CROCHET LESSONS
Bikini top by Lolli Swim.
Cotton-blend skirt
by Clover Canyon. Patentleather shoes by
Gianvito Rossi. Earrings
by Marni. Lipstick in
Russet River by Burt’s
Bees. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
Throwback bikinis, unexpected knits,
retro prints. If you want to get on island
time, an eclectic mix is just the ticket.
Photographed by Benny Horne
124
IN THE MIX
Lurex sweater by Marco de
Vincenzo. Bikini top by
Prism. Bikini bottom by Mi
Ola. Sunset Bronze
Prismatic Lip Gloss in
Sunset Kiss by Elizabeth
Arden. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
125
PATCHING THINGS UP
Wool vest by Prada. Bikini
bottom by Lolli Swim.
Gold necklace by Jennifer
Fisher. Gold vermeil
anklets by Jennifer Zeuner
Jewelry. Makeup colors:
Lid Pop in Cream Pop and
Pop Lacquer Lip Colour
+ Primer in Sugar Pop by
Clinique. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
126
SHORT CUTS
Polyamide-blend shorts
by Melissa Odabash.
Viscose polyester sweater
by Creatures of the
Wind. Leather bag by
Marni. The Only 1 Lipstick
in You’re All Mine by
Rimmel London. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
127
HAWAIIAN TROPIC
Bikini top by Tory Burch.
Raffia pants with belt
by Sophie Theallet.
Suede shoes by Mansur
Gavriel. Rouge Dior
lipstick in Rendez-Vous
by Dior. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
128
TRACK MEET
Silk jacket by Burberry.
Wool shorts by Miu Miu.
Juicy Shaker Lip Oil
in Cherry Symphony by
Lancôme. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
129
PLAYING WITH
(COLOR) BLOCKS
Silk elastane dress by
Louis Vuitton. PureGloss
Lip Gloss in White Tea
by Jane Iredale. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
130
BEACH BOUDOIR
Silk-and-tulle dress
by Simone Rocha. Bikini
top by Onia. Jeans by
Faustine Steinmetz. Suede
shoes by Mansur
Gavriel. Earrings by Robert
Lee Morris Collection.
Makeup colors: Full Metal
Shadow in Eau d’Argent
and Rouge Volupté Shine
Lip Colour in Orange
Perfecto by Yves Saint
Laurent. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
131
FINE LINES
Viscose-blend top and
viscose pants by Christian
Wijnants. Bikini bottom
by Aerie. Leather shoes
by Robert Clergerie. Flax
linen bag by Simon
Miller. Earrings by Chanel.
Makeup colors: Ready
Eyeshadow 4.0 in
The Instant Attraction and
Pop of Passion Lip OilBalm in Tangerine Pop
by BareMinerals. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
PUFF IT UP
Cotton sweater by J. W.
Anderson. Bikini bottom
by Lolli Swim. Earrings
by Marni. Polyester-blend
bag by Stella McCartney.
MoistureSmooth Color
Stick in Berry Brown by
Neutrogena. These pages:
Hair, Thomas Hintermeier;
makeup, Benjamin Puckey.
Model: Kai Newman.
Fashion editor: Rachael
Wang. Location:
Anse Chastanet resort,
St. Lucia. Details,
see Shopping Guide.
133
SHOPPING GUIDE
Cover: Edun silk dress, $1,290
for similar styles.
Matchesfashion.com for stores.
Cover Look, page 20: Rodarte
leather shoes with Swarovski
crystals, price available upon
request for similar styles.
Ikram, Chicago. 312-587-1000.
No. 21 silk organza dress,
$3,011. Numeroventuno.com.
Page 22: Edun silk dress,
$1,290 for similar styles.
Matchesfashion.com for stores.
Jennifer Meyer gold bracelet,
$600. Ylang23.com. Fashion
Notes, page 55: Altuzarra
paillette-embroidered top,
$2,595. Matchesfashion.com.
Altuzarra cotton-blend skirt,
$895. Saks Fifth Avenue stores.
Altuzarra earrings, price
available upon request.
Altuzarra.com. Jason Wu
leather-and-raffia sandals,
$795. Jasonwustudio.com.
User’s Guide to Style, page 60:
Joseph neoprene pants, $295.
Joseph-fashion.com. Vans
canvas shoes, $47. Vans.com.
Page 62: Levi’s denim jacket,
$59.50. Levi.com. Acne Studios
leather skirt, $1,750, and shoes,
price available upon request.
Acnestudios.com. Acne
Studios silk elastane pants,
$690. Acnestudios.com.
Emporio Armani suede boots,
$745. Emporio Armani, N.Y.C.
646-613-8099. The Bold One,
page 97: Emilio Pucci
embroidered georgette dress,
$3,950. Emilio Pucci stores.
Page 99: Red Valentino silk
blouse, $695 for similar styles.
Redvalentino.com. Gap denim
jeans, $69.95. Gap.com.
Jennifer Fisher diamond-andgold necklace, $660.
Jenniferfisherjewelry.com.
Page 100: MSGM tulle dress,
$530. Msgm.it. Body and Sol,
page 124: Lolli Swim bikini top,
$85. Mollybrownsswimwear
.com. Clover Canyon cottonblend skirt, $286. Clovercanyon
.com. Gianvito Rossi leather
shoes, $625. Gianvitorossi
.com. Marni earrings, $640.
Modaoperandi.com. Page 125:
Marco de Vincenzo Lurex
sweater, $940. Modaoperandi
.com. Prism bikini top, $150.
Net-a-porter.com. Mi Ola bikini
bottom, $120. Mi-ola.com.
Page 126: Prada wool vest,
$2,705. Select Prada stores.
Lolli Swim bikini bottom, $85.
134 Allure • June 2016
Nicdelmar.com. Jennifer Fisher
gold necklace, $430.
Jenniferfisherjewelry.com.
Jennifer Zeuner Jewelry gold
vermeil anklets, $132 to $143.
Jenniferzeuner.com. Page 127:
Melissa Odabash polyamideblend shorts, $210. Odabash
.com. Creatures of the Wind
viscose polyester sweater,
$680. Saks Fifth Avenue stores.
Marni leather bag, $1,960.
Madison, Los Angeles.
310-275-1930. Page 128: Tory
Burch bikini top, $115. Tory
Burch stores. Sophie Theallet
raffia pants with belt, $995.
Sophietheallet.com. Mansur
Gavriel suede shoes, $395.
Mansurgavriel.com. Page 129:
Burberry silk jacket, $1,596.
Burberry.com. Miu Miu wool
shorts, $835. Select Miu Miu
stores. Page 130: Louis Vuitton
silk elastane dress, price
available upon request. Select
Louis Vuitton stores. Page 131:
Simone Rocha silk-and-tulle
dress, $2,160. Modaoperandi
.com. Onia bikini top, $80.
Onia.com. Faustine Steinmetz
denim jeans, $588. Nordstrom
stores. Mansur Gavriel suede
shoes, $395. Net-a-porter.com.
Robert Lee Morris Collection
earrings, $175. Robertleemorris
.com. Page 132: Christian
Wijnants viscose-blend top,
$326.70, and viscose pants,
$302.50. Christianwijnants
.com. Aerie bikini bottom,
$34.95. Aerie stores. Robert
Clergerie leather shoes, $495.
Saks Fifth Avenue stores.
Simon Miller flax linen bag,
$390. Simonmillerusa.com.
Chanel earrings, $1,000.
Chanel stores. Page 133: J. W.
Anderson cotton sweater,
$1,065. J-w-anderson.com. Lolli
Swim bikini bottom, $75.
Dianesbeachwear.com. Marni
earrings, $520. Modaoperandi
.com. Stella McCartney
polyester-blend bag, $1,750.
Saks Fifth Avenue stores.
Autobiography, page 136:
Circa Angled Brush, Ultrasuede
Cream Blush in Portofino, and
Powder Brush.
PHOTOGRAPHERS’
CREDITS
Allure.com, page 10,
clockwise from top left: Leslie
Kirchhoff; Stan Wan; Jason
Lloyd-Evans; Greg Kessler;
Cathy Crawford. Contributors,
page 18, clockwise from top
left: Josephine Schiele; Trecey
Cunningham; courtesy of
subject (2); Lucas Visser;
Hye Ryoung Min. The Makeup
Pro, page 28, top row:
Natasha Calzatti. Second row,
from left: © A24/Everett
Collection; Everett Collection.
Third row, from left:
© Columbia Pictures/Everett
Collection; © Fox Searchlight/
Everett Collection; Everett
Collection. Bottom row: Fox
Searchlight Pictures/Protozoa
Pictures/Phoenix Pictures/
Ronald Grant Archive/Mary
Evans/Everett Collection.
Beauty School, page 36,
clockwise from top left: John
Shearer/Getty Images for
People; Josephine Schiele;
Jason Lloyd-Evans (3); Adir
Abergel; Charley Gallay/Getty
Images for Turner. Page 38,
top row, from left: Roger
Cabello; Sonny Vandevelde/
voguerunway.com (3). Second
row, from left: Feng Yu/Alamy;
Nikola Bilic/Alamy; YAY Media
AS/Alamy. Bottom row:
Flas100/Shutterstock. Beauty
Reporter, page 43, clockwise
from top left: Jason LloydEvans; Trunk Archive; Phil Oh/
vogue.com; Josephine
Schiele. Beauty Reporter,
page 46: Daniel Thomas
Smith/Quadriga (girl with
stars); Michelle Saunders for
Essie (Packham); Sonny
Vandevelde/voguerunway
.com (McQueen); Josephine
Schiele (still lifes). The Bold
One, page 102, top row, from
left: Vince Bucci/Getty
Images; Seth Poppel/Yearbook
Library. Second row, from left:
Aby Baker/Getty Images; Ben
Gabbe/FilmMagic. Third row,
from left: Pascal Le Segretain/
Getty Images. Bottom row:
© Walt Disney Studios Motion
Pictures/Everett Collection.
Page 103, from top: Billy
Farrell/bfanyc.com/Rex/
Shutterstock; Kevin Mazur/
WireImage; Charley Gallay/
Getty Images for Tom Ford;
Sam Emerson/© 2015 Sony
Pictures Classics. The Culture
of Fragrance, page 108:
Stockholm Streetstyle/
blaublut-edition.com (Lake);
Andrew Toth/FilmMagic (Paul);
Hye-Ryoung Min (Yoon);
Josephine Schiele (still lifes).
Page 109: Maarten de Boer/
Getty Images (Rodriguez);
Josephine Schiele (prop
stylist: Jocelyne Beaudoin/Art
Department) (still life);
courtesy of subject
(Samuelsson). Page 110:
Vanessa Jackman (Arora and
He); Josephine Schiele (prop
stylist: Jocelyne Beaudoin/Art
Department) (still life);
Josephine Schiele (Byredo).
Resting Bitch Face, page 123,
from top: JB Lacroix/
WireImage; Broadimage/Rex/
Shutterstock; Billy Farrell/
bfanyc.com/Rex/Shutterstock;
Nancy Kaszerman/Zuma
Press/Corbis.
ALLURE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT
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AU TO B I O G R A P H Y
EVA MENDES
JOSEPHINE SCHIELE (STILL LIFE);
MICHAEL LOCCISANO/GETTY IMAGES (MENDES)
FILLS IN THE BLANKS.
For product details,
see Shopping Guide.