Natural Trails - Tamworth Regional Council

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Natural Trails - Tamworth Regional Council
Job No 1130
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
local produce
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
flora & fauna of all shpes and sizes
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
see you here soon!
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
be swept away with the stunning vistas be swept away with the stunning vistas
Client Tourism Tamworth
Tourism Tamworth Ltd
Cnr Peel and Murray Streets
PO Box 552
T 02 6767 5300
F 02 6767 5312
E [email protected]
W www.visittamworth.com
waterways are a great way to get active
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
acknowledgements
WITHIN THE tAMWORTH rEGION
Nature lovers can take delight in the abundance
of outdoor activities on offer across the Tamworth
region. Stretching from Barraba to Manilla and into
Tamworth, Bendemeer and Nundle, the Tamworth
region encompasses an area three times the size of
the Sydney basin or just over 9,600sq km.
This guide highlights the range of activities that you
are able to undertake: bushwalking, birdwatching,
fossicking, enjoying mother nature at its best and
getting more familiar with our flora and fauna.
The region is known among bird watchers and years
of research led to the production of a comprehensive
guide to its bird routes. The bird routes consist of 36
sites along a 180km corridor. Most of the sites are part
of old droving roads known as Travelling Stock Routes
with many of them signposted for easy reference.
There are more than 230 species of birds seen in the
area, with the endangered Regent Honeyeater, found
near Barraba, one of the species most sought after by
twitchers.
barraba beef
Forming almost half of the popular driving route
‘The Fossickers Way’, the Tamworth region is rich
in garnets, zeolite, quartz, jasper and even gold
where locals and visitors alike can take part in a little
fossicking of their own. Designated as State Route
95, ‘The Fossickers Way’ travels along the western
slopes of the New England plateau passing through
some of the world’s former richest gem areas starting
from Nundle in the east through Tamworth, Manilla
and Barraba before crossing into the Gwydir Shire and
onto Inverell and Glen Innes. There are details in this
guide about other noteworthy geological sites in the
area related to a major crustal fault running through the
district.
The Tamworth region has a huge spectrum of
recreation facilities including beautifully landscaped
gardens, parks and major water reservoirs where
you can take some time out and enjoy the natural
splendour that surrounds you. Regardless of whether
you are in one of the local town parks or the nearby
national parks or state forests, you will be sure to
be swept away with the stunning vistas. The many
recreational facilities across the region offer a plethora
of activities including water sports like power boating,
sailing and water-skiing, as well as bushwalking,
fishing, picnic areas and camping amenities.
Flora and fauna of all shapes and sizes can be found
in every corner of the Tamworth region - from some
of Australia’s favourite wildlife such as kangaroos,
koalas, wombats and platypy through to endangered or
threatened flora and fauna that can be seen elsewhere
in Australia. Budding botanists and animal lovers can
locate specific species on the pull out map included
with this guide. For more sites check out the online
National Parks and Wildlife Atlas,
www.wildlifeatlas.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au
Five of the best picnic spots:
Bicentennial Park, Tamworth - The park in Kable Ave has wide open grassed areas, shaded areas, ponds, sculptures, obstacle fitness course, pathways, riverside walkway/cycleway, toilets and picnic tables
Manilla - On the banks of the Manilla River adjoining Chaffey Park (on Halls Creek Rd) has some picturesque settings. The sounds of water spilling over Manilla Weir adds to the enjoyment.
Anzac Park, Tamworth - The play equipment for children is one of the drawcards of the park featuring pathways lined by plantings of large palm trees, picnic shelters, grassed areas and a number of
war memorials just blocks from the CBD on the corner
of Brisbane and Upper Streets.
flowers followed by purple berries. This species
appears to be another serpentinite endemic*.
- Small Flowered Daisy Minuria Scoparia is a small
flowered daisy that is broom-like in habit and the
pappus bristles of the disc florets are not manifestly
dimorphic.
Tourism Tamworth would like to acknowledge
the following people and organisations for their
assistance in putting together this comprehensive
brochure:
Russ Watts, Tamworth Birdwatchers
T: 02 6760 5740 E: [email protected]
Bob Brown, Senior Geologist NSW Dept of Primary
Industries (Minerals), Armidale
T: 02 6738 8500
Tamworth Regional Council
T: 02 6767 5555 Web: www.tamworth.nsw.gov.au
NSW Department of Environment and Climate
Change
Web: www.environment.nsw.gov.au
Barraba
116 Queen Street
Barraba NSW 2347
T 02 6782 1255
Nundle
Jenkins Street
Nundle NSW 2340
T 02 6769 3026
Manilla
197 Manilla Street
Manilla NSW 2346
T 02 6785 1207
Tamworth
Cnr Peel & Murray Street
Tamworth NSW 2340
T 02 6767 5300
NSW National Parks & Wildlife
T: 1300 361 967 Web: www.npws.nsw.gov.au
Nundle Tourism, Barraba Tourism and Manilla
Tourism committees.
food cooked fresh on the premises
There is so much to see, taste and smell across the Tamworth region, providing you with the ideal harvest trail to tempt your tastebuds.
Tourism Tamworth Ltd Cnr Peel and Murray Street PO Box 552, Tamworth NSW 2340 T 02 6767 5300 F 02 6767 5312 www.visittamworth.com
WELCOME TO THE
NATURE TRAILS
Natural Trails 1
Acknowledgements 26
flora and fauna
listing an honour of all of 165 men from the New
England North West who lost their lives. Cast in
bronze, the sculpture shows the ruggedness of the
terrain and highlights the 265km route of the infamous
death marches undertaken by countless soldiers
1945. This place of beauty located near the CBD also
contains children’s playground equipment, water, toilets
and coin-operated BBQs.
There are some unusual birds and wildlife to see
throughout the Tamworth region in their natural habitat
from Australian favourites like the kangaroo, koala
and platypus through to an array of threatened and
endangered flora and fauna such as the Regent
Honeyeater and Boronia Ruppi.
Visitors looking for wildlife are urged to take care to
ensure their presence has a minimal impact on the
natural environment as possible. Please remember:
• Do not consciously disturb creatures or their habitats
• Never feed birds or other wildlife; they are wild creatures and should not be tamed
• Take binoculars to ensure you can locate birds and wildlife
• Walk quietly and be patient. This will assist you in seeing more
• Report any injured wildlife to the appropriate authority; in the Tamworth area it is WIRES on
1300 094 737
• Remember some creatures are potentially dangerous; be alert and stay away from kangaroos, emus, snakes, wild pigs and dingoes
• When driving, be sure to watch for wildlife and livestock on the roads
One of Australia’s favourite native animals, the
platypus, is often seen in the Manilla district with their
burrows in the banks of the Manilla River. Visitors
have the opportunity to get up close to our furry friend
thanks to local scientist Harry Burrell who helped
develop a breeding program to preserve and protect
platypi in the wild. His work is on display at the
Manilla Historical Museum adjoining the town’s Visitor
Information Centre.
A list of all of the animals that have been sighted in
the Tamworth region (as extracted from Department
Flora &and
fauna
Flora
Fauna
2425
of Environment and Climate Changes Atlas of NSW
Wildlife, September 2007) is shown on the map.
Although all of the fauna species are listed, only those
animals that have an asterisk which are primarily wellknown Australian wildlife, as well as some threatened
species are indicated on the map.
There are over 1030 species of plants that have been
identified in the Tamworth region and we are unable
to list all of them; we have however, listed threatened
species as well as referring to their position on the
map. In addition, in the Barraba area at least seven
serpentinite species confined to the Tamworth region
have been identified including:
- Dominant Stringybark which has previously been
confused with Eucalyptus macrorhyncha. This
unnamed stringybark occurs here and is the dominant
gum tree in the area. This stringybark is present on
serpentinite from Warialda to east of Chaffey Dam.
- Boronia Ruppii was named after the Reverend
Montague Rupp, the vicar of St Lawrence Anglican
Church, Barraba (1911-1914), he was also a noted
botanist collecting many plant species in the district
including from the Woodsreef area. This boronia is
endangered and only known from serpentinite areas
around Woodsreef.
- Hovea Cymbiformis (uncommon) - this plant is not
common at Woodsreef although it is more common in
other serpentinite areas to the south. It is quite difficult
to see when not in flower.
- Unnamed Callistemon - this unnamed species
is common along drainage lines in the Woodsreef
and Upper Bingara areas and is not known to occur
elsewhere.
- Spiny Grass Whalwhalleya Pungens - a grass with
rigid leaf tips that is only known to be found in the
Woodsreef and Upper Bingara areas.
- Unnamed Flax Lily Dianella sp. occurs in this area. As
with many Dianella species this one has showy purple
* natural to or characteristic of a specific people or place; native; indigenous
waterways are a great way to get active
outinand
about
the Tamworth
Region
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
Tamworth Botanic Gardens - The 28ha site at the top end
of Piper St aims to display and conserve the flora of the
region as well as display plants of the world and other parts
of Australia.
Marsupial Park - An area of natural habitat for native
animals and birds within Oxley Park in Endeavour Drive,
Tamworth. Healthy colonies of kangaroos, wallabies,
possums, emus and echidnas are in abundance.
Five of the best views:
Mount Kaputar - The summit of Mount Kaputar is accessed
from Barraba on Trevallyn Rd, then Mount Lindsay Rd and
the Barraba Track. Its elevation of 1510m above sea level
reveals widespread vistas.
Adams Lookout - Five kilometres from Barraba on the way
to Woodsreef Recreation Reserve and Fossicking Area,
provides fine views of the town and its surrounds. To get
there, turn right off ‘The Fossickers Way’ about 3km from
town on to Woodsreef Rd.
Hanging Rock Lookout - Only 10km South East of Nundle,
take the short drive up the hills to the old gold mining village
of Hanging Rock. The Lookout is about 1km off the Nundle
Road.
Moonbi Lookout – Just off the northbound carriageway
of the New England Highway about halfway up 1st Moonbi
Hill. A granite boulder formation was turned into a viewing
platform in the 1930s.
Oxley Lookout – Just minutes from Tamworth’s CBD, it
offers exceptional views of the city and the Peel River plain
extending to the Liverpool Ranges.
Five of the best action thrills:
Paragliding – Mount Borah, Manilla
Horseriding – options throughout the region
Canoeing - Namoi River rapids at Warrabah National Park
offer a challenge for experienced canoeists
Paintball – Tamworth paintball at Kootingal
Four-wheel driving – Barraba Track is ideal for 4WDs and
leads to the summit of Mount Kaputar.
Tourism Tamworth hopes you enjoy reading through the first
dedicated guide to the Natural Wonders of the Tamworth
region and find it a useful resource to plan your outdoor
activities. There’s no better place to get back to nature than
in the Tamworth region.
Whenever you venture outdoors make the most of the
experience by being prepared for the forecasted weather
conditions. Be sure to wear the most suitable type of clothing
for the activity.
The Tamworth region has low humidity. The landscape rises
from the floodplains off the Peel Valley at Tamworth with an
altitude of 385m above sea level to 344m above sea level at
Manilla, 500m at Barraba, 796m at Bendemeer and about
1300m at Niangala.
The variation of altitude and geography can lead to marked
differences in weather conditions at different locations. For
example, it is not unusual for the high altitude at Niangala to
experience temperatures of about 7C° less than Tamworth in
summer.
Bureau of Meteorology statistics show January is the hottest
month of the year in Tamworth with a mean maximum
temperature of 31.9C and mean minimum of 17.4C. It is also
the month with the highest mean rainfall of 85mm. April has
the lowest mean rainfall levels with 42.2mm. Similar patterns
are evident across the region but the mean temperatures
decrease as the altitude increases.
Remember, when enjoying the natural wonders of the region:
• Beware of over-exposure to the sun. Not only is sunburn
painful, but prolonged unprotected exposure can lead to
more serious ramifications including skin cancer. When
outdoors be sure to always wear suitable clothing such
as a light cotton long-sleeved shirt, a wide-brimmed hat,
sunglasses and apply SPF30+ sunscreen regularly.
• Always carry plenty of drinking water. Whether you’re
walking around Tamworth’s CBD or getting more familiar with
some of the natural bushland. In warm weather, in particular,
it’s surprising how quickly you can become dehydrated.
For longer walks it’s also a good idea to also have some
nutritious energy-boosting snacks on hand to help maintain
energy levels.
Out and About 2
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
FLORA AND
WITHIN THE tAMW
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Signature
David Woodward
• Be sure to make family and friends aware of your plans
• Take care to preserve wilderness areas for future
generations by taking your rubbish home with you or use
bins provided, do not damage any tree or plant, observe and
comply with informative signs.
• Observe fire bans and use fireplaces only.
• Enjoy seeing wildlife in their natural environment and
observe them only from a distance.
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
Name
• Wear suitable footwear.
Date 15/01/2009
• Fish only in season and with a licence.
• Do not carry firearms or other hunting equipment in
national a state parks and recreation reserves.
NATURALLY
RELAXED
in the Tamworth
Region
Take a step back, unwind and get back to nature in any of
the recreational areas spread across the Tamworth region.
There are a variety of spaces where visitors can stretch
their legs and become immersed in the beauty of the natural
environment surrounding them.
There are a number of forests, reserves and general outdoor
recreational areas located across the Tamworth region. This
list is a directory of the parks and gardens in each township.
* Those with an asterisk are major destinations of the region and there is
further information about it in this publication.
Barraba*
Town Parks & Gardens
Australia Day Park, Queen Street
Barraba Recreation Ground, Manilla Street
Barraba Sports Ground, Trevallyn Road
Riverside Park, Cherry Street
Fitzroy Street Park, Fitzroy Street
APEX Park, Flynn Avenue
O’Meara Park, Queen Street
Rotary Park, Queen Street
Lions Park, Manilla Road
Forests, Reserves & Recreational Areas*
Ironbark Nature Reserve - East of Barraba
Linton Nature Reserve - Near Barraba
Mount Kaputar National Park* - Near Barraba
Split Rock Dam* - North of Manilla
Visitors have the opportunity to get up close to our furry friends
One of Australia’s favourite mammals, the platypus, is often seen in the Manilla district with their burrows in the banks of the Manilla River.
There are over 1030 species of plants that have been identified in the
Manilla*
Town Parks & Gardens
Arthur Street Reserve, Arthur Street
Carinya Park, Merindah Avenue
Chaffey Park, Kennedy Street
Coronation Park, Manilla Street
Federation Park, Namoi Street/River Street
Rotary Park, Manilla Street
Showgrounds, River Street
Willows Parade Reserve, Willows Parade
Forests, Reserves & Recreational Areas*
Attunga State Forest*
Dinawirndi State Forest
Dowe CCR
Lake Keepit State Park*
Somerton CCR
Warrabah National Park*
Watsons Creek Nature Reserve & SCA
walk quietly and be patient
Nundle*
Town Parks & Gardens
Captain Cook Park, Jenkins Street
Nundle Recreation Ground, Oakenville Street
River Park, Oakenville Street
Sheba Dam, Barry Road/Crawney Road*
Swamp Creek Reserve, River Road
Naturally Relaxed 3
Flora & Fauna 24
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
it was once part of the thin crust and upper
(3) Tertiary lavas and landforms
Turn right back onto the Bundarra Road and continue for
approximately 7km where a number of hills with flat tops
can be seen on the right. These mesa-like hills are common
in the Barraba area where they have formed as a result
of erosional processes encountering hard basalt lavas
overlying softer sedimentary rocks. The sub-horizontal
basalts protect the softer rocks below them from erosion.
These lava caps were extruded about 35 million years ago,
whilst the rocks below them are considerably older.
(4) The Peel Fault
At the bridge over Ironbark Creek there is a prominent
road cutting on the eastern side developed in serpentinite
(serpentine); often referred to as schistose serpentinite
because of its flaky, serpentine character. This rock type
is relatively uncommon in eastern Australia. It represents
intensely altered metamorphosed and deformed igneous
rocks which formed the crust beneath a deep ocean about
550 million years ago. Over millions of years the crustal
rocks were folded, squashed and altered, undergoing
changes to the original minerals and textures to form the
serpentinite. The nearby Woodsreef asbestos mine produced
chrysotile asbestos from veins within this serpentinite.
(5) Further along the Bundarra Road
The ancient river gravels overlying serpentinite where
the top of the serpentinite cutting has gravel deposits
representing a river bed which ran during the Tertiary period,
up to 65 million years ago. These gravels locally carry low
concentrations of gold which was derived from the erosion
of gold-bearing reefs in this area and alluvial gold can be
panned from many of the creeks in the area, including the
nearby Ironbark and Nangahrah Creeks.
(6) Woodsreef Common
Return to the turn off to the Woodsreef Common picnic and
camping area and travel to the bottom of the gravel road to
the grassy flat on the banks of Ironbark Creek. There are
numerous interesting aspects of alluvial and reef gold mining
Geological/Fossicking 23
to be found here and gold may be panned from the creek.
Near the confluence of Nangahrah and Ironbark Creeks the
remnants of a floating dredge pond are visible in the banks.
A number of reef mines can be examined on the flanks of the
ridges on both the east and west banks of Ironbark Creek
upstream from here.
You may return to Barraba via the tour route, or alternatively
proceed a little further east and take the Crow Mountain
Road. This alternative, very scenic route passes through
more serpentinite and rolling hills of Devonian sandstones
and mudstones before rejoining The Fossickers Way to the
south of Barraba.
Originally known as “Britten Park”, a name bestowed on the
park around the turn of the century, the block of 10 acres
bounded by Brisbane, Napier, Fitzroy and Upper Streets was
dedicated for public recreation on 14 October 1881.
The present name “Anzac Park” dated from the time of the
erection of the Anzac Memorial Gates on Brisbane Street
in 1927, although common consent had bestowed it during
World War I as a memorial to all ANZACs and fallen soldiers
who served in the war (1914-1918). During the 1890’s plans
were in place to build a band rotunda in the park; work
commenced October 1900 and it was officially opened by
the then Mayor, Henry Charles Ison on 3 June 1901; on 9
May 1937 Alderman John Kennedy Killalea Mayor officially
opened the present band rotunda built to replace the 1901
structure.
In 1994, the Sandakan Memorial was officially unveiled
waterways are a great way to get active
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
Forests, Reserves & Recreation Areas*
Back River Nature Reserve
Ben Halls Gap National Park & State Forest
Chaffey Dam*
Dungowan Dam
Hanging Rock State Forest*
Nundle State Forest*
Sheeba Dams*
Terrible Billy State Forest
Tomalla Nature Reserve
Tomalla State Forest
Tuggole State Forest
Tamworth*
CBD area
Bicentennial Park* - Kable Avenue
Bligh Street Reserve - Peel Street
Chaoyang Friendship Park - Peel Street
CWA Park - Kable Avenue
Jewry Park - Jewry Street/Carter Street
King George Av Reserve - King George Avenue
Lions Park - Peel Street
Murray Reserve - Murray Street
No.1 Oval - Kable Avenue
Prince of Wales Park - Peel Street/Roderick Street
Railway Park - Marius Street
Reserve - Armidale Road
Reserve - Marius Street
Rotary Park - Armidale Road
Rugby Park - Marius Street
Viaduct Park - Macquarie Street
East Tamworth
Cockburn Retreat - Angela Street
Currawong Park - Raglan Street
High Zone Park - Golf Street
Oxley Park/Lookout* - White Street
Park - Woodside Drive
Powerhouse Park - Carthage Street/Kitchener Street
Reserve - Fitzroy Street
Reserve - Prentice Avenue
Reserve - Valley Drive
Reserve - Warramunga Avenue
Treloar Park - Napier Street/Hill Street
Ulmus Park - Manilla Road
North Tamworth
Angora Park - Carthage Street
Burgess Park - North Street
Lone Pine Park - North Street
Long Gully Park - Bourke Street
Marsupial Park* - Endeavour Drive
Reserve - Bradley Place
Reserve - Monteray Street/Bernice Place
Reserve - North Street
Regional Botanic Gardens* - Piper Street
Oxley Vale
Acacia Park - Lemon Gums Drive
Brolga Park - Lemon Gums Drive
Citiriodora Park - Lemon Gums Drive
Community Park - Ford Street/Jacaranda Place
Fraser Park - Kirkham Crescent
John Ives Park - Manilla Road/Glengarvin Drive/
Higgins Lane
Milburn Park - Manilla Road
Pages Park - Alexandra Street
Park - Ernest Street
Reserve - Kirkham Crescent
Reserve - Manilla Road/Glengarvin Drive/Charles Cohen
Close/Jemmy Place
Reserve - Milburn Road
Reserve - Mountview Crescent
Waratah Park - Waratah Place
Wattle Park - Lemon Gums Drive
West Tamworth
Belmore Park - Belmore Street/Gipps Street
Chaffey Park - Woodward Avenue
Cross Park - Gipps Street
Federation Park - Jewry Street
Kings Hill Park - Mathews Street
Park - Bridge Street
Parry Park - Parry Street
South Tamworth
Altona Park - Begonia Street
Barsden Park - Croydon Avenue/Oak Street
Boss Park - Mullumbimby Close
Calool Park - Arinya Street/Elm Street/Oak Street/Robert
Street
Naturally Relaxed 4
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
prominent area to see Regent Honeyeaters
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
Cedar Park - Burindi Avenue
Chauvel Park - Waree Drive
Chillingworth Oval - Anne Street
Electra Park - Susanne Street
Hyman Park - Robert Street/Thomson Crs Kamilaroi Park
McRae Street
Karuah Park - Croydon Avenue
Kestrel Park - McRae Street
LEAP Park - Caloola Street
Leo Park - Moora Street
Oak Park - Coromandel Street
One Tree Hill - Bandalong Street/Reservoir Street
Park - Anthony Road
Park - Kuloomba Street
Park - Kurrajong Street/Belah Close
Park - Susanne Street
Park - Wahroonga Drive/Kurria Close/
Mulwala Avenue/Nirimba Court/Noonga Crescent
Park - Wentworth Place
Park - Karwan Street
Pine Park - Edward Street
Quota Park - Baird Crescent
Reserve - Bryan Street
Reserve - Hillvue Road
Reserve - Olma Street
Reserve - Wilga Place/Yarraga Place/Wayamba Close/
Nardoo Place/Morilla Street
Scully Park - Belmore Street/Park Street
Skillshare Park - Morilla Street/Illoura Street
Wilga Park - Wilburtree Street
Calala
Monk Park - Panorama Road/Myrene Avenue
Myrl Park - Melissa Avenue/Myrl Street
Park - Harrier Parade
Park - Windhover Crescent
Reserve - Alanor Place
Reserve - Warrah Drive
Village Park - Campbell Road
Coledale
Borangii Park - Mack Street
Centenary Park - Bourne Street/Hamilton Court
Coledale Community Park - Green Street
Granny Munro Park - Matheson Street
Hathaway Park - Northview Street
Lloma Park - Macgregor Street/Frank Street/
Marshall Place
Reserve - Cole Road
Reserve - Harrier Parade
Stewart Park - Stewart Avenue
Tamworth Lions Park - Duri Road
Westdale
Discovery Park - Caley Close/Gosse Street
Flinders Park - Flinders Street
Lawson Park - Nowland Crescent/Cunningham Street/Mayne Drive
Reserve - Blaxland Way
Reserve - Gilbert Drive
Reserve - Wylie Place
Thomas Mitchell Park - Caley Close/Wills Place
Westdale Memorial Park - Flinders Street
Longyard
Baringa Park - Craigends Place/Glen Alpha Close/Stratford
Place
Park - Cobb & Co Circuit
Park - Eureka Place
Park - The Retreat
Reserve - Bylong Road
Reserve - Greg Norman Drive
Reserve - The Grange
Kingswood
Kingswood Park - Kingswood Drive/Hartmann Drive/
Pages Lane
Reserve - Colwell Road
Reserve - Herden Road/Pages Lane
Naturally Relaxed 5
Geological/Fossicking 22
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
there are beautiful parks and reserves around the dam
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
and mudstone rocks occur on the eastern side of a regionalscale fold while on the other side the rocks dip in the
opposite direction. The thin, white volcanic ash beds and
layers, and minor folding of the beds near the top of the
eastern end of the bank show these rocks were deposited
well off shore from a volcanic island chain which shed ash
and sediment into the surrounding sea.
(2) Schistose serpentinite (serpentine) developed just to
the east of the Peel Fault representing highly deformed
and altered, ancient seafloor igneous rock. This rock was
probably formed about 500 million years ago and has been
progressively intruded into its present location.
western margin of a major granite body that is more than
40km wide at this point. The granite becomes progressively
coarser away from the margin due to more rapid cooling of
the outer edges of the granite, whilst the remainder cooled
slowly and grew coarser crystals. This granite formed from
melting of sedimentary rocks deep within the earth’s crust
about 300 million years ago.
To prolong your tour, take a left turn at the intersection at the
foot of the ridge and continue through the countryside, where
some interesting chert and jasper bodies can be examined,
as well as green, schistose serpentinite.
Geological tour 4
(3) Road cutting in strongly cleaved metamorphic rocks
(phyllites and a little chert) that were laid down in a deep
ocean at some great distance from land. The vertical
cleavage developed in these rocks is a product of great
pressures that have produced major folding. The next few
cuttings along the road contain cherts and metamorphosed
mudstones and claystones.
(4) Deep road cutting showing well bedded cherts and
claystones on the western end, red jasper in the centre of
the cutting, and metabasalt on the eastern end. The cherts
and claystones were slowly deposited far at sea in very
deep water and the sea floor volcanic activity introduced
basaltic lavas amongst the clays, and produced iron and
manganese-rich deposits that formed jasper and manganese
oxides. Some of the nearby manganese deposits are
associated with the semi-precious stone rhodonite. Follow
the road through the same, ancient marine sedimentary and
volcanic deposits and take a left turn at the next intersection.
The abrupt change from rolling hills to steep topography
is due to the baking of the local rocks by the Bundarra
Granite. Intense heat has recrystallised and toughened
these rocks, often forming new minerals.
(5) The unusual Biotite pegmatite and altered dolerite rock
here is an altered variety of one of the many rocks that make
up serpentinite as the nearby granite has coarsened the
rock. As the road continues, cherts, jaspers, and hornfelsed
mudstones and claystones and metamorphosed basalt occur
in some cuttings.
Barraba area - The rocks of the Barraba area are split into
two major geological belts by a regionally extensive fault, the
Peel Fault.
This major fracture of the crust is developed for several
hundred kilometres from Forster on the coast, to Warialda
in the north. The Peel Fault has been sporadically active
for over 350 million years. Its presence is marked by a
dramatic change in the rock types on either side of it and by
a prominent escarpment.
The tour passes eastward from Barraba toward Woodsreef,
crossing the Peel Fault with sites clearly marked by signs.
National Parks
The two national parks within the Tamworth region offer
visitors two different perspectives of mother nature’s best
work along with picnic, camping and other facilities.
Warrabah National Park, one of the State’s few inland
river parks, can be accessed from Manilla on Namoi River
Road. It has a range of bush walks, plus fishing spots and
opportunities for rock climbing. Most walkers are drawn
to the river where rock hopping can be combined with
swimming. There is a picnic and camping area beside the
river with fireplaces, pit toilets and garbage pits. Camping is
permitted.
The stretch of the Namoi River in the park provides a
challenge for experienced canoeists. It has carved an
impressive gorge through the Nandewar Range and has
numerous rapids with huge granite boulders reach high
above the river valley. The river drops 245km in height over
15 km with many rapids rated at grade 3 (more difficult
with higher water levels) and should not be attempted by
inexperienced canoeists.
The road to the park from Manilla is sealed for the first 15
kilometres and the next 22 kilometres unsealed. Drivers
of coaches or a caravan need to take care on the road
particularly after wet weather.
(1) The Manilla River Bridge
Heading north from the Post Office towards Bingara, there
are layers of bedded, dark grey mudstone and siltstone
exposed in the river bank below the Caravan Park. These
rocks represent 400 million year old silt which settled in a
shallowing sea distant from land; the white layers are wind
blown volcanic dust from the volcanic island chain that was
active during this period.
Mount Kaputar National Park offers a breathtaking view from
the 1510m summit of Mount Kaputar. It is said that about 10
per cent of NSW can be seen from the top of the summit.
Mount Kaputar, which was an active volcano millions of
years ago, is a 48km drive from Barraba best reached
by four-wheel-drive along the Barraba Track. The track is
accessible in dry weather only and a permit and keys must
be obtained from Barraba Visitor Information Centre.
(2) Adam’s Lookout
Travel further north and take a right-hand turn onto Bundarra
Road and continue onto Adam’s Lookout. The view
westward shows folded and faulted mudstones, siltstones,
sandstone and volcanic rocks which were deposited 300 to
400 million years ago, in a sea which lay to the east of the
edge of a volcanic island chain situated off the coast of the
continent. Distinctive fossil imprints of the 360 million year
old Late Devonian plant fossil Leptophloeum australe are
locally common in the mudstones of the region.
A number of National Parks Discovery walks, talks and tours
are conducted in the park starting at Dawsons Springs near
the summit. Call the Narrabri office of the NSW National
Parks and Wildlife Service 02 6792 7300 for details.
known as organ-piping is readily accessed on a 900 metre
well-graded sealed track leading to a viewing platform. There
is a picnic area with barbecue and toilet facilities. Barraba
Visitor Information Centre has more detailed information.
best footforward
Whether you like to walk among nature’s wonders or with a
pavement under foot, Tamworth has a wide range of choices
for visitors who like to be active in the great outdoors.
Bushwalking is one of the most popular activities in the
Tamworth region’s national, state parks and reserves with
many featuring walking tracks.
Be sure to select tracks that suit your fitness level and avoid
walking during the middle of the day when it is the hottest.
To ensure your safety in the bush you should always:
• Carry basic first-aid supplies, insect repellent and sunscreen
• Walk with a companion
• Check what activities are permitted in the park or reserve and find out the expected weather conditions before departing on your journey.
Warrabah National Park near Manilla and Mount Kaputar
National Park accessed from Barraba both have well
signposted bushwalks guiding walkers along several different
routes. Visitor information centres at Tamworth, Nundle,
Manilla and Barraba have a range of guides and information
about national, state parks and various reserves in the
region. There is a section on the region’s national parks in
the guide with further information.
Further afield in the northern section of the park the 290
million-year-old Rocky Creek Glacial Area, signposted on
the Bingara, Narrabri Road. Viewing the glacial area is not
suitable for people with limited mobility. However, the Sawn
Rocks, Australia’s best example of the geological formation
(6) Fine grained, pale coloured granite occur along the
Geological/Fossicking 21
National Parks 6
waterways are a great way to get active
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
take in the delightful sites
enjoy the open spaces
bird and animal sanctuary
Wedge Tailed Eagles can be seen soaring on the air currents deflected by the Mountain and the views from this point are superb stretching across the Valleys
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
David Woodward
(4) Road cutting on the edge of Dungowan (Stop at
cutting furthest from village)
GPS AMG 320394E 6544212N; GDA 320500E 6544402N
This road cutting occurs in altered basalt, white chert, and
grey sandstone which are cut by numerous small faults
and quartz veins which have been altered by fluids passing
through the consolidated rocks and veins of quartz and
green epidote have formed during the alteration. Many small
faults have cut through the rocks in this cutting evident as
smooth, flat to gently curved surfaces, and several of which
show slickensides. The direction of ease of movement
of your hand over the rocks is the direction the fault last
moved in. Most road cuttings between here and Stop 5 show
variations.
(5) Chaffey Dam visitor’s area parking
GPS AMG 322840E 6529985N; GDA 322946E 6530175N
The road cutting shows an excellent collection of very
deep-water oceanic sedimentary rocks, numerous small,
vertical faults and many small folds. The rocks include
claystones and siliceous mudstones. These rocks were
deposited during the Silurian and Devonian periods, and
are representative of the type of sediments deposited in
the deepest portions of our oceans today, at depths up to
about 5kms. The black to blue-black staining on many of the
rocks is due to the presence of manganese oxides and are
formed from underwater volcanic activity which introduces
large amounts of minerals, particularly manganese, into the
seawater.
(6) Serpentinite (serpentine) in road cutting
GPS AMG 323089E 6528218N; GDA 323195E 6528408N
This site shows Serpentinite faulted against sedimentary
rocks along the Peel Fault for most of its length, and makes
an excellent marker for the faults presence. The character
of the serpentinite varies with some outcrops slatey and
fractured, whilst others are less deformed. Serpentinite is a
relatively rare rock in eastern Australia. It was once part of
the thin crust and upper mantle which was present beneath
the deepest region of the oceans during the Cambrian
period, about 500 million years ago however there is no
resemblance to their original rock types. These soft, talc-like
rocks react to the earth’s pressures by flowing upward along
major fractures such as the Peel Fault.
Date 15/01/2009
Signature
National Parks 7
(7) Road cutting near houses
GPS AMG 320170E 6527777N; GDA 320276E 6527967N
This cutting shows steeply dipping, bedded siliceous
siltstones and mudstones of the Tamworth Belt. Numerous
graded beds are present that are a product of sand, silt
and clay being rapidly dropped into still water. These rocks
were formed in relatively shallow oceanic waters during the
Devonian period about 350 million years ago.
(8) Road cutting in mudstone and siltstone
GPS AMG 320687E 6529283N; GDA 320793E 6529473N
Similar to those rocks seen at Stop 7, the graded beds are of
the same age however dip steeply rather than shallowly as
at the previous stop which has been caused by major faults
in the proximity. The cutting also includes some distinctively
green mudstones which are unique to these rocks and are
considered a diagnostic feature.
(9) Road cuttings in conglomerate
GPS AMG 320357E 6529788N; GDA 320463E 6529978N
The conglomerate exposed in the road cuttings on either
side of the road is one of the oldest and most unique rocks
in the region. The pebbles and mud which comprise the
conglomerate were deposited in an oceanic canyon during
the Ordovician period, more than 400 million years ago. The
canyon was a major feature which sediment was funnelled
from the shallow ocean closer to the Ordovician shoreline,
to the deep ocean beyond the continental shelf. Volcanic
rock types from surface eruptions, granites which crystallised
deep under ground and limestones from close to shore
indicate that the closest land was in tropical or subtropical
waters and was volcanic in character. These conglomerates
are only found in a small region along the eastern edge of
the Tamworth Belt.
Geological tour 3
Manilla area - Some aspects of the geological history of the
Manilla area can be seen heading east from Manilla towards
Watsons Creek.
The tour commences in Late Devonian marine sandstones
and mudstones of the Tamworth Belt and passes across the
Peel Fault into serpentine and deep-water oceanic silts and
cherts of the Central Block. The tour is completed within the
Bundarra Granite, having passed through a zone of rocks
showing thermal baking from the granite’s emplacement.
(1) Late Devonian, steeply dipping, thinly bedded siltstone
Geological/Fossicking 20
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
the drive demonstrates the character of the rock
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
the region.
Geological tour 2
(6) Parking area, Oxley Highway
GPS AMG 263964E 6572547N; GDA 264071E 6572737N
The road cutting on the opposite side of the road is
composed of easterly-dipping mudstones demonstrating the
axis crossing of the major, regionally extensive fold.
(7) South side of highway near end of overtaking lane
GPS AMG 263713E 6572537N; GDA 263820E 6572727N
Boulders and pebbles of mainly volcanic rocks occur
throughout this broad outcrop of Devonian conglomerate
and pebbly sandstone as a continuous, thick unit throughout
the region which includes varieties formed within rivers, and
some that were deposited within the ocean indicating this
conglomerate formed upon, and along the flanks of, one of
the many volcanic island chains which occurred off shore of
the Australian continental landmass more than 300 million
years ago.
Tamworth - Chaffey Dam via Nundle Road (south)
This drive commences in relatively shallow water marine
sedimentary rocks of the Tamworth Belt, crosses the Peel
Fault into very deep water marine sedimentary and volcanic
rocks, and concludes in the oldest rocks present in the
region (about 500 million years old).
(1) Road cutting on bend
GPS AMG 310063E 6554290N; GDA 310169E 6554480N
The rocks outcropping here are steeply dipping thick
sandstones and thinner mudstones with well-developed
bedding surfaces from the Devonian period about 350 million
years old. These sandstones and mudstones were deposited
many tens of kilometres from land, and are composed of
large amounts of volcanic sandy material while thin, white
layers in the mudstones are volcanic ash bands, formed by
the settling of windborne ash originating from the Devonian
volcanic island chain to the west.
(8) Road cutting on north of highway
GPS AMG 262074E 6571605N; GDA 262181E 6571795N
About 50m east of the Glengarry front gate there are some
of the most significant rocks exposed in the Tamworth Belt.
This cutting, and several to the west, comprises boulder
conglomerate and volcanic sandstones with boulders of
coarse-grained volcanic rock types. Nearby cuttings show
a range of interesting lavas that were deposited on land
however, the enclosing conglomerates and sandstones show
characteristics which indicate deposition in the ocean as
Calcite (calcium carbonate) is present as fillings in fractures
and in what were gas bubbles in the molten lava. The tall
ridges to the northwest of this stop comprise several huge
masses of land-deposited lavas amongst oceanic sediment
which suggests they slipped off the edge of a steep sided
volcanic island into ocean waters tens or hundreds of metres
deep; the island mass must have occurred very close to this
locality.
On the return to Tamworth you are witnessing the rock
products of the ocean which deepened away from the
western island chain as initial sandstones and limestones
indicate shallow waters close to land, and muds further
east represent both increasing distance from land and/or
increasingly deep water.
Geological/Fossicking 19
(2) Roadside open cut
GPS AMG 317528E 6546309N; GDA 317634E 6546499N
On the eastern side of the Peel Fault, these rocks are deep
water, marine (oceanic) muddy, silty and clayey sediments
that show little or no bedding, due to their deposition as
mass flow sediments. Following their deposition, some
accumulations of clays and muds on the edge of steep
underwater slopes were dislodged by seismic activity;
the dislodged sediment flowed down the slope as dense
clouds of silt which blended with previous bedding to form
a homogenous mass. The abundant quartz veining which
occurs throughout this outcrop has resulted from fracturing
accompanying the nearby Peel Fault.
(3) Road cutting on east of road
GPS AMG 319588E 6545278N; GDA 319694E 6545468N
The cutting shows some excellent outcrop of red and pink
jasper and pale yellowish-white chert that are abundant
along the western edge of the Central Block. They are
composed of silica (essentially quartz) which was deposited
on the ocean floor from millions of microscopic organisms
whose skeletons are made of silica which is eventually
converted to rock, forming chert and jasper. Most cherts and
jaspers from this area date from the Silurian to the Devonian,
about 350 to 400 million years old.
off the edge of a steep sided volcanic island
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
Horton Falls, 38km from Barraba on the Mount Lindsey Rd
are quite spectacular during wet periods. The falls plummet
83m to the valley floor amid the State’s most westerly
remnant rainforest. Take the challenge of walking to the rock
pools below or have a picnic and a swim at the top falls on
the drive to Mt Kaputar.
The lookout at the picnic area overlooks the largest of the
three waterfalls, a walking track leads to the bottom of the
gorge and takes around 2 hours return to complete. The
route is extremely steep and is not suitable for the unfit.
Another walking track leads to the top of the first waterfalls
and takes about 30 minutes return. The track is about half a
kilometre before the main picnic area.
Horton Falls Reserve has several bush camping and picnic
sites but there are no amenities. Walkers can expect to be
rewarded for their efforts with seeing a wide range of flora
and fauna. Regent Honeyeaters and Turquoise Parrots are
just two of the many species of birds documented in the
area.
The most easily accessable bushland journey is the
Kamilaroi Walking Track which starts at the eastern end of
Tamworth’s Oxley Lookout (White St) which is 519m above
sea level. The track has a range of different walks over
varying lengths and terrain. The total length is 6.2km which
can be comfortably completed in three hours.
The first kilometre of the track was built during The
Depression of the 1930s as part of a civic improvement
program funded by a NSW Unemployment Relief Council
grant. The track takes walkers through Oxley Park to picnic
and barbecue areas, various vantage points such as Wallaby
Rocks Lookout and Flagstaff Mountain Lookout. Detailed
information about the track including a map is available at
Tamworth Visitor Information Centre.
Tamworth Regional Botanic Garden, accessed from the top
end of Piper St adjacent to Endeavour Marsupial Park, has
a 2.3km walk around its 28ha site. A kiosk, pergola, water
feature, bush chapel, rose gardens and gazebo lookout are
its non-flora features.
For information on national parks call 1300 361 967 during
business hours or visit www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au or to
find out about State Parks visit www.stateparks.nsw.gov.au.
Anyone who prefers to walk on pavement should not miss
taking a walk along the banks of the Peel River. It extends
from the rear of the Tamworth Visitor Information Centre to
near Jewry St, running adjacent to Bicentennial Park along
the way. It is a popular route used by walkers and cyclists.
Bicentennial Park (Kable Ave, Tamworth) has its own
network of walkways between different features in the
grounds. The site was first set aside as a reserve for access
to water and public recreation in 1849 and became known as
Johnston Park. The park underwent major redevelopment to
coincide with Australia’s Bicentenary in 1988 and renamed
Bicentennial Park. There are various ponds, scupltures, a
pergola, picnic tables and benches, tree and shrub plantings
as well as an open air stage.
A wide cement pathway runs along Scotts Rd near the Peel
St intersection along the river flats to Goonoo Goonoo Rd.
There is also a self-guided Tamworth Heritage Walk.
Developed by Tamworth Historical Society, its route takes
visitors around Tamworth’s CBD past a number of private
homes, public buildings and places of heritage significance.
A map of each site is available along with a guide to a
heritage drive highlighting sites further afield in Tamworth.
Manilla has several self-guided walks around town. They are
detailed in brochures available at Manilla Visitor Information
Centre in Manilla St. The most recent, a riverwalk, was
launched in August 2008. It starts from near Market St and
ends behind the showground about one kilometer later and
takes in the junction of the Namoi and Manilla river systems.
There are about 800 trees planted, new picnic tables, chairs
and bench seats installed, gravelled pathway laid to take
walkers, cyclists and even horse riders along a one kilometre
river route.
National Parks 8
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
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Those willing to venture into bush just off the New England
Highway in the Moonbi Ranges will be rewarded with two
eye catching sights – one natural and one man made.
Travel north of Moonbi along the highway and pull over to
park at the first gap in the guard rail just before starting the
ascent of the 1st Moonbi Hill. A short walk across to Moonbi
Creek and you will come to the first concrete Monier Arch
Bridge built in NSW in 1900. A little further into the bush
from the bridge you can see the remnant of a section of the
original Great Northern Road which was the route over the
ranges until 1872.
Further up the hill on the left is the turn-off to Moonbi
Lookout which offers scenic views of the district and when
looking across the highway’s dual carriageway you can also
see Cory’s Pillar, a high balancing granite rock formation.
It is said to be where Edward Cory camped in the 1830s
while blazing the first trail over the ranges and is sometimes
known as Cory’s Pillow or Cory’s Nightcap. Trees growing
nearby may obscure Cory’s Pillar but rest assured it is still
standing.
HOOKED
ON
watersports
Despite its inland location, water sports are a popular form of
recreation for residents and visitors.
Apart from the Peel, Manilla, Namoi and other rivers, the
region has a number of man-made lakes which are ideal for
boating, swimming, waterskiing and sailing. Bush camping
is permitted at some locations while others have nearby
caravan parks and other accommodation.
Chaffey Dam is on the Peel River, 43kms east of Tamworth
on the road to Nundle. There is a viewing platform just off the
roadway which gives a great view of the dam. Swimming,
sailing, boating and fishing are popular activities on the
dam. The foreshore is an ideal spot for bushwalking and
picnicking with camping sites at the Bowling Point Alley
recreation reserve.
National Parks 9
Fishing is also a favourite past-time with yellowbelly, trout
and catfish stocked while waterbirds such as pelicans,
cormorants and ibis found on the banks and surface of the
dam. There are beautiful parks and reserves around the
dam where bushwalking and picnicking can be enjoyed, and
camping sites (plus amenity services) are available.
Sheba Dam Reserve, in the Great Dividing Range at an
altitude of 1150m above sea level, is another popular
picnicing, swimming and fishing area. Camping is available
on the reserve which is about 11km east of Nundle. Facilities
include toilets, barbecue/fireplaces and picnic tables. There
is a walking track which winds its way around part of the
larger dam. The dams were built by hand in 1888 to provide
water for gold mining operations in the Hanging Rock and
Nundle areas. Their recreation potential was realised after
the goldfields petered out.
Glenriddle Reserve, 15km south east of Barraba on the
Crow Mountain Rd, is reputed to be the best location on
Splitrock Dam for boating, fishing and bush camping. The
reserve is at the northern end of Split Rock Dam, named
after a fissure in a large rock near the dam. There is a sealed
road to the reserve. Toilets and picnic tables are available.
Anglers have reported good catches of most inland fish. Fish
species include; Golden Perch, Black Bream, Jewfish and
Murray Cod.
Visitors must be aware if you would like to fish in the
Tamworth region, there are specific laws that must be
followed including; obtaining a NSW recreational fishing
licence, protected fish species and waters closed to fishing.
For information about these guidelines, contact the NSW
Department of Primary Industries – Fishing & Aquaculture on
1300 550 474 or visit www.fisheries.nsw.gov.au.
Fishing is permitted in national parks with a licence provided
the park code and fish limits are observed. Anglers are
asked to clear their campsites and take all rubbish with them.
Golden perch (yellow belly), Cod, and Catfish can be caught
in the Manilla River.
Walking tracks range from short easy strolls
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
The Peel Fault line that splits folded, ancient marine
sedimentary and volcanic rocks (to the west) from ancient,
very deep water marine sedimentary and volcanic rocks to
the east.
Bob Brown, a geologist with the NSW Department of
Minerals has compiled and supplied Tourism Tamworth with
a series of self-drive tours across the Tamworth region to
allow you to discover fascinating geological occurrences for
yourself.
Geological drive 1
Tamworth – Lake Keepit via Somerton (west)
This drive demonstrates the character of the rocks which
formed in the Devonian to Carboniferous ocean about 300 to
350 million years ago. Driving east to west, you are passing
backwards in time toward the ancient Devonian volcanic
island chain.
(1) Road cuttings by abandoned roadside open cut pit
GPS AMG 290774E 6565278N; GDA 29088E 6565468N
The road cuttings reveal shallow west-dipping bedded
mudstones (dark grey, flaggy, cleavable rocks) and a few
sandstone beds (coarser grained, less well layered) which
were probably laid down in less than 200 metres of ocean
water below wave activity. The low angle, western dips
represent regional-scale folding of the rocks, with most rocks
along the highway dipping westward until the core (axis) of
the fold is passed near the Keepit Dam turnoff. To the west
of the fold axis the rocks dip eastward. A number of narrow,
white quartz and calcite (calcium carbonate) veins cut the
rocks as a result of local faulting. There are several faults
visible in the cuttings.
(2) Road cutting on the south side of the highway
GPS AMG 276380E 6572060N; GDA 276486E 6572250N
A pebbly conglomerate and sandstone outcrop deposited
during the Early Carboniferous about 300 million years ago.
The pebbles were probably rounded on land in river systems
and were carried out to sea by floods or other catastrophic
processes. The pebble types tell us something of the source
landmass, with coarse and fine-grained volcanic rock types
indicating active land-based volcanoes.
(3) Road cutting on south side of the highway
GPS AMG 268680E 6574341N; GDA 268787E 6574531N
Westerly dipping mudstones are exposed in the walls of
the cutting that are capped by a thick cover of coarse river
gravels. The mudstones represent the dominant, silty form
of sediment deposited on the floor of the Devonian and Early
Carboniferous Ocean; the river gravels demonstrate the
extent of natural erosion of the landscape during the past
few million years. Although the precise age of deposition of
the gravels is unknown it is likely that it occurred somewhere
during the past 30 million years. The probable river
responsible for depositing the gravels would have been the
ancestor of the present Peel River which flows to the west
several kilometres north of here.
(4) Road cutting with parking on south side of the road
GPS AMG 266800E 6574012N; GDA 266907E 6574202N
The dominant mudstones of the Early Carboniferous
ocean were locally inundated by sand and gravel from
the nearby landmass to the west and the shallow, tropical
ocean produced local reefs and an abundance of calcium
carbonate-rich silt and sand. Ocean floor dwelling species
such as crinoids (an ancient sea lily and a relative of modern
star fish and sea urchins) are abundant and have been
replaced by calcium carbonate; these fossils are about 300
million years old.
(5) River Glen front gate
GPS AMG 264045E 6573288N; GDA 264152E 6573478N
Take the turn-off to Lake Keepit and stop in the area
of the River Glen front gate. An abundance of calcium
carbonate derived from reef organisms is present as sand
and mud, and is also dissolved in the ocean water. Some
of the calcium carbonate crystallises on sand grains or
shell fragments is rounded into small spheres by strongly
oscillating currents, possibly in an area of high tidal activity;
the tapioca-like spheres resulting from this process are
known as ooids. They formed thick limestone beds exposed
as blocks on the eastern side of the road, opposite the River
Glen front gate as well as more beds several metres thick
that outcrop continuously on the western side for many tens
of kilometres. The limestone is composed of abundant ooids,
broken shelly fossils and crinoid stems, which is significant
as it represents a unique marker bed throughout the rocks of
Geological/Fossicking 18
two major geological belts by a regionally extensive fault
On FINAL approval
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The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
A spot just downstream of Manilla Weir (accessed through
Chaffey Park in Halls Creek Rd) is popular with locals. It is
a picturesque spot which non-anglers can also enjoy with
rivergums along the river banks, nearby grassed areas, a
playground and sports oval. It is adjacent to the caravan
park.
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
alluvial and reef gold mining
pan some gold from the creek
serpentintite and rolling hills
sea floor volcanic activity introduced basaltic lavas amongst the clays, and produced iron and manganese-rich deposits that formed jasper and manganese
Signature
Lake Keepit, which straddles the Tamworth Regional
Council and Gunnedah Shire Council areas, is the biggest
water storage in the area and a major destination for local
residents wanting to enjoy watersports and other forms of
recreation. More than 60,000 recreational users visit Lake
Keepit each year.
Lake Keepit State Park, about 55km north-west of Tamworth
offers fun and relaxation for all ages. It has an array
of facilities including picnic areas with gas barbecues,
amenities blocks with laundry facilities, camp kitchen, boat
ramp, children’s playgrounds, wading pool, BMX bike track,
walking trails, skate bowl suitable for roller blades, roller
skates or skateboards, five-hole golf course, tennis courts
and a well-stocked kiosk.
Through the spring and summer seasons the lake offers
pleasure boating, sailing, swimming, water skiing and
windsailing. You can bring your own equipment or hire it
from one of the clubs on site. There is also an abundance
of affordable accommodation at the lake including extensive
camping facilities, powered and unpowered caravan sites,
luxury ensuite cabins, four-bed standard cabins and six-bed
camp-o-tells (fixed tents) so you can make a real holiday of
it. There is an admission fee per vehicle to be paid as you
enter the park.
THRILLSEEKERS
fulfilled
If you’re looking for a real adrenaline rush when you visit the
Tamworth region, there are several options.
Geological/Fossicking 17
You can learn to paraglide at Manilla Sky Ranch or take a
tandem parasail. The school also teaches the willing how
to fly trikes, ultralights and gyros under the supervision of
Australia’s most qualified instructors.
For more high excitement, head to Lake Keepit State Park
where novices can try gliding. Lake Keepit Soaring Club
offers gliding joy flights and operate a flider flying school
seven days a week. The club can be contacted at the airfield
on 02 6769 7514 or [email protected]
There is also a sailing club at Lake Keepit which runs
classes at certain times of the year. For information call
02 6765 4097.
Anyone who wants to experience life as a jackaroo or jillaroo
may want to consider attending the five-day Leconfield
Jackaroo and Jillaroo School about 50km east of Tamworth.
The school is operated by the family who have lived on the
property for four generations. Since 1997 the school has
taught horse riding, cattle and sheep mustering, roping and
lasoo techniques, fencing and yard building, calf wrestling,
whip cracking, sheep shearing, horse sports and how to fix a
dropped shoe on a horse. For further information visit
www.leconfield.com.
Climbing into a saddle is also possible at a number of
locations including riding schools and properties which
operate farmstays. Tamworth Visitor Information Centre has
more information.
A fun adrenalin rush for the more adventurous is paintball.
Players wear camoflague coveralls and “hunt” and “shoot’’
each other with paint-filled “bullets’’. Tamworth Paintball
at Kootingal, about 15 minutes’ drive from Tamworth has
up to seven fields available for players aged 16 and older.
Tamworth Visitor Information Centre has more information.
Four-wheel drives and trail bikes are welcomed in state
forests but drivers and riders are reminded to stick to
defined tracks. Some State Forest maps and brochures
also recommend special forest drives. Please remember to
drive cautiously because forest roads are unsealed, can be
narrow and winding in places and may become slippery in
the wet. It’s important to keep in mind that these roads are
also used by logging trucks. Bike riders must be licensed
and trail bikes registered. Avoid using trails in the wet as a
large amount of damage can occur.
National Parks 10
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
take in the delightful sites
Wedge Tailed Eagles can be seen soaring on the air currents deflected by the Mountain and the views from this point are superb stretching across the Valleys
Tamworth’s 4WD Club suggests the Barraba Track, which
leads to the summit of Mount Kaputar, as a good choice
for visitors wanting to do some four-wheel driving. It also
recommends a drive to Sheba Dams near Hanging Rock in
the Nundle State Forest. The club meets monthly and can be
contacted by email on [email protected]
BIRD
theWATCHING
right way
The region is well known among bird watchers and boasts
36 bird route sites along a 180km corridor. Most of the sites
are part of old droving roads known as Travelling Stock
Routes with many of them signposted for easy reference.
Over 230 species of birds can be found within the area, with
the endangered Regent Honeyeater found near Barraba one
of the species most sought after by twitchers, as well as the
Turquoise Parrot.
The Tamworth region, in particular Barraba has an
international reputation as a bird-watching region and for
its well documented bird routes. Geographically it is a
transitional area between the sparsely vegetated inland
plains and the forests of the Great Dividing Range. This
means it is inhabited by birds from western NSW and
eastern NSW.
Some of the most popular routes to observe birds include
the Moonbi Common and New England Gully Road, where
parrots and finches can be found. The Cockburn River near
Limbri has several established bird watching and picnic sites
that follow the watercourse.
The high altitude of Nundle, Hanging Rock and Sheba Dams
attracts the Crimson Rosella and Satin Bowerbird along with
many bush birds and water birds.
Discover the feathered friends in Manilla from the Manilla
Post Office, head east along Strafford Street and turn at the
track located between the playing fields leading down to the
Manilla Weir. In amongst the magnificent gum trees look for
nesting parrots and honeyeaters while flocks of water birds
are seen on the playing fields.
National Parks 11
In Barraba, drop into the Visitor Information Centre and
get directions to The Millie Creek Travelling Stock Route
for guaranteed glimpses of the extraordinary Regent
Honeyeater in the Silver. Leaved Ironbark and White Box
Forest.
If twitchers continue further north another 3 kilometres to
a sign board, look for the Sacred Kingfisher’s nesting hole
in the bank hidden below tree roots running parallel to the
creek. Sightings of the rare and vulnerable species the
Turquoise Parrot have been observed around the camping
areas of the Warrabah National Park near Barraba and at
the Horton Falls Bird Route.
There are many more bird routes throughout the region that
will allow you to observe many of the unique wildlife found
within the Tamworth Region nature trail.
Those is search of wildlife are urged to take care to
ensure their presence has a minimal impact on the
natural environment as possible. Please remember to not
consciously disturb creatures or their habitats. Never feed
birds or other wildlife and remember to take binoculars to
ensure you can locate birds and wildlife. Walk quietly and
be patient to increase your chances of spotting more of the
birdlife and fauna.
There is a more detailed publication available at the
Tamworth, Nundle, Manilla and Barraba Visitor Information
Centres outling Barraba’s bird routes, but Tamworth
Birdwatchers has provided the following list of locations
throughout the region where birds can be readily spotted by
novice and more seasoned birdwatchers.
A leaflet available at the region’s Visitor Information Centres
produced by Tamworth Birdwatchers Inc and sponsored by
Namoi Catchment Management Authority includes images of
some of the region’s native bird species. It includes a written
description of each along with suggestions on how to attract
more native birds to backyards. Tamworth Birdwatchers Inc
can be contacted by calling 02 6760 5740 or [email protected]
optus.com.au Tamworth Birdwatches is affiliated with the
Bird Observers Club of Australia www.birdobservers.org.au.
FOSSICKING
DISCOVER
treasures
can be contacted on 02 6760 5740.
The Tamworth region makes up a large proportion of ‘The
Fossickers Way’ tourist drive that follows route from Nundle
stretching north following the highway for around 375km.
Throughout the area you can go fossicking for sapphires,
zircon, jasper, prase, rhodonite, crystals and even gold.
The gold and precious stone mining heritage of the region
dates back to the 1850’s when thousands of people came
to what was known as the Peel River Diggings which
incorporated Nundle, Happy Valley, Hanging Rock, and
Bowling Alley Point. Among the rush of people were
numerous Chinese; most looking for gold, plus a few came
to set up stores and gardens to supply the diggers.
The key fossicking sites in the Tamworth region that allow
public access are still found in the Nundle area along the
Peel River.
• Head out along the River Rd north of the village Nundle
follow the Peel River and a general public access point is
on the western bank situated about 2.3km past Fossickers
Tourist Park (Jenkins St).
• After heading around a large bend to the left and the river
becomes quite close to the road, you have entered the
‘Swamp Creek’ area which provides excellent fossicking
opportunities. Just on the right hand side of the road will be
an access point (by foot) for pedestrians to get down to the
river. A little further along the road there is a general public
access entry point as well.
• Continue driving north along River Road and on the left
you will come to a signposted Travelling Stock Route that
is between the road and the river. This area, down on the
eastern river bank, is an excellent spot for fossicking.
• The Old Chimney fossicking area is about 7kms from the
village of Nundle just after both the road and the river sweep
around to the right. There is pedestrian access down to the
eastern river bank.
• Woodsreef Reserve (16km East of Barraba) fossicking
area along Ironbark Creek.
Keen fossickers can also head north to Manilla and Barraba
following the Manilla River to seek further precious stones
especially in the vicinity of Woodsreef Common in the
Nangahrah and Ironbark Creeks around Barraba.
For gold prospectors, all your fossicking equipment can
be hired in the village of Nundle from The Mount Misery
Gold Mine (02 6769 3459) and Fossickers Tourist Park (02
6769 3355). The Nundle Trading Post (02 6769 3000) sells
equipment. Barraba Visitor Information Centre sells gold
panning equipment as do a number of fishing, camping and
outdoor stores across the region.
The NSW Department of Primary Industries has guidelines
for fossicking in State Forests and it is recommended that
they be followed in fossicking tourist areas to ensure the
surrounding environment is protected.
Fossickers should not:
• excavate, undercut or damage the bank of any watercourse
• interfere with the flow of water in any watercourse
• cause pollution of any watercourse
• disturb mud or clay or fine silt so as to cause significant turbidity in any watercourse
• drill or excavate a hole larger than 1m x 1m
• damage or take any bush rock.
Rock-solid
interests
Buddying geologists will find much of interest in the
Tamworth region in addition to fossicking and gold panning.
The area is often viewed as a fascinating geological region
with the city of Tamworth centred on a major crustal fault.
Geological/Fossicking 16
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
take in the delightful sites
Wedge Tailed Eagles can be seen soaring on the air currents deflected by the
Nangahrah Creek crossing, continue following the route
further along across Ironbark Creek, keep watch for the
Regent Honeyeater sign just before the Coonoor Rd turn-off.
(11) Garibaldi Bird Route
Head out from Barraba along the Woodsreef/Bundarra
Rd and take a left-hand turn onto McIntyre Rd where the
Garibaldi Travelling Stock Route extends for about 7km
futher down this road (outside the Tamworth Regional
Council area) there will be an ironbark scrub at the T-junction
of Gulf Creek and McIntyre roads; head west into the white
box scrub and you will find many birds including Yellowtubted and Regent Honeyeaters.
(12) Cobbadah to Upper Horton Bird Route
Just outside the Tamworth Regional Council area on the
Bingara Rd north of Barraba is the village of Cobbadah.
About 1km south of the village, a large open reserve with
clumps of native trees starts and by heading north-west
towards Upper Horton Village (left-hand turn off the Bingara
Road), the 18km road adjoins a wide travelling stock route.
Look for Barking Owl at Sheep Station Creek. On the
return trip, head south along the Bereen Rd and turn left at
Trevallyn Rd which will take you up to the Bereen Mountain
Lookout. When leaving the lookout, continue along Trevallyn
Rd towards Barraba (past routes 5 and 6).
(13) Bells Mountain Reserve
From Barraba, head north on the Bingara Rd and about
7km out of town you will come to a significant conservation
grassy box woodland. (Gate is locked, key is available from
Tamworth Bird Watchers Inc. Phone.02 6760 5740)
(14) Ironbark Creek
Heading south back towards manilla, take a left-hand turn
onto Pera Linton Rd and follow this past Split Rock Dam and
at the junction with The Mine Road. Turn left, stopping at
Glenriddle Bridge which is a common breeding site for Fairy
Martins, then continue on to the signpost.
For more information the Tamworth Bird Watchers Inc.
National Parks 15
two major geological belts by a regionally extensive fault
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
Nundle/Tamworth
(1) Betts Lane
Follow the New England Highway north towards Armidale
through Nemingha and past Kootingal for approximately
26.5kms to a left-turn into Betts Lane. Approximately 1.5km
along this lane there is a Mulberry Tree which is a favourite
site of Channel-billed Cuckoos. Continue further down Betts
Lane and turn right into Braefarm Road, which will rejoin the
New England Highway. Turn left towards Moonbi.
(2) Moonbi Common and New England Gully Road
Head further north, past the Moonbi Store and turn left into
Moonbi Gap Road and cross over the concrete bridge, once
the road veers right, the name changes to New England
Gully Road. Continue along this road and turn left into
Moonbi Common Road; this leads to the Common which is
a good site for Parrots and Finches. Returning back to New
England Gully Road intersection turn left and continue along
to the Moore Creek crossing, or alternatively good sites can
be found wherever farmland turns into bushland. Return to
Moonbi by following directions in the reverse.
(3) Moonbi Lookout
Follow the highway north from Moonbi up the Ranges and
turn left, following the signs to the Moonbi Lookout. Apart
from offering a panoramic view of the Moonbi Valley, this
area comes alive with birds when the figs are fruiting or
eucalyptus are flowering.
(4) MacDonald River
A further 20km north, over the Moonbi Range is the village of
Bendemeer (located just off the Highway). The MacDonald
River flows through centre of town and has a number of
picnic sites situated along its banks.
(5) Cockburn River (near Limbri)
Heading back towards Tamworth, head through the village
of Kootingal following the signs to Limbri, once you have
passed over the railways crossing there is a choice of routes
you can take. (A) Continue straight ahead over Ballantines
Bridge where a gravel road leads to Dungowan, turn left
heading towards Nundle to visit the next site (B) Turn left
where the road follows the Cockburn River with numerous
bird watching and picnic sites along the watercourse, return
to the Highway by retracing the route or take a longer scenic
drive through Woolbrook and Bendemeer.
(6) Nundle, Hanging Rock and Sheba Dams
Continue back to Tamworth and turn left at the village of
Nemingha towards Dungowan and Nundle. The lookout at
Chaffey Dam is worth a stop. An alternative route starting
from Woolomin (10min south of Dungowan) is via the West
Bank Road along the western side of Chaffey Dam passing
the Dulegal Arboretum which contains a great variety of
native plants. Continue on to Nundle, and once in the village
follow the signs up to the village of Hanging Rock and further
onto Sheba Dams. The higher altitude of Sheba Dams
means the Crimson Rosella and Satin Bowerbird are usually
resident, along with many bush birds and some water birds.
You can take a longer return route back to Dungowan via
Forest Road and Port Stephens Cutting.
(7) Nundle State Forest
There are a number of State Forests surrounding Nundle
and Hanging Rock that contain a variety of bird life including
Whipbirds and Lyrebirds. Care should be taken as there may
be pine plantation logging trucks in the forest; for clarification
on forestry activities contact State Forests on 02 6777 2511.
(8) Oxley Park and Endeavour Drive
In the city of Tamworth the main natural wilderness known
as Oxley Park offers two adjoining tracks which can be
accessed at the Lookout (top of White St) and Endeavour
Drive (top of Brisbane St). Both points offer walking tracks
through the bush where you can spot the Speckled Warbler
and at the top of Endeavour Drive, the Marsupial Park has a
large Bird Aviary which proves ideal to see and identify birds
up close.
(9) Crawney’s Travelling Stock Reserve
Head south of Tamworth to Nundle and once in the village
turn right into Jenkins Street and head out along Crawney
Road to the Reserve which begins approximately 15km from
the town among creek flats and winds through rugged high
country. Powerful Owl has been sighted in this area.
National Parks 12
On FINAL approval
please sign and fax
to: 02 6761 2229
Client Tourism Tamworth
Job No 1130
take in the delightful sites
Wedge Tailed Eagles can be seen soaring on the air currents deflected by the Mountain and the views from this point are superb stretching across the Valleys
SPECIFICATIONS/PUBLICATION
198x210mm 24pp + cover Nature Trail 2008.
Design and printing. QTY 3000
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
This design is owned by 2 Creative Media and is not to be reproduced in
any form whatsoever, without the written consent of 2 Creative Media.
All colour represented are simulations of pantones and cmyk values
and should not be treated as an accurate guide to print quality.
T. 02 6761 2222 © 2007.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS TO ARTWORK
I understand that any corrections that arise over my allocation of 3 proofs
provided from my 3 sets of author changes, will incur additional artwork
and/or consumable charges. Artwork charges are $96 per hour inclusive.
AUTHOR CORRECTIONS PROOF NO.
1.
No charge 4.
Extra charge
2.
No charge 5.
Extra charge
3.
No charge 10. Extra charge
CLIENT APPROVAL
Name
Signature
David Woodward
Date 15/01/2009
(10) Kootingal Travelling Stock Reserve
Head north toward Armidale on the New England Highway
for approximately 17km and prior to reaching the village of
Kootingal, Sandy Road will be signposted on the right hand
side. You will be able to enter the Reserve from the signpost
at the north east corner by going over the gate (permissible).
Note the nesting holes and remnants of aged box and gum
trees.
(11) Bolton’s Creek
This site is currently being developed by the Tamworth
Regional Council and Liaison Committee including the
Aboriginal Land Council. It is approximately 12km west of
Tamworth on the Gunnedah Road and will form a Grassy
White Box/Yellow Box Woodland Management Project. This
site is not signposted.
(12) Kootingal Village Reserve
Situated beside the village, the Reserve has a permanent
reedy creek with pleasant walks around the trees and
shrubs.
(13) Tintinhull Travelling Stock Reserve
Heading north along the New England Highway, about
halfway between Nemingha and Kootingal, take a left-hand
turn into Tintinhull Road and follow it for 4km; the Reserve
is on the right after the ‘T’ intersection with Porcupine Lane.
Regent Honeyeaters were observed here in 2004.
(14) Quipolly Dams
Head south west from Tamworth along the Werris Creek
Road towards Quirindi, then after passing through Werris
Creek there will be a left-turn to Quipolly Dams (signposted).
The dam is surrounded by private property however an array
of waterbirds can be seen including cormorants, swans and
Great Crested Grebes. Further up Lowes Creek Road a
smaller older dam is almost silted up providing habitat for
many waterbirds including breeding Blue-billed Ducks and
National Parks 13
crakes at appropriate water levels. Fifty different waterbirds
have been seen on the dams over the last ten years and 100
bush birds in the surrounding countryside.
Manilla
(1) Manilla Bridge to Bridge Walking Track
Follow Namoi Street down to the parking area near the main
Manilla Street Bridge where you can take a pleasant walk
along the river down past the junction of Manilla and Namoi
Rivers to the Showground.
(2) Manilla Weir
From the Post Office, head east along Strafford Street
and turn left at the track located between the playing fields
leading down to the Manilla Weir. In amongst the magnificent
gum trees look for nesting parrots and honeyeaters while
flocks of water birds can be seen on the playing fields.
(3) Warrabah National Park
Proceed north along ‘The Fossickers Way’ driving route
towards Barraba and turn right a few kms out of town
following the signs to the National Park; the road is 15km of
bitumen and 20km of gravel. The Turquoise Parrot has been
observed around the camping areas.
(4) Split Rock Dam
Continue to follow the Barraba Road north and turn right
following the sign to Split Rock Dam where you will reach the
main Dam wall. Ospreys and Honeyeater have been sighted
in this area.
(5) Spring Creek Travelling Stock Reserve (TSR)
Just outside Manilla, on the Barraba side of town, turn
left onto Boggabri Road and after following this for
approximately 8km turn left into Corella Road. Further
down this road, just after crossing Spring Creek, will be
the Reserve where you can enter through a gate and walk
down to the Namoi River. The River Red Gums (Eucalyptus
camaldulensis) along the rivers edge you can usually spot
Galahs, Sulphur-crested Cockatoos and Little Corellas.
(6) Borah Crossing Travelling Stock Reserve
two major geological belts by a regionally extensive fault
The picnic area leads to a number of good bird watching sites or you can also enter the Forest through loose wires in fence
From Spring Creek TSR (No 5) head west for 4km then
turn off the road to the left where you will come to a reserve
located on the northern edge of Lake Keepit. Enter through
a gate located amongst Silver-leaved Ironbarks, (patches of
Weeping Myalls are also visible); This is a possible site for
observing water birds, depending on the water level.
Telephone.02 6760 5740). Sacred Kingfisher’s are known to
nest in the area.
(7) Adams Travelling Stock Reserve
This Reserve is accessible from either Borah Crossing
or Borah Reserve (both signposted). This area contains
good remnants of Grassy White Box Woodlands with an
understorey of native shrubs such as Acacia Deanei and
Acacia Decora. Finches and Painted Honeyeaters have
been observed in this locality.
(5) Plumthorpe Travelling Stock Reserve
From Barraba, head west out of town on the Trevallyn
Road for 16.5km where you will be able to pass through
the gate and drive down to the Manilla River. Parrots and
Honeyeaters are commonly sighted.
(8 & 9) Barraba routes 8 & 9 are in close proximity to the
Manilla Routes.
Barraba
(1) Black Springs Travelling Stock Reserve
Located just south of Barraba, follow the road signs to the
gate where you can enter the Reserve, which has remnants
of the once vast Grassy White Box Woodland. Blossom time
brings many species of Honeyeaters.
(2) Woodsreef Reserve
This former town common is 16km east of Barraba on
Woodsreef/Bundarra Road; continue along this road
crossing over the concrete low level bridge at Ironbark Creek
up to the entry at the top of the hill through the ‘Recreation
Reserve’ gate. Vehicles other than 4WDs should check the
state of the road otherwise you can walk upstream towards
the creek and in through the small gate behind the concrete
picnic area, near the bridge.
(3) Mille Creek Travelling Stock Reserve
Head north from Barraba along the Bingara Road and
approximately 3.5kms out, the open reserve begins. You
can also walk or drive along a dirt track into Silver-leaved
Ironbark and White Box forest; Regent Honeyeaters have
been sighted here.
(4) Mille Creek Travelling Stock Reserve Site 2
Continue further north on the Bingara Road for
approximately 3km to another sign-posted route where you
enter the reserve through a gate (Gate is locked, key is
available from Tamworth Bird Watchers Inc.
(6) Little Creek Travelling Stock Reserve
Travel further along the Trevallyn Road, past the Horton
Falls turn off to the Reserve and wander along the creek
where many birds including Turquoise Parrots can be seen.
(7) Horton Falls Bird Route
Continue further west to Elembee Fibre Farm (entry by
appointment on 02 6783 1414), then onto Cut Road Creek
sign; enter lane on the left hand side and continue through
to Horton Falls. There are regular sightings of Turquoise
Parrots and Honeyeaters.
(8) Tarpoly Travelling Stock Reserve
Halfway between Barraba and Manilla there is white box
remnant woodland where Plum-headed Finches and
Whitewinged Choughs have been seen co-habiting with
immature Channel-billed Cuckoo. To access the reserve,
cross over the bridge and take an immediate right-hand turn
(coming from Barraba) into Borah Creek Road. The Reserve
begins after the grid.
(9) Borah Reserve
Continue along Tarpoly Reserve to the western end across
grids where, in approximately 7km, you will enter Borah
Reserve; at the southern end take the left-hand track down
to the creek. An abundance of bird life has been sighted in
this area such as Honeyeaters (including Regent), Common
Bronzewings, Turquoise Parrots, Little Lorrikeets and Rufous
Night Heron. Cross the grid at the western end and this is
the end of Tarpoly Reserve.
(10) Nangahrah Bird Route
National
Parks 14
A prominent area to see Regent Honeyeaters,
the route
starts 21km east of Barraba on the Bundarra Rd at

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