The Career Readiness Certificate - e

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The Career Readiness Certificate - e
The Career
Readiness
Certificate
State Strategies Toward a
Common Goal
Kentucky
Louisiana
Virginia
Indiana
For more information contact Barbara Bolin
at: [email protected]
Or visit the website at: www.crc.virginia.gov
The Career Readiness Certificate—An Idea Whose Time
Has Come!
Employers know that the costs of hiring, training, and retention significantly affect their
bottom line. For an employer who may be contemplating moving his/her business to a new
state or expanding an existing company, the skill level of the available workforce is often a
deciding factor. Hiring for entry-level positions is particularly difficult because the applicant
often has little or no work history, and presents with only a brief resume and an educational
credential such as a high school diploma or a two- or four- year degree. While these
credentials are beneficial they do not always give a clear indication of the skills that the
applicant possesses.
Experts know that by 2010, more than 80% of all jobs will require skill levels beyond those
gained in high school. Almost all workers will need training and education at the postsecondary level. In the United States, most training is done on the job, and all indications are
that this situation will not change in the coming decades. What employers need therefore, are
employees who are trainable, and who can benefit from the many opportunities afforded them
for skill enhancement.
Over the last twenty years, employers have become disillusioned with both the trainability of
high school and college graduates, and with their associated work ethic. The second issue and
its solution are, for the most part, societal concerns. The trainability issue though is one that
many states have embraced and have set out to address through the development of a portable
skills credential.
This publication has been produced to tell the story of the development of a portable skills
credential in four states—Kentucky, Louisiana, Virginia, and Indiana. The approach has been
different in each of these states but the end result is the same. Each credential uses
WorkKeys® as the language for skills definition, each state uses the same three assessments,
and the same skill levels to define workplace literacy. The Career Readiness Certificate
Consortium (CRCC) hopes that readers in other states will find inspiration, practical, and
helpful suggestions in this publication as they begin their own journey to deployment of a
portable skills credential.
The CRCC is indebted to Dr. Lisa Vosper (LA), Dr. Barbara Bolin (VA), Dr. Keith Byrd
(KY), and Brett Wineinger (IN) for their hard work in producing this monograph.
The Consortium is also grateful for the assistance provided by Dr. Dean Brown and Ms. Judy
Means of ACT, Inc., for their most practical help in editing and printing the volume.
And last but by no means least, the CRCC is sincerely grateful for the vision and leadership of
Gov. Mark Warner (D-VA). We are where we are because of his understanding of the
economic benefits of a regional, portable skills credential. We appreciate his willingness to
allow his Special Advisor for Workforce Development, Barbara Bolin to dedicate a great deal
of her time to the development and work of the Consortium.
May 10, 2005
KENTUCKY EMPLOYABILITY CERTIFICATE (KEC)
I.
CONTEXT
a. Background
There is a not so subtle shift occurring in what businesses seek by way of
employability credentials and how progressive academic institutions and
workforce training providers are responding to this opportunity. Businesses are
seeking individuals who have documented skills necessary to do the work
required in a high-performance workplace setting and who can be projected to
have the ability to acquire additional skills through on-the-job training.
In 1999, the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce sponsored a Leadership Summit
attended by CEO’s of major corporations throughout the Commonwealth. This
summit brought these leaders together to address the workforce needs of
Kentucky. One of the primary recommendations of this group was to create an
employability certificate with an assessment tool that could be used by both
industry and education.
In response to this recommendation by Kentucky’s business community,
Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS), Kentucky Adult
Education, Kentucky Workforce Investment Board, and the Commonwealth’s
Department for Workforce Development (now part of Kentucky Education
Cabinet) developed the Kentucky Employability Certificate (KEC) using ACT’s
WorkKeys System. Kentucky was one of the first states in the nation to
implement a statewide employability certificate that connects the goal of all
Kentucky stakeholders to advance the state’s workforce development interest.
The Kentucky Employability Certificate was created to:
• Provide skill-based credentials to Kentucky citizens to help them secure
employment
• Provide employers with workers that have documented skills proficiencies
• Create a pool of certified applicants that employers can hire with confidence
The vision for the Kentucky Employability Certificate would allow:
• Kentucky employers recognize the KEC as a meaningful credential and have
confidence in the skills that credential holders possess
• Kentucky citizens recognize the value of the KEC in terms of making them
more employable and documenting their skills to employers
• Public agencies develop a “pool” of certified workers
The Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE) will approve the 20052010 new public agenda in July 2005. As part of this plan, CPE has placed a high
importance on measuring the number of Kentuckians achieving certificates such
as the Kentucky Employability Certificate. Once the plan is approved, action
1
items will be developed to address those areas. The CPE agenda will guide the
work of the entire adult and postsecondary education system for Kentucky.
b. Implementation timeline
• November 1999
The Leadership Summit sponsored by the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce
set a goal to develop an employability certificate, as well as a common
language and common metric for business and education.
•
January 2000
Under the leadership and vision of the Cabinet for Workforce Development
(CWD) and the Kentucky Community and Technical College System
(KCTCS), these sponsoring agencies began partnering to implement the
WorkKeys System by ACT, Inc. on a statewide basis in order to achieve the
following goals:
Institutionalize a common language and common metric that identifies
workplace skills among public sector partners and the business
community,
Use a common assessment tool that is based upon the SCANS
competencies,
Identify skill gaps occurring in today’s workforce,
Provide targeted instruction to address skill gaps, and
Develop linkages and pathways from secondary to postsecondary and
adult education (as well as work and life long learning)
•
Fall 2000
Empower Kentucky provided funding to support six local interagency pilot
projects that would implement WorkKeys to meet the needs of the pilot
communities, including delivery of the WIN curricula for targeted instruction.
The Kentucky Department of Education became a partner in the initiatives.
•
Kentucky Legislative Session 2000
Senate Bill 1 (Adult Education Reform) passed and called for a statewide
competency-based certification for workplace skills.
•
December 2000
The Kentucky Manufacturing Skills Standards (KMSS) Certificate was
officially rolled out. As part of a comprehensive system, the Kentucky
Employability Certificate would complement the KMSS, especially for the
certification for the non-manufacturing sectors.
2
•
2001
The Kentucky Workforce Investment Board (KWIB) endorsed the KEC and
the use of its logo as a primary sponsor (in addition to ACT). This
endorsement by the KWIB represents the broad interests of business and
public partners in education, government, and economic and workforce
development.
Kentucky Adult education created KYVAE.org for adult learners including
curricula aligned to WorkKeys.
•
2001-2002
KCTCS deployed the WorkKeys System, including job profiling, for all of its
occupational technical programs. KCTCS students were pre and post tested
using the WorkKeys assessments to document foundational skills proficiency
in their program area.
KCTCS and CWD staff conducted workshops and training sessions for each
of the local Workforce Investment Board’s comprehensive One Stop Centers.
The training sessions were designed to provide all One Stop partners with an
understanding of the WorkKeys System and the KEC.
The Council on Postsecondary Education endorsed the KEC.
•
January 2003
The first 1,200 KECs were issued to individuals in Owensboro through the
Skills, Inc. and Owensboro Community and Technical College partnership.
•
May 2003
The statewide kickoff for the Kentucky Employability Certificate was held in
Owensboro on May 5, 2003. The kickoff featured two Owensboro
companies, Unilever and Owensboro Mercy Health System.
•
September 2003
The Kentucky Adult Education, Council on Postsecondary Education funded
ten projects designed to develop local partnership among public sector
partners to engage business and industry support for the KEC. Each project
was funded for $70,000.
Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Incentive Funds were targeted to leverage
additional resources to develop and promote industry based credentials,
including the KEC and KMSS.
3
•
October 2003
KCTCS established a position to coordinate the KEC initiatives and Perkins
Profiling Project. This position focused on integrating KCTCS activities with
business and industry as well as public agency partners.
•
April 2004
Based upon occupational program profiles results for 72 KCTCS programs,
the first KEC Occupational Specific Certificates were issued to graduating
students .
•
January 2005
KCTCS was a Bellwether Award finalist for the KEC.
c. KEC sponsors and endorsers
Primary Sponsors:
Kentucky Workforce Investment Board (KWIB)
ACT, Inc.
Endorsers:
Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS)
Education Cabinet
Kentucky Adult Education
Kentucky Chamber of Commerce
Kentucky Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)
Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE)
Associated Industries of Kentucky
Bluegrass Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management
Kentucky State District Council of Carpenters
Kentucky Industrial Development Council
II.
APPROACH AND IMPLEMENTATION
a. What is the CRC in your state?
The KEC provides skill based credentials to Kentucky citizens to help them secure
employment, provides employers with workers who have documented skills
proficiencies, and creates a pool of certified applicants employers can hire with
confidence.
The Kentucky Employability Certificate (KEC) is a portable credential which
documents an individual’s skill level in Applied Math, Locating Information and
Reading for Information.
An individual may be eligible for one of three levels of certification:
4
•
Silver Level Certificate which qualifies an individual for 50% of the
current jobs contained the ACT profile database. To obtain the Silver
Certificate the applicant must score at a Level 4 on all three skill areas.
See Attachment 1 for detailed information on skill levels.
•
Gold Level Certificate which qualifies an individual for 80% of the
current jobs contained in the ACT profile database. To obtain the Gold
Certificate the applicant must score at a Level 5 on all three skill areas.
See Attachment 2 for detailed information on skill levels.
•
KCTCS Occupational Specific Certificate which is based upon
occupational profiles for each program area by KCTCS. Skill areas and
levels vary for each individual program. The KEC Occupational Specific
Certificate is awarded in addition to the graduating student’s degree or
diploma and is based upon results for over 190 profiles in 72 occupational
areas. See Attachment 3 for the Occupational Specific Profile Matrix.
The choice to structure the KEC along three levels instead of just one reflects a
need to reach as diverse a population as possible. Kentucky is committed to
expanding the use of WorkKeys system and the KEC to as many constituencies as
possible—high school students, adult education students, one-stop centers, post
secondary students, incumbent workers and the business community. The use of
a tiered system allows individuals to make incremental gains and be recognized
for it.
b. Approach to launching the KEC
Statewide Training Sessions
The initial implementation strategy for implementing the KEC focused on building the
infrastructure to support this initiative throughout the Commonwealth. Before the KEC
was formally launched, a series of training sessions were held with each of the partners to
develop an understanding of the KEC as well as the WorkKeys system. Over twenty
training sessions were conducted for the field staff of the state level partners as well as
those agencies included in the One Stop Career Centers. These sessions focused on:
• Background – Why are we doing this?
• What is the skills gap issue?
• What is the WorkKeys® system?
• What is the Kentucky Employability Certificate?
• What are the roles of state and local partners?
• Next Steps – Where do we go from here?
KEC Pilot Projects
Concurrently, Empower Kentucky, KCTCS and the Workforce Development Cabinet
launched a series of pilots to “field test” the KEC. These pilots were conducted to
determine the level of interest of employers and job seekers, begin developing local
partnerships with public and private agencies, and “test” the process. The project
5
received $400,000 in Empower KY funds for seven local pilots and had 1,500+
participants. The partners included:
• Cabinet for Workforce Development
• Adult Education
• KCTCS
• One Stops
• Community Based Organizations
• Job Corps
• Business & Industry (see Attachment 7 )
Third-party evaluations for the project stated that the greatest benefit of the projects was
strengthening the relationships among the public partners. It also recommended that the
public partner staff receive training to understand the “business perspective” when
introducing WorkKeys
Introduction of the KEC
The state-level partners identified a team who traveled throughout the Commonwealth as
guest speakers to introduce business and industry to the KEC and the WorkKeys system.
Presentations were made to all Society for Human Resources Managers (SHRM) KY
chapters, chambers of commerce, economic development groups and business
organizations.
III.
ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATIONS
a. Operational information
The KEC is signed by the Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the Chair
of the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board, representing both the public and
private sectors’ interests.
KCTCS serves as the issuing entity for all participating agencies. This process
ensures the integrity of the credential and its dissemination process, and provides
uniform, consistent credentialing standards. The process for issuing the KECs was
designed to accommodate each individual partner’s unique circumstances. Individual
instructions for the general public, Adult Education and KCTCS are included in
Attachments 4, 5 and 6.
There are several options for paying for the KEC:
1. Career Seekers
a. Individuals can go to a KCTCS college or a One Stop Career Center to
take the WorkKeys assessments, apply for the KEC and assume the cost of
the assessments and KEC.
2. Adult Education
a. Individuals who qualify for services through Kentucky Adult Education
receive the WorkKeys assessments and the KEC at no cost. Kentucky
6
Adult Education has a pre-paid account with ACT for the WorkKeys
assessments and KCTCS for issuing the KEC.
3. KCTCS Students in Occupational & Technical Programs
a. KCTCS students enrolled in occupational and technical programs receive
the WorkKeys assessments and the KEC at no cost. Each KCTCS college
has written the KEC into their Perkins Plan and the cost of the assessment
is budgeted on an annual basis.
4. One Stop Career Centers
a. Several One Stop Career Centers throughout the Commonwealth offer the
WorkKeys assessments and KEC to qualifying individuals at no cost.
5. Workforce Initiatives
a. Through partnerships with other public agencies and the KCTCS Career
Pathways initiative, qualifying individuals receive the WorkKeys
assessments and KEC at no cost.
b. KEC communications strategies
Due to funding constraints, Kentucky has not developed a formal marketing plan for
the KEC. Through collaboration with public and private partners, such as local
chambers of commerce and economic development agencies, the founding state level
partners have encouraged local partnerships to promote the KEC.
Relying on collaboration among state-level partners, field staff located throughout the
state have recruited other partners to develop local plans. The first and most successful
partnership is in Owensboro, Kentucky. Owensboro created this model because of a 37%
literacy rate, the need for a trained workforce and the commitment to education by local
leaders. This has become the model program and other communities throughout the
Commonwealth are emulating the Owensboro program. The Owensboro partners and
their roles include:
•
•
•
Owensboro Community and Technical College District
o Provides Business & Industry training
o Develops Occupational Profiles for participating companies
o Offers Adult Educational services through SkillTrain
o Offers Industry & individual assessment services through SkillTest
SkillTest (a partnership with OCTC & Skills, Inc.)
o Administers WorkKeys assessments (Reading, Math, & Locating Information)
to job-seekers
o Administers additional assessments for companies seeking to identify and
enhance skill levels of current employees
o Offers retest capabilities
Skill Train (a partnership with OCTC & KY Adult Education)
o Delivers targeted WorkKeys instruction to job-seekers or employees seeking
to upgrade skills
o Enables qualified participants to retest through KY AE’s WorkKeys agreement
7
•
•
•
o Allows participants to certify skills by achieving the Kentucky Employability
Certificate
Owensboro Chamber of Commerce/Industry, Inc.
o Establishes the economic development strategy for the region
o Creates and conceptualize a system achieving the strategy
o Links Business and Industry to these Services
Skills, Inc. (a partnership with city & county government)
o Maintains an up-to-date database of job-seekers
o Makes employee referrals to business and industry
o Works with the local workforce and education partners to achieve goals.
Green River Workforce Investment Board & Career Center One Stop Partners
o Provides testing and assessment services to job seekers
o Makes referrals to business and industry
c. Kentucky Adult Education Pilot Projects
Eleven pilot projects were implemented by Kentucky Adult Education (KYAE)
Educational and Career Advancement Projects (ECAP) with the intent of developing
replicable models for engaging adult learners in using the WorkKeys system
(occupational database, assessment, targeted instruction -- including PLATO and WIN)
to earn a KEC. The common goal for each of the projects includes enabling learners to
pursue employment and, if appropriate, additional postsecondary education; and build
consensus among employers of KEC’s ability to affirm the acquisition of skills and
competencies. Sites for the KEC pilot projects include:
1. Clay County (Clay County Board of Education
2. Christian County (Christian County Board of Education)
3. Daviess County (Owensboro Community and Technical College)
4. Harlan County (Harlan County Board of Education)
5. Hopkins County (Madisonville Community and Technical College)
6. Jefferson County (Greater Louisville Region – Workforce Investment Board)
7. McCracken County (West Kentucky Community and Technical College)
8. Pike County (Big Sandy Community and Technical College)
9. Pulaski County (Pulaski County Board of Education)
10. Russell County (Russell County Board of Education)
11. Warren County (Bowling Green Community and Technical College)
Collaboration among Adult Education programs, KCTCS, One-Stop Career Centers,
Kentucky Industrial Development Councils, local employers, local Departments for
Employment Services, local Chambers of Commerce and Workforce Investment Boards
enhanced the attainment of project objectives to:
•
Increase the number of adult learners earning a KEC
•
Increase the number of adult learners seeking additional skills by moving on to
postsecondary education (i.e., apprenticeships, associates degrees, etc.)Increase
the number of adult learners securing employment
8
•
Increase the number of employers giving preference to job seekers with a
KEC/KMSSC
•
Align goals with One-Stop goals and outcomes
•
Align goals with Workforce Investment Boards
•
Align goals with economic development initiatives (county, region, etc.)
•
Determine policy implications
•
Align goals with Department of Employment Services goals in pre-hire projects
IV.
RESULTS
a. Challenges
Approached from a “public policy” perspective, the KEC initiative has been
approached and integrated into existing initiatives and programs, and has faced
challenges in terms of getting business and industry community on board.
Businesses such as Owensboro Mercy Health Hospital which have met with
success with WorkKeys have acted as “champions” for the initiative. See
Attachment 8 for a detailed case study. This business-to-business approach in
promoting WorkKeys and the KEC has been instrumental in overcoming the
challenge of getting information out to the business community.
A second challenge faced by this initiative is making the whole system of training
and workplace evaluation simple and comprehensible. To overcome this
challenge, the KEC has been posted on a special website, which has been
addressed in all promotional materials. See www.kctcs.edu/kec/ for additional
information including a video on the KEC and a list of business and industry
participation.
b. Number of certificates issued
To date, KCTCS has issued 2,726 Gold and Silver Kentucky Employability
Certificates and 409 Occupational Specific Kentucky Employability Certificates,
for a total of 3,135 certificates issued .
c. Next steps
KCTCS is a primary partner in a statewide database initiative, Kentucky
Excellence in Certification and Licensure (KY ExCel), to capture workforce
credentials of the commonwealth and provide an opportunity to connect
businesses with those individuals who have validated skill sets across the state.
This initiative will bridge the gap between the current and emerging needs of
employers with the number of individuals holding certificates, licenses and
degrees in Kentucky. Commonwealth-specific achievements, such as the KEC,
9
will be automatically verified and updated by KCTCS. Plans are underway to
launch a statewide marketing campaign for Ky ExCel and the KEC.
10
Attachment 1-Gold Level Certificate
The Gold Level Certificate qualifies an individual for 80% of the current workforce jobs
contained in the ACT profile database. To obtain this certificate an applicant must score at a level
5 on the skill assessments for Applied Mathematics, Reading for Information and Locating
Information.
What do these levels mean?
Applied Mathematics Level 5
Skill Range: Levels 3-7
Skills for level 5 are:
•
Perform one or two mathematical operations, such as addition, subtraction,
multiplication, or division using several positive or negative numbers.
•
Add commonly known fractions, decimals, or percentages, and three fractions that share
a common denominator
•
Calculate averages, simple ratios, proportions, and rates, using whole numbers and
decimals
•
Perform single-step conversions within English or non-English systems of measurement
•
Calculate perimeters and areas of basic shapes
•
Calculate percentage discounts and markups
•
Compute the “best deal” using one- and two-step calculations and then comparing costs
Locating Information Level 5
Skill Range: Levels 3-6
Skills for level 5 are:
•
Summarize and/or compare information and trends in a single graphic
•
Summarize and/or compare information and trends among more than one workplace
graphic, such as a charge slip and an invoice showing related information; in order to
accomplish this, the examinee must determine the relationship among the graphics
•
Summarize and/or compare information and trends in a single graphic
•
Summarize and/or compare information and trends among more than one workplace
graphic, such as a bar chart and a data table showing related information; in order to
accomplish this, the examinee must sort through distracting information
Reading for Information Level 5
Scale range: Levels 3-7
Skills for Level 5 are:
•
Identify uncomplicated key concepts and simple details.
•
Recognize the application of more complex instructions, some of which involve several
steps, to described situations
•
Recognize cause-effect relationships
•
Identify the paraphrased definition of a technical term or jargon that is defined in the
passage
•
Recognize the application of technical terms or jargon to stated situations
•
Recognize the definition of an acronym that is defined in the passage
•
Identify the appropriate definition of a word with multiple meanings
•
Recognize the application of instructions from the document to new situations that are
similar to those described in the reading materials
•
Recognize the application of more complex instructions to described situations, including
conditionals and procedures with multiple steps
Attachment 2-Silver Level Certificate
The Silver Level Certificate qualifies an individual for 50% of the current workforce jobs
contained in the ACT profile database. To obtain the Silver Certificate the applicant must score at
a Level 4 on all three skill areas.
What do these scores mean?
Applied Mathematics Level 4
Scale range: Levels 3-7
Level 4 skills are:
•
Perform single-step basic operations, such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division, using whole numbers
•
Change a number from one form to another, using whole numbers, fractions, decimals
and percentages
•
Add and subtract negative numbers as well as positive numbers
•
Perform one or two mathematical operations, such as addition, subtractions,
multiplication or division on several positive or negative numbers
•
Add commonly known fractions, decimals or percentages (e.g. ⅓, .75, 25%), and three
fractions that share a common denominator
•
Calculate averages, simple ratios, proportions and rates using whole numbers and
decimals
Locating Information Level 4
Scale range: Levels 3-6
Skills for Level 4 are:
•
Find one or two pieces of information in elementary graphics such as simple order forms,
bar graphs, tables, flowcharts and floorplans
•
Fill in one or two pieces of information that are missing from these types of elementary
graphics
•
Find several pieces of information in such graphics as detailed forms, tables, graphs,
maps, instrument gauges and diagrams
•
Summarize and/or compare information and trends in a single graphic
•
Summarize and/or compare information and trends among more than one workplace
graphic, such as a charge slip and an invoice showing related information; in order to
accomplish this, the examinee must determine the relationships among the graphics
Reading For Information Level 4
Scale range: Levels 3-7
Skills for Level 4 are:
•
Identify uncomplicated key concepts and simple details
•
Recognize the proper placement of a step in a sequence of events, or the proper time to
perform a task
•
Identify the meaning of a word that is defined within the passage
•
Identify the meaning of a simple word that is not defined within the passage
•
Recognize the application of instructions given in the document to situations that are also
described in the passage
•
Identify important details that are less obvious than those in Level 3
•
Recognize the application of more complex instructions, some of which involve several
steps, to described situations
Recognize cause-effect relationships
Locating
Information
Observation
4
5
3
Listening
5
Applied
Technology
5
Applied
Math
5
5
Program Area
Accounting Technology
5
3
4
5
4
4
4
4
4
Reading for
Information
4
5
5
5
4
6
4
4
5
4
4
5
4
5
6
4
4
4
5
5
4
4
5
4
5
Agriculture Technology
Applied Process Technology
6
5
5
Clinical Lab Technician
6
6
Automotive Technology
Air Conditioning Technology
Aviation Maintenance
Technology
Biomedical Equipment
Technology
Business Technology/
Banking
Business Technology/
Hospitality
Business Technology/
Office Systems
Business Technology /
Real Estate
Business Technology /
Management
Business Technology /
Marketing & Retailing
Business Technology/
CIS / MIS
Carpentry
Computer Aided Drafting
4
Child Development
Associate Certificate
Cosmetology
Criminal Justice
Teamwork
3
4
4
6
4
4
Writing
3
4
4
3
Program Area
Culinary Arts
Dental Assisting
Applied
Math
4
Applied
Technology
Listening
3
3
5
Dental Hygiene
6
5
5
Electrical Technology /
Construction
7
6
4
3
Diagnostic Medical
Sonography
Diesel Technology
Electronics Technology
5
Early Childhood Education
Environmental Science
Technology
Forest & Wood Technology
5
Fire and Rescue Technology
Graphic Arts
Locating
Information
4
5
5
6
Reading for
Information
4
Observation
5
6
4
5
5
5
5
5
4
5
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
5
4
3
4
3
Horticulture
3
Heavy Equipment Operation
Human Services
4
5
6
4
4
6
5
6
5
5
4
5
5
4
4
5
Instructional Assistant
Industrial & Engineering
Technology
Industrial Maintenance
Technology
Information Technology/ Ecommerce
Information Technology/
Information Systems Support
Information Technology/
Network Administration
Teamwork
4
4
3
4
6
Writing
4
Program Area
Instrumentation Technician
Legal Office Technology
Journeyman/Lineman:
Apprentice
Journeyman/Lineman:
Journeyman
Machine Tool Technology
Manufacturing Systems
Technology
Applied
Math
5
3
Applied
Technology
5
Listening
Locating
Information
4
Observation
5
Reading for
Information
Teamwork
5
6
5
5
4
4
6
5
3
5
6
5
4
5
2
4
5
4
Masonry
Medical Office Technology
4
5
5
Nuclear Medicine Technology
4
5
Nursing – AND
3
4
5
3
6
3
3
6
6
4
5
5
4
4
Nursing LPN
Occupational Therapy
Assistant
Paramedic
Pharmacy Tech
3
4
5
Plumbing
5
Physical Therapist Assistant
Professional Craft-Pottery
4
5
4
5
3
6
Radiography
4
5
5
Quality Assurance Technology
5
4
4
5
Respiratory Care
Small Engine Repair
Writing
5
4
3
4
Program Area
Surgical Technician
Surveying and Mapping
Technology
Upholstery
Welding
Applied
Math
4
Applied
Technology
Listening
4
3
Locating
Information
4
5
Observation
5
3
5
Reading for
Information
4
3
Teamwork
3
4
Writing
Attachment 4-Process for individual application
How does an individual
earn the KEC?
Take
Assessment
in Three Skill
Areas
Score at
Level 4 or
Level 5
Yes
Receive
Certificat
e
No
Targeted
Instruction
Re-take
Assessments
As Needed
General Public
To access the Kentucky Employability Certificate (KEC) Request form, please open the file titled
“Applications” located at
http://unity.kctcs.edu/dscgi/ds.py/View/Collection-3133.
The KEC is $10 per certificate requested.
In order to process your request, we must have the supporting WorkKeys documentation to
validate scores. We would prefer receiving the WorkKeys Examinee Roster Report but will
accept the WorkKeys reports for individuals. Certificates are issued at the highest level achieved
and documented. The KEC Coordinator at KCTCS will determine certificate levels. This will
eliminate the need for you to identify the Silver and/or Gold levels. KEC Certificates will be
processed and mailed within 7 – 10 working days from the date of the request is received.
1. Go to the official KEC request page at
http://unity.kctcs.edu/dscgi/ds.py/View/Collection-3133.
2. Complete the application as directed
3. Mail your completed application, payment, and supporting documentation of scores to
the following address:
KCTCS
Attn: KEC Coordinator
300 North Main Street
Versailles, KY 40383
Any requests received without payment or supporting documentation of scores will not be
processed.
If you experience problems or have any questions, please e-mail [email protected]
Attachment 5-Process for Adult Education Application
ADULT EDUCATION
To access the Kentucky Adult Education (ADULT EDUCATION) KEC Request form, please
login, using the User ID and Password given to you by the ADULT EDUCATION Frankfort
office, to the KEC DocuShare site at http://unity.kctcs.edu/dscgi/ds.py/View/Collection-3133.
You will NOT be able to access the application unless you login.
In order to process your request, we must have the supporting WorkKeys documentation to
validate scores. We would prefer receiving the WorkKeys Examinee Roster Report but will
accept the WorkKeys reports for individuals. Certificates are issued at the highest level achieved
and documented. The KEC Coordinator at KCTCS will determine certificate levels. This will
eliminate the need for you to identify the Silver and/or Gold levels. KEC Certificates will be
processed and mailed within 7 – 10 working days from the date of the request is received.
Only applications containing the official logo of ADULT EDUCATION will be accepted
without pre-payment.
1. Login to the KEC folder on the Docushare website. If you do not have a username and
password, please contact Peggy Muller at 502-573-5114.
2. Complete the application as directed.
3. Fax your completed application and supporting documentation to 502-696-5200.
To safeguard this confidential and sensitive material, KCTCS has procured a secure fax line.
This is the only secure fax number and is the only one that should be used.
If you prefer to mail your application and supporting documentation, please mail to the following
address:
KCTCS
Attn: KEC Coordinator
300 North Main Street
Versailles, KY 40383
If you experience problems or have any questions, please e-mail [email protected]
Attachment 6-Process for KCTCS Application
KCTCS
To access the Kentucky Community and Technical College KEC Request form, please login,
using the User ID and Password given to you by the KCTCS System Office, to the KEC
DocuShare site at: http://unity.kctcs.edu/dscgi/ds.py/View/Collection-3133. You will NOT be
able to access the application unless you login.
In order to process your request, we must have the supporting WorkKeys documentation to
validate scores. We would prefer receiving the WorkKeys Examinee Roster Report but will also
accept the WorkKeys reports for individuals. Certificates are issued at the highest level achieved
and documented. The KEC Coordinator at KCTCS will determine certificate levels. This will
eliminate the need for you to identify the Silver and/or Gold levels. KEC Certificates will be
processed and mailed within 7 – 10 working days from the date of the request is received.
Only applications containing the official logo of KCTCS will be accepted from KCTCS
institutions.
1.
Login to Docushare and go to the KEC folder. If you do not have a username and
password, please contact [email protected]
2. Complete the application as directed
3. Fax your completed application, completed journal entry, and supporting documentation
to 502-696-5200.
To safeguard this confidential and sensitive material, KCTCS has procured a secure fax line.
This is the only secure fax number and is the only one that should be used.
Any requests received without an accompanying journal entry will not be processed.
If you prefer to mail your application, journal entry and supporting documentation, please mail to
the following address:
KCTCS
Attn: KEC Coordinator
300 North Main Street
Versailles, KY 40383
Attachment 7-Companies Participating in KCTCS Program Profiles
Abner Construction Company
Adams Street Development
Ad-Vantage Multi
AEC Electric
Agri-Chem, Inc.
Airgas of Paducah
American Home Patient
American Stainless Steel
American Woodmark
American Woodwork
Ashland Police Department
Ashland Specialty Chemicals
Atana Wells
ATC
Audubon Dental Services
Audubon Hospital
Autoliv
Aylison Utley Regional Medical Center
B & L Construction
B&M Printing Ent.Inc.
Ball Homes
Baptist Hospital
Basic Home Improvements
Belcan Corporation
Blanchfield Army Community Hospital
BLT Truck Repair and Equipment
Bluegrass Regional MH/MR Board, Inc.
Bluegrass Trucking
BOP/USP
Bowling Green Medical Center
Boxer Consulting Group
Brame Farms, Inc.
Branch Banking and Trust
Brandeis Machinery
Brandy Morehead Reporting
Breckinridge-Grayson County Child
Development
Brenda Harrington Cakes
Broadcast Services
Brown Construction
Budd Tallent
Byerly Ford
Cardinal Chevrolet Cadillac Inc.
Carlton Cards
Caterpillar
Caverna Memorial Hospital
Center for Accessible Living
Central Adult Day Center
Child Development Service
Christian County Board of Education
Christian Health Center
Comair
Commonwealth Aluminum
Community Coordinated Child Care
Computer Services, Inc.
Continental Conveyors & Equipment
Cooley Medical Equipment
Creative Image
Dana Corporation
Daniel Boone Corridor Group
Deaconess Hospital
DESA International
Double A Farm, Inc.
Due West Barbecue
Duro
ECCOA
EKCC Road to Justice
Electrical Design Group
Elizabethtown Dependable Builders
Emerson Power Train
Emerson Power Transmission
ETA Engineering Consultants
Faith Tool & Dye
Farmers Bank and Trust Co.
Faulkner’s Gargage
Flemingsburg County Board of Education
Floyd County Health Department
Ford Motor Company
Frankfort Electric and Water Plant Board
Fulton Fire & EMS
Gault, Marshall, Miller & Jackson, PLLC
GE Medical
General Electric
Georgia Pacific
Gibbs Die Casting
Dr. John F. Gilbert’s Office
Go Figure Salon and Day Spa
Graves Gilbert Clinic
Green River Area Development District
Greenline Implement
Greenview Hospital
H & U Horizontal Boring
Halley Performance Products
Hardin County Sheriff’s Office
Hardin Memorial Hospital
Harvey and Martin Family Dentistry
Hazard Appalachian Regional Healthcare
Hazard Area Regional Hospital (ARH)
Hazard Perry County Community Ministries
Head Start
Health Alliance
Health South Rehab Hospital
Hennegan
Highlands Regional Medical Center
Hoffman
Holiday Inn
Hopkins County Economic Development
Hopkins County Fiscal Court
Hopkinsville Electric System
Housing Development Alliance
Human Services Consultation
IBEW
Imagery Consulting & Design
Ingram Barge
Internal Revenue Service
Internal Medicine Assoc. of Northern KY
Jackie Koch
J C Penney
J K Multimedia Productions
Jennie Stuart Medical Center
Jenny Wiley State Resort Park
Jim Crouse
Johnson Controls, Inc.
Johnson County Fiscal Court
Johnstone Supply
Joseph Edward Company
Dr. Ahmed Khatib
KY Dept. for Community Based Services
KY Dept. of Employment Services
KY Dept. of Highways
KY Dept. of Transportation
KY Division of Forestry
KY Division of Plumbing
KY Law Enforcement Council
Kentucky River Area Development District
Kentucky River Medical Center
KY State District Council of Carpenters
KY State Police
Kimberly Clark
Kindred Hospital
King’s Daughters Medical Center
Knight’s Mechanical
Knott County Central
Lake Cumberland Medical Association
Leslie County Board of Education
Lexington Dental Center
Lexington Fire Department
Licking Valley CAP
Lindon Realty
Little House of Mooreland Day Care
Logan Aluminum
Logan Memorial Hospital
Louisville Initiative
Louisville Metro Parks
Louisville Water Company
Lourdes Hospital
Madisonville Fire Department
Madisonville Regional Medical Center
Madisonville/Hopkins Co. Economic
Development Corp.
Mahr Hidden Hills Farms
Marathon Ashland Petroleum
Mary Mont Medical Center
Masonry Concepts
Mattingly Center for Continuing Education
Maysville Fire Department
Maysville Utility Commission
Medical Center Ambulance Service
Meisel Homes Inc.
Methodist Hospital
Metro Web Corp.
Middlesboro Area Regional Hospital
Middough Associates, Inc.
Mitsubishi Automotive Electric
Monroe County Medical Center
Morehead State University
Motoman, Inc.
Mountain Comprehensive Healthcare
Mountain Surveying, Inc.
Mountain Top Bakery
MPD, Inc.
Muhlenberg Community Hospital
MultiCare Specialists
Multi-Craft Hitco
Multi-Skills Training Services
Murray Electric
Myrna Byerly
National Weather Service
Norton Hospital
Oakwood Christian Health Center
Ohio County EMS
Otter Creek Correctional Center
Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital
James W. Owens Law Firm
Owensboro Mercy Health System
Owensboro Police Dept.
Paducah Fire Department
Paducah McCracken Co. Convention and
Visitor’s Bureau
Paducah Sun/Sunsix
Paintsville Tourism Commission
Patterson Place Day Spa
Paul B. Hall Regional Medical Center
Pennyrile Rural Electric
Perry County Board of Education
Perry County Central
Perry Manufacturing
Phillips Mann Realty
Photo Fringe
Pikeville Methodist Hospital
Pittsburg Tube
Planters Bank
Playmates Child
Power Transmission
Praxair Respiratory Services
Presbyterian Child Welfare Agency
Princeton Electric Plant Board
Princeton Fire Department
Printing Industries Association
R A Jones and Company
Red Banks Nursing Home
Redd, Browns & Williams
Ripley Corporation
River Valley Vending
Rock Castle Hospital
SACHS
Saint Claire Medical Center
SANCTUARY
SCA Incontinence Care
Schwab
Service Solutions
Short & Weiss, PSC
Siemer Milling Co.
Sites, Inc.
Slone Refrigeration Company
Somerset Personal Care
South Williamson Area Regional Hospital
St. Claire Medical Center
St. Elizabeth Hospital
St. Mathews Imports
Star Ford
Stark & Crooks
Starland Too Day Care
Sun Publishing
Sunitomo Electrical Wiring Systems
Surgical Group, P.S.C.
Swartz Truck and Transportation Service
SYSCO Food Service
The Marble Man
The Ripley Corp
Three Rivers Med Center
T J Samson Hospital
Toby Corporation
Toyo Seating USA
Trevantis
TrimMasters, Inc.
Trover Clinic
Trus Joist
TyCo Adhesives
Tyson
United Refrigeration
Universal Welding Services, Inc.
UK Medical Center
University of Louisville Hospital
USDJ/Federal Bureau of Prisons
Walle Corporation
Wal-Mart
Wayne County Hospital
Wendell Foster Center
West KY Diagnostic Center
West KY Reporting Service
Western Baptist Hospital
Western State Hospital
Westvaco
Whayne Supply
Whitesburg, Area Regional Hospital
Williams Gas & Electric
Williams/Texas Gas Corporation
Worldwide Equipment, Inc.
Yates Drafting Service
Youth Build
Zebra Graphics
KCTCS Case StudyWorkKeys in a
Healthcare Setting
Owensboro Community and Technical College
Who: Owensboro Mercy Health System (OMHS)
Owensboro, Kentucky
What: A self-study skills program that teaches new job skills and increases hospital
employees’ chances of receiving a promotion
How: Using a WorkKeys assessment to identify current skill levels, coupled with a
targeted instruction program to raise those levels
Challenge: The State of Kentucky has taken an active role in trying to
increase the competency of its workforce. According to estimates,
about 38 percent of adults in Kentucky function below the high
school level in reading and math. To increase those levels, the state
decided to go directly into the workplace through an alliance between
the Kentucky Community & Technical College System (KCTCS) and
the Department of Adult Education & Literacy.
Owensboro Mercy Health System (OMHS) had looked at some other workplace skills
tests but found that many of them were designed to test people specifically in the
manufacturing industry. Then their local KCTCS postsecondary provider, Owensboro
Community College, introduced the hospital to the WorkKeys System. The hospital
found WorkKeys more suitable to their needs because it tested a broader field of work
skills, and because the scoring system was easier for managers and directors to
understand. The hospital also liked that WorkKeys provided remedial courseware to help
workers raise their scores.
Solution: The OMHS Human Resources staff discovered that
WorkKeys was compatible with their assessment and training needs.
Working through Owensboro Community College and the Department
for Adult Education, OMHS developed a WorkKeys-based program
that would support their goal of giving employees opportunities for
self-improvement and advancement within the hospital system.
OMHS was awarded an Alliance Grant through the partnership between the Kentucky
Department for Adult Education and Literacy (DAEL) and KCTCS to fund one year of
the new program. The hospital supplied 12 computers and a lab area that allows
employees 24-hour access.
The Program: The WorkKeys program was administered through the
OMHS Educational Development Center (EDC), in partnership with
Owensboro Community College, a Kentucky Community & Technical
College System institution. Hospital employees began the program
by taking WorkKeys’ Applied Mathematics and Reading for
Information tests. Following the assessment, they started a self-study
program utilizing tools available in the EDC to improve their skills.
The EDC had a wide variety of computer- and paper-based study
materials to assist employees, including WorkKeys-based curricula
from education software providers like Worldwide Interactive
Network, Destination and Plato. After completing an average of four
to six weeks of self-study, employees took a post-test to determine
their new skill levels. These skill level scores could be used by
employees to identify other positions for which they may be qualified
or to increase their chances of being promoted.
Motivating Employee Involvement: To encourage employees to take
advantage of the program, OHMS offered a $250 stipend to any
employee who completed the program and raised his or her skill level
in Reading for Information and Applied Mathematics to at least a level
four on the WorkKeys scale. However, to receive the stipend, the
employee had to take the post-test. They also received a certificate
of achievement from the college that they could include with their
resumes.
While the stipend may have been a motivating factor in the involvement of many
employees, the EDC staff found that employees found a variety of other reasons to
participate. Some employees just wanted to know what their skill level was, while others
wanted to compare their skill levels with others. Some, who had been out of the
classroom for some time, just wanted to reassure themselves that they remembered some
of what they learned. Many were surprised that they did so well. Even the Human
Resources staff took the test so they would be able to tell other employees about the
experience. In fact, they were able to explain the program to all new employees at their
new employee orientation.
Employee Acceptance: When the program first started, EDC staff members were
worried that hospital employees may not be overly receptive to the testing and training.
They took a lot of time to assure people that this was a non-threatening place where they
could come to advance. The EDC even developed special classes for particular groups to
help them feel comfortable with the learning process. The housekeeping staff, for
example, attended a math class once a week, complete with homework – and they loved
it.
According to Annette Schaefer, EDC Coordinator, their efforts for acceptance paid off.
“We have had such positive feedback from our employees. So many of them have
become excited about learning and the possibilities for advancement.”
As part of the Alliance grant, the EDC set a goal of testing 300 employees during the first
year. In all, 318 employees took at least the first WorkKeys assessment test and over 230
actually completed the post-test and were awarded the $250 stipend.
Benefits: Besides the stipend, many other benefits were realized by
OHMS employees. Some were able to transfer to higher paying jobs
within the hospital, such as the two food and nutrition services
employees who used their new skills to become business office
assistants. Others were able to climb higher on the career ladder in
their current positions. Still others found a new sense of self-esteem
that allowed them to more confidently deal with challenges both in
the workplace and at home.
The hospital was able to realize many benefits, as well. It retained more valuable
employees by giving them opportunities to advance within their own system. As part of
the education process (and because of the new computer lab), the EDC was also able to
offer computer classes to improve work-place essential computer skills. Many
participating employees had never worked with computers before the program began.
Some hospital departments used the scores (with their employees’ knowledge) to develop
new positions or to find employees to fit certain positions.
Outlook: Because the first year of the WorkKeys program was such a
success, OHMS was awarded a second Alliance grant for 2002-2003.
Their goals are to test and provide targeted instruction to even more
employees as well as help those individuals better understand how to
use their scores to advance their hospital careers. An additional area
of assessment and instruction – Locating Information – will be added
to the hospital’s WorkKeys program so that participants can work to
achieve a Kentucky Employability Certificate.
Quotes
“Good people get good results. Great people get great results. In any
organization, you’ve got tremendous people at all levels of the organization.
What we’re very proud of is that we’ve been able to take individuals that
have started at entry level positions and through the (WorkKeys) partnership
with the Owensboro Community College, they’ve been able to enhance their
education, enhance their skills, and move up within the organization.” Greg Carlsen, CEO, Owensboro Mercy Health System
“We feel really good about WorkKeys. Our employees are becoming invested in the
program and are taking pride in the results.” Annette Schaefer, Educational
Development Center Coordinator, OMHS
“I definitely think this is a program companies with a lot of entry-level employees should
look at.” Pam Cox, Human Resources Manager, OMHS
Agencies Partnering to Build a Stronger Workforce and
Working Together for the Common Good of Louisiana!
LOUISIANA WORKReady! is a Louisiana Interagency Collaborative Initiative
Figure
Figure 1:
1: Change
Change in
in Workforce
Workforce Skills
Skills(1956-2004)
(1956-2004)
00
20
20
40
40
80
80
100
100
120
120
20
20
1956
1956
60
60
20
20
60
60
INTRODUCTION
Knowledge-based jobs, which require
postsecondary education or career and
technical skills training, have been
among the fastest-growing jobs and
have increased as a share of total
employment
[Figure
1].
Skill
requirements in high-technology and
other industries have been rising as a
result of the escalating use of
information technology. Education and
skills have become progressively
important to higher earnings and career
growth.
When we talk about the New Economy,
we're talking about a world in which
communications technology creates global
competition - not just for running shoes
and laptop computers, but also for bank
loans and other services that can't be
packed into a crate and shipped. A world in
which innovation is more important than
mass production. A world in which
investment buys new concepts or the means
to create them, rather than new machines.
A world in which rapid change is a
constant. A world at least as different from
what came before it as the industrial age
was from its agricultural predecessor. A
world so different its emergence can only
be described as a revolution.
Source: http://www.wired.com
65
65
* So what is the New Economy?
20
20
15
15
New jobs often require workers coming
2004
2004
from high schools or postsecondary
programs to have strong problem
solving and communication skills.
Unskilled
Unskilled Professional
Professional Skilled
Skilled
Source: ACT
According to ACT, current trends in
basic skill deficiencies indicate that American businesses will soon be spending more than $25 billion a
year on remedial training programs for new employees. In an effort to provide the basic skill levels
required for new employees, Louisiana has undertaken an ambitious effort to create an integrated
system that prepares its citizens for the New Economy*: Louisiana WORKReady! The premise
underlying Louisiana WORKReady! is simply to provide all citizens with the skills necessary to be
successful in every transition of life.
Louisiana WORKReady! creates a system that is flexible enough
to meet a variety of workforce needs. For example:
y A high school graduate directly entering the workforce or
postsecondary education;
y An incumbent worker upgrading skills to advance on the
job;
y An enrolled postsecondary education student seeking
employment in order to pay his/her way through school;
y An unemployed citizen or individual recently released from
a correctional facility re-entering the workforce;
y A high school dropout entering the workforce;
y An adult learner attempting to ratchet up skills and/or
improve literacy in order to gain a livable wage;
y A former welfare recipient entering the workforce for the first
time; or
y A graduate from a professional degree program moving into
his/her specialized field.
At the inception of this initiative, Louisiana’s demographics
suggested that an aggressive strategy to develop its workforce was not only important, but critical to its
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
Page 1 of 19
economic viability. Efforts to attract and retain business and industry and to stop the out-migration of
some of its best and brightest citizens hinged on Louisiana’s ability to take advantage of the
opportunities presented by the New Economy. Among these opportunities was a statewide focus on
preparing a highly skilled, competitive workforce with the necessary credentials and certifications to
compete in a global economy.
Portable credentials and industry-based certifications, in particular, communicate to a potential
employer that an individual has achieved the skills needed for success in a given job. Prior to attaining
these credentials or certifications, citizens were often utilizing a wide variety of assessment instruments
to gauge their academic preparedness or workplace readiness. These assessments are used in a
variety of ways - from placement in academic programs to competency evaluation in the workplace.
Thus, assessment for academic and/or workplace success becomes a critical component of an
integrated system that prepares Louisiana for the New Economy.
BACKGROUND
Workforce education and training efforts in this regard could be categorized as one in which Louisiana
is committed to a partnership that builds a stronger workforce for a stronger Louisiana. A multi-agency
consortium was convened to begin this work. The Louisiana Interagency Collaborative (the
Collaborative – Appendix A), a network of state agencies, was organized to identify ways to more
effectively and efficiently address common needs of the state that impacted and affected the respective
agencies. The Collaborative members included:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Board of Regents
Department of Corrections
Department of Education
Department of Labor
Department of Social Services
Department of State Civil Service
Louisiana Community and Technical College System
Workforce Commission
Initially, the Board of Regents convened the Collaborative in 2001 to discuss the status of assessment
usage in Louisiana. During the discussion, representatives expressed the need for a more coordinated
system to provide assessment services for their various customer groups. All agreed that the current
system did not serve the best interests of citizens, and was duplicative and costly. Thus, the group
formulated a goal to "create a coordinated system of assessment which addresses both academic and workplace readiness and minimizes duplication."
In order to fulfill its goal, the Collaborative met with ACT staff to discuss various ACT assessment
options. With the assistance of an objective facilitator, the group began to develop the framework for a
statewide assessment system; identify customers and other stakeholders; formalize qualities and
characteristics of the system; and chart action steps (Appendix B: Timeline).
Further discussion led to defining qualities and characteristics of a coordinated system. Specifically,
such a system of assessment should be:
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
Page 2 of 19
$
$
$
$
$
$
Customer-oriented, responsive and results-driven;
Employer-valued, utilized, and recognized;
Interagency in nature and highly coordinated;
One in which assessment data are shared;
A clearly defined pathway for all users to appropriate education, training, employment, etc.;
and
One that utilizes assessment instruments which are valid and reliable.
THE IMPETUS
With its goal and defining characteristics in mind, the Collaborative began to research the various
assessment types more closely. Assessment instruments were placed in two broad categories:
academic assessments and career/technical assessments. Even though there were several different
types of assessment instruments in use by state agencies, the majority measured only academic skill
levels and aptitudes.
Academic Assessments are those that are typically utilized to ascertain an individual=s academic ability,
aptitude and/or retention of knowledge. In secondary and postsecondary educational settings these
assessment instruments are often used for academic placement, promotion, and demonstration of the
mastery of content knowledge. In some cases, they are used to determine placement in entry-level
college courses and/or academic skill levels and eligibility for program entry. Adult education programs
use selected, nationally approved instruments to determine the basic academic skill levels of potential
participants, as required by the National Reporting System (NRS).
Career/Technical Assessment instruments are traditionally used to measure an individual=s workplace
skill level, career aptitude or occupational interest. According to Kapes and Whitefield=s A Counselor=s
Guide to Career Assessment Instruments, the most commonly used assessments for employment
consist of general ability and personality tests complemented by job-specific assessments.
At the commencement of the Collaborative’s work, a common statewide career assessment system did
not exist in Louisiana. For example, each of the 66 Local Education Agencies (LEAs) had the option of
selecting and administering its own aptitude tests, interest inventories and/or any other career
assessments. Likewise, One-Stop Centers utilized a variety of interest, aptitude and work value
inventories for Workforce Investment Act (WIA) - Title I participants and job-seekers.
Some assessment instruments tended to overlap the two functions, and some agencies had utilized a
single assessment instrument to serve multiple purposes. For example, National Career Development
Association categorizes the Test for Adult Basic Education (TABE) as an instrument Adesigned to
assess skills in contexts that are of high interest to adults: life skills, work, and [email protected] However,
TABE had been historically used for academic placement at some colleges within the state. As more
refined assessment instruments emerged that are designed specifically to measure academic
preparation, TABE and other similar instruments like it were replaced. In fact, the Louisiana Technical
College (LTC) shifted its academic assessment instrument from TABE to ACT=s ASSET/COMPASS. An
inventory of academic and career/technical assessment instruments that were being utilized by
Louisiana agencies is depicted in Appendix C.
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
Page 3 of 19
After several meetings and lengthy discussion, the Collaborative concluded that:
• Many successful efforts were in progress, but there was little, if any, coordination of the
administration of assessment instruments;
• There was very limited (practically no) data sharing among and between state agencies
once the individual had been evaluated;
• No systematic means to measure the “work readiness” of individuals leaving Louisiana’s
educational systems and training programs to enter the workforce were identified;
• State agencies were using multiple assessment instruments for similar purposes;
• None of the assessments measured, nor were being used to measure, an individual’s
level of workplace preparation; and
• Skills gaps existed.
The group determined that a five-point thrust focusing on workplace preparedness would guide their
work relative to the following:
1)
2)
3)
4)
Outline and recommend a streamlined assessment process for state use;
Identify and target the state’s populous in need of literacy improvements;
Propose and define a workplace readiness certificate using WorkKeys®;
Propose and present a career compatibility component which focuses on Career
Readiness Skills (employability); and
5) Facilitate the use of an integrated data system to share resources and information and to
manage the work of the system.
STREAMLINED ASSESSMENT PROCESS
The integrated WORKReady! system which aligns education, workforce development, and economic
development efforts has already begun in Louisiana. This alignment creates a coordinated system that
addresses Louisiana’s demand to have highly skilled workers who qualify for employment in high
demand occupations. This integrated system is putting “education to work,” by creating multiple
pathways for citizens to access jobs and advance in the workplace through a series of entry points.
The system minimizes duplicative assessment practices among state agencies and promotes
the attainment of a commonly-valued credential, the Louisiana WORKReady! Certificate, which
will be discussed in greater detailed later in this work.
Figure 2 delineates the proposed flow of the system. A series of pathways that citizens may take to
become work-ready are outlined. The various pathways offer open entry and exit points. The system
clearly defines agency roles and services, thereby eliminating confusion for citizens. Within the system,
agencies agree to accept and share data and recognize valid and reliable results. Agencies deliver the
services for which they have the qualified staff and are most equipped to provide.
First, a citizen would be evaluated using either an academic or career/technical assessment
administered by any participating state agency. During the next phase, assessment scores are
interpreted and academic or career decisions are made as the individual is advised or counseled by
academic/career development professionals. It is also during this phase that citizens may research
academic and/or occupational information using postsecondary education websites or tools such as the
Louisiana Occupational Information System (LOIS) or the Louisiana Virtual One-Stop (LAVOS) on the
Department of Labor’s website. They may also take additional interest/ability/aptitude surveys.
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
Page 4 of 19
-
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
Page 5 of 19
Pathway 1: Education and Training
Based on the results of the academic assessment, citizens may directly pursue education or training
through several entry points:
•
To attain the necessary literacy and basic academic skill levels to enter employment or
pursue postsecondary education or training.
•
To acquire the necessary career readiness, employability or “soft skills” training to
succeed in a chosen career or vocation. This type of training could consist of certain
competencies, developed in conjunction with business and industry, such as work
maturity and ethics, job search techniques, teamwork, etc.
•
To receive technical or occupational skills training, possibly leading to an industrybased certification, occupational certificate or diploma, or an applied associate degree,
within the postsecondary education system.
•
To enroll in a postsecondary academic program in pursuit of an academic degree
(associate, baccalaureate, master’s, doctoral, etc.)
A citizen entering this pathway will be advised to take the necessary steps to receive his or her
Louisiana WORKReady! (LWR!) Certificate, and proceed to employment - a desired goal of the
integrated system.
Pathway 2: Employment
Based on the results of the career/technical assessment, job seekers may directly enter the workforce.
They may also seek additional education or training in conjunction with their employment. This may be
the particular case for incumbent workers or underemployed workers. Citizens choosing this pathway
are also strongly encouraged to complete the requirements necessary to receive the Louisiana
WORKReady! Certificate.
Louisiana’s coordinated system of assessment outlines and recommends a streamlined and uniform
model for individuals to access the necessary assessments to become credentialed members of the
labor force. Regardless of which path of success an individual chooses, the assertion is that all
pathways, at some point, lead to employment, either by getting a job or creating jobs
(entrepreneurship).
LITERACY IMPROVEMENTS
In order to be competitive in the global marketplace, possessing appropriate skills is not only
necessary, but also mandatory. The Center for Workforce Preparation (www.uschamber.com/cwp)
recorded that “to appreciate the challenge, it’s important to understand that the very definition of literacy
has changed dramatically over the years.” Today, according to the National Literacy Act of 1991, a
literate American is able to “read, write, and speak English and compute and solve problems at levels
of proficiency necessary to function on the job and in society, to achieve (his) goals, and to develop
(his) knowledge and potential.”
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
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Some employers desire to “cross-assess” potential workers. In addition to the basic workplace skills,
the need to assess academic skills, primarily in reading and mathematics, is becoming increasingly
necessary, due in part to large numbers of employees lacking the basic academic skills necessary to
successfully perform their jobs. The need for an assessment instrument that establishes a framework
to match the skills of a student and/or client to a specific job or career was considered paramount.
Although strides had been made, LA continued to lag behind the nation on measures of literacy
attainment and academic achievement, and faced numerous economic and quality of life challenges
that had to be addressed to protect the future economic viability of the state.
Louisiana’s sobering statistics indicated a need for state agencies, employers, and business and
industry to increase the focus on improving literacy attainment and basic skills for its citizens. In 2002,
Collaborative members concluded that: 1) providing individualized basic skill upgrades and literacy
instruction was a critical gap to be addressed in service delivery systems; 2) both literacy and
workplace readiness skills needed improvement in order to address the critical shortage of trained
workers and those citizens lacking the basic skills necessary to meet the demands of a global
economy; 3) once an assessment instrument was identified that accurately measured the level of
workplace readiness and basic skills attainment of a citizen, individualized literacy instruction and/or
remediation efforts could be designed; and 4) state and local leaders needed to develop a way to
address these issues and to undertake a long-term agenda to impact this critical area, understanding
that some strategies and action steps can be put into place relatively quickly.
Later that year, then-Governor Mike Foster appointed a Skills Gap Task Force to identify the factors
draining Louisiana’s workforce pool. Adult and youth learning-related challenges were identified as
threats to the state’s economic stability (Appendix D).
In 2004, during her inaugural year, current Louisiana Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco appointed a
Task Force to study adult learning in Louisiana. The Task Force’s report included several
recommendations for increasing the usage of WorkKeys® to document workplace readiness
credentialing (Appendix E).
DOCUMENTING CAREER READINESS SKILLS (Employability) USING THE PROFILE XT
In February 2003, the Collaborative began the second phase of its work - to identify an assessment that
would provide an employability appraisal, which would measure the career readiness skills of an
individual. The Collaborative defined employability skills (soft skills) as “the non-technical abilities
required to function successfully in the workplace.” These included but are not limited to the following
abilities and skills:
• Interpersonal
• Leadership
• Problem Solving and Decision Making
• Self-Management
• Work Ethics
Choosing a career is one of life's biggest decisions. Unfortunately, it is usually made with inadequate
information. Whether selecting a first career, looking for a new career, planning career training or
making college plans, individuals need accurate information to make intelligent career and educational
choices.
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Soft skills as defined in scholarly literature are non-technical skills, abilities, and traits required
to function in a specific employment environment to: deliver information or services to
customers and co-workers; work effectively as a member of a team; learn or acquire the
technical skills necessary to perform a task; inspire the confidence of supervisors and
management; and understand and adapt to the cultural norms of the workplace. (Conrad, Cecilia A.,
and Wilhelmina A. Leigh. "Soft Skills: A Bridge or Barrier to Employment." Focus., Vol. 27, no. 1 (January 1999).
The challenge is that soft skills are difficult to measure. People only allow others to see what they want
seen. In other words, the old adages, "accentuate the positives and de-emphasize the negatives" and
"what they don't know won't hurt them" resulted in businesses experiencing immeasurable expenses
due to loss of time, unrealized return on investment (ROI), organizational inefficiency, dwindling
resources and lack of productivity due to employee turnover. Moreover, individuals who have been
miscast in positions have suffered economically and psychologically as well.
Profiles International (AssessmentCompany.com) likens potential employees to icebergs, in that what
you don't see is more significant, in many cases, than what you do see. In Figure 3, the company
identifies the visible portion of the total person, 10%, to include the resume, educational background,
referrals, appearance and work history. The other 90%, the invisible part of the person, is among the
most critical: thinking and reasoning style, occupational interests, and behavioral traits.
Figure 3: Profile XT Total Person Diagram
After months of reviewing the work of other states and engaging Louisiana Economic Development,
business, industry and community stakeholders, the Collaborative identified and agreed to pilot the
Profile XT.
The Profile XT, an assessment package developed by Profiles International
(AssessmentCompany.com), had the necessary utilities to satisfy the employability appraisal/career
compatibility component of the Louisiana WORKReady! Initiative (Appendix F).
Realizing that occupational success hinges on an individual being “job fit”, the employability appraisal
component takes the Louisiana WORKReady! Initiative to the next level of implementation. Through its
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
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discussions and research, the Collaborative noted that typically workers are hired based on their “hard
skills”, but a large majority of those who are released are let go based on their “soft skills”. In this
regard, the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) conducted a survey of employers in which
qualities were rated as “most important in job candidates” [Figure 4]. Two qualities tied for number one
with 66% of employers identifying each as most important: Having positive attitude toward job and
reliability. The quality that came in last place, with only 4% of businesses identifying it as most
important, was having all the necessary training.
Another well-documented study,
published in Harvard Business
Review, concluded that "Job Match"
is by far the most reliable predictor
of effectiveness on the job. The
study considered many factors
including the age, sex, race,
education and experience of
approximately 300,000 subjects. It
evaluated their job performance
and found no significant statistical
differences, except in the area of
"Job
Match.“
The
Review
concluded: "It's not experience
that counts or college degrees or
other accepted factors; success
hinges on a fit with the job."
Figure 4: Employer Ratings of Job
W. Edwards Deming author of The
New Economy, said, "If a person is
not performing as expected, it is
probably because they have been
miscast for the job.“
The Review noted that the only reliable method for evaluating "Job Match" is with a properly designed
assessment instrument capable of measuring the essential job-related characteristics particular to each
specific job. The Profile XT provides in a single system an all-purpose assessment that:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Measures one’s thinking-style, reasoning, occupational interests, and behavioral traits;
Matches these characteristics to employment sectors based on predetermined XT job profiles;
Allows for multiple types of reporting;
Employs a multitude of benchmarking capabilities;
Is used for selection, promotion, training, succession planning, and redeployment; and
Can be used to determine if an individual has been miscast for a particular career area.
While the WorkKeys® Assessments document the skill of a potential employee, Profile XT measures
the will of an individual. Together, WorkKeys® and the Profile XT offer a unique one-two punch in
determining the career readiness of a current or future worker.
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INTEGRATED DATA SYSTEM
The Collaborative determined that it was necessary to facilitate the use of an integrated data system to
share resources and information and to manage the work of the system. Several existing and new state
initiatives have been launched or are in development to advance data sharing and integration.
Louisiana Virtual One-Stop (LAVOS)
The Department of Labor's enhanced Louisiana Virtual One-Stop (http://lavos.laworks.net/) was
designed to assist individuals in selecting a new career, finding a new job, and locating suitable
education or training. Job seekers are guided through processes, such as creating a resume,
researching the labor market, and reviewing education and training opportunities available to them.
LA VOS contains several new features, including the ability for job seekers to match their interests to
careers and job training, and view and match their WorkKeys® scores to potential jobs.
Louisiana Interagency Performance Data System (LIPDS)
Louisiana Workforce Commission staff has been working with partner agencies to develop a
Louisiana Interagency Performance Data System. LIPDS is a pilot system designed to collect and
report performance measures on a variety of state programs. Currently, the system can generate
reports on employment outcomes, enrollments in public postsecondary education, reliance on public
assistance and incarcerations. Online reports are available for the LCTCS-TANF program, Louisiana
Rehabilitation Services and some Department of Corrections programs. When fully implemented, this
system will have the following primary features:
•
•
•
•
Centralized collection of performance data,
Customized reports available online at any time via a web interface,
Queries on request and online analytical processing, and
Establishment of a comprehensive database for longitudinal studies.
LIPDS is intended primarily as a tool for agencies involved in workforce development and social
program delivery. Agency personnel will access performance measures online for various populations
at any time, without the need to request data from each of the various agencies involved. This same
performance data would serve as a measurement tool in evaluating operational plans of the
agencies. In addition, this information will also be used to further develop a comprehensive view of
the workforce development programs in Louisiana. Its implementation is envisioned to consolidate
resources and data; provide a common and cost-effective measurement system; improve policy
analysis; and facilitate state efforts in establishing true performance-based budgeting.
The Louisiana Lifelong Learning Education Portal: Secondary to Postsecondary and Beyond
The Louisiana Lifelong Learning Education Portal: Secondary to Postsecondary and Beyond
(the Portal) is a new innovative tool that is being developed by the Board of Regents in consultation
and collaboration with the Department of Education, the Department of Labor and other entities to
provide a means by which a student can plan and monitor his or her academic progress from middle
school through postsecondary and into the workforce. This web-based interface will serve as an
educational and career planning tool to improve student access, revolutionize student engagement
and articulation, foster re-engagement for out of school students, and empower students to take
proprietary interest in and responsibility for their academic progress. Developed for our state’s
exclusive use, the Portal will provide current and future students, out-of-school youth and adult
learners with information on appropriate academic preparation (including their own assessment
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
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scores), career readiness information, postsecondary options, financial aid, job opportunities and
workforce training solutions. Once students become active in the workforce system, their information
would be transferred to LDOL for their continued use in the LAVOS System. Ideally, use of the Portal
will facilitate academic and career pursuits to assist citizens in the many transitions they will
encounter as they navigate the lifelong learning continuum.
THE NUCLEUS OF THE INTEGRATED SYSTEM: THE LOUISIANA WORKREADY! CERTIFICATE
From the onset, it was envisioned that at the heart of an integrated system that prepared Louisiana
citizens for the New Economy would be a credential that would:
•
validate basic skill level attainment and workplace readiness;
•
enable employers to quickly assess and recognize the skill level of workers for a wide range of
jobs;
•
provide a way for students and workers to document and advance their employability skills; and
•
inform educators how to best tailor instructional programs to help students acquire the specific
skills employers need.
The Collaborative concluded that if the basic skill level competencies were based, in part, on some
type of nationally-recognized instrument, the certificate could also be a portable credential, enabling its
recipients to work in many different areas of the state or nation. The concern, however, was whether
an appropriate assessment existed on which to base Louisiana’s credential. After researching nearly
250 different career assessments (of which only 16 met the criteria), one particular instrument WorkKeys® - contained the requisites necessary for use as the basis for awarding the Louisiana
WORKReady! (LWR!) Certificate.
ACT, Inc., the makers of the ACT college entrance
exam, designed the WorkKeys® Employment System
as a comprehensive system for measuring,
communicating and improving the common skills
required for success in nearly every skilled job and
career in America. It allows these skills to be
quantitatively assessed in both individuals and in
actual employment positions or job descriptions.
Therefore, WorkKeys® allows for comparison of the
skills required by a job with the skills possessed by
the job seeker. The WorkKeys® system consists of
four basic, interacting parts: instructional support
(training), assessments, research and reports,
and job profiling [Figure5].
Figure 5: The WorkKeys® System’s
Interacting Parts
Based on the three core assessments that ACT indicates most jobs require, Louisiana developed its
career readiness certificate. The Louisiana WORKReady! Certificate is a portable credential that
signifies to an employer that an individual has achieved acceptable levels in the foundation skills
necessary for success in the workplace. The WorkKeys® core assessments are:
y Applied Math
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
y Reading for Information
y Locating Information
Page 11 of 19
Use of the core WorkKeys® assessments is important to the future preparation and viability of
Louisiana’s workforce. All citizens who complete the core WorkKeys® assessments will have
documentation of their skills achievement, enabling them to pursue employment or further
education and/or training.
Although a few other states had developed career readiness certificates, a few members of the
Collaborative questioned whether merely modeling Louisiana’s credential after a certificate
developed exclusively for another state would adequately address the obvious demographic
differences and economic challenges, and meet the needs of all Louisiana’s current and potential
workers. After much debate and “making the case” discussions, three WORKReady! Certificate
types were developed based on the WorkKeys® core assessments: Applied Mathematics (Levels 37), Locating Information (Levels 3-6) and Reading for Information (Levels 3-7).
ƒ The Gold Certificate
Demonstrates that an individual has the requisite skills in
each core assessment for more than 80% of the profiled
jobs and occupations in the national WorkKeys® database by
scoring at or above a level 5.
ƒ The Silver Certificate
Demonstrates that an individual has the requisite skills in
each core assessment for 50% of the profiled jobs and
occupations in the national WorkKeys® database by scoring
at or above a level 4.
ƒ The Bronze Certificate Demonstrates that an individual has the requisite skills in
each core assessment for 30% of the profiled jobs and
occupations in the national WorkKeys® database by scoring
at or above a level 3.
Figure 6: LWR! Certificate Levels
Skill Area
Applied Mathematics
Reading for Information
Locating Information
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
Gold
>80%
of jobs
Silver
50%
of jobs
Bronze
30%
of jobs
5
4
3
5
4
3
5
4
3
Page 12 of 19
After a 16 month process, the Louisiana WORKReady!
Certificate was proposed to the Workforce Commission. The
Commission approved and initially forwarded to the Governor
two (Gold and Silver) of the three Certificate levels
recommended by the Collaborative. Believing that skill
certificates were needed for all job levels, the Collaborative
made a special presentation and urged the Commission to
adopt the Bronze Certificate also, which was omitted from the
original recommendation to the Governor. Following the
presentation, the Commission unanimously approved the Level
Three Certificate and recommended it to the Governor in March
2003, making Louisiana the first state in the nation to
design and offer the Bronze Certificate.
IMPLEMENTATION ACTIVITIES
Since the inception of Louisiana WORKReady!, each partner
agency continues to identify ways to incorporate WorkKeys®
and the WORKReady! Certificate into its programs, initiatives
and services and publicize this strategic initiative.
•
In an effort to more widely publicize the WORKReady!
Initiative, the Interagency Collaborative jointly hosted
the first state conference - Louisiana WORKReady!:
What’s All The Talk About? in June 2003. Over 500
in-state and out-of-state individuals representing
government, education, business and industry and
WorkKeys® advocates converged on Baton Rouge to
participate in the festivities.
The WORKReady! Certificate
All WORKReady! Certificates are
signed by the Governor of the
State of Louisiana and the Chair of
the Workforce Commission.
Each certificate is classified (Gold,
Silver, Bronze), assigned a unique
certificate number, dated and
sealed. The skill level the recipient
received in the core assessments
areas is also included on the
certificate.
The WORKReady! Certificate is
currently issued by the Workforce
Commission Office.
•
The Louisiana Workforce Commission, established by legislative act in
1997, serves as the human resource investment council for the state and
has been designated as the state Workforce Investment Board within the
meaning of the Federal Workforce Investment Act of 1998. The
Commission's membership, appointed by the governor, consists of 25
representatives from Louisiana business, labor, education, and public
service communities. The Commission currently issues the Louisiana
WORKReady! Certificate and works to solicit business and industry partners
to sign on as “Champions” of the Certificate. The Commission has produced
WORKReady! brochures for both employers and employees to further
promote the LWR! Certificate.
•
The Workforce Commission partnered with the Louisiana Community and
Technical College System (LCTCS) to offer customized workplace literacy
and technical training skills for low-income parents through a Temporary
Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Pilot (Appendix G). Utilizing funding
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
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from the Louisiana Department of Social Services, the Workplace Basic
and Technical Skills Training and Retention Services program was launched.
For three years, the state legislature allocated $10 million per year of surplus
federal TANF block grant funds to the Basic and Technical Skills program.
Using a portion of the funds allocated, the LCTCS established Workplace
Literacy Labs on each of its 50 campuses The program focused on serving
low-income adults in need of skills training and literacy improvements to gain
and retain employment.
Workplace literacy assistance consisted of
WorkKeys® assessments (the three core plus the six additional
assessments), correlated computerized basic skills training, and group and
individual instruction. All Tuition and Upgrade Program participants were
required to take part in workplace literacy assessment, completing
WorkKeys® and the correlated skills instruction on WorkKeys-related
software. At the completion of the workplace literacy requirement, students
received LCTCS transcripts listing WorkKeys® tests taken and scores
achieved.
•
LCTCS sites have reported success using WorkKeys® with students. For
example, Bossier Parish Community College recently described the
positive results experienced with 34 “at-risk” high school students who earned
Louisiana WORKReady! Certificates and increased their confidence in the
process (Appendix H).
•
Prior to the creation of the LWR! Certificate, the Louisiana Department of
Labor (LDOL) had implemented WorkKeys® and job profiling in some
Incumbent Worker Training Program projects at employers’ request. At the
local level, LDOL has established regional WorkKeys® testing centers [now
called Value Added Resellers (VARs)] utilizing the One-Stop Centers.
Through this system, local workforce investment areas will use WorkKeys®
to assess the workplace readiness skills of their Title I - WIA participants.
Interested job-seekers will be able to determine their workplace readiness
skill levels with the assistance of One-Stop Centers.
•
The Department of Labor has invested significantly over the past several
years in the job analysis component of the system, financially supporting the
training and professional development of six job profilers authorized by ACT
to facilitate job analysis focus groups. Accordingly, the LDOL also uses its
Business Service Representatives (BSRs) to publicize WorkKeys®, since
the BSRs already visit with employers around the state. Employers will be
educated about the advantages to be gained by using the WorkKeys®
System, informed about the profiling services that the Department offers,
and learn how WorkKeys® can affect the efficiency of current employees and
how to effectively choose employees for the future.
•
The State Department of Education has approved and included WorkKeys®
as an assessment to be administered to eligible participants in its Pre-GED
Skills Options and Adult Education Programs. To ensure that students are
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
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prepared to take and perform well on WorkKeys® assessments, the
Department has authorized local education agencies to purchase and offer
basic skill upgrade software that correlates with WorkKeys® to students in
approved programs. With input from ACT, a LA Accountability Achievement
Level – WorkKeys® Comparison Table was developed (Appendix I).
•
The Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) is in the
process of reviewing and refining the current High School Graduation
Diploma Endorsement criteria. WorkKeys® is being considered as an
enhancement to the existing Endorsements.
•
The Department of Social Services has instituted the Strategies to
Empower People (STEP) Program. A result of the Personal Responsibility
and Universal Engagement Act of 2003 passed by the Louisiana Legislature,
the purpose of the STEP program is to provide opportunities for work-eligible
families to receive job training, employment and supportive services to enable
them to become self-sufficient. With the assistance of the Departments of
Labor and Education, the Workforce Commission and LCTCS, the
Department of Social Services offers several opportunities for advancement
to STEP clients. Specifically, a job readiness element is incorporated in the
STEP process. Those clients who meet the necessary requirements to
participate in job readiness activities will take the Pre-WorkKeys® assessment
and ultimately take the core WorkKeys® assessments.
•
The Department of State Civil Service has expressed an interest in
possibly accepting WorkKeys® scores in lieu of some state civil service
employment exams, provided scores are based on WorkKeys® Job Profiles
and satisfy EEOC standards and legal precedents.
•
The Governor’s Adult Learning Task Force concluded that Louisiana
cannot achieve economic and quality of life benefits for its citizens
commensurate with the norms of the nation without significant improvement
in the education attainment levels of the adult population and without
addressing the mismatch between occupations in demand and worker
training. More specifically, they recommended, along with others, adoption
of the following two goals:
ƒ That, within five years, Louisiana will double the number of
adults certified annually as “workplace ready” as determined
using the ACT’s WorkKeys® Assessment, and within 10 years
quadruple this number.
ƒ That, within five years, Louisiana will double the number of
adults who become pre-WorkKeys® ready, and within 10 years
quadruple this number.
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The Task Force further recommended that the state: Take advantage of [its]
commitment to and investment in ACT’s WorkKeys® and use that instrument
as the primary mechanism for measuring competence and easing transitions
among various education providers and into the world of work (Appendix E).
•
During her inaugural year, Louisiana Governor Kathleen Babineaux
Blanco assembled Enterprise Teams, comprise of state agency heads, to
coordinate and more effectively and efficiently manage the resources of
state government. The Secretaries of Labor and Economic Development,
the Superintendent of Education (K-12), the Commissioner of Higher
Education and the President of the Louisiana Community and Technical
College make up the Workforce Enterprise Team which is staffed by the
Workforce Commission. To begin its task of addressing workforce
development from a systems perspective, the Enterprise Team agreed on
and recommended to the Workforce Competitiveness Task Force three
“Strategic Intents”:
1 - Create and/or reinvent and empower a system-level governance,
management, and accountability structure that will be responsible for
(a) articulating a vision and common agenda, (b) sustaining system
level planning and outcome achievement, and (c) guiding subsystem
level planning; 2 - Align system partners regionally. Undertake
regional, sector-based workforce development planning, training, job
matching and outreach; and 3 - Align post secondary education, job
training, and workforce investment strategies with regionally based
economic development priorities and targeted industry skills needs.
•
Louisiana Board of Regents served as the lead agency and convener of
the Interagency Collaborative to design the three-level certificate. Along with
the Workforce Commission and other agency partners, Regents’ staff
continues to promote the Louisiana WORKReady! Certificate, WorkKeys® and
the Profile XT Assessment throughout the state, region and nation.
•
Board of Regents staff developed a technological interface and data
system for processing WorkKeys® data in order to produce the LWR!
Certificates (Appendix J). The system houses the WORKReady! data
reported by various WorkKeys® Assessment sites for their test-takers. The
system has the capacity to issue various Certificate Production Reports (e.g.
- by certificate level, region, administration site, etc.). Once Regents has
validated, processed and assigned each credential a unique number, a
“clean” file containing the certificate information is transmitted to the
Workforce Commission.
The Commission prints and issues the
certificates, then forwards them to the submitting test site for issuance to the
recipient(s). To date, 6,360 certificates have been issues. Of this number,
13.3% or 846 were Gold; 3,315 or 52.1% were Silver; and 34.6% or 2,199
were Bronze (Appendix K).
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SUMMARY, LESSONS LEARNED AND NEXT STEPS
Summary
Heretofore, education, workforce development, and economic development have operated
independent of each other. The integrated system aligns these components, while taking into
account the unique role that each must assume in making Louisiana truly “Work-Ready!”
Improving the availability of a skilled
labor force is critical to Louisiana’s
economic future.
Louisiana must
continue to position itself to compete
for jobs that pay livable wages. To
this end, Louisiana Governor Kathleen
Babineaux Blanco has charged four
independent groups (the Governor’s
Workforce Enterprise Team – which
addresses workforce policy, the Adult
Learning Task Force, the Task Force
on Workforce Competitiveness and
the
High
School
Redesign
Commission) to evaluate Louisiana’s
current
systems
and
make
recommendations that would lead to a
more cohesive system which aligns
the
important
components
of
education, workforce development and
economic development; eliminates
silos, duplication and unproductive
competition; and limits the responsible
use of resources.
Figure 7: Workforce Enterprise Team Graphic
Louisiana’s Workforce Policy Agenda
Additionally, the Governor hosted, for the first time in the state’s history, a Solutions to Poverty
Summit. During the Summit, presentations on WorkKeys® and the Louisiana WORKReady!
Certificate were made. At separate events, similar presentations were made to the Workforce
Enterprise Team, the Adult Learning Task Force, and the Task Force on Workforce
Competitiveness. A presentation is proposed for the High School Redesign Commission at a future
date.
Lessons Learned from Louisiana
Although hindsight is 20/20, it is always a relevant exercise in which to engage and provide insight
to those who would use Louisiana’s process as a model. In this regard, the following are suggested
essential elements to be considered in the design, adoption and implementation of a state
recognized WorkKeys®-based credential for career readiness:
•
At the outset, establish a full understanding of WorkKeys® as an assessment tool and how it
can benefit and fit into the workforce planning and employment systems fostered by the
state.
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
Page 17 of 19
•
Early in the planning and design process, engage education, business, state agency and
community partners in discussions on workforce, skill-level and educational needs, e.g. The
Louisiana Interagency Collaborative.
•
Establish a forum, led by an external unbiased facilitator, in which the existing system is
evaluated, information is gathered and ideas for improvement can be exchanged.
•
Pursue and attain “buy-in” at the highest level, e.g. Office of the Governor, to maximize
exposure and support of the career readiness certificate.
•
Educate employers on the WorkKeys® Employability System and its benefits to businesses;
•
Once employers understand and appreciate WorkKeys®, explain to them the “WIIFM?”
(What’s in it for me?); and the “Why?” (Why should I accept and promote this?) of the LWR!
Certificate.
•
Establish a plan for dealing with splintering and fractionalization among partners as various
components of the process evolve.
•
Once the credential has been established, clearly define the specifications for branding and
promoting it.
•
Establish a viable communication network to ensure that a unified message is relayed to
stakeholders at all levels.
•
Identify and entrust coordination to a “lead entity” whose longevity is not dictated by the
state’s political process, i.e., changes in administration based on an election.
•
Promote the establishment of a blended funding stream that is supported by partners,
employers and others benefiting from the process.
•
Ensure that workable data and record keeping systems are in place and fully utilized.
Next Steps
In order to realize the full potential of the integrated Louisiana WORKReady! System, the state-level
Interagency Collaborative developed the following recommendations for consideration by key
stakeholders and policymakers:
1.
Fully implement the recommendations of the Adult Learning Task Force, the Solutions to
Poverty Summit, and the Task Force on Workforce Competitiveness and the High School
Redesign Committee, when ready (Note: This recommendation has been recently added
and was not among those initially made by the Collaborative, as these initiatives had not yet
taken place).
2.
Representatives of statewide employer organizations, including Chambers of Commerce,
trade associations, and the Louisiana Association for Business and Industry, should be
engaged to help further validate minimum basic and soft skill levels required for success and
to recognize the Louisiana WORKReady! Certificate as an important credential for work
readiness.
Prepared 2002, Revised 2005
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3.
In an effort to prepare Louisianans for the demands of a global economy, training in core
competencies in work readiness skills (i.e. resume preparation, work maturity and ethics,
etc.) should be incorporated into all phases of the education and workforce development
components of the system.
4.
Louisiana's state government leaders in education, workforce development, and economic
development (Governor’s Workforce Enterprise Team) should fully endorse the integrated
Louisiana WORKReady! System and encourage the investment of resources (both human
and financial) for its full implementation.
Workforce
Development
Education
Economic
Development
Louisiana WORKReady!
For more information on WorkKeys® usage in Louisiana or the Louisiana WORKReady! Certificate,
please contact:
Dr. Lisa S. Vosper
Associate Commissioner for Workforce Education & Training
Address
Louisiana Board of Regents
Claiborne Conference Center
1201 North 3rd Street, Suite 6-200
Baton Rouge, LA 70802
E-mail/Web address
E-mail: [email protected]
website: www.regents.state.la.us/workready.htm
Telephone/Facsimile
Phone: 225.342.4253
Fax: 225.342.6926
Note: Other agency partners participate in this effort, so inquires will be directed as appropriate.
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APPENDIX A:
About the
Louisiana
Interagency
Collaborative
Louisiana Interagency Collaborative
The Louisiana Interagency Collaborative is a network of state agencies organized to identify ways to
more effectively and efficiently address common needs of the state which impact and affect the
respective agencies. The Collaborative members include:
•
Board of Regents
•
Department of Corrections
•
Department of Education
•
Department of Labor
•
Department of Social Service
•
Department of State Civil Service
•
Louisiana Community and Technical College System
•
Workforce Commission
Initially, the Board of Regents convened the Collaborative in 2001 to discuss the status of
assessment usage in Louisiana. During this discussion, representatives expressed the need for a
more coordinated system to provide assessment services for their various customer groups. All
agreed that the current system did not serve the best interest of citizens, and was duplicative and
costly. Thus, the group formulated a goal to "create a coordinated system of assessment
which addresses both academic and workplace readiness and minimizes duplication."
For over fifteen months, the collaborative met to assess the current delivery system; evaluate
workplace readiness assessments; and design a coordinated system of assessment and a
workplace readiness credential that would be employer valued, recognized and utilized.
LOUISIANA WORKReady! is the result of this cooperative process.
In 2003, the concept for a LOUISIANA WORKReady! Certificate was proposed to the Workforce
Commission, which approved and initially forwarded to the Governor two (Gold and Silver) of the three
Certificate levels recommended by the Collaborative. Believing that skill certificates were needed for
all job levels, the Collaborative made a special presentation and urged the Commission to also adopt
the Bronze Certificate, which was omitted from the original recommendation to the Governor. After the
presentation, the Commission unanimously approved the Bronze Certificate and recommended it to
the Governor in March of that year.
The Louisiana Department of Labor and the LTC-Natchitoches campus have been engaged in
WorkKeys® job profiling for several years. Two years ago, the Louisiana Community and Technical
College System piloted a Workplace Literacy initiative. Using surplus funds from the LA Department
of Social Services’ Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) block grant, the Workforce
Commission partnered with the LCTCS to customize workplace literacy and technical skills training
through the development of Workplace Literacy Labs at each LCTCS campus.
Then Governor Mike Foster commended the Commission and the Interagency Collaborative for its
work, adopted implementation of the LOUISIANA WORKReady! Certificate as one of his 2003
priorities, and hosted an Industry briefing to engage the business community. Currently, the
Workforce Commission is serving as the issuing agency for the LOUISIANA WORKReady!
Certificate.
The Collaborative has widened its circle of partnership to include input from community and faithbased organizations, business and industry partners, and Louisiana Economic Development.
Together, these agencies and partners will continue to work in common for the good of Louisiana.
. . . And Miles To Go Before We Sleep!
Louisiana Interagency Collaborative
Page 2
Louisiana Board of Regents (convenor)
Dr. Lisa S. Vosper, Associate Commissioner for
Workforce Education and Training
Louisiana Department of Corrections
Ms. Jannitta Antoine, Deputy Secretary
George Foster (retired), Louisiana Technical College
LA Community and Technical College System
State Department of Education
Ms. Carol Hebert, TANF Workplace Literacy
Program Coordinator
Reba Poulson, Coordinator of Resource
Development and Perkins Programs
Ms. Melba Kennedy, Assistant Administrator Career and Technical Education
Mr. Jeff Rials, Program Coordinator
- Adult Literacy Services
Ms. Judy Maxwell, Workforce Development
Officer III - Office of Workforce Development
Louisiana Department of Labor
Ms. Sandra Simmons, Executive Management
Officer - Office of Workforce Development (resigned)
Ms. Mary Joseph, Deputy Assistant Secretary
Louisiana Department of Social Services
Mr. Daniel Tuman, Director of Administrative
Services Support Division, Office of Family Support
Louisiana Division of Administration Department of State Civil Service
Mr. Kurt Smith, Human Resource Assistant. Division
Administrator
Louisiana State University
Mr. Doug Weimer, Assistant Dean
- Continuing Education
Louisiana Workforce Commission
Mr. Fredell Butler, Senior Policy Analyst
Collaborative Facilitator
Andrala Walker, Owner & Founder AWEstruck
Consulting Group (formerly with Workforce Commission
Staff)
. . . And Miles To Go Before We Sleep!
APPENDIX B:
Louisiana
WORKReady!
Timeline
TIMELINE
• October 2001
The Louisiana Board of Regents convenes
partners from several state agencies to discuss
coordinating assessment among and between
agencies. This entity becomes known as the
Louisiana Interagency Collaborative.
• October 2001
Louisiana Interagency Collaborative meets
with staff from ACT (Karen Pennell, and Mike
Valiga and James Maxey) to discuss various
ACT assessments.
• October 2001
The Collaborative begins to develop the
framework for a statewide assessment system,
including establishing a system goal;
identifying customers and other stakeholders;
formalizing qualities and characteristics of the
system; and charting action steps.
• November 2001
Members of the Collaborative team attend the
National WorkKeys® Conference in Houston
Texas.
• December 2001
Collaborative members meet to debrief from
the WorkKeys® Conference, identifying
promising practices and continuing discussion
on assessment coordination.
• January 2002
Collaborative partners finalize system goals,
characteristics, and assessment model; begin to
design appropriate agency flow charts.
• February 2002
Collaborative endorses WorkKeys® as the
assessment with the necessary requisites to be
used as the basis of the state employability
certificate.
• March 2002
Collaborative partners evaluate basic skill
upgrade software (e.g. Aztec, KeyTrain, Plato,
and WIN) and literacy intervention products
(e.g. Fast Forward) to be used in conjunction
with WorkKeys®.
• March 2002
The concept for a coordinated assessment
system and possible use of WorkKeys® is
shared with staff of the Governor’s Office and
the Workforce Commission.
• Summer 2002
Louisiana Community and Technical College
System (LCTCS) begins to pilot the
WorkKeys® Assessment through its TANF
Initiative. All LCTCS TANF participants
receive a WorkKeys® core foundation skills
assessment and the opportunity to earn the
WORKReady! Certificate.
• Summer 2002
The Louisiana Legislature calls for the creation
of a Skills Gap Task Force to investigate the
“disconnect” between the knowledge and skills
citizens possess and those required to meet
current market needs and grow Louisiana’s
economy.
• December 2002
The LOUISIANA WORKReady! Certificate and
the three levels are presented to the Workforce
Commission and Governor’s Staffs.
• January 2003
The Collaborative begins a second phase
evaluation and identification of employability
skill assessment products
• February 2003
WorkKeys® endorsed and three Certificate
Levels recommended
• February 2003
Two of the three recommended LOUISIANA
WORKReady! Certificate levels (Gold and
Silver) approved by Workforce Commission &
recommended to the Governor.
• March 2003
Believing that skill certificates were needed for
all job levels, the Collaborative makes a special
presentation and urges the Workforce
Commission to adopt the Bronze Certificate.
• March 2003
The Commission unanimously approves the
Bronze Certificate and recommends its inclusion
to the Governor, assuring skill certificates for
jobs at all levels and making Louisiana the first
state in the nation to offer the Bronze
Certificate.
• April 2003
Governor Mike Foster identifies LOUISIANA
WORKReady! as one of his priorities for 2003
and issues a letter of support. Governor Foster
also recognizes the work of the Interagency
Collaborative and the Workforce Commission.
• May 2003
Presentation on LOUISIANA WORKReady!
made during a session of the 2003 National
WorkKeys® Conference.
• June 2003
LOUISIANA WORKReady!: What Is All The
Talk About? Conference held June 9-11, 2003
in Baton Rouge, Louisiana (500+ attended).
• October 2003
Louisiana’s Career Readiness work highlighted
at the National ACT Board of Director’s
Meeting in Iowa City, Iowa
• 2003 – 2004
Numerous parish, state, regional and national
presentations made to raise the awareness of
WorkKeys® and the Profile XT assessments and
the LOUISIANA WORKReady! Certificate.
• 2004
Agencies continue to develop, refine and
implement the action plans for their agencies to
use/incorporate
WorkKeys®
and
LOUISIANA WORKReady! Certificate.
the
• June 2004
Presentation of LOUISIANA WORKReady!
highlighted during the Closing Keynote Session
of the 2004 National WorkKeys® Conference in
Miami, Florida.
• August 2004
Presentation of LOUISIANA WORKReady!
highlighted during the 2004 National SHRM
Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.
• 2005
And miles to go before we sleep. . .
APPENDIX C:
Initial
Assessment
Activities in
Louisiana
Statewide
Statewide
Out of Level (Special
Education)
Iowa
LEAP (Louisiana
Education Assessment
Program) Alternative
Students in grades 8 and 10
Grades 3 - 9
Grades 3, 5 - 7, and 9
Grades 4 & 8
! Interest Aptitude
! Monitor student achievement
! Monitor student achievement
! Accountability
Board of Regents
State Agency Budget
Who Pays
Statewide
EPAS (Educational
Planning and
Assessment System:
Explore and Plan)
Grades 10-12 (taken at
various points during high
school)
Purpose of Assessment
Statewide
ACT, SAT, PACT,
PSAT
Grades 10 and 11
Student
Who Is Assessed?
Statewide
GEE 21 (Graduation
Exit Exam)
Grades 10-12
! Skills
State Agency Budget
Assessment Used
Statewide
ASVAB
Grades 11 & 12
! Academic/Career
predictor
! Accountability/Graduation
Inventory
! Career Interest/Aptitude
Test
! Prepare for the GED Qualifying
! Job Placement (TABE)
! Measuring academic growth
instruction
! diagnostic for individualized
placement
! to determine literacy level
Testing)
! Students - Pre- and Post
Testing
! ESL Students – Pre- and Post
Students age 17 and above
Students 19 and above
(optional)
No charge to students
Usually the local program.
Exceptions: in some areas
students pay a fee when
tested for “Ability to
Benefit.” and job placement
for Business.
No Charge
State Agency Budget
Student
State Agency Budget
State Agency Budget
Participating
LEA
IBC (Industry-Based
Certification)
Grade 12
! Academic, College Success
Participating
LEAs
HSTW (High Schools
That Work)
AMES (Adult Measure of
Educational Skill)
1-8
1, 3-7
BEST (Basic English Skills
Test)
1,4
CASAS (Comprehensive
Adult Student Assessment
System)
1-7
TABE
(Test of Adult Basic
Education)
Participating
LEAs
Region #
i.e.—labor
market regions
Appendix C: A View of Assessment Practices Among State Agencies
Agency/Entity
LA Department
of Education:
Career and
Technical
Education
Adult
Education
1-8
GED (General Educational
Development) Practice
Test*
Source: Louisiana Interagency Collaborative, 2001.
Purpose of Assessment
Job Placement
Career Advancement
Targeted Training
Career Planning
To determine skill levels and
eligibility for program entry
State Agency
Budget/Federal
Student
College Budget/Student
Fees
College Budget/Student
Fees
Who Pays
Appendix C: A View of Assessment Practices Among State Agencies
Who Is Assessed?
LCTCS
Community Colleges
Assessment Used
! To determine placement in entrylevel college courses or if scores
indicate appropriate
remedial/developmental course(s)
Region #
i.e.—labor
market
regions
All new full and part-time
certificate and associate degree
seeking students.
Agency/Entity
ASSET/COMPASS
All students – used as a pre- and
post test.
Louisiana Board of
Regents
TABE
Statewide
Statewide
All applicants requesting
admission for the freshman class
!
!
!
!
!
Scores are used to place students at
appropriate levels in freshman
courses, for counseling, and for
selection of scholarship recipients.
! To determine skill levels and
eligibility for program entry.
Technical College
ACT, ASSET/COMPASS
WorkKeys
*Campus -specific
placement test
Statewide
Statewide
enter the workforce
! Youth and Adults
! Job Applicant
! Career interest inventory
! Work value inventory
! Assessment
! Program Placement
! Targeted Training
Civil Service (State)
! TANF recipients
! Welfare to Work Recipients
! Employment/Job Placement
! Advancement; Probational/
Promotional Knowledge/Skills and
Abilities
State Agency Budget
Use varied types of
assessments, including
SAGE and TABE
! Academic Assessment
Statewide
! Inmates
! Job Applicants
! Promotional Candidates
JSEP (Job Skills Enhancement Program);
Professional Entry Test
(PET)
Statewide
Regional and
Statewide
SAGE
TABE
ONET Work Importance
Locator
ONET Interest Profiler
! Incumbent Workers
! Adult Learners preparing to
LSU System
Southern Univ. System
Univ. of LA System
Department of Labor
LWIAs and One Stop
Centers
Department of Social
Services
Civil Service
Department of
Corrections
TABE
Source: Louisiana Interagency Collaborative, 2001.
APPENDIX D:
Skills Gap Chart
&
Skills Gap
Task Force Report
Executive Summary
2000 Census
Occupational
Profile of jobs in
Louisiana2
23% require 4year college
degree
2012 Projected
Occupational
Profile of jobs in
U.S.3
The Workforce Gap
How Louisiana’s Class
of 2002 (not just
graduates) choose to
prepare for the
workforce1
19% require 4year college
degree
(PROFESSIONAL)
25% require high
school diploma or
equiv. and no job
specific
preparation
(SKILLED)
(UNSKILLED)
23% require high
school diploma or
equiv. and no job
specific
preparation
(SKILLED)
54% require 2year associate’s
degree or
advanced
training
(UNSKILLED)
56% require 2year associate’s
degree, certificate
or advanced
training
(PROFESSIONAL)
31% entered 4-year
public or private
colleges
6% entered 2-year
colleges, proprietary
schools or
apprenticeship
programs
29% graduated and
entered directly into the
labor market
34% dropped out of the
system before
completing high school
or left the state
Sources: Louisiana Department of Education, Annual Financial and Statistical Reports 1998-1999, 2002-2003; Louisiana Board of Regents, Statewide Student Profile System and estimates by Systems Solutions
Consulting; Demographic estimates by U.S. Census Bureau and Dr. Raymond Brady, Systems Solutions Consulting. (November 2004)
1
The Class of 2002 was estimated at 70,281 based on US Census data. There were 46,050 High school graduates (public, private and other) in 2002. Post-secondary education participation was based on data available from the
Board of Regents.
Occupational data is from STF3 File of the 2000 Census; classifications were developed by Dr. Raymond J. Brady, Systems Solutions Consulting based on O-NET and LDOL input.
Based on Bureau of Labor Statistics projections to 2012 adjusted to reflect 2000 Census distribution.
2
3
RIGHT H ERE, RIGHT NOW!
LOUISIANA’S URGENT AGENDA FOR A
KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY WORKFORCE
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
An 18-member Skills Gap Task Force met for three months in the fall of 2002, charged by the
Louisiana Legislature with making recommendations to close the state’s growing skills gap. The
Task Force defined the skills gap as two kinds of crises:
1. the difference between the knowledge and skills Louisiana citizens possess and those
required to meet current market needs as well as opportunities of the emerging
knowledge economy and
2. the shrinking of our primes age workforce due to falling birth rates, out-migration,
aging workforce nearing retirement, and the loss of excessive numbers from our
education pipeline.
Task Force members and staff tapped the current thinking of more than 20 economic and
workforce development groups. Two in particular resonated with the Task Force and powerfully
influenced its findings and recommendations: South Carolina’s Pathways to Prosperity and
Southern Growth Policy Board’s The Mercedes and the Magnolia.
The Task Force members offer the three recommendations in this Executive Summary as
priorities to the House and Senate Committees on Education and Labor and Industrial Relations.
The report sends a message to employers, the Governor, the boards and agencies responsible for
the delivery and funding of workforce education and training, and in fact to all Louisiana
citizens.
Thanks to leadership – from policymakers to classroom teachers to visionary employers –
Louisiana has taken significant steps during the last six years to close the skills gap. But there is
still much to do. While promising Louisiana reforms such as early childhood initiatives are longterm investments, skills gaps and worker shortages exist right here, right now. This gap is
creating problems that will have long-term effects on our people and our economy.
Those who enter the workforce immediately after exiting high school without the requisite
workplace skills, especially dropouts, are shortchanging the future. If current student trends
continue, many of these young people are not likely to seek additional training for up to ten
years. This is the immediate problem. Meanwhile, employers are interested in locating and
expanding in geographic areas with workers who have the skills for a knowledge-intensive
economy. Unfortunately, many of our workers with those skills are part of the outward
migration of Louisiana’s young better-educated families. So while these are immediate
problems, there are no “quick-fix” solutions.
Louisiana needs a seamless education system that closes the gap between the knowledge and
skills students possess and what good jobs require of workers. We need more people who know
how to apply academic and technical skills to their work environment and more who are capable
of using today’s technology. Just as importantly, we need more people – including parents and
students – who understand the kinds of jobs available in today’s job market and the kinds of
education required to land and keep those jobs. And we need that right away. If Louisiana is to
prosper, then we must close the present skills gap. We must take action right here, right now to
create in Louisiana a talent pool capable of meeting our current market needs as well as the
opportunities of the emerging, knowledge-based economy.
It is in this spirit that we offer recommendations in the hopes that others will join us in
collaborating, taking action, and working toward Louisiana’s economic prosperity. Right here,
right now, in Louisiana, Task Force members offer the following three recommendations.
Recommendation 1: Create a seamless education system for ALL students that includes
career concentrations, has links to work-based knowledge, ties curricula
for all students to market demand and post secondary education/training
requirements, and provides portable credentials.
Strategies:
o Strengthen funding and accountability for the Career Options Act 1124.
o Invest in industry-based certification for students.
o Expand Advanced Placement, dual enrollment and Tech Prep.
o Make college courses transferable among public institutions.
o Create a funding incentive for articulated programs.
o Adopt a career/technical high school diploma enhancement/endorsement.
o Implement educator advisement programs in middle schools, high schools, and
colleges.
o Expand teacher participation in professional development programs.
o Provide students and their parents with information about market shifts and
alternatives to a four-year college education plan.
o Make more productive use of the senior year in high school.
o Promote student-managed career portfolios that document both academic and careerrelated skills.
o Emphasize accountability measures that reward schools for improving completion
rates, including reclaiming dropouts.
o Expand the accountability measures for colleges to include participation in economic
and workforce development initiatives.
o Revisit funding for higher education.
o Maintain and sustain effective school reforms now in place and expand promising
practices.
o Create more awareness about the value of the community/technical college system
among educators and the public. (See Recommendation 3)
Recommendation 2: Provide technology education for educators, students PK-16 and adults
that increases information technology fluency, infuses computer skills into all curricula,
provides career information, teaches civic responsibility and the work ethic, and enhances
literacy and business communications skills.
Strategies:
o Develop materials for students on careers in information technology.
o Follow up and inform Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) participants.
o Develop computer education in innovative ways and deliver it in places that engage
parents and students.
o Discover or create computer programs that teach civic responsibility and the work
ethic.
o Create incentives to motivate employers to become engaged.
o Provide tax incentives for employers and others who wish to donate computers and
training.
o Find ways to get more computers and Bandwidth into schools and homes.
o Encourage students to use the senior year more productively.
o Find ways to encourage educators to embrace technology and use it in the classroom.
o Expand the Computers for Louisiana Kids (CLK) initiative.
o Explore ways to assist small businesses in providing work-related learning and soft
skills training to prospective employees.
Recommendation 3: Develop a strategic communications plan engaging key stakeholders in a
process that will increase awareness of the need to link employer needs in preparing
Louisiana students for the knowledge economy.
Strategies:
o Identify the stakeholders and evaluate stakeholder roles.
o Convene a statewide public relations committee charged with developing a strategic
communications plan.
o Implement a statewide communications plan.
o Develop an Honor Roll/Report Card that recognizes accomplishments of employers
and educators in tying education to market needs.
o Strengthen Career Options Act 1124.
One measure that will help gauge Louisiana’s success in implementing these three Skills Gap
Task Force recommendations is the extent to which Louisiana continues to emerge as a leadingedge reform state in economic development and workforce education and training. Indicators of
success should include the extent to which the Legislature and the next Administration sustain
Louisiana’s bold reforms and take them to the next level.
APPENDIX E:
Adult Learning
Task Force Report
Recommendations
Report of the
Adult Learning Task Force
Submitted to:
Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco
Senate President Donald Hines
House Speaker Joe Salter
Senator Sharon Weston Broome
Representative Willie Hunter, Jr.
Senator J. Chris Ullo
Representative Carl Crane
January 27, 2005
F. Emphasize linkages between literacy and vocational/technical skills, especially skills
related to the state’s highest demand occupations.
G. Emphasize transitions in the educational/work pipeline that make learning, both formal
and informal, a lifelong endeavor.
H. Include the perspective of the adult learner in devising strategies and responses to the
adult learning needs of the state.
V.
RECOMMENDATIONS
The Task Force envisions an adult learning system for Louisiana in which adults in each parish:
•
Have an easily accessible point of entry to educational programs and support services
appropriate to their needs.
•
Are helped to succeed in their learning endeavors.
•
Are helped to develop a portfolio of lifelong learning experiences and credentials.
•
Can draw on the educational resources of all the education providers in the state of
Louisiana.
•
Have their level of learning certified in ways that ease their transitions to the next levels
of education and improve their employability.
In order to achieve this vision, the Task Force makes the following recommendations:
A. That an Adult Learning Policy Council be established with membership comprised of
the chief executives (no substitutes) of entities deemed appropriate by the Governor.
This Council should be charged with:
1. Articulating a clear set of goals for adult learning (see section II for a starting point)
and developing strategies for reaching these goals.
2. Creating a mechanism for monitoring progress toward the achievement of those
goals—and making data readily available through a user-friendly medium. The
measures should be commonly defined across all programs so that the results can be
compared and program contributions to goal achievement measured.
3. Developing and broadly distributing an annual report card that describes progress
being made and compares Louisiana to other states on a set of key indicators.
4. Developing coordinated policy regarding adult learning.
5. Receiving new state dollars for purposes of enhancing adult learning and allocating
those dollars in ways that will leverage current program funds to the maximum
extent possible.
9
6. Recommending to the Governor a strategy for institutionalizing the work of the
Council and ensuring the sustainability of the policy leadership with which it is
charged.
B. The Adult Learning Policy Council should not immediately promote action designed to
restructure the existing mechanisms for delivering adult learning programs. Rather, it
should:
1. Establish goals for improvement in every parish of the state.
2. Designate a lead entity in each parish responsible for:
•
Establishing local goals in consultation with the Policy Council.
•
Coordinating efforts of various providers to achieve these goals.
•
Monitoring and reporting on performance.
3. Utilize and encourage both public and private providers.
4. Restructure the delivery system, if necessary, to reach performance goals based
upon a rigorous evaluation after three years if the proposed approach is not
successful.
C. Take advantage of the state’s commitment to and investment in ACT’s WorkKeys and
use that instrument as the primary mechanism for measuring competence and easing
transitions among various education providers and into the world of work. This means
that it will be important to:
1. Assess entrants into adult learning programs, using WorkKeys readiness
assessments as appropriate, to determine whether or not individuals are ready to
take core WorkKeys assessments.
2. Use ability to pass WorkKeys readiness assessments as an indicator of successful
completion of ABE programs.
3. Devise a WorkKeys profile that will be broadly accepted (as an alternative to a high
school diploma or GED) as a determinant of eligibility for entrance to the LCTCS.
This, in essence, would require profiling “Freshman Year in LCTCS” to establish
levels of basic skills (general education) required for successful participation.
4. Provide WorkKeys certifications for individuals completing programs designed to
prepare them for specific occupations.
5. Provide learners with ACT WorkKeys job profiles in the area of their career interest
to use in setting goals for their basic skills attainment.
10
6. Provide promotional materials and dissemination of information about WorkKeys to
learners and employers across the state.
7. Promote the utilization of WorkKeys by employers through:
•
Engaging employers in determining levels of skills needed by their
employees.
•
Communicating the importance of utilizing WorkKeys to ensure that
employees have these skills.
•
Promoting broad adoption and utilization by employers.
8. Provide colleges and universities with ACT WorkKeys job profiles in the areas of
career education and training they provide to use in setting goals for the basic skills
attainment of the students in those programs.
D. Formally expand the mission of the LCTCS to encompass adult learning programs for
individuals who can pass the WorkKeys readiness assessment but who do not yet meet
the WorkKeys profile required for successful LCTCS participation. In essence, this
encourages LCTCS to provide the equivalent of developmental education to students
who have not completed high school. LCTCS should be supported in this effort by
adjustments in current state funding formulae.
E. More fully engage employers in creating greater demand for adult learning and workready certification. Specifically the Task Force recommends that:
1. State government, as an employer, take the lead in promoting literacy for all its
employees. This should include:
•
Profiling state positions (at least those with large numbers of employees
against WorkKeys criteria).
•
Using WorkKeys as an assessment device for all potential new employees.
•
Providing training (during the work day) that will assist all existing
employees to achieve the appropriate WorkKeys levels for the position they
currently hold or wish to obtain. If there are state positions requiring skills
at less than a high school level, skills associated with entry to LCTCS should
be the target.
2. State government encourage all other public sector employers—school districts,
parish governments, etc.—to follow suit. For those entities receiving state funds,
require an annual report indicating:
•
Number of employees falling below the skill level threshold of profiled jobs
at the beginning of the year.
11
•
Number of employees who have achieved the level during the course of the
year.
•
Number of employees below “standard” at the end of the year.
3. Incentives be created for private sector employers to:
•
Require appropriate demonstration of competence in the hiring process.
•
Increase literacy levels of current workers.
Tax credits provide one mechanism for accomplishing this. Another is to make
direct payments to employers for increasing (using WorkKeys in a pretest/posttest
mode) learning among their employees.
4. Promotional materials and dissemination of information about work-ready
certification be provided to employers throughout the state.
F. Allocate additional state resources for support of adult learning programs and services
to be used to make adult education a truly comprehensive statewide program rather than
an aggregation of federal programs. These resources should be allocated by the Policy
Council to such purposes as:
1. Providing the policy leadership entity with funds to be used to make adult education
truly a state program rather than an aggregation of federal programs.
2. Creating points of entry to adult learning services at all educational levels in all
parishes.
3. Enhancing the capacity of LCTCS to provide adult literacy education to adults who
have passed WorkKeys readiness assessments but have not demonstrated skill levels
that would prepare them for successful postsecondary education participation. This
can be done as a program investment early in the process (e.g., to support Literacy
Labs) or on a performance basis after the capacity is created.
4. Establishing a financial aid program designed to meet the needs of adults,
particularly those who are part-time learners and who have financial need.
Alternatively, this could include a learner incentive program based upon
demonstrated achievement of learning objectives.
5. Funding a promotional campaign directed at workers, learners and employers, and
conducted in collaboration with SREB, emphasizing the importance of skills
acquisition, work-ready certification and lifelong learning. Campaign strategies
should include distribution of information through non-traditional channels (e.g.,
grocery stores, day care centers, movie theaters, etc.).
6. Expanding the use of technology to reach adult learners.
12
7. Increasing the emphasis on life skills, including those “soft” skills employers deem
as critical to success (e.g., communication skills, computer skills, including
accessing information online, etc.) through the development of an appropriate
course on job readiness and expanded use of Profile XT and other mechanisms
which document job fit.
8. Support programs for preparation of adult education teachers.
G. Establish a statewide educational “portal” that will highlight adult learning resources
and services and make navigating educational access through a single point of entry
(“one-stop shop”) easy for Louisiana’s citizens.
H. Establish or expand current data collection systems to ensure timely and regular
reporting of data against the goals and benchmarks established by the state. As part of
the enhanced data collect system, create the capacity to track levels of participation by
the private sector.
I. Recommit all “partners” in the educational pipeline to design, adjust or amend
programs and services to become as “adult friendly” as possible to support the state’s
goals.
J. Current state policies should be reviewed and amended as needed to remove unintended
barriers to adult learners.
13
APPENDIX F:
The Profile XT
Overview
&
Sample Report
Overview of the JobFit
Technology Program
Profiles International, Inc.
7427 Hwy 1
Donaldsonville, LA 70346
225.746.0600 or 800.434.2630
Overview of the JobFit Technology Program:
The Profile XT:
The Profile XT is an all-purpose assessment that measures the qualities that make up "The Total
Person" - Thinking-style and Reasoning. Occupational Interests, and Behavioral Traits. It is
convenient and easy to use, requiring only 60 minutes to take over the Internet, on a PC, or with a
booklet and pencil -- no administrator or proctoring is required.
The Profile XT is used for placement, promotion, self-improvement, coaching, succession planning,
and job description development. While no standardized assessments can be customized, the Profile
is more versatile. It can develop Job Match Patterns that are customized by company, department,
manager, position, geography, or any combination of these factors.
Job Match Makes the Difference
Job Match Patterns are important because they allow you to match the individual attributes of people
with the qualities important to success in specific jobs. Studies have shown that Job Match is a more
accurate predictor of job success than any of the commonly accepted factors, such as education,
experience, or training. When you match people with their jobs, you gain productivity and jobsatisfaction as you diminish stress, tension, conflict, miscommunication, and costly employee
turnover.
Seven Reports
The Profile XT can produce seven types of reports:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Individual Report - A guide for self-understanding
Placement Report - Selecting the right people through Job Match
Multi-Job Match Report - Useful for succession planning and reassigning employees to new
positions
Coaching Report - An excellent training and development tool
Job Profile Summary Report - Used with job descriptions to more accurately define job
requirements
Summary Reports - To give you a "snapshot" of essential information
Graph Report - For visual analysis of Job Match
Easy to Use
The Profile XT can be conveniently administered in several ways - over the Internet, or at your site,
using either a computer or an assessment booklet. Results are immediate thanks to computer
technology, and the reports you choose are in your hands in just minutes.
The Profile XT is the assessment to use for a thorough analysis of people, job responsibilities, and
Job Match. It is a valuable tool that will help you build your organization and reach your goals.
Product Dimension
The Profile XT & Career Coach Assessment
Primary Purpose
Pre & Post Employment; Coaching & Training, Succession Planning,
Benchmarking, Career Planning
Areas of Cognitive Ability
Measured
5
Behavioral Traits Measured
9
Occupational Interests
Measured
6
Average Reliability
.82
Distortion Scale
Yes
Job Success Predictability
Yes
Customized Job Match
Patterns
Free
Scoring Method
Online +
Number of Standard Reports
7+
Interview & Coaching
Questions with the Reports
Yes
Report Turn-Around Time
Immediate
Require Experts to Interpret
No
Secure Website for Company
Control
Yes
Time to Take
50 minutes
Technical Manuals
Yes
Complete Pre & Post
Employment Product Suite
Yes
Compliance
Complies with ADA, EEOC, Civil Rights. Meets and exceeds US
Department of Labor Guidelines for Assessments
Administration
Internet, PC, or paper and pencil (booklet)
Validated
Yes – Even if English is second language
Accurate
Yes
Reliable
Yes
Career Coach Assessment:
Profiles Career Coach does an analysis of an individual's thinking style, occupational interests,
and job-related behavioral traits and compiles the data into an accurate picture of the individual.
This profile is compared to hundreds of occupational profiles compiled by the Profiles International
research staff, using the occupational research database of the US Department of Labor.
The Career Coach Report provides descriptions of the person's characteristics, a list of jobs and
careers with which the person appears to have a job match, and suggestions for gathering additional
information about jobs and careers. Included is information about how to access the O*NET
Occupational Information Network. O*NET is a comprehensive database of worker attributes and job
characteristics which has replaced the Dictionary of Occupational Titles. O*NET is the nation's
primary source of occupational information.
Profiles Career Coach helps take the guesswork out of career selection. It guides in the development
of a career in which an individual can find success and job satisfaction. Profiles Career Coach is an
extremely valuable tool for anyone doing career planning.
The Performance Indicator:
The Profiles Performance IndicatorTM is easy to use. In just 15 minutes, an employee responds to thirty
questions. The responses are entered into a desktop computer and, moments later you can be reading an
informative and revealing Management Report. If you have ever wished employees came with instructions,
Performance IndicatorTM Management Reports will be like a wish come true. They are filled with essential
information about your people, describing significant job-related behavioral tendencies in these seven key
measurable areas:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Productivity
Quality of Work
Initiative
Teamwork
Problem Solving
Response to Stress and Conflict
Work Motivation
Profiles Performance IndicatorTM Management Reports give you a tremendous advantage in developing the
potential your employees bring to the job. Reports are filled with specific, individualized management suggestions
for working more productively with each person you manage. Morale gets a terrific boost because your
communication with employees is personalized. They feel your attention is customized to their needs, their
personality and their best interests. The improvement in communication and work motivation leads to significant
gains in productivity as more individual, departmental and organizational objectives are reached.
As an added bonus, the Profiles Performance IndicatorTM has a second report, an Individual Report, to provide
your employees with valuable feedback. It gives them information and ideas for professional growth. The report is
also their guide to better communication and cooperation with co-workers. It helps them understand their on-the-job
attitudes, emotions and behaviors.
A big employee payoff comes in building relationships, improving work performance and increasing job satisfaction.
Results are immediate! The Profiles Performance IndicatorTM is the right management tool for your organization.
It's an "Everybody Wins" system that pays big dividends.
What the Profile XT Measures
Profile for Thinking Style
Learning Index - An index of expected learning, reasoning and problem solving potential.
Verbal Skill - A measure of verbal skill through vocabulary.
Verbal Reasoning - Using words as a basis in reasoning and problem solving.
Numerical Ability - A measure of numeric calculation ability.
Numeric Reasoning - Using numbers as a basis in reasoning and problem solving.
Profile for Behavioral Traits
Independence - Tendency to be self-reliant, self-directed, to take independent action and make own decisions.
Objective Judgment - The ability to think clearly and be objective in decision-making.
Energy Level – Tendency to display endurance and capacity for a fast pace.
Assertiveness – Tendency to take charge of people and situations. Leads more than follows.
Sociability – Tendency to be outgoing, people-oriented and participate with others.
Manageability – Tendency to follow policies, accept external controls and supervision and work within the rules.
Attitude – Tendency to have a positive attitude regarding people and outcomes.
Decisiveness – Uses available information to make decisions quickly.
Accommodating – Tendency to be friendly, cooperative, agreeable. To be a team person.
Profile for Interests
Enterprising – Indicated interest in activities associated with persuading others and presenting plans.
Financial/Admin – Indicated interest in activities such as organizing information or business procedures.
People Service – Indicated interest in activities such as helping people and promoting the welfare of others.
Creative – Indicated interest in activities using imagination, creativity and original ideas.
Technical – Indicated interest in scientific activities, technical data and research.
Mechanical – Indicated interest in working with tools, equipment and machinery.
August 20, 2004
Sally Sample
Confidential
Placement Report
for
Sally Sample
Manager
Saturday, January 4, 2003
Profiles International, Inc.
7427 Hwy 1
Donaldsonville, LA 70346
225.746.0600
Pattern Date: 1/4/2003 12:12:05 PM
Copyright 1999-2003 Profiles International, Inc.
1
August 20, 2004
Sally Sample
Profile for Thinking Style
The Darker shading represents the Job Match Pattern for the role of Customer
Service Representative. The larger box indicates this individual’s score.
Learning Index – An index of expected
learning, reasoning and problem solving
potential.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Verbal Skill – A measure of verbal skill
through vocabulary.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Verbal Reasoning – Using words as a
basis in reasoning and problem solving.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Numerical Ability – A measure of numeric
calculation ability.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Numeric Reasoning – Using numbers as
a basis in reasoning and problem solving.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
81% match with Thinking Style Pattern for the Customer Service Representative position.
Sally Sample has a 74% overall match for the Customer Service Representative position.
Copyright 1999-2003 Profiles International, Inc.
2
August 20, 2004
Sally Sample
Profile for Behavioral Traits
Energy Level – Tendency to display
endurance and capacity for a fast pace.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Assertiveness – Tendency to take charge
of people and situations. Leads more than
follows.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Sociability – Tendency to be outgoing,
people-oriented and participate with
others.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Manageability – Tendency to follow
policies, accept external controls and
supervision and work within the rules.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Attitude – Tendency to have a positive
attitude regarding people and outcomes.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Decisiveness – Uses available
information to make decisions quickly.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Accommodating – Tendency to be
friendly, cooperative, agreeable. To be a
team person.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Independence – Tendency to be selfreliant, self-directed, to take independent
action and make own decisions.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Objective Judgment – The ability to think
clearly and be objective in decisionmaking.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
61% Behavioral Traits Pattern match for the Customer Service Representative position.
Sally Sample has a 74% overall match for the Customer Service Representative position.
The Distortion Scale Score on this assessment is 9. The Distortion Scale deals with how candid and
frank the respondent was while taking this assessment. The range for this scale is 1 to 10, with higher
scores suggesting greater candor.
Copyright 1999-2003 Profiles International, Inc.
3
August 20, 2004
Sally Sample
Profile for Interests
For the Job Match Pattern under consideration, the top three interests in descending order are:
Enterprising, Financial/Admin and People Service. The other three interests have no impact on this
position. The top three interests for Sally in descending order are: Enterprising, People Service and
Creative. Ms. Sample shares two of these interest areas: Enterprising and People Service
Top three Interests for this position
Enterprising – Indicated interest in
activities associated with persuading
others and presenting plans.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Financial/Admin – Indicated interest in
activities such as organizing information or
business procedures.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
People Service – Indicated interest in
activities such as helping people and
promoting the welfare of others.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Interests not relevant to this Position
Creative – Indicated interest in activities
using imagination, creativity and original
ideas.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Technical – Indicated interest in scientific
activities, technical data and research.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Mechanical – Indicated interest in working
with tools, equipment and machinery.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
When the top three interests are in common, the Job Match Percentage is greater than if
there are fewer than three in common.
Sally Sample has an 86% match with Interest Pattern for the Customer Service
Representative position.
Sally Sample has an overall match of 74% for the Customer Service Representative
position.
Copyright 1999-2003 Profiles International, Inc.
4
APPENDIX G:
LCTCS
TANF
Initiatives
LOUISIANA COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM
TANF Funds and the ACT WorkKeys® System
System President: Dr. Walter G. Bumphus
$10 million dollars of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) funds were provided to the Louisiana Community and
Technical College System through the Governor’s Office of the Workforce Commission for FY02 to provide educational
training services for low-income Louisiana parents. This state wide initiative provided funding to all 49 LCTCS campuses for
tuition and upgrade skills services that include full tuition cost, books and supplies, educational and employment counseling,
plus support services of child care and transportation. Over 3500 participants were served in the first year of operation
surpassing the initial target of 2800.
Additionally, first year funds provided for enhancement projects that were specifically targeted to build the capacity of the
LCTCS campuses in the areas of workplace literacy and early childhood education. Through competitive proposal
submissions campuses were awarded TANF dollars to increase the capacity of on-site child-care and family literacy services.
Workplace literacy computer laboratories, software and instructional personnel services were provided to all 49 campuses to
provide WorkKeys® assessments for all TANF participants.
Nearly $20 million dollars of TANF funds have been awarded to the LCTCS for FY03. Three separate initiatives have been
allocated from the Department of Social Services to the LCTCS through the last legislative session.
‰
‰
‰
TANF 1 funding provides $11.3 million dollars of funding to the LCTCS through the Governor’s Office of the
Workforce Commission to continue tuition services and to provide customized training for the unemployed and
underemployed parents of private and public agencies in the state. Upgrade and tuition services currently utilize
TANF funding to provide instructional and support services, as well as industry-based certification training in demand
occupational areas. This year’s funding also provides tuition services to participants referred by Support Enforcement
Services and Drug Courts.
TANF 2 provides $5 million dollars, allocated directly to the LCTCS, to partner with the Louisiana Department of
Economic Development to provide training for employers that are creating new positions within existing businesses or
for new industry locating to Louisiana. This training is targeted to specific occupational clusters identified by LED.
TANF 3 partners the LCTCS with the Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections. $3M of training funds
has been made available to train male parent inmates housed in state or local facilities that have served the majority
of their sentence and are nearing release.
All three initiatives are providing WorkKeys® assessments for each of the 1500 participants served to date for the present
fiscal year. (The workplace literacy services provide, focus on the identification of each student’s employability skill levels.)
Workplace literacy services that each TANF participant receives includes:
• Work Keys Readiness Screening Instrument
• Assessments in all Work Keys skill areas
• Individualized counseling/advising sessions to determine and relate skill level goals to
technical training areas
• Individualized instruction for skill upgrade training in skill areas as needed
• A certificate of achievement, listing Work Keys skill levels achieved - in addition to the
technical diploma, certificate, or industry-based certification
• Assistance with placement in employment
Over $4.9 million dollars, from both FY 02 and 03 funds, have been utilized to build the capacity of each of the 49 LCTCS sites
to provide Work Keys assessments and skill upgrade training. Each campus also has the assistance of a state wide Workplace
Literacy Coordinator to oversee all workplace literacy projects.
These LCTCS initiatives are serving as the model/pilot for implementation of the Louisiana Work Ready Certificate.
Completers of these programs will be well placed to become some of the first recipients of the LWRC. All 49 LCTCS
campuses have the capacity to become the foundation of the state wide system intended to provide WorkKeys assessment
services to Louisiana citizens.
Report Submitted by: Jacqueline Ackel and Carol Hebert, 2003
APPENDIX H:
An Example
of Success
APPENDIX I:
LA Accountability
Achievement
®
Levels – WorkKeys
Comparison Table
ACT WorkKeys Skill Level Illustrations
Louisiana
Accountability
Achievement
Level
Skill
Level
Unsatisfactory
1
Approaching
Basic
2
Reading for Information
• Identify word meanings as defined
within a passage.
3
• Recognize steps and sequences.
• Recognize direct applications of
instructions and directions.
• . Recognize cause and effect.
• Identify less obvious details.
Mastery
4
• Apply multiple-step directions to
situations described in a passage.
• Apply complex directions.
• Apply directions to new situations.
• Understand paraphrased
definitions of technical language
Advanced
5-7
Locating Information*
• ACT does not measure these levels through its assessments. The ACT Readiness Assessment determines if
an individual is prepared at the basic level (3), but does not differentiate between level 1 and level 2.
However, basic skill instructional software which has been correlated to WorkKeys® (e.g. – WIN or Key
Train) can provide information for these levels.
• Identify basic details and concepts.
Basic
Applied Mathematics
Complete problems which
require:
• Computation of whole
numbers.
• Adding/subtracting of positive
and negative numbers.
• Changing of number forms.
Complete problems which
require:
Find one or two pieces of
information in elementary
graphics such as:
• Simple order forms.
• Bar graphs and tables.
• Flow charts and floor plans.
Find several pieces of information
among elementary graphics:
• Reading simple graphs/
diagrams.
• Summarize and compare
trends.
• Working with fractions,
decimals or percentages.
• Determine the relationship
among graphics.
• Calculation of rations,
averages and proportions.
Complete problems which
require:
• Looking up and using
formulas.
• Explain rationale that describes
policies or procedures.
• Calculation of mixed
numbers.
• Generalize from content to new
situations.
• Computation of “best deal”.
• A number of set-up steps.
• Recognize from context less
common meanings of terms.
• Use of extraneous
information.
• Recognize and define technical
language from use in context.
• Multiple-step conversions.
• Identify general principles and
apply to new and complex
situations.
• Calculation and use of
multiple rates in comparisons.
• Correction of mistakes.
• Multiple and complex steps of
reasoning and computation.
Summarize/compare information
trends among elementary
graphics:
• Relate information among
graphics.
Sort through distracting
information among graphics.
Draw conclusions from
information presented in graphic
form:
• Apply information from
graphics to specific situations.
• Make decisions/predictions
requiring judgment based on
the analysis of data within
graphics.
• Finding mistakes in multiplestep calculations.
Note: – Skill level descriptions apply both to ACT WorkKeys Occupational Profiles and ACT WorkKeys test scores.
–
ACT WorkKeys Reading for Information, Applied Mathematics and Locating Information test scores below Level 3
mean that the test taker was unable to meet the skill level which employers set for the entry-level standard for jobs.
– Levels 1 & 2 correspond to Louisiana Accountability Achievement Levels as Unsatisfactory and Approaching Basic, respectfully.
* Skill Level 6 is the highest skill level assessed in Locating Information.
APPENDIX J:
LWR! Certificate
Web Application
Web
Application
Board of Regents/Workforce Commission
Scheduled Output
Reports
__________________
PDF, XLS, WK1, XML,
HTML, CSV, or TXT
BoR Database Server
HTML Forms / Download Certificates and Reports
WorkReady! Certificate Web Application
2. Production reports c an be
run nightly, weekly, monthly or
"on-demand". Certificat es,
Reports and Data Extracts a re
all accessible via the web
applicati on.
WorkReady!
Database
_________________
SSN
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
ZIP
PHONE
EMAIL
DATE
...OTHER...
1. Database is cust om
designed to captur e all
information required to
produce certificat es
CGI/DB2
Testing Site
Local Printer
4. Submitted tests a re
processed regularly and
assigned a unique
certificate number by
BoR. These certificate
records are transmitt ed
to the WFC, where
certificates are printed
and issued.
Required: http Browser (IE, Netscape,
JavaScript compatible with Ad obe
Acrobat Reader)
Testing Site
Workforce Commission
Internet
Testing Site
3. Application can be accessed through any internet
connected computer that has HTML 2.0 JavaScript
compatible browser. The application can be protec ted using
"basic" authentication via an internet user validation list.
Train
Auth. Tng
Site*
(1) Not Ready
ACT
Score/Record
Test
WorkKeys
Assessment
(2) Pencil
Ready
CBT**
Score/Record
Test
Process Flow of Louisiana WorkReady! Certification
Student
PreAssessment
Certified Assessment Site (CAS)
(Campus, One-Stop, etc.)
(3)
submit student records
OR
individual online
applications
(4)
issue certificates to CAS
OR
issue directly to student
Create
Certificates
Analyze
Outcomes
Louisiana Workforce
Commission
Notes:
1) Students designated “not ready” after pre-assessment require training before they can take the actual WorkKeys
Assessment.
2) Pencil tests are scored by ACT; ACT returns scores to Certified Assessment Site.
3) Sites transmit test records to the La. Board of Regents by submitting a file of assessment results or entering students
individually into an online certificate application form. Submitted Tests are processed regularly and assigned a unique
certificate number by the Board of Regents. These certificate records are transmitted to the La Workforce Commission
where certificates are printed and issued.
4) Certificates may be issued either to the Certified Assessment Site or directly to the student, depending on the preference of
the site.
*An Authorized Training Site (ATS) may or may not be the same entity as the Certified Assessment Site (CAS)
**CBT = Computer based test
APPENDIX K:
Sample
LWR! Report
(Sorted by region of the state, by
certificate level)
4/18/05 11:10:50
Report: CERTPRSHRL
Work-Ready Certificate Production
Awards by Region, Parish
11
2
9
155
16
44
8
2
5
2
74
4
103
6.9
16.1
7.7
14.6
28.6
.0
6.8
42.9
9.9
6.7
11.1
13.0
30.2
13.6
10.4
66.7
14.3
3.5
12.6
6.8
11.0
341
35
11
15
231
2
4
25
18
63
18
45
669
28
173
46
1
26
27
330
38
487
51.9
45.8
54.2
57.1
50.1
48.6
35.5
57.7
52.7
14.3
66.7
42.4
51.4
56.8
60.0
55.6
56.0
52.8
53.6
59.7
33.3
74.3
47.4
56.2
64.4
52.2
200
14
4
180
2
241
32
15
9
143
8
2
30
2
37
10
27
370
9
106
23
0
4
28
183
17
343
35.8
50.0
30.4
9.1
29.4
29.0
14.0
25.6
27.8
26.9
16.7
28.3
28.6
35.4
44.4
48.4
34.6
32.6
57.1
33.3
50.8
5.7
33.3
33.3
33.3
31.0
17.0
32.8
29.9
.0
11.4
49.1
31.2
28.8
36.8
53
4
46
11
34
169
93
39
720
52
24
637
7
681
72
31
26
438
14
6
59
35
111
30
81
1,194
53
323
77
3
35
57
587
59
933
Award Level
Parish
--- Gold ----- Silver ---- Bronze -Total
Name
Region
#
%
#
%
#
%
Awards
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Jefferson
1
17
6.6
126 48.8
115 44.6
258
Orleans
41
9.9
228 55.1
145 35.0
414
St. Bernard
29 23.4
56 45.2
39 31.5
124
St. John
5
6.8
38 51.4
31 41.9
74
St. Tammany
11 17.5
39 61.9
13 20.6
63
5
5
2
64
4
0
4
15
14.5
27
11
345
4
53.8
19
2
14
1
10
49
13
10
Region 1 Total
Ascension
East Baton Rouge
East Feliciana
Iberville
Pointe Coupee
St. Helena
Tangipahoa
Washington
99
21.2
37.5
17.6
14.3
387
50.9
50.0
52.2
90.9
55.9
52.7
54.8
56.4
Region 3 Total
Acadia
Evangeline
Iberia
Lafayette
St. Landry
St. Martin
St. Mary
Vermillion
Region 4 Total
Allen
Beauregard
Calcasieu
Jefferson Davis
Region 5 Total
2
Region 2 Total
11
9
112
1
18.5
27
2
24
10
19
89
51
22
6
5
4
3
133
13.2
.0
17.4
.0
14.7
18.3
31.2
17.9
Lafourche
Terrebonne
7
0
8
0
5
31
29
7
Avoyelles
Catahoula
Concordia
Grant
La Salle
Rapides
Vernon
Winn
Page
1
4/18/05 11:10:50
Report: CERTPRSHRL
7
8
Work-Ready Certificate Production
Awards by Region, Parish
846
100
7
6
3
76
8
158
65
58
0
1
5
21
5
3
87
13.3
12.2
7.4
11.8
3.1
15.9
7.7
10.9
16.5
7.2
.0
5.3
14.7
26.3
8.6
5.3
19.4
3,315
417
50
27
45
228
67
707
189
378
1
11
19
42
26
41
244
52.1
50.7
53.2
52.9
46.9
47.8
64.4
48.8
48.1
47.2
12.5
57.9
55.9
52.5
44.8
71.9
54.3
2,199
305
37
18
48
173
29
585
139
365
7
7
10
17
27
13
118
34.6
37.1
39.4
35.3
50.0
36.3
27.9
40.3
35.4
45.6
87.5
36.8
29.4
21.3
46.6
22.8
26.3
6,360
822
94
51
96
477
104
1,450
393
801
8
19
34
80
58
57
449
Award Level
Parish
--- Gold ----- Silver ---- Bronze -Total
Name
Region
#
%
#
%
#
%
Awards
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------6
Region 6 Total
Bossier
Caddo
Claiborne
De Soto
Lincoln
Natchitoches
Sabine
Webster
Region 7 Total
Franklin
Madison
Morehouse
Ouachita
Union
Region 8 Total
Statewide Total
Source: Prepared by Board of Regents for ACT.
Page
2
Answering the Skills Question for Employers
Governor Mark R. Warner
As governor, I take very seriously my job as the top economic development
officer for the Commonwealth of Virginia. The number one question I get
asked when a business might locate or expand here is “what about your
workforce?” “What are your schools like, what skills do workers have, and
what programs are in place to train them?” Since October 2004, I’ve had a
new tool to help with that answer.
Last fall, Virginia launched the Career Readiness Certificate, a portable
skills credential. It’s an obvious benefit to workers who want to prove they
have skills. But it also helps potential employers to determine people’s skills
in a region and to decide to invest in a community. So it’s also a great tool for
economic developers.
Because the Career Readiness Certificate is based on legally defensible
assessments that clearly delineate the actual skills a person has, it is a most
valuable tool in the hiring process. All an employer needs to do is to list the
requirement for the Career Readiness Certificate at the Bronze, Silver, or
Gold level on the job posting, and on the application form, as is currently
done with the high school diploma or a college degree. Used as a prescreening tool in this way, the Certificate can save many dollars and a great
deal of time during the hiring process. Hiring costs are high -- but the cost of
making a bad hire is even greater.
For potential employees or career seekers, the Certificate is a clear indication
of what the recipient can do in terms of skills needed in the workplace. As a
stand-alone credential, or as a complement to the high school diploma, GED,
or college degree, the Certificate indicates the attainment of a crucial skill
set. Each certificate has those skills listed on it. Even if an employer is
unaware of WorkKeys, the ACT assessment tool that is used to assess the
skills, this listing makes it very clear during the hiring process.
5/5/2005
Final CRC Monograph
We’re already making great progress. And it’s progress we can quantify and
advertise as an economic development tool. There are now many thousands
of Virginians with the Career Readiness Certificate, and we have their skill
levels entered in the Virginia Skills Bank, a free, Web-based application that
can be queried by zip code, geographic region, college district, and in many
other ways, to show the skill levels of the populace in that region.
As the Career Readiness Certificate has been developed in the
Commonwealth, we have also been working with many other states to
encourage the development of a similar portable skills credential across
economic regions. To date, a consortium of more than 17 states has been
formed to work on this crucial economic development issue. Over the next two
months, the consortium is expected to grow to more than 25 states, as there
is widespread acceptance of the need for such a credential. I am proud that
Virginia has led the way in this effort, and I am pleased that Virginia's
regional economy will benefit from this work.
For more information on the Career Readiness Certificate and the Virginia
Skills Bank, please visit www.crc.virginia.gov
5/5/2005
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2
Career Readiness Certificate Taskforce
Governor Mark Warner
Governor’ Office:
Dr. Barbara Bolin, Special Advisor for Workforce Development
Katherine DeRosear, Director of Policy and Planning
Heather Glissman, Project Manager
Dorita Moore, Administrative Assistant
Ms. Andrea Wooten, Virginia Workforcre Council
Dr. Ann Battle, Virginia Economic Development Partnership
Mr. Brett Vassey, Virginia Manufacturer's Association
Ms. Cindy Lowe, Virginia Employment Commission
Ms. Dale Batten, Department of Rehabilitative Services
Ms. Deborah Wright, Thomas Nelson Community College
Ms. Donna Stevens, Virginia Economic Development Partnership
Mr. Duke Storen, Virginia Department of Social Services
Mr. Eddie Chernault, Southside Virginia Community College
Ms. Ellen Grey, Northern Virginia Community College
Ms. Gail Robinson, Virginia Employment Commission
Mr. Gary Fletcher, Richmond City Workforce Investment Board
Ms. Gloria Westerman, Virginia Community College System
Mr. Jack Heslin, Community College Workforce Alliance/KeyTrain
Ms. Joan Powers, Virginia Community College System
Ms. Liz Riley, Virginia Community College System
Mr. Mac McGinty, Thomas Nelson Community College
Dr. Fletcher Mangum, Mangum Consulting
Ms. Mary Sullivan, Blue Ridge Community College
Mr. Matt Erskine, Deputy Secretary Commerce & Trade
Mr. Michael Ferraro, Training Solutions Inc./Virginia Workforce Council
Ms. Nettie Simon-Owens, Danville Community College
Ms. Patty Ryan, New River Community College
Mr. PrestonWilhelm, Department of Business Assistance
Ms. Renee Brown, Paul D. Camp Community College
Ms. Rhonda Hodges, Patrick Henry Community College
Mr. Robert Almond, VA Department of EducationDirector of CTE
Mr. Ron Laux, Community College Workforce Alliance/John Tyler
Community College
Ms. Rose Johnson, Virginia Community College System
Mr. Trigg Copenhaver, Virginia Panel Corporation/Virginia Workforce
Council
Mr. Willie Blanton, Virginia Employment Commission/WIA Division
Dr. Yvonne Thayer, Virginia Department of Education/Adult Education
Ms. Johnna Coleman-Yates, Tidewater Community College
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3
Virginia Workforce Council Members
The Honorable Mark R. Warner, Governor
Ms. Marjorie M. Connelly (Chair), Capital One Services, Inc
Mr. Michael Alan Daniels (Vice-Chair), Science Applications International
Corporation
The Honorable J. Brandon Bell, II, Senate of Virginia
Mr. David L. Brash, Russell County Medical Center
The Honorable Kathy J. Byron, Virginia House of Delegates
Mr. John Cannon, Business Consultant
Mr. James E. Copp, Virginia Employment Commission
Mr. Mark B. Dreyfus, ECPI College of Technology
Dr. Glenn DuBois, Virginia Community College System
Ms Dolores Esser, Virginia Employment Commission
Mr. C. Michael Ferraro, Training Solutions, Inc.
Mr. Richard A. Gonzalez, EthNet: the Ethnic Network
The Honorable Clarke N. Hogan, Virginia House of Delegates
Mr. Hugh D. Keogh, The Virginia Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Daniel G. LeBlanc, Virginia State AFL-CIO
The Honorable Yvonne B. Miller, Senate of Virginia
Mr. Robert H. Myers, Virginia State Building & Construction Trades Council
Mr. Hiawatha Nicely, Jr.
Ms Rita C. Ricks, Mirror Enterprise, Inc.
The Honorable Michael J. Schewel, Secretary of Commerce and Trade
The Honorable Don Sullenberger, Shenandoah Valley Partnership
Mr. James H. Underwood, IBEW-Local Union No. 666
Mr. Brett Vassey, Virginia Manufacturers Association
The Honorable Belle S. Wheelan, Secretary of Education
The Honorable Jane Woods, Secretary of Health and Human Resources
Ms Andrea Wooten, Virginia Workforce Council Member
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4
I. Background Information
Employers know that the costs of hiring, training, and retention significantly
affect their bottom line. The cost of making a good hire is high; the cost of
making a bad hire is even greater!
In the private sector, there is great concern about the skills gap that exists
between those skills required on the job and those exhibited by potential and
incumbent workers. Employers experience significant difficulty in hiring
people who have basic employability skills and who are therefore trainable
for specific jobs. There is also dissatisfaction with the standard of
employability of students who graduate from high school and college because
academic competencies are often not supported by employability skills.
A portable skills credential that is easily and universally understood and
valued by employers, educators and recipients facilitates job placement,
retention and advancement in our mobile society. Such a credential that
describes exactly what the holder can do is a terrific supplement to a high
school diploma, a GED or a college degree, or it is a great stand-alone
credential.
From May 2001 when a one-day symposium was held with economists,
researchers, educators, and workforce professionals to concentrate on present
and future workforce skills, the vision and mission of the Virginia Workforce
Council (the State WIB) has included an emphasis on identification of skills
needs and plans to address those needs.
Also in 2001, the Manufacturers Education Consortium (MEC), a Richmond
pilot program (see Appendix A) backed by Brett Vassey, Virginia
Manufacturers Association and by Hugh Keogh, Virginia Chamber of
Commerce, assessed every Chesterfield High School student with
WorkKeys® In addition, the MEC recognized approximately 500 high school
students and 100 community college students who graduated from the MEC
endorsed manufacturing curriculum offered at Chesterfield High School,
John Tyler Community College, and J. Sargent Reynolds Community College.
The MEC pilot demonstrated the efficacy of creating a portable skills
credential based on WorkKeys with specific industry “add-ons” such as the
MEC curriculum. A demonstration database was also created to allow
manufacturing employers to directly contact graduates of the MEC program.
In the summer of 2002, under the leadership of Dr. John Seigelski, ViceChancellor for Workforce Development at the Virginia Community College
System (VCCS) and building on the work of Dr. Jerry Miller of ACT™, five
community colleges set up demonstration pilot projects to test the
effectiveness of a portable skills credential based on WorkKeys®. The main
question to be answered was “Will employers understand/value the CRC?”
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5
The five colleges were Thomas Nelson, Community College Alliance, Central
Virginia, New River, and Northern Virginia.
In spring 2003, after learning of work done in Kentucky and Michigan, the
Virginia Workforce Council endorsed the concept of a portable skills
credential. This was a natural step in the evolution of the work of the
Virginia Workforce Council to address the skills needs of employers.
In October 2003, as part of his Education For A Lifetime initiative
(http://www.governor.virginia.gov/Initiatives/Ed4Life/WorkforceDev.htm)
Gov. Mark Warner announced that work was underway to develop the
Virginia Career Readiness Certificate that would give workers a portable,
recognized workforce credential that shows employers that workers have
required workplace literacy skills. Responsibility for the development was
given to a statewide task force convened and led by Dr. Barbara Bolin,
Governor Warner’s Special Advisor for Workforce Development. The task
force included representatives of partner agencies and organizations
including the Dept. of Social Services, Dept. of Rehabilitative Services, the
private sector, Department of Education (CTE), and the Virginia Community
College System.
Examination of data from the five pilot sites was overwhelmingly convincing
in terms of the value of the CRC to employers and potential employees alike.
Because he recognized that Virginia’s economy is regional, Governor Warner
asked his Special Advisor to make the CRC a regional credential. A loose
consortium of seven states (VA, KY, TN, NC, WV, DC, MD) was formed in
December 2003. After the first meeting of the consortium in January 2004,
word of the development of the CRC spread to other states and the CRCC
quickly grew to include more than 25 states by May 2005.
II. Approach and Implementation
Governor Mark R. Warner launched the Career Readiness Certificate on
October 19, 2004, at which time he recognized more than 5,500 Virginia
residents who had already successfully completed the credential, and many
employers who had invested in the professional skills development of their
employees.
Over the last 10 years, WorkKeys®, a product of ACT™ (formerly American
College Testing), has become a widely accepted common language for skills
definition among employers, educators/trainers and potential/incumbent
employees. The power of the WorkKeys® system lies in its: 1) objectivity; 2)
simplicity (WorkKeys® skill levels are described in terms of single digit
numbers whose meanings are clearly defined and readily accessible); 3)
compliance with federal law (ADA, EEOC); and 4) legal defensibility.
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The Virginia Career Readiness Certificate is based on three WorkKeys®
assessments: Applied Mathematics, Locating Information and Reading for
Information, and is awarded at three levels: Bronze (level 3 on each
assessment), Silver (level 4) and Gold (level 5).
Virginians can be assessed at Virginia Workforce Network Career Centers
(one-stop centers), at any community college, offices of social services, offices
of rehabilitative services, or anywhere the assessments are offered. There
are private companies in Virginia that offer all WorkKeys services, and the
assessments are also offered to students in some high schools. If needed,
training is available on-line, or a 6-week employability skills course, available
at some community colleges, guarantees its graduates both a Career
Readiness Certificate and a certificate of employability from the college.
Because many Virginia community colleges were already WorkKeys Service
Centers, and because it is essential that the integrity of the credential be
protected (i.e. that there be accountability for its issuance), the statewide
task force suggested that the Virginia Community College System (VCCS)
should assume all administrative and operational responsibilities for the
CRC. Through its Chancellor, Dr. Glen Dubois and the Vice Chancellor for
Workforce Development, Dr. Rose Johnson, the VCCS readily accepted this
challenge on behalf of the Governor.
III. Administration and Operations
In Virginia, the Career Readiness Certificate was designed by the statewide
task force and bears the Governor’s signature (see Appendix B). The skills
attained by the recipient are written on the back of each certificate.
Because the VCCS has assumed all administrative responsibilities for
theCRC, certificates are physically issued by community colleges. Each
CRC/WorkKeys® Administrator has a password-protected electronic
template of the certificate with only two active fields—the name and date.
The VCCS sends “blank” certificates (in the bronze, silver, and gold
designations) to colleges so that the Administrator can print the appropriate
name and date on certificates as they are being issued. The cost of “blank”
certificates is very low and initially, the cost was covered by the Virginia
Workforce Council. Covering future costs is an issue still being worked out by
the VCCS.
The cost of the CRC ranges from $45-100 across the Commonwealth, and this
cost can be covered by a federal funding stream (TANF, WIA, Perkins,
Rehabilitative Services, Corrections, etc), an employer, a school district, a
college, or an individual. Similarly, training costs can be covered in a variety
of ways, and the cost is dependent upon whether training is done on-line or in
5/5/2005
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7
a classroom. Details are worked out at the local level with MOU’s between
the WIB, employer, career center, and/or community college. The state has
played no role in attempting to standardize implementation procedures or
costs. This is in line with the Commonwealth’s philosophy of “state
leadership, local control”.
The certificates are printed on special paper that indicates if/when a copy has
been produced. Five copies are supplied to the recipient with the original so
that a copy can be included with a resume or a job application. Certificates
are numbered sequentially and each number is used only once.
The Virginia Skills Bank (VSB) is a database that has been developed to
manage all CRCand WorkKeys® data for the Commonwealth. The VSB is a
free, web-based application that can be queried by zip code, geographic
region, college district and in many other ways to show the skill levels of the
populace. An interested potential employer can query the database for the
region under consideration and determine data like there are 900 people with
a GoldCRC, 800 with a Silver and 500 with a Bronze living near where they
intend to do business. It does not tell them how many of those people are
currently employed, but it does indicate those people who might be willing to
work for them, and it does indicate a level of skill and trainability that
otherwise would not show up. It is also a clear indication to residents and
employers alike that Virginia is committed to upgrading and documenting
the skills of the workforce.
When a certificate is issued by a college CRC Administrator, its number is
entered into the VSB. Other information (such as the last four digits of the
SSN, address, etc.) is also entered but this information is only available to
the college Administrator, and is used for record-keeping purposes only.
In order to help Virginians to become familiar with the CRC, a marketing
campaign was undertaken in May 2005. The campaign is comprised of four
parts:
1) billboards and TV announcements,
2) print materials with a statewide consistent look and feel but
individualized to each community college and career center,
3) an incentive plan for local WIBs, and
4) training for community college personnel on utilization of the VSB.
The budget for the campaign so far is $198,000.
With the assistance of WTKR/Hampton Roads, Gov. Warner developed a TV
PSA that was distributed to each local WIB. This PSA is being used by both
the WIB and their community college partners on local television channels at
no charge.
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The marketing and outreach efforts were aimed at both career seekers and
employers. However, posters for the one-stop career centers were designed for
career-seeking customers, and brochures were aimed at employers. The
Governor’s PSA and billboards had a dual message.
Templates for the posters and brochures were made available to all
community colleges with the expectation that they would be shared with the
career centers (see Appendix C).
Through 2004-2005, the Governor’s Special Advisor, Barbara Bolin, has made
many presentations to employers, educators and others across the
Commonwealth. She has also developed and maintained communication with
newspaper and journal reporters, resulting in the publication of several
articles on the CRC, and the growth of the Career Readiness Certificate
Consortium.
The WIB incentive program issues grants of $2500 to any WIB that wishes to
participate. The WIB agrees to use the money to award at least 50 CRC’s to
its customers between April 1 and September 1, 2005. (Results will be
tracked through the VSB). When a WIB meets this obligation, the state will
pay for the training of one Career Development Facilitator for a career
center. This will help the WIB to progress toward Tier II certification
requirements for the year 2006.
The CRC has been accepted widely across the workforce and career
development system. The diagrams in Appendix D illustrate how the CRC is
being used in agencies, in other Governor’s initiatives, and across the
Virginia Workforce & Career Development System. It is hoped that the VWC
will recommend that CRC assessments become a standard part of the work of
the Rapid Response unit of the Virginia Employment Commission, and that it
will strongly encourage the VCCS to make the CRC a mandatory graduation
requirement for all workforce education students.
IV. Results
The CRC is proving to be a valuable credential for many thousands of
Virginians. It is particularly useful to citizens, many of whom do not have a
high school diploma, who have been adversely affected by the effects of plant
closures. The low cost, skill-specific training, and short completion time are
all factors in its success.
The actual number of CRC’s so far issued in Virginia will be determined
when the community colleges fully populate the VSB with their data. A
reasonable estimate is 7,000 as of May 1, 2005.
The Virginia Workforce Network career centers are providing pre-screening
services for employers. After searching the WorkKeys® database of
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9
Occupational Profiles, each employer determines the appropriate level of the
CRC that should be used in the pre-screening process. This approach
guarantees to the employer that a referred candidate has the appropriate
level of workplace literacy that ensures trainability for the job. It is hoped
that employers will also state the desired level of the CRC in all job postings
as part of the educational requirements.
Virginia’s economic development professionals are being encouraged to refer
potential employers to the VSB as a determinant of the trainability of the
workforce in a region.
Development of a portable skills credential is relatively straightforward and
does not require a large budget or bureaucracy. What IS required is the
commitment and political will to make it a reality. It is also helpful to have a
fully committed leader for the initiative, preferably at the highest level of
state government or education system.
It is imperative that the credential be fully marketed and supported or it will
quickly fade into oblivion. Unless there is a “so what?” component in the
process, there will be no return on the investment of time and other
resources. Development of the credential MUST therefore be accompanied by
a way of:
a) Using it as an economic development tool, and
b) Helping employers find skilled employees.
The Career Readiness Certificate was always intended to be the starting
point for skills development. In Virginia, the next logical step is to develop
further skills credentials that will be “add-ons” to the CRC. The work of the
MEC (see page 3) indicates that this is an approach that will work well. In
this time of lifelong, continuous learning, citizens of all ages must be
encouraged to take a building block approach to a career. The CRC is a great
first step on that journey!
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10
Abbreviations
5/5/2005
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11
Abbreviations
CRC
VWC
VMA
VCCS
MEC
MOU
CTE
CRCC
ADA
EEOC
VSB
WIB
PSA
SSN
Career Readiness Certificate
Virginia Workforce Council, the state WIB
Virginia Manufacturers Association
Virginia Community College System
Manufacturers Education Consortium
Memorandum Of Understanding
Career & Technical Education
Career Readiness Certificate Consortium
Americans with Disabilities Act
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Virginia Skills Bank
Workforce Investment Board (local)
Public Service Announcement
Social Security Number
5/5/2005
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12
Appendix A
5/5/2005
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13
Appendix A
Manufacturing Education Consortium (MEC)
•
Vision: Meeting Virginia’s manufacturing workforce development needs of
tomorrow, through comprehensive MEC-endorsed high school and college
curriculums today.
• Mission: Create highly qualifies and diverse candidates for career in
manufacturing in the Greater Richmond Region by:
•
Developing and maintaining a manufacturing education endorsement
process for educational programs that are aligned to the workplace.
•
Providing special consideration in selection processes to MEC certified
graduates by participating MEC member organizations.
•
Continue to develop partnerships between manufacturers and member
institutions to ensure the viability of educational programs and institutions.
•
Increase the visibility of manufacturing career opportunities.
•
Serve as a model workforce development partnership focused on
curriculums that are aligned to the needs of the workplace.
MEC Endorsed Curriculum Content Areas
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Basic Mathematics
Basic Computer
Statistical Process Control
Quality Assurance
Mechanical Principles
Work Ethic
Follow Directions
Teamwork
Oral Communications
Thinking Skills
Manufacturing Member Organizations
• Applied Materials
• ChemTreat, Inc.
• Dispersion Specialties, Inc.
• Dominions Resources
• E.I. Dupont De Nemours
• ERNI Americas
• Infineon Technologies
• Interbake Foods
• Kraft Foods North America, Inc.
• Old Dominion Window & Door
• Philip Morris, U.S.A.
• RGU Enterprises
• Wella Manufacturing of Virginia
• Westvaco Manufacturing
5/5/2005
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14
Appendix A
Education Member Organizations
• Chesterfield County Public Schools
• Goochland County Schools
• Hanover County Public Schools
• Henrico Public Schools
• J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College
• John Tyler Community College
• Prince George County Public Schools
• Richmond City Public Schools
5/5/2005
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15
Appendix B
5/5/2005
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16
Appendix B
Commonwealth of Virginia
Career Readiness Certificate
In recognition of demonstrated skills in
Applied Mathematics, Reading for Information, & Locating Information
NAME
is awarded a Silver Certificate
DATE
__________________
Governor Mark Warner
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17
Appendix C
5/5/2005
Final CRC Monograph
18
Billboard Size: 10'6" x 36'
THE CAREER READINESS CERTIFICATE
Proven Success
Get Started With A Successful Career In:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Animal Sciences
Automotive Technology
Business
Commercial Art
Computer Technology
Construction
E-commerce
Forestry
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Healthcare
Hospitality
Marketing
Manufacturing
Public Safety
Teaching
AND MORE!
Contact your local community college
representative or One-Stop Career Center
to find out more about how to earn your
Career Readiness Certificate.
Contact Name
(000) 000-0000
E-mail
Your Career Readiness Certificate shows
you can do the job. It could mean the
difference between starting your new
career or starting over.
You can do it, and now, the Career
Readiness Certificate proves it.
THE CAREER READINESS CERTIFICATE
Get
Hired
GGet Started With A
Successful Career In:
• Animal Sciences
• Automotive Technology
Your Career Readiness Certificate shows you can do the job.
It could mean the difference between starting your new
career or starting over.
• Business
• Commercial Art
• Computer Technology
• Construction
• E-commerce
• Forestry
• Healthcare
• Hospitality
• Marketing
• Manufacturing
• Public Safety
• Teaching
• AND MORE!
Contact your local
community college
representative or
One-Stop Career Center
to find out more about
how to earn your
Career Readiness
Certificate.
Contact Name
(000) 000-0000
E-mail
You can do it— the Career Readiness Certificate proves it.
THE CAREER READINESS CERTIFICATE
Answers
You Have
Get Started With A
Successful Career In:
• Animal Sciences
• Automotive Technology
Employers want to know what you can do for them. One
way to answer questions about your job skills is to earn a
Career Readiness Certificate.
• Business
• Commercial Art
• Computer Technology
• Construction
• E-commerce
• Forestry
• Healthcare
• Hospitality
• Marketing
• Manufacturing
• Public Safety
• Teaching
• AND MORE!
Contact your local
community college
representative or
One-Stop Career Center
to find out more about
how to earn your
Career Readiness
Certificate.
Contact Name
(000) 000-0000
E-mail
It’s the answer your employer is looking for.
Are You
Ready
Your Career Readiness Certificate shows you can do
the job. It could mean the difference between starting
your new career or starting over. So, get ready.
Get Started With A
Successful Career In:
• Animal Sciences
• Automotive Technology
• Business
• Commercial Art
• Computer Technology
• Construction
• E-commerce
• Forestry
• Healthcare
• Hospitality
• Marketing
• Manufacturing
• Public Safety
• Teaching
Contact your local
community college
representative or
One-Stop Career Center
to find out more about
how to earn your
Career Readiness
Certificate.
• AND MORE!
Contact Name
(000) 000-0000
E-mail
THE CAREER READINESS CERTIFICATE
Fostering Economic Development in Our Communities
Employers look for places where their business can flourish. In Virginia, the number one
concern among employers and those who are considering locating here is the availability of a
skilled workforce. That’s why the Career Readiness Certificate is especially useful in cities and
counties where the likelihood of finding qualified workers might otherwise inhibit business
development.
Acceptance of this new credential is growing quickly. The Career Readiness Certificate
has been endorsed by:
• Virginia Chamber of Commerce
• Virginia Community College System
• Virginia Manufacturers Association
• Virginia AFL-CIO
• Virginia Workforce Council
Additionally, a coalition of states has been formed, the Career Readiness Certificate
Consortium, which is designed to help standardize and deploy certificates across the country.
In addition to Virginia, the Consortium includes: Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia,
Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota,
Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington, Wyoming, and the District of Columbia.
Several other states including California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota,
Montana, New Mexico, and Rhode Island are also working to develop and deploy certificates. The certificate has gained wide acceptance in the business community, and the
Governor is working with governors in all states to expand the initiative so that the Career
Readiness Certificate is recognized and accepted by employers.
Virginia’s Career Readiness Certificate
Virginia Community College System
Workforce Development Services
101 N. 14th Street 15th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
READY TO
WORK
for You
The Career Readiness
Certificate is the answer
for employers who want
a trainable workforce.
When applicants carry
the Career Readiness
Certificate, they
demonstrate skills
in math, reading and
information processing.
Employers can use these
scores to make the best
decision when hiring or
training workers.
Who is the
The Career Readiness Certificate can be
The Career
Readiness Certificate
Right Person
and recipients. It is designed to help describe
skills for 90% of jobs.
• Gold signifies that a recipient possesses
skills for approximately 65% of jobs.
• Silver signifies that a recipient possesses
skills for approximately 30% of jobs.
• Bronze signifies that a recipient possesses
based on their test performance:
three levels of Career Readiness Certificates
standardized test. Individuals earn one of
awarded after an individual completes a
The Career Readiness Certificate is
earned the certificate.
In the first year, more than 5,500 residents
school diploma, a GED or a college degree.
be used as a terrific supplement to a high
as a stand-alone credential, the certificate can
locating information. In addition to its value
mathematics, reading for information, and
in three important work-related areas: applied
the abilities of a potential or current employee
easily understood by employers, educators
for the Job?
Employers need people with the right
skills, training and education to get the job
done, but finding those people can be
difficult. Bridging the gap between an
employee’s existing skills and those
required on the job also can be costly and
time-consuming. Hiring for entry-level
positions poses an additional challenge to
employers, because applicants often have
little or no work history—and employers
have no immediate way to evaluate the
skills possessed by candidates.
In an effort to address these challenges,
Governor Mark Warner developed the
Virginia Career Readiness Certificate
(CRC). The CRC shows an individual’s
competency in applied mathematics,
reading for information, and locating
information—skills required by more than
85% of jobs in the country.
Employers now have a clear,
standardized tool to assess the skill level
of potential and current employees. That
means choosing the right person for the job
just got easier.
Regional Data Available at the
Virginia Skills Bank
Considering there are currently thousands
of Virginians with Career Readiness
Certificates, a searchable web-based
application, the Virginia Skills Bank, was
created as an economic develop tool to
showcase the skills of Virginia’s work-
force. Information can be queried accord-
skill levels of the populace. An interested
ing to zip code, geographic region, college
Find out more
for a region and find data such as the num-
Bronze CRC living near where they intend
ber of those who have a Gold, Silver, or
potential employer can search the database
district and many other ways to show the
about the Career Readiness Certificate, the
Virginia Skills Bank and other resources
for businesses at:
www.crc.virginia.gov
to do business. It does not tell employers
how many of those people are currently
employed or how many might be willing
to work for them, but it does provide
information on skill and trainability that
otherwise would not be available. More
information on the Virginia Skills Bank
can be found at www.crc.virginia.gov.
For more information about the Career Readiness
Certificate contact your local Virginia Community
College or One-Stop Career Center.
The Career Readiness Certificate is facilitated by
Virginia Community College System
Workforce Development Services
101 N. 14th Street 15th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
CRC Brochure_1B
4/15/05
11:39 AM
Page 1
The Career Readiness Certificate is the answer
for employers who want a trainable workforce.
When applicants carry the Career Readiness
Certificate, they demonstrate skills in math, reading
and information processing. Employers can use
these scores to make the best decision when hiring
or training workers.
The Career Readiness
Certificate
The Career Readiness Certificate can be easily understood
by employers, educators and recipients. It is designed to
help describe the abilities of a potential or current employee
certificate can be used as a terrific supplement to a high
in three important work-related areas: applied mathematics,
Who is the Right Person
for the Job?
school diploma, a GED or a college degree.
the certificate.
In the first year, more than 5,500 residents earned
addition to its value as a stand-alone credential, the
reading for information, and locating information. In
Does the applicant have the skills, training and education that an employer needs to get the job done?
That’s a critical question for most businesses—and
individual completes a standardized test. Individuals earn
The Career Readiness Certificate is awarded after an
until now. The Career Readiness Certificate
one of three levels of Career Readiness Certificates based on
there’s been no easy way to determine the answer
is designed specifically to answer questions about
their test performance:
90% of jobs.
• Gold signifies that a recipient possesses skills for
approximately 65% of jobs.
• Silver signifies that a recipient possesses skills for
approximately 30% of jobs.
• Bronze signifies that a recipient possesses skills for
a potential or current employee’s skills in three
important areas: applied mathematics, reading for
information, and locating information—skills
required by more than 85% of jobs in the country.
Employers now have a clear, standardized tool
o assess the skill level of potential and current
employees. That means choosing the right person for
the job just got easier.
Virginia’s Career Readiness Certificate
Virginia Community College System
Workforce Development Services
101 N. 14th Street 15th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
Who Has The Job
Skills You Need?
CRC Brochure_1B
4/15/05
11:39 AM
Page 2
Fostering Economic Development
in Our Communities
Employers look for places where their business can flourish. In
Virginia, the number one concern among employers and those
who are considering locating here is the availability of a skilled
workforce. That’s why the Career Readiness Certificate is especially useful in cities and counties where the likelihood of finding
qualified workers might otherwise inhibit business development.
Acceptance of this new credential is growing quickly. The
Career Readiness Certificate has been endorsed by:
• Virginia Chamber of Commerce
• Virginia Community College System
• Virginia Manufacturers Association
• Virginia AFL-CIO, and
• Virginia Workforce Council
Regional Data Available at the
Virginia Skills Bank
acceptance in the business community, and the Governor is
develop and deploy certificates. The certificate has gained wide
Montana, New Mexico, and Rhode Island are also working to
California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota,
and the District of Columbia. Several other states including
Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington, Wyoming,
Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota,
Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky,
addition to Virginia, the Consortium includes: Alabama,
help standardize and deploy certificates across the country. In
Career Readiness Certificate Consortium, which is designed to
be willing to work for them, but it does provide informa-
those people are currently employed or how many might
do business. It does not tell employers how many of
Silver, or Bronze CRC living near where they intend to
data such as the number of those who have a Gold,
employer can search the database for a region and find
the skill levels of the populace. An interested potential
region, college district and many other ways to show
can be queried according to zip code, geographic
showcase the skills of Virginia’s workforce. Information
Bank, was created as an economic develop tool to
searchable web-based application, the Virginia Skills
Virginians with Career Readiness Certificates, a
Considering there are currently thousands of
working with governors in all states to expand the initiative so
Additionally, a coalition of states has been formed, the
that the Career Readiness Certificate is recognized and accepted
tion on skill and trainability that otherwise would not be
available. More information on the Virginia Skills Bank
by employers.
can be found at www.crc.virginia.gov.
Find out more
about the Career Readiness Certificate, the
Virginia Skills Bank and other resources for
businesses at:
www.crc.virginia.gov
For more information about the Career
Readiness Certificate contact your
local Virginia Community College or
One-Stop Career Center.
The Career Readiness Certificate
is directed by
Virginia Community College Systems
Workforce Development Services
101 N. 14th Street 15th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
(804) 819-XXXX
Who is the Right Person
for the Job?
Employers need people with the right skills, training
and education to get the job done, but finding those
people can be difficult. Bridging the gap between an
employee’s existing skills and those required on the
job also can be costly and time-consuming. Hiring
for entry-level positions poses an additional challenge to employers, because applicants often have
little or no work history—and employers have no
immediate way to evaluate the skills possessed by
candidates.
In an effort to address these challenges,
Governor Mark Warner developed the Virginia
Career Readiness Certificate (CRC). The CRC
shows an individual’s competency in applied
mathematics, reading for information, and locating
information—skills required by more than 85% of
jobs in the country.
Employers now have a clear, standardized tool to
assess the skill level of potential and current
employees. That means choosing the right person
for the job just got easier.
The Career Readiness Certificate is the answer for
employers who want a trainable workforce. When
applicants carry the Career Readiness Certificate,
they demonstrate skills in math, reading and
information processing. Employers can use these
scores to make the best decision when hiring or
training workers.
Virginia’s Career
Readiness Certificate
The Career Readiness Certificate can be easily understood
by employers, educators and recipients. It is designed to
help describe the abilities of a potential or current employee
in three important work-related areas: applied mathematics,
reading for information, and locating information. In
addition to its value as a stand-alone credential, the
certificate can be used as a terrific supplement to a high
school diploma, a GED or a college degree.
In the first year, more than 5,500 residents earned
the certificate.
The Career Readiness Certificate is awarded after an
individual completes a standardized test. Individuals earn
one of three levels of Career Readiness Certificates based on
their test performance:
• Bronze signifies that a recipient possesses skills for
approximately 30% of jobs.
• Silver signifies that a recipient possesses skills for
approximately 65% of jobs.
• Gold signifies that a recipient possesses skills for
90% of jobs.
Virginia’s Career Readiness Certificate
Virginia Community College System
Workforce Development Services
101 N. 14th Street 15th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
READY TO
WORK
for You
Fostering Economic Development
in Our Communities
Employers look for places where their business can flourish. In
Virginia, the number one concern among employers and those
who are considering locating here is the availability of a skilled
workforce. That’s why the Career Readiness Certificate is especially useful in cities and counties where the likelihood of finding
qualified workers might otherwise inhibit business development.
Acceptance of this new credential is growing quickly. The
Career Readiness Certificate has been endorsed by:
• Virginia Chamber of Commerce
• Virginia Community College System
• Virginia Manufacturers Association
• Virginia AFL-CIO
• Virginia Workforce Council
Regional Data Available at the
Virginia Skills Bank
acceptance in the business community, and the Governor is
develop and deploy certificates. The certificate has gained wide
Montana, New Mexico and Rhode Island are also working to
California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota,
and the District of Columbia. Several other states including
Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington, Wyoming,
Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota,
Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky,
addition to Virginia, the Consortium includes: Alabama,
help standardize and deploy certificates across the country. In
Career Readiness Certificate Consortium, which is designed to
be willing to work for them, but it does provide informa-
those people are currently employed or how many might
do business. It does not tell employers how many of
Silver, or Bronze CRC living near where they intend to
data such as the number of those who have a Gold,
employer can search the database for a region and find
the skill levels of the populace. An interested potential
region, college district and many other ways to show
can be queried according to zip code, geographic
showcase the skills of Virginia’s workforce. Information
Bank, was created as an economic develop tool to
searchable web-based application, the Virginia Skills
Virginians with Career Readiness Certificates, a
Considering there are currently thousands of
working with governors in all states to expand the initiative so
tion on skill and trainability that otherwise would not be
Additionally, a coalition of states has been formed, the
that the Career Readiness Certificate is recognized and accepted
available. More information on the Virginia Skills Bank
by employers.
can be found at www.crc.virginia.gov.
Find out more
about the Career Readiness Certificate, the
Virginia Skills Bank and other resources for
businesses at:
www.crc.virginia.gov
For more information about the Career
Readiness Certificate contact your
local Virginia Community College or
One-Stop Career Center.
The Career Readiness Certificate
is facilitated by
Virginia Community College System
Workforce Development Services
101 N. 14th Street 15th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
Fostering Economic Development in Our Communities
Employers look for places where their business can flourish. In Virginia, the number one
concern among employers and those who are considering locating here is the availability of a
skilled workforce. That’s why the Career Readiness Certificate is especially useful in cities and
counties where the likelihood of finding qualified workers might otherwise inhibit business
development.
Acceptance of this new credential is growing quickly. The Career Readiness Certificate
has been endorsed by:
• Virginia Chamber of Commerce
• Virginia Community College System
• Virginia Manufacturers Association
• Virginia AFL-CIO
• Virginia Workforce Council
Additionally, a coalition of states has been formed, the Career Readiness Certificate
Consortium, which is designed to help standardize and deploy certificates across the country.
In addition to Virginia, the Consortium includes: Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia,
Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota,
Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington, Wyoming, and the District of Columbia.
Several other states including California, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota,
Montana, New Mexico and Rhode Island are also working to develop and deploy certificates.
The certificate has gained wide acceptance in the business community, and the Governor is
working with governors in all states to expand the initiative so that the Career Readiness
Certificate is recognized and accepted by employers.
Virginia’s Career Readiness Certificate
Virginia Community College System
Workforce Development Services
101 N. 14th Street 15th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
WE’VE GOT THE
ANSWERS
The Career Readiness
Certificate is the answer
for employers who want
a trainable workforce.
When applicants carry
the Career Readiness
Certificate, they
demonstrate skills
in math, reading and
information processing.
Employers can use these
scores to make the best
decision when hiring or
training workers.
Who is the
The Career Readiness Certificate can be
The Career
Readiness Certificate
Right Person
and recipients. It is designed to help describe
skills for 90% of jobs.
• Gold signifies that a recipient possesses
skills for approximately 65% of jobs.
• Silver signifies that a recipient possesses
skills for approximately 30% of jobs.
• Bronze signifies that a recipient possesses
based on their test performance:
three levels of Career Readiness Certificates
standardized test. Individuals earn one of
awarded after an individual completes a
The Career Readiness Certificate is
earned the certificate.
In the first year, more than 5,500 residents
school diploma, a GED or a college degree.
be used as a terrific supplement to a high
as a stand-alone credential, the certificate can
locating information. In addition to its value
mathematics, reading for information, and
in three important work-related areas: applied
the abilities of a potential or current employee
easily understood by employers, educators
for the Job?
Employers need people with the right
skills, training and education to get the job
done, but finding those people can be
difficult. Bridging the gap between an
employee’s existing skills and those
required on the job also can be costly and
time-consuming. Hiring for entry-level
positions poses an additional challenge to
employers, because applicants often have
little or no work history—and employers
have no immediate way to evaluate the
skills possessed by candidates.
In an effort to address these challenges,
Governor Mark Warner developed the
Virginia Career Readiness Certificate
(CRC). The CRC shows an individual’s
competency in applied mathematics,
reading for information, and locating
information—skills required by more than
85% of jobs in the country.
Employers now have a clear,
standardized tool to assess the skill level
of potential and current employees. That
means choosing the right person for the job
just got easier.
Find out more
about
about the
the Career
Career Readiness
Readiness Certificate,
Certificate, the
the
Virginia
Virginia Skills
Skills Bank
Bank and
and other
other resources
resources
for
for businesses
businesses at:
at:
www.crc.virginia.gov
Regional Data Available at the
Virginia Skills Bank
Considering there are currently thousands
of Virginians with Career Readiness
Certificates, a searchable web-based
application, the Virginia Skills Bank, was
created as an economic develop tool to
showcase the skills of Virginia’s work-
force. Information can be queried accord-
ing to zip code, geographic region, college
district and many other ways to show the
skill levels of the populace. An interested
potential employer can search the database
for a region and find data such as the num-
ber of those who have a Gold, Silver, or
Bronze CRC living near where they intend
to do business. It does not tell employers
how many of those people are currently
employed or how many might be willing
to work for them, but it does provide
information on skill and trainability that
otherwise would not be available. More
information on the Virginia Skills Bank
can be found at www.crc.virginia.gov.
For more information about the Career Readiness
Certificate contact your local Virginia Community
College or One-Stop Career Center.
The Career Readiness Certificate is facilitated by
Virginia Community College System
Workforce Development Services
101 N. 14th Street 15th Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
Appendix D
5/4/2005
Final CRC Monograph
19
Appendix D
CRC Deployment across the Workforce and Career Development System
Race to GED
DSS clients
Adult Ed.
Dept. of Corrections
High School CTE
Rapid Response
(Dislocated
Workers)
Apprenticeship
CRC
in VA
Comm. College
WF students
Employment
Pre-screening at
Career Centers
Customized training
Incumbent workers
Middle College
WIA clients
DRS clients
RED = already implemented
BLACK= suggested for implementation
CRC Deployment across the Workforce and Career Development System
Worker Pipeline
(P-20)
Worker
Improvement
• Customized training
• Rapid Response
• Pre-screening at Career Centers
• WIA clients
• Incumbent workers
Primary subsystem
• Apprenticeship
• Comm. College WF students
• High school CTE
• WIA clients
• Middle College
Workers with
Barriers
• Race to GED
• Adult Ed.
• WIA clients
• Pre-screening at Career Centers
• Rapid Response
• Dept. of Corrections
• DSS clients
Secondary subsystem
5/4/2005
Final CRC Monograph
20
INDIANA’S WORKFORCE READINESS CERTIFICATION
AS A PART OF THE [email protected] PROGRAM
Indiana has enjoyed involvement with ACT Inc. and the WorkKeys system since
February of 2004. Since that time the state has worked with 217 employers, approved
900 job profiles, and anticipate 25,000 individuals being assessed by the end of 2005.
Most importantly, in the first year of operation, [email protected] placed over 1,500
jobseekers with matching skill-sets into positions. Unfortunately there are also those who
did not meet the entry level requirements for positions they sought. It is beneficial to
assess these individuals and determine their needs, but we must also provide a
mechanism for them to improve and an outcome to attain. That is why Indiana not only
assisted local Workforce Investment Boards in the purchase of Keytrain and WIN, but
also established Workforce Readiness Certification.
The Workforce Readiness Certification was rolled out in July of 2004 in a Blue
and Gold level. Individuals scoring a level four or higher in three core assessments
would receive the Blue certification, while those scoring a five or higher received the
Gold standard. The core assessments include Reading for Information, Locating
Information and Applied Mathematics. These three assessments would be involved in
nearly all of the jobs in Indiana if profiled and would lead to a good evaluation of an
individuals work readiness.
The Indiana Department of Workforce Development (DWD) continues to issue
Gold and Blue certifications signed by the Governor and Commissioner. These
certifications may be obtained by going to one of Indiana’s 27 “WorkOne” locations or in
the case of incumbent workers it may be provided on-site at the employer’s location. The
[email protected] program, through the use of Federal Reed Act dollars, covers the cost of
these certifications.
Participants are entered into the Customer Self-Service System (CS3) upon taking
the WorkKeys assessment. At that time they are also entered for partial or full
employment services depending on if they are incumbents or if they are assessing for a
profiled job. The number of credentials issued, individuals assessed and average scores
for a geographical region may be extracted from CS3 by running a report. DWD’s Field
Operations Unit is responsible for issuing and tracking all Work Readiness Certifications.
Having a Work Readiness Certification has been a tremendous tool for showing
Indiana’s workforce capacity. It is also in line with DWD’s emphasis on credential
outcomes for training and the establishment of career ladders. To date, Indiana has
received a very favorable response from the Indiana Department of Education, local
Workforce Investment Boards, Local Economic Development Organizations, and
community school districts. However the most favorable opinions come from the 1,671
recipients of the Gold Certification and the 3,421 individuals that achieved the Blue level.
This constitutes approximately 33% of the individuals assessed and many of the
remaining individuals did not take the core assessments due to the requirements of their
profile. Indiana is pleased to have a program that quantifies a worker’s readiness for the
workplace and we are excited to join our colleagues in other states that have either
developed, or are in the process of developing their own workplace readiness
certification.
WorkKeys
®
Blue Certificate
________________________________________________
For demonstrating proficiency in the following assessment areas:
Applied Mathematics:
Level _______________________
Locating Information:
Level _______________________
Reading for Information: Level _______________________
Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr., Governor
Ronald L. Stiver, Commissioner
Date
Date
Blue Certificate
WorkKeys® is a national workforce development system that compares a worker’s skills
with the skills required to successfully perform a specific job. The holder of this certificate
has scored at least a level four in Applied Mathematics, Reading for Information, and
Locating Information.
A Blue level certificate indicates skills at a level required by 50 percent of all jobs profiled
nationally through the WorkKeys® system. The holder of this certificate demonstrates mastery
of the following skills:
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
Skills for Level 4
READING FOR INFORMATION
Skills for Level 4
LOCATING INFORMATION
Skills for Level 4
• Solve problems that require one
or two operations
• Multiply negative numbers
• Calculate averages, simple
ratios, simple proportions, or
rates using whole numbers
and decimals
• Add commonly known fractions,
decimals, or percentages
(e.g., 1/2, .75, 25%)
• Add up to three fractions that
share a common denominator
• Multiply a mixed number by a
whole number or decimal
• Put the information in the right
order before performing
calculations
• Identify important details that
may not be clearly stated
• Use the reading material to
figure out the meaning of words
that are not defined
• Apply instructions with several
steps to a situation that is the
same as the situation in the
reading materials
• Choose what to do when
changing conditions call for a
different action (follow directions
that include "if-then" statements)
• Find several pieces of
information in one or
two graphics
• Understand how graphics are
related to each other
• Summarize information
from one or two straightforward graphics
• Identify trends shown
in one or two straightforward graphics
• Compare information and trends
shown in one or two
straightforward graphics
This Blue Certificate is equivalent and commensurate with WorkKeys® Silver certificate.
For information about WorkKeys® contact your local WorkOne Center.
A list of all WorkOne Centers can be found online at:
www.workforce.IN.gov
X403
WorkKeys
®
Gold Certificate
________________________________________________
For demonstrating proficiency in the following assessment areas:
Applied Mathematics:
Level _______________________
Locating Information:
Level _______________________
Reading for Information: Level _______________________
Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr., Governor
Ronald L. Stiver, Commissioner
Date
Date
Gold Certificate
WorkKeys® is a national workforce development system that compares a worker’s skills
with the skills required to successfully perform a specific job. The holder of this certificate
has scored at least a level five in Applied Mathematics, Reading for Information, and
Locating Information.
A Gold level certificate indicates skills at a level required by 90 percent of all jobs profiled
nationally through the WorkKeys® system. The holder of this certificate demonstrates mastery
of the following skills:
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
Skills for Level 5
READING FOR INFORMATION
Skills for Level 5
LOCATING INFORMATION
Skills for Level 5
• Decide what information,
calculations, or unit conversions
to use to solve the problem
• Look up a formula and perform
single-step conversions within or
between systems of
measurement
• Calculate using mixed units
(e.g., 3.5 hours and 4 hours
30 minutes)
• Divide negative numbers
• Find the best deal using oneand two-step calculations and
then comparing results
• Calculate perimeters and areas
of basic shapes (rectangles
and circles)
• Calculate percent discounts
or markups
• Figure out the correct meaning
of a word based on how the
word is used
• Identify the correct meaning of
an acronym that is defined in
the document
• Identify the paraphrased
definition of a technical
term or jargon that is defined
in the document
• Apply technical terms and
jargon and relate them to
stated situations
• Apply straightforward
instructions to a new situation
that is similar to the one
described in the material
• Apply complex instructions that
include conditionals to situations
described in the materials
• Sort through distracting
information
• Summarize information from
one or more detailed graphics
• Identify trends shown in
one or more detailed or
complicated graphics
• Compare information and
trends from one or more
complicated graphics
For information about WorkKeys® contact your local WorkOne Center.
A list of all WorkOne Centers can be found online at:
www.workforce.IN.gov
X402
[email protected] Program Overview
Announced by Gov. Joe Kernan in January 2004, [email protected] is a bold and innovative new program
that merges the training efforts of the Indiana Departments of Workforce Development and Commerce to
create the world’s most capable workforce.
In the last several years, Indiana has taken an aggressive approach to creating jobs and improving the
skills of its workforce. In 2002, Indiana became the only state in the nation to restructure its entire
corporate tax code in order to spur more job growth.
Energize Indiana, the most sweeping economic development plan in our state’s history, was passed with
bipartisan support in 2003. Providing a wide array of new economic development tools and incentives, it
focused the state’s future on four industry sectors: Advanced Manufacturing, Information Technology,
Life Sciences, and 21st Century Distribution.
On the heels of those historic actions, [email protected] was the next logical step. The program builds upon
those efforts and focuses on our greatest asset, Hoosier workers. Through [email protected], workers can
upgrade their skill levels and companies can become more competitive.
A major component of [email protected] is the WorkKeys® skills assessment. Developed by ACT, skills
assessments provide an impartial look at an individual’s strengths and weaknesses. The assessments can
also be used to help match people to jobs within CS3, the state’s computerized job matching system.
Job profiling is the employer segment of [email protected] The profiles help businesses identify the skills
and skill levels needed for workers to be successful on the job. Professional job analysts work with
experienced employees to define the duties of each occupation and, together, they create specific job
profiles.
After identifying the skill levels of employees, companies can evaluate any skill gaps between the job
profile and each individual’s skills assessments. This impartial evaluation can then serve as a foundation
to develop training programs tailored to specific individual and company needs.
Finally, through job fairs, advertising and local WorkOne Centers, [email protected] offers assistance in
recruiting employees. By using this extensive job recruitment and marketing plan, [email protected] is
helping companies and workers make the best possible choices and energizing Indiana’s workforce.
State working on job hunt
Indiana hoping a change in name changes direction of development
By Rebecca Helmes
Staff writer
After two factory job layoffs, Larry Pennington has a job again.
With more than three decades of manufacturing experience, he likes his job at Autocar in Hagerstown and
wants to see the company grow beyond its current 210 employees.
"It's been a real good place to work," he said. "They worked with (me), we had a few problems starting out
but they worked with me."
Pennington is an example of someone who benefits from the work state and local economic development
officials did to bring Autocar to Wayne County.
He's working in a facility that might never have come to the area were it not for deals struck with people
working specifically to attract jobs to the area.
And the plant is prospering.
It is putting together eight trucks per day -- a far cry from the three trucks the facility made for all of July 2003
when it was just getting started.
Ron Afflebach, Autocar's human resources director, said the company is growing, and part of the credit for
that falls with local and state economic development officials.
"The state of Indiana has done very well by us," he said, and so has the county. "In order to compete
globally you need to leverage all the resources any state brings to bat for you."
Autocar President Jim Johnston said the state has been by the company's side from the beginning.
It helped them get into the former Dana Corp. building at a minimal cost, ensured the working conditions
there were good, helped them glean workers from the Work Keys program, one that matches potential
employees with employers through the Indiana Department of Workforce Development, and obtained
training grants for employees.
Now, 18 months into the plant's operations, they are profitable.
"We're not just going to talk about it, we're going to help you invest," said Johnston about how the state
approaches businesses.
Autocar's products are exported to Canada and Australia, and 80 percent of their components are made in
Indiana. The company buys many of its supplies from other Indiana businesses, such as the engines made
in Columbus and the transmissions made in Indianapolis. Company executives would like the state to take
part in a program that encourages other Indiana businesses to buy as much of their supplies as they can
from other Indiana companies.
Mickey Maurer, the president of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, formerly known as the
Indiana Department of Commerce, recently visited the Hagerstown facility.
"They're taking the time, making the effort," Johnston said about state officials. After Maurer's visit, Afflebach
traveled to Indianapolis and said the state brought together all the key contacts the company would need to
pursue various state programs to potentially help the business. There are 12 to which Autocar could apply.
"They benefit the company, but they also benefit the citizens of Indiana," said Afflebach.
WorkOne
Employees are arguably a company's most important asset. In Indiana, the state can help match companies
with potential employees through skills and aptitude tests to make searching for employees easier.
"You'll find the majority of employees laid off from another job before they came here," Afflebach said.
Jason Young, an Autocar worker from Connersville, worked at a Wendy's restaurant before taking his
current job in Autocar's diagnostics area.
After Young spent some time filling out paperwork from the WorkOne office, his documents came to
Afflebach's attention.
"Here's a smart guy who's underemployed," Afflebach said about what he thought before Young was hired.
"Most of these people don't know anything about building trucks, but they have the aptitude to learn how to
build trucks."
Autocar hires almost exclusively from east central Indiana.
Young didn't know anything about trucks before, but now he's using a computer to run tests on them when
they're almost finished being built. He said it took him about a month to get the basics down, and now he
learns new material every time the engineers change a model.
The WorkOne offices give Autocar job applicants using the Work Keys program. Only those people who
have the aptitude to learn how to do the kind of work Autocar does are sent for further consideration by the
company.
"The state has underwritten it, we haven't had to pay for that," Afflebach said. "It actually saves time for the
HR (human resources) types like me. I feel there's a very good labor force here in the area. I consider that to
be a competitive advantage."
Pennington also found his job through WorkOne and wants to see the facility continue to grow.
"Hopefully some day we'll have two complete shifts on different sides," he said. "Lots of them (his coworkers
at Autocar) got factory experience, lot of them don't have."
Autocar has 84 union members and 19 probationary members. The average pay is more than $12 per hour,
and starting pay for the factory is $9.47 an hour.
Pennington said there are not too many factories that people can hire into as a young person and retire from
decades later. "It's good to have the work," he said.
As he walked through the plant this week, Afflebach greeted most workers by name and they returned the
greeting.
"I know all these employees by name, and they know me," he said. "We want to all retire from here."
NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release: April 18, 2005
Media Contact: Kip Chase, 317/ 232-3396
Robert Shula, 317/ 234-0263
[email protected] to aid four central Indiana companies
Four Indianapolis area companies utilize state workforce development program
Indianapolis, Ind. –Four more central Indiana companies have signed up for [email protected], one of
Indiana’s workforce development programs.
Through the Indiana Department of Workforce Development, Marion County’s American
Medical Supply Co Inc., Marten Transport Ltd., Miller Veneers Inc. and Shelby County’s O’Neal
Steel were awarded a total of $45,706 to assess the skills of up to 566 individuals and profile 16
different positions.
•
American Medical Supply Co. Inc. of Indianapolis will use the $6,238 from the Department of
Workforce Development to assess the skills of up to 11 people, three of which are potential new
hires. The money will also allow the company to profile its positions of general management,
customer service representative and store clerk.
•
Marten Transport Ltd. of Indianapolis will use a $14,100 allotment to assess the skills of up to
125 possible new hires. This funding will also go towards profiling the positions of regional driver,
tractor-trailer technician and reefer technician. Marten, one of the premier protective-service
transportation companies in operation today, currently operates more than 2,400 tractors and
3,000 trailers. With terminals in Wisconsin, Georgia, California, Oregon and Indiana, Marten
employs more than 2,000 people and works with an additional 600 owner-operator partners.
•
Miller Veneers Inc. located in Indianapolis will utilize the $12,776 allotment to offer skills
assessments to 30 existing workers and a potential 30 new hires, while also profiling the positions
of flitch cleaning/log pulling, warehouse, dryer offbearer, sawmill offbearer and hanger. Miller
Veneers, which employs 179 people, has been in the wood veneer production industry for three
quarters of a century.
•
O’Neal Steel of Shelbyville will use the $12,776 allotment from the Department of Workforce
Development to provide skills assessments to 45 existing employees and profile the positions of
stock pulling/materials handler, parts cleaning, press brake operator, machining center and
welder.
WorkKeys®, the centerpiece of [email protected], is a comprehensive that determines the skills
necessary for a specific job. It also matches the individual's skill level to particular job requirements.
Job profiling, the employer segment of WorkKeys®, helps businesses identify the skills and skill levels
needed for workers to be successful at their specific job.
The Indiana Department of Workforce Development is charged with continually improving the
Hoosier workforce by assisting companies to create new jobs and improve employee skills. The
agency offers a variety of training and educational grants, partners with the state’s 27 WorkOne
Centers, administers the unemployment insurance system, provides labor market information, assists
employers with preparing workers for layoffs and closures and operates the a statewide job placement
service
For more information on this or other DWD programs, call 888-465-4616 or visit the web site at
www.workforce.IN.gov.
###
How [email protected]
Helps Businesses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Find and train the right people
Strengthen applicant pools
Increase employee productivity
Boost employee morale and reduce turnover
Identify and fill employee skill gaps
Target specific training needs
Recruitment assistance through job fairs,
advertising and marketing opportunities
• Streamline hiring process, reducing costs
• Equal opportunity compliant
[email protected] is based on a nationally recognized
system called WorkKeys® that teaches and assesses
workplace skills. WorkKeys was created by ACT, a
non-profit education and career-planning group.
For more information, go online to:
www.indianaatwork.IN.gov
INDIANA
WORKFORCE
DEVELOPMENT
Department of Workforce Development
10 North Senate Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46204-2277
1-800-465-4616
www.workforce.IN.gov
Indiana Department of Commerce
One North Capitol, Suite 700
Indianapolis, IN 46204
1-800-280-0584
www.indianacommerce.com
The Right People.
The Right Time.
The Right Place.
As the economy changes, competition increases and
technology advances—one thing remains the same.
You’re only as good as your team.
To be successful in any business, a strong, skilled and
flexible workforce is required—but locating, developing
and maintaining that team isn’t always easy.
Through [email protected] Hoosier employers now have
access to an innovative new program that can help
employers and employees speak the same language,
ensuring your business finds the right people at the
right time.
Using a nationally renowned assessment system,
[email protected] identifies skills needed to perform certain
tasks, assesses the skills of new, existing and potential
employees and offers training to upgrade skill levels—
all free of charge.
Job Profiles
Job profiles help employers identify the skills needed for
workers to be successful on the job. Using proven
methods, professional job analysts work with existing
staff to define the duties of each occupation and create
a specific job profile.
Job Profile Facts:
• No cost to the company or employees
• Easy, one-page applications for employers
• Profilers work with the company’s on-the-job experts
• Up to 5 job profiles developed per year,
per company
• Less than 1 week to complete each profile
• Company retains all documentation
Gap Training
Skills Assessments
Available to all Hoosiers, skills assessments help take
the guesswork out of the recruitment process.
Employers receive objective, reliable information about
each candidate’s workplace skills, including:
• Information location
• Observation
• Reading for information
• Mathematics
• Applied technology
• Teamwork
• Listening
• Business writing
• Communication
[email protected] uses a welll defined “skill scale” established
by ACT, a non-profit education and career-planning group,
to explain each skill and candidate’s score.
Assessments may use a combination of traditional
paper testing and/or audio or visual analysis, and some
assessments are available in Spanish.
Assessment Facts:
• Assessment times range from 30 to 65 minutes
• Individuals may receive assessments in as many
as 5 of 9 categories
• Assessments are provided free of charge
up to 2 times
• New or experienced workers are eligible
Maintaining a workforce with the latest skills available is
vital to the success of any company. [email protected]
offers financial assistance to help improve or fill any
gaps in an employee’s skill.
Gap Training Facts:
• No company or employee investment is required
• [email protected] pays up to 75% of eligible
training expenses
• Training is available for new and experienced
workers
• Companies may also be eligible for other state
assistance
Recruitment Assistance
Through job fairs, advertising and local WorkOne
Centers, [email protected] offers assistance in
recruiting employees.
By using this extensive job recruitment and marketing
plan, [email protected] is helping companies and workers
make the best possible choices and energizing
Indiana’s workforce.
Indiana
@Work
Ø Three-quarters of Indiana small business owners believe that the economy will improve
during the first half of 2004 and more than 40 percent plan to hire new workers.
National City Corp. survey of 1,200 Indiana small business owners, IBJ, 12-29-03
Ø Indiana is one of the top 10 states for new or expanding businesses.
Plants Sites & Parks, January 2004
Ø Indiana has the 11th most business-friendly tax climate in the nation.
The Tax Foundation, May 22, 2003
Linking Hoosier
workers to jobs of
the future
Ø In 2003, more than 48,000 Hoosiers received job training through Dept.
of Commerce training programs. More than 219 companies were assisted through the
same programs, leveraging more than $2 billion in private investment.
Indiana Dept. of Commerce
[email protected] builds on the success of Energize Indiana by extending worker assessments and job profiling
for Hoosier workers and employers statewide, while beginning to match workers with job opportunities based upon their
personal set of career skills. [email protected] demonstrates our state’s recognition that to compete in a global marketplace, our
greatest assets are those members of our current, emerging and future workforce living right here in Indiana. Pilot programs
with a national job matching and worker assessment tool called “WorkKeys” have already been successful across Indiana, now
[email protected] will go further by:
Ø Focusing on skills for a specific career, not just a specific job;
Ø Expanding existing job matching and worker assessment programs statewide;
Ø Creating “Career Pathway E-resumes” for the lifetime of a worker’s career; and
Ø Expanding e-resumes to build around Energize Indiana’s four targeted industrial sectors of advanced manufacturing,
information technology, life sciences and high-tech distribution through coordinated management
How [email protected]…works
Action and Funding
Example: A worker was recently
laid off from his job as a machine
operator, a job in which he has
worked for 15 years, and is now in
the market for new employment.
Unfortunately, there is no demand
for machine operators in his
community, and he doesn’t want to
move his family. He knows he has
skills and experience in a specific
occupation…and now he’s looking
for a way to use them differently.
[email protected] requires only state government administrative
action, and combines existing Energize Indiana federal funding of $5
million a year for five years, as well as nearly $5 million a year for
five years in state funds from Dept. of Commerce training programs.
Through [email protected], at his local
DWD WorkOne Center, the worker
gets an assessment of his career
skills. He then uses [email protected]
to discover what current job
openings in his local area he is
qualified for. He discovers a job
opening, with a higher salary, but it
requires a little more education than
he has. [email protected] helps him
get the training he needs, provides
him with an electronic database of
his skills and experience…and a
higher paying job to match.
WorkKeys pilot success stories
Tippecanoe County
The Tecumseh Area Partnership (TAP) has worked with many
different entities in their region, including Eli Lilly and Company
Tippecanoe Labs, Lafayette Jefferson High School and the Lafayette
Adult Resource Academy. Recently, TAP partnered with the local
WorkOne Center and Purdue University to support an employer
reception to showcase WorkKeys as a prelude to a technology job fair
being held in May.
Southwest Indiana
Career Choices Incorporated (CCI), in partnership with the Dept. of
Workforce Development in the Southwest Work Service Area has
performed seven job classification profiles and is currently working on
eight additional such profiles. Companies impacted include Whirlpool
Corporation, Berry Plastics Corporation and Curtis-Maruyasu of
America (CMA). Job seekers interested in working for these
companies attend WorkKeys assessment sessions held weekly at the
Evansville WorkOne Center. Since Dec. 1, 2003, more than 100
assessments have been completed. In addition, the partnership with
Whirlpool has resulted in more than 600 job assessments since they
began using WorkKeys.
Color-Coded For Easy Reference:
Guide to Indiana's
WorkOne Offices
WorkOne Centers
WorkOne Express Offices
Department
Of Workforce
Development
July 2004 Edition
THE CENTER OF WORKFORCE INNOVATIONS
Michigan
City
East Chicago
Gary
Hammond
Porter
Marshall
Starke
Pulaski
Newton
Fulton
Jasper
Warsaw
Kosciusko
Whitley
Wabash
ton
Cass
Delphi
Wells
Peru
Grant
Howard
Marion
Clinton
Covington
Boone
Vermillion
Anderson
Putnam
Richmond
Greenfield
Shelby
Brazil
Owen
Clay
Spencer
Terre Haute
Vigo
Connersville
Morgan
Bloomington
Greene
Bartholo-
Loogoo-
Orange
Paoli
Pike
Gibson
Perry
SOUTHWEST INDIANA
Boonville
Rockport
Jackson
Salem
Ripley
Ohio
North Vernon
Jefferson Switzerland
Scott
Madison
Scottsburg
SOUTHERN SEVEN Clark
Crawford
Jasper
Spencer
Lawrenceburg
Columbus Jennings
Washington
Dubois
Warrick
Brown
Dearborn
Decatur
mew
Bedford
Knox Washington Martin
Petersburg
Nashville
Greensburg Franklin
Seymour
SHAWNEE TRACE
Daviess tee
SOUTHEASTERN
INDIANA
Franklin Shelbyville
Monroe
Lawrence
Vincennes
Fayette
Martinsville
Linton
Sullivan
Union
Rush
Johnson
SOUTH CENTRAL INDIANA
Sullivan
Evansville
Mt. Vernon
Marion
Greencastle
WESTERN INDIANA
Posey Vanderburgh
Wayne
New
Castle
(see inset)
Avon
Winchester
Henry
Hancock
Rockville
Clinton
Princeton
Fishers
Hendricks
Randolph
EAST CENTRAL
INDIANA
CIRCLE SEVEN
Montgomery
Parke
Muncie
Hamilton
Lebanon
Portland
Delaware
Madison
Frankfort
Crawfordsville
Fountain
Jay
Hartford City
Tipton
Lafayette
Adams
Blackford
Kokomo
TECUMSEH AREA
PARTNERSHIP
Decatur
Bluffton
Huntington
Tippecanoe
Warren
Allen
Miami Wabash Hunting-
NORTH CENTRAL
INDIANA
Carroll
Fort Wayne
NORTHEAST INDIANA
Logansport
Monticello
White
Auburn
Columbia
Citt
Rochester
THE CENTER OF WORKFORCE Winamac
INNOVATIONS
Benton
DeKalb
Noble
Plymouth
Knox
Rensselaer
Steuben
NORTHERN
INDIANA
Valparaiso
Morocco
LaGrange
Elkhart
LaPorte
NORTHWEST
Angola
Elkhart
St. Joseph
LaPorte
Portage
Crown
Point
LaGrange
South Bend
Floyd
Clarksville
Jeffersonville
New Albany
English
Corydon
MARION
COUNTY
Harrison
Tell
City
Westside
Eastside
Michigan
Street
Good jobs for
good people.
Energizing Indiana’s Workforce
One Hoosier at a Time.
Get the right job at the
right time in the right place.
Looking for work? Not happy with your current job?
Not sure where you fit? [email protected] can help!
Available at any of the state’s WorkOne Centers,
[email protected] is an innovative new program
designed to help Hoosiers learn new skills,
improve job performance and find better jobs.
[email protected] uses a nationally recognized
system that gives workers an impartial look at
their strengths and weaknesses as well as
opportunities to fill in any gaps. And,
[email protected] will even help match you to jobs
that fit your skills.
And the best part — it’s all free!
Assessment Facts:
Available to all Hoosiers, skill assessments are
provided in the following categories:
• Information location
• Observation
• Reading for information
• Mathematics
• Applied technology
• Teamwork
• Listening
• Business writing
• Communication
Assessments may use a combination of traditional
paper testing and/or audio or visual analysis, and
some assessments are available in Spanish.
Your best job is yet to come!
For more information about finding your place in
Indiana’s workforce, log on to
www.indianaatwork.IN.gov
or call
1-888-WorkOne
NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release: Jan. 7, 2005
Media Contact: Jeff Harris, 317/ 232-3396
Robert Shula, 317/ 234-0263
Nine Southern Indiana companies receive aid through
[email protected]
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Gov. Joe Kernan announced today that nine southern Indiana companies
have joined [email protected], Indiana’s innovative workforce development program.
“[email protected] was created to help companies assess the skills needed for jobs and match
them with workers who fit those needs,” Kernan said. “I am pleased that these Hoosier businesses
are taking advantage of these state resources to invest in their most important asset – their workers.”
Awarded through the Indiana Department of Workforce Development, the following companies
received assistance:
•
Azteca Milling LP of Evansville received $12,160 to provide 100 skills assessments for existing
workers and profile its forklift operator, loader, warehouse manager, warehouse supervisor and
customer service positions.
•
Collis Inc. of Evansville received $15,400 to assess the skills of up to 250 job applicants as it
seeks to fill up to 100 new positions. The Vanderburgh County company also used the funding to
profile its fabrication, finishing, machine setup, forklift operator and supervisor positions.
•
Counter Design of Evansville used its $11,800 award to offer skills assessments to up to 50 job
applicants as the company looks to fill a projected six new positions. In addition, the company’s
production manager, machine operator, custom builder, field tech/templater and finish operator
positions were profiled.
•
Futaba Indiana of America Corp. received $14,320 to assess the skills of up to 600 job
applicants as the company fills a projected 200 new jobs. Futaba also used the funding to profile
its production associate, quality inspector, material handlers and skill trades personnel
occupations.
•
General Electric of Mount Vernon received $14,860 to assess the skills of up to 225 existing
employees and profile its mechanic, engineer and lab technician C and D posts.
•
Mount Vernon’s Infinity Molding and Assembly Inc received $11,800 to assess the skills of up
to 50 job applicants for six new jobs. The funding also will be used to profile the company’s
process technician, quality technician, maintenance and shipping/receiving clerk positions.
•
Intrametco Processing Inc. of Evansville received $11,086 to assess the skills of 10 incumbent
workers and 40 job applicants as the company adds three members to its staff. Intrametco also
will profile its furnace operator, furnace assistant, shredder operator, saw operator and quality
control supervisor positions.
[email protected]/ add 1
•
Located in Jasper, Jasper Desk Co. will use $9,012 from the [email protected] program to provide
up to 70 skills assessments to potential job applicants as it seeks to fill as many as 25 positions.
The company also will profile its machine operator, finish utility, assembly, veneer utility and
sander positions with the funding.
•
Rockport Roll Shop LLC located in Rockport received $11,800 to provide up to up to 50 skills
assessments of existing and potential new employees. Eighteen assessments will be offered to
job applicants as the company seeks to fill six new jobs. The company also will profile its grinder,
chromer, mill loader, maintenance and shift lead positions.
[email protected], a joint effort between DWD and the Indiana Department of Commerce, builds
around Energize Indiana's four targeted sectors: advanced manufacturing, information technology, life
sciences and high-tech distribution. Available through the state’s WorkOne and WorkOne Express
Centers, [email protected] has made skills assessments available to nearly 30,000 Hoosiers and
companies statewide have requested more than 700 job profiles since its inception in January.
WorkKeys®, the centerpiece of [email protected], is a comprehensive system developed by
ACT® that determines and categorizes the skills necessary for a specific job. It also matches the
individual's skill level to particular job requirements and serves as a foundation for training programs
that close skill gaps and develop a more capable workforce.
Job profiling, the employer segment of WorkKeys®, helps businesses identify the skills and
skill levels needed for workers to be successful on the job. Professional job analysts work with
experienced employees to define the duties of each occupation and together, they create specific job
profiles.
Through its various programs and initiatives, the Indiana Department of Workforce
Development is charged with continually improving the Hoosier workforce by assisting companies to
create new jobs and improve employee skills. The agency offers a variety of training and educational
grants, partners with the state’s 27 WorkOne Centers, administers the unemployment insurance
system, provides labor market information, assists employers with preparing workers for layoffs and
closures, and operates the a statewide job placement service
For more information on this or other DWD programs, call 1-800-465-4616 or visit the web site
at www.workforce.IN.gov.
###
NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release: Jan 7, 2005
Media Contact: Jeff Harris, 317/ 232-3396
Angie Nussmeyer, 317/ 233-5050
[email protected] continues to add
companies in Northeastern Indiana
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – Today the Gov. Joe Kernan announced that seven additional Northeastern
Indiana businesses have joined the state’s innovative new workforce development program,
[email protected]
Awarded through the Indiana Department of Workforce Development, grants to the following
companies were announced:
•
Columbia City’s Dana Coupled Products Inc. will use the $15,230 from [email protected] to
assess the skills of up to 300 people. Of this number, up to 150 job applicants will be assessed to
potentially fill 50 new job openings and the remaining are incumbent employees. In addition, the
company will also profile its supervisor, maintenance technician, set-up, team leader and operator
positions at its Whitley County location.
•
Located in Huntington, Homier Distributing Co. will assess the skills of up to 125 incumbent
employees and profile five occupational categories with $12,700 from [email protected] These
positions include tractor assembler, warehouseman, customer service representative, leasing
agent and traffic clerk.
•
With its $7,324 from [email protected], Columbia City’s Oak View Tooling Inc. will assess the skills
of up to 15 people so that the company may find qualified candidates for three potential job
openings. Any remaining assessments will be used for incumbent employees. Also part of the
Whitley County company’s request was five job profiles, including tool grinder, shop foreman,
office secretary and bookkeeper positions.
•
Huntington’s Transmetco Corp. will utilize its $7,432 from [email protected] to profile four
occupational categories, including furnance operator, sorter, material handler and shipping and
receiving. The company will also provide skills assessments to up to 20 existing workers.
•
[email protected] has committed $10,586 to Huntington’s Transwheel Corp., which will be used to
assess the skills of up to 85 employees. Additionally, the company will profile its painting,
computer numerical control operator, wheel repair and shipping and receiving positions.
•
LaOtto’s Wayne Tool and Design will use $9,830 from [email protected] to provide skills
assessments to 50 employees and to profile five occupational categories. Jobs will be profiled in
its press department and welding department as well as its set-up, maintenance and quality
inspector positions at the DeKalb County facility.
-more-
Northeastern Indiana/ add 1
•
With hopes to expand its workforce, Ligonier’s Western Consolidated Technologies Inc. assess
the skills of up to 75 people, 30 of which will be job applicants to potentially fill 10 job openings.
The Noble County company will also use the $10,370 in funding to profile its set up, press
operator, machine production operator, computer numerical control operator and cutter operator
positions.
[email protected], a joint effort between the Indiana Department of Workforce Development
(DWD) and the Indiana Department of Commerce, builds around Energize Indiana's four targeted
sectors: advanced manufacturing, information technology, life sciences and high-tech distribution.
Available through the state’s WorkOne and WorkOne Express Centers, [email protected] has made
skills assessments available to more than 30,000 Hoosiers and companies statewide have requested
more than 700 job profiles since its inception in January.
WorkKeys® skills assessments, a comprehensive system developed by ACT® that determines
and categorizes the skills necessary for a specific job, is the centerpiece of [email protected] It also
matches the individual's skill level to particular job requirements and serves as a foundation for
training programs that close skill gaps and develop a more capable workforce.
Job profiling, the employer segment of WorkKeys®, helps businesses identify the skills and
skill levels needed for workers to be successful on the job. Professional job analysts work with
experienced employees to define the duties of each occupation and together, they create specific job
profiles.
Through its various programs and initiatives, DWD is charged with continually improving the
Hoosier workforce by assisting companies to create new jobs and improve employee skills. The
agency offers a variety of training and educational grants, partners with the state’s 27 WorkOne
Centers, administers the unemployment insurance system, provides labor market information, assists
employers with preparing workers for layoffs, and closures and operates the a statewide job
placement service
For more information on this or other DWD programs, call 800-465-4616 or visit the web site at
www.workforce.IN.gov.
###