Delaware County Technical Schools Program budget

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Delaware County Technical Schools Program budget
Delaware County Technical Schools
PROGRAM BUDGET SUMMARY
2016-2017
Delaware County Technical High School – Aston
100 Crozerville Road
Aston, PA
Delaware County Technical High School – Folcroft
701 Henderson Boulevard
Folcroft, PA
The Vocational Programs at
The County Alternative High School (TCA)
710 South Old Middletown Road
Media, PA
Delaware County Intermediate Unit
Marple Education Center
85 N. Malin Road
Broomall, PA
Delaware County Technical Schools
PROGRAM BUDGET
2016-2017
Board of Directors
Edward J. Cardow, Chichester
President
Maureen Carey, Upper Darby
Vice President
Susan Haagen, Nonmember
Secretary
Thomas C. Brown, Nonmember
Treasurer
Maria Edelberg, Ed.D.
Executive Director
Michael V. Puppio, Jr., Esq.
Solicitor
Charles Warren
Tracy A. Karwoski
Russ Bilotta
Edward Harris
Barbara Harvey
Catherine Hilferty Patricia Booker
Harry J. McElwee
Nancy Mackrides
Edward McBride Christopher DeSantis
Richard Sonntag
Darren Burrell
Chester Upland School District
Garnet Valley School District
Haverford Township School District
Interboro School District
Marple Newtown School District
Penn-Delco School District
Radnor Township School District
Ridley School District
Rose Tree Media School District
Southeast Delco School District
Springfield School District
Wallingford-Swarthmore School District
William Penn School District
Message from the Executive Director
The 2016-2017 budget for the Delaware County Technical Schools (DCTS) has been prepared to balance the
programming needs of technical school students in the county with sound fiscal discipline. The budget reflects
a $438,101 increase from the 2015-2016 budget. The districts’ contribution to the budget increased $270,738
or 2.88 %. Contractual obligations are the primary factor contributing to the budget increase including the
rate increase from 25.84% to 30.03% for the Public School Employees Retirement System (PSERS).
DCIU enrolls over 1000 students in one of the highest performing Career and Technical Centers in the state.
With 18 programs offered at three campuses – Aston, Folcroft and Marple -- we firmly believe that we offer an
outstanding technical school program in Delaware County, that prepares students to continue their education
in a post-secondary setting or to be job ready. Our students’ success rate on the National Occupational
Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI) exams has consistently been in the mid 90% range for four years in a
row. And, to ensure our programs remain relevant and that we are keeping up with the changing occupational
landscape, our leadership staff meet regularly with local business and manufacturing leaders to assess local
workforce needs for the near future. These meetings have been the catalyst for transforming our CTE programs
into the Schools of Health and Bioscience; Engineering and Computer Science; Logistics, Distribution and
Transportation; Hospitality, Tourism, and Human Services; and Construction Technology and Design. Within
each School, programs represent an array of education levels, skill requirements, and career pathways.
Furthermore, we are thrilled to begin a new program in 2016-17, Exercise Therapy and Sports Science. This
program provides both theoretical and clinical components designed to prepare students for post-secondary
education and multiple career pathways in the following fields of study: sports medicine, athletic training,
physical therapy, occupational therapy, exercise physiology, fitness training and nutrition.
DCTS is pleased to enjoy a supportive relationship with local school boards and Superintendents who
understand the importance of offering students a quality career and technical education. We sincerely
appreciate this support, which has enabled the DCTS staff to provide state of the art programming for
students to learn the skills needed to compete in a 21st century economy and workforce.
We look forward to that continued support and to another successful year and we remain excited about the
many possibilities for a bright future for Delaware County’s students.
Maria Edelberg, Ed.D.
Message from the Director
The Delaware County Technical High Schools provide career and technical education for all of the students in
Delaware County. DCTS continues to provide rigorous education and training programs where students earn
Industry Certifications and are provided with a means to seamlessly transition into postsecondary education
or enter the workforce. The emphasis and accountability continues to align career areas with the Programs of
Study provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.
The programs offered by the technical schools are competency based career and technical education
programs approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The Career Pathway model enables
DCTS students to seek employment in areas that will provide them with a life-sustaining career as they
transition from school to college and work.
Integrating academics into the career and technical curriculum is an integral part of each CTE program.
DCTS is committed to supporting the sending school districts by making the academic content relevant to
students through project based learning along with ‘real life’ learning environments.
All of DCTS programs are articulated with many postsecondary institutions as part of the Pennsylvania
Department of Educations Program of Study and SOAR (Students Occupationally and Academically Ready)
initiatives. These articulation agreements along with postsecondary dual enrollment agreements allow
students to earn college credit while in high school.
This budget supports secondary career and technical education in Delaware County as we continue to provide
high quality education and training for students to meet the expectations and demands of the workforce of
today and tomorrow.
Philip Lachimia, Ed.D.
Table of Contents
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1-2
Summary of District Participation/Cost for 1/2 Time Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3
Summary of District Participation/Cost for Skills Start/TCA Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4
Estimated Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5
Estimated Expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6
Summary of Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7
Proposed Revenue by Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8
Summary of Expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 9
Proposed Expenditures by Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 10
Instructional Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 11-32
Pupil Personnel Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 33
Administrative Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 34-35
Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 36
Accounting Code
Legend
1100 – Academic Courses
01 Delaware County Technical High Schools – Aston
1300 – Technical Courses
02 Delaware County Technical High Schools – Folcroft
2000 – Support and Operation Cost
03 Delaware County Intermediate Unit – Marple Campus
04 The County Alternative School – TCA
2016-­‐2017 Index by District
District Index
Index -­‐ High to Low
District
Chester Upland
Southeast Delco
William Penn
Upper Darby
Interboro
Chichester
Ridley
Penn Delco
Garnet Valley
Haverford
Marple Newtown
Springfield
Wallingford Swarthmore
Rose Tree Media
Radnor
Totals
Index
3.9%
3.5%
3.5%
3.4%
3.2%
3.2%
3.1%
2.9%
2.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.90%
# students
1/2 time
38
93
86
93
105
53
108
50
48
65
35
44
32
31
15
896
# students
Total
SS & TCA
Students % students
11
49.00
4.95%
7
100.00
10.10%
9
95.00
9.60%
26
119.00
12.02%
9
114.00
11.52%
3
56.00
5.66%
18
126.00
12.73%
1
51.00
5.15%
4
52.00
5.25%
0
65.00
6.57%
1
36.00
3.64%
0
44.00
4.44%
4
36.00
3.64%
1
32.00
3.23%
0
15.00
1.52%
94.00
990.00
100.00%
Total %
71.72%
28.28%
100.00%
2016-­‐2017 Index by District
# Students by District
Students -­‐ High to Low
District
Ridley
Upper Darby
Interboro
Southeast Delco
William Penn
Haverford
Chichester
Garnet Valley
Penn Delco
Chester Upland
Springfield
Marple Newtown
Wallingford Swarthmore
Rose Tree Media
Radnor
Totals
Index
3.1%
3.4%
3.2%
3.5%
3.5%
2.4%
3.2%
2.4%
2.9%
3.9%
2.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.4%
2.90%
# students
1/2 time
108
93
105
93
86
65
53
48
50
38
44
35
32
31
15
896
# students
Total
SS & TCA
Students % students
18
126.00
12.73%
26
119.00
12.02%
9
114.00
11.52%
7
100.00
10.10%
9
95.00
9.60%
0
65.00
6.57%
3
56.00
5.66%
4
52.00
5.25%
1
51.00
5.15%
11
49.00
4.95%
0
44.00
4.44%
1
36.00
3.64%
4
36.00
3.64%
1
32.00
3.23%
0
15.00
1.52%
94.00
990.00
100.00%
Total %
83.54%
16.46%
100.00%
Key Points
•• The 2016-2017 Delaware County Technical Schools Program budget is $12,725,006.
•• The budget to budget increase is 3.56% or $438,101.
•• District funding for 2016-2017 increased $270,738 or 2.88%, which is equal to the index plus funding for
one additional Teacher Assistant position to account for the increase in students with disabilities, PAC
committee approved.
•• The Delaware County School Districts composite Act 1 index is 2.90%, range for the districts’ index is
2.40% to 3.90%.
•• The 2015-2016 budget utilized a vacant position created through attrition, for the Apple Systems and
Design Program. This is a new program offering that began in the 2015-2016 school year.
•• The 2016-2017 proposed budget utilizes a vacant position to add one professional staff for the
Exercise Therapy and Sports Sciences Program. The unfunded position will only be staffed and funded if
enrollment justifies opening the program. In addition, one teacher assistant position was added, accounting
for an increase in students with disabilities.
•• The 2016-2017 budget includes the Public School Employees’ Retirement System (PSERS) rate increase from
25.84% to 30.03%. This increase added $221,924 to retirement expense, a 1.81% increase to the proposed
budget. The expense is offset by state revenue in share of PSERS.
•• The 2016-2017 budget includes an 11.63% increase in projected medical costs offset by savings utilizing a
composite rate.
•• Districts are being asked to contribute $8,522,221 toward the half-time career and technical program based
on the percentage of district participation determined by the three-year averaging method.
•• The Special Education Skill Start and TCA programs require district contributions of $1,146,466.
•• Individual district costs are outlined on Page 3 and 4. Total operating costs for all programs are located on
Page 9, with the revenue sources needed to provide those programs listed on Page 8.
•• The three-year averaging method will be used for budgeting and year-end reconciliation for the half-time
technical program.
•• Budgeting and year-end reconciliation for Skills Start and TCA programs is based on per student tuition.
1
2016-2017 PROPOSED DELAWARE COUNTY TECHNICAL SCHOOLS BUDGET
SUPPLEMENTAL KEYPOINTS
COMPONENTS OF THE 3.56% NET BUDGET TO BUDGET INCREASE
DESCRIPTION
ACTUAL
CURRENT
ESTIMATED
PROPOSED
BUDGET TO
EXPENDITURES
BUDGET
EXPENDITURES
BUDGET
BUDGET
BUDGET TO
BUDGET
2014-2015
2015-2016
2015-2016
2016-2017
DIFFERENCE
% DIFFERENCE
PERSONNEL SERVICES - SALARIES (100)
4,638,969
4,858,869
4,769,102
4,944,228
85,359
1.76%
PERSONNEL SERVICES - BENEFITS (200)
2,780,101
3,388,882
3,169,872
3,714,271
325,389
9.60%
PURCHASED PROFESSIONAL & TECHNICAL SERVICES (300)
962,360
1,089,813
1,082,040
1,108,072
18,259
1.68%
PURCHASED PROPERTY SERVICES (400)
630,837
727,279
717,935
717,379
-9,900
-1.36%
-2.80%
OTHER PURCHASED SERVICES (500)
320,525
369,926
359,375
359,559
-10,367
1,100,455
1,469,102
1,425,797
1,508,963
39,861
2.71%
PROPERTY (700)
115,728
78,900
74,600
68,400
-10,500
-13.31%
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES (800)*
386,460
304,134
303,834
304,134
0
0.00%
0
0
0
0
0
0.00%
10,935,435
12,286,905
11,902,555
12,725,006
438,101
SUPPLIES (600)
OTHER FINANCING USES (900)
TOTAL
The following identifies the areas of the budget to budget increase
Salary (100)
Retirement (200)
Medical (200)
85,359
0.69%
221,924
1.81%
87,454
0.71%
Other benefits (200)
16,011
0.13%
Contracted Services (300)
18,259
0.15%
Supplies (600)
Equipment (700)
Other Costs
39,861
0.32%
(10,500)
-0.09%
(20,267)
-0.16%
438,101
3.56%
Retirement and medical represent $309,378 of the increase or 2.52% of the 3.56% budget to budget increase.
Salaries represent $85,359 of the increase or 0.69% of the 3.56% budget to budget increase.
All other areas of the budget represent $43,364 of the increase or 0.35% of the 3.56% budget to budget increase.
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES (800)*
Miscellaneous expenses reflect $304,134 of which $297,609 is the capital reserve expense found on page 74 of the budget. This expense is a transfer to the Technical Schools
Capital Account realized from Marple rental proceeds.
2
FUNDING FOR THE 2016-2017 TECHNICAL SCHOOL 1/2 TIME PROGRAM
BASED ON 3 YEAR AVERAGE PARTICIPATION
Funding for 2016-2017 is based on districts' 3-year average share of participation
Aston/Folcroft 1/2 day Program
Participating District
Final
2013-2014
ADM
Final
2014-2015
45-day
2015-2016
3-YEAR
AVERAGE
2016-2017
Budget Summary
% of 3 Year
*Operational
Average
Cost
2015-2016
Budget Summary
% of 3 Year
Operational
Average
Cost
Chester Upland
Chichester
Garnet Valley
Haverford
Interboro
Marple Newtown
Penn Delco
Radnor
Ridley
Rose Tree Media
Southeast Delco
9.03
81.27
42.58
47.49
90.54
43.41
39.49
14.44
85.35
30.68
81.31
20.72
82.29
53.96
49.18
102.98
41.75
39.86
9.98
73.25
26.06
89.44
37.91
52.80
48.00
65.00
104.27
34.15
49.87
14.38
107.98
30.04
92.18
22.55
72.12
48.18
53.89
99.26
39.77
43.07
12.93
88.86
28.93
87.64
2.66%
8.49%
5.67%
6.35%
11.69%
4.68%
5.07%
1.53%
10.47%
3.41%
10.32%
226,691
723,537
483,210
541,161
996,248
398,840
432,077
130,390
892,277
290,608
879,493
1.28%
9.18%
5.56%
6.04%
11.19%
5.13%
4.64%
1.59%
9.81%
3.42%
10.81%
105,525
756,816
458,377
497,949
922,524
422,927
382,530
131,082
808,754
281,951
891,196
Springfield
Upper Darby
Wallingford-Swarthmore
51.50
91.23
29.19
41.05
84.34
37.48
43.75
93.00
31.80
45.43
89.52
32.82
5.35%
10.54%
3.87%
455,939
898,242
329,810
6.28%
11.18%
3.85%
517,735
921,700
317,401
William Penn
82.07
84.64
85.40
84.04
9.90%
843,700
10.04%
827,716
819.58
836.98
890.53
849.01
100.00%
8,522,221
100.00%
8,244,183
*The amount in this column represents each district's Technical Schools 1/2 time Technical Programs budget amount for the school year 2016-2017.
There will be a reconciliation at year end based on the 3-year averaging method.
This will be paid in four quarterly installments: September 1, November 1, January 1 and April 1.
3
FUNDING FOR THE 2016-2017 SPECIAL EDUCATION TECHNICAL PROGRAMS
Skill Start
Participating Districts
Chester Upland
Chichester
Garnet Valley
Haverford
Interboro
Marple Newtown
Penn Delco
Radnor
Ridley
Rose Tree Media
Southeast Delco
Springfield
Upper Darby
Wallingford-Swarthmore
William Penn
45 Day
ADM
5.00
2.00
3.00
7.00
1.00
1.00
15.00
1.00
4.00
10.00
4.00
4.00
57.00
% of
45 Day
ADM
8.77%
3.51%
5.26%
0.00%
12.28%
1.75%
1.75%
0.00%
26.33%
1.75%
7.02%
0.00%
17.54%
7.02%
7.02%
100.00% $
2016-2017
Budget Summary
T. C. A.
Budgeted
Cost
45 Day
ADM
47,483
18,993
28,490
66,476
9,497
9,497
142,448
9,497
37,986
94,966
37,986
37,986
6.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
3.00
3.00
16.00
5.00
541,306
37.00
% of
45 Day
ADM
16.22%
2.70%
2.70%
0.00%
5.41%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
8.11%
0.00%
8.11%
0.00%
43.24%
0.00%
13.51%
100.00% $
Budgeted
Cost
Total
ADM
*Operational
Cost
2015-2016
Budget Summary
Total
ADM
Operational
Cost
98,134
16,356
16,356
32,711
49,067
49,067
261,691
81,779
11.00
3.00
4.00
9.00
1.00
1.00
18.00
1.00
7.00
26.00
4.00
9.00
145,617
35,349
44,846
99,187
9,497
9,497
191,515
9,497
87,053
356,657
37,986
119,765
9.00
5.00
3.00
7.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
12.00
1.00
7.00
26.00
4.00
9.00
137,846
77,229
38,177
87,137
21,565
10,783
10,783
141,050
10,783
92,966
356,128
43,131
126,189
605,161
94.00
1,146,466
87.00
1,153,767
*The amount in this column represents each district's Special Education Technical Programs budget amount for the school year 2016-2017.
There will be a reconciliation of actual ADM and actual expenditures at year end.
This will be paid in four quarterly installments: September 1, November 1, January 1 and April 1.
4
ESTIMATED REVENUE 2015-2016
BY PROGRAM
ACCOUNT CODE
CODE
6510
6910
*6920
6940
6946
6946
6990
7220
7810
7820
ASTON AND
FOLCROFT
TECHNICAL
PROGRAM
DESCRIPTION
INTEREST FROM INVESTMENTS
RENTAL - SCHOOL FACILITIES
RENTAL ( MARPLE FACILITY)
TUITION INTERGENERATIONAL
RECEIPTS - MEMBER DISTRICTS
RECEIPTS - PROGRAM TRANSITION
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE
STATE SUBSIDY VT EDUCATION
P.D.E. SOCIAL SECURITY PAYMENTS
P.D.E. RETIREMENT PAYMENTS (PSERS)
21,000
0
1,063,375
0
8,244,183
Total
SKILL START
T. C. A.
ESTIMATED
REVENUE
2015-2016
128,761
689,096
166,432
562,169
2,000
0
0
0
539,137
0
0
37,007
5,271
17,804
2,000
0
0
0
614,630
0
22,690
37,007
10,696
36,130
25,000
0
1,063,375
0
9,397,950
0
151,451
763,110
182,399
616,103
10,875,016
601,219
723,153
12,199,388
*THIS RENTAL INCOME REFLECTS MONIES RECEIVED FOR THE USE OF MARPLE FACILITY AND OFFSETS OPERATIONAL COSTS FOUND IN FUNCTION 2600.
5
ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES 2015-2016
BY PROGRAM
ACCOUNT CODE
CODE
1100
1330
1342
1370
1380
1390
1391
2111
2120
2122
2130
2310
2360
2380
2440
2500
2620
2800
3100
3210
ASTON AND
FOLCROFT
TECHNICAL
PROGRAM
DESCRIPTION
ACADEMIC
HEALTH OCCUPATION
HOME ECONOMICS
TECHNICAL EDUCATION
TRADE/INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
SAFETY
CO-OP PROGRAM
PUPIL SERVICES
GUIDANCE
GUIDANCE COUNSELORS
ATTENDANCE OFFICE
BOARD OF SCHOOL DIRECTORS
DIRECTOR'S OFFICE
PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE
HEALTH SERVICES
BUSINESS OFFICE
OPERATION/MAINTENANCE PLANT
SUPPORT SERVICES - CENTRAL
FOOD SERVICES MANAGEMENT
STUDENT CLUB SPONSORS
Total
SKILL START
T. C. A.
ESTIMATED
EXPENDITURES
2015-2016
594,342
1,252,654
703,288
492,439
2,127,844
66,754
270,704
121,059
23,575
86,358
113,228
58,342
503,921
719,483
139,190
176,688
2,864,574
245,801
29,700
73,162
31,281
0
64,601
0
138,584
2,065
8,372
8,071
1,572
5,757
7,549
3,890
33,595
47,966
9,279
11,779
158,123
16,387
1,980
4,878
0
0
167,777
0
311,176
37,967
0
5,380
1,048
3,838
5,032
2,593
22,396
31,977
6,186
7,853
65,000
10,925
1,320
3,252
625,623
1,252,654
935,666
492,439
2,577,604
106,786
279,076
134,510
26,195
95,953
125,809
64,825
559,912
799,426
154,655
196,320
3,087,697
273,113
33,000
81,292
10,663,106
555,729
683,720
11,902,555
6
SUMMARY OF REVENUE
BUDGET
CODE
11651000000
11691000000
11692000000
11694000000
11694600000
11694600000
11699000000
11722000000
11781010000
11782000000
DESCRIPTION
ACTUAL
REVENUE
2014-2015
INTEREST FROM INVESTMENTS
RENTAL - SCHOOL FACILITIES
RENTAL ( MARPLE FACILITY)
TUITION INTERGENERATIONAL
RECEIPTS - MEMBER DISTRICTS
RECEIPTS - PROGRAM TRANSITION
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE
STATE SUBSIDY VT EDUCATION
P.D.E. SOCIAL SECURITY PAYMENTS
P.D.E. RETIREMENT PAYMENTS (PSERS)
TOTAL
CURRENT
BUDGET
2015-2016
ESTIMATED
REVENUE
2015-2016
PROPOSED
BUDGET
2016-2017
8,467
0
1,043,548
0
8,255,051
0
240,981
769,206
173,208
483,670
25,000
0
1,063,375
0
9,397,950
80,000
151,451
763,110
184,116
621,903
25,000
0
1,063,375
0
9,397,950
0
151,451
763,110
182,399
616,103
25,000
0
1,083,579
0
9,668,688
90,000
152,414
775,000
187,950
742,375
10,974,131
12,286,905
12,199,388
12,725,006
*THIS RENTAL INCOME REFLECTS MONIES RECEIVED FOR THE USE OF MARPLE FACILITY AND OFFSETS OPERATIONAL
COSTS OF $679,611 FOUND IN FUNCTION 2600. THE BALANCE OF FUNDS SUPPORT A CAPITAL RESERVE FOR FUTURE BUILDING PROJECTS
7
PROPOSED REVENUE
2016-2017
2016-2017
BY PROGRAM
ACCOUNT
6510
6910
*6920
6940
6946
6946
6990
7220
7810
7820
CODE
DESCRIPTION
INTEREST FROM INVESTMENTS
RENTAL - SCHOOL FACILITIES
RENTAL ( MARPLE FACILITY)
TUITION INTERGENERATIONAL
RECEIPTS - MEMBER DISTRICTS
RECEIPTS - PROGRAM TRANSITION
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE
STATE SUBSIDY VT EDUCATION
P.D.E. SOCIAL SECURITY PAYMENTS
P.D.E. RETIREMENT PAYMENTS (PSERS)
Total
ASTON AND
FOLCROFT
TECHNICAL
PROGRAM
SKILL START
T. C. A.
PROPOSED
BUDGET
2015-2016
21,000
0
1,083,579
0
8,522,221
90,000
152,414
700,986
172,111
680,905
2,000
0
0
0
541,306
0
0
37,007
5,310
20,608
2,000
0
0
0
605,161
0
0
37,007
10,529
40,862
25,000
0
1,083,579
0
9,668,688
90,000
152,414
775,000
187,950
742,375
11,423,216
606,231
695,559
12,725,006
*THIS RENTAL INCOME REFLECTS MONIES RECEIVED FOR THE USE OF MARPLE FACILITY AND OFFSETS OPERATIONAL
COSTS OF $679,611 FOUND IN FUNCTION 2600. THE BALANCE OF FUNDS SUPPORT A CAPITAL RESERVE FOR FUTURE BUILDING PROJECTS
8
SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
FUNCTION CODE
1100
1330
1342
1370
1380
1390
1391
2111
2120
2122
2130
2310
2360
2380
2440
2500
2620
2800
3100
3210
ACTUAL
EXPENDITURES
2014-2015
DESCRIPTION
ACADEMIC PROGRAM
HEALTH OCCUPATION
HOME ECONOMICS
TECHNICAL EDUCATION
TRADE/INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
SAFETY
CO-OP PROGRAM
STUDENT SERVICES
GUIDANCE SERVICES
GUIDANCE COUNSELORS
ATTENDANCE OFFICE
BOARD OF SCHOOL DIRECTORS
DIRECTOR'S OFFICE
PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE
HEALTH SERVICES
BUSINESS OFFICE
OPERATION/MAINTENANCE PLANT
SUPPORT SERVICES - CENTRAL
FOOD SERVICES MANAGEMENT
STUDENT CLUB SPONSORS
Total
CURRENT
BUDGET
2015-2016
ESTIMATED
EXPENDITURES
2015-2016
PROPOSED
BUDGET
2016-2017
584,728
1,232,990
890,426
336,217
2,561,444
108,328
264,060
134,468
17,949
91,677
124,757
63,222
576,388
747,517
138,614
267,282
2,431,295
275,419
32,034
56,620
636,489
1,383,883
951,718
534,709
2,658,314
113,901
285,063
137,176
26,195
102,627
134,989
64,825
565,190
822,763
162,069
196,320
3,123,247
273,113
33,000
81,314
625,623
1,252,654
935,666
492,439
2,577,604
106,786
279,076
134,510
26,195
95,953
125,809
64,825
559,912
799,426
154,655
196,320
3,087,697
273,113
33,000
81,292
665,233
1,436,965
979,976
524,159
2,824,911
119,813
298,306
144,930
26,522
85,799
141,069
65,524
582,299
860,845
180,521
199,598
3,194,615
278,575
33,000
82,346
10,935,435
12,286,905
11,902,555
12,725,006
9
PROPOSED EXPENDITURES
2016-2017
2016-2017
BY PROGRAM
ACCOUNT
1100
1330
1342
1370
1380
1390
1391
2111
2120
2122
2130
2310
2360
2380
2440
2500
2620
2800
3100
3210
CODE
ASTON AND
FOLCROFT
TECHNICAL
PROGRAM
DESCRIPTION
ACADEMIC PROGRAM
HEALTH OCCUPATION
HOME ECONOMICS
TECHNICAL EDUCATION
TRADE/INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
SAFETY
CO-OP PROGRAM
STUDENT SERVICES
GUIDANCE SERVICES
GUIDANCE COUNSELORS
ATTENDANCE OFFICE
BOARD OF SCHOOL DIRECTORS
DIRECTOR'S OFFICE
PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE
HEALTH SERVICES
BUSINESS OFFICE
OPERATION/MAINTENANCE PLANT
SUPPORT SERVICES - CENTRAL
FOOD SERVICES MANAGEMENT
STUDENT CLUB SPONSORS
Total
SKILL START
T. C. A.
PROPOSED
BUDGET
2016-2017
631,971
1,436,965
751,064
524,159
2,356,040
69,815
283,391
130,437
23,870
77,219
126,962
58,972
524,069
774,760
162,469
179,638
2,956,887
250,717
29,700
74,111
33,262
0
71,530
0
167,468
4,456
14,915
8,696
1,591
5,148
8,464
3,931
34,938
51,651
10,831
11,976
153,738
16,715
1,980
4,941
0
0
157,382
0
301,403
45,542
0
5,797
1,061
3,432
5,643
2,621
23,292
34,434
7,221
7,984
83,990
11,143
1,320
3,294
665,233
1,436,965
979,976
524,159
2,824,911
119,813
298,306
144,930
26,522
85,799
141,069
65,524
582,299
860,845
180,521
199,598
3,194,615
278,575
33,000
82,346
11,423,216
606,231
695,559
12,725,006
10
Aston and Folcroft
Function 1100
ACADEMIC PROGRAM
Academic Program
Kathryn McCauley (40)
Joseph McHugh (43)
Lisa Pelosi (41)
The Academic Program supports integration of Math and
English instruction in all Career and Technical classes. Studies
have proven that utilizing career and technical education
classes to teach academic subjects increases a student’s
understanding of these subjects.
ACADEMIC PROGRAM
Health and Physical Education
HEALTH AND
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
This course is being offered as an option for DCTS students
to earn health and physical education credits needed
for graduation. Subject instruction is offered within the
context of a student’s area of vocational study. For example,
students enrolled in one of the Building Trades courses will
learn lifting and carrying methods that will help reduce
injuries to the back and knees. Healthy living skills are
emphasized. Students must have home district approval
to enroll in this course. Credits can be used for a student’s
diploma credits.
Michael Grimshaw, Aston (47)
Lindsey Tomlinson, Folcroft (46)
11
Aston
Function 1330
DENTAL ASSISTANT
PROGRAM
Susan Weinand (53)
Dental Assistant Program
Students who enroll in the Dental Technology Program learn a variety of skills that
will enable them to become a dental assistant, dental laboratory technician, and/
or pursue a career as a dental hygienist. The dental assisting program focuses on
patient-centered care in support of improving oral health as a key to personal
health and well-being.
The major areas of study in the course follow EFDA technical standards, including:
dental radiology, oral pathology, chair-side dental assisting, anatomy and
physiology, dental materials, sterilization, and dental office business procedures.
The dental assistant works directly with the dentist, performing a variety of tasks
from helping the dentist examine and treat patients to completing laboratory and
office work.
MEDICAL CAREERS
Medical Careers
Rosemaryrakat, R.N. (50)
Marybeth Vogel R.N. (52)
Christine Sekul, R.N. (56)
Denise Kossuth, R.N. (49)
Katherine Thompson, R.N. (59)
This course is recommended for the college-bound student who is interested
in pursuing a career in the healthcare profession. In this program, the hospital
becomes the classroom. Through partnerships with Crozer-Keystone Health
System, Main Line Health, and Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, students rotate through
various departments in the hospitals. Students observe many career opportunities
and work alongside medical professionals as they care for patients. The academic
curriculum includes the study of: anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology,
medical terminology and abbreviations, safety, infection control, communication
techniques, legal/ethical issues and responsibilities. Students also learn basic
patient care skills including: assessment of vital signs, first aid, assisting with
activities of daily living, and sterile techniques. CPR training is also offered as part
of the program. The challenging academic curriculum, patient care skills practicum
and clinical rotation help the students with future career choices in healthcare and
prepare them for the next step in their education.
12
Aston
Function 1342
CULINARY ARTS
AND HOSPITALITY
PROGRAM
John Maier (52)
Donald Young (53)
Culinary Arts and Hospitality
Culinary Arts and Hospitality prepares students for success
in our nation’s number one employer, the food service and
hospitality industry. Students are taught food preparation, dining
service, inventory control, safety, sanitation and management
skills. Our students also learn food nutrition, healthy cooking,
equipment identification, use of hand tools and culinary
vocabulary. Students prepare soups and sauces, breakfast
entrees, sandwich production, pies, cakes, yeast-raised products,
entree preparation, international dishes, vegetable preparation,
garnishing, salads and dressings. Over the past several years,
DCTS students have won state and national food preparation
and service competitions. Our students are involved in different
student organizations such as, SkillsUSA and FCCLA (Family
Career and Community Leaders of America). We are the only high
school Culinary Arts program in this part of Pennsylvania to be
certified by the American Culinary Federation. Upon graduation,
students may seek immediate employment, enter an apprentice
program or continue their culinary or management studies at the
post-secondary level.
13
Aston
Function 1370
ADVERTISING DESIGN
AND COMMERCIAL ART
John Moore (57)
APPLE SYSTEMS
AND DESIGN
Robert Kauffman (66)
Advertising Design and Commercial Art
Advertising Design and Commercial Art is a computer graphics
program that introduces students to technology-based desktop
publishing, multimedia design and production skills. Students
learn the concepts of color and design and their use in computerbased graphic design. They also learn animation, sound, video
and graphics editing in the multimedia class. The goal of the
program is to provide students with the basic knowledge and
skills required for employment in a variety of fields, which
requires the use of computer graphics applications, or for
admissions to a post-secondary institution to refine their skills.
Apple Systems and Design
Apple Systems and Design is a program that prepares students
to apply basic engineering principals and technical skills in
support of professionals who use computer systems. This
comprehensive program specializes in Apple computer
systems and applications. Students have the opportunity to
earn a number of Apple creative application and information
technology certifications.
14
Aston
Function 1370
COMPUTER NETWORKING
SUPPORT AND
DIGITAL FORENSICS
David Tatum (58)
Computer Networking Support
and Digital Forensics
The Computer Networking Systems course will enable students
to design, install, configure and troubleshoot local and wide
area networks. All aspects of networking are explored; from
simply understanding how a packet is placed on the network
wire to how to create a remote connection from home to work.
Upon completion of this course, students may seek further
education at a college or trade school, or obtain an entry-level
position in the computer networking field.
The Computer Forensics part of the program provides training
and initial certification for students in this emerging industry.
Computer Forensics involves complex evidence recovery
procedures and expert witness services. High level forensic
software tools combined with the expertise of a well trained,
experienced investigator are required to successfully seek out
the data while preserving its integrity. Such skills will be brought
to the classroom.
15
Aston
Function 1380
BUILDING TRADES
Building Trades
Joe Fick (65)
Practical experience and classroom training prepares students
enrolled in the Building Trades program to find employment
in the construction field or enter a post-secondary institution.
Students are taught carpentry, masonry, plumbing, roofing,
drywall application, painting and framing/finishing. They
also learn safety standard compliance, tool and equipment
identification, communication skills, employability skills and a
strong emphasis is placed on obtaining basic math and writing
skills. Course content is relevant to residential and light industrial
construction needs with emphasis on overall construction, site
preparation, building design, finishing, estimating, external
finishing and energy conservation.
COSMETOLOGY
Cosmetology
Barbara McGinnis (63)
The Cosmetology Program is a three-year standards-based
education program. The 1250 hours required for this course,
are earned when a score of 80% or above is achieved for each
individual unit, which includes both theoretical and handson training. Students learn haircutting, coloring, manicuring,
facials, hairstyling, and shampoo techniques and treatments.
The Pennsylvania State Board of Professional and Occupational
Affairs mandates 50 hours in professional practice, including
sterilization, sanitation, professionalism and law; 200 hours
in related sciences such as histology, trichology, chemistry,
physiology and dermatology; and 1000 hours in cognitive and
manipulative skills. The ultimate goal, upon completion of the
program, is for all students to pass the State Board Examination.
16
Aston
Function 1380
CARPENTRY
Carpentry
Thomas Reimer (64)
The Carpentry program prepares students for employment in
residential home remodeling and light commercial construction
industries. The curriculum covers the use of hand and power tools,
blueprint reading, estimating and scheduling of construction
operations. Students are introduced to concrete form building,
placing, reinforcing and finishing. Students learn different types of
home construction including sills, floor joists, stud walls, ceiling joists,
rafters and the materials to finish them. On-site construction projects
are incorporated into classroom instruction. Students are taught
safety standard compliance with emphasis on OSHA standards and
local building codes. The Carpentry program students are provided
with the technical knowledge and applicable skills necessary to be
employed as an apprentice, with advance placement possible in a
post-secondary program.
HEATING,
AIR CONDITIONING AND
REFRIGERATION (HVAC)
Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
(HVAC)
Ken Roberts (62)
This course prepares students to apply the technical knowledge and
skills necessary to install, repair and maintain commercial, industrial
and residential heating, air conditioning and refrigeration systems.
The course is taught in compliance with the standards established
by the National Association for Testing Excellence (NATE) and the
Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA). It includes studies
in system design, installation, troubleshooting and repair. Upon
completion, students should have attained sufficient knowledge,
training and understanding to gain admission to a post-secondary
institution and/or obtain an entry-level position in the HVAC field.
17
Aston
Function 1380
ELECTRICAL/
RESIDENTIAL WIRING
Harry McGinnis (67)
Electrical/Residential Wiring
The Industrial and Residential Electricity program introduces
students to the basic concepts of residential and commercial
wiring. Students install circuits, switches, conductors, circuit
breakers and other electrical devices. Topics covered in this
course include safety, materials and supplies, tools, codes,
blue print reading, and motor control. These skills are taught
in compliance with the National Electrical Code (NEC) industry
standards. This course also integrates math, reading, writing,
and oral communication skills with employability and problemsolving skills. Upon completion, students may seek admission
to a post-secondary institution or obtain an entry-level position
in the electrical field. Students are expected to have good
attendance records and the ability to work as a team. These skills
are necessary for employment in the field.
18
Aston
Function 1380
ENGINEERING
TECHNOLOGIES
Rock Durant (60)
Engineering Technologies
In the Engineering Technologies program students will learn
two skill sets that will prepare them for high-demand, lifesustaining, STEM careers in the engineering, welding and
fabrication fields. Instruction includes, but is not limited to
safety, ethics, power, problem solving, teamwork, drafting CAD,
automated systems, fundamental electronics, welding, sheet
metal fabrication and manufacturing systems. The engineering
component will prepare college-bound students for advanced
studies. Students primarily on the welding and fabrication
track will enter the workforce competitively equipped with the
ability to read and draw detailed blueprints. Students will be
given opportunities to work with various materials and will be
expected to use both skill sets to complete projects. At program
completion, students will know how to apply engineering
concepts and meet project requirements, while being conscious
of the needs and demands of workers.
19
Aston
Function 1390
INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL NURSE
Roxann Gariffo
Industrial School Nurse
Students’ safety is insured by the constant attendance of an
Industrial Nurse. In addition to providing daily routine and
emergency medical care, the industrial nurses implement a
safety program. Each occupational class has a student safety
steward, who along with the class teacher, is taught how to
maintain a safe and healthy working environment. The Student
Assistant Program (WIN) is a state-mandated program that offers
help and guidance to students who are in crisis. The school also
offers Students Against Driving Drunk (SADD), a group that
educates students concerning the problem of illegal drinking
and driving.
20
Aston
Function 1391
SCHOOL TO CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
Christine Marshall
School to Career Opportunities
DCTS operates a cooperative-education department. Under
teacher supervision, students participate in a variety of activities
that provide career experiences.
•• Shadowing is an experience that allows the student to
investigate a career area through the process of observation
at the work site.
•• Workplace mentoring allows a student to learn about a
career from a skilled employee through a supervised work
experience for a specific period.
•• Cooperative Education is a program that extends the
vocational training and learning experiences to qualified
seniors by exposing each to an actual job setting. A training
plan is developed between the employer, cooperative
education coordinator, and the vocational instructor.
Students receive a salary and are evaluated at work sites by
DCTS staff.
21
Folcroft
Function 1330
HEALTH SCIENCES
Health Sciences
Mary Flanagan, R.N. (38)
Diann Hopely, R.N. (51)
Meghan Becker, R.N. (48)
Monica Millio, R.N. (55)
Students will be submersed in a rich curriculum created
to prepare them to be career and college ready during
their training and exploration of various health-related
occupations. Anatomy and physiology, patient care skills,
emergency response, disease control, medical ethics,
documentation and records management, pharmacology,
EKG and phlebotomy are just some of the topics students will
study. Health Science is a foundation for all health careers
pathways where students will have the opportunity to train
for a Certified Clinical Medical Assisting certification or a
Certified Nursing Assisting certification.
EXERCISE THERAPY
AND SPORTS SCIENCES
Exercise Therapy and Sports Sciences
The program prepares individuals to assist in rehabilitation
services under the supervision of physical therapists,
occupational therapists, and other therapeutic professionals,
and to perform routine functions in support of rehabilitation.
Includes instruction in roles and responsibilities of
rehabilitation providers, basic function of the human body,
disabling conditions, therapeutic skills, client management,
and communication skills.
22
Folcroft
Function 1342
EARLY CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION
Erin Sparacio (55)
CULINARY ARTS
AND HOSPITALITY
Michael Fedeli (54)
Early Childhood Education
The Early Childhood Education (ECE) program prepares students to work with
young children in a variety of settings that require an understanding of how
children grow, learn and develop. The curriculum is aligned with the National Child
Care Association’s core of 15 “Professional Abilities.” Students must attain these
abilities for graduation. Field experience and practicum provide opportunities to
become involved in actual work with children and to share experiences with fellow
students. ECE students operate The Tot Stop Preschool, an on-site program that
serves as a first school experience for three to five year old children. The student
teachers plan, prepare and perform all aspects of this three-day a week program.
Early Childhood Education prepares students to enter the workforce or continue
their education in career areas related to childcare and guidance.
Culinary Arts and Hospitality
Culinary Arts and Hospitality prepares students for success in our nation’s number
one employer, the food service and hospitality industry. Students are taught food
preparation, dining service, inventory control, safety, sanitation and management
skills. Our students also learn food nutrition, healthy cooking, equipment
identification, use of hand tools and culinary vocabulary. Students prepare
soups and sauces, breakfast entrees, sandwich production, pies, cakes, yeastraised products, entree preparation, international dishes, vegetable preparation,
garnishing, salads and dressings. Over the past several years, DCTS students have
won state and national food preparation and service competitions. Our students
are involved in different student organizations such as, SkillsUSA and FCCLA (Family
Career and Community Leaders of America). We are the only high school Culinary
Arts program in this part of Pennsylvania to be certified by the American Culinary
Federation. Upon graduation, students may seek immediate employment, enter an
apprentice program or continue their culinary or management studies at the postsecondary level.
23
Folcroft
Function 1380
BUILDING TRADES
Building Trades
Frank Consorto (77)
Practical experience and classroom training prepares students
enrolled in the Building Trades program to find employment
in the construction field or enter a post-secondary institution.
Students are taught carpentry, masonry, plumbing, roofing,
drywall application, painting and framing/finishing. They
also learn safety standard compliance, tool and equipment
identification, communication skills, employability skills and a
strong emphasis is placed on obtaining basic math and writing
skills. Course content is relevant to residential and light industrial
construction needs with emphasis on overall construction, site
preparation, building design, finishing, estimating, external
finishing and energy conservation.
COSMETOLOGY
Cosmetology
Rachel Moir (71)
Jennifer Travaglini (72)
The Cosmetology Program is a three-year standards-based
education program. The 1250 hours required for this course,
are earned when a score of 80% or above is achieved for each
individual unit, which includes both theoretical and handson training. Students learn haircutting, coloring, manicuring,
facials, hairstyling, and shampoo techniques and treatments.
The Pennsylvania State Board of Professional and Occupational
Affairs mandates 50 hours in professional practice, including
sterilization, sanitation, professionalism and law; 200 hours
in related sciences such as histology, trichology, chemistry,
physiology and dermatology; and 1000 hours in cognitive and
manipulative skills. The ultimate goal, upon completion of the
program, is for all students to pass the State Board Examination.
24
Folcroft
Function 1380
EMERGENCY AND
PROTECTIVE SERVICES
William Richard (74)
Emergency and Protective Services
The Emergency and Protective Services (EPS) program offers a
comprehensive public safety education to students interested
in pursuing a career or volunteering in the emergency medical,
law enforcement, fire, security, industrial safety or emergency
management services. Students work with protective services
professionals to gain first-hand experience in all areas of these
exciting professions. Units of study include firefighting, law
enforcement, emergency medical services, communications
and report writing, public speaking and physical training.
Students receive instruction in the field as well as the classroom.
Students are required to have a high degree of motivation and
self-discipline, as well as the ability to obtain Child Abuse and
Criminal Background Clearances.
25
Folcroft
Function 1380
LOGISTICS AND
INVENTORY
MANAGEMENT
Brian Swierczek (75)
COLLISION REPAIR
TECHNOLOGY
Martin Stamper (76)
Logistics and Inventory Management
Logistics and Inventory Management introduces students to the
distribution service industry. The course curriculum prepares
students to work in distribution centers, warehouses, and supply
rooms. Students learn safety standard compliance, tool and
equipment identification, operation of industrial lift/transport
equipment, data entry and communication skills. The students
develop these skills while managing and operating the DCIU
warehouse. Upon completion, students will have the necessary
skills to obtain an entry-level position in the field.
Collision Repair Technology
DCTS’s Collision Repair Technology course is based on an
occupational analysis of the auto body field and reflects
the entry-level job requirements of I-CAR (Inter-Industry
Conference on Auto Collision Repair) and the Automotive
Collision Technology standards. Using state-of-the-art
equipment, students are taught MIG welding/cutting, metal
repair, corrosion protection, masking, refinishing, undercoating,
unibody inspection and detailing. They are also taught safety
compliance, tools and equipment identification. The Collision
Repair Technology program is designed to give each student
the knowledge, understanding and training needed to secure
a position in the collision repair field, and/or enter a postsecondary institution.
26
Folcroft
Function 1380
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNOLOGY
William Jenkins (68)
Pete Dillon (69)
Automotive Technology
DCTS has the distinction of being among a small number of
schools and colleges to be selected to participate in the AYES
program, a partnership with General Motors, Daimler Chrysler,
BMW, Honda, Hyundai, Subaru, Toyota, Mitsubishi Motors,
Nissan, Volkswagen, Audi and Mercedes Benz corporations.
This program gives DCTS students a competitive edge by
allowing them to work directly on new cars with technicians
experienced in the field and at dealerships. Students prepare
for the recognized NATEF/ASE accredited instructional
program that emphasizes learning skills to diagnose, service
and maintain all types of automobiles. Upon graduation,
students will be eligible to take the NATEF/ASE exam after
completing one year of employment in the automotive
field. Graduates of this program will be qualified to enter the
automotive field as entry-level service technicians in new car
dealerships or related automotive businesses.
27
Folcroft
Function 1390
INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL NURSE
Donna Bartenbach, R.N.
Industrial School Nurse
Students’ safety is insured by the constant attendance of an
Industrial Nurse. In addition to providing daily routine and
emergency medical care, the industrial nurses implement a
safety program. Each occupational class has a student safety
steward, who along with the class teacher, is taught how to
maintain a safe and healthy working environment. The Student
Assistant Program (WIN) is a state-mandated program that offers
help and guidance to students who are in crisis. The school also
offers Students Against Driving Drunk (SADD), a group that
educates students concerning the problem of illegal drinking
and driving.
28
Folcroft
Function 1391
SCHOOL TO CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
Barbara McGee
School to Career Opportunities
DCTS operates a cooperative-education department. Under
teacher supervision, students participate in a variety of activities
that provide career experiences.
•• Shadowing is an experience that allows the student to
investigate a career area through the process of observation
at the work site.
•• Workplace mentoring allows a student to learn about a
career from a skilled employee through a supervised work
experience for a specific period.
•• Cooperative Education is a program that extends the
vocational training and learning experiences to qualified
seniors by exposing each to an actual job setting. A training
plan is developed between the employer, cooperative
education coordinator, and the vocational instructor. Students
receive a salary and are evaluated at work sites by DCTS staff.
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TCA
Function 1342
TCA FOOD PREP
Food Prep
Michael Cruice (78)
Food Preparation and Service prepares students for entrylevel employment in the food service industry. Course work
includes sanitation and safety requirements, table service, and
presentation of food and beverages to customers. Students
learn to cook basic breakfast foods, breads, appetizers,
entrees, sandwiches, cakes and desserts. They learn correct
culinary vocabulary words and terms to help them with later
employment in the food service industry. Students learn to plan
menus according to accepted nutritional standards. They gain
knowledge in operating equipment such as grills, stoves, fryers,
slicers, mixers, food chippers, dishwashers, and assorted knives
and hand tools.
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TCA
Function 1380
BUILDING TRADES
AND MAINTENANCE
Robert Manocchio (79)
PERSONAL CARE
SERVICES
Helene Stanley (81)
Building Trades and Maintenance
Building Trades and Maintenance is a level one program which
concentrates on the basic skills of carpentry, masonry, plumbing
and electrical systems.
Personal Care Services
Personal Care Services is a level one program which places
emphasis on personal grooming as well as all aspects of the use
of cosmetic products and treatments for external beautification
of clients. Students also learn employability skills for future
opportunities. Hours of instruction can be applied to the State
Board of Cosmetology licensure requirements.
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TCA
Function 1390
INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL NURSE
Natalie McFadden, R.N.
Industrial School Nurse
Students’ safety is insured by the constant attendance of an
Industrial Nurse. In addition to providing daily routine and
emergency medical care, the industrial nurses implement a
safety program. Each occupational class has a student safety
steward, who along with the class teacher, is taught how to
maintain a safe and healthy working environment. The Student
Assistant Program (WIN) is a state-mandated program that offers
help and guidance to students who are in crisis. The school also
offers Students Against Driving Drunk (SADD), a group that
educates students concerning the problem of illegal drinking
and driving.
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Aston and Folcroft
Functions
2100-2130
CAREER AND
GUIDANCE
COUNSELING
Diane Rouse, Aston
Kristen Pellegrino, Folcroft
STUDENT SUPPORT
SERVICES
Patricia Lauria, Folcroft
Susan Carr, Aston
Amy Rybnik, Folcroft
Career and Guidance Counseling
The Career and Guidance Department provides career, academic
and personal counseling. Students are assisted in developing
career objectives and long-range plans. Post-secondary recruiters
are regular guests at the school, and the guidance counselor
assists students in SAT registration and preparation. Information
is provided on financial aid, scholarships, loans and grants for
post-secondary education. The counselor works with students,
faculty and families to enhance the Technical School experience.
Student Support Services
The Student Support staff provides career and technical
evaluation, situational assessments, instructional counseling and
placement assistance to special population students who are
enrolled in the program. These evaluative services are designed
to provide the special population student with the necessary
career information to make a more informed career choice.
Student Support staff coordinate Technical School participation
in MDE (Multi-Disciplinary Evaluation) and IEP (Individualized
Educational Plan) meetings. In-service programs are provided
for teachers to help keep them up to date on latest instructional
techniques to ensure student success.
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Functions
2300-2380
ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES
Dr. Philip Lachimia,
Director
Luis Diaz, Jr.
Assistant Director, District Liaison
Ron Contrady
Principal, Aston
S. Ryan Coughlin
Principal, Folcroft
Linda Lomas
Supervisor, Student Services
Functions
2400
STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICES
Roxann Gariffo, R.N.
Aston
Administrative Services
The Delaware County Technical Schools operate as a local education agency. The
Delaware County Intermediate Unit Board of Directors is the operating agent for the
Delaware County Area Vocational-Technical School Board. One member from each of the
county’s 15 school districts sits on the Board of Directors.
The Director of Vocational-Technical Education is responsible for the effective operation
of the Delaware County Technical Schools and for the schools’ compliance with all rules,
regulations, and procedures as provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Education,
Bureau of Vocational Education.
The Assistant Director is responsible for the effective day-to-day operation of the
schools. This position maintains regular communication with high school principals from
all sending schools.
Student Health Services
Students’ safety is insured by the constant attendance of an Industrial Nurse. In addition
to providing daily routine and emergency medical care, the industrial nurses implement
a safety program. Each occupational class has a student safety steward, who along with
the class teacher, is taught how to maintain a safe and healthy working environment.
The Student Assistant Program (WIN) is a state-mandated program that offers help
and guidance to students who are in crisis. The school also offers Students Against
Driving Drunk (SADD), a group that educates students concerning the problem of illegal
drinking and driving.
Donna Bartenbach, R.N.
Folcroft
Natalie McFadden, R.N.
TCA
34
Function 2500-2800
BUSINESS AND
SUPPORT SERVICES
Business and Support Services
OPERATIONS AND
MAINTENANCE
SERVICES
Operations and Maintenance Services
The Business Office provides general fund accounting, payroll,
investment programs, and insures the Technical Schools’
compliance with state and federal regulations. All year-end
reconciliations of the Technical Schools’ program costs are
produced by the Business Office staff and presented to the
districts participating in these programs. Other support
services include human resources, and technology and data
support. These services are contracted through the Delaware
County Intermediate Unit.
The Operations and Maintenance Services Office oversees
the daily operation of the Technical School facilities. Technical
School employees and contracted services maintain the three
buildings owned by the Delaware County Vocational-Technical
School Authority.
The services of the Operations and Maintenance supervisor
and staff are contracted through the Delaware County
Intermediate Unit.
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Function 3100-3210
Student Services
CAFETERIA
SERVICES
Cafeteria Services
VOCATIONAL
STUDENT
ORGANIZATIONS
Career and Technical Student Organizations
Cafeteria Services provides breakfasts and lunches for students.
These services are contracted through the Delaware County
Intermediate Unit.
Participation in career and technical student organization
activities is an integral part of the Delaware County Technical
Schools program. Students have the chance to gain additional
skills in personal communication, civic responsibility and
competition in all phases of career and technical education.
Students can participate at the local, state and national levels.
Delaware County Technical Schools’ students have earned
state and national awards for their achievements in these
organizations. Our students have also held offices in
these organizations.
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