IDLC Finance Limited Statement on green banking as of 31/12/2015

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IDLC Finance Limited Statement on green banking as of 31/12/2015
1.1.1
IDLC Finance Limited
Statement on green banking as of 31/12/2015
Policy Formulation and Governance
Formulation and Board/Regional Head approval Yes
No
Remarks
of Green Banking Policy
Yes
An amended version of the Green Banking Policy, incorporating
observations of FMO, has been approved by IDLC Board on June
23, 2014.
1.1.2
Allocation of Fund in the Budget for
Green Banking (In Million Taka)
Green Finance
Climate Risk Fund
Marketing, Training and Capacity
Building
1.1.3
Utilization of Funds (In Million Taka)
Green Finance
Climate Risk Fund
Marketing, Training and Capacity
Building
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
BDT 250
Million
BDT 0.1
Million
BDT 0.23
Million
BDT 250
Million
BDT 0.60
Million
BDT 0.27
Million
BDT 250
Million
-
BDT 250
Million
BDT 1.3
Million
-
BDT 1000
Million
BDT 2.0
Million
BDT 1.0
Million
Quarter 1
BDT 129.65
Million
BDT 0.07
Million
BDT 0.18
Million
Quarter 2
BDT 99.2
Million
BDT 0.587
Million
BDT 0.23
Million
Quarter 3
BDT 220
Million
-
Quarter 4
122 Million
Total
BDT 570.85
Million
BDT 1.7627
Million
BDT 0.8556
Million
BDT 0.5
Million
BDT 0.4456
Million
BDT 1.1057
Million
-
Remarks
Remarks
1.1.4
Formation
of Green
Banking
Unit
Yes
Yes
No
Composition (Name, Designation & Department)
Mr. Md. Mehbuboor Rahman, Manager, Green Banking Desk
Mr. Md. Shahriar Rahman, Executive Officer, Green Banking Desk
Mr. Kazi Farhan Zahir, AGM, Structured Finance, Corporate
Ms. Farzana Islam Lisa, AGM, Corporate
Mr. Md. Jobayer Alam, AGM, SME
Mr. Rashedul Haque, Head of Products and Marketing, Consumer
Mr. Adnan Rashid, Sr. Manager, Credit Risk Management(CRM)
Mr. Md. Shahariar Kamal, Manager, Corporate
Ms. Shamima Akter, AGM, Human Resource Department
Ms. Laila Nasrin, DGM, IT
Ms. Tabassum Abedin, Sr. Manager, Admin
Mr. Mohammed Morshedul Quader Khalili, Head of ICC (Internal Credit and Compliance)
Ms. Sherifa Amreen, Manager, Marketing Communications
Ms. Ayesha Haque, Manager and Head of CSR
1.2 INCORPORATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RISK IN CORE RISK MANAGEMENT
Quarter 1
1.2.1
1.2.2
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
67
75
54
80
276
67
75
54
80
276
Low 35
36
39
51
161
0
0
8
10
High 30
39
15
21
105
63
61
57
87
268
Low 31
30
44
55
160
0
0
4
4
31
13
28
104
1412.10
614.78
1767.85
5106.54
No of projects applicable for environmental due
diligence (EDD)
No of projects rated (Environmental Risk Rating
sanctioned)
Moderate 2
1.2.3
Rated Projects
Financed
Total Number (Disbursed)
Moderate 0
High 32
Total amount disbursed (in Million
BDT)
1311.81
Remarks
Remarks
Quarter 1
Low 656.25
Moderate 0
High 655.56
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
1002.11
541.88
903.55
3103.79
0
0
300.00
300.00
409.99
72.9
564.30
1702.75
Remarks
Loan classification as of quarter end
UC(standard)
SMA
SS
DF
BL
No of projects 87
Amount (in Million BDT) 1767.85
1.3 Initiating in house environment management
1.3.1
No of branches and booths (Data in each quarter will
reflect the cumulative figure)
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
29 branches
29 branches
29 branches
32 branches
32 branches
2 booths
2 booths
2 booths
2 booths
2 booths
1.3.2
No of branches powered by solar energy (Data in
each quarter will reflect the cumulative figure)
2
2
2
2
2
1.3.3
No of booths powered by solar energy (Data in each
quarter will reflect the cumulative figure)
0
0
0
0
0
1.3.4
Introduction of Green Office Guide or General
Instruction
Yes
Yes
No
Remar
ks
Remarks
A Green Office Guideline has been approved by the Management on
June 24, 2014
1.3.5
Pin points of Green Office Guide or General
Instruction
Remarks
The Green Office Guideline focuses on saving electricity, water and paper, and
maintenance of a clean and hygienic office environment across branches, through
systematic intervention across the following areas:
1. Green Code of Conduct for IDLC Staff;
2. Green Office Premises;
3. Green Technologies; and
4. Staff Training;
1.3.6
Inventory Details
Consumption of Water(In Million Taka)
Consumption of Paper(In Million Taka)
Energy Consumption (In
Electricity
Million Taka)
Gas
Fuel
1.3.6
Quarter 1
0.12
0.38
3.1
0
1.2
Others (Please Specify)
1.4 Introducing Green Financing (In Million BDT)
Quarter 1
ETP
No Amount
For Installation of
1
30
ETP(Amount
Million
Disbursed)
Projects financed
having ETP(Full
amount disbursed)
Bio-gas Plant
Solar panel/Renewable
1
10
Energy Plant
Million
Solar Energy /Renewable
11 25.35
Energy Plant
Million
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
0.14
0.44
4.0
0
2.2
Quarter 3
0.16
0.39
4.1
0
2.3
Quarter 4
0.14
0.4
5.1
0
2.0
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Quarter 2
No
Amount
3
36
Million
Quarter 3
No
Amount
4
59
Million
-
-
-
-
1
2
Million
1
6 Million
Quarter 4
No
Amount
1
32
Million
-
-
Total
No Amount
9
157
Million
Total
0.56
1.61
16.3
0
7.7
Total
Remarks
Remarks
Remarks
Direct Green
-
-
3
18 Million
Direct Green
1
25.35
Million
Indirect Green
Bio-fertilizer Plant
Hybrid Hoffman Kiln (HHK)/
(Conversion from FCK to
Zigzag)/Compressed Block
Fire safety
Quarter 1
Quarter 2
Quarter 3
Quarter 4
Total
3
5.60
Million
-
-
1
40
Million
-
-
4
45.60
Million
Direct Green
2
2
2
15
Million
100
Million
4
40
Million
50
Million
10
72.7
Million
230
Million
17.5
Million
-
Direct Green
-
9
Million
30
Million
17.5
Million
-
Green Industry
1
Energy Efficiency
-
8.70
Million
50
Million
-
Green Finance at reduced
rate of interest
-
-
1
1
1
2
5
1
-
-
-
-
-
Remarks
Direct Green
Direct Green
-
1.5 Utilization of Climate Risk Fund
1.5.1
Fund for part of CSR activities
(Event) related to climate
change (In million taka)
1.5.2
Fund for part of CSR activities
(project) related to climate
change (In million taka)
1.6 Introduction Green Marketing
1.6.1 Introduction of Green banking
Products (Please Specify)
Quarter 1
-
BDT 0.07
Million
Quarter 2
BDT 0.2
Million
BDT 0.387
Quarter 3
-
-
Quarter 4
BDT 0.46
Million
Total
BDT 0.66
Million
BDT 0.6457
Million
BDT 1.1027
Million
Remarks
Environment Awareness
Competition (Poster, Slogan &
Recycle) with 450 students of
8 schools of Dhaka City.
Environment Awareness
Campaign among 1500
students of 8 schools of Dhaka
city and 450 blanket
distribution for
underprivileged in North
Bengal.
IDLC signed a MoU with Spectrum Lanka Technology Solutions Limited with a view to create a one
stop solution for establishment of LEED certified green industry. MoU states a participatory
arrangement where clients availing consultancy service and others from Spectrum Lanka for the
establishment of green industry may also be entitled to avail green finance from IDLC with respect
to approval. IDLC will also refer clients to Spectrum Lanka if it fits the purpose. Few other MoU
signing with different stakeholders are in process. (Annexure III)
Green Desk is also preparing a new brochure for green finance and expecting that to be on board
for marketing purpose from next quarter.
1.7 Employee Training, Consumer Awareness and Green Event
Quarter Quarter
1
2
1.7.1 No of
5
10
programs/trainings/seminar/
workshops/awareness program
exclusively conducted for Green
Banking
Quarter
3
7
Quarter
4
7
Total
Remarks
29
With the continuation of previously held
2 sessions of workshop titled
“Strengthening capacity and knowledge
on Environmental and Social Risk and
Opportunity Management (ESROM)
among Financial Institutions in
Bangladesh”, IDLC organized another 4
sessions of it in this quarter. The
workshop was a joint initiative of
several
development
financial
institutions like DEG, FMO, OeEB,
Proparco, UNEPFI and their five
Bangladeshi FI partners – IDLC Finance
Limited, Brac Bank, Eastern Bank,
Dutch-Bangla Bank, and The City Bank.
29 employees of IDLC out of nearly 150
bankers from different Banks, FIs had
the opportunity to develop their
capacity on environmental and social
Quarter
1
Quarter
2
Quarter
3
Quarter
4
Total
Remarks
issues in financial sectors, identification
of risks & opportunities and finding
innovative & bankable green products
for the financial market. (Annexure II A
And Annexure II B)
IDLC officials are also regularly
participating in different workshop and
symposium on efficient brick kiln
financing and persuading different
client base for implementing auto brick
project. As part of this, IDLC officials
along with 4 prospective brick clients
attended
the
workshop
titled
“Supporting Brick Sector Development
Program” on 14th November 2015 at
LGED-RDEC Auditorium. In corporation
with Bangladesh Bank, Department of
Environment organized this workshop
where concerned regulatory bodies,
stakeholders related to brick industry
and representatives from Bank, FI’s
were present.
Green Desk also attended in a
knowledge sharing session organized by
the newly formed green cell of BKMEA
where IDLC officials showcased the
Quarter
1
Quarter
2
Quarter
3
Quarter
4
Total
Remarks
green financing offerings for BKMEA
members.
Besides, IDLC participated in the midterm evaluation process of the
Catalyzing Clean Energy in Bangladesh
(CCEB) program organized by the
USAID’s Accelerating Capacity for
Monitoring and Evaluation (ACME).
IDLC shared their view & experience in
CCEB’s
energy
efficiency-related
activities and committed to assist CCEB
in achieving its objectives by financing
energy efficiency measures taken by the
industrial entrepreneurs.
1.7.2
1.7.3
No of participants covered
Employees
Customers
Green Events (Please Specify)
1.8 Disclosure of green banking activities
Disclosure In
Annual Report
Website
Media
143
56
87
1
Status
Yes
Yes
Yes
144
84
60
95
95
2
154
26
4
1
536
261
151
4
Signing of a MoU with Spectrum Lanka
Technology Solutions Limited.
Remarks
Green Banking activities have been covered in IDLC’s 2014 Annual Report.
Green Banking activities are updated regularly under the section “Green Banking and
Sustainability” in IDLC’s website (www.idlc.com). Furthermore, different news and
press releases are also available in the website news section.
IDLC’s green finance was picked up by the Dutch press! P+ magazine focuses on
corporate social responsibility and a prominent one for publication related to
sustainable business. Although the publication is in Dutch language, but it focused
mainly on IDLC, its corporate strength, portfolio and share of green finance,
investment towards capacity development and knowledge accumulation for going
green, yearlong activities and achievements. It mentions IDLC as a role model of
Disclosure In
Status
Remarks
sustainable business from country perspective and hoped that others will be
encouraged through this. (Annexure IV)
FMO also published a newsletter titled “Green SME Finance in Bangladesh” focusing
on IDLC’s effort on financing sustainable business by supporting SMEs via funding and
also encouraging greener business practices. (Annexure V)
News of workshop on ESROM organized by IDLC, several DFIs such as DEG, FMO,
OeEB, Proparco, UNEPFI and other Bangladeshi FI partners - Brac Bank, Eastern Bank,
Dutch-Bangla Bank, and The City Bank was covered in several printing medias.
Preparation of Independent green
banking and sustainability report
Yes
Being the only listed member of United Nation Environment Program for Financial
Institution (UNEP FI) in Bangladesh, IDLC recently signed a “Statement” showing our
commitment todays sustainable energy management globally. This statement was
presented at the climate conference in Paris. (Annexure VI)
IDLC prepares an independent Sustainability Report following the GRI (Global
Reporting Initiatives) Guidelines.
Green Banking issues have been covered extensively in IDLC’s 2014 Sustainability
Report. On our upcoming 2015 Sustainability report, major concentration will be given
in green banking activities & its achievements.
2.1 Sector specific environment policy
2.1.1
Formulation of sector specific Yes
No
Environment Policy (Under phase 2) In
(If yes then please give pin points in a Process
separate sheet)
2.1.2
Remarks
IDLC with support from FMO and FI Konsult, is implementing an ESMS
(Environmental and Social Management System) across the organization.
During pilot testing, as Bangladesh Bank referred new draft ESRM
guideline, IDLC is attempting to merge established ESRM with new draft
ESRM guideline before full rollout.
Name of the sectors for which specific Following sectors has been decided considering sector specific exposure and their
environment policy formulated
environmental and social risk: Textiles, apparels and accessories, power and energy, iron and
steel, building materials, cement, glass, ceramics and pipes, pharmaceuticals, food and
beverage, telecommunication, transport, paper and packaging etc.
2.2 Green Strategic Planning
2.2.1
Formulation of green strategic planning (If yes Yes
then please describe in a separate sheet)
2.3 Environment Risk Management Plan
2.3.1
Formulation of Banks specific
environmental risk management
plan and guideline
Yes
Yes
No
No
Remarks
In process
Remarks
IDLC complies with Bangladesh Bank guideline on Environmental
Risk Management (ERM) for FI dated January, 2011 and the ECR1997 standard. IDLC also complies with the UNGC and UNEP FI
principles on a voluntary basis being the only listed FI in
Bangladesh
Besides, IDLC is in process of implementing ESMS across the
organization. A software has been formed with assistance from FI
Konsult and FMO to assess the environmental risk and to
compute scoring of risk of different sectors under different
business segment. ESMS excel based tool has already been
developed and we are pilot testing with business relationship
managers.
Meanwhile, GBU and CRM of IDLC are working with new draft
ESRM guideline dated June 2015 issued by Bangladesh Bank and
trying to make a feasible combination with ESRM and ESMS. As
soon as it becomes finalize by the Bangladesh Bank, IDLC will
incorporate it with its credit risk management framework.
Annexure-1
Progess of Green Finance
IDLC Finance Limited
31-Dec-15
Total Loan
Disbursement
(Funded)
7,273.66
Direct Green
Finance
(Disbursement)
Indirect Green
Finance
(Disbursement)
(Taka in million)
Total Green
Finance
(Disbursement)
122.00
122.00
Direct Green Finance
as % of Total Loan
Disbursement
1.68%
Details of Green Finance
Renewable Energy
Amount (in million
Taka )
Bio-gas
Hydro-Power
Wind- Power
Amount (in million
Taka )
Setting up of Biogas Plant
in existing Dairy
& poultry Farm
Solar Home
System
Integrated Cow
Rearing
and Setting up of
Bio-gas Plant
Organic Manure
from Slurry
Mid Range Biogas Plant
Biomass based
large scale Bio-gas
Plant
Solar Micro/Mini
Grid
Poultry & Dairy
based large scale
Bio-gas Plant
Hydropower
(Pico, Micro &
Mini)
Wind Energy
driven Power
Plant
Solar Energy
Solar Irrigation
Pumping System
Solar PV
Assembly Plant
Solar PV Plant
capable to produce
1 MW or more
Power
Solar Cooker
assembly Plant
Solar Cooker
assembly
Plant
Solar
Water
Heater Assembly
Plant
Solar Air Heater &
Cooling System
Assembly Plant
Solar Energy
Driven Cold
Storage
Surface Water
Purification Plant
using Solar Pump
Substitution of
Conventional
Lime Kiln by
Energy Efficient
Kiln
Substitution of
Conventional
lighting system,
electronic
material, Boiler
with energy
efficient
alternatives on the
basis of Energy
Audit
Energy Efficiency
Amount (in million
Taka )
Energy efficient
Improved Cook
Stove(ICS)/ICS
Renewable/Hybrid
Cook Stove
Assembly
Plant
LED
Bulb/Tube
Manufacturing Plant
Auto sensor power
switch assembly
Plant
LED Bulb/Tube
Assembly Plant
Solid Waste Management
Amount (in million
Taka )
Methane Recovery
Auto sensor power
from Municipal
switch assembly
waste & to
Plant
produce Power
Municipal waste
to Compost
Biological
Effluent
Treatment Plant
(ETP)
Biochemical
Effluent
Treatment Plant
(ETP)
Conversion
of
Chemical ETP to
Combination type
(Chemical+Biolog
ical) of ETP
Amount (in
million Taka )
Amount (in
million Taka )
Hazardous waste
treatment facility
Liquid Waste Management
Amount (in million
Taka )
Waste Water
Treatment Plant
32.00
Sewage Water
Treatment Plant
Alternative Energy
Amount (in million
Taka )
Production of
Burnable Oil from
waste Tire by the
Process of Pyrolysis
Amount (in
million Taka )
Fire Burnt Brick
Amount (in million
Taka )
Setting up of
Hybrid Hoffman
Kiln(HHK)/Tunnel
Kiln/equivalent
technology in Brick
manufacturing
Industry
Non Fire Block Brick
Amount (in million
Taka )
Compressed BlockBrick
Autoclaved Aerated
Concrete
Waste Paper
Recycling Plant
for production of
recycled paper
Recycling & Recyclable Product
Amount (in million
Amount (in
Taka )
million Taka )
Recyclable Poly
Propylene Thread &
Baggage
Manufacturing Plant
Plastic Waste
Recycling Plant
(PVC, PP, LDPE,
HDPE,PS)
PET Bottle
Recycling Plant
Recyclable
Baggage
Manufacturing
Plant
Solar Battery
Recycling Plant
Green Industry
Amount (in million
Taka )
Establishment of
Green Industry
50.00
Safety and Security of Factory
Amount (in million
Taka )
Ensuring Work
Environment and
Security of Workers
of Textile and
Garments Industry
40.00
Miscellaneous
Amount (in million
Taka )
Vermicompost
Palm Oil Plant
Others
Amount (in million
Taka )
Annexure II A
Workshop on, “E&S Capacity Building”
Organizer: FMO, DEG, Proparco, OeEB, UNEPFI
Participants: Employees of IDLC, Brac Bank, EBL, DBBL, City Bank
Date:8-9, 11-12, 15-16, 17-18
November, 2015
SL No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Time: 9 AM to 5 PM
Name
Masud Rana
Mehbuboor Rahman
M. Samiul Islam
Md. Saiful Islam
Muhammad Mustafa Tousif
Tanvir Shawkat
Fuad Hasan Choudhury
Sufian Raji
Mohammed Areful Islam
Mohammad Enam Ahmed Chowdhury
Md. Abdullah-Al-Mamun
Tashmeem Muntazir Chowdhury
Mahmood Hossain
Tahseen Amin Hemel
Tabassum Abedin
Md. Arifur Rahman
Mahbub Ul Kader
Md. Masud Rana
Tapos Kumar Roy
Venue: Hotel Lakeshore & City Bank
Head Office
Designation
Manager
Manager
Manager
Sr. Executive Officer
Manager
Assistant Manager
Assistant Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Manager
Senior Manager
Asst. Manager
AGM
Sr Manager
Manager
Annexure II B
IDLC in Environmental and Social Risk and Opportunity Management (ESROM) Workshop
In continuation with the previous two training sessions, IDLC organized another
four sessions (each with 2-day workshop) titled “Strengthening capacity and
knowledge on Environmental and Social Risk and Opportunity Management
(ESROM) among Financial Institutions in Bangladesh”. The workshop was a joint
initiative of several development financial institutions like DEG, FMO, OeEB,
Proparco, UNEPFI and their five Bangladeshi FI partners – IDLC Finance Limited,
Brac Bank, Eastern Bank, Dutch-Bangla Bank, and The City Bank. The objective
of this program was to develop capacity for bankers with respect to
environmental and social issues, identification of risks and opportunities and
finding innovative & bankable green products for the financial market.
The whole program was arranged through a set of transaction-based case
studies from the different financial institution portfolios. Prominanat figures
from financial DFIs & financial institutions as well as renowned industry
entreprenuers were present at those sessions and shared their views &
experiences. It is expected that from now on, trained bankers/credit
analysts/Relationship managers will be able to address Environmental and
Social (E&S) risks and opportunities and identify innovative and bankable
green opportunities. Furthermore, this training will assist to adopt mitigation
measures for identified risks, subsequently ensuring proper compliance and
enhancement of brand value.
Discussion session facilitated by FMO official
Participants of the 5th ESROM workshop
These six training sessions trained approximately 150 relationship officers and
credit analysts of partner FIs. 29 employees of IDLC from several departments
were present in those sessions.
Certificate Giving Ceremony
Annexure III
IDLC Signs MoU with Spectrum Lanka Technology Solutions Limited
IDLC Finance Limited recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with
Spectrum Lanka Technology Solutions Limited, a technical and management
consultancy company for Ready Made Garments and Textile industry on 26th
November 2015 at IDLC CHO. The objective of this MoU is to promote and develop
business in Green Industry, Compliance Management, Energy Efficiency and
Renewable Energy and encourage Green Technology in environmentally
vulnerable sectors in mutually beneficial areas as per both companies’ terms &
conditions.
IDLC representatives in the ceremony
The ceremony was chaired by Mr. M. Jamal Uddin, Deputy Managing Director of
IDLC Finance Limited and Mr. Aminda Atthanayeke, Managing Director of
Spectrum Lanka Technology Solutions Limited. Also present at the event were
Mr. Md. Mesbah Uddin Ahmed, DGM, Head of Corporate of IDLC Finance
Limited, Subrata Bhattacharjee, Director of SLTSL.
As per the MoU, IDLC will extend financing facility to the referred clients of
Spectrum Lanka Technology Solutions Limited from Bangladesh Bank Green
Finance scheme or any other scheme as seems applicable to that point or from
its own source. It is to be noted that rate of interest and other terms and
conditions will be set according to guideline of the availed fund. IDLC shall also
suggest the service of Spectrum Lanka Technology Solutions Limited to its clients
(If required) related to different green projects.
SLTSL representatives in the ceremony
MoU signing
investments SUBSIDIES
+ Tekst Hans van de Veen + Fotografie Tanvir Mahmud
45
P+ winter 2016
P+ winter 2016
44
Vergroenen leningen kost tijd
“De vraag is of je meer subsidies nodig hebt,
of juist meer pioniers zoals Mehbuboor Rahman”
Is financiering van groene investeringen door het midden- en kleinbedrijf in ontwikkelingslanden mogelijk zonder subsidie? In de meeste gevallen niet, zo lijkt het. Al is het maar omdat
er moet worden opgebokst tegen de gangbare subsidiëring van fossiele brandstoffen. Maar van
wie moet dat geld komen? Banken kijken naar de overheid, maar kunnen zelf ook meer doen.
Zoals investeren in hun eigen kennis van milieutechnologie.
M
ehbuboor Rahman is een doener. In krap een jaar tijd
bouwde de manager van IDLC Finance in Bangladesh een
portfolio van 15 miljoen dollar op, bestaande uit tientallen groene projecten. Bijvoorbeeld in de baksteenproductie. Je denkt er
niet als eerste aan, maar met een jaarlijkse CO2-emissie van bijna
10 miljoen ton is deze sector een topvervuiler in het dichtbevolkte Bangladesh. Dat komt vooral door de traditionele wijze van
drogen van de stenen, met openluchtvuren en dieselstook. IDLC
financierde de overstap van enkele baksteenproducenten op
nieuwe, energiezuinige droogmethodes met behulp van ovens.
Energie-efficiëntie is de gemene deler van de meeste groene
projecten in Bangladesh. Veel bedrijven kregen leningen voor het
vervangen van oude boilers of dieselaggregaten. Scheelt al gauw
30 procent aan energieverbruik, schat Rahman. Andere groene
leningen gingen naar afvalwaterzuivering en compostering van
afval. Investeringen in zonne-energie, biogas en waterkracht
zorgden voor een extra energieproductie van 377 MW. In de
snelgroeiende Bengaalse economie was het voor het eerst dat
bedrijven een beroep konden doen op giften en kredieten met
een specifiek groene bestemming. IDLC Finance stapte in deze
markt nadat de centrale bank van het land een groenfonds
opzette van 25 miljoen dollar, waarmee banken en kredietinstellingen goedkope financiering konden aanbieden.
Een goedkope lening in een ontwikkelingsland als Bangladesh
betekent een rente van 9 procent, in plaats van de normale 14 tot
18 procent. En een looptijd van minimaal vijf jaar, in vergelijking
met de maximaal vier jaar bij commerciële kredieten. De aantrekkelijke voorwaarden verklaren mede het succes van het groene
IDLC-fonds. Rahman: “De meeste ondernemers in Bangladesh
investeren alleen in milieumaatregelen als er gratis geld of
goedkope leningen beschikbaar zijn. De terugverdientijd van
dit soort maatregelen is minimaal drie jaar, en vaak langer.
Bij zonne-energie zelfs vijftien jaar. Dat kan een gemiddelde
ondernemer zich niet veroorloven.”
IDLC speelt daarop in door te werken aan bewustwording. In
het hele land organiseert het bijeenkomsten voor ondernemers,
waar de nadruk ligt op energiebesparing. “Op dat gebied zijn
de snelle winsten te behalen.” Bedrijven kunnen een gratis audit
krijgen, resulterend in een lijst met aanbevelingen voor meer
energie-efficiëntie. Ook intern is bewustwording nodig. Met
ruim twaalfhonderd werknemers is IDLC in Bangladesh de
grootste kredietinstelling buiten de banksector. Rahman:
“Een van de eerste vragen die ondernemers mij stellen over bijvoorbeeld zonne-energie is: doen jullie dat zelf ook? Wij moeten
het voorbeeld geven, dus hebben we flink geïnvesteerd in duurzame energie en energiebesparing.”
Ondanks deze inspanningen zal de markt van duurzame projecten in Bangladesh voorlopig niet zonder subsidie kunnen, denkt
Rahman. Het groene potje van de centrale bank is inmiddels leeg.
“De vraag is of we dit soort projecten nu ook op commerciële
basis kunnen financieren. Wij denken dat het daar nog te vroeg
voor is. Daarom zoeken we extern naar fondsen, waarmee we
onze gratis audits en goedkope kredieten kunnen voortzetten.”
Wat voor duurzaamheid geldt in Bangladesh, is evenzeer waar
voor investeringen in veiligheid voor werknemers. Na de rampzalige brand in de textielfabriek Rana Plaza, die aan meer dan
elfhonderd werknemers het leven kostte, zijn inmiddels duizenden textielfabrieken in het land – met steun van buitenlandse
donoren, waaronder Nederland – doorgelicht op onder meer
brandveiligheid. Dat resulteerde in waslijsten met aanbevelingen
voor de afzonderlijke bedrijven, maar die zijn weinig geneigd
maatregelen te nemen. Rahman: “Men beseft het belang misschien wel, maar de bedrijven zitten onderling in een moordende
concurrentie. Ze hebben het kapitaal niet om te investeren in
Ontwikkelingsbank FMO vindt subsidie op
zonnepanelen niet zo’n goed idee voor
Bangladesh: “Ondernemers zullen een
volgende keer pas actie ondernemen als er
weer goedkoop geld beschikbaar is.”
sprinklers en vluchtwegen. Natuurlijk is dat kortetermijnbeleid,
maar dit soort investeringen draagt nu eenmaal niet onmiddellijk bij aan extra verdiensten. Het is voor hen een pure kostenpost. Zonder financiële tegemoetkoming doen ze dit niet.”
Ook FMO worstelt met dit dilemma. De ontwikkelingsbank
steunt IDLC tot 2019 met een krediet van 20 miljoen dollar. Dat
geld is niet bedoeld om er extra goedkope leningen mee uit te
zetten. “De vraag is of je meer subsidies nodig hebt, of juist meer
pioniers zoals Mehbuboor Rahman”, zegt Frederik Jan van den
Bosch, manager Micro & Small Enterprise Finance bij FMO.
>
In plaats van een vervuilende
dieselgenerator pompt nu een draaiend
waterrad op het Indonesische eiland
Sumba water naar de groene akkers
verderop.
Is Nederland belangrijk in microfinanciering?
Wereldwijd maken zo’n 250 miljoen mensen gebruik van microfinanciering. Er gaat naar schatting 110
miljard euro om in deze sector. Hiervan wordt 26 miljard euro gefinancierd door buitenlandse
investeerders. De dertien leden van het Nederlands Platform voor Microfinanciering zijn goed voor bijna
10 procent daarvan. Deelnemers zijn commerciële banken als Rabobank, ASN Bank, ING en Triodos,
sociale investeerders als Oikocredit en ICCO Terrafina Microfinance, en ngo’s als Oxfam Novib en Cordaid.
47
www.inclusivefinanceplatform.nl
>
“Ik denk het laatste. IDLC greep de kans van het groene potje
van de centrale bank met beide handen aan. Andere banken niet.
Daarmee bouwde IDLC een portfolio in deze markt op. Dat
maakt het verschil.”
Bij FMO zijn ze niet zo’n fan van gesubsidieerde leningen, zegt
Van den Bosch. “Om bedrijven een eerste zetje te geven kan het
nuttig zijn, maar het schept verwachtingen. Ondernemers zullen
een volgende keer ook pas actie ondernemen als er goedkoop geld
beschikbaar is. Een verwachtingspatroon waar je niet meer vanaf
komt.” De uitweg is volgens hem kredietaanbieders als IDLC
sterker te maken en daarmee een impuls te geven aan de hele
groene sector. “Met slimme incentives kun je veel bereiken, ook
zonder subsidie.” Zijn Bengaalse collega weet daar wel een voorbeeld van. Financiële instellingen moeten volgens hem meer
investeren in het vergroten van hun eigen kennis van groene
technologie. “Ondernemers investeren niet in duurzaamheid
vanwege de kosten, maar ze kennen de nieuwe technologieën
ook niet. Als banken wel die kennis in huis hebben kunnen ze
ondernemers beter overtuigen van de mogelijke business case.”
Kennis van milieutechnologie is de sleutel, zegt Rahman, zelf
opgeleid als ingenieur. “Misschien nog wel belangrijker dan
subsidies.”
Hij krijgt daarin bijval van Pier Vellinga, de Nederlandse
klimaatprofessor. Sinds hij toetrad tot de Supervisory Board
van FMO pleit Vellinga daar ook voor meer technische kennis
binnen de bank. “Dat heb je nodig om je klanten te begrijpen.
Wie zoals FMO aan duurzaamheid wil werken, kan niet volstaan
met financiële kennis. Dan moet je de technologie kennen, weet
hebben van clean tech, van de laatste innovaties.”
Vellinga sprak onlangs op een bijeenkomst die het Nederlands
platform voor Microfinanciering (NpM) organiseerde samen met
Hivos en FMO. Centraal stond de vraag: gaan groen en sociaal
samen bij het investeren in midden- en kleinbedrijf in lage- en
middeninkomenslanden? Ja, zeiden de NpM-leden, en ondersteunden dat met recent onderzoek. Conclusie: de belangstelling
voor groene investeringen neemt sterk toe aan de kant van dono-
“Met slimme incentives kun je veel bereiken, ook zonder subsidie.”
aan het weven van sarongs, die 40 euro per
stuk opleveren. De ingewikkelde Sumbanese
weeftechniek ikat is internationaal vermaard.
Ook bekwamen vrouwen zich in andere kooktechnieken: het koken is complexer geworden
dankzij nieuwe apparatuur. ’s Avonds wordt tv
gekeken. Chinese vechtfilms verdrijven de
verveling.
ren en financiële instellingen, maar de vraag bij bedrijven in
ontwikkelingslanden blijft daarbij achter. Naast educatie –
bewustwordingscampagnes zoals in Bangladesh – zou ook de
overheid daar verandering in kunnen brengen, denken de NpMleden. Vooral in de vorm van publiek-private samenwerking,
waarbij publiek geld wordt ingezet om de ondernemers voor de
groene zaak te winnen.
In een verklaring aan minister Ploumen voor Buitenlandse
Handel en Ontwikkelingssamenwerking committeren de dertien
leden van het platform zich aan vergroening van hun financieringsactiviteiten in ontwikkelingslanden. En daarbij vragen
ze steun aan de overheid. “We zien het belang van groene investeringen die bijdragen aan armoedevermindering”, zegt Josien
Sluijs, directeur van NpM. “Opschaling is nodig van de vele kleine
projecten die er nu zijn. We hebben grote partijen achter ons die
bereid zijn te investeren. Maar het kan niet zonder dat ook overheden meedoen.” Het gaat niet om geld alleen, benadrukt ze. “In
de financiële wereld is het belangrijk dat alle wet- en regelgeving
op orde is. Dat je goed zaken kunt doen met bepaalde landen. En
dat er een stimulerende omgeving is voor ondernemers.”
FMO-topman Nanno Kleiterp sluit zich aan bij de oproep, maar
ziet ook dilemma’s. Hij is net terug uit Midden-Amerika, waar
hij in vergelijking met een paar jaar terug een duidelijk toegenomen belangstelling zag voor groene investeringen. “Toen
hadden de banken het vooral over financiële risico’s, nu zien ze
kansen.” Jammer alleen dat, toen Kleiterp een CEO van een bank
in Costa Rica vroeg hoe hij de groene investeringen inpaste in de
algemene strategie van zijn bedrijf, het eerlijke antwoord luidde:
“Mij gaat het erom de langetermijnpositie van onze bank veilig
te stellen. Jullie ontwikkelingsorganisaties zijn daarvoor belangrijk. Dus als jullie allemaal zeggen dat ik groen en inclusief moet
zijn, dan ben ik dat.” Nogal teleurstellend, erkent Kleiterp, maar
ook een aanwijzing dat de sector niet te hard van stapel moet
lopen. “We moeten balans aanbrengen. Niet suggereren dat we
alleen nog maar groen willen investeren. Het midden- en kleinbedrijf in ontwikkelingslanden snakt naar kapitaal. Daar moeten
wij aan bijdragen. Ook al gaat het om investeringen die niet per
se groen zijn. Natuurlijk moeten ze geen negatieve impact op
het milieu hebben. De markt voor groene projecten die ook goed
zijn voor werkgelegenheid moet de kans krijgen om te groeien.”
www.fmo.nl
Verdrijft duurzame energie
de armoede op Sumba?
Het straatarme Indonesische eiland Sumba krijgt 100 procent hernieuwbare
energie, met dank aan ontwikkelingsorganisatie Hivos.
+ Tekst Han van de Wiel + Fotografie Feri Latief
W
e lopen door de velden, klimmen een
dijkje op, en staan vrij onverwacht aan
de oever van een meanderend riviertje. Op het
water ligt een draaiend waterrad, dat is bevestigd op drijvers zodat het kan meebewegen met
de stand van het water. Het waterrad pompt
water in een groot bassin en vandaar wordt
het getransporteerd naar de akkers verderop.
We staan midden in Waingapu, een stad in het
oosten van het straatarme Indonesische eiland
Sumba. Het heeft al maanden niet geregend,
maar daar is niets van te merken. Volwassenen
en kinderen werken onder de brandende
zon tussen de tomaten, paksoi, kolen, uien,
chilipeper en wortels. Veertig huishoudens
leven van de opbrengst, en verkopen wat ze
niet consumeren. Vroeger werd een dieselgenerator gebruikt voor de irrigatie. Maar
diesel en onderhoud kosten geld en vaak was er
gedoe over de juiste verdeling van het water.
Dit project illustreert de visie en aanpak van de
Nederlandse ontwikkelingsorganisatie Hivos,
zegt Adi Lagur van Hivos. “We laten zien dat
energie een middel is, geen doel. Het gaat erom
dat je weet wat de gebruikers met die energie
willen en kunnen doen. De teelt van groenten
bevorderen bijvoorbeeld, zodat de mensen
een perspectief krijgen op het verbeteren van
hun leven.”
In Kamanggih, hemelsbreed 40 kilometer
verderop, loopt een groep jongens mee bij de
bezichtiging van de miniwaterkrachtcentrale,
die stroom levert aan 350 huishoudens. Umbu
Hinggu Panjanji, hoofd van de boerencoöperatie, geeft uitleg. “Vroeger behielpen we ons
in het donker met kerosinelampen. Nu we
elektriciteit hebben, kunnen we vaardigheden
ontwikkelen waaraan we vroeger vanwege de
duisternis niet toekwamen.”
De vrouwen van het dorp besteden meer tijd
Beide projecten zijn onderdeel van Sumba Iconic
Island, een initiatief van Hivos om de energievoorziening op het eiland rond 2020 voor
100 procent hernieuwbaar te maken. “Het is
een ambitieus initiatief, dat wereldwijd als
voorbeeld kan dienen en ons in staat stelt het
verhaal over ontwikkelingssamenwerking
en duurzame energie te vertellen”, zegt Eco
Matser van Hivos.
In 2009 had een kwart van de 680 duizend
eilanders toegang tot energie (elektriciteit en
moderne warmtebronnen om te koken). Twee
derde van de bevolking was afhankelijk van
kerosine voor lampen en hout om op te koken.
Alle brandstof werd geïmporteerd. Inmiddels
heeft 40 procent van de bevolking stroom.
Met steun van Hivos werden drie waterkrachtcentrales gebouwd en krijgen steeds meer
dorpen biogasinstallaties. Staatsenergiebedrijf
PLN heeft duizenden zonnepanelen en minigrids verkocht mét onderhoudsgarantie.
En binnenkort staat er een grote windmolen
op het eiland.
Sumba is te groot voor Hivos alleen. Noorwegen, de Asian Development Bank, de
Indonesische overheid, het staatsenergiebedrijf PLN en andere bedrijven investeren
samen 5 miljoen euro in de energieopwekking.
Anderhalf uur voordat het vliegtuig vertrekt,
eten we in een restaurant dat is opgetrokken
uit bamboe. Het wordt gerund door Balinezen.
Fotograaf Feri is enthousiast: “Dat die hier
investeren, is een goed teken. Balinezen ruiken
als geen ander waar toeristische kansen liggen.” De ontwikkeling van Sumba is in volle
gang. ■
www.hivos.nl
P+ winter 2016
P+ winter 2016
46
BANGLADESH, FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS
COMPANY
IDLC Finance Limited
SECTOR
Green SME Finance
in Bangladesh
GREENLINE FINANCING TO SUPPORT YOUNG BUSINESSES
Financial Institutions
TOTAL ASSETS
US$ 871 mln
IDLC Finance focuses on financing sustainable business by supporting SMEs via
funding and also encouraging greener business practices. FMO is supporting this
goal by providing long tenor loans and additional sustainable business advice.
IMPACT AND PERFORMANCE
Target in 2015 for direct
green finance: US$ 12.5 mln
Major focus areas:
• Renewable Energy
INVESTMENT INFORMATION
• Energy Efficiency
• Green Industry
NAME
IDLC Finance Limited
SECTOR
Financial Institutions
TOTAL ASSETS
US$ 871 mln
TOTAL LOAN PORTFOLIO
US$ 680 mln of which 88% dedicated to SMEs
AMOUNT ARRANGED
US$ 20 mln
FMO INVEST
US$ 20 mln
YEAR OF INVEST
2014
FINANCIAL PRODUCT(S) USED
FMO-A senior unsecured facility
TENOR
5 years
SUPPORTING YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS
Over the past few years, the Bangladesh Bank has engaged
the country’s financial sector in the promotion of inclusive,
environmentally sustainable financing. This has helped the
Bangladesh economy to maintain over 6% annual average GDP
growth from 2011-2014.
However, the population is relatively young, so in order for this
expanding labor force to find employment, opportunities need
to be created by both public and private sector, and as such IDLC
has identified SMEs as an area of focus. The company is also
committed to sustainable business practices and strong financial
performance. Over the past 30 years IDLC has become the largest
multi-product multi-segment Non-Banking Financial Institution
in Bangladesh and one of the blue-chip companies on local
stock markets. The business which started in 1986 with five staff
members has today evolved into a multi-product US$750 million
business. IDLC is today represented in 31 branches & booths in
15 cities with over 1,200 staff.
LEADING GREEN BANKING
IDLC has created a Green Banking Unit (GBU) as one of its major
priority sectors and now recognized as one of the market leaders
in promoting the Green Banking Concept in Bangladesh.
This has led to some key achievements including energy project
financing for five power projects with the capacity of 377 MW
to improve energy access. Another Solar Nano Grid project will
produce 300 KW of electricity for 20,000 people living in off-grid
areas. Apart from IDLC’s drive on sustainable energy, five LEED
• Fire & Safety Management
• Waste Management
certified green industry buildings equipped with state-of-the-art
technology are receiving green finance. IDLC is the first in the
financial industry in Bangladesh to publish a sustainability report
since 2011 revealing its commitment and ambition to become a
carbon neutral company.
FINANCING CHANGE
FMO has been additional by providing IDLC with a longer tenor
loan than available in the commercial market. IDLC was thus
enabled to also offer longer tenors to its SME clients. FMO’s
assistance in developing an Environment and Social Management
System has really set the bar high and has given IDLC a right
focus for the coming years.
IDLC understands that with global development and global
warming, green banking plays a significant role in protecting our
existence, and wants to impart this knowledge and best practice
to its clients.
FMO is the Dutch development bank.
financial institutions, energy and
FMO has invested in the private sector
agribusiness. Alongside partners, we
in developing countries and emerging
invest in the infrastructure, manufacturing
markets for more than 45 years. Our
and services sectors. With an investment
mission is to empower entrepreneurs to
portfolio of EUR 8 billion spanning over 85
build a better world. We invest in sectors
countries, FMO is one of the larger bilateral
where we believe our contribution can
private sector development banks globally.
have the highest long-term impact:
www.fmo.nl
Over 100 Financial Institutions Mobilized to Increase
Global Investment in Energy Efficiency
Energy efficiency is key as climate change action as well as for sustainable development. It is the measure
expected to bring half of all emissions reductions needed to reach a peak in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020
and stay within a 2°C global average temperature increase scenario. It brings multiple benefits such as improved
resource efficiency and industrial productivity, strengthened energy security as well as better health and
wellbeing conditions. Yet, a lack of visibility and clear focus on energy efficiency, together with insufficient
investments, have left most of this potential untapped.
Bridging the energy efficiency finance gap will require financial institutions to channel more capital flows for
energy efficiency as well as policy-makers to address barriers and stimulate energy efficiency investment through
supportive policy frameworks. Energy efficiency is relevant for all countries, either developing, emerging or
developed.
The mobilization of financial institutions emerged in the context of two high-level initiatives promoting
investment in energy efficiency:

The UN Sustainable Energy for All (SE4All) initiative, a partnership between governments, the private
sector and civil society, which has among its objectives to double the global rate of improvement in
energy efficiency by 2030.

And the G20 Energy Efficiency Finance Task Group which has led several consultations in 2015 with
finance stakeholders and prepared the ‘Voluntary Energy Efficiency Investment Principles for G20
Participating Countries’, which were welcomed by G20 Energy Ministers in their historic Communique,
and attached to the G20 Leaders’ Communique in November.
EBRD’s initiative and co-operation with the UN SE4All Energy Efficiency Accelerator led to the endorsement by
banks of the Statement by Financial Institutions on Energy Efficiency Finance. This effort was coordinated with
UNEP FI, associating additional banks, and mobilizing investors on the G20 Energy Efficiency Investor Statement,
in the context of the G20 work on energy efficiency finance.
Between these two initiatives, over 130 financial institutions commit to further embed energy efficiency in their
strategies and operations.
1
STATEMENT BY FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY
We, the Alliance of Energy Efficiency Financing Institutions:

acknowledge that the financial sector is uniquely placed to channel finance to activities that promote energy








efficiency
understand there are many unaddressed energy efficiency financing opportunities in our markets
are already providing finance to support our clients with energy efficiency investments
will actively contribute to scaling up energy efficiency financing
without taking on undue burden, are willing to work towards tracking our deployment of energy efficiency
finance
recognise the need to further embed energy efficiency investment principles into the way in which we
engage with our clients
have a special interest in guiding our clients towards best practice financing decisions, including on
modernisation and competitiveness strategies that instil enhanced energy efficiency
are willing to work with institutional and public financiers seeking to deploy climate finance to our clients
welcome the opportunity to share our experiences and acquire knowledge of successful business strategies for
integrating energy efficiency across our financing operations.
Endorsed by over 100 banks and leasing companies from 42 countries
ABN AMRO
ACBA - Credit Agricole Bank
ACCESSBANK
Agjencioni Per Financim NE Kosove
AKBank
Ameriabank
Armswissbank
ASN Bank
Bai Tushum & Partners
Banamex
Banca Transilvania
Bancolombia
Bancompartir
Bank Eskhata
Bank Millennium
Bank of Georgia
Bank of India
Bank of Valletta
Bank Republic
Basisbank
BBVA
Belgazprombank
Belvnesheconombank
BMCE Bank of Africa
BNP Paribas
Bpifrance
BPS-SBERBank
BRAC Bank Limited
BRD - Groupe Societe Generale
CASA DE Economii SI Consemnatiuni
CenterInvest Bank
CIBanco
Connecticut Green Bank
Crédit Agricole
Crédit Coopératif
Crédit Foncier
CREDO
Daegu Bank
Demir Kyrgyz International Bank
Demirbank
DenizBank
Desjardins Group
Ecobank
Erste & Steiermarkische Bank
Eurobank
Firstrand
Garanti Bankasi
Garanti Leasing
Halkbank Skopje
Hana Bank
HSBC Bank Armenia
Humo MDO
IDLC Finance Limited
Imon International
Industrial Bank
ING Group
Kyrgyz Investment and Credit Bank
La Banque Postale
Megabank Public Joint Stock Company
Microinvest
Minsk Transit Bank
Mobiasbanca
Moldincombank
Moldova Agroindbank
Mutualista Pichincha
National Bank of Egypt
NLB Tutunska Banka Skopje
NRW Bank
Ohridska Banka Ohrid
OTP Bank Romania
Pireaus Bank
Procredit Group
Raiffeisen Bank Aval
Raiffeisen Bank Bosnia and Herzegovina
Raiffeisen Bank Romania
SEF International Universal Credit
Organization
Şekerbank
Shinhan Bank
Slovenska Sporitelna
Societe Generale Group
Societe Generale Banka Beograd
State Export Import Bank of Ukraine
Sudameris Bank
Sumitomo Mitsui Trust Holdings
Tatra banka
Triodos Bank
TuranBank
Türkiye Ýþ Bankasý
Türkiye Sinai Kalkinma Bankasi
UK Green Investment Bank
Ukrsibbank
Unibank
Unicredit Bank Mostar
Unicreditbank Serbia
Unicredit Bulbank
Unicredit Tiriac Banka
United Bulgarian Bank
Vakiflar Bankasi
VTB Georgia
Xac Bank
Yapý ve Kredi Bankasi
YES Bank
Zagrebacka Banka
2
G20 ENERGY EFFICIENCY INVESTOR STATEMENT
As our contribution to the work of the G20 Energy Efficiency Finance Task Group, as managers and
investors, we share a common understanding of the positive economic and societal benefits of energy
efficiency. In order to ensure that our activities promote and support energy efficiency, and in
consideration of our fiduciary responsibility: We recognize the need to fully embed energy efficiency into
our investment process.
We, the undersigned, undertake to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Embed material energy efficiency considerations into the way in which we evaluate companies;
Include energy efficiency as an area of focus when we engage with companies;
Take into consideration energy efficiency performance, to the extent relevant to the proposal being
considered, when we vote on shareholder proposals.
To the extent relevant, incorporate energy efficiency investment considerations when we select managers;
Assess our existing real estate assets and managers and monitor and report on their energy efficiency
performance;
Seek appropriate opportunities to increase energy efficiency investments in our portfolios.
Signed and endorsed by 39 investors managing close to USD 4 trillion
3
For Further Information
G20 Energy Efficiency Finance Task Group (coordinated by IPEEC Secretariat)
Benoît Lebot
Executive Director, IPEEC Secretariat (International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation)
[email protected]
www.IPEEC.org/eeftg
Sustainable Energy for All Initiative (SE4All)
Thibaud Voita
Programme Officer, Energy Efficiency
[email protected]
www.se4all.org
UNEP
Mark Radka
Chief Energy, Climate, and Technology Branch
[email protected]
Eric Usher
Head (acting), UNEP Finance Initiative
[email protected]
Annie Degen
UNEP Finance Initiative Energy Efficiency Coordinator
[email protected]
www.unepfi.org/work-streams/energyefficiency/
EBRD
Josué Tanaka
Managing Director
Energy Efficiency & Climate Change
[email protected]
www.ebrd.com/home
Terry McCallion
Director
Energy Efficiency & Climate Change
[email protected]
Ian Smith
Head of Sustainable Energy Financing Facilities
Energy Efficiency & Climate Change
[email protected]
Ceres
Rob Berridge
Director, Shareholder Engagement,
[email protected]
www.ceres.org
PRI
Sagarika Chatterjee
Associate Director, Policy and Research
[email protected]
www.unpri.org
4

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