El Ranchito Chile Puerto Rico Pause/ Continue

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El Ranchito Chile Puerto Rico Pause/ Continue
Residency Programme
Matadero Madrid—
AECID
El Ranchito
Chile
Puerto Rico
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El Ranchito
Residency Programme
Matadero Madrid—AECID
M a r c h 2 7— M a y 1 7 2 0 1 5
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
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internationalisation and mobility of Spanish creators
outside of Spain.
The El Ranchito programme is an exercise in community building between creators from different countries; it encourages experimentation with new modes
of production, as well as exhibition and interpretation
of contemporary art. The artists selected in this edition
through a public call process include: Spanish artist
Irene de Andrés and Solar. Acción Cultural – who will
continue in June the second phase of their residencies
at Beta Local – as well as Spanish artists Pepe Murciego and Quiela Nuc + Raúl Querido, who will complete
their exchange in September at the Centro Cultural de
España in Santiago. Furthermore, Puerto Rican artists
Alana Iturralde and Joel Rodríguez and Chilean artists
Patricia Domínguez and Javier Rodríguez, have completed their residencies at Matadero Madrid.
El Ranchito was launched in 2011, in view of Madrid’s abundance of exhibition spaces and shortage of
spaces devoted to production and experimentation.
The programme is strongly tied to the city’s artistic and
cultural scene, and gained ground in 2013 with a new
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Pause/Continue is the title chosen jointly by the eight
artists taking part in this edition of the programme, a
name that ascribes importance to the intermittent and
evolving nature of artistic practices. Over five weeks
the artists were given the chance to work in the Nave
16 studios at Matadero Madrid to determine the course
of an artistic research endeavour crystallising in projects ranging from videozine to documentary drawing,
experimental publication, work with textiles, sound
installation or ethnographic research.
This edition of El Ranchito reasserts the interest in fostering international exchanges with Latin
America and demonstrates the valuable results of
the close partnership established in recent years
with AECID, the Spanish Agency for International
Development Cooperation. Two countries have been
invited to participate in this edition of the international residency programme. They are represented by
Beta Local, a non-profit organisation headquartered
in San Juan, Puerto Rico, which promotes aesthetic
practice and thinking, and the Centro Cultural de España in Santiago, Chile, an institution that fosters the
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Matadero Madrid—AECID
El Ranchito. Matadero Madrid—AECID
Residency Programme
—Guest Countries: Chile—Puerto Rico
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phase of internationalisation enabling Madrid’s artists
to share space with creators from different countries
and also travel to other artistic residencies around the
world. Expansion of the project was made possible by
the strategic alliance between Matadero Madrid and
AECID; since 2014 the programme has welcomed 18
creators from countries like Argentina, Brazil, Finland
and Columbia, and has fostered the mobility of another
18 local creators. Its endeavours in this area will continue in 2015 with exchanges at the Tokyo Wonder Site
(Japan) and the Changdong Art Studio (Korea).
We would like to give a special thanks to the participating institutions that have made this new edition
possible: the National Council for Culture and the Arts
of the Government of Chile and the Consulate General of Spain in Puerto Rico, as well as the eight participating artists, without whom the project would have
been impossible.
Chile—Puerto Rico
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Matadero Madrid—AECID
El Ranchito
—Carlota Álvarez Basso
Director of Matadero Madrid
—Itziar Taboada
Director of Cultural and Scientific
Relations (AECID)
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Chile—Puerto Rico
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El Ranchito
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
Irene de Andrés
—The Second Voyage
“Puerto Rico, a former Spanish
colony, is a small tropical island
that nonetheless has an extensive
range of ecosystems. Its rich
history, which has had ties to the
Spanish crown since the early
days of colonisation in 1493, as
well as its natural wealth, make
Puerto Rico a very familiar country
of great natural beauty. Puerto
Rico retains the charm and
hospitality of yesteryear, while
offering all of the amenities of a
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www.
irenedeandres.com
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Artists
—Viajes El Corte Inglés
(Travel Agency)
When we think of the tropics we
picture what is considered to be
a modern paradise: a palm-lined
beach, white sand and crystal clear
waters. This destination, a favourite
for summer tourism, has filled with
resorts and ports where cruise ships
can dock in search of the exotic.
Having arrived at our “all-inclusive”
destination, it is fitting to establish
a dialogue touching on different
eras, sources and perspectives by
examining the evolution of the
concept of travel. It begins with
the first colonists, eager to “discover” and conquer new lands,
before being imbued with symbolic
meaning by the 19th century Romantics, battered by tempests and
doomed to shipwreck. Next come
the military exercises of the 20th
century’s great wars, the invention
of the radar and the proliferation
of military bases to ensure mastery
of the oceans, ultimately leading
to the concept of travel for the
purpose of tourism, as consumers of
territories. 21st century travellers no
longer restrict themselves to merely
collecting images; they also demand
to experience unusual settings
and “authenticity”.
In our century, tourism has
taken root as the new method of colonisation, and it is directly linked to
the original purpose of travel. Due to
its particular history, Puerto Rico will
be one of the first places to explore
the trails that different travellers
have left on the island.
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modern destination”
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
Patricia Domínguez
—Their eyes will be the last to pixelate
Friedrich, since we as a society
haven't given the horses the right to
self-govern, maybe the day will come
when they will stop being cultural objects, working in the fields, or having
to go to war, to be used colonize, give
us status, be handed over as tax, gifts,
sacrifices, bestow us with folkloric
All the horses caretakers, the ones
who live with them, have been given
the job to document the horse’s
bodies, textures and temperatures
by touching them in order to record
the information for the future. I've
actually met two of them. Jesús in
Navalcarnero and Angel in Loja. They
allowed me to video record their
process. In my next letter I will tell
you how they touch and caress them
using the sense of touch to see in
order to remember them.
Looking forward to hearing from you,
P.
Artists
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I frequently find myself thinking
about your story with the horse in
Turin. A few years ago, not in Turin
but in Chile, I witnessed an exhausted horse fall to his knees and
collapse on the ground. When I saw
that the horse refused to stand up
and its owner was raising a stick to
hit him, I threw myself over the horse
and hugged him. I cried with him for
about five hours. We wept together
for all the living beings that coexist
through the relationships of work,
duty and affection.
identity, ideals of freedom, entertain
us, accompany us, be our guides,
healers, be a machine.But if that day
arrives, we should know that they
will have to transform themselves
into pixelated light. Then our conversations with them will be one-way
or one dimensional. Our displays of
affection will be quantitative and we
will have to come up with rituals to
remember them through a kind of digital animism (as my friend Jan would
say). We will make a final sacrifice to
transform them into light and pixels
so we can then live with their images.
Their eyes will be the last to pixelate
and we will have to make sure they're
at the highest resolution possible.
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I've got news. I've found a
statue in Madrid where a horse had
the right to auto-represent himself
on a marble sculpture. He chose to
have wings and to lift up his front
legs. I'm sending you a picture of
the sculpture under construction. It
shows two workers resting beneath
it during their lunch break. They dedicate their time to caress the horse's
marble body with their hands, just as
the horse requested.
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Dearest Friedrich,
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
Alana Iturralde
—Fragility Manifesto
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Artists
www.iturraldeleon
. t u m b l r. c o m
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
cavalier.
(from the Latin caballus, caballarĭus).
1. adj. A horseman (archaic).
2. adj. Said of a person:
offhand, supercilious, blasé.
Cavalier IN intention, IN
tenacity, IN endeavour,
IN opinion.
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3. A courtly gentleman, esp. as
a lady's escort.
4. Supporter of Charles I in the
English Civil War.
5. A Spanish gentleman.
6. Someone important or of
elegant bearing.
7. Noble (II term of courtesy).
8. Old Spanish dance.
9. A pile of surplus earth placed
next to and on top of debris.
10. Mil. In French, the "cavalier"
is an artificial hill behind the
walls that allows soldiers
to see the enemy above
the walls.
11. archaic. Soldier on horseback.
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perspective.
(from the Medieval Latin perspectiva
[ars], optics).
1. The art of drawing solid
objects on a two-dimensional surface so as to give the
right impression of relative
positions, size, etc.
2. Artwork or picture drawn in
this way.
3. A set of objects that can be
seen by the viewer from a
particular position, especially when they are far away.
4. Misleading and deceitful
appearance or picture
of things.
5. The point of view from
which an issue is considered
or analysed.
6. View, considered in principle
to be closer to reality, backed up by the distant, spatial
or temporal observation of
any event or phenomenon.
7. Possibility that can be
foreseen during the course
of some kind of business. U.
m. in pl.
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Artists
Pepe Murciego
—Cavalier Perspective
cavalier perspective.
1. f. The cavalier perspective,
also called cavalier projection
or high view point, is a way to
present a three-dimensional
object on a flat drawing, and
more specifically a type of
oblique projection.
www.perspectivacaballera
.com
Real Academia Española,
Oxford Dictionary, Wikipedia.
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Chile—Puerto Rico
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El Ranchito
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
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Music has been a part of my life since
I was a little kid. I remember my
grandma's eight-track stereo and
that we couldn’t make it work, the
old record player in the middle of
the lounge at home, the same one
we trashed years later trying to do
scratching like real DJs and searching
for subliminal messages in records
by Menudo, the salsa-style bolerazos
on z93 FM every Sunday, my crush
on Daniela Romo when I heard De
mi enamórate, when my father
got annoyed with my brother for
listening to heavy metal, thinking it
was Satanic music, playing air guitar
with a broom, rap, mixtapes, all my
older brother’s CDs that I scratched,
swapping music at school... I could
go on reminiscing about my experiences with music, but I'm interested
precisely in what I don't remember
clearly, the negative spaces or the
ones on the margins of music.
I've been thinking about
these spaces for some time, about
what’s there between the songs
during a concert in some bar or
other, about those jam sessions with
friends that never get recorded, the
random feedback of an electric guitar, the sound an instrument makes
when it's being tuned, the chance
notes played during a rehearsal, the
first chord a musician usually plays
when they pick up an instrument,
a drummer and a guitarist playing
different beats, the strings tighte-
ning up on a bass guitar, the "one
two, one two" during a sound check,
the search for the perfect fuzz or the
perfect delay, testing an audio loop
that's out of sync with an electronic
beat, a trumpet player warming up
for a set, and what's not there in the
end product of most music recordings, with a few exceptions.
Before coming to El Ranchito I took my recording gear around a
few bars in Puerto Rico to record the
sound checks made by bands before
gigs and the sounds between the
songs in their sets. I compiled audio
of bands playing dub, garage, punk,
surf, salsa and electronic music.
During my stint at El Ranchito I've
been able to continue the recording
process in Madrid with help from
musicians on the local scene and
by visiting some of the nearby bars
and alternative venues. The audio
clips I’ve recorded will be used
later to work on a composition that
mixes both contexts. This project is
intended as a dialogue about these
spaces on the margins of music and
doesn't try to draw any definitive
conclusions on the issue; it's more of
a subjective observation.
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Artists
Joel Rodríguez
—The margins of music
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
— (…) And after setting out by
cart, did you use any other type
of transport?
— Sure, loads. On horseback
and on camels, to cross the
desert. When I was doing it I
thought I was going to die, I
had no food, I had nothing...
there are things I can’t even
describe …I thought I was
going to die. I didn't know
where the south, or the
north, were. I only had to
flee. The sound of the sand
is unique. In the desert a lot
of people die. You know,
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in the Sahara you can walk
100 kilometres without
finding a single town. When
I passed through it I went
days without eating, without drinking, until I heard
the sounds of the sand. That
was mind-boggling.
— Were you scared?
— No, I wanted to die. In the
end I didn’t care whether I lived or died, because I had no
one, but now I do. Because
now, at least, I have friends.
I have someone, you know?
At that time I had no one. I
didn’t want to live (…)
— (…) And then they tell you
that you have rights, but you
don’t have any. They get you
simply because you have
no papers, and then it’s two
days behind bars as if you
were a criminal. The truth is,
it’s ugly. They arrested one
person like a criminal, they
took him away in handcuffs,
and then two days behind
bars. As if he was someone
who stole or killed... just because you have no papers ◻
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— My father was a minister
under Sékou Touré. He held
a high office. The problem is
that Touré died and was replaced through a coup d’état
by General Lansana Conté,
who was a dictator, more
or less like Pinochet. After
rising to power, they killed
everyone who wanted to
take the right path. Because
Sékou Touré aided terrorists,
he sold them arms. My father
had begun to investigate this
issue, because he performed
security functions. Then,
when this happened, Lansana Conté killed everyone
who held a high office who
was on the good path. One
of them was my father (…)
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Artists
Javier Rodríguez Pino
—Wayfarers, Part I: the Story of Lamine Sarr
◻ Snippets from the interview of
Lamine Sarr —a Guinean immigrant
in Spain— based on which I am
creating a set of drawings that will
appear in the travel journal and life
diary of Lamine himself.
Graphite on paper
Detail
www.
javierodriguezpino.com
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
Quiela Nuc + Raúl Querido
—DM693
DM693 is a node in a network
Looking through
Listening with
Turning in place
and around a field with no centre
It seems chaotic, but
It is not chaos
It functions at full SwiNg.
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Artists
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All around there are more nodes,
AuTonoMOxS nodes
There is communication,
back and forth_
creating, disseminating
Sharing and growing in (the) common.
Map—Line—Intersections
We choose a point,
another point,
+++ WeAdd
NOW
Here
∞
www.dm693
. t u m b l r. c o m
DM693 is a project by QUIELA NUC +
RAÚL QUERIDO that seeks to underscore the cultural proximity between
Spain and Chile through the importance and the multiplier effect of
self-managed activities in the musical
and audiovisual fields.
Starting out based on an
economy of means and mutual
support networks, various initiatives have been launched, such as
the production of an ep + concert +
20 video/zines.
The aim is to document
and foster creative dynamics in
Madrid, in Santiago de Chile, and
more, providing a set of clues that
bring us closer to a sustainable
model of self-management based
on the sharing of resources and
objectives, incorporating an active,
open-ended platform.
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
Solar. Acción Cultural
—Diagram
Democracia
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We thus see the emergence
of a new mode of applying arise a
new mode of applying outside terminologies to new places to new places
that generate glossaries, relationships and discourse spanning inclusive
and collaborative processes, which
depart from creative practice as an
individual, autonomous happening
to establish new coordinates that
pose and lay out open questions
that go beyond approaches through
conceptual connectors.
Storm and drunk
Salón
C.I.T.I
La Neomudéjar
www.
solarizacion.org
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At a time when artistic practices encompass everything from the period
prior to the idea’s conception to the
period following its materialisation,
in terms of the expanded field, the
theoretical container in which these
practices develop also takes on a
symbolic meaning that is just as
important as the occurrence in itself.
Thus, several different journeys are
set out as a means of reaching one
point from another, in which the blurring and interweavings between the
different ways of doing things evolve
into correlations with the artistic
languages themselves.
In the recent past, and in
different contexts, various initiatives
(routes) have emerged encompassing
a wide variety of formats. In and of
themselves, these constitute artistic
drifts that not only ease the path for
today’s creators but also give rise to
new languages in the interpretation
of the city and, one might say, of the
concept of citizenship and culture as
responsible for both its immediate surroundings and for the super structure.
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Artists
diagram.
1. A figure, composed of lines
that is used to illustrate a definition or statement or to aid in
the proof of a proposition.
2. A simplified drawing showing
the appearance, structure,
or workings of something; a
schematic representation.
El Ranchito
Chile—Puerto Rico
El Ranchito Chile—Puerto Rico
Re s i d e n c y P r o g r a m m e s b y M a t a d e r o M a d r i d —A E C I D
El Ranchito Chile—Puerto Rico
P a u s e /Co n t i n u e
Organisers
Matadero Madrid, AECID, Beta Local, Centro Cultural de España
en Santiago de Chile
Artists
Collaborator
National Council of Culture and the Arts (CNCA)
Matadero Madrid
Director: Carlota Álvarez Basso
Management: José Miguel Medrano
Art Programme: Manuela Villa Acosta
Institutional Relations: Marta García Santo—Tomás
AECID
(Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation)
Director of Cultural and Scientific Relations:
Itziar Taboada Aquerreta
Head of Department for Cultural Cooperation and Promotion:
Guillermo Escribano Manzano
Head of Department for University and Scientific Relations:
César Espada Sánchez
Head of Area for Cultural Promotion:
Cinthya Breña Testal
Head of Area for University and Scientific Cooperation:
Héctor Núñez Amor
Head of Service:
María Jesús de Domingo Ontoso
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Coordination
Gema Melgar / Flavia Introzzi / Sonsoles Rodríguez
Catalogue art direction
RV.Studio: www.rvstudio.es
Catalogue graphic design
Diego Lara
Front Cover Image
Patricia Domínguez
Interludes photography
Aitor Baigorri Ozcoidi
Printing
Palgraphic
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Madrid City Council
Mayor: Ana María Botella Serrano
Delegate for Arts, Sport and Tourism:
Pedro María Corral Corral
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Credits
With the support of
Spanish Consulate in Puerto Rico
Irene de Andrés : www.irenedeandres.com
Patricia Domínguez: www.patriciadominguez.cl
Alana Iturralde: www.iturraldeleon.tumblr.com
Pepe Murciego: www.perspectivacaballera.com
Joel Rodríguez: www.betalocal.org
Javier Rodríguez Pino: www.javierodriguezpino.com
Quiela Nuc + Raúl Querido: www.dm693.tumblr.com
Solar. Acción Cultural: www.solarizacion.org
Chile—Puerto Rico
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Organisers
Collaborator
With the support of