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Dental Congress
Welcome to the 2011 FDI Annual World
It’s a great satisfaction for the Mexican Dental Association that, for the third time in history (1972, 1999 and
2011), we will host the Annual World Dental Congress of the International Dental Federation (FDI), now in its
edition XCIX. It’s a great honor, but also a great responsibility.
FDI is the largest dental organization in the world, bringing together 220 countries and more than one million
dentists worldwide.
The Congress is from 14 to 17 September 2011, at Centro Banamex in Mexico City. We are sure that we will
have one of the best scientific programs that have been launched in Mexico and we are proud to have the
participation of the best exponents of contemporary Dentistry. We will have speakers from many parts of
the world, who will present current topics of immediate clinical use in most dental specialties: Endodontics,
Periodontics, Prosthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Maxillofacial Surgery, Implantology, Dental Caries, Saliva,
Genetics and Oral Health, among other specialties. With this scientific program we are aiming for attendees to
have access to technological advances and scientific findings, as well as the more advanced techniques.
Also, we’ll organize a large trade show, which will feature the world’s largest companies, offering products,
equipment, instruments and cutting edge technology. We invite you to attend. You will have the opportunity
to leverage a variety of offers and would be able to participate in the daily raffle for a Mercedes Benz car.
We are preparing a grand opening with the participation of the highest figures of Dentistry in the world and
in which, as part of the artistic section we’ll present the essence of our great Mexican culture. We’ll be very
pleased and proud to share this event with you.
Visit our website and find all the information you need of the scientific program, hotels, social activities and
registration, as well as general information.
Do not miss the opportunity. We trust that this will be a memorable and outstanding Congress as well as one
of the most significant dental shows in our country.
We’ll be waiting for you. Don’t stay out of this great event, this will be a watershed in the history of the Dental
Congress in Mexico.
Dr. Víctor Manuel Guerrero Reynoso
LOC Chairman
2
Welcome to the 2011 FDI Annual World Dental Congr
ess
It gives me great pleasure to introduce you to the 2011 FDI Annual World Dental Congress in Mexico City,
September 14-17 2011. After 1972 and 1999, we are excited to return to Mexico City to experience the unique
warm hospitality so typical of Mexicans.
Under the theme of “New Horizons in Oral Health Care”, this congress will offer a platform to learn and
exchange ideas with a host of internationally renowned speakers participating in a cutting edge scientific
programme jointly developed by FDI and the Mexican Dental Association (ADM). The choice of Mexico City
for the 99th Annual World Dental Congress will provide delegates with unique opportunities to develop their
professional knowledge and skills as well as network with a truly global audience. I also strongly encourage
you to take advantage of the presence of over 200 exhibiting companies to keep up to date with evolving
technologies of equipment and latest dental materials.
A visit to Mexico would not be complete without taking advantage of discovering the rich culture, gastronomic
traditions and multicolored folklore the country provides. Many opportunities will be available to you to
experience these during the congress and, should you extend your stay in the country, you can take advantage
to further discover Mexico’s biodiversity through specially selected excursions throughout the country.
I am greatly looking forward to the 2011 FDI Annual World Dental Congress in Mexico City and look forward to
meeting you there!
Kind regards,
Dr. Roberto Vianna
FDI President
3
Quick Guide!
Updated info @
www.fdiworldental.org
Contact details:
FDI World Dental Federation
Tour de Cointrin – Avenue Louis-Casaï
Case Postale 3
1216 Genève Cointrin - Switzerland
[email protected]
phone: + 41 22 560 81 50
fax:
+ 41 22 560 81 40
Registration and accommodation booking
Please visit www.fdiworldental.org
FDI Education Committee
Chairman
Elmar Reich (Germany)
Vice-Chairman
Sally Hewett
(United States of America)
Members
Joël Trouillet (France)
Takashi Inoue (Japan)
Young-Guk Park (Korea)
Tao Xu (China)
FDI Programme Director - Africa
Denis Bourgeois (France)
Scientific programme
See pages 6 to 25
FDI Programme Director - Asia-Pacific
William Cheung
(Hong Kong SAR China)
Hotel information
See page 42
FDI Programme Director - Europe
Sarkis Sözkes (Turkey)
FDI Programme Director - Latin America
Ana Haydée Pereira (Argentina)
FDI Programme Director - Middle East
Mohammad Jafar Abedini
(United Arab Emirates)
Mexico City 2011
4
FDI Executive Director
Jean-Luc Eiselé (FDI)
Mexico Local Organising Committee
FDI Associate Director, Congresses & Events
Neil Kirkman (FDI)
Chairman
Víctor Guerrero Co-Chairman
Jaime Edelson FDI Associate Director, Education & Scientific Affairs
Julian Fisher (FDI)
Public Relations
Ernesto Acuña Scientific Program Chairman
Rolando Velasco Social Activities
Leopoldo Becerra Treasurer
Alfonso González Inter-institutional Relations
Armando Hernández Communications Exhibitions Cindy Flores Ayub Safar Boueri
The FDI World Dental Exhibition
The FDI’s World Dental exhibition provides a unique opportunity to meet with leading manufacturers,
supplier and dealers from the international and regional dental trade and industry.
You will have the opportunity to learn about the latest developments in dental technology,
equipment and products.
Exhibition opening hours:
14th September
15th September 16th September
17th September
10.00 - 19.00
10.00 - 19.00
10.00 - 19.00
10.00 - 19.00
5
Scientific programme New Horizons in Oral Health Care
Wednesday 14 September
09.00 - 11.00
Looking to new paradigms of
caries management and risk
assessment
Caries symposium: caries free
Communities
The tooth as a toolbox:
dental stem cells and their
role in tissue homeostasis,
pathology and regeneration
Dental Stem Cells
John Featherstone (United
States of America)
Thimios Mitsiadis
(Switzerland)
Global Trends in Patient Safety
and Infection Control
Organisation for Safety and Asepsis
Procedures symposium
New vision in periodontology:
Prevention or cure
Biofilm impact in health and
disease
Looking to new paradigms of
caries management and risk
assessment
Caries symposium: caries free
Communities
Making decisions about
providing crown and
bridgework
Aesthetic guidelines for
the restoration of anterior
teeth
Antonio Bello Roch (Mexico)
Oral and maxillofacial
radiology
An update of new techniques
(including Cone Beam CT) and
review of the basic principles of
interpretation
Juan Yepes (United States of
America)
Odontopediatría: nuevos
horizontes en el tratamiento
Calidad y Seguridad en la
Atención Odontológica
Francisco Ramos-Gomez
(United States of America)
Jorge Triana Estrada (Mexico)
Agustin Zeron (Mexico)
11.30 - 13.30
John Featherstone
(United States of America)
Rita Villena (Peru)
Global trends in oral cancer and
the pathological basis of disease
prevention
Prasad Amaratunga (Sri Lanka)
The extensively damaged
tooth: When does it need a
crown?
Richard Ibbetson
(United Kingdom)
Diabetes and oral Health
Symposium
International Association of
Periodontology Symposium
Dealing with difficult
patients
Meet the Fokkers (and
learn to love them)
Luis Karakowsky (Mexico)
Kevin Lewis
(United Kingdom)
Dentomaxilofacial
Esthetics
The New Parameters and
Technique: Looking for the
Link between the clinic the
lab and back to the clinic in a
predictable way
Otton Fernández
(COSTA RICA)
Nuevas tendencias en las técnicas
de manejo de comportamiento en
odontología pediátrica
Carlos Díaz Covarrubias Alatorre
(Mexico)
New dental materials for
the paediatric dentist
La salud bucodental en
México*
Perfil epidemiológico
*no interpretación - idioma:
español
Heriberto Vera Hermosillo
(Mexico)
15.00 - 17.00
Global Oral Health Initiative
The new diagnostic frontier: saliva
Salivary diagnostics
Implant prosthodontics:
Immediate loading protocols
Rationale, applications, pitfalls
David Wong
(United States of America)
Carlo Ercoli
(United States of America)
New frontiers in global sciences
Approach for nerve injury
following dental implant surgery
Innovations in non surgical
periodontal therapy
Eduardo Saba-Chujfi (Brazil)
Orthodontics
Functional appliances, RME
or SME, new developments in
expansion of the palate, for the
general dental practitioner
Derek Mahony (Australia)
New Frontiers in Oral Pathology:
The Ontology Initiative
Jose Luis Tapia
(United States of America)
HPV and Oral cancer
Stina Syrjanen (Finland)
Fukuda Ken-ichi (Japan)
The world’s largest dental
program for people with
intellectual disabilities
wants to work with you!
Special Olympics Special
Smiles Forum
OPEN TO ALL INTERESTED
6
Wednesday 14 Sept.
Morning Sessions 9.00-11.00
This presentation supports the objective of the Global Oral
Health Initiative (GOHI): to implement a collaborative,
prevention orientated model of oral health care, ultimately
resulting in measurable improvements in oral health and
thus general health in all communities worldwide.
Looking to new paradigms of caries
management by risk assessment
Caries symposium: Caries free
communities
John D.B. Featherstone
(United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand the process of dental caries as an infectious
and transmissible disease
- Learn about the pathological and protective factors
related to caries initiation, progression and prevention
- Understand the principles of clinical intervention in the
caries process, and how to apply them in dental practice
The tooth as a toolbox: dental stem cells
and their role in tissue homeostasis,
pathology and regeneration
Dental Stem Cells
Thimios Mitsiadis (Switzerland)
Learning objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Describe recent knowledge on tooth development and
regeneration, especially in molecular and cellular events
- Identify the role of Notch signalling in these events
- Recognise the role and applications of dental stem cells
for tissue or entire tooth regeneration
- Discuss the activation of stem cell niches in teeth after
injury and the clonogenic potential of dental cells
Aesthetic guidelines for the restoration
of anterior teeth
Antonio Bello Roch (Mexico)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand evidence based guidelines in more depth
when restoring anterior teeth
- Detail ready-to-use information that can be transferred
to a clinician’s restorative practice
7
Oral and maxillofacial radiology
An update of new techniques (including
Cone Beam CT) and review of the basic
principles of interpretation
Juan Yepes (United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Describe and evaluate the different technologies
currently available for 3D imaging in dentistry
- Select the appropriate imaging parameters to assist in
different diagnostic and treatment tasks
Global Trends in Patient Safety and Infection Control
Organisation for Safety and Asepsis Procedures
Symposium
WHO Patient Safety Curriculum: The
impact on dental education globally
A. Enrique Acosta Gio (Mexico)
Learning objectives
After the presentation, participants will be
able to:
- Identify adverse events in dentistry and strategies to
reduce the risk of accidental harm to dental patients.
- Integrate a framework to enable teamwork, improve
quality and manage risks
- List the elements of the plan to disseminate the
curricular guide throughout the global dental educational
community
Coordinating and calibrating infection
control standards in Latin America
Carmen Carrington-Betts (Panama)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- List several examples of how countries can raise the level
of infection control and safety through policy statements
- List elements for a plan to disseminate a Biosafety
standard throughout the regional professional and
educational communities.
Business continuity planning for dental
organizations and institutions
Eve Cuny (United States of America)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Identify key elements of a business continuity plan
- Determine resources available to assist in planning for
disaster recovery
- Begin developing a framework for their organization’s
business continuity plan
New vision in periodontology:
Prevention or cure
Biofilm impact in health and disease
Agustin Zeron (Mexico)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation participants should be able to:
- Understand the new concept of periodontal diseases
as primarily an inflammatory disease initiated by an
infectious biofilm
- Learn how the risk is conferred to individual patients and
how the risk is assessed and managed
- Recognize the two way relationship between oral health
and overall health
Odontopediatría: nuevos horizontes en
el tratamiento*
Francisco Ramos-Gómez (Estados Unidos)
Objetivos de aprendizaje
Al término de la presentación, los participantes estarán en
condiciones de:
- Describir el contexto y la evidencia clínica a favor de la
atención bucodental perinatal e infantil
- Ofrecer a los odontólogos información acerca de un
modelo de práctica dental para trabajar con la población
más joven de pacientes pediátricos y adquirir una
experiencia más profunda en odontopediatría
- Comprender los principios CAMBRA y disponer de
conocimientos para tratar la caries dental en cualquier
paciente basándose en protocolos de evaluación de riesgo
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:Spanish
Mid-day Sessions: 11.30-13.30
Looking to new paradigms of caries
management and risk assessment
Caries symposium: Caries free
communities
John Featherstone
(United States of America)
Rita Villena (Peru)
This presentation supports the objective of
the Global Oral Health Initiative (GOHI):
to implement a collaborative, prevention
orientated model of oral health care, ultimately resulting
in measurable improvements in oral health and thus
general health in all communities worldwide.
Making decisions about providing crown
and bridgework
The extensively damaged tooth: when
does it need a crown?
Richard Ibbetson (United Kingdom)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Appreciate the advantages and limitations of direct
restorations
- Understand when indirect restorations are indicated
- Know the different types of indirect restorations and the
indications for their use
- Define the skills required for tooth preparation for
indirect restorations
Calidad y Seguridad en la Atención
Odontológica*
Jorge Triana Estrada (Mexico)
Objetivos de aprendizaje
- Diseñar y promover medidas de mejora para gestionar
los riesgos, desarrollando además indicadores para la
evaluación de calidad asistencial mínima requerida
- Difundir los esquemas diseñados en materia de seguridad
del paciente en nuestro país
- Estandarizar los procedimientos de seguridad del paciente
en todos los centros de atención buco dental
- Implementar esquemas para la prevención de eventos
adversos, para garantizar la seguridad del paciente en los
centros de atención buco dental, pública y privada
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
Spanish
8
Dealing with difficult patients
Meet the Fokkers (and learn to love them)
Kevin Lewis (United Kingdom)
Learning Objectives
Participants will be helped to recognize
several types of “difficult” patients, and to understand
what approach is likely to make them less (or more)
“difficult”. After the presentation, participants will be able
to:
- Recognise the clues from a patient’s voice and “body
language”
- Know how to adapt their own communication technique
for each patient
New dental materials for the paediatric
dentist
Luis Karakowsky (Mexico)
After the presentation, participants will be
able to:
- Understand that restorative rules in operative dentistry
have changed.
- Discuss the principles and concepts of minimally invasive
dentistry with respect to paediatric dentistry
- Identify and describe new diagnostic tools that detect
early enamel carious lesions, recognition of risk factors,
biomimetic materials that remineralize dental tissue,
intelligent dental restorative materials, therapeutic pit and
fissure sealants
Global trends in disease burden and
control of oral cancer
Early diagnosis and preventive strategies
of oral cancer and pre-cancer in developing
countries
Prasad Amaratunga (Sri Lanka)
Principal aim of this lecture is to educate the audience
about new trends in Oral Cancer and the Pathological basis
of disease prevention. Lecture will also cover molecular
basis of the disease, current status of Chemoprevention
and share speakers experience in implementation of
preventive programmes in the Asia Pacific region
Diabetes and oral health
International Association of Periodontology
Learning Objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Recognise and evaluate the role of dentistry in a holistic
approach to treatment of people with diabetes
- Apply strategies for holistic approach into daily general
dental practice
Dentomaxilofacial Estetics
The New Parameters and Technique:
Looking for the link between the clinic the
lab and back to the clinic in a predictable
way
Otton Fernández (Costa Rica)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Analyse the parameters of a smile, in both the male and
female population
- Examine the clinical information for the most common
smile using it as a tool in dentofacial analysis
- Demonstrate how to apply the face-bow
- Use mounted study casts as a predictable instrument to
test the wax planning back into the patient face again, to
complete the diagnostic circle
La salud bucodental en México*
Perfil epidemiológico
Heriberto Vera Hermosillo (México)
Objetivos de aprendizaje
Al término de la presentación, los participantes estarán en
condiciones de:
- Enumerar los indicadores que permiten a los odontólogos
establecer un panorama epidemiológico de las patologías
orales más frecuentes en México
- Reconocer y detallar las estrategias oficiales de la
Organización Panamericana de la Salud
- Contribuir a la consecución de los objetivos globales
establecidos por la OMS en materia de salud bucodental en
2020
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
Spanish
Nuevas tendencias en las técnicas
de manejo de comportamiento en
odontología pediátrica
Carlos Díaz Covarrubias Alatorre (Mexico)
Objetivos de aprendizaje
Nuevas tendencias en la educación, han incrementado
el mal comportamiento de los niños en el consultorio
dental, y el rechazo de los padres a la utilización de
ciertas técnicas, han obligado a la utilización de diferentes
alternativas para su atención que serán revisadas
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:Spanish
Afternoon Sessions 15.00-17.00
Global Oral Health Initiative
This presentation supports the objective of the Global Oral
Health Initiative (GOHI): to implement a collaborative,
prevention orientated model of oral health care, ultimately
resulting in measurable improvements in oral health and
thus general health in all communities worldwide.
9
The new diagnostic frontier: saliva
Salivary diagnostics
David Wong (United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Explain and answer the questions “Why saliva, why
now?”
- Describe the role and importance of salivary biomarkers
for oral and systemic disease detection
- Analyse the role of the dentist in primary healthcare
(PHC) and argue the case for including dentistry in a PHC
network
- Detail the steps needed to enhance dentistry and make
medicine better
Implant prosthodontics: Immediate
loading protocols
Rationale, applications, pitfalls
Carlo Ercoli (United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Load the implants with a provisional prosthesis at the
time of implant placement
- Record the relative positions of the implants and soft
tissues, occlusal vertical dimension, maxillomandibular
relationship, and tooth position at the second appointment
- Insert the definitive prosthesis at the third appointment
- Understand the scientific data supporting this technique
Innovations in non surgical periodontal
therapy
Farewell to the past times when the
cementum tissue had to suffer with an
extreme scaling and root planning
Eduardo Saba-Chujfi (Brazil)
Learning objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Present the relevancy of promoting oral health for
periodontal patients, mainly with systemic diseases
- Analyze measures that can help with the promotion of
periodontal health to contribute in the achievement of
lower morbidity and mortality levels
- Evaluate new approaches on periodontal non-surgical
treatment through cementum tissue detoxification to
allow minimal gingival migration or shrinkage, as well as
better esthetic results
Orthodontics
Functional appliances, RME or SME, new
developments in expansion of the palate,
for the general dental practitioner
Derek Mahony (Australia)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Describe which expansion appliances should be used, for
which age groups?
- Review of the periodontal considerations associated with
rapid, versus slow expansion.
- Differentiate arch development, via localized
dentoalveolar remodeling, versus actual bony changes
associated with the opening of the palatal suture
- Understand research, associated with orthodontic
stability and use of maxillary expansion appliances
Approach for nerve injury following
dental implant surgery
Fukuda Ken-ichi (Japan)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Safely and effectively deal with patients with nerve injury
following dental implant surgery
- Understand and review the fundamental knowledge
about sensory disturbances
New frontiers in global science
New frontiers in oral pathology
The odontology initiative
Jose Luis Tapia (United States of America)
Learning Objectives:
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Understand the basics of biomedical ontology
- Recognize the need for data interoperability in oral
pathology
HPV and oral cancer
Human papillomavirus and oral cancer
– from molecular biology to clinical
applications
Stina Syrjänen (Finland)
Introduction to Human papillomavirus
Key events in malignant transformation caused by HPV
Molecular pathogenesis or oral cancer
Current evidence of the role of HPV in oral cancer and oral
potentially malignant disorders
The evidence for the existence of different subgroups
among oral cancer
Is HPV screening needed for early detection of oral
potentially malignant disorders
The role of prophylactic HPV vaccines in prevention of oral
cancer
The world’s largest dental program for people with
intellectual disabilities wants to work with you!*
Special Olympics Special Smiles Forum
Learning objectives:
- A global oral initiative for children and adults with
intellectual disabilities
- A description of the program will be presented as well as
how to become involved at the local level. The program is
currently in 215 countries
- It is universally acknowledged that access to and the
ability to receive quality dental care is the number one
problem people with intellectual disabilities
* This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language: English
10
Thursday 15 September
09.00 - 11.00
CLO3 – Custom-made Lingual
Orthodontics in 3 steps
Oral plastic surgery
Maximizing esthetics with
minimally invasive dentistry
Dentogingival aesthetics… An
interdisciplinary approach to
treatment planning
Edward Pat Allen
(United States of America)
Ricardo Mitrani (Mexico)
Periodontology: model for
effective prevention
Transferring evidence to
preventive care
TMD: new diagnostic and
management techniques
Pablo Echarri (Spain)
Diagnosis and treatment for
chronic orofacial pain
Management of orofacial pain
Fakuda Ken-ichi (Japan)
El papel de las dentaduras
completas en la compleja
rehabilitación del paciente
edéntulo con implantes dentales
La compleja rehabilitación
protésica y quirúrgica del
paciente edéntulo
Predictable successful
endodontics
How to feel, fill and thrill
accessory canals
Donald C Yu (Canada)
Who’s in charge in your
practice?
Dental Practice Committee Forum
Omar Suarez (United States of
America)
OPEN TO ALL INTERESTED
Pierre Baehni (Switzerland)
Jose F. Cortes Botello (Mexico)
11.30 - 13.30
Medical emergencies in the
dental office
Stanley Malamed
(United States of America)
Unlocking knowledge and
potential of oral soft tissue
Role of oxidative stress
and potential of topical
antioxidants in treatment of
oral diseases
Edward Pat Allen (United
States of America)
Practice management
Dollars and Sense
Knowledge exchange and
oral health
WDDHPC/SPH Forum
Kevin Lewis (United Kingdom)
OPEN TO ALL INTERESTED
Bioesthetic dentistry.
Searching for the perfect
balance!
Understand how to control
function, esthetics and biology
in the every day and complex
cases
Clinical Approaches to
Dental Materials
Gottfried Schmalz (Germany)
Alejandro James (Mexico)
Global Oral Health Initiative
ICDAS ICCMS
Rita Villena (Peru)
Nigel Pitts (United Kingdom)
Incorporando la tecnología
digital a la implantología
dental
Ricardo Peniche (Mexico)
15.00 - 17.00
Medical emergencies in the
dental office
Stanley Malamed (United
States of America)
The changing face of
periodontology
A look in the past 10 years
Protocols to enhance the
esthetic predictability of
implant therapy: rationale,
techniques, and prognosis
Ernesto Lee
(United States of America)
The Intelligent Practice
Optimising record keeping
Gerhard Seeberger (Italy)
Minimal Intervention
Innovations for dental
practitioners
Kim Kutsch (United States of
America)
Aesthetic and practical
anterior resin composites
restorations
Marcos Vargas
(United States of America)
¿Los conductos radiculares
pueden desinfectarse
perfectamente antes de la
obturación endodóncica?
De lo sencillo a lo complejo
en rehabilitación oral con
Zirconia CAD/CAM en dientes e
implantes
Yolanda Villareal de Justus
(Mexico)
Maite Moreno (Mexico)
Maria Reina Guillemin (Mexico)
11
Morning Sessions 9.00-11.00
CLO3 – Custom-made Lingual
Orthodontics in 3 steps
Pablo Echarri (Spain)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Determine the indications and limitations of the cases
that can be treated with lingual brackets bonded on first
bicuspids, canines and incisors
- List the protocol of bonding and the archwire sequence
used in this CLO3 technique
- Describe the fine-tuning and finishing stage of the CLO3
technique
Oral plastic surgery
Maximizing Esthetics with Minimally
Invasive Surgery
Edward Pat Allen (United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- List the causes of infection around implants
- Describe the MIS technique for soft tissue grafting around
implants
- List the indications for MIS around implants
Dentogingival aesthetics… An
interdisciplinary approach to treatment
planning
Ricardo Mitrani (Mexico)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand the importance of an interdisciplinary
treatment planning approach
- Understand the importance of proper treatment
sequencing
- Review and use communication tools between the
restorative dentists, surgeons, orthodontists, and dental
technicians
Predictable successful endodontics
How to feel, fill and thrill accessory canals
Donald C Yu (Canada)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand Micro CT of the apex and accessory canals
- Learn 8 ways of radiographically locating accessory
canals
- Prevent misadventures by following the 10 guidelines
- Improve your success by achieving the 5 mechanical
objectives
- Predictably fill the accessory canals with gutta-percha
- Understand thermoprofile of 3D compaction
- Learn the classic Schilder warm vertical compaction
technique
Diagnosis and treatment for chronic
orofacial pain
Management of orofacial pain
Fukuda Ken-ichi (Japan)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Detail the evidence as to why chronic intractable
orofacial pain is often refractory to a variety of
conventional pain therapies
- Identify why patients with the pain, usually remain
emaciated, depressed, and exhausted
- Present the diagnoses and treatments for chronic
orofacial pain
This presentation supports the objective of the Global Oral
Health Initiative (GOHI): to implement a collaborative,
prevention orientated model of oral health care, ultimately
resulting in measurable improvements in oral health and
thus general health in all communities worldwide.
Periodontology: model for effective
prevention
Transferring evidence to preventive care
Pierre Baehni (Switzerland)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand the general and local factors influencing
periodontal health
- Learn how to target preventive interventions based on
patient’s profile
- Know how to integrate preventive care in dental setting
TMD: new diagnostic and management
techniques
Omar Suarez (United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Know how to examine, recognize and provide care for
various forms of TMD and orofacial pain disorders
- Understand and recognize the periarticular manifestation
of systemic inflammatory diseases
- recognize when and how to extend the examination
beyond the orofacial structures
- Recognize and manage dental and orofacial disorders that
exist as a co-morbidity of rheumatic diseases
12
Who is in charge in your practice?*
Dental Practice Committee Forum
Different ways to expand the value of
your practice
Armando Hernandez Ramirez (Mexico)
Will prevention influence your
income?
Claudio Fernandes (Brazil)
Learning objectives:
At the end of this presentation participants will be able to:
- Recognise and describe the major issues facing general
dental practice and identify strategies for improving
practice management in a changing health system
- Evaluate how the new classification system that will
impact their practice and clinical management of caries
*This forum will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
English
El papel de las dentaduras completas en
la compleja rehabilitación del paciente
edéntulo con implantes dentales*
La compleja rehabilitación protésica y
quirúrgica del paciente edéntulo
José F. Cortés Botello (México)
Objetivos de aprendizaje:
Al término de la presentación, los participantes estarán en
condiciones de:
- Tener un panorama claro de las distintas alternativas
protésicas que existen para los pacientes edéntulos y debatir de
la secuencia de procedimientos clínicos y de laboratorio en la
rehabilitación con implantes dentales.
- Comprender la importancia de una dentadura completa bien
fabricada en el diagnóstico, la planificación del tratamiento y la
rehabilitación de pacientes edéntulos con implantes dentales.
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
Spanish
Mid-day Sessions 11.30-13.30
Medical Emergencies in the dental office
The renaissance of local anaesthesia*
Stanley Malamed (United States of
America)
* 4 hour course: 11.30 – 13.30 / 15.00 – 17.00
Learning objectives:
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Discuss the results of current research into mandibular
infiltration with articaine HCl in the adult dental patient
- Describe the pharmacology behind buffered local
13
anesthetics (the local anesthesia ‘ON’ switch)
- Describe the pharmacology behind the local anesthesia
reversal agent, phentolamine mesylate (the local
anesthesia ‘OFF’ switch)
- Discuss the results of current research into the use of
intranasal local anesthesia for dental pain control
- Discuss the use and success of computer-controlled local
anesthetic delivery (C-CLAD) systems
Unlocking knowledge and potential of
oral soft tissue
The Role of Oxidative Stress in Periodontal
Disease: Current Concepts
Edward Pat Allen (United States of America)
Learning objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Describe the role of oxidative stress in inflammatory
diseases
- List the systemic diseases that have been linked to
periodontal disease
- Describe the effect of oxidative stress on gingival
fibroblasts
- Describe the benefit of oral topical application of a
combination of antioxidants
Bioesthetic Dentistry Searching for the
perfect balance!
Understand how to control function,
esthetics and Biology in the every day and
complex cases
Alejandro James (Mexico)
Learning objectives
The most important factor in restorative dentistry
is considering biology from every angle: occlusaly,
esthetically and functionally
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Design and implement a comprehensive treatment plan
in order to achieve and maximize long-term trouble-free
cases
Clinical Approaches to Dental Materials
Material selection for the individual
patient
Gottfried Schmalz (Germany)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Detail how dentists can apply the guidelines for material
selection, which are based on clinical and preclinical testing
- Describe patients’ parameters: their wishes, concerns
(mainly on safety) and individual biological risks (e.g.
allergies, oral mucosa lesions like lichenoid reactions)
- Identify methodologies to assess risk factors and outline
the variety of tests available to evaluate patients that will
enable dentists to communicate effectively with patients
- Present a summary of the data on selected dental
materials examining health evidence
Afternoon Sessions 15.00-17.00
Practice management
Dollars and Sense
Kevin Lewis (United Kingdom)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Understand how business objectives and professional
ethics and values must remain aligned – even in
challenging economic times
- Understand eight leadership and management
characteristics that will contribute to the success of dental
practices of all sizes
- Understand proven business strategies and their
application to the management of a dental practice
Knowledge Exchange and Oral Health*
Joint World Dental Development & Health Promotion
Committee (WDDHPC) / Public Health Section (PHS) Forum
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Determine how knowledge transfer can be used to
improve oral health status.
- Describe and discuss knowledge exchange techniques
used to address various situations.
- Understand the importance of knowledge exchange
relating to prevention and health promotion in the context
of national policies.
* This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
English
Global Oral Health Initiative
ICDAS ICCMS
Rita Villena (Peru)
Nigel Pitts (United Kingdom)
This presentation supports the objective
of the Global Oral Health Initiative
(GOHI): to implement a collaborative,
prevention orientated model of oral
health care, ultimately resulting in
measurable improvements in oral health
and thus general health in all communities
worldwide.
Incorporando la tecnología digital a la
implantología dental*
Ricardo Peniche (Mexico)
Resumen
La odontología está cambiando rápidamente, los avances tecnológicos implican el desarrollo de productos y técnicas
innovadoras. La implantología dental ya es parte de estos
adelantos con protocolos que involucran softwares y
procesos automatizados para el beneficio de nuestros
pacientes. *This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
Spanish
Medical Emergencies in the dental office
The renaissance of local anaesthesia*
Stanley Malamed (United States of
America)
* Continued from mid-day session
Learning objectives:
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Discuss the results of current research into mandibular
infiltration with articaine HCl in the adult dental patient.
- Describe the pharmacology behind buffered local
anesthetics (the local anesthesia ‘ON’ switch)
- Describe the pharmacology behind the local anesthesia
reversal agent, phentolamine mesylate (the local
anesthesia ‘OFF’ switch)
- Discuss the results of current research into the use of
intranasal local anesthesia for dental pain control
- Discuss the use and success of computer-controlled local
anesthetic delivery (C-CLAD) systems
Protocols to enhance the esthetic
predictability of implant therapy:
rationale, techniques, and prognosis
Ernesto Lee (United States of America)
Learning objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Define esthetic objectives in implant therapy
- Identify the esthetic potential and limitations of various
clinical scenarios in implant dentistry
- Illustrate techniques for implant site preservation and
development
- Discuss indications for immediate implant placement and
provisionalization
- Analyze the selection of implant-supported vs. toothsupported restorations in the esthetic zone
Minimal Intervention
Innovations for dental practitioners
Kim Kutsch (United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand the role of minimally invasive dentistry in the
future of patient care
- Describe the current biofilm disease model of dental
caries, the role of caries risk assessment in identifying
patients at risk for the disease, and the current trends in
treatment strategies for dental caries
- Explain the role of remineralization in treating dental
caries
14
Aesthetic and practical anterior resin
composites restorations
Marcos Vargas (United States of America)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to
understand the principles of:
- Shade selection for resin composites.
- Cavity preparation to improve blending
- Resin composite manipulation
- Layering resin composites
- Contouring and polishing
The changing face of periodontology
A look in the past 10 years
Maria Reina Guillemin (Mexico)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand how new information has changed the way
we wage treatment outcomes
- Select and critically appraise how to incorporate new
technologies into our practices.
The intelligence practice
Optimizing record keeping
Gerhard K. Seeberger (Italy)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Describe different formats for office records
- Define essential items for records in dental medicine
- Use negative result records for self-education and quality
improvement
- Identify several of the risks and benefits of electronic
record keeping
- Describe the need for accurate and complete records in
dental practice
- Realize a record, which could assist a dental specialist for
the patient visited
¿Los conductos radiculares pueden
desinfectarse perfectamente antes de la
obturación endodóncica?*
Yolanda Villareal de Justus (Mexico)
Los objetivos de aprendizaje son conocer:
- Los requerimientos biológicos de la desinfección para
obtener éxito endodóncico.
- Las ventajas y desventajas de los diferentes irrigantes.
- La confiabilidad/efectividad de usar la presión negativa y
el ultrasonido en la introducción de irrigantes.
- La efectividad del ozono para destruir el ecosistema
microbiano (bacterias, hongos, virus y priones).
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
Spanish
De lo sencillo a lo complejo en
rehabilitacion oral con Zirconia CAD/
CAM en dientes e implantes*
Maite Moreno (Mexico)
Objetivo de aprendizaje
El/la cirujano dentista sera capaz de plantear soluciones en
tratmientos ordinarios y especiales de rehabilitacion oral.
Conocera propiedades fisicas de zirconia, desde una corona
individual , puentes de zirconia en dientes naturales e
implantes y la pasividad en un Puente Procera sobre
implantes. Ademas, se presenta un procedimiento clinico
innovador antes de impresion, aplicando laser de 908 nm
para evitar sensivilidad en dientes vitales y desinfeccion en
superficies de dentina.
* This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
Spanish
15
Friday 16 September
09.00 - 11.00
Technology and Periodontics
Utilizing technology to enhance
“success” in periodontics
Samuel B Low (United States of
America)
Caries Management under
science and clinical evidence
Armando Hernandez Ramirez
(Mexico)
Learning to work as a dental
team
Greg Psaltis (United States of
America)
Orthodontics
Functional appliances today - the
evidence, choices and optimum
clinical management
Surgical and Prosthetic
Coordination on Advanced
Implant Cases
Pearls of Practice
Ronald Sambursky (United States
of America)
Frank Lamar
(United States of America)
James Lamar
(United States of America)
Fundamental concepts in
restorative dentistry
Occlusal stability in dentistry
Rodrigo Escalante (Mexico)
Endodoncia versus Implantes: La
Nueva Polémica en Odontología
Mauricio González del Castillo
Silva (Mexico)
Nigel Harradine
(United Kingdom)
11.30 - 13.30
Odontology
The art a science of micro
ultrasonic instrumentation in
periodontal therapy
Bonding all ceramic restorations
in 2011
Using advanced materials and
technologies
Samuel B Low
(United States of America)
Nasser Barghi
(United States of America)
Current Innovations in Dental
Materials
Always newer - always better?
Articulación
temporomandibular:
diagnóstico por imágenes,
indicaciones y consideraciones
Gottfried Schmalz (Germany)
Ramon Braojos (Mexico)
Class III correction with
orthodontic mini implants
Innovation in plastic surgical
periodontal therapy
Nasib Balut (Mexico)
Eduardo Saba-Chujfi (Brazil)
Prevención de lesiones de
mancha blanca (LMB) en el
esmalte dental durante el
tratamiento ortodóncico con
aparatos fijos, y disminución de
frecuencia del desprendimiento
accidental de brackets
Roberto Justus (Mexico)
15.00 - 17.00
Non or Minimal invasive
dentistry
Endodontics decision making a
current view
August Bruguera (Spain)
Jorge Vera Rojas (Mexico)
Prevention and early
intervention in special care
dentistry
International Association for
Disability and Health Prevention
Gabriela Scagnet (Argentina)
Dimitris Emmanouil (Greece)
Juan Pablo Loyola Rodriguez (México)
Volunteering
You can make a difference for
global oral health
Infant dentistry
Managing early child caries:
Opportunity for preventive
practice
Marcos Bloch (Mexico)
Carillas Cerámicas
Arturo Fernandez Pedrero
(Mexico)
Greg Psaltis
(United States of America)
Sally Hewett
(United States of America)
European Dental Student
Association
16
Morning Sessions 9.00-11.00
Technology and Periodontics
Utilizing technology to enhance “success”
in periodontics
Samuel B Low (United States of America)
Learning objectives
After this presentation, participants will be able to:
- Determine tooth survival in short and long term
prognosis.
- Consider risk assessment determination as critical in
periodontal evaluation
- Incorporate anti inflammatory therapy
- Evaluate anti-infective systems to effect biofilm
development
- Choose between various forms of power instrumentation
and various micro thin tips
- Review current laser wavelengths for antimicrobial and
bio stimulation properties
Learning to Work as a Dental Team
Greg Psaltis (United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand the concept of “oral doctor” versus oral
technician
- Learn significant advantages to expanding the roles of
hygienists and assistants
- See how the reduction in personal pressure can help the
dentist remain healthier
- Begin to grasp the far-reaching possibilities of group
decision-making in a dental practice
Surgical and Prosthetic Coordination on
Advanced Implant Cases
Frank Lamar (United States of America)
James Lamar (United States of America)
Learning Objectives:
After this presentation, participants will be
able to:
- Outline the keys to working as a team on
advanced dental implant cases
- Discuss setting up treatment protocols dependant on the
proposed prosthetic design
- Review treatment sequencing and time lines for various
treatment scenarios
- Describe and evaluate how a common plan, which is
followed by the implant surgeon, restorative dentist,
and dental laboratory can result in improved patients
outcomes
17
Pearls of practice
Improve your efficiency and predictability
Ronald Sambursky
(United States of America)
Learning objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Review treatment planning of cases both large and small
- Combine the knowledge of predictable Fixed
Prosthodontics that has stood the test of time and blend
that knowledge with modern day materials and techniques
in order to develop a good understanding of how to
implement it in their practice tomorrow.
- Review troubleshooting techniques that they may not
have learned in dental school
This presentation supports the objective of the Global Oral
Health Initiative (GOHI): to implement a collaborative,
prevention orientated model of oral health care, ultimately
resulting in measurable improvements in oral health and
thus general health in all communities worldwide.
Caries Management under science and
clinical evidence
Armando Hernandez Ramirez (Mexico)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation the participant will be able to:
- Identify the necessary knowledge, based on the minimalintervention philosophy, to implement in your practice
a medical model in the management, detection and
treatment of caries and carious lesions in your patients,
with the support of modern tools and technologies.
Orthodontics
Functional appliances today - the
evidence, choices and optimum clinical
management
Nigel Harradine (United Kingdom)
After this presentation, participants will be able to:
- Have an understanding of the well-supported and
clinically-important facts from research into functional
appliances
- Have an understanding of the strengths and
imperfections of various types of functional appliance
- Recognise the qualities of an ideal functional appliance
- Provide an overview of the knowledge of the current state
of the art in appliance design and the practical clinical
management
Conceptos fundamentales en
odontología restauradora*
Estabilidad oclusal en odontología
Rodrigo Escalante (México)
Objetivos de aprendizaje
Al término de la presentación, los participantes estarán en
condiciones de:
- Comenzar a poner en práctica de inmediato los conceptos
aprendidos en el área de la estabilidad oclusal
*This session will not be interpreted. Language presentation:
Spanish
Endodoncia versus Implantes: La Nueva
Polémica en Odontología*
Mauricio Gonzáles del Castillo Silva
(Mexico)
Learning objectives
Al finalizar este curso los participantes podrán:
- Discutir el papel que desempeñan los Odontólogos en
general
- Establecer las bases científicas de una buena endodoncia
- Conocer la nueva tecnología endodóntica y el pronóstico
de la misma
- Establecer los alcances de la endodoncia y sus
limitaciones
- Establecer los alcances y limitaciones de la Implantología
*This session will not be interpreted. Language presentation:
Spanish
Mid-day Sessions 11.30-13.30
Odontology
The art a science of micro ultrasonic
instrumentation in periodontal therapy
Samuel B Low (United States of America)
Learning objectives
After the presentation participant will be able to:
- Be familiar with the current literature justifying the use of
power driven instrumentation
- State the indications and contraindications for their use,
including safety precautions
- Select the necessary instrumentation commercially
available to achieve effective results
- Implement techniques unique to this modality, especially
in the area of enhancing patient comfort
- Incorporate power driven instrumentation into the
periodontal component of the practice
Bonding all Ceramic restorations in 2011
Using Advanced Materials and
Technologies
Nasser Barghi (United States of America)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Utilise practical and clinical information on bonding
all ceramic restorations in light of current scientific
information and long-term clinical observation to achieve
improved outcomes in practice
- Understand the rationale for enhancing the durability
of the bond through evidence-based information,
technological advancements and new products
Class III correction with orthodontic mini
implants
Nasib Balut (Mexico)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Understand the scope that can be obtained with the use
of mini implants in class III malocclusion problems and the
indications and contraindications to its use.
Innovation in plastic surgical periodontal
therapy
A new day for periodontal plastic surgery:
innovating for quality of life, health and
looks, and reducing and correcting gingival
smiles
Eduardo Saba-Chujfi (Brazil)
Learning objectives
After this presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand the point of promoting oral health for
periodontal patients
- Analyze periodontal surgeries that jointly with previous
non-surgical treatments can help with the promotion
of periodontal health, bringing motivation and esthetic
results
- Understand different periodontal surgical techniques and
new approaches to periodontal surgical treatment
- Consider a new plastic technique for the correction and
reduction of gummy smiles
Current Innovations in Dental Materials
Always newer - always better?
Gottfried Schmalz (Germany)
Learning Objectives
After this presentation, participants will be able to:
- Critically discuss innovations in composite resin/
adhesives technology including new low shrinking
composite resins (e.g. siloranes) or one bottle systems for
dental adhesion
- Analyse how Improved aesthetics are reached through
new ceramics (either pressed, fired or CAD/CAM
fabricated)
18
- List indications, material selection, techniques and luting
and be able to demonstrate in a clinical setting
- Recognise why invasiveness and costs should be balanced
against aesthetics
- Discuss : whether amalgam is still a topic and detail the
rationale behind the argument
Articulación temporomandibular:
diagnóstico por imágenes, indicaciones y
consideraciones*
Ramon Braojos (Mexico)
Objetivos de aprendizaje
Reafirmar conocimientos de Anatomia Normal y Anormal
de Articulacion Temporomandibular. Analizar imagenes de
resonancia magnetica en salud y enfermedad. Reconocer
signos y sintomas de los padecimientos articulares
relacionados con el desplazamiento del disco articular.
Analizar conceptos de la ubicacion condilar y su relacion
con salud o enfermedad. Fabricacion y tratamiento con
guardas oclusales.
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation language:
Spanish
Prevención de lesiones de mancha blanca
(LMB) en el esmalte dental durante el
tratamiento ortodóncico con aparatos
fijos, y disminución de frecuencia del
desprendimiento accidental de brackets*
Roberto Justus (Mexico)
Objetivos de aprendizaje
El participante aprenderá porque:
- El esmalte se protege contra el desarrollo de LMB cuando
los brackets se adhieren con RMGI.
- La desproteinización del esmalte con Clorox (hipoclorito
de sodio al 5.25%), antes de grabar, aumenta la fuerza de
adhesión (Justus R. Seminars in Orthodontics, marzo 2010)
disminuyendo la frecuencia del desprendimiento accidental
de brackets, tanto con resina compuesta como con RMGI. El participante aprenderá cómo:
- Desproteinizar la superficie del esmalte.
- Adherir brackets con RMGI.
*This session will not be interpreted: Presentation language:
Spanish
Afternoon Sessions 15.00-17.00
Non or Minimal invasive dentistry
August Bruguera (Spain)
Learning objectives
After this presentation, participants will be able to:
- Recognise and describe why our esthetic treatment
planning should begin with a comprehensive external
examination and be completed intra-orally
19
- Explain the relevance of the distortion in the horizontal
plane and its impact on aesthetic dentistry
- Review the relative fracture resistance of natural dentin
and enamel and evaluate whether there is a need for high
fracture resistance in restorative materials
- Discuss the evidence around adhesive cementation in
relation to fracture resistance and analyse from a clinical
perspective
- State why smaller veneers and veneers without
preparation have high fracture resistance.
Endodontics decision making: a current
view
Jorge Vera Rojas (Mexico)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Describe the use of ultrasonic tips to remove
calcifications and interferences
- Describe the hydrodynamics involved inside the root
canal during irrigation to improve intracanal irrigating
solution action
- Compare the prognosis of the endodontically/
periodontally treated tooth to that of a single tooth
implant.
- Apply a strategy for treatment of teeth compromised by
apical periodontitis. Prevention and early intervention in special care
dentistry
International Association for Disability and Oral Health
Symposium (IADH)
Gabriela Scagnet ( Argentina)
Dimitris Emmanouil (Greece)
Juan Pablo Loyola Rodriguez (México)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation attendees will be able to:
- Learn how to cover the preventive aspects and an
efficient intervention in Special Needs Dentistry from the
early stages of life throughout adulthood
- Understand the importance of having more specialised
dentists involved in this field providing early dental care to
patients with special needs
Infant dentistry
Managing early child caries: Opportunity
for preventive practice
Marcos Bloch (Mexico)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand that minimum-intervention or non-invasive
dental care is only feasible through “baby and paediatric
stomatology”
- Discuss the evidence supporting prenatal, perinatal and
postpartum education and preventive care for women,
leading to preventive care for babies starting days after
birth and stretching three years on
- Better describe the concept of prevention in dental care
Volunteering
You can make a difference for global oral
health
Greg Psaltis (United States of America)
Sally Hewett (United States of America)
European Dental Students Association
Learning objectives
After the presentation, participants will be
able to:
- Learn of global oral health needs and
disparities and ways to help
- Learn how to find programs that suit the volunteer and
the people being served
- Learn how and why to volunteer
- Learn who can volunteer
- Learn to evaluate existing programs for sustainability
- Learn what techniques are possible to perform in
resource-poor environments
- Share experiences for mutual learning
Carillas Céramicas*
Arturo Fernandez Pedrero (Mexico)
Presentaremos un recorrido histórico de
diferentes conceptos, materiales, técnicas,
indicaciones, contraindicaciones y procedimientos de
cementación que resultan ser básicos para lograr el éxito
al igual que las características de superficie de los dientes
a tratar.
*This session will not be interpreted: Presentation language:
Spanish
20
Saturday 17 September
09.00 - 11.00
Making decisions about
providing crown and bridgework
The tooth supported fixed
prosthesis: Is it obsolete in the
age of the implant?
Richard Ibbetson (United
Kingdom)
Functional and biologic
determinants in smile design:
principles, techniques and
evidence
The role of dentists in the
initial recognitions of systemic
diseases
Multidisciplinary approach to
achieving maximum aesthetic
results
FOLA Symposium
Roman Carlos Bregni (Guatemala)
Ernesto Lee
(United States of America)
Lupo Villegas Dominican Republic
(Dominican Republic )
GOHI (Hygienists session)
Nigel Pitts (United Kingdom)
Comprehensive school health
care: Where does oral health fit?
Julian Fisher (FDI)
Rita Villena (Peru)
Ian Erasmus (South Africa)
Habib Benzian (Germany)
Clinical management of
malocclusions cases class II
division I and division II mix to
permanent dentition with fixed
and straight arch orthopedic
technics
Distalization with wire mechanics
Adan Casasa (Mexico)
11.30 - 13.30
The use of Composite Grafts
of recombinant human Bone
Morphogenetic Protein-2/
Acellular Collagen Sponge
(rhBMP-2/ACS), Cancellous
Freeze Dried Allogeneic Bone
(CFDAB) for the reconstruction
of alveolar bone defect
So little room, so much to see
The Complete Pediatric Oral
Examination
Planning for success in Practice
William Cheung (Hong Kong SAR
China)
Greg Psaltis
(United States of America)
Oral health of older people: a
challenge for dental profession
Daniel Pierre Kandelman
(Canada)
Michael Peleg
(United States of America)
Why children should have an
orthodontic check-up no later
than age 7?
A review of early orthodontic
treatment indications
Non communicable Diseases
Harry-Sam Selikowitz (Norway)
Michael Glick
(United States of America)
Prótesis Funcional y Estética:
Estética predecible en el sector
anterior y en la maxila edéntula
basada en restauraciones
implantorretenidas
Mario Rodrigues Tizcareño (Mexico)
Carlos Nurko (Mexico)
15.00 - 17.00
Patient safety and dental
practice: what do we need to
know
Minimum Intervention: The
secret to a new dental practice
MI: Innovative Technologies
Excellence in esthetics
The latest in esthetics…
composite, porcelain and zirconia
Oral pathology in children and
adolescents: from the easy to
the complicated
Nermin Yamalik (Turkey)
Bernardo Perea Perez (Spain)
Kim Kutsch
(United States of America)
Christopher Hooper
(United States of America)
Eduardo L. Ceccotti (Argentina)
The roadmap for continuing
education
Adherencia epitelial en
implantes dentales
Cómo lograr resultados estéticos
Lone Schou (Denmark)
21
Alejandro Treviño (Mexico)
Morning Sessions 09.00 – 11.00
The tooth supported fixed prosthesis: Is
it obsolete in the age of the implant?
Richard Ibbetson (United Kingdom)
Learning objectives:
After this presentation, participants will be able to:
- Review the provision of fixed prostheses
- Appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of implantsupported and tooth-supported fixed prostheses
- Examine the clinical techniques for ensuring predictability
in tooth-supported fixed prostheses
Functional and biologic determinants in
smile design: principles, techniques, and
evidence
Ernesto Lee (United States of America)
Learning objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Identify macro-esthetic parameters in smile design
- Analyse occlusal determinants and their role in esthetics
- Identify interdisciplinary strategies to modify the biologic
determinants of smile design
- Review current therapeutic guidelines and evidence for
management of gingival display
- Identify the esthetic potential and limitations of various
clinical scenarios in implant dentistry
The role of dentists in the initial
recognitions of systemic diseases
Roman Carlos-Bregni (Guatemala)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Recognize and diagnose systemic diseases and oral
cancer, but also to manage appropriate referral and
possible treatment.
Specifics: Diagnosis of the oral manifestations of
endocrine disorders, hematologic diseases and neoplasias,
oral manifestations of end stage renal disease, oral
manifestations of metabolic and connective tissue
diseases, oral manifestations of systemic infectious
diseases, oral manifestations of GI tract and nutritional
deficiencies
Multidisciplinary approach to achieving
maximum aesthetic results
FOLA Symposium
Lupo Villegas (Dominican Republic)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Use clinical cases
- Understand the importance of mapping out a good
treatment plan and the sequence to a successful result
- Demonstrate how every step taken can be detailed and
documented with digital photography
Global Oral Health Initiative
(Hygienists session)
Nigel Pitts (United Kingdom)
Julian Fisher (FDI)
Rita Villena (Peru)
Ian Erasmus (South Africa)
This presentation supports the objective of the Global Oral
Health Initiative (GOHI): to implement a collaborative,
prevention orientated model of oral health care, ultimately
resulting in measurable improvements in oral health and
thus general health in all communities worldwide.
Comprehensive school health care:
Where does oral health fit?
Habib Benzian (Germany)
Learning objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Understand the principles of integrated school health
programmes
- Describe lessons learnt from school health programmes
around the world
- Formulate generic policy recommendations for effective
and successful school health programmes
- Outline practical steps in conceptualising, implementing
and managing school health programmes
Manejo clínico de maloclusiones de clase
II división I y división II de la dentición
mixta a la permanente con técnicas
ortopédicas fijas y arco recto*
Distalización con mecanismos de alambre
Adán Casasa (México)
Objetivos de aprendizaje
Al término de la presentación, los participantes estarán en
condiciones de:
- Aprender una técnica diferente para distalizar molares
utilizando distintos aparatos, arcos de alambre y elásticos.
- Los aparatos son fáciles de adaptar, no necesitan
interrupción de la secuencia de tratamiento mecánico y
requieren una cooperación limitada del paciente
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation
language: Spanish
Mid-day Sessions 11.30-13.30
The use of Composite Grafts
of recombinant human Bone
Morphogenetic Protein-2/Acellular
Collagen Sponge (rhBMP-2/ACS),
Cancellous Freeze Dried Allogeneic Bone
(CFDAB) for the reconstruction of alveolar bone defect
Michael Peleg (United States of America)
This lecture will explore
- The fundamental principles needed for a successful bone
graft in compromised clinical situation.
- The surgical technique will be discussed in detail.
- Potential complications will be reviewed.
Data from clinical studies will be used to demonstrate
both the potential value of the composite bone grafts
(allogeneic and rhBMP-2) and the value of the MIS implant
design in the refinement of the clinical procedures used to
achieve ultimate success
timing has shown to be the most effective and efficient.
Why deviate from this standard and initiate treatment
earlier? The objectives of this presentation are to present
what orthodontic problems are effectively and efficiently
managed before that. The published data available to
date is covered, and the different indications for early
orthodontic treatment are presented with the use of
different clinical cases.
Non Communicable Diseases
So Little Room, So Much To See
The Complete Pediatric Oral Examination
Greg Psaltis (United States of America)
Learning objectives:
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Recognize oral anomalies
- Diagnose early orthodontic problems
- Understand proper treatment planning
- Follow growth and development issues more easily
Planning for success in Practice
William Cheung (Hong Kong SAR China)
Learning objectives:
There are many challenges in building a successful
private dental practice today. After the presentation, the
participants will be able to:
- Understand the ingredients in building a successful dental
practice
- Meet the challenges of running a modern private dental
practice
Oral health of older people: a challenge
for dental profession
Daniel Pierre Kandelman (Canada)
Learning objectives
- Understand better the oral health of older people, their
needs, and the accessibility of care .
- Should be able to participate to the improvement of
oral health of the elderly population within their private
practices and or within existing national dental public
health programmes directed toward this important
segment of the population
- Understand the common risk factors approach and its
implementation for disease prevention.
Why children should have an orthodontic
check-up no later than age 7?
A review of early orthodontic treatment
indications
Carlos Nurko (Mexico)
The “Gold Standard” for initiating orthodontic treatment
is known to be during the adolescent growth spurt, and
or the late-mixed to early permanent dentition. This
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The role of dental practitioners as advocates
promoting health by integrating general
and oral health promotion.
Sam Selikowitz (Norway)
Learning objectives
- The scientific basis of the Common Risk Factor Approach
- Identifying the advantages of integrating oral and general
health promotion to reduce NCDs
- The role of dental practitioners as advocates
The role of oral health care professionals in
overall health.
Michael Glick (United Sates of America)
Learning objectives
At the end of this presentation participants will be able to :
- Address the discourse on this topic and engage dentists
to broaden their perspective of their role as health care
professionals
Prótesis Funcional y Estética*
Estética Predecible en el Sector Anterior
y en la Maxila Edéntula Basada en
Restauraciones Implanto-Retenidas
Mario Rodríguez-Tizcareño (Mexico)
Objetivos de aprendizaje:
Al término de la presentación el asistente será capaz de:
- Identificar los fundamentos biológicos y protésicos para
el desarrollo de un plan de tratamiento estéticamente
orientado.
- Discutir las diferentes alternativas y sus protocolos para
la transferencia del plan de tratamiento virtual a la realidad
quirúrgica y protésica y su aplicación clínica en diferentes
situaciones.
- Discutir diferentes sistemas para la fabricación de
restauraciones implanto retenidas.
*This session will not be interpreted. Presentation
language: Spanish
Afternoon Sessions 15.00-17.00
Patient safety and dental practice: What do we need to
know?
A general look at patient safety from a
dental practice perspective
Nermin Yamalik (Turkey)
Elements of patient safety in ambulatory
dental care – a surgical checklist
Bernardo Perea Perez (Spain)
Learning objectives:
- To become more familiar with the topic
of patient safety and its impact on delivery
of health care
- To become more aware of certain important dimensions
of patient safety and daily dental practice
- To better understand major elements of patient safety in
ambulatory oral health care
Minimum Intervention: The secret to a
new dental practice
MI: Innovative Technologies
Kim Kutsch (United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants should be able to:
- Understand the role of risk assessment based diagnosis
in providing more predictable treatment outcomes and
higher patient satisfaction
- Describe innovative technologies and materials that
support MID
- Explain why Minimal Intervention Dentistry is THE secret
to greater patient satisfaction and the ultimate dental
practice
Excellence in esthetics
The latest in esthetics…composite,
porcelain and zirconia
Christopher Hooper
(United States of America)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation, participants will be able to:
- Recognise and describe proper preparation form
for direct and indirect restorations, how to make the
perfect impression, a simple procedure for predictable
cementation and bonding, how to select the proper
material (pfm, empress, eris, lava, bruxzir)
Oral pathology in children and
adolescents: from the easy to the
complicated
Eduardo L. Ceccotti (Argentina)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants should be able to:
- Update the general practice dentist and pediatric dentist,
through images in the diagnosis and treatment of common
lesions and unusual ones but requiring early diagnosis
- Recognise the way various lesions can present, to run the
differential diagnoses with other diseases
- Learn to decide the best and quickest way to treat the
lesion, specially those with serious prognoses
The roadmap for continuing education
Lone Schou (Denmark)
Learning Objectives
After the presentation participants will be able to:
- Review and update the background and the professional
understanding of the need for all health care providers to
undertake lifelong learning activities in order to practice
dentistry
- Understand the complexity and the need for all potential
providers of continued education to work together to
develop relevant CE in different local circumstances
Show Case FDI AWDC 2012 HONG KONG
Leading the World To Optimal Oral Health: a new century
of advances in dentistry“Leading the World To Optimal
Oral Health” is both FDI’s vision and the goal of the
FDI’s Annual World Dental Congress (AWDC) scientific
programme. The 2012 AWDC is FDI’s 100th Congress,
a milestone for the Federation and also an opportunity
to reflect on the achievements in dentistry over the last
century and look forward to the advances that will change
dentistry and oral health care in the near future.The
AWDC scientific programme is unique, bringing top-flight
national, regional and international speakers to address
most important challenges and issues in dental practice,
enabling dentists and dental teams to transfer cutting edge
knowledge into their daily clinical work and management
of their practices.
Adherencia Epitelial en Implantes
Dentales*
Como lograr Resultados Estéticos
Alejandro Treviño (Mexico)
Learning Objectives
Entender porque la arquitectura y disposición de los tejidos
peri-implantares se guían a través del espacio biológico.
Como el epitelio de union es uno de los determinantes para
obtener resultados estéticos aceptables en implantología
Estructurar la evidencia cientifica en:
Estética y altura de la papilla en implantes
Alteraciones del reborde y patrones de cicatrización
seguidos a una extracción
Colocación de implantes inmediatos contra implantes
tempranos
* This session will not be interpreted. Presentation
language: Spanish
YOUR OWN PRESENTATION
An important function of the Annual World Dental Congress is to offer colleagues the opportunity to make their own
presentations. You can present one Free Communication and/or a Poster.
FREE COMMUNICATION: A ten minute verbal presentation on a topic of your choice followed by a three minute
discussion.
POSTER: Presentation on a topic of your choice in the form of a poster. The presenter of the selected poster will be
required to present verbally at a given time.
TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT, PLEASE DO SO ONLINE. THE DEADLINE FOR ENTRY IS THE 15th of APRIL 2011
www.fdiworldental.org
PLEASE DO NOT SEND ANY VIA EMAIL, FAX OR POST - ONLY ONLINE ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS WILL BE CONSIDERED
FDI POSTER AWARD COMPETITION
All delegates have the opportunity to compete for 3 awards in the FDI Poster Award Competition.
6 best posters will be selected from the poster abstract submissions and will have to present their poster during the
congress in front of 3 judges.
Each winner will receive free registration to a future FDI Congress and 1,500 towards their participation.
The competition will be conducted in 2 phases:
Phase 1: The 6 best posters will be selected from the poster
abstract for the competition
150cm
Phase 2: On-site, the selected 6 will present for 5 minutes
+ Q&A.
The 3 winners will be selected from the 6.
POSTER AWARDS
All delegates have the opportunity to
compete for three awards in the FDI
Poster Competition.
Each winner will receive free
registration to a future FDI Congress
and €1,500 towards your participation
Terms and Conditions Apply.
90cm
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OPTIONAL SOCIAL PROGRAMME
OS1 Welcome Ceremony
The Auditorio Nacional is Mexico’s most prominent live-performance venue
and many specialist media acclaim it as one of the world’s best. It was
designed by Mexican architects Pedro Ramírez Vázquez and Gonzalo Ramírez
del Sordo, and entirely revamped by Abraham Zabludovsky and Teodoro
González de León. It inter alia hosts musical, artistic, theatrical and dance
shows.
This Auditorio was ranked as number-one on the list of the world’s best
stages for artistic shows in the first quarter of 2007 by Pollstar, an American magazine.[ ]In its quarterly
review, this magazine stated that it had outclassed the Fox Theatre (Atlanta), Radio City Music Hall and Madison Square
Garden (both in New York), Universal Amphitheatre (Los Angeles) and Heineken Music Hall (Amsterdam, Holland). It is
one of this city’s largest buildings.
Please note that the venue seating is limited and therefore tickets will be distributed on a first come first served basis
Date & Time: Wednesday 14 September, 20.00 – 01.00
Venue: Auditorio Nacional
Cost: Free to registered participants
(subject to availability)
OS2 Mexican Night
The Lienzo Charro in Constituyentes springs from a sense of belonging, craving for life,
and drive to perpetuate an attitude. The birthplace of organised charrería (horsemanship
and rodeo riding) in this country was established on 4 June 1921. These horse riders are
fighters who embrace time-honoured tradition. They are tough and uphold the values of
one of the endeavours that most loyally encapsulates the Mexican spirit.
Charrería is all about fields, brawn, strife, art and bravery. It captures the essence of the
cross-fertilization that spawned it, and the mindset that an entire people share.
It is opening its doors to the public for a firsthand experience of this distinctive lifestyle, and
for a feria mexicana that will take over Lienzo Charro.
Date & Time: Thursday 15 September, 20.00 – 01.00
Venue: Lienzo Charro de Constituyentes
Cost: 85 USD
OS3 Gala Dinner
Spectacular and original
El Lago boasts an exclusive atmosphere, and one-of-a-kind class. The fine
dining and amazing wine cellar at El Lago elate the most discerning patrons.
The superlative cuisine, cosy atmosphere and stunning surroundings explain
why this restaurant is the one that guests from across this country and way
beyond do not want to miss.
The exclusive, discerning connoisseurs we serve raise this restaurant’s
standards every day. That is why only the top chefs and most experienced
staff will do for our guests.
Date & Time:Friday 16 September, 20.00 – 00.00
Venue: Elago Restaurant
Cost: 170 USD
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ACCOMPANYING PERSON PROGRAMME
Wednesday, 14th September
Thursday, 15th September
Friday, 16th September
Saturday, 17th September
Full day City tour
Pyramids with ballgame
Shrine & Pyramids
Segway City Tour
Hot Chocolate and Convent
Visit
Cooking demo at XVI
Century Convent
Tiles & Taxco
Home & Garden Casona
tour
Xochimilco / Frida
Puebla: History and Talavera
Shopping tour
Xochimilco / San Angel
Bookings
Please choose one of the 3 options per day and contact:
Lorena Flores
[email protected]
Phone: +(52) 55 5148 7593
Full Day City Tour
A sensational first glance at
one of the most beautiful
cities in the world. This tour
will bring you through the
most touristic areas.
First, you will visit the
Museum of Anthropology
where you will see the famous “Aztec Calendar”.
The day will continue onto Reforma Avenue and the
historic downtown with its impressive palaces.
Lunch will be served at a terrace overlooking the “zócalo”,
one of the three largest civic squares in the world.
Cost per person: $ 57.00 USD
Approximate length: 7 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 9.00 am
Hot Chocolate and Convent Visit
You will be transported 300 years
back in time, to convent life in
Mexico City on the XVIII century.
You will venture through the
cells and corners of this place
once home to the second Order
of Conceptionist nuns from the
“New Spain”.
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You will also see one of the most beautiful baroque chapels
in the city as well as visit one-of a-kind cells and chapel.
Your visit will finish in a beautiful interior garden where
you will taste hot chocolate in the traditional way the nuns
used to prepare it.
Cost per person: $ 67.00 USD
Approximate length: 5 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 9.00 am
Xochimilco & Frida
Xochimilco, a World Heritage
Site, is a unique place in the
world. While you are floating
along the water channels in
a traditional “trajinera”, you
will see the ancient system
of “chinampas” surrounded
by a wide array of flowers, a
marvelous musical ambiance,
parties and colors.
You will then venture into the borough of Coyoacán, one
of the most typical places in the city where you will visit
a museum devoted to the art of Frida Kahlo and Diego
Rivera.
Cost per person: $ 65.00 USD
Approximate length: 7 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 8.00 am
Pyramids with Ballgame
Shrine and Pyramids
Even though they are
outside city limits, no
visit to Mexico City would
be complete without
seeing the most important
archeological site in the
country, Teotihuacan, with
its impressive pyramid of
the Sun and its 365 steps, as well as the grandeur of the
surrounding buildings.
The most visited Catholic
temple in the world is not
St. Peter in Vatican City,
but the Shrine of Our
Lady of Guadalupe. It can
welcome, during feast
day in December, up to
7 million people in one
night.
The visit will include a live demonstration of the way that
the ancient “Huehuetl Tlahtolli” or ballgame was played.
You will also have the opportunity to participate in a
workshop of pre-Hispanic art.
The visit will continue toward the most important
archaeological site in the country – Teotihuacan – with its
impressive Sun pyramid and its 365 steps, together with
the grandeur of its other buildings.
Cost per person: $ 77.00 USD
Approximate length: 9 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 7.00 am
Cost per person: $ 58.00 USD
Approximate length: 7 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 8.00 am
Cooking demo at XVI century convent
Tiles & Taxco
Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, also known as “the tenth muse”,
the foremost author in Mexican baroque literature, lived
in this beautiful convent which now hosts one of the most
important gastronomy schools in the country.
Taxco is known worldwide
as one of the best places to
purchase silver. Taxco is also
a beautiful and quaint little
town that hosts one of the
most amazing churches in the
country: Santa Prisca.
In this tour you will have the opportunity to learn, hands
on, how some of the most delicious Mexican dishes are
prepared under the instruction of a renowned chef.
You will then have the pleasure to enjoy your own dishes in
the unique restaurant-school nestled in the convent.
Cost per person: $ 75.00 USD
Approximate length: 5 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 10.00 am
Puebla & Talavera
Only a couple of hours
away from Mexico City is a
beautiful city which is also a
World Heritage Site: Puebla
de los Angeles.
This capital city of the
state with the same name is impressive,
not only for the beauty of its buildings and temples or the
grandeur of the biggest pyramid in the country, but also
because it is the cradle of a large part of Mexican cuisine
and the world famous “talavera” pottery. A demonstration
of this art will be given.
Cost per person: $ 62.00 USD
Approximate length: 10 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 7.00 am
On the way there, we will make a stop at a very interesting
and unique artisanal tile factory. In this factory the pieces
for some of the most important works of art in this style
were manufactured.
Cost per person: $ 62.00 USD
Approximate length: 10 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 7.00 am
Shopping tour
From arts and crafts to
the most modern articles;
from the most traditional
antiques to the latest
gadgets, Mexico City is a
shopping paradise.
During this tour we will take you to different spots to shop
for all types of items for all kinds of tastes.
Remember that haggling/bargaining is a national sport!
Cost per person: $ 51.00 USD
Approximate length: 6 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 9.30 am
Segway City tour
A different and fun way to
visit the city is on one of these
entertaining personal vehicles.
You will start on Chapultepec,
taking our initiation course and
continue on Reforma Avenue
until the Historic downtown.
You will be constantly stopping to discover the history and
secrets of this marvelous area.
After lunch you will continue a tour through the buildings
of Downtown on foot.
Cost per person: $ 100.00 USD
Approximate length: 6 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 9.00 am
Home & Garden Casona tour
The borough of San Angel was
in colonial times, the place
where upper classed Spaniards
held their weekend homes.
Today, those residences are
privately owned by well-to-do
people. Many of these families
boast fabulous arts and antique collections.
The owners of these “casonas” have formed an association
called “The ladies of San Angel” and are devoted to
philanthropic activities. One of these ladies will host us for
a home-made lunch in her house.
A large percentage of the price of this tour will go to
charitable purposes.
Cost per person: $ 98.00 USD
Approximate length: 7 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 8.30 am
Xochimilco & San Angel
Xochimilco, a World Heritage
Site, is a unique place in the
world. While you are floating
along the water channels in
a traditional “trajinera”, you
will see the ancient system
of “chinampas” surrounded
by a wide array of flowers, a
marvelous musical ambiance, parties and colors.
On Saturdays, in the San Angel borough, a travelling
arts and crafts bazaar sets up. This will give us a great
opportunity to shop for unique Mexican items.
29
Lunch will be at a traditional restaurant at the San Jacinto
Plaza.
Cost per person: $ 65.00 USD
Approximate length: 7 hours
Pick-up from hotel: around 8.00 am
All tours include:
Transportation
Guide throughout the activity
Meal and one beverage
Entrances to museums and sites mentioned in the itinerary
All activities mentioned in each program
Tips
Taxes
Post Congress Excursions
ROUTE 1: The culture of wine and
aquarium world
ROUTE 2: The Millenium Taraumaras
ROUTE 3: The magic of traditions and
nature
ROUTE 4: The Cradle of History and
Romanticism
ROUTE 5: The Art of Tequila and Music
under the Sun
ROUTE 6: Exploring the Potosina
Huasteca
ROUTE 7: The thousand flavors of the
mole
ROUTE 8: The mystery and the origin
of the Maya
ROUTE 9: A Colonial Experience
Bookings
For more information on available dates, or to book your
tour, please contact:
Lorena Flores
[email protected]
Phone: +(52) 55 5148 7593
ROUTE 1: The culture of wine and
aquarium world
The route crosses the peninsula of Baja California, which
has been the magnet for adventurers and athletes for
years. The two coasts of the peninsula attract visitors in
search of contrasting experiences. On the Pacific Ocean’s
side, you will be able to see whales, cosmopolitan cities,
vineyards, golf courses and experience one of the best
cuisines in the country. On the Atlantic Ocean side, the Sea
of Cortez offers a fantastic marine life, oasis, lovely towns
and Jesuit missions. In between lies the desert offering
sceneries unique in the world.
Day 1. Arrival at the City of Tijuana. Reception and transfer
to Puerto Nuevo for a lobster meal. After lunch, transfer to
Monte Xanic vineyard for a visit and wine tasting. The tour
continues with a visit to the vineyards of Viña de Liceaga,
also including a wine tasting. Finally, transfer to the city of
Ensenada where you will spend the night at the Hotel Coral
Cove & Marina.
Day 2. Breakfast at the hotel and then transfer to Tijuana
airport. Flight to San Jose del Cabo and then transfer from
the airport to the hotel in the beachside resort of Los
Cabos. Night at the Hotel Seven Crown Los Cabos.
Day 3. Breakfast at the hotel. Free day.
Day 4. Breakfast at the hotel. Free day.
Day 5. Breakfast at the hotel. Free morning. Transfer back
to San Jose Airport.
Price per person in U.S. Dollars
SGL $ 1.400
DBL $ 800
Note: Prices subject to change without notice
Included
Not Included
Accommodation in standard
room at the hotels mentioned
above or similar, VAT, room
taxes and gratuities on food.
American breakfast daily, 1
dinner (day 1).
Airline tickets.
Tips to guides / drivers.
Transportation service
available in cars with air
conditioning.
Guide and assistance during
transfers.
Tips to airport porters, maids
in hotels, etc.
Tickets to the vineyards
Note: We will quote air services separately, according to the
customer’s home place in single journeys, the trip coming to
Tijuana and back out from San Jose del Cabo.
ROUTE 2: The Millenium Taraumaras
A unique experience rich in scenery, magic and colour.
The route stretches along the majestic Copper Canyon
and extends from the port of Mazatlan, Sinaloa, to
Los Mochis, to explore the vast Sierra Tarahumara. This
route includes travel by train through the Copper Canyon
in Chihuahua and a walk through ancient Tarahumara
villages. The train ride ends in Mazatlán, well known for its
gold mines..
Day 1. From Los Mochis, you will go to Topolobampo
Bay on a boat trip to Bird Island and visit a sanctuary for
dolphins. After lunch, the next destination will be El Fuerte,
where you will have a good rest at the Hotel del Fuerte.
Day 2. The train called El Chepe will take you to Bahuichivo
station. Once there, the tour will include a visit to
Cerocahui and lunch and then continue with a walk in the
Cerro del Gallego, ending the day with a delicious dinner at
the Hotel Paraiso del Oso or Mission.
Day 3. Traveling by train is a wonderful experience, so it
bears repeating. After breakfast, El Chepe will take you
to Copper Canyon where we will spend the night. Before
then, there will be a guided walk along the banks of the
impressive canyon.
Day 4. Visit the Stone Pillars Volada and Lake. After
lunch, the bus will lead you to the magical village of Creel
to continue the tour to Arareco Lake, the Valley of the
Mushrooms, the Valley of the Frogs and the Jesuit Mission
of San Ignacio. Accommodation.
Day 5. Once ready and prepared for another long day,
the bus will take you to Ciudad Cuauhtemoc, to visit the
Mennonite camps. There, you will enjoy a meal with local
products, before leaving for Chihuahua and spend the night
at the Hotel Quality Inn.
Day 6. Walk around the city before going to Chihuahua
airport for departure.
End of services.
Price per person in U.S. Dollars
Canyon section
Valley section
DBL: $ 1.810
DBL: $ 1.600
SGL: $ 2.650
SGL: $ 2.290
TPL: $ 1.680
TPL: 1.400
QUAD: $ 1.430
QUAD: $ 1.300
KIDS (up to 12 years):
KIDS (up to 12 years):
$ 1.200
$ 1.100 ROUTE 3: The magic of traditions and
nature
Cultural richness and heritage of the Purépecha region
that conveys the traditions and the rural setting of one
of the most beautiful places, full of history, art and
culture. This route covers the same historical cities natural
landscapes, beaches and picturesque small towns and
major tourist attractions.
Day 1. After breakfast, transfer to the historic center of
Mexico City.
Day 2. Guadalupe Shrine and Teotihuacan Pyramids. After
breakfast at the hotel, visit of the Basilica of Guadalupe,
a journey through the most visited Catholic churches
around the world and continuation to the Pyramids of
Teotihuacan. Back to the hotel at around 6.00 pm.
Day 3. City / Morelia. Breakfast and check out followed by
a visit of Xochimilco on a “trajinera” ride. We will then go
to Morelia, check into the hotel late at night and see the
lighting of the Cathedral.
Day 4. Morelia. Breakfast. Guided tour on foot through
the historic center. After lunch, sightseeing tour of the
commercial and the Dulce Museum. Rest and leisure.
Accommodation.
Day 5. Morelia / Patzcuaro. Breakfast. Departure to
Patzcuaro. Time free for lunch on your own. After
lunch, departure to the historic center of this city.
Accommodation.
Day 6. Patzcuaro / Uruapan. Breakfast. Departure to Santa
Clara del Monte and visit. Time free for lunch and transfer
to the Lake Zirahuen. Transfer to Uruapan and Holidays
hotel.
Day 7. Uruapan / Ixtapa. Breakfast. Departure to visit
the National Park Eduardo Ruiz, followed by the historic
city center, time free for meal. Departure to Ixtapa.
Accommodation.
Day 8. Ixtapa. Breakfast. Day free to enjoy the beach or
other activities. Accommodation.
Day 9. Ixtapa - Mexico. Breakfast. Transfer to airport and
flight to Mexico City.
Price per person in U.S. Dollars
DBL $ 2.600 USD
Note: Prices subject to change without notice
31
Included
Transfers
Museum admission.
Visit to the Pyramids (entrance to the archaeological zone)
and the Basilica of Guadalupe.
Unknown Xochimilco trip with snacks and transportation
channels
Certified guide during the tours.
08 nights accommodation hotel
Taxes
IMPORTANT NOTES:
Prices subject to change without notice.
Only respect to the time of booking and pay off the trip for
each passenger.
Prices based for two people traveling together throughout
the circuit.
Hotels and transportation services, subject to confirmation
at time of booking request them.
Day 4. Guanajuato-Guadalajara. Breakfast at the hotel and
departure to Guadalajara. Arrival and visit of Guadalajara
(does not include tickets to museums).
Day 5. Guadalajara. Breakfast at the hotel. Visit of the
town of Tequila and a Tequila distillery. Afternoon free in
Tlaquepaque for some shopping.
Day 6. Guadalajara: Breakfast at the hotel. Morning free.
After 12.00 pm, return to Mexico City.
Price per person in U.S. Dollars
DBL $ 1.200
SGL $ 1.500
TPL $ 1.100
Note: Prices subject to change without notice
Included
Transportation among the attractions.
Specialty Guides
Guided tours
Tickets to attractions as per itinerary
All breakfasts
Traditional food in Bernal Otomi
5 night’s accommodation
ROUTE 4: The Cradle of History and
Romanticism
This route takes the traveler along the Mexican Bajio
to touch the lands of Jalisco. Here we combine history
and nature. Historical tours can be made by cities
witnessed the struggle for Independence as Queretaro
and Guanajuato, or captivating scenery as the Sierra
Gorda with its green valleys. Of course, the traveler will
be constantly surrounded by culture and rich traditions of
folkloric art in this region.
Day 1. Mexico City-Queretaro: Transfer to the National
Museum of Anthropology and History. Transfer to
Querétaro and visit of the city. Accommodation.
Day 2. Queretaro-San Miguel de Allende. Breakfast. Visit
of Queretaro and transfer to Bernal. You will get to see the
semi-desert zone of the state of Querétaro and experience
some Traditional food. Transfer to San Miguel de Allende
and historical journey through the city.
Day 3. San Miguel de Allende–Guanajuato. Breakfast at
the hotel. Visit of San Miguel de Allende and then transfer
to Guanajuato, cradle of Independence for a city tour.
Since 1988, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Guanajuato
has no traffic lights or neon signs, creating an extremely
enjoyable place to walk, peaceful, yet with plenty of life in
the streets, and plenty to see.
ROUTE 5: The Art of Tequila and Music
under the Sun
For a truly Mexican scene, you will need to get to Tequila,
Jalisco, and discover the fields of Agave. But it is just a part
of the route, a stop is also planned in the cosmopolitan
capital of Guadalajara and then reach the Pacific coast
from Puerto Vallarta to the classic small fishing villages in
Nayarit. A route that is associated with landscapes, good
music, food and tequila.
Day 1. Arrival at Guadalajara airport or bus terminal
in Guadalajara. Reception and transfer to hotel.
Accommodation.
Day 2. Guadalajara and Tlaquepaque. Breakfast at hotel.
City tour. We will continue with a visit to Tlaquepaque. In
the evening, you will enjoy the night out in Guadalajara
including dinner, guided tour at night. Accommodation
Day 3. Tequila. Breakfast at the hotel. Transfer to the town
of Tequila where we will visit the city center. Time free
for lunch in the town of tequila. Return to Guadalajara.
Accommodation.
includes more than 80 acres (320,000 m2) of natural
waterfalls and pools interlaced with towering Surrealist
sculptures in concrete. Lunch included.
Day 4. Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta. Breakfast at
the hotel. Transfer to the airport or bus terminal in
Guadalajara. Arrival in Puerto Vallarta. Transfer to hotel.
Rest of the day free. Accommodation.
Day 4. Ciudad Valles - Tamtok. Departure to the
archaeological site of Tamtok, considered as one of the
most important in Mexico for its monuments. Tour and
return to Ciudad Valles. Lunch included.
Day 5. Puerto Vallarta. Breakfast at the hotel. Free day
Accommodation.
Day 6. Puerto Vallarta. Breakfast. Transfer to the bus
station or to the airport of Puerto Vallarta.
Day 5. Valley City - Mexico City. Return to your place of
origin.
Price per person in U.S. Dollars
DBL $ 840
SGL $ 1.100
Reduced $ 350
Note: Prices subject to change without notice
Included
Price per person in U.S. Dollars
DBL $ 600
TPL $ 500
QUAD $ 400
Note: Prices subject to change without notice
Not included
Included
Transfers Mexico’s CD
5 nights accommodation
5 breakfast and dinner
Transportation service
available
Guidance and assistance
All taxes
Guadalajara
04 nights hotel accommodations in the Valley or similar
Transfer from Guadalajara
to Puerto Vallarta
Tours to places mentioned in the itinerary
Admission to the places to visit
Transfer Vallarta Mexico
Food mentioned in the itinerary
Personal expenses
Transportation during the tours
Tips
Taxes
ROUTE 6: Exploring the Potosina
Huasteca
A beautiful central Mexican jungle, the Huasteca
region offers everything from pure nature, as the Cave
of Swallows (a vertical cave populated by birds) to
modern sites such as Tampico, where the local economy
and tradition are going through the customs Veracruz,
Tamaulipas and Hidalgo cuisine.
Day 1. Ciudad Valles. Arrival and transfer to your hotel.
Day free.
Day 2. Ciudad Valles-Tamasopo waterfall. Departure to the
Huasteca, where you will visit the outlet and the Puente de
Dios (Bridge of God), a natural rock formation that looks
like a bridge that spans a natural well surrounded by lush
vegetation. Back to Ciudad Valles. Lunch included.
Day 3. Valley City - Basement of the Buses. Departure
to Xilitla where you will visit Edward James’s surrealistic
garden. Las Pozas (“the Pools”) is a sculpture garden built
by James, more than 2,000 feet (610 m) above sea level,
in a tropical rain forest in the mountains of Mexico. It
33
ROUTE 7: The thousand flavors of the
mole
There are over 300 varieties of mole, almost as many types
of cuisine exist in Mexico. This route covers the states of
Tlaxcala, Puebla and Oaxaca, three destinations that
compete to claim the creation of such an exceptional dish.
The trip includes a taste of the best restaurants, walks
through the most magnificent natural scenery and a visit
to archaeological sites in Oaxaca.
Day 1. Ciudad De Mexico. The tour will start with a visit
of Mexico City Historic Center and will continue to Milpa
Alta, the Mecca of Mole. Return to your hotel.
Day 2. Ciudad de Mexico-Teotihuacan. Visit of the
Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe and then visit of the
archaeological site of Teotihuacan, where the pyramids of
the Sun and the Moon are. Back to Mexico City.
Day 3. Tlaxcala. We’ll visit the Cacaxtla archaeological site
and the city of Cholula. Visit of the city of Puebla in the
afternoon. Accommodation.
Day 4. Puebla. Visit of the market to enjoy the different
smells and tastes of different types of moles and cuisine of
Puebla. Transfer to Oaxaca. Accommodation.
Day 5. Oaxaca. Visit of the archaeological site of Mitla,
Monte Alban archaeological site built on a mountain,
where you will find expressions of the Olmec, Zapotec and
Mixtec. Afternoon tour of Oaxaca. Back to the hotel.
Day 6. Oaxaca. Transfer to the airport of Oaxaca or to the
bus station.
Price per person in U.S. Dollars
DBL $ 850
SGL $ 1.220
Reduced $ 450
Note: Prices subject to change without notice
Included
Not included
5 nights accommodation
5 breakfast and lunch
Transfer Oaxaca - Mexico
Transportation service
available
Personal expenses
Guidance and assistance
Tips
All taxes
Day 3. Campeche - Uxmal - Mérida. Breakfast. Departure
to Uxmal, one of the most beautiful archaeological sites of
the Puuc. Farewell lunch group. Continue to Merida. Check
into hotel. Lowering the sun, realize your panoramic tour.
Accommodation.
Day 4. Merida - Chichen Itza - Cancún. Breakfast. On
arrival at Chichen Itza, cultural visits. Time free. In Dzitnup,
visit of the XKEKEN cenote. Transfer to Cancun on the
Riviera Maya. Accommodation.
Day 5. Cancun and Riviera Maya. Buffet breakfast
in Cancun. All Inclusive Riviera Maya. Day free.
Accommodation.
Day 6. Cancun and Riviera Maya – Mexico City. Buffet
breakfast in Cancun. All Inclusive Riviera Maya. Airport
transfer
OCUPATION
DBL
TPL
SGL
MNR
OCUPATION
DBL
SGL
TPL
MNR
Cancún 3**
820
780
1.050
492
Cancún 4**
922
865
1.170
515
Cancún 5*
893
922
1.200
530
R. Maya 3*
1.029
975
1.356
648
R. Maya 4*
1.070
997
1.422
667
R. Maya 5*
1.090
1.024
1.542
692
Included
ROUTE 8: The mystery and the origin of
the Maya
It was at this end of the country where the Maya were
gaining ground in the jungle to build their pyramids
mathematically perfect, then the Spanish came and
instead developed towns and cities centered around a
beautiful baroque church, plantations and ranches around
of their estates. Today, from the Yucatan Peninsula to
the border with Guatemala, this route has great natural
beauty, rich culture and centuries of history have left their
mark on its inhabitants warm.
Day 1. Villahermosa - Palenque. Transfer to the ParqueMuseo La Venta, then to Palenque. Afternoon free.
Opportunity to visit, optionally, the cascades of Misol-Ha
and Agua Azul. Accommodation.
Day 2. Palenque - Campeche. Breakfast. Visit of the
archaeological site of Palenque. Time free. Lunch tourist
menu and transfer to Campeche. Check in at hotel.
Sightseeing tour. Accommodation.
SECTUR accredited guide.
Accommodation in selected hotel
5 breakfasts, 1 dinner and 1 breakfast
I.V.A. and lodging tax
Assistance Card: ASSIST CARD
Backpack (one per person)
ROUTE 9: A Colonial Experience
To know the history of Mexico, you can go to the library,
surf the Internet, or better, take a tour of the Midwest.
Here, visitors find a variety of cities like Zacatecas,
Aguascalientes and San Miguel de Allende with a
common denominator: they were part of Independence
and the Mexican Revolution, were down an empire and
a nation born. All bear in its walls, streets and churches
traces a memorable past.
Day 1. Queretaro - Guanajuato. Departure to the city of
Queretaro, panoramic view. Lunch at Restaurant End of
the Century. Continue to San Miguel de Allende with a city
walking tour. Transfer to Guanajuato. Accommodation.
Panoramic view of the city.
Day 2. Guanajuato - Aguascalientes. Breakfast. Mummy
Museum visit and departure to San Juan de los Lagos.
Transfer to Aguascalientes, meal and tour in the city.
Accommodation
Day 3. Aguascalientes - Zacatecas. Breakfast. Departure
for Real Seat, check out and transfer to Zacatecas, a
mining town. Time free for lunch. View of the beautiful
facades carved in pink stone and whose cathedral is the
most prominent example of Mexican baroque; visit of
the Cerro de la Bufa, the Mine of Eden if time permits.
Accommodation.
Day 4. Zacatecas - San Luis Potosi – Querétaro. Breakfast.
Departure to San Luis Potosi and historic visit. Free time for
lunch. Transfer to Queretaro. Accommodation.
Day 5. Queretaro - Mexico City. Breakfast. Tour in
Queretaro and lunch. Departure for Mexico City.
Price per person in U.S. Dollars
DBL $ 1.080
SGL $ 1.200
TPL $ 1.000
Note: Prices subject to change without notice
Included
01 nights of lodging in Guanajuato
01 nights of lodging in the city of Aguascalientes
01 nights of lodging in Zacatecas
01 nights of lodging in Queretaro
04 Breakfast
02 Meals
Transportation around the Circuit Driver Guide
35
general information
VENUE
REGISTRATION FEE (per participant)
Centro Banamex Convention and Exhibition Centre
Av. Conscripto 311
Col. Lomas de Sotelo
Del. Miguel Hidalgo
C.P.11200
México D.F.
Tel: 01 (55) 5268 2000Av. Simon Bolivar S/n
Registration fees are available on www.fdicongress.org
CONTACT DETAILS
FDI World Dental Federation
Tour de Cointrin – Avenue Louis-Casaï
Case Postale 3
1216 Genève Cointrin - Switzerland
[email protected]
Phone: + 41 22 560 81 50
Fax: + 41 22 560 81 40
www.fdiworldental.org
EMAIL COURTESY
Before emailing your query please check for the
information in this brochure or on our website.
PRE-REGISTRATION
Those who wish to attend the Congress should register
online, by fax or by mail by 31 August 2011. After this date,
participants are required to register onsite at the Congress
venue.
The enrolment fees are reduced for any registration
received with the required payment before 29 May 2011.
Each registrant must complete a separate form.
Registrations can be made via the Congress website www.
fdicongress.org. If you fax or mail a hard copy registration
form please ensure it is clear and easy to read. Please read
through this booklet carefully before you complete your
form.
For any questions about pre-registration, please send an
email or contact:
Alonso Tapia Rodríguez
[email protected]
Phone: +52 55 5148-7537
ENTITLEMENTS
DELEGATES
The registration fee entitles delegates to the following:
- Access to all lectures in the Scientific Programme
- World Dental Exhibition
- Welcome Ceremony (subject to availability)
- Congress Documentation
- Congress Bag
Please note that the registration fee is for the full four
inclusive days. This does not guarantee you a seat at any
particular scientific session. We recommend arriving early
to avoid any possible disappointment.
ACCOMPANYING PERSONS
Accompanying persons are defined as spouses, children, or
partners of full registrants. Registration includes:
- Welcome Ceremony
- World Dental Exhibition
- Welcome Gift
- A pre-selected half day tour (not applicable for
accompanying persons under 16, subject to availability and
minimum of 8 pax per tour)
In addition, accompanying persons may attend all social
events and other tours at their own expense.
ENTRANCE TO CONGRESS
Each registered participant will receive a name badge. The
badge will be your official pass and must be worn to obtain
entry to all scientific sessions and exhibition.
REGISTRATION PAYMENT
Registrations will not be processed or confirmed
until payment is received in full; payment by Visa and
MasterCard only.
Please contact Alonso Tapia Rodríguez at [email protected]
tecnoregistro.com.mx if you would like to pay by an
alternative method or call +52 55 5148-7537.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INSURANCE
Your registration and payment will be acknowledged
with confirmation of your requirements according to your
registration form. Your registration will not be processed or
confirmed if payment does not accompany your form.
Registration fees do not include insurance of any kind. It is
strongly recommended that at the time you register for the
Congress and book your travel you take out an insurance
policy of your choice. The policy should include loss of
fees/deposit through cancellation of your participation in
the Congress, or through cancellation of the Congress, loss
of international/domestic air fares through cancellation
for any reason, loss of tour monies through cancellation
for any reason including airline or related services strikes,
failure to utilise tours or pre booked arrangements due
to airline delay, Force Majeure or any unforeseen or
unrelated event, medical expenses, loss or damage to
personal property, additional expenses and repatriation
should travel arrangements have to be altered. The
Congress organisers cannot take any responsibility for
any participant failing to arrange their own insurance. This
insurance is to be purchased in your country of origin.
Your letter of acknowledgment will include the advice
necessary, prior to your arrival at the Congress.
CHANGES AND CANCELLATIONS FOR
REGISTRATION, SOCIAL PROGRAMME
AND TOURS
Any changes or cancellations must be received in writing.
No changes requested by telephone will be accepted.
Refunds will be issued according to the reimbursement
rules. Please allow a minimum of 8 weeks for processing
any refund. Refunds are based on the total transactions
for all registration fees, courses, tours, and social events.
Participants are advised to keep a copy of the registration
form.
Registration and Social Programme cancellation dates:
Until 29 May 2011: 90% reimbursed
Until 31 July 2011: 80% reimbursed
After 31 July 2011: no reimbursement
LETTER OF INVITATION
An official letter of invitation to the Congress will be sent
upon request. This invitation is intended only to facilitate
participants’ travel and visa arrangements and does not
imply provisions of any financial or other support. If an
invitation letter is required, please contact the FDI.
CERTIFICATE OF ATTENDANCE
A Certificate of Attendance will be issued to all who
participate in the Scientific Programme.
ADA CERP
The FDI World Dental Federation is an ADA CERP
recognised provider. Delegates who have registered for
the Congress are eligible to receive continuing education
points by attending scientific sessions throughout the
meeting.
LANGUAGES
All scientific and educational programmes will be held in
English and/or Spanish. Simultaneous interpretation may
be provided in English and Spanish for selected sessions.
Subject to change.
37
General Information
being located in the very geographic and historic centre of
Mexico, its capital is connected by land to every national
destination.
MEXICO AT A GLANCE
Mexico City is home to 9 million people administratively
divided in 19 Political Boroughs. Along with the
Metropolitan Zone it adds up to 18 million inhabitants.
Mexico City itself produces more than a third of the
nation’s GNP.
Official Name:
United Mexican States
Political Capital:
Mexico City
Political System:
Representative, Democratic Federal Republic
Population:
111,211,789 (July 2009 est.)
Total Area:
1,972,550 square kilometers
Altitude: Between the 2240m to 3,700m. The altitude increases
from North to South of the city.
Currency: Mexican Peso (Mex$)
Religion: Mainly Catholic, but there are several other beliefs.
Official language: Spanish, but there are many indigenous languages that are
spoken all over the country.
Time Zone:
GMT -6 (regular time)
GMT -5 (daylight saving time)
National Day:
September 16th
PASSPORT & VISA
According to the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs
(Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores), certain foreign
nationals who intend to stay in México fewer than 180
days for the purpose of tourism or 30 days for business
can fill out a tourist card (FMT) at the border or upon
landing at an airport for a nominal fee and presenting
a valid passport. This service is available to citizens of:
Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada,
Chile, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland,
France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Ireland,
Island, Israel, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg,
Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Paraguay,
Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, San Marino, Singapore,
Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, South Korea, Sweden,
Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States of America,
Uruguay and Venezuela.
Persons coming from other countries must contact a
local Mexican embassy/ consulate in order to find out the
requirements for citizens of their country, and may have to
apply for and obtain a visa in advance of travel.
The immigration officer at your point of entry into Mexico
can also request that you demonstrate that you have
sufficient economic solvency and a round trip ticket.
For further information, please visit: http://portal3.sre.gob.
mx/english/
MEXICO CITY
BANKING / CURRENCY
Mexico City is privileged since it offers what very few
other cities can: a centralised location – which means
that everything from culture, nature, tourism, education,
entertainment, healthcare, religious centres and night life
surround the city.
The Mexican currency is the Peso ($ or MXP). It is issued in
bills of $20, $50, $100, $200, $500 and $1,000 pesos, and
in coins of ¢10, ¢20, ¢50 (cents) and in $1, $2, $5, $10 and
$20 pesos.
Located in the nation’s centre (99º 09’ W longitude,
19º 24’’ N latitude, GMT -6), the city is surrounded by
mountains that rise from the remains of seven ancient
lakebeds and has an average elevation of 2300 m above
the sea level.
It borders to the north, east and west with Estado de
Mexico and with the state of Morelos to the south. By
The most commonly used credit cards are Visa, MasterCard
and American Express. Automatic Teller Machines (ATMs)
are available 24 hours a day and can be found in shopping
areas and at banks.
Foreign currency can be changed at the Airport, banks,
hotels and some other places.
Banking hours are: Monday to Friday, 9 am to 4 pm.
TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
Taxi
The Mexico City International Airport (MCIA) is the largest
airport in the country. Many airlines operate international
routes to and from MCIA, including Aeroméxico, Mexicana,
Air France, Air Canada, American Airlines, Lloyd Bolivian
Airlines, LAN Chile, Varig, Avianca, United Airlines, Delta
Airlines, Continental Airlines, amongst others.
An official or approved taxi is a unit that must be painted
with the current official colors: white, cherry and golden,
with the logos of the Independence Angel and with
the new Car Tags that distinguish it as individual public
transportations of passengers.
Transportation from the Airport to the Hotel
We suggest to all participants to use only the certified taxis
that are posted inside the airport facilities: Sitio 300, Sitio
Excelencia, Sitio Porto Taxi and Sitio Nueva Imagen.
The distance of the Airport to Downtown is about 15 km.
The airport taxi will cost approximately $130.00 pesos
(12.00 USD$).
City Transportation
There are almost infinite options for getting around in
Mexico City. While its public transportation system can be
complicated, some of
its options offer top–
level services, such as
the subway system,
known as the Metro,
which is one of the
world’s largest, most
efficient and most
economical ones.
Other options such as Trolleybuses, the Metrobus and
the Light Rail (known as the “Tren Ligero”) help reduce air
pollution.
For those who seek greater comfort there are taxi and auto
rental services.
Subway
The cost of a Metro ticket is one of the lowest in the world,
as the fare has been 2 pesos since 2002. Unlike some
other subway systems around the world, a ticket allows
passengers to transfer from one line to another and get
to numerous destinations without having to buy another.
Without a doubt it is the best, quickest and safest way to
get around town.
The approved taxi has the License Plates number printed
on the roof, the trunk and both doors.
The taxi driver license must be visible in the taxi – this is an
official card that identifies him by the complete name and
a photograph.
Hotel Taxis and Radio Taxis
You may also use the services of hotel taxis. The drivers
usually speak English and the cost of the rides is preestablished. You can also use some Radio Taxi Companies
such as:
Taximex: 5538-14-40 or 5519-7690
Servi-Taxi: 5271-2560
Radio Servicios Móviles de Transporte: 5771-4012; 77101-30; 5760-4696 or 5551 -7710
Taxi Radio Mex: 5584-0571
Servitaxis: 5516-6020
Radio Maxi Seguridad:
5768 -8557 or 5768 -8553
Electric Transportation
Metrobus
The City’s Electric Transport System (Sistema de Transporte
Eléctrico) is another alternative provided by the municipal
government to reduce carbon emissions.
This modern public transportation system offers an
alternative for the city’s transit problems since it runs a
straight line aside the normal traffic flow.
The system currently encompasses 15 trolleybus and light
rail lines; the latter is considered the best way to get to
Xochilmilco from the city center.
The fare is $5 MN and is paid using an electronic card
purchased for $11.50 MN, which includes the card’s
refundable deposit value of $8 MN plus one fare.
39
The License Plates or Car Tags are white with the most
representative monuments of the city, the image of
the Independence Angel and the slogan: “Ciudad en
Movimiento”. Also, the Car Tags have one letter at the
beginning, followed by five numbers (see right image):
MEXICO CITY AND ITS TOURISTIC
ATTRACTIONS
Mexico City, founded in 1325, is the main tourist
destination of the country. It has a large and diverse
touristic offer that includes 9 pre-Hispanic archeological
sites, close to 1,500 Colonial buildings, as well as more
than 150 museums, 300 art galleries, zoos, urban forests,
green areas and hundreds of modern buildings.
Mexico is the only City in the world that has 4 sites
declared Humanity’s Heritage by the UNESCO; these are:
The Historic Center, the Xochimilco Canals, the National
University and the House of the Architect Luis Barragán.
We strongly suggest that you take the time to get around
the city so that you don’t miss:
The Historic Center: the Zocalo Square, the Templo Mayor
Archeological Site, the National Palace and the Diego
Rivera muralist paintings, the Ayuntamiento Palace, the
Mexico City’s Museum, the Santo Domingo Square, the
Palace of Fine Arts and the Latin American Tower.
Reforma and Chapultepec: In these areas you will find
our great historic and national monuments such as the
Independence Angel, the Emperor Cuauhtemoc Monument, the Hunting Diana Monument, the National
Museum of Anthropology, the Chapultepec Castle, the
Chapultepec Lake and its Zoo.
Towards North: Tlatelolco Archeological Site, the
Guadalupe Shrine and the wonderful Teotihuacan
Pyramids.
Towards South: the Colonial Neighborhoods such as
Coyoacan and San Angel; there you will find the House of
Frida Kahlo and the House / Study of Diego Rivera.
More to the South: Cuicuilco Archeological Site,
Xochimilco, the Dolores Olmedo Museum and the
National University.
Another way to get around Mexico City is the Turibus,
a Double Decker bus that offers guided tours through
headphones where you can listen to the explanations
in English, French, Italian, Japanese and Spanish. The
participants of the FDI World Dental Congress will get
special discounts to ride the Turibus as well as to attend
the National Folkloric Ballet.
If you require any tourist information, visit the official
web site of the Mexico City’s Secretary of Tourism www.
mexicocity.gob.mx or call 01 800 008 90 90. Languages:
English, French, Portuguese, German, Italian and Chinese.
EATING OUT
In Mexico City you can enjoy a wide variety of traditional
Mexican dishes as well as cuisine from around the
world. There’s everything here, from the most exclusive
restaurants to simple, traditional “fondas”.
When looking for traditional Mexican and Spanish food,
your best option is the downtown Historic Center, where
the colonial atmosphere provides the perfect background
for enjoying breakfast or dinner
The Condesa neighborhood is home to numerous worldcuisine restaurants (particularly Argentine, Colombian and
Italian) as well as to modern “fusion” establishments.
And if you’re looking for something a lot more traditional,
the markets in Xochimilco and Coyoacán offer Mexican
favourites that can’t be beat.
TIPPING
Tips are not included in the bill. It is customary to leave
around 10 or 15% of the total check.
MEALS AND DISHES
It’s quite common for most visitors to try different foods
here, so if you are a gastronomic adventurer you’re going
to be tempted by Mexico City!
Traditional dishes:
• Quesadillas
Corn tortillas filled with cheese, vegetables, chicken or
beef. Cheese and Squash blossom quesadillas, or those
made with Huitlacoche (an edible fungus that grows on
corn) are not to be missed.
• Tacos
Tacos come in an enormous variety and you can eat them
any time and almost in any place. Tacos de Canasta are
small corn tortillas filled with beans, potatoes or meat
stocked in a big basket that keeps them warm. There are
also the traditional Tacos de Suadero (small tortillas filled
with fried beef) and Tacos de Carnitas (typically larger and
filled with fried pork).
• Tamales
Traditional for breakfast or dinner, Tamales are eaten
throughout Latin America, but they vary greatly, being
corn the main ingredient. Mexico City tamales are made
from cornmeal and small amounts of hot peppers, chicken
or pork, and wrapped in corn husks. They are often
accompanied by Atole, a hot, sweet pre-Hispanic beverage
also made with corn or rice.
• Tortas
Sandwiches made with white rolls and stuffed with
cheese, eggs, beef or chicken, etc… In fact, the possible
combinations are really only limited by the imagination.
• Pan Dulce (Sweet Pastries)
Going into a Mexico City traditional bakery is a total
experience and a tempting one at that; there are seemingly
innumerable options: shell-shaped “Conchas”, elephantine
“Orejas”, “Cuernitos” (croissants), “Churros” (fried-dough
bars sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon) and many kinds
of pastry slices with cream filling, are just a few of the
elaborate creations that have been around since the
Colonial times.
ELECTRICITY
Mexico voltage is 120 V; 60 Hz. Any electrical equipment
you carry with you that operates at the higher (240v)
rate will need to be dual-voltage (e.g. hair driers). A lot of
electrical equipment (like video cameras, digital cameras,
laptops) that operate on 12 volts via a product-specific
adaptor will happily cope with dual voltage. Check the
adaptor and the device instructions to be sure. When
shopping for electrical appliances, do remember to check
the voltage of the item against the acceptable voltage in
your home country.
SAFETY
DRINKING WATER
In Mexico, tap water is potable, but generally not
recommended for drinking. Hotels usually give guests
one (large) bottle of drinking water per room per night.
Bottled water is also readily available in supermarkets and
at tourist attractions. Tap water in Mexico City, however,
is safe to drink as well as in Monterrey, and several other
major urban centres.
HEALTH AND MEDICARE
Medicine in urban areas is highly developed, public
hospitals are just as good as public hospitals in USA and
just as the American public hospitals, they are always full.
It’s recommended going to private hospitals for faster
service.
In remote areas, consider carrying a first aid kit, aspirin, and
other related items are sold without medical prescription.
WEATHER
Mild during winter and warm and dry during April and May.
The rain season starts in May and ends around October.
Mornings and evenings, especially in winter, can be cold.
TIME
The time of day in Mexico City corresponds to GMT-6 and
daylight saving time is observed in summer. Most shopping
centres and other businesses are open from 9 am to 8 pm,
Monday to Sunday.
Most museums and points of interest are open from 9 am
to 5 pm, Tuesday to Sunday, the latter often offering free
admission.
Most public transportation systems operate from 5 am to
midnight.
41
Just like in any other great city in the world, remember to:
- Watch your belongings and don’t make a great show of
them.
- If you want to take a walk or exercise, ask your hotel
personnel to direct you to the most appropriate routes.
- Walk on busy, well-lit streets at night.
- If you’re bringing your own car with you, don’t forget to
check on the “Hoy No Circula” program regulations.
- On the streets, don’t accept or pay for unrequested
services.
- Report incidents to any preventive police officer,
regardless of his or her division.
LEARN MORE
Further information about Mexico City and Mexico can be
found on the following websites:
Secretaría de Turismo de la Ciudad de México
http://www.mexicocity.gob.mx/index.php
Gobierno del Distrito Federal
http://www.df.gob.mx/index.jsp
Oficina de Congresos y Convenciones de la Ciudad de
México
[email protected]
Mexico City’s Secretary of Tourism
http://www.mexicocity.gob.mx/index.php
Mexico City´s Government
http://www.df.gob.mx/index.jsp
Mexico City’s Congress and Conventions Office
[email protected]
Booking and cancellation policies
Hotel guide & price list
ESTIMATED
TIME TO
BANAMEX
CENTRE
HOTEL
Presidente
Intercontinental
20 min
* All rates are stated in US Dollars.
ESTIMATED
TIME TO
SINGLE
AIRPORT
OCCUPANCY
DOUBLE
OCCUPANCY BREAKFAST
30 min
/ bus
/ bus
Booking5 *Policies
$252.35
$252.35
Included
Hotel W
5*
20 min
/ bus
30 min
/ bus
$277.55
$277.55
$40.00
JW Marriott
5*
20 min
/ bus
30 min
/ bus
$271.37
$271.37
Included
* Including taxes and tips for porters and maids.
* Please read the booking policies (terms and conditions) before
filling out your booking form.
* You will need to send a valid credit card number to Turismo y
Convenciones, S.A. de C.V. to secure your booking.
The hotel you choose will run a preauthorization check on your
credit card 45 days before you arrive.
* We will send you a confirmation number once we receive your
booking form online or by fax ((+5255) 5148-2010).
Pleas e20 fmin
ul f ill 30t he
min Hot el Booking Form , paying s pec ial at tent ion t o t he required f ields. This
* We accept cash, bank transfers and credit cards (Visa, MasterCard
*
/ bus
/ bus
$281.48
inf5orm
at
ion will
be v$240.00
ery im port
ant $35.00
t o giv e you proper att ent ion on your res erv at ion. I n t his f orm,
and American Express).
you m us
t prov20ide
35 min
min your c redit c ard dat a, whic h wil l be t ak en only as a guar ant ee, t he hot el will,
* Please
settle
the outstanding balance at the hotel you choose.
455 days
bef ore/ bus
your$302.75
arriv al$302.75
dat e, a$40.00
c redit pre
-c heck
ing.
*
/ bus
Hotel Nikko
ST Regis
* If you
funds
your chosen
hotel’sT&C
bank account,
Onc e we
e your Book ing Form online
or want
by ftoa transfer
x +(52
55 to
5148
2010),
will s end t he
35 minrec eiv
20 min
please
contact
our
Booking
Department
for
details.
c onf
5 * irm/at
busion num
/ bus ber.
$186.18 $186.18
$30.00
Sheraton Ma.
Isabel
Marriott Reforma
* You may cancel by fax ((+5255) 5148-2010) or e-mail
Paym ent
opt ions
35 min
20 min: Credit Card (VI SA, M as t erc ard & Am eric an Expres s ), W ire t rans f ers or in
([email protected]) until August 15, 2011.
5 *h in/ bus
/ bus o c
$169.90
$169.90
$25.00
c as
our m exic
it y of f ic
es .
Fiesta Americana You
Grand Chapultepec 5 *
Melia Reforma
If you
cancel
on or
after
August
16,ount
2011,.you will be charged for 2
25 min
30 min t ly t o your pref erenc e hot*el,
will
pa y direc
t he
t ot al
acc
ount
am
/ bus
/ bus
$187.68
$187.68
$35.00
nights + applicable taxes for late cancellation.
/ bus
/ bus
$156.55
$156.55
$30.00
day you booked, you will be charged for 2 nights + applicable taxes.
35 min
20 min
The W ire t rans f ers wil l be dir ec t ly t o t he Hot el Bank ac c ount , pleas e c ont act t he T&C b ook ing
* No-show:
if you do not check in to the hotel you choose on the
min s o
20 tmin
depart40
m ent
hey c an prov ide you wit h t he
num bers.
5*
Only writ t en c anc ellat ions wil l be acc ept ed unt il August 15th, 2011.
* You may change booking dates and/or guest names by fax
From
c anc$219.30
ellat ion$30.00
has a c harge
t wo ni or
ght
of ([email protected])
ext em porary c anc ellat ion .
((+5255)of
5148-2010)
e-mail
5 * augus
/ bus t 16t
/ bush any
$187.68
until
August
29,
2011.
No
changes
willyour
be allowed
that date
w.minI n c20as
e you don't s ho w up in t he e xpec t ed arriv al dat e,
rooafter
m will
be c a nc elled
Fiesta Americana No-s ho35
min
(no
exceptions).
and
wil l be
c harged
2 night s$28.00
, plus t axes and t ips .
Reforma
4 * you
/ bus
/ bus
$158.05of $158.05
Marquis Reforma
Fiesta Inn
Naucalpan
us your
telephone
number
e-mailat
address
you
W e only
ac c ept
writ t en c hanges on dat es or* Please
nam send
es unt
il Augus
t 29t
h, or
2011
f ax if+(5255)
5148 20 min
40 min
4 * or/ bus
$103.73
$103.73 ury
$20.00
2010
em ail:/ bus
res erv
ac [email protected]
c on. c om.have
m xany questions.
Emporio Reforma
* If you
questions,
please
[email protected]
T&Curyc
(our office
Cont ac35t min
inf orm
t ohave
12,anyem
ail: res
ervcall
acoriones
on. cinom. m x f x:
20 at
minion: ph: +(5255) 5148 7509
Angel
Urraza
625,
Col
del
Valle,
4
*
/
bus
/
bus
$95.80
$109.62
$22.00
+(5255) 5148 2010
NH Mexico City
Holiday Inn Express
Reforma
4*
35 min
/ bus
20 min
/ bus
$115.58
$115.58
$20.00
4*
35 min
/ bus
20 min
/ bus
$142.20
$142.20
Included
Código Postal 03100, México, D.F., (+5255) 5148-7509 ext. 12,
or [email protected]).
Please visit: www.fdiworldental.org for
more details about hotels
1
6
2345
1. Centro Banamex
4. Hotel Nikko Mexico
2. Hotel W
5. Hotel Marriot
3. Hotel Presidente Intercontinental
6. Hotel Fiesta Americana Grand Chapultepec
1. Centro Banamex
2. Hotel W
42
About FDI
World Dental
Federation
FDI World Dental Federation represents 191 national dental
associations and specialist groups. Our vision is leading the
world to optimal oral health, acknowledging that oral health is
a fundamental part of general health and well-being. This vision
is brought to life through being the global voice for oral health
and delivering excellence in oral health policy and promotion,
continuing professional education, and access to care.
FDI Mission Statements
The Voice
of Dentistry
Optimal
Oral Health
Member
Support
Information
Transfer
To be the worldwide,
authoritative and
independent voice
of the dental profession
To promote optimal
oral and general health
for all people
To support the member
associations in enhancing
the ability of their
members to provide
oral health care
to the public
To advance and promote
the ethics, art,
science and practice
of dentistry
FDI World Dental Federation is a non-governmental organisation (NGO) in official relations with the United Nations
(UN) and the World Health Organization (WHO).
For more information about our activities visit
www.fdiworldental.org
Cover page: Winner of 2009 FDI & Wrigley Photographic Award

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