DOWNLOAD MACNA 2014 Program Book

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DOWNLOAD MACNA 2014 Program Book
Marine Aquarium Conference
of North America XXVI
Denver | 2014
Sponsored by:
from Rob Mougey • Chair, MACNA 2014 & President, C.O.R.A.L.
WELCOME!
We are excited to have you with us and look forward
to sharing our beautiful city. We have planned many fun
and educational events and activities. Over 140 exhibitors will introduce the latest products and some truly
amazing corals, and our many speakers and workshops
will be educational and informative.
MACNA brings together hobbyists, professional
aquarists, manufacturers, retailers, and scientists from
around the globe. Together we will explore the current
state and future direction of marine aquatics and learn
about new husbandry techniques.
As you enjoy the Exhibit Hall, the presentations, and
the parties, it’s important to understand what makes it all
possible. MACNA has several long-time sponsors whose
generous financial support allows the show to continue.
Seachem, which has been our Platinum Event Sponsor for
many years, provides significant funding and great prizes
for our drawings. We heartily thank Seachem for providing seed money and for their unquestioning support.
United Pet Group (UPG), maker of Instant Ocean
and Marineland products, has been our Diamond Banquet Sponsor for years. If you are a Full Conference Pass
holder, you’ll enjoy a gala evening of food, fun, and
entertainment at the Saturday banquet at the Four Sea-
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sons Ballroom. UPG is underwriting this event, which
features Mitch Carl as our emcee, the MASNA Aquarist
of the Year Award, the MACNA 2015 presentation, and
keynote speaker Dr. Luiz Rocha of the California Academy of Sciences, whose appearance is made possible by
the generous financial support of Central Aquatics, our
Gold Keynote Sponsor.
Full Conference Pass holders can attend the Friday reception at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, a block west of
the Colorado Convention Center. Thanks to the generous
support of Gold Reception Sponsor Boyd Enterprises, we
will take a nostalgic trip back to the Denver of the 1920s,
complete with an old-time speakeasy, vintage gaming,
and historic libations. If you like to dance, visit the lower
level of the Ellie, where “roots rock” band the Octanes
will keep your toes tapping (cowboy boots optional).
CoralVue is our Gold Prize Drawing Sponsor. Their
support has allowed us to offer some amazing prizes. Be
sure to swing by the drawing area and check out the cool
products that our sponsors and exhibitors have lined up
for you. Walt Smith International has donated a 10-day
trip to Fiji for two. Wishing for a new aquarium? Marineland has generously donated a complete 300-gallon Deep
Dimension setup. Drawings will be held every day; you
STEVIE CRECELIUS/VISIT DENVER
to Denver and MACNA 2014
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STAN OBERT/VISIT DENVER
must be present to win. The grand prize drawing
will take place on Sunday.
In this Program Book, sponsored by Gold
Program Book Sponsor Neptune Systems, you
will find an excellent article by Martin Moe on
the history of MACNA, a history of the evolution of aquatics in Colorado, and some beautiful
shots of local reef tanks. The book also includes
the Exhibit Hall floor plan, directions to the Friday reception at the Ellie, maps of the facility,
and a list of local attractions. We hope you will
spend some time with our speakers; their bios
and speech topics are on page 30. We want to
extend special thanks to James Lawrence, Linda
Provost, Anne Linton, Judy Billard, Louise Watson, and Matt Pedersen at CORAL Magazine for
creating and publishing this Program Book.
The workshops will take place just outside
the Exhibit Hall’s main entrance and next to the
prize drawing area. Sponsored by Gold Workshop
Sponsor Proline Aquatics, they will include informational how-to sessions, fun, relaxed presentations, live animals from the Downtown Aquarium, and some unusual demonstrations. You never know
who—or what—might show up here!
Our Silver and Bronze sponsors also contribute to
the success of the show. In the Speaker Room, spon-
The Denver Downtown Aquarium:
Meet a grouper up close.
sored by AquaIllumination/AI, you’ll enjoy many quality
presentations. Support from Kessil is allowing us to use
some interesting new speaker formats this year, including a debate between our own Jake Adams and Julian
Sprung and a scintillating roundtable discussion. CaribSea has provided saltwater for the tanks and reef life at
this year’s MACNA. Media Sponsor Reefs.com has been
helping us to get the word out all year. Proaquatix threw
a party for the exhibitors during a very long setup day,
and Two Little Fishies provided our badges and bracelets.
If you are enjoying the great products and giveaways in
your sturdy tote, thank the fine folks at Reef Nutrition!
It’s fun to spend time on the show floor, but the primary focus of every MACNA conference is education.
The speakers bring a wealth and depth of knowledge that
they are happy to share, both in the Speaker Room and
in personal encounters. You’d be hard pressed to find this
many published aquatic experts together in one room
anywhere else. Thanks to the support of Fluval, Hikari,
AquaMedic, Piscine Energetics, Ecotech, and Fritz
Aquatics, we are able to bring some of the most influential and knowledgeable experts in the world to MACNA.
In addition to our generous sponsors, a group of
dedicated, hard-working hobbyists have volunteered
thousands of hours to put the show together. To accomplish this monumental task, they have worked many
late nights and long weekends for over two years. We’re
thankful for such a great team, and grateful to their families for allowing them to spend time away from home.
The Colorado Organization for Reef & Aquatic Life
(CORAL) Board of Directors includes Adam Monchak,
Jon Garnett, and Jake Adams. Their efforts and hard
work are evident in the success of MACNA 2014. It
requires more than four dedicated (dare I say crazed?)
individuals to run an event of this size, and we have a
support team that is made up of people with a variety
of skill sets, working diligently to bring the best possible
MACNA to Colorado. The core members of our team are
Larry Leszczynski, Heather McNeill, Liana Mougey, Carissa Garnett, Chris Campbell, Brie Brasch, Jeff Harris,
Scott Chase, and Mike Drumm. Their tireless effort and
months of work have truly paid off.
You’ll also notice many volunteers helping out every day at MACNA. You encountered them when you
checked in or purchased drawing tickets. They may help
you find your way around. If you win something, one
of them will hand you your prize. Many of them work
behind the scenes, supporting the exhibitors. They include club members from the Colorado Organization for
Reef & Aquatic Life (CORAL), the Marine Aquarium Society of Colorado (MASC), the Southern Colorado Marine
Aquarium Society (SCMAS), the Denver
Area Reef Club (DARC), the Colorado
Aquarium Society (CAS), and the Rocky
Mountain Cichlid Association (RMCA).
Thanks to all of you fantastic volunteers
and sponsors for making this interclub
MACNA a success.
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F R I DAY
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S AT U R DAY
S U N DAY
Early Registration only — Exhibit Hall closed
8 AM MASNA Member Meeting
8 AM How to Host a MACNA
8 AM MASNA Club President’s Meeting
THINGS TO DO:
•V
isit the Downtown Aquarium; bring your
“C” card and go for a dive!
• S ee the Denver Zoo & Tropical Discovery
at City Park
ave fun at Elitch’s Amusement Park
•H
• S ee the Chihuly Exhibit at the Botanic Gardens
•T
ake the kids to the Children’s Museum
•P
et Rosie at the Butterfly Pavilion
•V
enture to the Museum of Nature & Science
at City Park
• S ee the Pop Art exhibit at the
Denver Art Museum
• S hop till you drop at Cherry Creek Mall
•R
ide the Light Rail to Park Meadows
•H
ave dinner at the Buckhorn Exchange,
Denver’s Oldest Restaurant (Liquor License #1)
9 AM Exhibit Hall open for MASNA members
9 AM SPEAKER START TIME
9 AM SPEAKER START TIME
9 AM SPEAKER START TIME
9 AM NICK KLASE: LED Lighting in Aquariums
9 AM TONY VARGAS:
What Makes a Great Reef Tank?
9 AM DR. SANJAY JOSHI:
Conversion of a 500G Reef, Metal Halide
to LEDs: A Personal Experience
10 AM Exhibit Hall open to attendees
10 AM Exhibit Hall open to attendees
10 AM KEVIN KOHEN: Establishing and
Maintaining an NPS Reef Aquarium
10 AM JIM WALTERS: Rants and Raves
from a 37-Year-Old Fish Store
11 AM TEA YI KAI: For the Love of Wrasses
11 AM DR. CHARLES MAZEL:
The Function of Fluorescence on the Reef
FURTHER AFIELD:
•T
ake the free Coors Brewery tour in Golden
•V
isit Estes Park
•D
rive over Trail Ridge Road
•M
arvel at the Red Rocks Amphitheater
•V
isit the Gardens of the Gods
•D
rive to the top of Pikes Peak
•H
ave a Mountain Pie at the original Beau Jo’s
Pizza in Idaho Springs
uaff a brew at the Bucksnort
•Q
iscover Left Hand Brewery in Boulder
•D
•V
isit the Air Force Academy
12 PM JAMIE CRAGGS: Intentionally Spawning
Stony Corals in the Aquarium
1 PM Debate: JAKE ADAMS v. JULIAN SPRUNG
2 PM MENEEKA GURROBY: A Family-Run
Fish-Collecting Station in Mauritius
3 PM EHSAN DASHTI:
Getting Critical about Water Chemistry
4 PM DR. JEAN JAUBERT: 25 Years of
Uninterrupted Growth for a Captive Reef
Kept at Monaco’s Oceanographic Museum
12 PM VINCENT CHALIAS:
Coral Diversity Is All About Habitat
1 PM RUFUS KIMURA: Wonders of the Deep
2 PM DR. TODD LAJEUNESSE:
Zooxanthellae, Coral, and Symbiosis
3 PM JOHN CIOTTI: Modern Aquarium
Aesthetics from a Champion Aquascapist
4 PM JULIAN SPRUNG: Roundtable Discussion:
Proposed Endangered Species Act Listing for
Stony Corals
5 PM MARTIN MOE:
The Foundation of Marine Aquaristics
5 PM TOM BOWLING: New Fish Culture in Palau
6 PM Exhibit Hall closes
6 PM Exhibit Hall closes
7 PM Reception • Ellie Caulkins Opera House
7 PM Banquet — MITCH CARL, Emcee
DR. LUIZ ROCHA, Keynote Speaker
10 AM Exhibit Hall open to attendees
10 AM LAURA BIRENBAUM:
Keeping and Breeding
the Dwarf Cuttlefishes
11 AM RICHARD ROSS:
What’s Up with Phosphate?
12 PM MICHAEL PALETTA: Aquarium History:
Oh, How Far We’ve Come!
1 PM JUSTIN CREDABEL: A Six-Pack
of Marine and Reef Aquarium Trivia
2 PM JULIAN BAGGIO: Sustainable Marine Livestock Collection by Cairns Marine in Australia
3 PM WALT SMITH: Following the Sun:
Journeys of a Sea Dreamer
4 PM Live Grand Prize Drawing start time
4 PM Exhibit Hall closes
There is no better high than discovery.
—E.O. Wilson,
Biologist & Naturalist
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I recall the beginning of the modern marine aquarium hobby. I was there. Well, maybe not at the
very beginning—marine life has been kept in captivity since antiquity, which was before my time. The earliest recorded account of keeping fishes captive is apparently from the Sumerian culture, about 4500 BCE. Fishes were
maintained for food in ponds and enclosures but were not farmed or propagated. The Assyrians, and probably
the Babylonians, also kept fish ponds, and the Egyptians of 1000 BC kept tilapia in ponds, where they probably
reproduced and provided a supply of fresh fish. The Chinese, however, were the first real fish culturists. They
began with carp as early as 3500 BCE; when the Christian era began, goldfish culture derived from carp culture
was well established in China. By the time of the Sung Dynasty (960–1278 CE), goldfish were truly domesticated. Koi were derived from a different species of carp and were first bred in Japan in about 900 CE.
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aquarium in his home, and his
If the start of the “modern”
sister, Miss Elizabeth Emerson
marine aquarium hobby can be
Damon, was among the first
given a specific date, it is probably
freshwater aquarists in America.
1842, when Dr. George Johnston
Julio Perez wrote an interesting
published his History of British
history of freshwater and marine
Sponges. Dr. Johnston describes
aquariums for the 2013 MACNA
keeping a 6-ounce jar of seawater
program publication.
stocked with coralline algae, filaFast-forward to the 1950s.
mentous green algae, Ulva, small
World War II was over, techmussels, annelid worms, and a
nology was advancing quickly,
starfish. After eight weeks the
and the freshwater hobby was
water was still clean and clear.
rapidly coming of age. Marine
In 1847, Mrs. Anne Thynne
aquarium–keeping was fasciof England reported on her sucnating, but weird and difficult.
cessful experiences keeping a
One of the major books at that
6-gallon marine vivarium in
time was the Handbook of TropiLondon:
Martin Moe collecting Longspined
Sea Urchins in the Florida Keys for
cal Aquarium Fishes, written by
“I had a quantity of microhis captive breeding research.
two distinguished authors, Herscopic corallines, which mulbert R. Axelrod and Dr. Leonard
tiplied very fast; serpulae, that
P. Schultz (Curator of Fishes at
readily elongated their stony casthe Smithsonian Museum). This
es; some nereis, ophiurae and a
book, published in 1955, consisted of a whopping 718
great many beautiful little things for which I could find
pages and covered the entire scope of the aquarium hobno name. On one piece of rock was the first germ of
by. Marine aquariums? Not so much—only four pages
a living sponge. It was very fine, and grew to the size
were devoted to that topic, and aquarists with marine
of a hazel nut, coming to maturity in about six weeks.”
aspirations were duly cautioned.
(Please note that these words, written over 150 years
“Elaborate systems of filtration have been worked out
ago, could very easily have been written yesterday by a
in various public aquaria. Owing to the great care and
modern reef tank aquarist.)
difficulties inherent in showing marine fishes and the
Mrs. Thynne kept her little aquarium alive and well
scarcity of suitable specimens, the New York Aquarium
by keeping a small reservoir of seawater on hand and
has not contained any marine forms for several years.
instructing her handmaiden to remove water from the
Since it has an excellent filtration system and still finds
vessel every other day, replace it with seawater from the
the job a difficult one, the hobbyist should proceed fairreservoir, and then refresh the old water by pouring it
ly cautiously.” And proceed cautiously they did—but the
back and forth from one vessel to another for half an
lure of keeping marine fishes in a home aquarium was irhour before storing it in the reservoir. She also sent
resistible. In 1958 Helen Simkatis came out with a book,
someone to the coast every three months for a fresh supSalt Water Fishes for the Home Aquarium, containing
ply of seawater.
black and white photos, diagrams, and instructions on
how to build a sub-sand filter, also termed a biological
of aquarium-keeping and
filter based on the understanding that bacterial action
freshwater fish–breeding—and, much more recently, matransformed waste material into plant nutrients. With
rine fish and invertebrate culture—runs from the midthe information in that book, an aquarist could set up a
1800s to the marine reef tanks of today. It makes for
successful marine aquarium if he or she had the patience
interesting reading for modern marine aquarists. One
and/or good luck to work through the run-in period reof the early adventures in the hobby occurred in 1856:
quired to establish proper populations of the then unthe great showman, P. T. Barnum, “borrowed” two curaknown nitrogen-fixing bacteria.
tors from the Zoological Gardens of London, bought a
Robert P. L. Straughan was pretty much the first fullnumber of glass tanks, and exhibited sea anemones and
time marine aquarist, collector, and seller of marine
other marine animals at his American Museum in New
life, as well as a prolific writer on the subjects of maYork, the first “public” aquarium in the new world. Then
rine aquariums and marine life. His book The Salt WaBarnum sponsored the first expedition to capture tropiter Aquarium in the Home went through three editions
cal marine fishes. In 1861, under his direction, William
(1959, 1964, and 1970) and was the early “bible” of the
Damon and Albert S. Bickmore sailed from Bermuda in
marine aquarium hobby. The word “nitrogen,” however,
a small fishing boat, carrying 600 live tropical marine
does not appear in these books, and bacteria were somefishes for display at Barnum’s American Museum. Dathing to be avoided at all costs. Frank de Graaf, Curator
mon was one of the first aquarists to keep a saltwater
An extensive history
MATTHEW L WITTENRICH
A
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t h e p a st o n t h
MONTAGE: LINDA PROVOST. EARTH: LEONELLO CALVETTI; CLOWNFISH: BLUEHAND/ SHUTTERSTOCK
Th
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by Martin A. Moe, Jr.
M AC N A X X VI
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DOWNLOAD TODAY!
with—well, with glue. For the most part, people stayed a
healthy distance from the display, well out of the “splash
zone” that it would create if it broke apart. It never did
break apart while it was on display. No, that happened
when the truck drivers dropped the box off the back of
the truck!
Such was the state of the art of marine aquarium
technology in the mid-1950s and 1960s. Soon, however,
the situation was to change. The years between 1955 and
1965 were formative ones for the fledgling marine branch
of the aquarium hobby—they saw the early stages of the
technological developments that made keeping a marine
aquarium possible. These were, in no particular order,
widespread availability of artificial sea salts, the all-glass
aquarium, the shipping by air of
commercially available marine fishes and invertebrates, sub-sand/undergravel filter technology, external
hang-on-the-back marine filters and
media, knowledge of the nitrogen cycle in marine and freshwater aquariVisitors marvel at aquatic life in the
Jardin Zoologique d’Acclimatation,
ums, and appropriate lighting. There
Paris, 1860. The aquarium was
was much more to come, of course,
opened by Napoleon III and later
but these developments turned keepbecame notorious for displaying live
ing a marine aquarium from a scihumans from native African tribes.
ence project into a hobby. Another
new concept born at this time was
the formation and activity of marine
aquarium societies and clubs, which
would have a great impact on the
hobby in the not too distant future.
of the Artis Aquarium of the Netherlands, wrote the Pet
Library Marine Aquarium Guide in 1968 (English edition 1973). He had a much greater understanding of the
chemistry at work in a successful marine aquarium and
included a “diagram of the bacterial decomposition of nitrogenous organic matter (aerobic decomposition),” thus
the stage was set for the growth of the marine aquarium
hobby. All of these books contained instructions on what
salts and how much of each to use to create several gallons of artificial seawater. (I knew Bob Straughan fairly
well and talked with him frequently, and he published my
first article on breeding clownfishes in the March/April
1973 issue of his Salt Water Aquarium, The International
Magazine for Marine Aquarists.)
Bob often claimed the distinction of having built the
first all-glass aquarium held together with nothing but
silicone sealer. Perhaps he did; I cannot contest his claim.
I built my first all-glass aquarium in 1965, when I was a
fishery biologist with the Florida State Marine Research
Laboratory in St. Petersburg. Creating markets for Florida
seafood was a major thrust of the agency at that time,
and I was asked to create a live display of Florida seafood, fishes, and spiny lobsters for conventions and trade
shows. We built a 50-gallon all-glass aquarium and a big
wooden box for its transport. It was spectacular! Few people at that time had seen an all-glass aquarium. It occupied a sturdy table in front of the booth, and lobsters and
fishes swam around in this big glass case held together
1955, is considered the oldest marine-only aquarium society and remains one of the largest with 300
members. Other areas soon began
to host marine aquarium–oriented
clubs and societies. I gave my first
talk in 1972 at a marine aquarium
club formed in Tampa, Florida, by
Billy and Laurie Causey. (I came home from that meeting with a puppy instead of fishes, and our three kids were
very happy.) Over the next 40 years, I gave frequent talks
at marine aquarium clubs from Hawaii to Mexico, from
Canada to England, and all over the U.S.
As marine aquarium societies began popping up in
cities and towns all over the continent, larger events lasting all day and featuring several speakers began to occur. I
visited many marine aquarium societies back then—after
all, I had clownfish to sell.
Another sea change in the hobby began with a series
of six articles written by George Smit in 1986 for Freshwater and Marine Aquarium Magazine. Among other innovations, George introduced the European method of
PUBLISHED IN L’ILLUSTRATION, JOURNAL UNIVERSEL, PARIS, 1860/SHUTTERSTOCK
The Florida Marine Aquarium Society (FMAS), formed in
using live rock as the main filtrate for nitrogen management and intense lighting of the proper spectrum for
the growth of photosynthetic-capable organisms. This
opened the doors to coral culture, and the hobby never
looked back.
By the late 1980s the marine side of the aquarium
hobby had grown so much that clubs were getting together and hosting joint events. The first Marine Aquarium Conference of North America (MACNA) occurred
in 1989 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It was co-hosted by
the Cleveland Saltwater Enthusiasts Association (C-SEA)
and the Marine Aquarium Society of Toronto (MAST).
Helmut Debelius and I shared the keynote speaker spot,
each giving two lectures, and Tom Frakes, Dr. Peter Rubec, and George Smit were the other speakers listed on
the program. Forrest Young and Albert Thiel also gave
presentations. A great time was had by all.
I recall two young aquarists, J. Charles Delbeek and
Julian Sprung, whose enthusiasm for reef tanks was
dripping from their pores and entangled in their hair
(especially Julian’s hair—it couldn’t withstand the stimulation and went away). Great things were to come from
those two. I had just finished writing the first Marine
Aquarium Reference, and a manuscript copy of that book
was auctioned off at the conference. Now, 26 years later,
I’m finally completing an expanded rewrite of that book
as five e-book volumes.
At about this time, John Janssen, the president of
the Midlands Marine Aquarium Society (MMAST) in
Columbia, South Carolina, had the idea for a national
organization of marine aquarium societies. He couldn’t
attend the first two MACNA conferences, but the idea
caught hold and the Marine Aquarium Societies of
North America (MASNA) was formed. At first MACNA,
the annual conference, and MASNA, the national parent association, were separate, but at the fourth MACNA conference in Miami, Florida, MASNA “adopted”
MACNA and has helped select the host society for future
MACNAs and given the host society support in the huge
job of producing a national conference. Today MASNA
has many member aquarium societies, many commercial sponsors and partners, and thousands of individual
members, and is active on many fronts of the modern
marine aquarium/reef movement.
The first marine aquariums
used what we call
the “natural” method, and this analysis of the natural
environment, blended with basic scientific knowledge
and experimentation, is at the heart of the hobby. When
Anne Thynne kept her tube worms, polychaete worms,
and bristle stars alive in a 6-gallon marine vivarium,
there was no separation between science and hobby.
In the nineteenth century, hobbies and pastimes were
the vehicles of science, and advances in scientific understanding were usually first developed by those who
“tinkered” with nature and combined knowledge of the
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natural world with mechanics. In this way, basic problems were solved and new fields in science and industry were created. Thinkers and experimenters such as
Charles Darwin, Thomas Edison, and the Wright brothers turned the world upside down and sent science and
technology scurrying to catch up.
This is also both the history and the current state of
the marine aquarium hobby. Many of the advances in
culture and captive husbandry have been conceived in
the basements, living rooms, and garages of the hobbyist marine aquarists of yesterday and today. Both marine
tropical fish–breeding and captive coral maintenance
and propagation began with marine aquarium hobbyists. Science today has its own culture and language, and
there is a porous barrier between the scientific hobbyist
and the hobbyist scientist. Nowhere is this barrier more
porous than it is at MACNA conferences.
Scientific hobbyists and hobbyist scientists rub shoulders, break bread together, and learn from each other at
every conference. At first the science world was a bit…
oh, let’s say skeptical about the advances in the science
of keeping and breeding marine organisms, but that
skepticism has, for the most part, turned to mutual understanding, respect, and exchange of information. The
hobbyist literature has evolved from mimeographed (do
you have any mimeographed papers and reports in your
files? I do!), hand-stapled society newsletters to professionally produced scientific books with beautiful color
photos and powerful websites. And MACNA was, and is,
at the crossroads.
The only constant in the marine aquarium/reef hob-
what’s in your
box?
UniqueCorals.com
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MAC NA X X V I
by is change. The people, the technology, the communications, and the place of the hobby in the public and scientific
arenas change to keep pace with the times. Unfortunately, the marine life that is the core of the science and the
hobby is also changing, and not for the better. Sometimes
good things happen—new species are found, we discover
new ways to keep well-known but delicate species, and we
make advances in captive propagation that result in new
domesticated forms of common species basic to the hobby. But at the same time, the planet is changing and the
coral reefs are in trouble on many fronts.
Marine aquarists are on the front lines of the battle
to preserve and understand the beauty and intricacy of
our tropical marine life. Preservation and restoration
of the environment and the functional ecology of coral
reefs are key themes in our publications and at our conferences. One of our most potent weapons is the effect
that we can have on public knowledge and public opinion. We are legion, and we must take the information
and ideas we gain from MACNA and other conferences
and meetings, our literature, and our own experiences
and use them in what should be a worldwide effort to
protect and restore our oceans and seas. They are, after
all, where life on Earth began and where it might end.
M AC N A X X VI
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by Jake Adams
MACNA:
Why Denver?
Reef exhibit at Denver Downtown Aquarium
As the editor of Reef Builders, I travel to all the corners of the earth in search of new products, exquisite aquariums, and the sources of the exotic marine life that we all adore. Everywhere I go, when they learn
that I live in Colorado, a landlocked state in the central U.S, people ask me why it is that I don’t live in Florida
or California.
I’ve lived in Colorado on and off for most of my life. I
graduated from a marine science program in South Carolina, a coastal state with plenty of marine life, and then
did an internship studying spawning corals in Puerto
Rico, a Caribbean island with arguably a lot of beautiful corals and reef life. But when those two experiences
were over, I knew that I wanted to return to the Mile
High City because it has long fostered a very progressive
aquarium community.
Indeed, Colorado is an unlikely place to find
such a dense concentration of marine aquarium
activity, but it actually follows a global geographic
trend. The beginnings of marine aquarium–keeping are rooted in northern Europe during Victorian times, when it was noble to appreciate nature
in all its forms.
long winters are conducive to keeping aquatic animals
in vessels of varying shapes and sizes. Colorado, too, has
long winters and plenty of annual snowfall, and many of
its citizens have adapted to this climate by creating and
thoroughly enjoying both freshwater and marine aquariums for a great many decades. I’ll skip the trivia about
how prevalent SCUBA diving is in Colorado and how our
Colorado Aquarium Society is over 65 years old, and go
straight to the marine aquarium details.
Corals under LED lighting in one of the author’s
experimental nano tanks.
The aquarium hobby was especially popular in England, France, Holland, and Germany, countries
where long winters force the population to spend a
significant part of their time indoors. In particular,
18
MAC NA X X V I
JAKE ADAMS
Let it snow
M AC N A X X VI
19
As a teenager in the late 1990s, I was amazed to see
how many great Colorado marine aquarists already had
thriving reef aquariums and how passionate most of the
fish stores were about the reef aquarium specifically. I
learned to propagate corals from a local coral farmer in
1999, when coral frags, grown by reefers as more than a
hobby, were already starting to appear in local fish stores.
One store used to order box lots of SPS corals, which
arrived almost every Friday, and the fuzzy-stick-heads
could get downright aggressive about who was going to
take home which piece.
Coral frag fever
I can still acutely remember the fever pitch of enthusiasm
that was felt in the local community when the store at
which I worked was due to receive a box of the first-ever
maricultured corals from the Solomon Islands. Keen to
avoid the chaos that sometimes ensued when lots of juicy
corals appeared at once, we did a mini-lottery to determine who would be the first to select corals. I can’t speak
for the reefing in other regions, but in Colorado SPS corals were so precious and prone to RTN (rapid tissue necrosis) that we all made a massive effort to share frags of
as many of our corals with as many friends as possible to
ensure their continuation in the local community.
This culture of sharing, learning, and communing
about marine aquariums goes way back to a time before
reef clubs were a thing, and it has led to many local strains
of highly prized corals being distributed all over the country. One notable example is the neon-green Sarcophyton
leather coral that was wait-listed as long ago as the year
2000. Our green polyp leather coral was “discovered” by
a certain author many years later and turned into a “limited edition” coral strain, but it has now been relegated to
being a beginner’s coral frag at many LFSs.
Colorado sunbursts
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MAC NA X X V I
Another special aquarium animal that came from the
Rocky Mountain State is the Colorado Sunburst Anemone, a beautiful orange form of the Bubbletip Anemone that has grown in popularity and become one of the
most highly coveted strains of Entacmea quadricolor.
Fast-forward to 2014: this year, the marine aquarium
community in Colorado has reached its zenith by hosting
the most prestigious marine aquarium event in the world.
On the last weekend in August, the world’s most passionate marine aquarists and progressive reefers will converge
on the Mile High City to enjoy the kind of enriching marine aquarium experience that only MACNA can offer.
We’re very excited to be hosting the
2014 Marine Aquarium Conference of
North America, and once you arrive and
see what a great event we have in store,
you’ll understand what makes Denver and
the Central Colorado region such a special
place to be a reef aquarium enthusiast.
M AC N A X X VI
21
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Would you like us to show you where to stick it?
We didn’t think so. That’s something you probably like doing yourself, and it’s really a
pleasure when you have the right tools to do the job. That’s where we come in. Two Little
Fishies AquaStik™ Coralline Red and Stone Grey are underwater epoxy putties with
clay-like consistency for easy attachment of corals. The colors of AquaStik blend perfectly
with rock for a natural effect. Both colors are available in 2oz and 4oz sizes.
CorAffix™ is an ethyl cyanoacrylate bonding compound with viscosity similar to honey.
Use it for attaching stony corals, gorgonians, and other sessile invertebrates in natural
positions on live rock, or use in combination with AquaStik to attach larger coral heads.
CorAffix Gel and CorAffix Pro cyanoacrylate bonding compounds have a thick gel
consistency that makes them very easy to use for attaching frags of stony corals, zoanthids,
and some soft corals to plugs or bases. AquaStik, CorAffix, CorAffix Gel and CorAffix Pro
work on dry, damp, or wet surfaces, cure underwater, and are non-toxic to fish, plants and
invertebrates. Developed by aquarium expert Julian Sprung.
Two Little Fishies
22
MAC NA X X V I
M AC N A X X VI
23
MACNA XXVI • 2014 • DENVER
Convention Center Area
24
MAC NA X X V I
M AC N A X X VI
25
MACNA XXVI FLOOR PLAN
131
Red Sea
129 Aquarium
Equipment
Factory
127 Aquatic
Experience
Chicago
Couches
231
Finnex
Sea 228
Dwelling
Creatures
Ruby 328
Reef
229 Dirk’s
Crystal 226
Clear
Aquatics
Build 326
My LED
125 open
Fluid 224
Designers
225 Schuran
331
Cobalt
329 Doctor
Eco
Systems
117
Eye Catching
Coral
115 ReefLive
113 Spectrapure
111 Coldwater
Marine
Aquatics
The 214
Coral
Shop
Reynolds 210
Polymer
327
Brightwell
Aquatics
425 World
Wide
Corals
Mind 522
Blowing
Corals
317
Unique Corals
417
Hikari Sales
USA, Inc.
Reef 310
Brite
202
Panta
Rhei
315
Giesemann
Aquaristic
311 Marine
Aquarium
Expo
Aquacraft 414
415
Eshopps
San 412
Francisco
Bay Brand
411 Sicce
Smooth 410
On
309 Instant
Reef
Public
Elevator
The Great MACNA
629 Sea &
Reef
Aquaculture
Taam/ 728
Rio
627 Jason Fox
Signature
Coral
Sticks 726
& Stones
Corals
625 Gonzo’s
Coral
Frags
Lifegard 624
Aquatics
Milwaukee 622
521
EcoTech
Marine
519
Carolina
Aquatics
517
Aqua
Medic
Route 66 514
Marine
515 Ecological
Labs
Aquatic 512
Art, Inc.
513 Aquamart
Royal 510
Exclusive
USA
Living 614
Color
Aquariums
401
United Pet Group
Drawing
Area
825 Reef
H20
723
Marco Rocks
Bashsea 926
Marine
Design
Living 922
Color AMS
821
New Life
International
617
Ecoxotic
717
Titan Aquatics
Exhibits
817
Sustainable
Aquatics
715 Reef
Hobbyist
Magazine
GHL/ 714
Aqua
Digital
713 Champion
Lighting &
Supply Co.
815 My Reef
To Yours
Coast 814
Tropicals
Digital 812
Aquatics
Midnight 912
Mariculture
Reef 708
Frenzy
Foods
MACNA 2015
709 Aquatic
Realm
International
811 Aqua FX
contacted daily by phone. You must submit your
name and phone number on the back of your
drawing ticket. Your information will not be sold
or used for any reason other than contacting a
winner. One entry per attendee. Don’t be lazy,
no sharing buttons!
923 Ocean’s
Edge
919 Tropic
Marin
917 Reef
Radiance
913 Exotic
Fish & Reef
Imports
911 Ocean
Inspirations
Hydor 810
809 Prodibio
907 V20
Aquarium
Foods
807
Fritz
Aquatics
707
Proaquatix
701
Central
Aquatics
801 802
Aqua Carib
Illumi- Sea
nation
Speaker
Room
upstairs
➥
Triton 908
Aquatics
➥
STAIRS
ESCALATOR
*No need to be present to win. Winners will be
Workshop
Area
925 Elite
Aquatics
Ocean 914
Revive
813 Cermedia
710
zoanthids.com
601
Neptune
Systems
BUTTON HUNT
Zetlight 828
Puratek 724
607
open
Get at least 25 different button pins from various vendors
on the show floor. Present them at the registration booth
for a free BUTTON HUNT DRAWING* ticket. PRIZES!! Limited to the first 200 people to enter, so get your hunt on!!
829 ZooMed
929 Aznnutty
Saltwater
Connections
ReeFlo 924
501
Seachem
Event
Entrance
Glass 928
Cages
721
High Def
Corals
609 4 Guys
1 Tank
507
CoralVue
727
Omega Sea
931 Cairns
Marine
621
Piscine
Energetics
Dr. G’s 610
611 Fragtastic
Marine
Reef
Aquaculture
511 Reef
Builders
831
Tecous
729 Pecan
Grove
Solutions
623 Reef
Koi
615 New
Era
CORAL Magazine
MASNA
STAIRS
Reef 626
Breeders
523 Real Reef
407
Boyd
Enterprises
307
Reef
Nutrition
301
Proline
Aquatics
527 Acrylic
& Glass
Exhibits
731
Stone
Aquatics
631
inTank
Reefer’s 628
Cove
525 Aquatronica
217
ORA
209 Alga
Gen
201
Triton
Reef
Endless 424
Ocean
421
Reef
Wholesale
207
Reefs.com
101
Kessil
429 Rod’s
Foods
JBJ 528
Blue 422
Life
USA
DFW 314
Aquarium
Supply
531
The Fish Crew
529 Walt
Smith
International
321
Drs. Fosters
and Smith/
LiveAquaria
211 The
Alternative
Reef
109
Fluval
Addicting 428
Corals
221
Two Little
Fishies
215
Dr. Tim’s
Aquatics
Exotic 212
Reef
Creations
431
CPR Aquatics
Oceans 426
Paradise
123 open
121
Orphek
Couches
Restrooms
Reception
& Banquet
MACNA XXVI • 2014 • DENVER
List of Exhibitors
28
MAC NA X X V I
117 Eye Catching Coral
231Finnex
224 Fluid Designers
109Fluval
611 Fragtastic Reef
807 Fritz Aquatics
714 GHL / Aqua-Digital
315Giesemann
928 Glass Cages
625 Gonzo Coral Frags
721HighDefCorals
417Hikari
810Hydor
309 Instant Reef
631inTank
627 Jason Fox Signature Corals
101Kessil
624 Lifegard Aquatics
321Live Aquaria/Dr. Foster
& Smith
614 Living Color
922 Living Color AMS
723MarcoRocks
609 To Be Announced
311Marine Aquarium Expo
912 Midnight Mariculture
622Milwaukee
522 Mind Blowing Corals
815 My Reef to Yours
601 Neptune Systems
615 New Era
821 New Life International
911 Ocean Inspirations
914 Ocean Revive
923 Oceans Edge
426 Oceans Paradise
727OmegaSea
217ORA
121Orphek
202 Panta Rhei
729 Pecan Grove Solutions
621 Piscine Energetics
707Proaquatix
809Prodibio
301 Proline Aquatics
724Puratek
523 Real Reef
131 Red Sea
626 Reef Breeders
511 Reef Builders
708 Reef Frenzy Foods
825 Reef H2O
715 Reef Hobbyist Magazine
307 Reef Nutrition
917 Reef Radiance
421 Reef Wholesale
310ReefBrite
628 Reefer’s Cove
623Reefkoi
115ReefLive
924ReeFlo
207Reefs.com
210 Reynolds Polymer
429 Rod’s Food
514 Route 66 Marine
510 Royal Exclusiv
328 Ruby Reef
412 San Francisco Bay Brand
225Schuran
629 Sea & Reef Aquaculture
228 Sea Dwelling Creatures
501Seachem
411Sicce
410Smooth-On
113SpectraPure
726 Sticks & Stones Corals
731 Stone Aquatics
817 Sustainable Aquatics
728Taam/Rio
831 Teco US
211 The Alternative Reef
531 The Fish Crew
214TheCoralShop.com
717 Titan Aquatics Exhibits
528 Transworld Aquatic (JBJ)
908 Triton Aquatics
201 Triton Reef
919 Tropic Marin
221 Two Little Fishies
317 Unique Corals
401 United Pet Group
907 V2O Aquarium Foods
529 Walt Smith International
425 Worldwide Corals
828Zetlight
710Zoanthids.com
829ZooMed
Reception at the
Ellie Caulkins Opera
House • 7–11 pm
One block west of the
Convention Center
• Food, beverages, and
fun
he Octanes @ 8 pm
•T
in the Chambers Grant Salon (lower level)
• Gaming tables and food on all other levels
• Theme is 1920s Speakeasy. Dress in your
favorite pinstripe suit or flapper dress…or not. :)
Sponsored by BOYD
Saturday Banquet at the Four Seasons
Ballroom in CCC • 7–11 pm
• Plated dinner for 1,600
• Master of Ceremonies: Mitch Carl, Curator at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Stony
Coral Sexual Reproduction Researcher
Sponsored
with the SECORE Project
by UPG
• Presentation of MACNA 2015
• Presentation of MASNA Aquarist
of the Year
• Drawing for Fiji Trip from WSI
eynote Speaker: Dr. Luiz Rocha:
•K
Speciation in Coral Reef Fishes
• Bars open at 6 pm in the Pre-Function Space
VISIT DENVER
609 4 Guys 1 Tank
527 Acrylic & Glass Exhibits
428 Addicting Corals
209AlgaGen
811 Aqua FX
414Aquacraft
513Aquamart
517 Aqua Medic
129Aquarium Equipment
Factory
512 Aquatic Art, Inc.
127 Aquatic Experience Chicago
709 Aquatic Realm Intl
801AquaIllumination
525Aquatronica
929Aznnutty’s Saltwater
Connections
926 Bashsea Marine Design
422 Blue Life USA
407 Boyd Enterprises
327Brightwell
326 Build My LED
931 Cairns Marine
802CaribSea
701 Central Aquatics
813Cermedia
713Champion Lighting
& Supply Co.
814 Coast Tropicals
331Cobalt
111 Coldwater Marine Aquatics
407 CORAL Magazine
507CoralVue
431 CPR Aquatics
226 Crystal Clear Aquatics
314 DFW Aquarium Supply
812 Digital Aquatics
229Dirk
329 Dr. Eco Systems
610 Dr. G’s Marine Aquaculture
215 Dr. Tim’s
515 Ecological Labs
521 Ecotech Marine
617Ecoxotic
925 Elite Aquatics
424 Endless Ocean
415Eshopps
913 Exotic Fish and Reef Imports
212 Exotic Reef Creations
M AC N A X X VI
29
Speaker Bios
Jake Adams
Jake Adams is a professional marine aquarist, reef aquarium author, and speaker
from Colorado. He is best known as the senior editor of the popular reef aquarium news blog Reef Builders. Jake has a Bachelor’s degree in marine science and
has research experience with spawning corals in the Caribbean. He has consulted
on the design and installation of jumbo reef tanks, retail stores, aquaculture and
mariculture facilities, and research aquariums. When he isn’t speaking to reef
clubs or writing for marine aquarium publications, Jake also enjoys working with
freshwater fishes and planted aquariums. As one of MACNA 2014’s organizers, he
will bring some innovations to the conference, including a series of Flash workshops and a head-to-head debate on one aspect of aquarium husbandry.
CaribSea, Inc.| phone: +1-772-461-1113 | caribsea.com | [email protected]
TOPICS: Discoveries of the Fluval Sea Flores Expedition (with Vincent Chalias)
Refugiums: Why Bother? — A live debate with Julian Sprung
Julian Baggio
Julian is a senior manager at Cairns Marine, Australia’s largest and leading marine livestock supplier, based near the Queensland coast with easy access to the
Great Barrier Reef and the Coral Sea. Julian completed his degree in marine science at the University of Queensland, majoring in marine parasitology. First employed by Cairns Marine in 1997 as a collections diver, Julian shifted into the
role of facility aquarist, specializing in the care and transport of Cairns Marine’s
public aquarium animals. Over the past seven years he has overseen export sales
and freight logistics, more recently focusing on the growing demand worldwide
for Australian SPS corals and the challenges involved with their care and successful transportation.
TOPIC: Sustainable Wild Collection of Australian Fish & Corals
Laura Birenbaum
Real aragonitic base rock, no cement, no
curing. Extensive macro and micro-porosity
infused with spored bacteria for outstanding
biological performance. Clean and safe
for all fish and inverts, environmentally
responsible each piece being very unique.
40 lb box #00376 20 lb box #25376
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MACNA
Laura is a proud owner and co-founder of ReefGen, the wholesale coral and fish
aquaculture company in Riverhead, NY. Laura and her business partner, Justin
Credabel, propagate a diverse selection of coral frags in collaboration with the
Long Island Aquarium and Exhibition Center. Laura has successfully bred four
generations of dwarf cuttlefish using 15 dedicated cuttle propagation tanks, all on
a 20,000-gallon reef “sump.” She has worked many sides of the aquarium trade
including retail, wholesale, and manufacturing. She co-owned a reef aquarium
shop in Bellingham, Washington, while earning her B.S. in marine biology from
Western Washington University. Laura is presently Vice President of the Long
Island Reef Association.
TOPIC: Breeding Dwarf Cuttlefish (Sepia bandensis)
Tom Bowling
Tom Bowling is a marine scientist, former commercial diver, and current head of
Biota Aquaculture in Koror, Palau, where the company is culturing marine fishes
for restocking reefs on islands where these species have been overfished. To date
they have succeeded in raising Bumphead Parrotfish (a world “first” for the family
Scaridae), Twin-Spot Snapper, Blue-Lined Seabream, and others from eggs collected in the wild. Tom studied marine science and aquaculture in Australia and has
previously owned several businesses there, including Ocean Oddities, which was
one of the first commercial seahorse farms Down Under, and worked at Marshall
Islands Mariculture Farm with ORA. One of his goals is to supplement the trade
in wild-caught aquarium fishes with sustainably cultured reef species.
TOPIC: Starting a Marine Fish Aquaculture Business on a Pacific Island and Finding
Success with Bumphead Parrotfish and other species
30
MAC NA X X V I
M AC N A X X VI
31
Speaker Bios
Vincent Chalias
Vincent Chalias is a marine biologist based in Bali, where he has helped develop
coral mariculture methods. He and several Indonesian colleagues are working
together to produce hundreds of species for Amblard S.A, a leading European livestock importer. Vincent has a degree in marine aquaculture from the University
of Montpellier (France) and continues to develop new techniques for culturing
new and different species. He is credited with the discovery of a new species of
frogfish (Histiophryne pogonius) and is currently working on the description of
new Euphyllia coral species. Vincent is also a passionate underwater photographer
and a contributor to CORAL and other magazines.
TOPIC: Discoveries of the Fluval Sea Flores Expedition (with Jake Adams)
Presented by Fluval Sea
John Ciotti
Johnny Ciotti is a Los Angeles–based commercial advertising photographer and
creative director who has produced national ad campaigns and commercials for
such iconic brands as Butterfinger, Pepsi, Pampers, HotPockets, The Sharper Image, and Reebok, as well as such aquarium brands as Ecoxotic, Current-USA, Neptune Aquatics, Reef Nutrition, and Unique Corals. Johnny has worked hand in
hand with the likes of world-renowned freshwater aquascaping artists Jeff Senske,
Mike Senske, and Takashi Amano. His aquascapes, which have been noted to
shake things up a bit, have been published in numerous online sites and in an
array of international aquarium magazines.
TOPIC: Modern Aquascaping
Jamie Craggs
Jamie Craggs is a coral biologist and currently the Aquarium Curator at the
Horniman Museum & Gardens, London, UK. Since arriving at the Museum in
2008 he has been improving the working practices, animal welfare standards, and
captive breeding programs within the aquarium. His main research interest is the
reproductive biology of reefbuilding corals, and since 2012 he has been running
Project Coral, a multi-year research initiative focusing on inducing broadcastspawning corals to spawn predictably in captivity. Taking advantage of the latest
microprocessor technologies, he was able to orchestrate and document the
spawning of two species of Acropora within the museum’s coral research system
in South East London.
TOPIC: Induced Acropora Spawning in Captivity
Justin Credabel Grabel
Justin Credabel Grabel is co-founder, with Laura Birenbaum, of ReefGen, a
wholesale producer of captive-grown corals, fishes, and other marine livestock.
Their farm is located at the Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead, New York. Working with aquarium director Joe Yaiullo, ReefGen is producing premium corals
as well as other livestock, including Candy Basslets, Flamboyant Cuttlefish, and
Chain Catsharks. Justin’s particular passion for notoriously hard-to-keep Goniopora stony corals led him to develop Goniopower, a specialty food manufactured
by Two Little Fishies. A graduate of the University of Connecticut, he is a frequent
contributor to aquarium magazines and a speaker at marine events.
TOPIC: Justin Credabel Six Pack (Thraustochytrids—The Unsung Symbiont Hero; Hydrogen Peroxide and Algae Control; Grafting and Fusion; Potassium Dosing; Unusual
Coral Propagation; and “Whatever I Happen to Be Jazzed About at the Moment”)
32
MAC NA X X V I
M AC N A X X VI
33
Speaker Bios
Ehsan Dashti
Ehsan is the co-founder and owner, with his wife, Linda Dashti, of Triton Applied Reef Bioscience in Düsseldorf, Germany—a company with an international
water testing service that uses “cutting edge technology to analyze artificial and
natural seawater for aquarium professionals and hobbyists.” Eshan says he is “a
reef and chemical geek out of a real biochemical family” who is trying to push
the boundaries of reefkeeping by, for example, measuring and reporting trace and
macro elements that have been previously ignored, as well as exploring old and
new techniques to mimic the natural seawater habitat of corals.
TOPIC: High Precision Testing of Seawater, Trace Elements in the Reef Aquarium, and
Comparisons to Natural Seawater of the Flores Sea and Komodo
Meneeka Gurroby
Meneeka Gurroby is a member of the family-owned Ornamental Marine World,
a purveyor of rare fishes endemic to the waters of the Indian Ocean Republic of
Mauritius, volcanic islands ringed with pristine coral reefs. Working with her
father, Chabiraj Gurroby, her brother Mohesh, and longtime family friend Suresh
Liloo, Meneeka exports fishes to North America, Europe, and other areas. “My
mom even helps out on occasion,” she says. The company works to fill special
orders only, collects with nets, and takes pride in collecting responsibly and sustainably. Meneeka says, “We truly love what we do and love sharing our beautiful
and bountiful marine life, and of course, a bit of a picture of our amazing island
home with all of you.”
TOPIC: The Aquarium Fishery in Mauritius
Presented by Schuran Seawater Equipment
Professor Jean M. Jaubert
Jean Jaubert, Ph.D., is a world-renowned coral reef researcher, emeritus faculty
member of the University of Nice, France, and longtime director of the nearby
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco. His work at the Monaco Public Aquarium
has included numerous studies of coral growth, as well as water treatment methods in aquariums. He is well known for inventing the so-called “Jaubert Method,”
in which a plenum or void area under a bed of substrate works to reduce dissolved
nitrate naturally and without mechanical assistance. Professor Jaubert has written about reef restoration and is past chief scientist and expedition leader of the
Cousteau Society. He is presently General Manager of Bio-Eco Sciences & Technologies, Ltd.
h
i
n
t
g
y
A
r
q
e
u
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a
i
t
v
E
under one
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TOPIC: 25 Years of Uninterrupted Growth for a Captive Reef Mesocosm at Monaco’s
Oceanographic Museum
November 7-9, 2014 | Chicago, Illinois
Marriott Renaissance Hotel, Schaumburg Convention Center
www.aquaticexperience.org
Professor Sanjay Joshi
In real life, Sanjay Joshi, Ph.D., is a professor of industrial and manufacturing
engineering at Penn State University. He has been a self-confessed “reef addict”
since 1992 and currently keeps several marine aquariums at home, including a
500G small-polyp stony coral–dominated reef. He also co-manages the 500G
aquarium at Penn State. He is actively involved in educating aquarists on various topics such as lighting, aquarium system design, and general reef husbandry
through lectures and publications in reef magazines. He has published articles in
magazines such as Advanced Aquarist, Reefs Magazine, CORAL, Marine Fish and Reef
Annual, Aquarium Frontiers, and Aquarium Fish. He received the MASNA Aquarist
of the Year award in 2006 for his contributions to the marine aquarium hobby.
60,000 Sq Ft of Exhibit Space and Displays + Latest New Products
Aquatic Competitions + Show Specials + Networking + Education Seminars
Speakers include
Anton Lamboj | Bob Fenner | Brandon McLane | Charles Delbeek | Chris Lukhaup
Eric Bodrock | Francis Yupangco | Heiko Bleher | Jake Adams | Jen Reynolds
Joe Olenik | Jonathan Dooley | Julian Sprung | Karen Randall | Kevin Kohen
Oliver Knott | Oliver Lucanus | Patrick Dontson | Rusty Wessel
Sandy Moore | Sanjay Joshi | Steve Lundblad | Ted Judy
Use the promo code MACNA and receive 20% off the All Access Weekend Pass.
TOPIC: Conversion of a 500G Reef from Metal Halide to LEDs: A Personal Experience
AQUA14_0006_MACNA.indd 1
34
MAC NA X X V I
7/10/14 4:35 PM
M AC N A X X VI
35
Speaker Bios
INTRODUCING THE
Tea Yi Kai
NEXT
GENERATION
Known online by the alias “Lemon,” Yi Kai is 22 this year and is pursuing his
degree in biotechnological sciences. Like many, he started toying around with
the freshwater hobby but quickly grew into a proficient hobbyist on the marine
scene. He has a passion for fish and wildlife photography and has a commendable
amount of knowledge with regard to reef fishes. Yi Kai is the youngest editor on
ReefBuilders and is best known for his articles on uncommon and deep-water
fishes, both in the wild and in the Asian aquarium market. Living in Singapore,
he is at the epicenter of the rare fish mecca in the Far East and often gets news
stories from Asia, especially those from Japan, faster than most.
OF AQUACULTURED
ROCK
TOPIC: For the Love of Wrasses
Rufus Kimura
A portion of REEFROCK© sales helps support
REEFPROJECT2.0© and the ADE (Aquaculture
Development for the Environment) programs.
Rufus Kimura and his Hawaii-based dive team, Kaiohi Tropical Fish, are recognized as some of the foremost deep-water collectors in the aquarium industry.
He spent his formative years devising ways to capture the local tide pool inhabitants on Molokai. Starting at the age of 11, he had “a rough, rocky, comical, and
more often than not dangerous beginning” as a commercial fish collector. After
an inexcusable number of near-death experiences, Rufus says he realized that
he was not invincible and started listening “to the voice of reason (probably my
mother’s) and decided to do things the right way.” Using closed circuit rebreathers and tech-scooters, they routinely log dives in excess of 480 feet in search of
fishes like Genicanthus personatus and Paracentropyge boylei.
Read more about this on
ReefProject2.com
C
TOPIC: Wonders of the Deep—a video and slide presentation focused on the deep-water
collection of rare aquarium species
M
Y
Nick Klase
Nick Klase is a lighting industry veteran and the co-founder and CEO of Build
My LED in Austin, Texas. Prior to founding the company, he was the VP of Horticulture Lighting at a global LED manufacturing company, where he led a team
focused on creating “the world’s most efficient photosynthetic lighting systems.”
Mr. Klase also held a variety of management roles at Acuity Brands Lighting, including a nine-year tenure as General Manager of Outdoor Controls. Mr. Klase
received his MBA from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, and a bachelor’s
degree in Business Administration and Theology from Oral Roberts University in
Tulsa, Oklahoma.
CM
MY
CY
CMY
Visit us at
Booth #529
K
TOPIC: LED Lighting in Aquarium Applications
©
Kevin Kohen
Kevin Kohen is Director of LiveAquaria.com in Rhinelander, Wisconsin, where
he oversees the operations of the facility and is responsible for the acquisition of
the animals, as well as their husbandry. He led the venture to launch Live Aquaria
and designed and oversaw the installation of the Drs Foster & Smith Aquaculture
Coral & Marine Life Facility, where more than 20,000 gallons are devoted to coral
and marine fish culture. Kevin has a Bachelor of Science degree from Wright State
University and is an avid marine life photographer and fish enthusiast for some
30 years. He was one of the early pioneers who maintained live corals in captivity
in the early 1980s. He writes articles for various aquarium publications and he
was the MASNA Aquarist of the Year in 2012.
TOPIC: Establishing and Maintaining a Thriving Non-Photosynthetic (NPS) Reef
Aquarium
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A DIVISION OF
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REEFROCK2.0/2.1
M AC N A X X VI
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Speaker Bios
Dr. Todd LaJeunesse
Todd LaJeunesse, Ph.D., is a tenured professor in the Biology Department at Penn
State University. His laboratory relies on molecular-genetic analyses to characterize the diversity, ecological niche, and geographic range of coral symbionts,
Symbiodinium spp. and how they are adapting to changes in global climate. When
he was a boy living on the coast of Maine, he cultivated a fascination and personal
connection with nature, especially marine invertebrates. He has Bachelor’s degree
from Cornell University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has published approximately 60 research articles in peer-reviewed international journals, and his research is funded by the National Science Foundation
and by The Pennsylvania State University
TOPIC: Zooxanthellae, Corals, and Symbiosis
Dr. Charles Mazel
Charles Mazel, Ph.D., is the founder of NightSea and a Principal Research Scientist at Physical Sciences, Inc., in Andover, Massachusetts, developing equipment
for viewing and imaging fluorescence and instrumentation to measure fluorescence and other optical characteristics. His research focuses on the biology of
fluorescence and inventing new tools for studying and recording fluorescence in
corals, anemones, mantis shrimps, and other animals. He has made fluorescence
dives in numerous locations around the globe, measured fluorescence properties
underwater, and made the first deep-sea dives to explore the phenomenon of
fluorescence from a manned submersible. He has a special interest in fluorescence
and its effect on the color of corals, in nature and in the aquarium.
TOPIC: The Function of Fluorescence on the Reef
Martin Moe
Martin A. (Skip) Moe, Jr., is a marine biologist and aquarist who has developed
the basic technology for the captive culture of Pompano and many marine tropical fishes. With his wife, Barbara, in 1973 he founded Aqualife Research Corporation, the first company to produce hatchery-cultured marine tropical fishes in
commercial quantities: Ocellaris Clownfish, Neon Gobies, Porkfish, and Caribbean angelfishes. He holds a Master’s degree from the University of South Florida.
His basic book The Marine Aquarium Handbook: Beginner to Breeder is the bestselling aquarium book of all time and has been a primary reference for new marine
aquarists since 1982. He is currently developing the techniques for culturing the
keystone herbivore of the Atlantic coral reefs, the Long-spined Sea Urchin, Diadema antillarum. He was MASNA Aquarist of the Year in 1995.
TOPIC: The Foundation of Marine Aquaristics
Michael Paletta
AMAZONAS
Michael Paletta works in genomics in breast and colon cancer for Genomic
Health. He has a Bachelor’s degree from Dickinson College and a Master’s degree in psychopharmacology from Yale University. He has been an avid reefkeeper
since 1984 and has personally kept reef aquariums ranging in size from 20 gallons
to 1,200 gallons; he has also helped build and set up other reef aquariums up to
4,000 gallons in size. He currently maintains several reef aquariums, including a
300-gallon SPS-dominated tank and a 75-gallon LPS tank. He has consulted for
The National Aquarium in Baltimore as well the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium.
Michael is the author of more than 100 articles on various aspects of reefkeeping,
as well as the books Ultimate Reefs and the bestselling The New Marine Aquarium.
TOPIC: Aquarium History: Oh, How Far We’ve Come!
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Speaker Bios
Dr. Luiz Rocha
Luiz Rocha, Ph.D., a native of Brazil, is the Curator and Follett Chair of Ichthyology at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Luiz’s research
interests center on the evolution, biogeography, and ecology of coral reef fishes.
His overarching goal is to understand what drives the extremely high biodiversity
found on tropical reefs. His field work and research, in which he uses DNA and
modern genomic techniques, have led to the discovery of numerous new species,
including wrasses, gobies, parrotfishes, and angelfishes. Luiz is a Coral Reef Fish
Specialist for the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Species
Survival Commission. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the Universidade Federal da Paraiba in Brazil, and his Ph.D. in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
from the University of Florida.
KEYNOTE SPEAKER TOPIC: Speciation in Coral Reef Fishes
Richard Ross
Richard Ross is a Senior Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium in the California
Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, where he maintains many exhibits including
the 212,000-gallon Philippine Coral Reef. He also participates in ongoing field
work in the Philippines and ongoing coral spawning work in the Florida Keys, and
continues to try to push the boundaries of coral husbandry and the breeding of
marine fishes and inverts. He has kept saltwater animals for more than 25 years
and has worked in aquarium maintenance, retail, and wholesale, and has consulted for a coral farm/fish collecting station in the South Pacific. Richard is a regular
author for trade publications (he is very proud of his Skeptical Reefkeeping series)
and a frequent speaker at aquarium conferences, and was a founder of one of the
largest and most progressive reef clubs in Northern California, Bay Area Reefers.
TOPIC: What’s Up with Phosphate?
Walt Smith
Walt and his wife, Deborah, are co-founders of Walt Smith International in Fiji,
where they are engaged in marine livestock collection, natural coral farming, and
live rock manufacturing. Their experiments in mariculture started in 1998, making theirs the first commercial coral and live rock farm in the world. Walt started
as a marine fish enthusiast “way back in 1970, when technology was limited to an
undergravel filter and air stones. At that time there were no reef tanks, coral, or
live rock available to the hobby.” When Walt opened his Tonga collection station
in 1989, he had already spent over 17 years as a wholesaler in Los Angeles and
has had a first-hand view of the explosive growth of interest in reef aquariums.
TOPIC: Following the Sun, Journeys of a Sea Dreamer: Starting a Marine Aquarium
Collecting Station in a Third World Country
Julian Sprung
Julian Sprung is the owner of Two Little Fishies, based in Miami Gardens, Florida,
book publishers and manufacturers of specialty foods for fishes and invertebrates
and accessories for aquariums, water gardens, and paludariums. He is the co-author, with Charles Delbeek, of the bestselling three-volume The Reef Aquarium set.
Julian is a graduate of the University of Florida, with a Bachelor of Science degree
in zoology. Julian has been keeping marine aquariums for more than 30 years and
has dived in various Caribbean locales, as well as in the Red Sea, Australia, Solomon Islands, Fiji, Japan, France, Croatia, Maine, and Oregon. He was the 2004
MASNA Aquarist of the Year for his contributions to the marine aquarium hobby.
TOPICS: Roundtable Discussion: The proposal to list stony corals under the
Endangered Species Act
Refugiums: Why Bother? — A live debate with Jake Adams
40
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Speaker Bios
Tony Vargas
Tony Vargas is the author of The Coral Reef Aquarium and numerous magazine
articles. In the mid-1980s he began experimenting with keeping marine invertebrates. In the late 1980s, he and a handful of other amateur aquarists in the New
York City area were among the first in the U.S. to successfully keep and maintain
Acropora alive—long term—in captivity. Tony shared this experience with others
through a popular column called “Feature Coral” for FAMA Magazine. One of
the Acropora articles in FAMA was acknowledged in Carden Wallace’s textbook
Staghorn Corals of the World. Today, Tony SCUBA dives around the world taking
underwater photos and observing many of these creatures in their natural environment. He lives and keeps a large reef aquarium in West Palm Beach, Florida.
TOPIC: What Makes A Great Reef Tank?
Jim Walters
Jim Walters is co-owner of Chicago’s Old Town Aquarium, one of the nation’s
leading aquatic emporiums and a supplier of livestock, including new and rare
animals, for leading public aquariums, museums, and advanced hobbyists. He
says he “has literally spent his life with his hands in the water.” Jim has worked
in the aquarium industry since his early teens; he has over 30 years of experience
in the retail and wholesale aspects of the hobby. He is also an avid diver and has
ventured on many tropical collection trips, giving him the opportunity to learn
yet another facet of aquarium-keeping: responsible collection. Jim has had the
chance to handle and care for some of the most rarely imported animals, including many firsts, some of which have never been scientifically described.
TOPIC: Rants and Raves from a 37-Year-Old LFS
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A R O U N D
ACORN
3350 Brighton Blvd.
720-542-3721
www.denveracorn.com
Oak-fired oven and grill with
seasonal New American menu
of family-style small plates and
entrées.
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MAC NA X X V I
BEAST + BOTTLE
719 E. 17th Ave.
303-623-3223
www.beastandbottle.com
Rustic American restaurant serving
craft dinner and brunch, including lamb sweetbreads with root
vegetable hash, English pea souffle,
monkfish with braised leeks.
BISTRO VENDOME
1420 Larimer St.
303-825-3232
www.bistrovendome.com
Classic French bistro fare made
from seasonal local ingredients.
CAFÉ BRAZIL
4408 Lowell Blvd.
303-480-1877
www.cafebrazildenver.com
Inventive South American cuisine
including lomo embuchado, Feijoada, xim xim, and fried bananas.
COLT & GRAY
1553 Platte St.
303-477-1447
www.coltandgray.com
From foie gras and charcuterie and
cheese to rabbit, grilled beef heart,
and Colorado lamb tartare.
303-399-5353
Steaks, fin fishes, crustaceans,
fondue, macaroni and cheese. Live
music.
CHOLON MODERN ASIAN BISTRO
1555 Blake St.
303-353-5223
www.cholon.com
Contemporary Southeast Asian
menu including pork ribs with
smoked tamarind barbecue sauce
and green papaya salad, asparagus
and mushroom salad with soy
truffle vinaigrette.
EUCLID HALL
1317 14th St.
303-595-4255
euclidhall.com
Innovative international pub food
including house-made sausages,
poutine, schnitzels. Extensive beer
selection and creative cocktails.
FRUITION
1313 E. 6th Ave.
303-831-1962
www/fruitionrestaurant.com
New American cuisine.
DUO
2413 W. 32nd Ave.
303-477-4141
www.duodenver.com
Creative local-farm-to-fork New
American cuisine. Pastry chef Yasmin Lozada-Hissom is a four-time
semifinalist for the James Beard
Outstanding Pastry Chef award.
EL TROMPITO TAQUERIA
1540 W. 70th Ave.
720-540-3483
www.taqueriaeltrompito.com
Tacos, burritos, tortas (Mexican
sandwiches), sopas, and dinner
combination plates.
MECCA GRILL
270 Downing St.
303-722-4100
meccagrilldenver.com
Colorado produces 1,413,242
barrels of beer per year (3rd in the
U.S.) and has 175 craft breweries—
that’s 4.7 per capita.
ELWAY’S CHERRY CREEK
2500 E. 1st Ave., Suite 101
LOLA DENVER
1575 Boulder St.
720-570-8686
www.loladenver.com
Coastal Mexican food made with
fresh and seasonal ingredients and
seafood. Family style paella on Sunday evenings, weekend brunches
(from chicken and waffles to crab
and avocado benedicto).
OSTERIA MARCO
1453 Larimer St.
303-534-5855
www.osteriamarco.com
Family-style Italian, pizza, artisanal
house-made cheese.
POTAGER
1109 Ogden St.
303-832-5788
www.potagerrestaurant.com
One of Denver’s original farm-totable restaurants.
RIOJA
1431 Larimer St.
303-820-2282
www.riojadenver.com
Inspired by Mediterranean ingredients, local and seasonal products.
SPUNTINO
2639 W. 32nd St.
303-433-0949
www.spuntinodenver.com
Sandwiches, pastas, entrees including house-made porchetta, duck
liver mousse with fig compote.
JACK-N-GRILL
2524 N. Federal Blvd.
303-964-9544
www.jackngrill.com
Popular Mexican spot.
THE KITCHEN
1530 16th St. Mall
303-623-3127
thekitchen.com/the-kitchen-denver
Farm-to-table bistro serving classic
comfort food. Raw bar, meat, fish,
seasonal vegetarian dishes.
Larimer Square—Denver’s oldest
and most historic section, a few blocks
from the Convention Center.
MARCO’S COAL-FIRED PIZZERIA
2129 Larimer St.
303-296-7000
www.marcoscoalfiredpizza.com
Creative coal-fired New York and
Neopolitan pizzas, gluten-free options, legendary lemoncello chicken
wings.
FUEL CAFÉ
3455 Ringsby Court
303-296-4642
www.fuelcafedenver.com
From breakfast sandwich (brioche,
boursin, arugula, and choice of
meats) or corn fritters to mahi
mahi with eggplant (dinner).
STEVE CRECELIUS/VISIT DENVER
Denver may be renowned
for
its fabled Wild West history, nearpermanent sunshine (300 days
each year and counting), healthy
lifestyle, endless outdoor pursuits,
and booming singles scene (just
ask Forbes Magazine). But the Mile
High City, looming 5,280 feet
above sea level and framed by the
snow-capped Rocky Mountains,
has never been particularly famous
for its restaurant scene. Food snobs
from other cities have thumbed
their noses at what they call our
“cowboy cuisine,” jeered at our apparent lack of sophistication, and
wondered what, if anything, they
could possibly eat in a city that
doesn’t border an ocean, tout yearround outdoor farmers’ markets, or
trumpet a celebrity chef whose last
name is Lagasse, Keller, Robuchon,
Waters, or Meyer. While they were
sneering and giggling behind our
backs, however, we were patting
our backs and rolling our eyes.
Over the last several years,
Denver restaurants and chefs have
given us myriad reasons to shut
up and eat. We’ve experienced a
restaurant boom that has diners
frequenting these restaurants in
droves, proving that eating out in
Denver is more than just a pastime;
it’s a certified passion.
Here’s a starting point for
MACNA visitors who want to venture out for a break from a weekend
of hotel dining.
—Lori Midson & Louise Watson
ARAUJO’S
2900 W. 26th Ave.
303-455-3866
Mexican; famous for $1.50 breakfast burritos.
VISIT DENVER
Denver’s Cuisine Scene
E AT T& OS EW
E N
SUSHI SASA
2401 15th St. #80
303-433-7272
www.sushisasa.com
Called the “best sushi restaurant in
Denver” by many critics.
Middle Eastern kababs, falafel,
sandwiches, lamb entrees.
MIZUNA
225 E. 7th Ave.
303-832-4778
mizunadenver.com
Comfort foods: Burgundy escargots,
French onion soup, lobster macaroni and cheese, veal sweetbreads.
NEW SAIGON
630 S. Federal Blvd.
303-936-4954
Since 1987, widely recognized as
the best Vietnamese restaurant
in town.
TABLE 6
609 Corona St.
303-831-8800
www.table6denver.com
Classic American bistro serving
fried duck meatballs with rice
crepes, pasta, fish, meats, glutenfree fried chicken.
Z CUISINE AND À CÔTÉ
2239 W. 30th Ave.
303-477-1111
zcuisineonline.com
“Farm to fork” Parisian/American
bistro famous for various cuts of
Colorado grass-fed beef; À Côté is
an after-dinner absinthe bar.
M AC N A X X VI
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Colorado Marine Aquarium Shops
DENVER METRO • NORTH
ABOUT FISH
7236 N. Federal Blvd.
Westminster, CO 80030
303-429-1941
www.about-fish.com
AQUA IMPORTS
2690 28th St. #C
Boulder, CO 80301
303-444-6971
www.aqua-imports.com
ELITE REEF
8410 Wadsworth Blvd. Unit F
Arvada, CO 80003
720-379-8076
www.elitereef.com
EXOTIC AQUATICS
3216 Arapahoe Ave.
Boulder, CO 80303
303-442-5363
Find us on www.Facebook.com
FISH DEN
5055 W. 144th Ave. #3
Denver, CO 80212
303-458-0376
www.fishdendenver.com
LIQUID KINGDOM INC.
6470 W. 120th Ave. #D5
Broomfield, CO 80020
303-460-8487
Find us on www.Facebook.com
DENVER METRO • SOUTH
AQUAMART
3255 S. Wadsworth Blvd.
Lakewood, CO 80227
303-716-5700
www.aquamartonline.com
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MAC NA X X V I
AQUATIC ART INC.
9337 Commerce Center
Circle #3
Highlands Ranch, CO 80129
720-253-8660
www.aquaticartinc.com
ESSENTIAL PET
17930 Cottonwood Dr.
Parker, CO 80134
303-805-5451
www.essential-pet.com
FANTA-SEA
16522 Keystone Blvd.
Parker, CO 80134
720-484-5343
www.fanta-sea.com
FLUID DESIGNERS
2721 W. Oxford Ave. Unit 4
Sheridan, CO 80110
303-927-7379
www.fluiddesigners.com
KEY’S ISLAND
1800 W. Oxford Ave.
Englewood, CO 80110
303-783-0697
NEPTUNE’S TROPICAL FISH
1970 E. County Line Rd.
Highlands Ranch, CO 80126
303-798-1776
www.neptunestropical.com
SOUTH BROADWAY TROPICALS
3372 S. Broadway
Englewood, CO 80113
303-762-1856
www.southbroadwaytropicals.com
TODD’S TROPICAL FISH
10015 E. Hampden Ave.
Denver, CO 80231
303-338-1331
www.toddstropicalfishdenver.com
TROPICAL PET OASIS
10366 S. Dransfeldt Rd. #12
Parker, CO 80134
303-590-5040
www.tropicalpetoasis.com
NORTHERN COLORADO
SOUTHERN COLORADO
ANIMAL ATTRACTION
2518 11th Ave.
Greeley, CO 80631
970-353-3400
www.monsterreef.com
MR. AQUA USA
105 E. Fillmore St.
Colorado Springs, CO 80907
719-577-9898
www.mraqua.com
ALPINE KOI & REEF
2715 E. Mulberry St.
Fort Collins, CO 80524
970-224-3663
www.alpinekoi.com
PET PARADISE
1115 Pueblo Blvd. Way
Pueblo, CO 81005
719-564-6191
www.pueblopetparadise.com
GREAT WHITE AQUATICS
4112 S. College Ave.
Fort Collins, CO 80525
970-267-3474
www.greatwhiteaquatics.com
SEASCAPE AQUATICS
5038 N. Academy Blvd.
Colorado Springs, CO 80918
719-388-8504
www.seascapesaquatics.com
THE FISH CREW
1414 E. Harmony Rd. #1
Fort Collins, CO 80525
970-286-2245
www.fishcrew.com
TROPICAL TREASURES
2212 E. Platte Ave.
Colorado Springs, CO 80909
719-577-4311
www.coloradotropicaltreasures.com
ROB MOUGEY
Colorado boasts
some worldclass aquarium and pet retail
stores, and MACNA attendees are
encouraged to visit them in their
spare time. Several shops will also
have booths in the Exhibition Hall
at the Colorado Conference Center
during the show.
VALLEY PETS
6380 S. U.S. Highway 85–87
Fountain, CO 80817
719-390-4583
WESTERN SLOPE
FISH CONNECTION
810 E. College Dr.
Durango, CO 81301
970-259-3474
www.fishconnectiononline.com
J & M AQUATICS
2851 North Ave.
Grand Junction, CO 81501
970-245-2526
www.jmaquaticsandpetcenter.com
MARINE TECH
2478 Patterson Rd. Suite 26
Grand Junction, CO 81505
970-255-8600
www.marinetechstore.com
Cris Capp’s outstanding 500-gallon
(1,900-L) SPS reef, established
three years ago with some corals
migrated from a previous smaller
aquarium. A long-time aquarist who
is very active in aquarium forums,
Cris successfully switched from the
ranks of hobbyist to professional
aquarist, parlaying his husbandry
skills into a successful retail store
(Aquatic Art in Highlands Ranch,
under Denver Metro South). He has
a special love for small-polyp stony
corals, as evidenced by his ability
to grow them like weeds.
—Rob Mougey
WESTERN SLOPE AQUATICS
2650 North Ave. #117
Grand Junction, CO 81501
970-245-6987
www.wsapetshop.com
M AC N A X X VI
47
A
N
C
S H OW C A S E
A
M
by David Marriott
Reefing History in Colorado
Win Farnsworth’s six-year-old,
1,500-gallon office reef, installed
by Cris Capp of Aquatic Art.
Broadway Tropicals, Aquaria, Dolphin Tropicals,
Todd’s Tropical Fish, Exotic Aquatics, and Sherman
Tank—and this was just in the Denver metro area. Several of these stores are still thriving today.
That was it: I had to get back in. As I started researching my new direction I discovered that most of
the major players in acrylic filter manufacturing were
here in my own backyard, including Amiracle Plastics,
U.S. Aquarium, Lifereef Filter Systems, Aquaricare Algae Scrubbers, Reef Tech, Debron Aquatics, and others.
In the years to come, my reefing adventures would
allow me to work in every aspect of the aquarium industry right here in Colorado. Working for Amiracle
and U.S. Aquarium gave me the opportunity to build
relationships with dealers, manufacturers, and distributors throughout the country and introduced me
to the likes of Steve Hurlock and Steve Chang, who
played major roles in establishing the standards to
VISIT OUR BOOTH: #307
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Reef Nutrition was the first to develop and market
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feeds. And we haven’t stopped innovating since.
We offer superior feeds for healthy, eye-popping reefs that
are cultured on-site with our own nutritious, marine
“Instant Algae®” — using bio-secure, proprietary processes
of our parent company, Reed Mariculture.
* Live copepods
* Rotifer-based feed
* Copepod-based feed
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* Marine fish egg-based feed
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* Packaged live macro-algae
* Marine microalgae
To become a dealer, please contact us at
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Reef Nutrition Firsts:
© 2014 Reed Mariculture Inc. All Rights Reserved. Reef Nutrition, We Feed Your Reef, and Instant Algae are registered trademarks of Reed Mariculture Inc.
ROB MOUGEY. SYSTEM INSTALLED BY CRIS CAPP/AQUATIC ART, HIGHLANDS RANCH, CO
After moving from
sea-level San Diego to milehigh and dry Denver in 1991, I truly thought my time
in the aquarium industry had come to an end. Little
did I know that I would discover a reefing mecca hidden in the Rocky Mountains. One day I happened
upon a company that was manufacturing trickle filters. After a quick look around, and finding no one in
sight, I made a note of the address and the business
name: Amiracle Plastics. At the time this was one of
the largest filter manufacturers in the country.
My curiosity got the best of me and, one evening,
while thumbing through the Yellow Pages to find out
what aquarium shops were in the area, if any, I was
impressed by the selection of stores that sold saltwater
fishes. They included Neptune’s Tropical Fish, South
which most Colorado reefers continue to aspire.
Steve Chang was one of the pioneers in growing and
fragging SPS/LPS corals in the mid-90s. He couldn’t
grow pulsing Xenia fast enough! I think I was number 30 on his waiting list for a thumbnail-sized bit of
bright green toadstool leather that he sold at the time
for $350. SPSs were way too intimidating for me then.
The late, great Steve Hurlock was one of the most
dedicated and passionate reef enthusiasts I have ever
had the pleasure of meeting. A trip to Steve’s house
allowed visitors to experience a huge cold-water tank,
a 600-gallon reef, and a pair of Weedy Sea Dragons.
In 1999 I was the general manager of Reef Gallery,
a store that catered exclusively to saltwater aquariums
back when freshwater fishes were still considered a
fish store’s bread and butter. Luck was
with us and as the economy boomed,
our little store became busier than we
had ever imagined it would. Reefing was
here to stay. It was around this time that
Jake Adams first visited our store. A few
years later he worked for me after finishing college, and we have been good
friends ever since.
Though times have changed and the
Internet has forever altered the way we
do business and get our information,
reefing in Colorado is not only surviving but thriving. Visit one of our local
reef clubs, like MASC or THESCMAS or
DARC, and it won’t take you long to see
how strong the Rocky Mountain reefing
community is. Colorado still has some
of the best local fish stores in the country and acrylic manufacturers like Lifereef Filter Systems and others. Cris Capp of Aquatic
Art and Will Lindquist of Premier Fish and Reef set the
standard that other aquarium maintenance companies strive for. Cris has built a national reputation for
his quality SPS corals and very large custom aquariums.
Some of the newer players on the block, who have
learned to take advantage of online sales, are the coral
dealers Gonzo’s Coral Frags, Reefkoi Corals, and Mind
Blowing Corals. They and many others have spoiled
Colorado reefers forever by providing a constant selection of some of the finest corals you will find anywhere.
As for me, I still get to go to work
at my shop, Fluid Dynamics, every day
and play with fishes and corals, maintain awesome reef displays, design cool
acrylic products, and meet and associate with incredible hobbyists.
WE
OBSESSIVELY
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SALTWATER
INDUSTRY
100% Captive-Bred Marine Ornamental Fish
Sea & Reef Aquaculture specializes in culturing only the
highest-quality marine ornamental fish. Through careful
research and dedication, our team of marine biologists
bring you saltwater fish of optimum health and vivid color.
Visit us at
Booth 629
for a chance to w
in
one of our Lightn
ing
Maroon Clowns!
facebook.com/Seaandreef | [email protected]
www.seaandreef.com
www.reefbuilders.com
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S&R_Ad 3.1875X4.5625.indd 1
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7/15/14 2:31 PM
Advertiser Index
AquaIllumination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
www.aquaillumination.com
Aquatic Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
www.aquaticexperience.org
Banggai Cardinalfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
www.reef2rainforest.com
Bashsea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
www.bashsea.com
Boyd Enterprises. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 11
www.chemipure.com
CaribSea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
www.CaribSea.com
Coralife. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
www.CoralifeProducts.com
CoralVue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
www.CoralVue.com
CORAL Magazine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . insert
www.coralmagazine.com
CORAL Magazine App . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
www.reef2rainforest.com
Drs. Foster & Smith. . . . inside back cover
www.DrsFosterSmith.com/fish
EcoTech Marine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
www.ecotechmarine.com
In the end, we “keep” aquariums
FishChannel.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
because we are human. Our
www.FishChannel.com
argument is that “it is worth it”
Hikari. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8, 9
to become much more aware of
www.hikariusa.com
the real world. For those who rail
Instant Ocean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
www.instantocean.com
against zoos and any keeping
Lifereef Filter Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
of wild species, consider these
www.lifereef.com
truths: humans only love what
Marine Breeding Initiative. . . . . . . . . . 49
they know; and people do not
www.mbisite.org
Neptune . . . . . . . . 25, 27, 29, back cover
destroy what they love.
www.neptunesystems.com
—Robert M. Fenner
New Era . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
MagFeederHalfPageMACNA_Layout
7/11/14 3:42 PM Page 1
The Conscientious Marine Aquarist 1 www.neweradiets.com
MACNA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . insert
www.macna2015.org
MASNA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . insert
www.masna.org
Pacific Aqua Farms. . . . . . . . . . . . insert
www.pacificaquafarms.com
Pacific Sun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
www.pacific-sun.eu
Pecan Grove. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
www.pecangrovesolutions.com
Proline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
www.vertexaquaristik.com
Puratek. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
www.puratek.com
Real Reef Rock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
www.realreefrock.com
Red Sea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
www.redseafish.com
Reef Builders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
www.reefbuilders.com
Reef Nutrition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
www.reefnutrition.com
Reef Radiance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
www.reefradiance.com
Sea & Reef. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
www.seaandreef.com
Seachem/aquavitro.. inside front cover, 3
www.aquavitro.com
Tunze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
www.tunze.com
Two Little Fishies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 50
www.twolittlefishies.com
Unique Corals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
www.uniquecorals.com
Walt Smith International. . . . . . . . . . . 37
www.waltsmith.com
ZooMed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
www.zoomed.com
If You Like It
Then You Should Put A Ring On It
DrsFosterSmith.com/fish
Like our very popular VeggieMag, our NEW feeding device, MagFeederTM and its accessories make feeding your fishes more effective and
enjoyable too. MagFeeder comes with a floating feed ring that retains flakefoods, pellets, powdered invertebrate feeds, or any food you
want to dose into your tank but don’t want to see go right over the overflow. The magnetic coupling makes it possible to easily position the
ring without getting your hands wet, and the jointed connection assembly makes it simple to adjust the distance from the aquarium wall.
Another feature that comes with MagFeeder is the Two Little Fishies button that pops into the mushroom head of the feeder. It retains any
ring-shaped foods, such as the GrazerTM from New Era. The magnetic coupling lets you position or retrieve a Grazer easily without getting
your hands wet. Stay tuned for more new and exciting feeding accessories that you can attach, deploy, move and retrieve with MagFeeder.
Manufactured in the USA by: Two Little Fishies, Inc 1007 Park Centre Blvd. Miami Gardens, FL 33169
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MAC NA X X V I
www.Twolittlefishies.com
• EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
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