cable tool drilling

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cable tool drilling
CABLE TOOL DRILLING
„
„
„
By
Roger E. Renner, MGWC
NGWA President 2001
Roger E. Renner, MGWC
„
„
„
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„
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President of E.H. RENNER & SONS, INC.
President of NGWA 2001
NGWA Certified MGWC
President of Mn. Water Well Assoc. 1990
Vice-Chairman of Mn. Dept of Health
Advisory Council on wells &
borings/Licensing Board.
Past Member of Mn. Dept of Health
Plumbing Advisory Council.
Member of AWWA, Wisconsin Water Well
Assoc. and MGWA & MRWA.
CABLE TOOL DRILLING
„
„
This workshop will present general information on cable
tool drilling, safety around the drill rig and selecting
proper size tools and their use. Safe equipment
operation will be addressed, in addition to unique
properties of this method.
In this session on cable tool drilling, We will discuss
the History of cable tool and how it relates to today’s
drilling jobs. A discussion on the terms used, safe
aspects of drilling with cable tool & the future of cable
tool. A discussion on the API standard tool joints, good
care & maintenance of tools. A discussion on the various
fishing tools now available and how they are used.
OUTLINE
„
„
„
CABLE TOOL HISTORY
JOB SITE SAFETY
CABLE TOOL BASICS
„
„
CABLE TYPES
API TOOL JOINTS
„
FISHING TOOLS & TERMS
„
FISHING JOB AT PIIC #4
CABLE TOOL
HISTORY
History
„
„
Since man first drilled wells on earth, he
has faced the problem of obtaining
water to survive.
Ancient drillers must have realized the
need for special drilling tools with which
to extract obtain this water.
„
Chinese and Persians constructed
wells as early as 2000 B.C. by the
percussion drilling method.
History
History
„
ONE OF THE FIRST WELLS DRILLED IN THE
UNITED STATES WAS IN 1807 IN BUFFALO
LICK, WEST VIRGINIA BY DAVID & JOE
RUFFNER.
History
„
„
TOOL STRING MADE UP BY A LOCAL
BLACKSMITH, CONSISTING OF JOINTED IRON
RODS AND A CHISEL BIT.
WELL COMPLETED IN 1808 TO A DEPTH OF 58FT.
History
„
SPRING POLES ALLOWED
THEM TO DRILL DEEPER
BUT FISHING FOR BROKEN
TOOLS BECAME THE NORM.
History
„
1830 HORSE POWERED RIGS GAVE WAY
TO THE STEAM ENGINE AND STANDARD
4-LEGGED DERRICKS
History
„
1831 BILLY MORRIS INVENTED JARS
„
TWO TYPES
„
„
„
ENDLESS - SPANGE
WELDED
THE NEXT 50 YEARS FREE-FALLING
JOINTED STEEL RODS WERE
DEVELOPED.
History
„
„
„
1867 Henry Kelly invented the portable drill rig
that revolutionized the water well drilling industry.
First rig built in small shop near Osage Iowa
1891 Henry Kelly became associated with O.B.
Tanneyhill selling rigs under company name of
Morgan, Kelly, and Tanneyhill.
EARLY PROBLEMS/FISHING
„
DRILL STRING MADE OF WOOD
„
BREAKAGE WAS COMMON
„
WEAR WAS FAST
„
DEPTH DETERMINED BY FLOATING TOOLS
WHICH ALSO SLOWED DOWN THE DRILL.
German
grabs
hooks
1850
German
fishing tools
of 1886
EARLY PROBLEMS/FISHING
„
PROBLEMS OF UNCREWING W/STRAIGHT
THREAD
„
USE OF STEEL CABLE VS HEMP ROPE
„
STEEL DERICKS VS WOODEN DERICKS
„
USE OF CRACKER
History
„
„
„
DRILL TOOLS JOINTS WERE ORIGINALLY
MADE WITH A STRAIGHT THREAD A
PRACTICE WHICH CAUSED THESE JOINTS
TO TAPER FROM LONG, CONTINUED USE.
DISCOVERED THAT A TAPERED JOINT
MADE A MUCH STRONGER, SECURE
CONNECTION.
DRASTICALLY REDUCED FISHING.
“CRACKER”
„
„
„
History
SINCE DERRICKS WERE ALL STIFF LEGGED,
SOMETHING HAD TO BE MADE FOR
ABSORBING THE SHOCK OF THE DRILL
TOOLS
ACCOMPLISHED BY USING A 25 – 50FT
LENGTH OF MANILA LINE BETWEEN THE
TOOLS AND STEEL CABLE.
CALLED THE “CRACKER”
History
„
ED RENNER’S FIRST SINGLE CYLINDER ENGINE DRIVEN CYCLONE
„
WOODEN MAST, HEMP ROPE, PITMAN ARM
{EARLY 1900’S}
History
„
„
1904 Kelly died, name changed to
Armstrong-Quam Co.
1910 name again changed to Armstrong
Manufacturing Company.
„
Armstrong developed first upper head
rubber mounted shock absorber that
eliminated the “cracker”
„
„
Bud Armstrong Invention
Armstrong Manufacturing Co.
History
Providing standard transportation for this
steam powered rig were four mules.
History
„
CYCLONE – Horse drawn, wooden frame, pitman
„
ED RENNER
EARLY 1900’S
THESE MACHINES WERE
EVEN SELF PROPELLED
(HORSELESS)
HISTORY
1905 Loomis Clipper
1912 version of an Armstrong “spudding
outfit,” forerunner of the Armstrong 50W
1914 model #3 Keystone
History
„
THE API THREAD BECAME THE
STANDARD IN 1919.
Keystone No. 3-1/2
1922
Either wood or coal boiler
History
„
„
Bucyrus bought into the Armstrong Line
of Rigs in 1933
Changed the name to BucyrusArmstrong
History
„
„
„
1940 Bucyrus Armstrong 21-W
3” double acting piston pump.
France Ave City limits..
4-1/2” steel well.
263ft deep.
Edina Minnesota
History
„
„
Waterloo Iowa
NEW 21 & 22-W RIGS
Bucyrus-Armstrong Manufacturing Co.
History
„
L-R: Thomas Renner, Bud Armstrong, unknown,
E.H. Renner - “Lunch Time”
1940
History
„
„
„
E.H. RENNER at the
controls of his new
21-W cable tool rig
Made by Bucyrus
Armstrong Co.
1941
History
„
„
1943 - Bucyrus Erie
changed the name
to Bucyrus-Erie
Developed new
B.E. 24-W with a
Hercules Engine
History
.
„
„
New 22-W,Mounted on a Forester
From a company who change their name to BUCYRUS-ERIE
History
„
„
„
Wisconsin Water Well Association Convention 1996
Oshgosh, WI
Not much has changed. {Buckeye Supply}
22w
„
Air cool engine,
hydraulic jacks, welder.
36-L
ALWAYS KEEP IT SAFE
JOB SITE SAFETY
„
„
„
„
Use your head to keep vigilance
Sound of operations
Feel of drilling
Unusual happenings
„
„
„
Visitors (Owner, fuel, Engineer)
Fishing
Environment (Temperature, moisture,
fumes, gases, swl changes)
SUPPORT TRAILER
„
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PHONE
SECURITY
FIRST AID
TOOLS
HEAT IN SUMMER
COLD IN WINTER
CABLE TOOL RIG SET UP
„
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„
„
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PROPER SET UP
PROPERTY LINES
LOCATE SERVICE
WORK ZONE
SAFETY PARIMETER
ACCESS
CABLE TOOL RIG SET UP
„
GUY LINES
EACH SET UP REQUIRE SITE
ASSESSMENT/ACTION
Adapt rig set up to each site
„
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Level rig
Set up dog house
Set Platform
Spot pipe
Secure Welder
Obtain Water source
Contain cuttings.
Safe zone
Determine &
set up safe
zone
Rig set up
„
Dangers of:
„
„
„
„
„
Wind
Cold
Ice
Breaks
Clutches
Wind and Cold / Site Safety
„
Wind break
„
„
Contain heat
Dangers of Frost bite
THE BIGGER THE WELL:
„
THE EASIER TO DRILL
„
THE MORE OPTIONS AVAILABLE
„
THE MORE DEEPER CAPABILITY VIA
MULTICASED
Selection
„
„
Selection of Tools
CABLE
History
Measurement
Types of Cable
Cable Maintenance
„
TOOL JOINTS & BREAKAGE
TYPES OF TOOLS
„
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BIT
BAR
JARS
SOCKET
BAILER
CASING
FISHING
TYPES OF BITS
> BIT
„
„
„
HUBBARD
STAR
HOLE OPENER
OR UNDERREAMER
Hubbard Bits
„
Sharp cutting edge
„
„
„
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Forged
Hard Face (welded)
Length of wash port
Square
Pin size
36” star bit
„
Bars or Stems
„
„
„
Pin by box
Squares
API standard
Size:
„
„
„
„
Length
Diameter
Pin Size
Weight
MAKE A TIGHT
CONNECTIONS
WRENCHES
PLAIN OR JACK END
CLAW END
BAR AND CHAIN TOOLS
DUTCHMANS - SLIPS
„
5” wrenches
Pick the right wrenches
Barrett Circle Jack
„
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Ratchet
Align marks
Recheck frequently
Tighten safely
Use correct
wrenches
Remove from area
Keep clean/oiled
TYPES OF BAILERS
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DART BOTTOM
LESLIE BOTTOM (Sand)
CALIFORNIA BOTTOM
TIP OVER BAILER
„
„
Leslie Sand Bailer
„
„
Rod
Top
Throat
Plunger
„
„
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Leather
Washer plates
Bailer Tube
„
Leslie Sand Bailer
„
„
Latch
Flopper
Bottom
„
Bailer closed
position
Leslie Sand Bailer
Selection
„
Biggest change in the cable tool industry is
the invention of the steel wire rope.
Selection
„
Wire rope as we know it today
appeared in the U.S. about 1830 but
did not develop until after the Civil War
ended in 1865.
„
Accelerated the drilling process.
„
Reduced friction & provided longer life.
Selection
Measurement
How to measure wire rope diameter The correct
diameter of a wire rope is the diameter of a
circumscribed circle which will enclose all the strands.
The measurement should be made carefully with
calipers. Illustrations above show correct and incorrect
method of measuring the diameter of wire rope.
Selection
„
„
True diameter allows you to
determine the wear on the cable.
Flat, crushed, or broken strands
Selection
Selection
Selection
Cable tool line
„
TYPES OF CABLE
TOOL LINE
„
„
„
Drill line
Bailer line
Casing line
„
„
Slings
Guy Lines
Cable tool line
DRILL LINE IS 6x19 Left Lay - Regular
Lay Classification:
Each strand has 9 outer wires over 9
smaller inner wires over one large
center wire.
Good rope to withstand abrasion or
crushing on the drum.
Cable tool line
BAILER LINE IS 6x7 Right Lay Regular Lay Classification:
Each strand has 6 wires over one
large center wire.
Good rope to withstand abrasion or
crushing on the drum.
Cable tool line
CASING LINE IS 18x7 Right Lay Regular Lay Classification:
Eighteen strands with 6 wires over
one large center wire.
Good rope to withstand abrasion or
crushing on the drum.
Cable tool rope
„
„
{Contra-helically laid} ropes are designed with
opposing rotational forces.
Achieved by laying six strands around a core strand
in one direction and then laying 12 strands around
the first operation in the opposite direction.
Cable tool Rope
„
The word Lay means:
„
„
„
Direction
„ Right/left
Relationship
„ Regular/Lang
Length
„ One Rope Lay
Cable tool Rope
„
„
„
„
Drill line
Bailing Line
Left Lay
Regular
Rotate
Right Lay
Regular
Rotate
Hoist line
Right Lay
Regular
Non-Rotate
Cable tool Rope
„
REGULAR LAY
Wires are laid opposite the direction the
strands lay in the rope
Cable tool Rope
„
„
LANG LAY
The wires are laid in the same direction as the
strands lay in the ropes
Cable tool Rope
Cable tool Rope
„
SEVEN FEATURES OF CABLE
„
„
„
„
„
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Strength
Reserve strength
Resistance to deformation
Crushing resistance
Bend-ability
Stability
Cable tool Rope
„
BENDING STRESS
„
All ropes operating over sheaves or drums are subject to bending stress.
„
„
The degree of fatigue partially depends upon the ration of the diameter of
the rope to the diameter of the sheave or drum.
Other factors affecting the fatigue life of the rope are load, number of
cycles and condition of the sheaves and drums.
Cable tool Rope
„
CORRECT
WRONG
Cable tool Rope
„
Proper way to spool bailer line
and Casing line.
Cable tool Rope
„
Proper way to spool Drill line.
„
Over wind from right to left.
Cable tool Rope
„
„
Proper spooling
ensures cable is
installed without
damage.
Damaged cable
ensures failure of
the cable and a
fishing job.
SPOOLING
THE BULL
REEL
SPOOLING
THE SAND
REEL
SPOOLING
THE CASING
LINE
Cable tool Rope
„
„
Bucyrus Erie 36-L cable change using a
chain and sprockets.
Replace cable as often as necessary.
Cable tool Rope
„
Chain driven spooling techniques
make cable changes easy.
Cable tool Rope
„
Can be used to
install and
remove cable
from rig.
Cable tool Rope
„
Good Maintenance practices:
„
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„
„
„
Break in new rope
Reversing ends
Constructional stretch
Lead in new socket every 2 weeks
Clean & lubricate regularly
Cable Care
„
„
Clean and lubricate regularly to reduce wear.
Inspect for dirt, rusty conditions, breaks & cracks
Cable Care
„
65% of all fishing jobs are cable breaks
due to:
„
„
Poor Maintenance
Lack of inspections
„
„
„
„
Fatigue, cracking, splintering
Periodic rope socket changes
Break in period
Double shifting rig.
Cable Wear
„
Cable fatigue normally appears at
locations of the crown sheave.
Cable Wear
„
„
Cable splintering is a fatigue resulting from heavy
loads over small sheaves.
Again, normally found in the crown and
sometimes found tool late.
Cable Storage
Storage
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„
„
„
„
Under a roof or waterproof covering
Away from moisture, acids, ocean
spray
Poly wrap
Cleaned & re-lubricated
Away from steam or hot pipes
Cable Size
WIRE DRILLING CABLES
FOR WATER WELL WORK
CABLE SIZE
5/8”
3/4"
7 /8"
1”
which may be used with
TOOLS WEIGHING
up to 1600 lbs.
1600 to 2700 lbs.
2700 to 4000 lbs.
over 4000 lbs.
API cable joints
WIRE CABLE WHICH MAY BE USED
WITH VARIOUS JOINT SIZES
Joint Size (In Inches)
11/2 x
15/8 x
2x 3
21/4 x
23/4 x
31/4 x
4x 5
21/4
2-5/8
31/4
31/4
41/4
Size of Cable (In Inches)
9/16
5/8
5/8
5/8
3/4
3/4, 7/8
7/8
or
or
or
or
or
or
or
5/8
3/4
3/4
3/4
7/8
1
1
Cable Capacities
Sand Line
Sand Line
„
Casing line uses a non-rotating 18 x 7
wire rope.
Sand Line
„
„
{Contra-helically laid} ropes are designed with
opposing rotational forces.
Achieved by laying six strands around a core strand
in one direction and then laying 12 strands around
the first operation in the opposite direction.
Cable tool Joints
„
EARLY TOOL MANUFACTURES PRIDED
THEMSELVES ON HOW A TAPERED
JOINT SHOULD BE MADE.
CABLE TOOL JOINTS
„
THREE ORGANIZATIONS SET
STANDARDS
„
„
„
AMERICAN PETROLEUM INSTITUTE or API
INTERNATIONAL ASSOC. OF DRILLING
CONTRACTORS OR IADC
OIL WELL SERVICE or OWS
„
API STANDARDS
Cable Tool Joints
Templates
„
TEMPLATES AND GAUGES - API STANDARD
Rope Sockets
Rope sockets
Swivel-Type Rope Sockets
Swivel is sometimes referred to as a mandrel.
„
„
Type of Sockets
Causes of fishing
Tool joints
Swivel-Type Rope Sockets
Swivel is sometimes referred to as a mandrel.
„
„
BUTTON SAVER
Curvature is 25-degrees
same as mandrel & socket
RINGS
„
„
„
Joint rings of .010” in thickness
4” x 5” joint and 4-1/4” x 6” joint
Make up for joint wear
36” STAR BIT
Tool joints can break at the box square
Two principal factors
responsible for the greatest
percentage of fishing problems
„
„
1. Abuse of tools and continued use of them
after they have become worn beyond point
of safety.
2. Lack of respect for the dangers involved in
well drilling, poor judgment and
operational procedures.
An experienced driller can:
„
Grasp the cable and ascertain every
condition of the hole.
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
Bit Blows.
Tools are turning.
Change of formation
Falling ledges
Hole collapsing
Cable breakage
Tools are sticky
60-L
Paul Strom
Building
1956
„
JOB SITE SAFETY – ANTISIPATING THE UNEXPECTED.
FOCUSED AND ATTENTIVE
„
„
A Prudent driller avoids trouble by
constant watchfulness and careful
maintenance of equipment.
Perform your job like you fingers depended on
it.
A FISHING STRING IS MADE
UP OF:
ROPE SOCKET
„ SHORT STEM
„ FISHING JARS
„ FISHING TOOL
„
FISHING TOOLS STRING
„
Socket (non swivel)
„
Bar
„
Fishing Jars
„
Fishing tool
ROPE SOCKET
„
„
„
Desirable for a “stiff neck” or
Babcock or burns type rope socket.
Do not want the tools to spin in the
hole while fishing.
Insert a small piece of wood in the
swivel to prevent turning.
Burns socket
swivel
Fishing
Stem
Fishing Stem
„
Desirable for a drill stem not to
exceed 10ft.
Fishing jars
„
„
„
Identical to regular jars except for the
length of rein opening, or stroke.
Some Spudding gears have various holes for
longer strokes.
Necessary for a complete revolving stroke
cycle of the rig to assure jar action in one
direction only—either up or down, but never
both.
FISHING
TOOLS
Fishing Tools
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„
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„
„
„
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
Horn Socket
Corrugated Friction Socket
Rope Spear or Rope Grab
Latch Jack
Wall Hook
Alligator Grab
Jar bumper
Crows (Cows) foot
Fishing Tools
„
„
I. Down Cutting Wire Rope Knife.
J. Combination Socket
„
„
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„
„
„
Regular pattern slip socket
Full circle fishing socket
Combination slip socket
K. Slip collar Socket
L. Jar Socket
M. Spud - regular type
Horn Socket
„
„
„
„
„
„
Long taper steel barrel, slotted on one side
Mouth passes over top of lost tools.
Cable let out to allow jars to close.
Spud horn over top of lost tools with
only a few blows.
Straight hoist pull will bring lost tools to
the surface.
Drive wedge in slot to release horn on fish.
CORRUGATED
FRICTION SOCKET
„
Spiral impressions formed on steel barrel &
fitted with a pin joint with a slight bell
bottom.
„
Long bar, heavy stroke on jars
„
Drive down over bar
„
Permits a limited amount of upward jarring.
Rope Spear or
Rope Grab
„
„
„
Tapered prong on which “wickers” are
welded.
Send down hole where large amounts of
cable are lost on top of the tools
Fitted with standard pin and wrench
square.
Two prong grab
Three Prong Grab
Never drive down on a spear
or rope grab when the tools
are stuck in the hole.
Suggest dropping soft coal
into the hole. A handful per
inch of hole. Aid in keeping
the cable separated.
Directions on use
of Grab/Spear
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
Spear or grab should be lowered on the fishing string until it
reaches the cable.
Engage the spudding gear and lower fishing string slowly to
allow the wickers to pick up the cable.
When you think you have enough knotted cable, stop the
spudding action, and lift out the tools.
Avoid jerking or spudding up.
When the spear or grab appears at the surface, stop and wrap
the cable up with wire to prevent unraveling.
Hoist high enough to grab tools with wrench square.
Care not to get tangled up in cable if you drop them.
Latch Jack
i
i
"
.
„
Used for fishing out bailers
I
I
„
„
„
„
„
Lower latch jack until contact is made.
Latch will open & close over bail.
Hoist string out slowly
Some light upward jarring is ok.
Hard to get off fish if bailer is stuck.
Bailer reins, throats, & crowns.
Outside latch
Sand bottom.
Wall Hook
„
„
A wall hook is used to hook a
lost bit or to straighten a
string of tools out of a cave
and back into the center of
the hole for recovery.
Since the cable is left lay,
order out a left hand
curvature.
Alligator Grab
„
„
„
„
„
Useful in recovering small objects.
Jaw tension can be increased by
adjusting the spring above jaw cage.
Jaws held open by a trip pin on bottom.
Jaws close when contract is made.
Run on a full string of fishing tools,
Socket, bar, jars, grab.
Jar Bumper
„
„
„
„
Three Types:
Solid eye
Swivel eye
Solid
Jar Bumper
„
„
„
„
„
Used to free stuck tools
when jars are not used.
Jar bumper is put in place
of the bailer.
Cable is placed in slot.
Strain on stuck tools, drop
bumper 10-15ft onto top
of rope socket.
If tools are not from in 15
minutes, remove bumper
for inspection.
Crows Foot
„
„
„
„
„
Used to de-burr the top of the rope socket that is
deformed or curled from bumping.
The burrs prevent a secure catch by the
combination slip socket.
Size is determined by the hole size & tools size.
Avoid driving tool into side wall.
Exact measurements of location must be known.
Down wire cutting
rope knife
„
„
„
„
„
Either Down or Up wire cutting
rope knife is available.
Used to cut cable on tools stuck
in hole to permit grab via
combination socket.
Blade located in body connected
to a small set of jars.
Swivel eye at top connected to
sand line.
Face plate removal allows
positioning over drill line.
Down wire cutting
rope knife
„
„
„
„
„
Before assembly is lowered, light
tension is placed on drill cable.
Permits the body to slide freely
along the drill cable.
Assures the operator that no
cutting can be done until the
body contacts the rope socket
Lowered slowly until contact with
the rope socket.
2-3 blows will cut cleanly.
Combination Sockets
„
Three types of slip sockets:
„
1> Regular pattern slip socket
„
2> Full Circle fishing socket
„
3> Combination slip socket
Regular pattern
slip socket
„
„
„
Designed for ordinary fishing
jobs where hard or continual
jarring is not required.
Two spoon shaped slips that
work inside a tapered barrel.
Bowl thickness determines the
max diameter it will catch with
thin slips.
Regular pattern
slip socket
Full Circle
fishing Socket
„
„
„
Due to the full circle support, this
socket will stand severe jarring and not
oblong the bowl.
Provides a much firmer hold on the
collars of lost tools.
Can be used for retrieval of sockets,
bars, jars, or bits.
Full Circle
fishing Socket
„
„
4-slips mounted on two
reins to form a complete
circle.
Attached by a bolt that
allows the slip to ride up
as the fish enters and
falls down to trap the
string.
Full Circle
fishing Socket
„
Large diameter joints are 3-1/4” x 4-1/4”
Combination Slip Socket
„
„
„
3-slips form a circle inside a
tapered bowl.
Held in place by a strong
compression ring.
Designed to catch rope
sockets necks, thread pins, or
box collar diameters.
Combination Slip Socket
Collar Sockets
„
„
„
„
„
Exact diameter of fish
must be known.
Driven gently over lost
tool.
Each slip is smaller than
the lower one.
Hitch is secured, pull up
10-15ft & swing tools
before removal
No heavy jarring
Jar Sockets
„
Designed to fish for broken jars.
„
Two types available
„
„
„
Side Jar Socket where only one rein is
looking up.
Center Jar Socket where both reins
are looking up.
Rather weak and difficult to run.
Not recommended to run unless
absolutely no other fishing tool will
work.
Jar tongue Sockets
„
„
„
Designed to catch broken jars
when the tongue is sticking
up.
Used when tolerances do not
allow corrugated friction
socket or full circle slip
sockets.
Made of two patterns, solid
and screw bowl.
Jar tongue Sockets
„
„
„
„
„
Run with long stroke jars run
between the socket and stem.
Lowered down over tongue.
If secured, set back down and
hit down to set the socket,
and pull back up.
Cannot use spudder. Jarring
up with a tight hitch.
Do not jar down or the hold is
easily broken.
Spud
„
„
„
„
„
Composed of a long spade-like piece of
high carbon steel, curved to conform to a
section of the wall of the well.
Equipped with a pin joint on the upper end
with a square or flats.
Purchased quarter, half, or three-quarter
round.
When ordered specify joint size, length,
and round.
May be purchased the length of the lost
tools.
Spud
„
„
„
„
„
Used with long stroke fishing jars
immediately above the spud, with a short
stem and a stiff wire line socket.
Operate in slow motion to allow jars to
strike both ways.
Once materials are churned up, bailer used
to clean out the results of each run.
Drive pipe over the lost tools.
Repeat until the top of the lost tools to
allow contact hold with the fishing socket.
KEY TO SUCCESSFUL FISHING
„
EVALUATE THE HOLE STABILITY.
SAND FILL UP INSIDE THE CASING OR OPEN
HOLE THAT IS ALSO AROUND THE TOOLS
(FISH).
DRILLING FLUID CONDITION
LOST CIRCULATION
LEDGES
KEY TO SUCCESSFUL FISHING
„
„
„
„
NEVER PUT ANTHING IN THE HOLE YOU
DON’T THINK YOU WILL GET BACK.
CAN YOU GET OFF IF YOU GET ON.
KNOW THE LIMITATIONS OF THE TOOLS
RECORD THE OD, ID. AND LENGTH OF THE
FISHING STRING AND MAKE DRAWINGS
KEY TO SUCCESSFUL FISHING
„
PATIENCE
„
CAREFULL EVALUATION & MEASUREMENTS
„
USE THE RIGHT FISHING TOOLS
„
NEVER USE QUESTIONABLE FISHING TOOLS
OR EQUIPMENT
DEGREE OF SUCCESS
„
SUCCESS IS MEASURED NOT IN THE
TIME IT TOOK YOU TO REMOVE LOST
TOOLS IN THE HOLE
„
BUT RATHER
„
DID YOU GET THEM OUT.
CABLE TOOL DRILLING
„
„
„
By
Roger E. Renner, MGWC
NGWA President 2001
Acknowledgements:
„
Cameron Tool & Supply Co.
Cameron, West Virginia
„
Water Well Drilling with cable tool
„
„
Cable tool Fishing
„
„
„
Ray Gordon - 1958
Merle G. Decker - 1968
Acme Fishing Tool Co.
Aqua-Vu
Acknowledgements:
„
„
„
„
„
„
Trident Tool Co.
NGWA - Eighty Years
Leschen Wire Rope Co
Rampp Company of Marietta, OH
Handbuch der Tiefbohrkunke - 1850
Mn Dept of Health
„
A well sealing primer - 1997
Acknowledgements:
„
Ed Huntoon
„
Editor of Fishing Tools
DO WE HAVE ANY
QUESTIONS?
Roger E. Renner
NGWA-Certified Master Ground
Water Contractor
(800) 409-9355
[email protected] ehrenner.com