Dr. David Cababaro Bueno - TRENDS in RESEARCH WRITING for INTERNATIONAL PUBLICATIONS

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Dr. David Cababaro Bueno - TRENDS in RESEARCH WRITING for INTERNATIONAL PUBLICATIONS
TRENDS IN RESEARCH WRITING
FOR INTERNATIONAL
PUBLICATIONS
“GRADUATE SCHOOL & RESEARCH AND
PUBLICATIONS”
Columban College, Inc.
Olongapo City
DR. DAVID CABABARO BUENO
Dean- Graduate School
Director- Research and Publications Office
[email protected]
[email protected]
RESEARCH
Is
exploration combined
with learning.
A
"detailed study of a
subject in order to
discover information or
achieve a new
understanding of it."
R
E
S
E
A
R
C
H
A
process of
searching,
discovering, and
investigating
information, as well
as collecting,
interpreting, and
evaluating the
information you find.
R
E
S
E
A
R
C
H
Research
= expansion
of knowledge +
inquiry and
investigation aimed at
the discovery of facts,
theories, or laws.
S
U
R
V
I
V
O
r
Tip
To
be a successful
researcher, you need to
develop knowledge and
skills in information
literacy and research
and build upon these
skills year after year.
I
N
F
O
R
M
A
T
I
O
N
LITERACY
To
be a successful
researcher, you need to
develop knowledge and
skills in information
literacy and research
and build upon these
skills year after year
I
N
F
O
R
M
A
T
I
O
N
LITERACY
One
must know how to
apply the tools and
techniques for finding,
evaluating, and using
information effectively
WHY
do
R
E
S
E
A
R
C
H
 Applying
concepts learned in
coursework to "real life"
situations.
 Learning
about issues, and
methods in chosen fields.
 Sharpening
skills.
 Learn
problem-solving
to read primary literature.
WHY
do
R
E
S
E
A
R
C
H
 Exploring
and preparing for
future careers.
 Enhancing
professional
communication skills.
 Developing
marketable skills.
 Collaborating
with others and
working effectively as part of a
team.
WHY
do
R
E
S
E
A
R
C
H



Discovering personal
interests.
Growing as a critical,
analytical, and independent
thinker.
Developing internal
standards of excellence.
OBJECTIVES…TO
express,
appraise,
synthesize,
value,
and
concretize
trends & issues in research
writing for international
publication.
CHALLENGES IN PUBLICATION
•Journal publication is
a process that entails close
coordination between human
resources and technology.
CHALLENGES IN PUBLICATION
The knowledge and skills of
the workers should be optimized
to get a wide array of publication
jobs done no matter the cost.
CHALLENGES IN PUBLICATION
The technology that the
publication office needs to
upgrade should be given due
consideration.
CHALLENGES IN PUBLICATION
This is a revolutionary
concept that also requires
establishing and updating
standards.
Source: Style Sheet for PAIR International Journals
QUALITY ASSURANCE
 Authors
are advised to subject their
paper to plagiarism detection, grammar
checker, and readability prior to
submission since quality assurance
begins with the writer.
 They
should apply the corrections
indicated and append the first and final
reports.
QUALITY ASSURANCE
 The
Editorial Board of each
journal prefers scientists who,
on their own, initiate the
sanitizing part of scientific
writing.
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
C
R
I
T
E
R
I
O
N
#1. Scope, Newness
and Relevance/
Applicability to
International
Community
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
S
T
A
N
D
A
R
D
S
The scope (extent of what one
intends to cover) of the study is wideranging.
The aspects of the paper such as,
but not limited to, methods and
results are seemingly new.
The entire paper is interesting to
read by other nations.
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
S
T
A
N
D
A
R
D
S
The research results have
international character and
applicability.
The quality of academic writing
reflects the nature and nuances of
the discipline.
The quality of academic writing
is graduate level.
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
C
R
I
T
E
R
I
O
N
#2: Results of
Plagiarism, Grammar
and Readability
Check
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
S
T
A
N
D
A
R
D
The manuscript obtains the
minimum result: plagiarism
detection – 95%; grammar check
– 90%.
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
C
R
I
T
E
R
I
O
N
#3: Quality of
References
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
S
T
A
N
D
A
R
D
S
Sources (journals, books, and
other references) are traceable
online unless otherwise a
justification is made.
Journals are internationally
refereed and indexed.
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
S
T
A
N
D
A
R
D
S
Articles on Wikis and gray
literature (non-scientific sources)
must be avoided.
Scientific sources cited were
published preferably in Year 2010
onwards unless otherwise a
justification is given.
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
C
R
I
T
E
R
I
O
N
#4: Completeness of Parts
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
S
T
A
N
D
A
R
D
S
Each part of the manuscript
contains appropriate and sufficient
substance.
The paper demonstrates the
following parts:
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
1. HEADING
P
A
R
T
S





Title
Name of the Author(s)
Email Address
Affiliation
Address
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
2. ABSTRACT
P
A
R
T
S
3. KEYWORDS
4. INTRODUCTION
5. FRAMEWORK OF THE STUDY
6. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
P
A
R
T
S
7. METHODOLOGY (for non-experimental
researches)
MATERIALS AND METHODS (for
experimental researches)
8. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
9. CONCLUSIONS
STANDARDS FOR SUBMISSION
P
A
R
T
S
10. TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH
11. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
12. REFERENCES
1
ACTIVITY #
Professors’ Self-efficacy and Interest
in Research: A Cross-Sectional
Investigation of Two Private Higher
Educational Institutions
<Survey-Questionnaire>
(10-15 Minutes)
FULL
MANUSCRIPT
1. HEADING
Title
 Boldface
 12-15
 Title
characters
by result (preferably); the most
important result is made as the title.
1. HEADING
Title
 Catchy,
interesting, relevant to
international audience
 Language
universally understandable
 Set
the first letter of each key word in
uppercase.
 Do
not use title by scope; broad titles
FOR EXAMPLE,
 Title
by Scope: Categorizing Communication
Strategies in the Oral Expositions of
Tourism Management Students (X)
 Title
by Result: Fillers, Mime and SelfRepetitions as Most Frequently Used
Communication Strategies in Oral
Expositions (√)
1. HEADING
Name
of the Author(s)
Provide
middle initial in the
author’s name (or names of the
authors for team research), if
applicable.
Set
in uppercase
1. HEADING
Email
Address
 Use
an email address that is not
embarrassing.
 Pursuant
to ISO Standards, no author
shall use yahoo mail. An email address
(preferably Google account) should at least
have his/her name or nickname on it to
help other people easily identify him/her.
1. HEADING
Affiliation
Use
the name of the
institution in which the author
is connected and its
geographical location (City
and country).
1. HEADING
Affiliation
 For
submissions (thesis, dissertation,
seminar paper, etc.) completed by a
graduate student, the name of the
institution from which he/she
graduated should be used if funding has
been granted, otherwise the author
decides on which institution should be
used.
ILLUSTRATION
Research Skills of Graduate School Professors as
Input to Training and Development
DAVID CABABARO BUENO
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0072-0326
[email protected]
Columban College, Inc.
Olongapo City, Philippines
2. ABSTRACT
Should
contain 190 (minimum)- 210
(maximum) words
The
Abstract must contain five parts
written in one paragraph: Introduction to the
topic, chief purpose/objective, method, results,
and conclusion.
3. KEYWORDS


Indicate the discipline of the study, concepts
studied, research design/ process and setting of
the study (country and continent) as keywords.
Set keywords in sentence case.
Example:

Keywords- Education, teaching strategies, lecturediscussion, descriptive-survey design, Philippines, Asia
ILLUSTRATION
Abstract- To achieve an effective graduate educational reform, faculty development emerged as a
key factor. It facilitates the professional and instructional growth of lecturers and promotes
improvement in the institution through helping them to become contributors to the school’s
mission. The study was designed to determine the research skills of graduate professors based
on the Expected Performance Standards (EPS) set by one Private Higher Education Institution
(PHEI) as input to training and development. The descriptive-cross-sectional design and
descriptive statistical analysis were used. The teaching outcomes were based on the average
performance from the three assessments conducted by the Dean among the professors during
the academic year 2014-2015. The results exposed that the faculty were outstanding in
achieving the objectives of the graduate program by showing mastery of subject matter, relating
current issues and community needs and participating the activities of professional
organizations. However, they were just satisfactory in demonstrating mastery of research skills
in relation to research output, assisting graduate students in developing research competencies,
and showing professional growth through research activities and publications. It is undeniably
essential to include in the training and development program the need to continually upgrade
their research preparation, dissemination and utilization.
Keywords – Graduate education, research skills, professors, training and development,
descriptive-cross-sectional design, Olongapo City, Philippines
2
ACTIVITY #
Writing
of the (1) HEADING;
(2) ABSTRACT; and (3)
KEYWORDS.
( 10 Minutes )
4. INTRODUCTION
 The
INTRODUCTION should contain:
 First
Section
Global situational analysis of the
problem supported by the literature from
different continents

4. INTRODUCTION
 Second
Section
 Regional
situational analysis supported
by literature from the region of the study.
Researchers from Middle East, North
Africa, the Association of Southeast Asian
Nations (ASEAN) such as Brunei
Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos,
Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines,
Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam must
include literature from these countries to
capture the perspective in the study.
4. INTRODUCTION
 Third
Section
 Local
situational analysis of the problem
 Fourth
 Gap
Section
in the literature from the literature
reviews that the study intends to find
 Differentness of the study from other
previous studies
 Compelling reasons of the writer for
choosing the problem
4. INTRODUCTION



Use several sources with several authors
embedded in a sentence.
Utilize research review papers and scientific
sources preferably from subscription journals
because they are more authoritative and
credible such as Pubmed, Science Direct,
Springer, Proquest, EbscoHost, among others.
Note: Basic research and other types of research may
follow a different format.
5. FRAMEWORK



(Optional for experimental researches)
It should contain basic explication of the
meaning of the variables of the study.
Present the framework in either
schematic or textual form merging the
theories discussed in which the study was
anchored.
5. FRAMEWORK
 Remove
 No
diagram unless very essential.
framework is required (for
experimental study).
ACTIVITIES
3&4
Writing
of the (1)
INTRODUCTION; and
(2) FRAMEWORK
(30 – 45 Minutes)
6. OBJECTIVES


State the OBJECTIVES of the study in
paragraph form.
Use objectives that show what the
researcher shall do with the data and
not words to indicate what the
researcher intends to do as a research
process.
6. OBJECTIVES
 Write
the objectives in paragraph form
setting one from the others by a number
in close parenthesis.
 Do
not use problem statements/
questions.
ILLUSTRATION
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
This study was conducted to determine the training needs of
graduate faculty based from the expected performance standards
set the graduate school in relation to professional performance,
instructional procedures and techniques, and evaluation and
grading. Moreover, it aimed to propose a specific training and
development program to address the research skills of the faculty
imbedded on the mentioned performance standards.
ACTIVITY
#5
Writing
of “OBJECTIVES OF
THE STUDY”
(5 Minutes)
7. METHODOLOGY
For

Pure Sciences:
MATERIALS AND METHODS
Research Design
 Research Site



Participants
Instrumentation

Construction, try-out, reliability and validity
7. METHODOLOGY
•
Research Ethics Protocol
Informed consent
 Clearance from the Ethics Review Board
 Gratuitous permit from a government agency for
floral and faunal studies
 Permit from the head of the indigenous peoples of
the research sites
 Representative of animal welfare society for clinical
studies involving animals

Data Collection
 Statistical Techniques (No formulae needed )

7. METHODOLOGY
For

Social Sciences:
METHODOLOGY
 Research Design
 Research Site
Participants
 Instrumentation
Construction, Try-out, Reliability and
Validity
7. METHODOLOGY
For
Social Sciences:

Research Ethics Protocol
Informed consent
Clearance from the Ethics Review Board

Data Collection

Statistical Techniques
ILLUSTRATION
METHODOLOGY

Research Design

The descriptive-cross-sectional design of research was used in the
study to obtain information concerning the analysis of the research
training needs of the graduate faculty. It one of the common study
designs to assess the research skills of the faculty using surveyquestionnaire at a given academic year (Alexander, L.K., Lopes, B.;
Masterson, K.R. & Yeatts, K.B., 2016).
ILLUSTRATION

Participants

The respondents of the study were the faculty members of the
graduate school in one private higher education institution in the
Philippines with at least an average of three teaching loads from first
to third trimester during the academic year 2014-2015. There were 16
faculty members subjected to the trimestral assessment and
evaluation conducted by the Office of the Graduate School. All of them
finished doctorate degrees in various specializations such as
educational administration, business management, and public
administration. Majority of them have been in the graduate school
teaching for more than 10 years now.
ILLUSTRATION


Instrument
An instrument on the performance standards was patterned and tailored from the surveyquestionnaire of the Philippine Association of Colleges and Universities-Commission on
Accreditation (PACUCOA) used during the preliminary visit to the various graduate programs of the
College. The specific requirements on professional performance, instructional procedures and
techniques, and evaluation and grading were used as the criteria. The same instrument was used
for the purposes of determining the training needs of the faculty. To assess the performance
standards for graduate faculty, there are 10 items under professional performance (endeavors to
achieve the objectives of the graduate school and of the program); 10 items related to instructional
procedures and techniques (provides a functional and well-planned syllabus which specifies the
target competencies, research and class activities required for course); and seven items for
evaluation and grading (uses valid techniques to evaluate student performance). The instrument
used the 5 point Likert scale with the corresponding descriptive ratings and analysis for the possible
areas for training and development program: (1) Descriptive Rating (DR): (5) 5.00-4.20=
Outstanding Competence (OC); (4) 4.19-3.40= Very Satisfactory Competence (VSC); (3) 3.39-2.60=
Satisfactory Competence (SC); (2) 2.59-1.80= Fair Competence (FC); (1) 1.79-1.00= No
Competence (NC); (2) Analysis: (5) 5.00-4.20= Not Needed (NN); (4) 4.19-3.40= Sometimes
Needed (SN); (3) 3.39-2.60= Needed (N); (2) 2.59-1.80= Much Needed (MN); (1) 1.79-1.00= Very
Much Needed (VMN).
ILLUSTRATION


Instrument (cont.)
These criteria were subjected to face and construct validity by the previous administrators of
the graduate school and graduate education experts and professors after taking into
consideration the expected performance standards for graduate faculty by an external
accrediting agency. The juries used the same descriptive ratings and analysis clearly indicated
in the instrument. The result of the average computed mean of the juries was 4.62 interpreted
as “Outstanding Competence”. After the validation of the instrument, reliability test was
conducted to determine the consistency of the scores using the instrument measuring the
same set of skills with similar type of study was established. In this study, the Test-Retest
Method was used to examine the reliability of the questionnaire. The validated instrument
underwent pilot testing to a select group of graduate faculty in one private university. After two
weeks, the same questionnaire was administered to the same group. Pearson-Product
Moment Correlation was used to correlate data gathered. The computed coefficient of
correlation was 0.89 (Very High). The result was interpreted based on the following: 1.0
(Perfect); 0.81 - 0.99 (Very High); 0.61 - 0.80 (High); 0.41 - 0.60 (Moderate); 0.21 - 0.40 (Low);
and 0.01 - 0.20 (Negligible correlation). Thus, the computed correlation value indicated that
the instrument was reliable.
ILLUSTRATION


Data Gathering Procedure
After subjecting the questionnaire to validity and reliability tests, a letter of request to
the Office of the President endorsed by the Vice President for Academics and
Students Services (VP-AASS) was properly secured in the conduct of survey and
assessments of the graduate faculty. Data were gathered towards the end of every
trimester (first to third trimester) during the academic year 2014-2015 among the
graduate faculty. The Dean conducted face-to-face and personal assessment using
the instrument. Each faculty was formally introduced to the purposes of the study and
assured of the strict confidentiality of the data gathered. The data gathered were
collated, treated and analyzed in accordance to the objective of the study. A
spreadsheet software was used for more efficient, effective and accurate treatment of
data. The level of competence of the faculty relative to the specific indicators of the
performance standards was the basis for the analysis towards training and
development program. Thus, the gap between what is expected as to the level of
competence and the trainings needed to improve such professional performance was
determined.
ACTIVITY
#6
Writing
of
“METHODOLOGY”
(30 Minutes)
8. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
 Sometimes
termed DISCUSSION only for
theoretical papers
 Answers
to objectives
 Highlight
salient findings of the study
supported by global, regional and local
8. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
 Use
keywords from objectives as sidehead of the Results and Discussion.
 Intercontinental
literature support of the
data (in-text citation)
 Summary
tables and significant results
8. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
 Long
tables with brimming data should be
avoided especially when the text can stand
to discuss and/or explain the data.
 Validation
 Provide
of the theory used (integrated)
a critique on the methods and
theories used in the last paragraph.
ACTIVITY
#7
Writing
of “RESULTS
AND DISCUSSION ”
(45 Minutes)
9. CONCLUSIONS
 In
paragraph form, not broken down
 Highlight
new discovery (if any) that you
obtained only after completing the study,
something (not found in the literature) which
contributes to new knowledge.
 This
section supports or negates previous
conclusions, validates theory used and/or
generates new theory.
ILLUSTRATION
CONCLUSION

In order to capacitate graduate school faculty to become globally competitive,
research capability training and development become the first priority in the
strategic planning and development initiative of the school administrators. The
integrated activities in the strategic plan will surely hone the faculty competencies
and efficacies in research as evidenced by their own research publication, assisting
students in developing competencies at the graduate level research, and eventually
showing interest dealing with professional growth through post-doctoral studies,
research writing and publications; and sharing their knowledge or expertise with
external stakeholders. Regular attendance to in-service training programs will
likewise develop stronger awareness relative trends and issues in graduate
education. It is undeniably important that administrative and financial support to
faculty to continually upgrade their research skills and preparation, publication,
dissemination and utilization are needed.
ACTIVITY
#8
Writing
of
“CONCLUSIONS”
(15 Minutes)
10. TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH
 This
part describes the various forms of
popular and innovative media that
translate scientific information into
ways that can be understood by users of
the research.
 This
includes but not limited to: policy,
song, dance, illustrational books, drama,
storytelling, brochures, posters,
paintings, radio play and video clips.
ILLUSTRATION
TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH

The result of the study could be translated through journal publications,
newsletters, radio, social media, and other media for information dissemination and
to revisit the institutional research agenda and support from the administration.
Additionally, internal stakeholders might be able to translate it into a more
comprehensive institutional policy and specific strategic intervention program that
could increase the interest of graduate school professors towards research writing
and publications.
11. RECOMMENDATIONS
 Write
recommendations only for
national, regional and global
significance and application.
12. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS





(Optional)
Limited to funders of the research with
grants award number code and data
Acknowledge service agencies that funded
the study (required).
Sources of data mined, e.g. WHO, UNESCO
Do not acknowledge God, family, friends,
colleagues
13. REFERENCES



All references used in the manuscript
should be traceable online.
Authors are cautioned from using gray
literature (any work that is NOT
scientifically peer reviewed and published
in internationally indexed research
journals).
Prefer references which have earned
citations already.
13. LITERATURE CITED


URL should be shortened; go to goo.gl and
paste your long URL in the search box to
obtain the short URL then replace your
long URL.
Include Digital Object Identifier (DOI),
copy the DOI and DO NOT copy the URL
anymore.
13. LITERATURE CITED
Do not label this section
“Bibliography”. A bibliography contains
references that you may have read but have not
specifically cited in the text.
 NOTE:
 Bibliography
sections are found in books and
other literary writing, but not scientific journalstyle papers.
13. LITERATURE CITED
Long
URL
Speer, J. H. (2010). Fundamentals of tree-ring
research. University of Arizona Press. Retrieved
on May 1, 2014 from
http://books.google.com.ph/books?
id=XtxEbCzbKUUC&printsec=frontcover&dq=tr
ees+2010&hl=en&sa=X &ei=ha8U8vKIsn3igKH9oHADA&redir_esc=y#v=onepa
ge&q=trees%20 2010&f=false
13. LITERATURE CITED
 Shortened
URL through goo.gl
Speer, J. H. (2010). Fundamentals of tree-ring
research. University of Arizona Press. Retrieved
on May 1, 2014 from http://goo.gl/Od2qtR
13. LITERATURE CITED
o
Authored book (two authors)
Taraban, R. & Kerr, M. (2004). Analytic and pragmatic
factors in college students’ metacognitive reading
strategies. Reading Psychology Retrieved on February
12, 2013 from
http://www.cognitivesolutionslc.com/metacogread.pdf
13. LITERATURE CITED
o
Authored book (more than two
authors)
Taraban, H., Cotter, R., Confir, T. & Jefferson, F. (2004).
Analytic and pragmatic factors in college students’
metacognitive reading strategies. Reading Psychology
Retrieved on February 12, 2013 from
http://www.cognitivesolutionslc.com/
metacogread.pdff
13. LITERATURE CITED
 Article

in an online scientific journal
Include the issue number in parenthesis (not
underlined) immediately following the volume
number and preceding the page numbers.
Bogaards, P. (2013) Deux langues, quatre
dictionnaires. Lexicographica, 12(6),162-173.
Retrieved on March 12, 2012 from
http://www.wuenjournal.com/ regular.pdf
ACTIVITY
#9
Writing
of
“REFERENCES”
(10 Minutes)
Differences
Between a Thesis/
Dissertation and a
Journal Article
ACTIVITY
#10
Presentation
of the
“FULL MANUSCRIPT”
(55 Minutes)
PUBLICATION
===============
Why Publish?
NOT SO GOOD REASONS
1. To Prove What You Know
=Simply to prove that you know better
than everyone else.
=Simply for show-off.
NOT SO GOOD REASONS
2. Publish or Perish
= it is a cliché.
= as a scare tactics.
= as a shock therapy.
NOT SO GOOD REASONS
3. Publish to Get recognition or
Awards
= Financial rewards
= Manipulation of data
= Unethical and unprofessional
GOOD REASONS
1. Publish to Learn
=you want to learn something new
=a good reason to conduct research
=source of information for others
=share your passion about the topic
GOOD REASONS
2. Publish to Share Ideas
= must share to others through publication
= others will learn how to analyze, dissect,
and critique a journal article
=to contribute to the discussion when you
find a gap in the readings
=learn how to digest every ideas
presented
GOOD REASONS
3. Publish to Participate in the
Discussion
=conferences are pleasant only if
everyone is participating
=everyone is expected to play an active
role in the discussion
GOOD REASONS
4. Publish to Stay Up-to-date in
Your Field
=you will be reading a lot more deeply
and critically
=learn how to synthesize various
contributions
GOOD REASONS
5. Publish to Mentor to Be
Mentored
=do not be ashamed of asking your
colleagues to mentor you
=humility is one of the important
characteristics of good and powerful
scholars
GOOD REASONS
6. Publish to Because No One Else
Does
=Need to plan on contributing significantly
to the discussion in the field
GOOD REASONS
7. Publish to Celebrate God’s
Goodness
=publishing has a good level of being a
gift
=you have an innate gift in you for
publication
BUT…
Why Aren’t
People
Publishing?
WHY AREN’T PEOPLE PUBLISHING?

You are AFRAID?

You have low SELF-ESTEEM?

You do not know WHERE TO START?

You do not want to PUBLISH?

You do not have the TIME?

You do not have the FINANCES?
PUBLICATION
ETHICS
ETHICAL ISSUE ARE :
1. Data fabrication and falsification :
 Data
fabrication- the researcher did not
actually do the study, but made up data.
 Data
falsification -the researcher did the
experiment, but then changed some of the
data.
ETHICAL ISSUE ARE :
2.Multiple submissions :
 It
is unethical to submit the same
manuscript to more than one journal at
the same time. Doing this wastes the
time of editors and peer reviewers, and
can damage the reputation of journals if
published in more than one.
ETHICAL ISSUE ARE :
3.Redundant publications :
This
means publishing many very
similar manuscripts based on the
same experiment. It can make
readers less likely to pay attention
to your manuscripts.
ETHICAL ISSUE ARE :
4. Improper author
contribution or attribution:
 All
listed authors must have made a
significant scientific contribution to the
research in the manuscript and
approved all its claims. Don’t forget to
list everyone who made a significant
scientific contribution, including students
and laboratory technicians.
ETHICAL ISSUE ARE :
5. Plagiarism:
 Taking
the ideas and work of others
without giving them credit is unfair and
dishonest. Copying even one sentence
from someone else’s manuscript, or even
one of your own that has previously
been published, without proper citation is
considered plagiarism—use your own
words instead.
PLAGIARISM
PREDATORY
PUBLICATIONS
 Received
an email lately encouraging you to
publish with a new exciting sounding journal?
 Before
you send your manuscript, take a few
minutes to check up on that journal.
 Predatory
publishers abuse the open access
author-pays model for their own profit. This
growing industry is causing problems for
academics.
WHAT ARE PREDATORY JOURNALS?
Predatory journals are those
which seek to profit by preying
on inexperienced or desperate authors.
 This
is not to imply that the simple
charging of an author fee must always
make a journal predatory.
WHAT ARE PREDATORY JOURNALS?
Many
high-quality and
authoritative Open Access
(OA) journals may charge an
author fee for publication, and
this practice is not
automatically predatory.
WHAT ARE PREDATORY JOURNALS?
 Predatory
journals, on the other hand,
exist only to collect these (often
exorbitant) fees, and publish articles only
as an afterthought without rigorous (or
any) review by editors or peers.
 The
sole aim of these predatory journals
is to make money, not to evaluate and
disseminate high-quality research which
advances scholarship in a discipline.
WHAT ARE PREDATORY JOURNALS?
What
is Predatory Open Access
Publishing?
 These
“predatory” publishers solicit
articles from faculty through spam
emails with the goal of exploiting their
desire to publish for the article
processing fee.
COMMON TACTICS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
1.Establishing what appears to
be a legitimate online
presence with webpages for bogus
journals, complete with issues of previously
published articles.

Closer scrutiny reveals the articles to be
plagiarized, completely fake or promoting
unsound science that was not approved for
more mainstream journals.
COMMON TACTICS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
2.Some advertise a bogus
Impact Factor on their website and
in emails to prospective authors.

They can also list editors for their journals
who either did not agree to be an editor, or
use fake names to populate the editorial
board.
COMMON TACTICS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
3.Advertising
expedited peer
review to get your article
published quicker.
COMMON TACTICS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
4.Soliciting you to
edit a special theme issue
in your area of research,
through which they use you to
recruit more of your
colleagues.
COMMON TACTICS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
5.Engaging in questionable
business practices such as
charging exorbitant author
publishing fees or failing to disclose
cost of publication fees to potential
authors.
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF
PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
 If
you're not sure if a publisher is legitimate or
predatory, be on the watch for the following
red flags:
1. E-mailed Invitations to Submit an Article:
 Was the e-mail well written? Were
there typos or misspelled words? Was the
language awkward or unprofessional? Did
the e-mail use flattery to convince you to
submit your article or join their editorial
board?
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
2. Journal's Name Suspiciously Similar to Another
Prominent Journal in the Field:

Is the title trying to make you believe it a
journal or publisher with which you are
already familiar? Many predatory publishers
create journal titles (and even publisher
company names) that
are intentionally similar to well respected
journals or publishers.
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
3. Misleading Geographic Information in the
Title:

A title might suggest that the journal is
based in the United States or England, but in
reality, the publisher might actually be
based in India or China.
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
4. Unprofessional Website Appearance:
Does the website have a professional
appearance? Are there typos? Are there
advertisements?
 Does the website include "About"
information? If so, is the information that is
provided sufficient? Do they seem to have a
legitimate aim and scope? Is the journal
sponsored or produced by a well-known,
and well-respected organization,
association, or academic institution?

RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
5. Insufficient Contact Information:
Do they provide full contact information
including a physical address, phone
numbers, and e-mail addresses? Be wary of
journals that only provide a web contact
form.
 Do a Google search for the address and
look at the street view. Does it look like the
type of location from which a reputable
publisher would operate?

RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
6. Lack of Editors or Editorial Board:

Does the journal list the members of its
editorial board on their website?
7. Editors with No or Fake Academic Credentials:

Are these people recognized experts in the
field with full credentials? Feel free to
contact editors and ask about their
experience with the journal.
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
8. Unclear Author Fee Structures:
 Are policies regarding author fees easily
located on the journals website? Is this
information clearly explained? Do the
author fees seem comparable to other
reputable open access journals?
9. Bogus Impact Factors:
 Does the journal claim to have an impact
factor? Search for the journal on Incites
Journal Citation Reports to verify this
claimed impact factor.
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
10. Invented Metrics:

Have you heard of the metrics the journal
uses? Do other reputable journals use these
metrics? Many predatory publishers use
fake or invented metrics to fool you into
believing they are a credible journal.
11. False Index Claims:

Where is the journal indexed? Can this be
verified on UlrichsWeb?
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
12. Peer Review Process:

What is the journal's peer review process? Is
this process clearly explained on the
journal's website? Can you verify that this
process is actually followed?

Be wary of promises of a speedy peer
review process. Many predatory journals
claim to have a rigorous peer review
process when no peer review actually
exists.
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
13. Lack of ISBN
14. ​"Instructions for Authors" Information is
Unavailable
15. Evaluate Published Articles:
 Are published articles available?
 Do the article titles and abstracts seem
appropriate for the journal?
 Feel free to contact past authors and ask
about their experiences with the journal.
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
16. Publisher has a Negative Reputation:
 Have you found documented examples that
the journal or publisher has a negative
reputation in reputable sources?
17. Author Fees:
 Are the policies regarding author fees easily
located on the journal website? Is this
information clearly explained? Do author
fees seem comparable to other reputable
open access journals?
RED FLAGS: KNOW THE SIGNS OF PREDATORY PUBLISHERS
18. Use Common Sense:
 If
things just don't seem to be
right, trust your instincts and
stay away.
Principles
of
Transparency and
Best Practice in
Scholarly Publishing
(December 19, 2013 by Claire Redhead)
 The
Committee on Publication Ethics
(COPE), the Directory of Open Access
Journals (DOAJ), the Open Access
Scholarly Publishers Association
(OASPA), and the World Association of
Medical Editors (WAME) are scholarly
organizations that have seen an
increase in the number of membership
applications from both legitimate and
non-legitimate publishers and journals.
 About
the Committee on Publication Ethics
(COPE, http://publicationethics.org/)

COPE provides advice to editors and publishers on all
aspects of publication ethics and, in particular, how to
handle cases of research and publication misconduct.

COPE does not investigate individual cases but
encourages editors to ensure that cases are
investigated by the appropriate authorities (usually a
research institution or employer).

All COPE members are expected to follow the Codes
of Conduct for Journal Editors and Publishers.
 About
the Directory of Open Access
Journals (DOAJ, http://www.doaj.org/)




The mission of the DOAJ is: to curate, maintain and
develop a source of reliable information about open
access scholarly journals on the web;
To verify that entries on the list comply with
reasonable standards;
To increase the visibility, dissemination, discoverability
and attraction of open access journals;
To enable scholars, libraries, universities, research
funders and other stakeholders to benefit from the
information and services provided;
 About
the Directory of Open Access
Journals (DOAJ, http://www.doaj.org/)

To facilitate the integration of open access journals
into library and aggregator services;

To assist, where possible, publishers and their journals
to meet reasonable digital publishing standards; and

To support the transition of the system of scholarly
communication and publishing into a model that
serves science, higher education, industry, innovation,
societies and the people.
 About
the Open Access Scholarly Publishers
Association (OASPA, http://oaspa.org/)

The OASPA is a trade association that was established
in 2008 in order to represent the interests of Open
Access (OA) publishers globally in all scientific,
technical and scholarly disciplines.

This mission will be carried out through exchanging
information, setting standards, advancing models,
advocacy, education, and the promotion of
innovation.
 About
the World Association of Medical
Editors (WAME, http://www.wame.org)

WAME is a global nonprofit voluntary association of
editors of peer-reviewed medical journals who seek
to foster cooperation and communication among
editors; improve editorial standards; promote
professionalism in medical editing through education,
self-criticism, and self-regulation; and encourage
research on the principles and practice of medical
editing.

WAME develops policies and recommendations of
best practices for medical journal editors.
QUALITIES OF REPUTABLE JOURNALS

There is no single checklist that determines if a journal
or publisher is legitimate or predatory. However,
qualities of reputable publishers include the following:
1. Journal Scope is well defined and clearly stated on
the journal's website
2. Editors and Editorial Board consists of recognized
experts in the field
3. Journal is affiliated or was established by scholarly or
academic institution or organization
QUALITIES OF REPUTABLE JOURNALS
4. Peer Review process is rigorous and explained clearly
on website
5. Articles fall within the stated scope of the publication
6. Publication fee structure is clearly explained and easy
to find on website
7. ISSN exists
8. Articles have Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs)
9. Journal has an Impact Factor
QUALITIES OF REPUTABLE JOURNALS
10. Usage rights are clearly stated (e.g. Creative
Commons License CC By license)
11. Journal is registered on UlrichsWeb Global Serials
Directory
12. Journal is listed in the Directory of Open Access
Journals
13. Publisher is a member of Open Access Scholarly
Publishers Association (OASPA)
QUALITIES OF REPUTABLE JOURNALS
14. Journal is indexed in subject databases or indexes
15. Contact information is clearly provided and available
16. Publishing schedule and publication frequency is
clearly stated
17. Solicitation of manuscripts and other direct
marketing are appropriate, well-targeted, and
unobtrusive
REPUTATION AND LEGITIMACY OF A JOURNAL

LIST OF STANDALONE JOURNALS. Potential, possible,
or probable predatory scholarly open-access
journals…
https://web.archive.org/web/20161202192038/https://schol
arlyoa.com/individual-journals/

LIST OF PUBLISHERS. Potential, possible, or probable
predatory scholarly open-access publishers
https://web.archive.org/web/20161222020349/https:/schola
rlyoa.com/publishers/
INDEXING & ABSTRACTING SERVICES
A
good number of Academic Journals of
OMICS International are indexed in
famous indexing services like PubMed,
ISI, Scopus, Chemical Abstracts Service,
ProQuest, Gale EBSCO and so on.
 These
are thus permanently archived in
respective peer reviewed journals,
providing unrestricted use and
application of the scientific information.
INDEXING & ABSTRACTING SERVICES
 List
of Journals Indexed
http://library.bjmu.edu.cn/ejym/dzfu/ljiwe
b.pdf
 Science
Citation Index- Journal List
http://ip-science.thomsonreuters.com/cgibin/jrnlst/jlresults.cgi?PC=K
REFERENCES
Bueno, D.C. (2007). Elements of Research and Thesis Writing. Syneraide Publishing,
Quezon City, Phil.
Bueno, D.C. (2016). Educational Research Writing. Great Books Trading, Manila,
Philippines
Bueno, D.C. (2016). Research Writing for Business and Hospitality Students. Great
Books Trading, Manila, Philippines.
Bueno, D.C. (2016). Practical Quantitative Research Writing. Books at ibapa, Manila,
Philippines.
Bueno, D.C. (2016). Practical Qualitative Research Writing. Great Books Trading,
Manila, Philippines.
Bueno, D.C. (2016). Statistics for Research. Great Books Trading, Manila, Philippines.
Safary Wa-Mbaleka (2014). Publish or Perish, Fear No More
JPAIR Multidisciplinary Research Journal Publication System
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Altrichter, Herbert; Feldman, Allan; Posch, Peter; & Somekh, Bridget. (2008).
Teachers investigate their work: An introduction to action research across
the professions (2nd Ed.). London: Routledge.
Craig, Dorothy Valcarcel. (2009). Action research essentials. San Francisco, CA:
Jossey-Bass.
Johnson, Andrew P. (2008). A short guide to action research. Boston: Pearson
Education, Inc.
Lassonde, Cynthia A.; & Israel, Susan E. (2008). Teachers taking action: A
comprehensive guide to teacher research. Newman, DE: International
Reading Association.
Mertler, Craig A. (2009). Action research: Teachers as researchers in the
classroom. Los Angeles, CA: Sage.
Sagor, Richard. (2005). The action research guidebook. Thousand Oaks, CA:
Corwin Press.
ON-LINE REFERENCES
Committee on Publication Ethics
(COPE, http://publicationethics.org/‎)
 Directory of Open Access Journals
(DOAJ, http://www.doaj.org/)
 Directory of Open Access Journals
(DOAJ, http://www.doaj.org/)
 Open Access Scholarly Publishers
Association (OASPA, http://oaspa.org/)
 World Association of Medical Editors
(WAME, http://www.wame.org)

The strategic challenges facing
research are reflective of universitywide issues, as the university
prepares for the dramatically
changing conditions of tomorrow.
Responses to these pressures will
only be successful if they are
orchestrated as collective strategies.
“Come to me, all
you who are weary
and burdened, and
I will give you
rest.”-Matthew 11:28
Dr. David Cababaro Bueno
Dean, Graduate School
Director, Research and Publications Office
 AB-General Science
 BSE-General Science
 LET
 Master of Arts in Science Education
 Doctor of Education
 Master in Public Management
 Master in Business Administration
 Doctor in Business Administration (c)
 Doctor in Public Management (ip)
 Author of 21 Books and Modules
 Author of 67 Research Abstracts
[email protected]
[email protected]
fb : Doc Dave
Thank You
po !!!