2 - Stevenson High School

Comments

Transcription

2 - Stevenson High School
STEVENSON
HIGH
SCHOOL
LIVONIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS
2016 - 2017
PROGRAMS OF STUDY
Office
Personnel
Stevenson High School
33500 West Six Mile Road
Livonia, MI 48152
Main Office: (734) 744-2660 • Fax: (734) 744-2662
www.livoniapublicschools.org
Gary Harper, Principal ext. 48104
Lyndy Lewis, Assistant Principal (A-G)
Business Office ext. 48113
Pete Mazzoni, Assistant Principal (H-O)
Scheduling Office ext. 48110
Ani Akaraz, Assistant Principal (P-Z)
Attendance Office ext. 48103
Guidance & Counseling
Mrs. Laurie Christenson
Mrs. Christine Gajor
Mrs. Tracey Hammaren
Mr. Jim Miller
Ms. Rochelle Noel
Mrs. Angela Wojtyniak
Ms. Lori Wozniak
Stevenson
High School
Table of Contents
Table of
Contents
Stevenson
High School
Introduction to Students and Parents ............................................................. 1
Foreword ........................................................................................................ 2
Planning Your High School Program ............................................................. 3
Choosing Your Career Pathway ..................................................................... 5
District Policies & Procedures ...................................................................... 11
Program Selection & Scheduling ................................................................. 12
Graduation Requirements ........................................................................... 13
Development Plan ........................................................................................ 14
High School 7th Hour Option ....................................................................... 15
Visual Performing and Applied Arts Courses ............................................... 16
Mathematics or Math-Related Courses…………………..…………….………17
Standardized Student Assessment .............................................................. 18
College Preparation Information ................................................................. 19
Secondary Guidance Program ..................................................................... 20
College Admissions Requirements .............................................................. 21
NCAA Eligibility ............................................................................................ 22
High School Guidelines Testing Out of Courses .......................................... 26
Michigan State Aid Law………………………………………………………..…27
Grading System Honor's Courses & Honor Roll........................................... 28
Dual Enrollment at Post-Secondary Institutions ........................................... 29
Opportunities for Career Technical Education ............................................ 31
Independent Study ....................................................................................... 32
Requests for Schedule Changes ................................................................. 32
Alternative School Programs........................................................................ 33
Student Activities ......................................................................................... 34
Courses & Departments ............................................................................... 36
Interdepartmental Programs ........................................................................ 37
Intern Programs……………………………...…………………..……………….37
Art ................................................................................................................ 39
Business ...................................................................................................... 41
Family and Consumer Sciences .................................................................. 44
Global Education .......................................................................................... 46
Health and Physical Education .................................................................... 48
Industrial Technology ................................................................................... 51
International Baccalaureate Program .......................................................... 53
Language Arts .............................................................................................. 55
LMC (Learning Materials)............................................................................. 59
Mathematics ................................................................................................. 60
MSC (Math/Science/Computers)………...…………...……………….………...63
Music............................................................................................................ 64
Science ........................................................................................................ 66
Social Studies .............................................................................................. 70
Special Education ........................................................................................ 72
World Languages ......................................................................................... 73
Career Technical Education .........................................................Blue Section
Course Request Sheets ..................................................................Last Page
Introduction to Students and Parents
Introduction to
Students and
Parents
Greetings to our LPS Students & Parents:
A high quality, comprehensive high school offers a wide selection of courses, which are designed to
challenge all levels of ability and interest. For those students with well-defined career objectives, the
Livonia Public School District offers an additional programming sequence of skill courses through the
expanded services of the Livonia Career Technical Center. The elective program at each school also
affords opportunities to explore new activities and academic disciplines.
It is our hope that the PROGRAMS OF STUDY will help students and parents plan a program which is
appropriate to the unique needs of each individual. The decisions that are made concerning the courses a student will pursue are extremely important and, as such, our counselors and teachers are eager
and available to help in any way possible. If you have questions or desire assistance, we encourage
you to talk with your counselor or teacher.
It is our sincere hope that your PROGRAMS OF STUDY will prove to be beneficial to you now and in
the future. As such, we are dedicated to the premise that we shall do everything in our power to provide
educational opportunities of the highest quality for every student in our schools. We wish you much
success!
Sincerely,
Andrea L. Oquist
Superintendent
Livonia Public Schools
Our Mission…
To educate, challenge, and inspire every student to achieve personal success
and become a confident contributor to society.
Stevenson
High School
1
FOREWORD
Foreword
Stevenson High School is committed to provide a unified, articulated, and rigorous curriculum for
all students in grades 9 - 12. As part of Livonia Public Schools, a Career Pathways district,
Stevenson High School is also committed to help students set up and review an Educational
Development Plan (EDP) during each of their high school years.
The Programs of Study booklet has been revised to incorporate Career Pathways, implementing
a greater focus on career awareness and planning into students four year planning process. This
Programs of Study booklet encompasses both the career components and class selections in
order to help those who use it develop a more focused Educational Development Plan (EDP) for
students.
Considerable thought should be given to the EDP that each student develops. Classes should be
selected because they meet the requirements of the goal that each student has selected. Some
classes are considered essential for college, others for mastery of job skills, and still others for
personal growth and enrichment. With the large number of classes available to students, careful
structuring of the EDP is important in order to incorporate all elements necessary for student
success. Students should discuss their course interests with counselors, teachers, and parents.
They should ask questions and make sure that their selections meet their needs. Finally, once
they have determined their EDP, students need to put forth the time and effort that will promote
their success.
In addition to the rigorous academic component of our school, we also offer an array of athletic
and co-curricular opportunities. The Athletic Director and Student Activities Director are the best
source of information in these areas.
Finally, Stevenson High School provides support services to help students be successful in
school. Among the services available to students are transition support, counseling services,
career guidance, study skills, attendance support, substance abuse support, school social
workers, school psychologist, student assistance coordinator, police liaison officer, special
education programs, bilingual education, and media services.
Charting a path through high school leading to success after graduation is critically important to
each student and should be approached with utmost care. Thus, it is important to keep this
material for future reference. Be aware that because material is provided early in the prior school
year, some changes in procedure, policy, or course offerings may occur.
Stevenson
High School
2
To Students and
Parents
Planning Your High School Program
Planning a four-year high school program is a serious undertaking. Although many of your courses will be
determined by the graduation plan you select, you will still have many other choices to make during your
years of school. The courses you select will be guided largely by your goals for the future.




Will you continue your education in college or in a trade or vocational school?
Do you want to learn a career skill in order to enter the full-time work force immediately after school?
Are you interested in a technical field?
Are you thinking of entering a professional field that requires many years of specialized education?
The answers to these questions are extremely important for making decisions about your course selections
for all four years in high school. Your interests and abilities should also guide those answers.
Some students are sure of their future plans; others are not. It is also common for young people to change
their minds about which career to choose. For this reason, it is important for you to plan as challenging a
program as you can; if your career plans should change, then it will not be as difficult to move into another
program. While it may sometimes seem tempting to schedule a less-demanding combination of courses,
choosing courses that meet your needs or interests is the best way to prepare for your future.
Stevenson High School offers you many ways to prepare for a productive adult life—to make certain that
you can control your future. Stevenson High School provides a wide range of programs that prepare
students for post-high school experience: college, business school, vocational-technical school, military
service, fine arts participation, full-time employment, and other areas. The programs offered allow a student
to choose the program to best meet future needs.
Career Pathways is an important element to the development of high school courses and preparing for a
student's future. Courses listed on a student's EDP should be an integration of a student's future path as
aligned by Career Pathways and the graduation requirements. The Career Section of the guide explains
future career options in terms of a student's interest areas and suggests courses and activities that will help
you arrive at your goal in life.
Next are sections on various topics including student assessment, college entrance requirements,
Stevenson's Comprehensive Guidance Program, NCAA, and other important school information.
Following that are descriptions of all courses offered with accompanying information about prerequisites
and grade level placement.
Stevenson
High School
We strongly urge you to give the attention to planning for high school that its importance deserves.
By planning wisely, you can create the future that is most appropriate for you.
3
WHAT IS A CAREER PATHWAY?
Career Pathways are clusters of related occupations that require different levels of education and training. People working in a career path share similar
interests, abilities, and talents. Career paths help students identify a career focus without being locked into a specific occupation. By exploring career
paths, students expand future choices. They develop an understanding that all paths are important—all of them necessary to keep a community going.
The Six Career Pathways
Arts & Communications
Health Sciences
Careers related to humanities and the performing,
visual, literary, and media arts
Careers related to the promotion of health as well as
the treatment of injuries, conditions, and diseases
Business, Management, Marketing, &
Technology
Human Services
Careers in child care, civil service, education,
hospitality, and the social services
Careers related to all aspects of business including
accounting, business administration, finance,
information processing, and marketing.
Engineering/Manufacturing & Industrial
Technology
Natural Resources & Agriscience
Careers related to natural resources, agriculture, and
the environment
Careers related to technologies necessary to design,
develop, install, or maintain physical systems.
4
Choosing Your
Career Pathway
Importance of Career Planning
Foundation Skills
The four years of high school from the 9th to 12th
grades can be an exciting and rewarding time for students. Preparing for life after Stevenson or career
preparation and planning is a very important component of each student's high school program. This planning involves a great deal of time, thought, researching and decision making as each student matures.
There are many factors that determine success in high
school. It is important for students to have a focus so
they can make the most of the opportunities that lie
before them. Parents, counselors, and teachers play
key roles in guiding students through the many challenges that they encounter. It is important to plan early, often, and establish goals.
Component workers in the high-performance
workplace need:
Choosing a Career Pathway:
A Personalized Education Plan
Participation in a well-organized, well-planned career
development component, which includes the concepts
of Career Pathways, directly affects both readiness for
employment and actual employability success. Students' performance in school improves, involvement in
school and community activities expands, decisionmaking skills strengthen, career preparation advances, and flexibility for meeting change increases. In
addition, students who continue formal education beyond high school have a clear direction and a better
understanding as to why they are pursuing postsecondary education and training options. There is an
understanding that learning is lifelong. The state of
Michigan has developed a six-career pathway program. Every occupation within the world of work would
fall within one of the six pathways identified by the
state of Michigan:
Stevenson
High School
• Arts & Communications
• Business Management, Marketing, &
Technology
• Engineering, Manufacturing, & Industrial Tech.
• Health Services
• Human Services
• Natural Resources & Agriscience
5
Basic Skills:
Reading, writing, arithmetic, speaking, and
listening.
Thinking Skills:
The ability to: learn, reason, think creatively,
make decisions, and solve problems.
Personal Qualities:
Individual responsibility, self-esteem,
self-management, sociability, and integrity.
Workplace Competencies
Personal Qualities:
Know how to allocate time, money, materials,
space, and staff.
Interpersonal Skills:
Can work on teams, teach others, serve
customers,
lead, and work well with people from culturally
diverse backgrounds.
Information:
Can acquire and evaluate data; interpret and
communicate; and use computers to process
information.
Systems:
Can understand social, organizational, and
technological systems; monitor and correct
performance;
and design or improve systems.
Technology:
Can select equipment and tools, apply
technology to specific tasks, and maintain and
troubleshoot equipment.
The skills and competencies described on this page
clearly show that students should plan a rigorous
high school program that will provide the foundation
for continued learning beyond high school.
Career
Exploration
Career Exploration
Career Pathways were created by the state of Michigan to provide educators and students with direction in
choosing experiences and course work aligned with future goals. Stevenson High School guides students
to develop their plans for the future during their high school years. An instrument we use to help us do this,
Career Cruising, is a web-based program that assesses career interests, matches those to particular
careers, and searches colleges offering those majors. This resource can be accessed at home and
provides an additional source for parent to research careers and schools with their child.
Direction to Use Career Cruising
• Go to careercruising.com
Type in the user name "stevenson" and password "spartans"
• Click on Start Cruising
• Go to any desired feature
Features of Career Cruising
Matchmaker:
Asks students to take skill and interest inventories to assess
the careers best suited to them.
Careers:
Allows students to research particular careers looking at job
descriptions, salaries, education, and job market.
Schools:
A database listing colleges and universities across the country
is available. Searches can be conducted by academic programs, career pathways, and student career assessment outcomes.
EDP (Educational
Development Plan):
Stevenson
High School
This helps students create their educational plan, build a
resume, conduct college searches, and saves all of their
research.
Throughout the middle and high school, students will have access to career cruising and will create and
save their own file, called their EDP. This can then be assessed, added to, and further explored by parents from home.
6
BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT, MARKETING, &
TECHNOLOGY
ARTS & COMMUNICATIONS
Careers in this pathway are related to communication and the
performing, visual, literary, and media arts. These careers are interesting
to people who value creativity, music, and/or self-expression.
CAREERS
Careers in this pathway are related to business operations including
financial operations, office operations, planning and management
activities, information processing, and marketing. These jobs are
interesting to people who enjoy implementing ideas, providing
leadership, and working on team projects.
SAMPLE CAREERS
SAMPLE CAREERS
On-The-Job Training/
High School Diploma
Actor/Actress
Cartoonist
Compositor
Desktop Publisher
Disk Jockey
Floral Designer
Fashion Model
Hair Stylist
Musician/Composer
Sign Painter
Certificate or
Associate Degree
Advertising Agent
Artist
Camera Operator
Commercial Artist
Digital Assembler
Fashion Designer
Graphic Designer
Jeweler
Photographer
Stage Technician
Bachelor's Degree
or Above
On-The-Job Training/
High School Diploma
Actor
Advertising Designer
Author
Commercial Artist
Editor
Journalist
Language Interpreter
Musical Therapist
Scientific Illustrator
TV Production Director
Bank Teller
Bookkeeper
Clerical Staff
Data Entry Clerk
Food Service Worker
Hotel Clerk
Insurance Agent
Retail Salesperson
Travel Agent
RELATED ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS
Art Fundamentals
Art Techniques, Advanced
Business Tech Mgmt.
Composition Courses
Creative Textile Design
Drawing
Geometry
Instrumental Music/Band
Interior Design
Literature Courses
Marketing Courses
Music Appreciation
Music Theory
Painting
Photography
Psychology
Sculpture and Clay
Sociology
Speech-Related Courses
Technology
Vocal Music
Woods
World Language
CHS
CAPA Dance
CAPA Music
CAPA Theater
Certificate or
Associate Degree
Administrative Assistant
Bookkeeper/Auditing Clerk
Building Manager
Court Reporter
Estimator
Financial Manager
General Bookkeeper
Hotel Manager
Bachelor's Degree
or Above
Accountant
Actuary
Administrative
Budget Analyst
Loan Officer
Marketing/Public
Real Estate Manager
Relations Director
Secretary
RELATED ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS
Art
Business Technology Mngt.
Composition Courses
Economics
Food and Nutrition
Humanities
International Relations
Law and Society
Marketing 2
Writing for Publication
FHS
IB Program
LCTC
Architectural Technology
Business Careers
Digital Imaging
Engineering Technology
Fashion Merchand. 1,2
Website Design
Literature Courses
Marketing/Sales
Psychology
Sociology
Speech-Related Courses
Sports/Entertainment Mktg.
Statistics
World Language
CHS
Literature Appreciation
Writing for Business
SHS
Global Education
7
FHS
IB Program
LCTC
Digital Imaging
Network Administration
Website Design
SHS
Global Education
ENGINEERING/MANUFACTURING &
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY
HEALTH SERVICES
Careers in this pathway are related to technologies necessary to design,
develop, install, or maintain physical systems. Working with tools,
equipment, and other kinds of machinery is important to people who
have careers in this pathway.
Careers in this pathway are related to the promotion of health as well as
the treatment of injuries and diseases.
SAMPLE CAREERS
SAMPLE CAREERS
On-The-Job Training/
High School Diploma
Auto Body Technician
Carpenter
Climate Control Mechanic
Custodian
Drafter
Machine Tool Setter
Security Systems Installer
Certificate or
Associate Degree
Auto Repair Technician
Building Construction Tech
Chemical Technician
Computer-Aided Designer
Heating/AC Worker
Industrial Electronics Tech.
Pipe Fitter
Bachelor's Degree
or Above
On-The-Job Training/
High School Diploma
Architect
Automotive Engineer
Chemical Engineer
Computer Analyst
Computer Programmer
Mechanical Engineer
Surveyor
Admitting Clerk
Clinical Assistant
Dental Assistant
Dietary Aide
Home Health Aide
Medical Office Clerk
Orderly
RELATED ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS
Architect/Mechanic CAD
Automotive Maintenance
Broadcast Communications
Business Tech Mngt
Calculus
Chemistry
Composition Courses
Drafting
Geometry
Marketing 2
Interior Design
Managing Your Money
Marketing
Photography
Physical Education
Physics
Pre-Calculus & Trigonometry
Psychology
Small Engine
Statistics
Woods
Certificate or
Associate Degree
Dental Lab Technician
Emergency Medical Tech.
Industrial Hygienist
Licensed Practical Nurse
Medical Technician
Occupational Therapy
Assistant
Bachelor's Degree
or Above
Chemist
Chiropractor
Dentist/Physician
Nuclear Med. Technician
Pharmacist
Physical Therapist
Veterinarian
RELATED ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS
Biology
Business Tech Mngt
Calculus
Chemistry
Child Care Professional 1, 2
Child Development
Composition Courses
Family & Consumer Science
Food and Nutrition
FHS
Hydrology
IB Program
LCTC
Architectural Technology
Auto Technology 1,2
Building Trades
Engineering Technology
Home Construction
Network Administration
Web Site Design
8
Parenting
Personal Living
Physical Education Courses
Physics
Pre-Calculus & Trigonometry
Psychology
Sociology
Speech-Related Courses
Weight Training
Whole Self Fitness
FHS
IB Program
LCTC
Health Occupations
Medical Assistant
Sports Medicine
HUMAN SERVICES
NATURAL RESOURCES & AGRISCIENCE
Careers in this pathway include interacting with people, helping solve
problems, speaking in front of groups of people, and serving the public.
Careers in this pathway include working outdoors with plants, animals,
and the environment in all types of weather.
SAMPLE CAREERS
SAMPLE CAREERS
On-The-Job Training/
High School Diploma
Beauty Consultant
Chef/Cook
Child Care Provider
Clergy
Corrections Officer
Fire Fighter
Fitness Consultant
Flight Attendant
Food Service Worker
Certificate or
Associate Degree
Civil Service Worker
Coach
Cosmetologist/Manager
Crime Laboratory Technician
Culinary Arts/Chef
Hospitality Worker
Legal Assistant
Police Officer
Bachelor's Degree
or Above
On-The-Job Training/
High School Diploma
Anthropologist
Criminologist
Lawyer
Librarian
Psychologist
Social Worker
Sociologist
Teacher
Security Administrator
Animal Caretaker
Farm Worker
Florist
Fruit and Vegetable Farmer
Landscaper
Pest Controller
Recreation Worker
Retail Floral Salesperson
Veterinary Assistant
RELATED ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS
Biology
Chemistry
Child Care Professional 1, 2
Child Development
Composition Courses
Economics
Family & Consumer
Science Skills
Family Living
Foods and Nutrition
Instructional Materials/LMC
Law and Society
Managing Your Money
Parenting
Personal Living
Physical Education Courses
Psychology
Sociology
Speech-Related Courses
Sports 1,2
Statistics
World Languages
Certificate or
Associate Degree
Farm Manager
Fish and Game Warden
Florist
Forestry Technician
Golf Course Manager
Horticulturist
Landscape Design Assistant
Nursery Worker
Retail Floral Salesperson
Bachelor's Degree
or Above
Agricultural Engineer
Botanist
Conservation Officer
Ecologist
Farm Manager
Geologist
Landscape Architect
Naturalist
Park Ranger
RELATED ELECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS
Biology
Chemistry
Composition Courses
Drawing
Ecology
Economics
Foods and Nutrition
FHS
IB Program
LCTC
Criminal Justice
Graphic Design
Hospitality Mgnt. 1,2
Fashion Merch. 1,2
Sports Medicine
9
Genetics
Geometry
Global Education
Managing Your Money
Marketing
Photography
Physics
Psychology
Small Engines
FHS
Hydrology
IB Program
This page intentionally left blank.
10
District Policies
& Procedures
District Policies and Procedures
Stevenson High School
Livonia Public Schools
2016-2017
Stevenson
High School
11
District Policies
& Procedures
Program Selection & Scheduling
Program selection and scheduling is a team effort between teachers, counselors, and parents for students at Stevenson High School. Counselors begin the process by providing information, suggestions,
and materials. Students then review their goals and, with parental help, discuss their Educational Development Plan (EDP).
Throughout the year, counselors meet with each student to review the EDP, guiding the student to
courses that will help to meet the Career Pathway they have chosen. As part of this EDP development,
counselors use student assessment results, career development activities, and graduation requirements
to guide each student's educational development plan. School courses are then chosen on the "Course
Selection Sheet" which is reviewed, signed by parents, and returned to the counselor.
Each year, the student's EDP is carefully reviewed, noting that as a student matures, his/her Career
Pathway may change. Appropriate changes in course selection are made to realign the student's program with his/her goal.
Teachers are an excellent source of help with course selection. Their experience with the student enables him/her to identify the student's abilities and achievements, which then helps in selecting the appropriate class. Teacher's opinions will help the student to develop a realistic and workable EDP.
Counselors are responsible for guiding each student toward developing a strong EDP that supports his/
her Career Pathway. Counselors will ensure that the student's plan satisfies the requirements for graduation and is appropriate for meeting needs for the future. Guidance is an ongoing process from 9 - 12th
grade, and the counselor will review and revise each students plan as he grows and matures.
All Stevenson students complete class selection process in the spring for the following school year.
Class selection is dependent upon grade level, recommendation, and availability. Elective choices increase in number as the student progresses through his/her high school years.
Students are given the opportunity to explore class options. Class selection materials are distributed by
the Counseling Department.
Stevenson
High School
12
Graduation Requirements
District Policies
& Procedures
A minimum of eighteen (18) units of credit must be earned in the
following areas:
A.
Language Arts (Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12).....................4.0 units
 1 unit Language Arts 9
 1 unit Language Arts 10
 1 unit - 0.5 Composition and 0.5 Literature
 1 unit - Choice of 12th Grade Language Arts Classes
B.
Mathematics …............................................................... 4.0 units
 4 units of mathematics which must include at least
Geometry, Algebra I and Algebra II (or an equivalent) with a
math or math-related class in the final year.
C.
Science ........................................................................... 3.0 units
 1 unit Biology
 1 unit Chemistry
 1 unit Physics/Physical Science or completes a CTE Program
D.
Social Studies..................................................................3.0 units
 1 unit World History
 1 unit U.S. History
 00.5 unit American Government
 00.5 unit Economics
E.
Physical Education........................................................1.0 unit
 00.5 unit Personal Fitness
 00.5 unit Health
F.
Visual, Performing, and/or Applied Arts ......................1.0 unit
G.
World Languages .......................................................... 2.0 units
 2 units of the same World Language, or
 1 unit of the same World Language and completes Career and
Technical Education (CTE) Program, or
 1 unit of the same World Language and 1 unit of VPAA in
addition to required VPAA credit
TOTAL ............................................................................................ 18 units
Electives:
5 units of credit of the 23 required for graduation may be electives.
Stevenson
High School
A Personal Curriculum Plan may be developed for a student in which graduation
requirements are modified in accordance with the state mandated Michigan Merit
Curriculum. For example, the VPAA requirement can be modified through a
Personal Curriculum Plan for a student who takes additional credit(s) beyond the
required English Language Arts, Math, Science, or World Language or if the student
completes a CTE Program.
More information and clarification on a Personal Curriculum Plan can be provided by
high school counselors.
13
Online Learning Experience:
Students are required to experience
twenty (20) hours of online learning. The
requirement will be met through online
experiences provided in high school core
required courses.
Class Standing
Annually, student credits are evaluated
to determine a student's grade level
placement. The following is a minimum
number of credits a student must have
earned to achieve a particular grade
level.
Standing
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Credits
5.0
11.0
17.0
REQUIRED TESTING
As a requirement for graduation, a high
school student must participate in all
state or federal academic testing
programs which the School District is
required to administer, unless otherwise
indicated in an Individualized Education
Program (IEP), a Section 504 Plan, or
similar program of services. A high
school student's failure to meet this
requirement will render him/her ineligible
for a high school diploma, and will
preclude that student's participation in
graduation commencement exercises.
Any deviation from this requirement must
be approved by the Superintendent or
his/her designee.
STEVENSON
Name _____________________________________________
EDP
Student ID #: __________________ Grade: __________
Date: _________________
(Please print last name, first name)
Graduation Year _________________
Career Pathways:
1. ______________________________________________
2. ______________________________________________
Possible occupations/careers from my selected pathway:
1. ______________________________________________
SHS 9th Grade Electives
Art
1500 2500
2501
1505 2505
1516 2516
1521 2521
1538 2538
Fund of Art
Painting
Drawing
Sculpture/Clay
Jewelry
Photography
Business Ed
1590 2590
2591
Bus Tech Mngmt
Adv Bus Tech Mgt
Family & Consumer Science
1604 2604
Sewing 1
2605
Sewing 2
1608 2608
Creative Design
1610 2610
Foods 1
2611
Foods 2
1615 2615
Personal Living
2617
Interior Design
Orientation
1825
Orientation
Industrial Technology
1660 2660
Small Engine
1634 2634
Intro Drafting
1645 2645
Design Tech
1652 2652
Intro Woods
2653
Adv. Woods
Music
1732 2732
1734 2734
1737 2737
1740 2740
1742 2742
Physical Education
1464 2464
Personal Fitness
2470
Sports 1
2471
Sports 2
2472
Weights 1
1477 2477
Gymnastics
1492
7th Hr Personal Fit
World Language
1250 2250
French 1
1252 2252
French 2
1262 2262
German 1
1264 2264
German 2
1270 2270
Japanese 1
1276 2276
Spanish 1
1278 2278
Spanish 2
1298 2298
7th Hr Spanish 2
Concert Band
Symphony Band
Orchestra
Singing Spartans
Girls’ Chorus
2. ______________________________________________
Grade 9
First Semester
Grade 11
Grade 10
Second Semester
First Semester
Second Semester
First Semester
Grade 12
Second Semester
First Semester
Second Semester
 Acc. English Language Arts 9
 Accelerated English Language Arts 10
 Accelerated English Language Arts 11
 AP English Literature and Composition
 1101/2101 English Language Arts 9
 English Language Arts 10
 Reality Lit
 General Comp.
 Global Education English 4
 1103/2103 English Language Arts 9B
 English Language Arts 10B
 World Views
 Composition
 1120/2120 Global Education English 9
 Global Education English 2
 Visionary Lit
 Adv. Comp.
Elective:
 Global Education English 3
 Humanities
 Conflict & Compromise
 Leadership & Lit
Elective:
 Humanities II
 Research Contemp. Issues
 Media Literacy
 Accelerated Algebra 2
 Accelerated Analysis
 AP Calculus AB
 Math Elective
 Accelerated Geometry
 Accelerated Algebra 2
 Accelerated Analysis
 AP Calculus AB
 1324/2324
Geometry
 Algebra 1
 Algebra
 Precalculus
 1343/2343
Geometry B
 Algebra 1B
 1366/2366
Advanced Biology
 Advanced Chemistry
 Advanced Physics
 AP Elective
 Astronomy
 1365/2365
Biology
 Chemistry
 Physics
 Genetics
 Bioethics
 1364/2364
Biology B
 Chemistry B
 Physical Science
 Natural Disasters
 Ecology
 Accelerated World History
 AP United States History

 1403/2403
World History
 U.S. History
 Government
 Economics
 1402/2402
World History B
 U.S. History B
 Government B
 Economics B
 1121/2121
Global Ed. World History
 Global Education American History
 Global Education Government/Economics
Elective:
Elective:
Elective:
or
 Algebra 2
or  Precalculus
or
Calculus
 Algebra 2B
Elective:
AP U.S. Government
 AP Macroeconomics
Elective:
 Sociology
 Psychology
 General Psychology
Elective:
 Law and Justice
 International Relations
 AP Psychology
 AP Microeconomics
 Global Education International Relations
Elective:
Elective:
Elective:
Elective:
Elective:
Elective:
Elective:
Elective:
7th Hour:
Required Electives:
Personal Fitness: 0.5 Credit
Health: 0.5 Credit
World Language: 2.0 Credits
 Student has been made aware of the Livonia Career Technical Center programs leading to career options. Some classes at the LCTC may be used to meet the Math, Health, and VPAA requirements.
____________________________________________________
 Student Signature 
__________________________________________________________
 Counselor Signature 
____________________________________________________________
 Parent Signature 
The Livonia Public Schools School District prohibits unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, handicap, or disability in any of its educational programs or activities.
14
The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Director of Human Resources, 15125 Farmington Road, Livonia, MI 48154. (734) 744-2500
High School
7th Hour Option
High School 7th Hour Option
The current high school day consists of six class periods. Beginning with the 2008-09 school
year, students have been offered the opportunity to take an additional class during 7th hour. The
7th hour option is not a precursor to graduating early from Livonia Public Schools. District policy
requires that all students have a minimum of eight semesters of course work. Rather, this option
is being provided to students who may wish to take advantage of electives which may otherwise
not be available to them in the normal sequence of classes.
Personal Fitness is typically offered during the second semester to all students.
Government is typically offered during the first semester to students in grades 11 and 12.
Health is typically offered during the first semester to students in grades 10-12.
Economics is typically offered during the second semester to students in grades 11 and 12.
Spanish 2 is a year long course for students who have successfully completed Spanish 1.
These courses will also be offered during the normal school day.
Students who take advantage of this opportunity must be enrolled in seven classes throughout
the given semester. Please be aware that the start times for after-school activities will not be altered and transportation will not be provided at the end of the seventh hour.
Stevenson
High School
15
Visual
Performing &
Applied Arts
Courses
Visual Performing and Applied Arts Courses
A student needs to have completed at least 1.0 unit of credit in this area to graduate.
Art
Core Content
Music
Advanced Art Technique
Fundamentals of Art
Drawing
Advanced Drawing
Jewelry
Advanced Jewelry
Painting
Advanced Painting
Photography
Advanced Photography
Sculpture and Clay
Advanced Sculpture and Clay
Radio and TV
Advanced Radio and TV
Drama
Advanced Drama
Writing for Publication
Yearbook
Concert Band
Symphony Band
Wind Ensemble
Orchestra
Singing Spartans
Select Girls Chorus
Symphonic Choir
Business
Business Tech Management
Adv Business Tech Management
E-Commerce & Social Media Mgt
Marketing 1
Marketing 2
Marketing 3
Project Design Management
Sports & Entertaining Marketing
Family and
Consumer Science
Sewing 1
Sewing 2
Open Sewing
Creative Design
Foods 1
Foods 2
Foods 3
Interior Design
Industrial
Technology
Introduction to Drafting
Architectural Drafting
Mechanical Drafting
Introduction to Woods
Advanced Woods
Small Engines
Stevenson
High School
16
LCTC
Hospitality Management 1
Hospitality Management 2
Graphic Design 1
Graphic Design 2
Website Design & Interactive Media 1
Website Design & Interactive Media 2
Fashion Merchandising 1
Fashion Merchandising 2
Architecture Design
Engineering Design
Mobile Applications/Game Development
Building Trades
Residential Construction
Mathematics or
Math-Related
Courses
Mathematics or Math-Related Courses
Students are required to have a mathematics or math-related class in their final year of high
school.
Math Courses
Math-Related Courses
Algebra 2B
Precalculus with Trigonometry
Calculus
AP Calculus AB
Trigonometric Explorations
Statistics
MSC Advanced Topics (CHS only)
IB Math SL (FHS only)
IB Math Studies SL (FHS only)
Stevenson
High School
Marketing I
Marketing II
Sports & Entertainment Marketing
Marketing III – School Store
Business Tech Management
Adv Business Tech Management
Ecommerce & Social Media Mgt
Project Design Management
Small Business Accounting
Managing Your Money
AP Physics C:Mechanical
AP Chemistry
(0.5)
(0.5)
(1.0)
(1.0)
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.5)
All Livonia Career Technical Center programs and the Hospitality Management program
(held at Franklin High School) meet the high school graduation requirement for Senior Math Related.
Students must be in their fourth or senior year of high school to meet this requirement.
17
Standardized
Student
Assessment
Standardized Student Assessment
Important tests are given throughout the year. Please check in the Guidance Office or in the Career Information
Center (CIC) for specific dates, times, locations, and costs of the tests you are interested in. Students with specific
questions should meet with their counselors. Juniors and seniors are encouraged to visit the Career Information Center (CIC) for college and scholarship information.
PSAT/NMSQT
AP Exams (Advanced Placement Exams)
(Preliminary SAT/
National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test)
Target: College-bound 11th graders
When: A Saturday morning in October
Where: Stevenson High School
Purpose: National Merit Scholarship competition qualifier
Fee:
Nominal charge is established by the
College Board,
MME
When:
Determined by the College Board, usually in
May
Where: Stevenson High School during the school day
Fee:
Costs are established by the College Board
Sign up: Pay for test in advance in Guidance Office,
usually in February
SAT/ACT Tests
(Michigan Merit Exam)
Target: All 11th grade students
When: Spring of junior year. Dates are determined
by State of Michigan
Fee:
None
Testing: SAT plus Writing, ACT Workeys, Michigan
Components: Science, Social Studies
Details: Taken at Stevenson High School. Taking
this exam is a graduation Requirement. Visit
www.collegeboard.org
and
www.michigan.gov/mde for more info.
Stevenson
High School
18
(SAT Reasoning Test/American College Test)
When: Throughout the year at neighboring schools
Register: Packets are available on line at www.act.org
or www.collegeboard.org
Fee:
It is imperative to remember that tests must
be signed up and paid for well in advance of
test date directly to the testing company
Purpose: College entrance exams
Code #: High school code number for identification
purposes on ACT/SAT is #232-358
College
Preparation
Information
College Preparation Information
Minimum course requirements necessary for college admission vary from college to college depending upon the
program and the degree a student may be interested in pursuing. Admission standards vary by universities and
programs. To determine specific requirements, parents are urged to contact the high school Guidance Office or
the Admissions Office of the college or university of their choice.
Colleges and universities are giving increased attention to the following factors in considering students for
admission:
1. A high school diploma from an accredited high school.
2. Grades obtained in academic subjects.
3. High school grade-point average.
4. Trend of grades.
5. Level of difficulty of classes taken.
6. SAT and/or ACT scores.
7. Extracurricular activities.
Generally, minimum course requirements for college admission include certain sequences in the five academic
areas: English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and World Languages. Some technical schools require
an emphasis in science and mathematics.
The current graduation requirements are in line with the recommended college preparatory program.
College Visitation Policy
College admissions representatives visit SHS primarily in the fall. Occasionally a college representative will visit in
the spring. Juniors and seniors are encouraged to meet with them. To attend these valuable sessions, students are
required to sign up ahead of time in the Counseling Center. An up-to-date schedule is available on line on the
Guidance and Counseling web page: http://stevenson.livoniapublicschools.org/guidance
Helpful Websites
Stevenson
High School
College Planning and Searches ……………………..www.collegeboard.com
Career Exploration with Career Cruising................. www.careercruising.com
College Scholarship Searches .......................................... www.fastweb.com
Financial Aid Resources..................................................... www.fafsa.ed.gov
Occupations and Training Search ...................................... www.bls.gov/oco/
Researching Colleges ................................. www.michigancollegeguide.com
SHS Guidance Page ...... http://stevenson.livoniapublicschools.org/guidance
19
Secondary
Guidance
Program
Stevenson High School Guidance and Counseling Program
Mission Statement: All students will acquire and demonstrate competencies in career planning and
exploration, knowledge of self and others, and educational/career-technical development as they learn to
live, work, and learn over their lifetime.
Our program adheres to both the National Standards for School Counseling Programs and the Michigan
Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Program. The Standards are based on providing success
through activities designed to ensure students' academic, career, and personal/social development.
COUNSELORS
Mrs. Laurie Christensen, Chair
Mrs. Christine Gajor
Mrs. Tracey Hammaren
Mr. Dennis Hinze
Mr. Jim Miller
Ms. Rochelle Noel
Mrs. Angela Wojtyniak
Ms. Lori Wozniak
The Guidance and Counseling Program is composed of four program components.
•
Assist with learning activities in large groups.
•
Individual planning of academic, personal and career development.
•
Responsive services to meet immediate student needs.
•
Systems support to enhance the total guidance and counseling program.
The Guidance Curriculum is divided into three areas:
•
Career planning and exploration
•
Knowledge of self and others
•
Educational development
At Stevenson, activities that involve assessing, scheduling, planning, experiencing and looking ahead
reinforce all parts of the curriculum throughout the student's four-year period. The activities are individualized, in small and large groups, and online. A myriad of opportunities exists for students to experience
different venues.
The Stevenson High School Guidance and Counseling Program is structured with each counselor assigned
to a portion of the alphabet, serving students in all four grade levels
Stevenson
High School
Parents are encouraged to contact the Guidance and Counseling Office for more information or assistance
at (734)744-2660 ext. 48150.
20
College Admission Requirements
State Universities of Michigan
Central Michigan University
Eastern Michigan University
Ferris State University
Grand Valley State University
Lake Superior State University
Michigan State University
Michigan Technological University
Northern Michigan University
Oakland University
Saginaw Valley State University
The University of Michigan – Ann Arbor
The University of Michigan – Dearborn
The University of Michigan – Flint
Wayne State University
Western Michigan University
President's Council
UNIVERSITY ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Prospective students are also encouraged to complete courses in the
following areas:
• Foreign language - 3 years strongly recommended
• Fine and performing arts - 2 years strongly
recommended
• Computer literacy - 1 year of hands-on experience in using
computers strongly recommended
The state universities of Michigan have adopted specific requirements
for students who graduate from high school and who wish to enter any
of the 15 public universities. The new statement is an outgrowth of an
initiative begun over six years ago to improve academic preparation of
students seeking admission to a state university.
The state universities have agreed that to be eligible for regular
admission to a four-year degree program, a high school student must
successfully complete the following course requirements:
The universities recognize that, for a variety of reasons, some students
may not be able to complete all of the requirements. In such circumstances, students may still be considered for admission and, therefore,
are encouraged to apply to the university of their choice. In all instances,
each university has final authority for admissions decisions based on the
level of achievement required and other indicators of potential for academic success.
• English - 4 years required
• Mathematics - 4 years required, including
Intermediate Algebra
Students are encouraged to make the best use of courses that are offered at their high school. By doing so, they are more likely to develop
the competencies and skills that are essential for academic success
and, at the same time, have greater control over their choice of college
and career options.
• Biological/Physical Sciences - 3 years required;
– 1 year of biological science and
– 1 year of physical science
– At least 1 year of a laboratory course is also strongly
recommended
• History and Social Sciences - 3 years required;
1 year of American History, 1 year of World History,
1 semester of American Govt. and 1 semester of Econ required
21
NCAA Eligibility
Stevenson
High School
22
23
NCAA Eligibility
Stevenson
High School
24
25
High School
Guidelines
Testing Out of
Courses
In accordance with Michigan law, 380,1278(a)(4)(c), a student will receive credit for a Michigan
Merit Curriculum course in which the student earns a qualifying score, as determined by the
school district, on 1 or more assessments developed or selected by the district that measure a
student's understanding of the subject area content expectations or guidelines that apply to the
credit.
The qualifying score established by the district is eighty percent. Students who successfully test
out of a course will have the course listed on the student's transcript with a grade of "S" for
satisfactory. The course(s) will be applied toward fulfillment of the graduation requirement, but
will not be applied toward the total number of credits needed for graduation and will not be
included in the computation of the student's grade point average.
The testing administration schedule is established during the first semester of each school year.
Test outs are administered one time per year during the second semester.
Detailed information is available on the school and district website.
Stevenson
High School
26
High School
Guidelines
Testing Out of
Courses
Michigan State Aid Law
Section 1279B The board of school district shall grant high school credit in any course to a pupil
enrolled in high school, but who is not enrolled in the course, who has exhibited a reasonable
level of mastery of the subject matter of the course by attaining a grade of not less than C+ in a
final exam in the course, or if there is no final exam, by exhibiting that mastery through the basic
assessment used in the course which may consist of a portfolio, performance, paper, project, or
presentation. For the purpose of earning credit under this section, any high school pupil may
take the final examination in any course. Credit earned under this section shall be based on a
"pass" grade and shall not be included in a computation of grade point average for any purpose.
Credit earned under this section may or may not be counted toward graduation, as the board of
the school district may determine, but the board's determination shall apply equally to all such
credit for all pupils and credit earned under this section shall be counted toward fulfillment of a
requirement for a subject area course and shall be counted toward fulfillment of a requirement
as to course sequence. Once credit is earned under this section, a pupil may not receive credit
thereafter for a course lower in course sequence concerning the same subject area.
Stevenson
High School
27
Grading
System
Honors Courses
&
Honor Roll
Stevenson High School Grading
System Honors Courses & Honor Roll
The following numerical values are used in determining a
student's grade point average. The plus and minus value is
a determining factor in the student's final semester grade.
Included is the numerical value used for students enrolled in
accelerated or Advanced Placement (AP) courses. These
were approved by the Board of Education and took effect in
January 1989.
Regular Courses
A = 4.0
A- = 3.667
B+ = 3.333
B = 3.000
B- = 2.667
C+ = 2.333
Weighted Honors Courses
C = 2.000
C- = 1.667
D+ = 1.333
D = 1.000
D- = .667
E =0
A = 5.000
A- = 4.667
B+ = 4.333
B = 4.000
B- = 3.667
C = 3.333
C =
C- =
D+=
D =
D- =
E =
3.000
2.667
2.333
2.000
1.667
0
Accelerated and AP Courses
The list below contains the 17 accelerated and advanced
placement courses offered at Stevenson High School.
Students are enrolled in these courses based on teacher
recommendations and student test scores.
ACC English 9, 10, and 11
ACC Geometry
ACC Algebra 2
ACC Analysis
ACC World History
Stevenson
High School
AP Biology
AP Calculus AB
AP Chemistry
AP English Literature and Composition
AP Macroeconomics
AP Microeconomics
AP Physics C: Mechanical
AP Psychology
AP United States Government & Politics
AP United States History
28
Honor Roll
The honor roll at Stevenson High School is
established each marking period based on
the following criteria:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Marking period grade GPA of 30.5 or higher
No grade lower than a BNo grade of an EW (E-Withdraw from class)
No grade of an I (Incomplete)
Extra honor points are not used when determining
a student's honor roll status. The names of honor
roll recipients are posted in a showcase in the
main lobby at the end of each marking period.
Earning a Unit of Credit
Each semester, credit is awarded in one-half credit
increments for each course successfully completed. Students are required to take the equivalent of
six courses per semester. Each school year is
separated into two semesters. This makes it
possible for a student to earn six units of credit
each year if he/she completes all course work for
the traditional, six-class period school day. For
these classes, like those at the Career Technical
Center, students can earn more than one-half
credit per semester.
Additional methods for earning credit are available under certain circumstances. See your
high school counselor to learn more.
Dual Enrollment at Post-Secondary Institutions
Public Act 160 of 1996 created the Postsecondary Enrollment Options
Act, commonly referred to as dual enrollment. PA 160 was amended
by SB 622 effective July 1, 2012. This law directs school districts to
assist students in paying tuition and fees for courses at Michigan public
or private colleges or universities, if all of the following conditions are
met:
4. The college courses must be academic in nature, normally applies
toward satisfaction of a degree requirement at the postsecondary
institution, and cannot be a hobby, craft, or recreation course, or in the
subject areas of physical education, theology, divinity, or religious
education.
5. Student eligibility for dual enroll is a building principal decision that
should include multiple sources of information about whether or not the
student is ready for a post-secondary experience. In terms of academic
readiness, student eligibility for enrollment should be informed by
student performance on one or more of the following assessments:
EXPLORE, PLAN, ACT, COMPASS, MME, PSAT, SAT or
ACCUPLACER*. Table 1 below lists the qualify scores for each of these
assessments.
1. Students are in grade 9, 10, 11, or 12.
 If the student first dually enrolls in 9th grade, that student may
take not more than two dual enrollment courses per year in the
student's 9th, 10th, and 11th grade years and not more than 4
dual enrollment courses in the student's 12th grade year.
 If the student first dually enrolls in 10th grade, the student may
take not more than two dual enrollment courses in the 10th grade
and not more than 4 dual enrollment courses in the 11th and 12th
grade.
 If the student first dually enrolls in grades 11 or 12, the student
may not take more than 6 dual enrollment courses in either 11th
or 12th grade.
Note:
6. School districts are required to pay the lesser of:
a. The actual charge for tuition, mandatory course fees, materials fees
and registration fees; or
b. b. The state portion of the students' foundation allowance, adjusted
to the proportion of the school year they attend the postsecondary
institution.
Note: Students who do not complete a dual enrollment course must
repay the district.
A district is not permitted to pay for more than 10 total dual
enrollment classes for any one student.
2. Students must be enrolled in both the school district and
postsecondary institution during the local school district's regular
academic year and must be enrolled in at least one high school class.
Students who believe they are eligible for dual enrollment, qualify for
tuition and fee support, and wish to participate, should contact their
school counselor.
3. The district must not offer the college courses. An exception to this
could occur if the local board of education determines that a scheduling
conflict exists, which is beyond the student's control.
29
Minimum Dual Enrollment Qualifying Score by Assessment
* Accuplacer qualifying scores are typically specific to a state or Institution of Higher Education (IHE). The Department will work with
The College Board and Michigan IHEs to build consensus around Minimum Dual Enrollment Qualifying Scores on this assessment.
30
Opportunities
for Career
Technical
Education
Opportunities for Career Technical Education
I.
J.
The Livonia Public Schools believes that all
students should graduate from high school with a
plan for their future. Whether it is continuing their
education at a four-year college or university, a
two-year community college or technical school,
military service, or entry into the work world, all
students should have a focus on the "next step"
after high school.
The Livonia Public Schools provides all students
with the opportunities to make informed decisions
about their future. The three Livonia high schools
and the Career Technical Center provide programs
that are designed to provide a pathway to their
ultimate career goal.
High schools provide programs that prepare
students for jobs that are in demand and that offer
long-range career opportunities. Some students
may choose to participate in the more specialized
technical preparation curricula at the Career
Technical Center. Many of these programs begin in
the ninth grade at the high school and continue
toward a two or four-year degree at a college or
university.
Students enrolled in career technical education will
be prepared to enter fields of work, which lead to
more economically rewarding positions. Programs
have been developed in the areas of Business,
Marketing, Trade/Technical, Medical, Family &
Consumer Science, and Child Care.
Stevenson
High School
Courses offered at the high school are found in the
Business, Industrial Technology, and Family &
Consumer Science sections of the Programs of
Study and can be taken starting at the freshman
level. Courses offered at the Livonia Career
Technical Center are open to students in the three
high schools during their junior or senior year.
31
Courses are available in the following areas at the
Livonia Career Technical Center:
Architectural & Engineering Technology
Auto Technology
Building & Residential Construction
Computer Networking Technology
Criminal Justice
Fashion Merchandising
Graphic Design
Hospitality Management (at Franklin High School)
Management & Business Administration
Medical Technology (Medical Assisting, Medical
Occupations, Sports Medicine)
Website Technology
II. The following are additional programs and activities which
are available to assist students in their career exploration:
a) Career Technical Center visitations (arranged through
high school counselor)
b) College and Career Information Center in Guidance
Office (explore your interest/select a college/university)
c) Career Intern Program/Vocational Intern Program
d) Career Assemblies (as scheduled)
e) Student Portfolio (through individual teachers/counselor)
f) Educational Development Plan (starting in eighth grade
and continuing each year with your counselor)
g) Career Cruising (see your counselor)
III. Need more information? See a counselor and read the
Programs of Study for specific courses.
Independent
Study
Requests for
Schedule
Changes
Independent Study
The following guidelines should be followed for the consideration of an Independent Study:
Deadline to submit request for 1st semester:
Monday before school starts
Deadline to submit request for 2nd semester:
Monday of last week of 1st semester
Independent Study is primarily for the purpose of
providing the opportunity for students to have learning
experiences which are not part of the regular course
offerings. The application for Independent Study is in
the Counseling Office.







A student must complete an application which shall
be submitted to the Scheduling Assistant Principal
Content must not be addressable through any other
course format
Scheduling Conflicts are not an acceptable use of
an Independent Study
An Independent Study course consists of work not
described in the Programs of Study in any other
format
An Independent Study course must be relevant and
address many learning styles appropriate to the
tasks
The Scheduling Assistant Principal will have final
say on acceptance/decline of the request
A detailed description of the curriculum, with objectives and an assessment rubric, needs to be presented to the Scheduling Assistant Principal along
with the Independent Study request
Stevenson
32
Requests for
Schedule Changes
After course selections and before the master
schedule and student programs are printed,
students may make schedule changes. Students
must be prepared to attend school all hours of the
school day. Schedule changes may not be made
for the purpose of early release to go to work
unless the job is a part of the school program.
After the schedule is complete and the student
schedules are printed, a request for change must
be submitted in writing on the form available in the
Guidance Office.
Changes will be approved only for the following
reasons:
1. Changes necessitated by a previous failure
2. Conflicts (two classes which meet at the same
hour)
3. Incomplete schedules
4. Placement in the Volunteers in Community
Service program
5. Changes due to summer school work
Any student who drops a course without replacing
it with another will receive a grade of "EW" on their
transcript. Changes that permit a student to enter a
class for credit must be completed by the end of
the first week of the semester.
Students who are anticipating a change in their
class schedule are expected to follow their old
schedule until a new one has been provided.
Alternative School Programs
CAPA- ESL- MSC - IB - GLOBAL EDUCATION
CAPA (Creative and Performing Arts Program) offers in-depth courses
The Class of 2011 will be the first class eligible for the diploma program.
There will be seats available for students currently attending Stevenson and
Churchill High Schools, but those students would have to transfer to Franklin
before their junior year. Efforts are underway to allow eighth grade students
who wish to be an IB diploma candidate the opportunity to enroll at Franklin
as they begin their ninth grade year.
of study in dance, drama, and vocal music. The curriculum is designed to
teach classical and contemporary art forms. Students have the opportunity to
perform at the highest level of his or her potential. CAPA is housed at
Churchill High School and scheduled morning and afternoon. Students from
any high school may enter the beginning courses if space is available. CAPA
students will meet all academic graduation requirements. They are expected
to participate in after-school rehearsals and performances. Students are
selected based on recommendations, auditions, and interviews.
The School of Global Education
The School of Global Education is open on a limited basis for students whose
home high school is Churchill High School or Franklin High School. Consideration for admission into this program is based on the following criteria:
· Beginning with the 2010-11 school year, there will be five seats per high
school (Churchill and Franklin) for incoming ninth grade students only.
· The allotted number of seats is designated only for students, including
non-public students, from each high school's respective attendance area.
· Students who do not remain in the Global Education Program through the
completion of their junior year must return to their home high school.
· Students must be at or above grade level in reading to be considered for
admission into the School of Global Education.
· Students entering the School of Global Education will become full-time
students of Stevenson High School.
· Transportation to and from Stevenson High School must be provided by the
parent/guardian.
· Siblings of students admitted into the School of Global Education may also be
permitted to enter Stevenson High School so long as the older sibling is
currently enrolled. Admission of the sibling into the School of Global
Education is dependent on the normal selection process.
· Students who transfer to Stevenson next year as tenth graders may not be
eligible for athletics during the first semester.
ESL (English as a Second Language) is a one-year non-continuing course
located at Churchill designated for students who have recently arrived in the
United States and whose native language is not English.
Greater provision for learning English will be provided for the students whose
language barrier prevents basic communication. Emphasis will be on oral,
aural and written communication.
MSC (Mathematics/Science/Computer Program) is an invitational program
which offers the opportunity for students to experience an appropriately
accelerated, integrated curriculum in Mathematics, Science, and Computers.
The curriculum of MSC is specifically designed for the academically talented
student interested in math and science. The content is taught at a faster
pace and in greater depth. This is a four-year, half-day program housed at
Churchill High School which prepares students for advanced placement
examinations in calculus, computer, biology, chemistry, and physics. Eighth
grade algebra and geometry students are eligible based upon scores on
standardized tests for M/S/C. Other factors considered are statements of
interest and teacher recommendations.
IB (International Baccalaureate) Program at Franklin High School will allow
Students who meet the criteria above and wish to be considered for admission
into the School of Global Education must complete an interest form and submit it
to their counselor with their course request sheet. Non public school students
may obtain the interest form from the Office of Instruction located on the second
floor of the Administration Building on Farmington Road. The interest form is
also available online at the Stevenson website. Submit completed interest forms
along with test scores indicating the student is at grade level in Reading to:
Mr. Gary Harper, Principal at Stevenson High School. A random draw will be
held to determine who enters the program if the interest is greater than the seats
available.
selected 11th and 12th grade students to earn an IB diploma in addition to their
regular high school diploma. The IB Curriculum is recognized for its academic
rigor and its "international mindedness" exposure. Students working for an IB
diploma will be required to take a full IB schedule that includes courses in
Language 1 (English), Language 2 (Spanish), Individuals and Society (Social
Studies), Mathematics, Experimental Science, and Visual Arts, Students will
also take end-of-course exams that will be assessed using international
standards. The IB program has additional requirements of an extended essay, a Theory of Knowledge course, and 150 hours of documented creativity,
action, and service.
The deadline for submitting an interest form is February 1.
33
Student Activities
Student activities play an important role at Stevenson High School. When
students are involved in co-curricular activities, they will be able to use their
academic skills in self-motivating, interest-based activities. They learn
Interpersonal skills working with other students who share those same interests.
They learn life-long skills such as communication, leadership, organization,
teamwork, problem solving, and time management. They also learn in a
cooperative, hands-on manner. Students can choose from a wide variety of
organizations from student government, to clubs, to drama and music, and more.
Stevenson has over 40 co-curricular organizations. The following is a partial list.
The complete list is available in the Brieske Room, the student activities office.
The following descriptions represent a sample of several co-curricular
organizations in more detail:
CLUBS
Bible Study
Book
Bowling
Chess
Conservative
All-School Musical: The All-School Musical has become an annual springtime
presentation at Stevenson High School. The cast is composed of students of all
grade levels who are selected for parts through open auditions. The purpose of
the all-school musical is to bring to the student body and the community a
selection of some of the finest musical comedies that have been performed on
the Broadway stage at a reasonable price and offer a performing arts program
for those students actively participating in the production.
DECA
Diversity
Equestrian
Fit Club
GSA
German
Greenhouse
Ice Skating
Japanese
Ping Pong
Aurora: The Aurora is the Stevenson High School Yearbook. The staff of the
yearbook is made up of students who select it as a class. The Aurora is
supported by advertising and student purchases.
Spectrum: The Spectrum is a literary arts magazine. The staff of Spectrum
consists of student volunteers. It is supported by student purchase and is
distributed in June.
Quiz Bowl
Robotics
Ski
Spanish
S.E.A.
Other clubs may be formed by students if they can get a faculty sponsor, write a
constitution, and obtain senate and principal's approval. Students should see
the Student Activities Director for more information.
SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
Community Service
National Art Honor Society
ELVS
National Honor Society
French Honor Society
All-School Play: The All-School Play is an activity which provides ample
opportunities for students to learn about theater through participation in the
production of a high-quality, non-musical play. Tryouts are held early in the fall
and are open to all students. Technical areas are staffed by interested students
from all class levels.
Peer Mentoring
SADD
National Honor Society: This national organization serves to honor excellence
and provide service. Stevenson's chapter inducts sophomores and juniors in late
spring. In order to be inducted into Stevenson's chapter of the National Honor
Society, a student must be a sophomore or junior who had a grade point average of 30.5 or higher after the first semester of their sophomore or junior year,
and must be able to demonstrate having participated in two service projects, one
leadership role, and two high school clubs or organizations (not including sports
teams) since the beginning of the sophomore year. The faculty committee
makes final selections after asking the entire faculty to make comments on the
character of the prospective members.
LITERARY PUBLICATION
Aurora –Yearbook
Spectrum—Literary Magazine
DRAMA
All-School Musical
Thespian Society
One Act Plays
Three-Act Play
Pantomime Show
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Student Senate
Senior Class Council
Sophomore Class Council
SPEECH
Legislative Debate Teams
MUSIC
Jazz Band
Marching Band
Junior Class Council
Freshman Class Council
Forensics
Village Singers
34
Student Activities
(continued)
RECOGNITION IN STUDENT ACTIVITIES AT STEVENSON
Academic Letters: An Academic Letter may be awarded to any student who completes four full time semesters of study with
Livonia Public High Schools with a grade point average of 30.50 or better. Students who achieve such a high accomplishment
must apply for this letter of recognition through the Principal's Office during the first three weeks of each semester.
Activity Letter: Activity credits are awarded to students for their participation in nonathletic, co-curricular activities. Students who
receive 50 activity credits, with a minimum two-year commitment in a variety of clubs and organizations, are eligible for an
Activity Letter. For more information, contact the Student Activities Director.
Varsity Letter: Boys and girls may receive a Varsity Letter by participating in Athletics, Cheerleading, and Pom Pon.
These awards are available to students who meet the prescribed regulations.
School Recognition Jackets/Sweaters: School recognition jackets/sweaters have been designed by our high school for the
wearing of academic or activity letters. Such jackets/sweaters may be purchased through vendors listed at our Student Activities
office. Academic letters and activity letters should be worn with pride on these jackets. Anything worn on these jackets must be in
compliance with the standards prescribed by the Student Activities Director and Principal.
35
Courses &
Departments
Courses & Departments
2016-2017
Stevenson
High School
36
A study skills portion will assist students in developing skills for taking
notes, taking tests, developing vocabulary skills, and using context clues
to improve reading. Specific strategies for study skills for individual
content areas will be learned. Supervised study and cooperative
learning will help the student to apply the skills learned.
Interdepartmental Programs
1827/2827—Student Leadership
Prerequisite: Must be a Senate or Class Officer, a Senator who is a Junior
or Senior in an appointed position.
The purpose of the Student Leadership Class is to empower students
with the opportunity to learn and use their leadership skills to actualize
the positive potential available from their academic and co-curricular
talents.
Intern Programs
1859—Career Intern Program (CIP)
Grade 12
2860—Career Intern Program 2 (CIP)
Prerequisite: Completed application
Approval of program coordinator
The Career Intern Program is a work-based career exploration
experience for high achieving, college-bound seniors. Non-paid
internships are available in many areas including engineering, law,
medicine, radio/TV, education, and video game development.
However, internship placements can be developed to match most
career areas of interest. Students have been placed at Ford Motor,
GM, Merrill-Lynch, as well as area hospitals, law firms, and
veterinarian hospitals, to name a few.
Class Goals:
1. To recognize the functions of the total school program and better understand
the students' role as a leader.
2. To identify the groups that function with the school and community.
3. To work effectively in groups.
4. To recognize different viewpoints that students, teachers and administrators
have regarding school problems.
5. To recognize the value of goals in achieving short-term and long-term
results.
6. To develop techniques of leading, delegating responsibility, and following
through with projects.
Students are invited to apply to the Career Intern Program for two or
three hours of their school day (usually hours 4-5-6 or 5-6) and receive
1.0-10.5 credits per semester. Interns are at the internship site four days
per week. The fifth day is spent in a seminar with the program
coordinator working on projects and covering topics such as
communication skills, teambuilding (utilizing high and low ropes),
and college selection. Interns also develop portfolios, which prove
useful for scholarships and college admissions.
1456/2456—Community Service
The community service position provides an opportunity for the student
to gain valuable insight into the academic needs and/or difficulties of
other students. Service students will gain direct-encounter experience
helping students at SHS with assignments, tests, and preparation for
exams working in the Resource Room or Counseling Office. Students
will also facilitate the Peer Mentoring Program and other programs to
assist in meeting the needs of students. This is an excellent experience
for students planning to pursue a career in education. Any interested
11th or 12th grade student is required to complete an application which
is available from the counselor.
Interns are required to keep a daily journal of their activities, provide
their own transportation (they will receive a parking permit), and dress
according to the requirements of the internship site.
1825—Orientation
(1st semester only)
Grade 9
This is a one-semester course specifically for entering freshmen of all
ability levels. It is designed to develop successful experiences in high
school and includes specific information about the school program and
appropriate study skills. Students will learn how to access athletics,
activities, and special curricular offerings. They will recognize academic
and emotional strengths that will promote success in their high school
careers.
Seniors are invited to participate in the program based on a combination
of GPA, educator recommendations, and a personal interview by the
program coordinator. Letters of eligibility are mailed in January of the
junior year.
Interested students are required to complete the application packet,
which will be available at an assembly scheduled prior to registration, or
from their counselor during registration.
37
Intern Programs (continued)
1861/2861—Vocational Intern Program (VIP) 12
Prerequisites: Counselor recommendation/referral and completed
application. Approval of program coordinator
Students who have vocational goals that cannot be met through existing
programs may apply for participation in the Vocational Intern Program.
Through non-paid internships, students experience careers by working
with personnel in business and industry. At the conclusion of one semester, or a full year's training, the student may be qualified for employment in an entry-level job.
Course Credit Information:
• Full semester course
• Students may register for this course for hours 5-6 (1.0 credit)
• Elective credit will be awarded
* Grading will be 'S' (satisfactory) or 'U' (unsatisfactory)
Students may enroll in the VIP for two or three hours of their schedule
and earn 1.0-10.5 credits per semester. The program coordinator will
assist the student in developing an internship site that will expose the
student to the skills they are seeking. Participation in the VIP requires a
seriousness of purpose on the student's part, good attendance, and a
willingness to work in the program during out-of-school hours.
Evaluation: Students will be required to submit a weekly journal, as well
as a final paper or project. Evaluations by the sponsoring educator will
be completed at the end of each marking period.
Application procedure: Interested students must submit a completed
application, available from their counselor, and participate in an interview with the intern coordinator and member of the Skill Center staff.
Additional Course Information: Many colleges and universities award
pre-student teaching credit as well as credit toward the hours needed for
admission to physical/occupational therapy training programs.
Interested students are required to complete the application packet
which is available from his or her counselor.
Students may provide their own transportation or use the district bussing
from their high school to the Skill Center.
38
Art
Philosophy of the Department
1503/2503—Advanced Painting (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Painting with a grade of C or better
Students will learn more advanced techniques, using
primarily water-based paints. They will examine painting
styles such as realism, abstraction, impressionism and
expressionism through study and discussion of art history. They will continue to develop personal expression and individual style. An emphasis
will be placed on developing work for scholarship application and college
admissions. Advanced students will be working at more challenging levels and doing more individualized projects.
We believe that through the making of art, and through the study of our
art heritage, we can teach students to use and develop their creativity,
help them learn about self-expression and visual communication, and
guide them to evaluate aesthetic choices based on sound principles.
Art courses develop the ability to conceptualize, experiment, organize,
problem solve, and carry out ideas to completion.
Art can help provide today's students - tomorrow's citizens and leaders with the insight, sensitivity, and humanity necessary for our civilized society to survive and grow in a healthy direction.
1505/2505—Drawing (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None (Fundamentals of Art is recommended.)
This course teaches drawing methods and the basic elements of drawing which are useful in learning to draw realistically. Basic drawing media are used, such as pencils, ink, markers, and colored pencil. Some of
the projects covered include still life, portraits, shading, perspective, and
cartooning.
We also believe that art should be an enjoyable exploration of color, expression, line, communication, shape, form, texture, and all the many
other qualities which continue to bring challenge and pleasure to us as
human beings.
1500/2500— Fundamentals of Art
Prerequisites: None
This one semester course will introduce the student to a variety of media, skills and techniques. Students will have the opportunity to learn,
explore and experiment with creative art. Elements and principles of design will be integrated into the student's investigation of drawing, painting, sculpture, print making, and art history.
1507/2507—Advanced Drawing (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Drawing with a grade of C or better
Students will further develop skills and concepts introduced in the beginning drawing class, with an emphasis on media proficiency. Students
will sharpen observational skills, strengthen composition skills and work
on projects ranging from realistic, abstracted, and surrealistic. An emphasis will be placed on developing work for scholarship application and
college admissions. Advanced students will be working at more challenging levels and doing more individualized projects.
1501/2501—Painting (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Art and/or Drawing
This course offers a variety of experiences in painting. Emphasis is on
individual creativity, craftsmanship, unique concepts, and originality. The
student will gain a working knowledge of color mixing, color schemes,
color harmonies, and principles and elements of design. Basic techniques in tempera, watercolor, and acrylic will be taught. Students will be
given the opportunity to develop craftsmanship through a variety of assignments including still life, landscapes, and nature. Critical discussions
and observation will take place regularly.
1516/2516—Sculpting/Clay (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None (Fundamentals of Art is recommended)
This course uses a wide variety of materials with an emphasis on clay.
Students will learn the basics of 3-D design through a variety of methods
and techniques. Projects may include hand-built pottery, sculpture
(using human and/or animal forms), tile making, architectural explorations, and the study of sculpture and ceramics in our own and other
cultures.
39
1518/2518—Advanced Sculpting/Clay (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Sculpting/Clay with a grade of C or better
This course is a continuation of the construction skills learned in the beginning course. Students will learn more complex techniques that may include
wheel throwing and various carving techniques. Students will be encouraged to develop and refine a personal style. There will be an emphasis on
design, craftpersonship, originality and surface decoration. Students will
continue to develop their aesthetic judgment through group critique and the
study of professional working artists.
1538/2538—Photography (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Students are required to obtain their own 35mm Single
Lens Reflex FILM camera. If financial hardship exists, contact the
counselor. Preference will be given to upperclassmen.
This class is designed for students interested in the photography field and
fulfills a fine art, commercial, or vocational interest. Students will learn basic
film camera and dark room techniques. Creating meaningful compositions
will be taught, and careers in photography will be introduced. Knowledge of
the chemistry and use of lab equipment for film will be emphasized as well.
Students will learn to process their own film and print their own photographic
images. Each student will need to purchase Black and White 100-400
speed film and photographic paper for this course, which will be available for
purchase within the school store.
1521/2521—Jewelry (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None (Art Fundamentals or Drawing is recommended.)
This is a hands-on, craft class that teaches the basic techniques necessary
to create a wide range of jewelry. The elements and principals of design will
be integrated in designing and creating original pieces in a variety of materials. Safety and the proper use of tools and materials will be stressed. Students who choose to use sterling silver, gems or other precious materials
when creating their jewelry may do so at their own expense.
1540/2540—Advanced Photography (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Photography with a grade of C or better. Students are
required to obtain their own DSLR and a flash drive. Disposable cameras cannot be used. If financial hardship exists, contact the counselor.
Preference will be given to upperclassmen.
This course will provide for further advance study in photography with the
possibility of creating a portfolio of quality photographs for future employment, scholarship, or competition. Further experimental techniques will be
taught and exhibition of advanced work is encouraged. Students may need
to purchase film and photo paper for this course.
1523/2523—Advanced Jewelry (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Jewelry with a grade of C or better
This course is a continuation of the construction skills learned in the beginning course. Students will learn more complex techniques including stone
setting and lost wax casting. There will be an emphasis on design, craftpersonship and originality. Those who chose to use sterling silver, gems or
other precious materials may do so at their own expense.
1547/2547—Advanced Art Techniques (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Three art classes with a grade of B or better and written
approval from the Art Department
This is for the student who has had several art classes and is reasonably
serious about his or her interest in art. This class is designed to explore
drawing, sculpture, painting, and other media on an intermediate to advanced level. Some students will prepare a portfolio for admission to college
art departments. Some students will be working on independent projects in a
chosen area. All students will be involved in learning new techniques, developing a knowledge of art history, and evaluating their work in a supportive
learning environment. This class is essential for juniors who plan to develop
a portfolio during the first semester of their senior year.
938—Digital Imaging I (Livonia Career Technical Center - Blue Section)
939—Digital Imaging II (Livonia Career Technical Center - Blue Section)
40
Business
Philosophy of the Department
Technology
Students must acquire a foundation of knowledge, skills, and attitudes, which enable them to assume responsibility for their learning and effectively use technology as a tool for learning and
achieving our core curriculum outcomes. In our information age,
students must use technology as a tool for managing information,
for communication, collaboration, and problem solving with others
in the global workplace.
The Business Education curriculum must have the capacity to develop student's understanding of global economic business systems; technological skills including telecommunications; basic
communication skills including reading, writing, listening, and
speaking; computational skills; and work attitudes. Students must
understand the entrepreneurial spirit, ethical responsibility of a
businessperson, and the need for personal financial independence.
Technology literacy means more than acquiring computer literacy.
It includes the use of a variety of information systems technologies that increase the ability to access, manipulate, and disseminate information. It means developing an understanding of physical and bio related technology systems. Technology literacy implies a positive attitude about the use of technology and the application of technology based on ethical standards.
Finance
Students working in the financial sequence will acquire skills and
knowledge in budgeting, investments, consumer credit, savings,
banking and various financial markets. In addition students may
be required to verify and enter details of business transactions,
summarize data in separate ledgers, balance books, compile reports, calculate wages, prepare payment, and analyze financial
statements. Computer technology is an integral part of financial
practices and procedures and will be incorporated in all financial
courses.
Marketing
Students pursuing career objectives in marketing must demonstrate competencies in the following areas: selling, promotion, distribution, risk management, pricing, purchasing, marketing information management, product/service planning, finance, and entrepreneurship. Marketing personnel must also demonstrate understanding of the marketing economics, business, and human
resource foundations.
41
1550-Marketing 1 (1st Semester) Grades 10-12
0.5 credit
Prerequisites: None
Students will receive an overview of the ever-changing world of marketing with an emphasis on promotion and selling. Topics of study will be
the marketing functions, economics, communication, marketing research, distribution, product development, pricing, marketing strategies,
and business ethics.
Senior Math Credit
VPA Credit
1555/2555-Marketing 3
Grades 11-12
(one year course)
1 credit per semester
Prerequisites: Marketing I & II, or Sports & Entertainment
Marketing, or consent of the instructor.
This is a one-year course that puts theory into real-life business situations. Practical experiences are gained by the operation and management of the school store. Students gain hands-on experience with technology as they perform retail operations. Students will have experience
in the following areas of retail operations: salesmanship, buying and
pricing, cashiering, record keeping, display and sales promotion, merchandising, inventory, customer relations, marketing mathematics, entrepreneurship, human relations, decision making, budgeting, and scheduling. Business ethics and employability skills are an integral part of the
course.
Through course work, field trips, and guest speakers, students will gain
confidence and the opportunity to achieve marketable skills. In addition,
students will take part in DECA, a national marketing student
organization.
Senior Math Credit
VPA Credit
2551- Marketing 2 (2nd Semester)
Grades 10-12
0.5 credit
Prerequisites: None
Entrepreneurship is a course designed to start you thinking like the owner or manager of a business. Owners recognize that a person's level of
success is only limited by his/her imagination and hard work. As the
business owner, you will explore the impact of the economy on your
business. Legal requirements, physical layout, operating and staffing
needs, promotion, social and ethical responsibilities, and applications of
technology will be studied.
Ultimately, the goal of entrepreneurship is to educate each student regarding all aspects of starting a business. This knowledge will assist the
student in writing a business plan, which could be used to start a
business.
Senior Math Credit
VPA Credit
1571 - Small Business Accounting (1st Semester) Grades 10-12
Prerequisite: None
0.5 credit
The course is highly desirable for those expecting to be a part of the
global business world (i.e. accountant, administrative assistant, entrepreneur, and computer specialist). A college-bound student planning to
major in any phase of business will be required to take several accounting courses.
1552/2552-Sports And Entertainment Marketing Grades 10-12
(one year course)
0.5 credit per semester
Prerequisites: None
Sports and Entertainment Marketing takes students on a step-by-step
journey through the world of marketing. Students encounter and learn
about the key functions of marketing and how those functions are applied to sports and entertainment. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the fundamental principles and concepts identified
with sports and entertainment marketing, and to develop critical thinking
and decision-making skills through the application of marketing principles in these industries. Successful completion of this course will help
students develop a knowledge of the career possibilities in the sports
and entertainment industries as they relate to a diverse population and
global society, and develop the knowledge that is required to produce an
actual sports and entertainment event.
Senior Math Credit
VPA Credit
The first semester of accounting presents the double-entry accounting
system in its simplest form. The students will learn to analyze and record
daily transactions of small businesses using journals and computer software formats. Other processes covered are the correct procedures both
manually and electronically for posting, preparing worksheets and financial statements, and adjusting and closing ledger accounts for proprietorships and partnerships. The final experience in Small Business Accounting is a business simulation in which the student keeps a set of
books for a small business for a one-month period. Students will also be
trained to use the personal computer with windows/ network, color monitor, and laser printers.
Senior Math Credit
42
1575/2575 - Managing Your Money
Grades 10-12
Prerequisite: None
(1 Semester)
0.5 credit
This course, which is recommended for all students, introduces students
to the practical areas of finance. Computer software will be used to enhance skills in appropriate areas. Course topics include:
- Budgeting personal finances
- Developing banking skills
- Savings options
- Understanding investment options
- The Dangers of Debt
- Avoiding Identity Theft
- Maintaining personal tax records
- Developing job search and interview skills
Senior Math Credit
1592/2592 - Social Media Business Management Grades 10-12
(1 Semester)
0.5 credit
Prerequisite: None
Social Media Management is a project based class that teaches
students how to use social media to help businesses connect with customers. Students will learn various Social Media platforms such as,
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Pinterest, You Tube, LinkedIn,
Blogging, etc. Students will learn the proper etiquette and technique
expected when Social Media is used in the business world. This class
provides a broad introduction to technologies and management models
used to successfully create and run an E-Commerce Business. This
class is taught in a computer lab and iPads and tablet technology is integrated throughout the course. Coursework is completed in class.
Senior Math Credit
VPA Credit
1590/2590 - Business Technology Management
Grades 9-12
Prerequisite: None
(1 Semester)
0.5 credit
Business Technology Management is a class designed to teach students how to use technology as a business and personal tool through
the use of application software. Students will develop business management skills using Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint, Excel and
Access). Students will also be introduced to advanced features in
Google Documents, Google Drive and Google Applications. This class is
taught in a computer lab and iPads and tablet technology is integrated
throughout the course. Students will learn how technology is used in
advanced academic settings, in a business environment and in everyday
situations. Coursework is completed in class.
Senior Math Credit
VPA Credit
1593/2593- Project Design Management
Grades 10-12
(1 Semester)
Prerequisite: None
0.5 credit
Project Design Management is a class designed to take a digital media
approach to business. Students will learn graphic design as it relates to
business using many different programs including Photoshop, Microsoft
Office, Google Applications, web-based photo-editing, etc. Students will
also learn various audio and video production techniques used in the
business world today. This class will utilize iPads and tablet technology
for many projects. This class is taught in a computer lab and is projectbased. Coursework is completed in class.
Senior Math Credit
VPA Credit
1591/2591 - Adv Business Technology Management Grades 9-12
(1 Semester)
0.5 credit
Prerequisite: Business Tech Management or teacher approval
Advanced Business Technology Management is a project based class
that focuses on integrating business management and technology. Students will use technology to apply management concepts. Students will
use advanced features of Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint), Google Applications, Google Drive, Google Documents, and other online tools (Prezi, Moviemaker, Photo-editing, etc.). Business concepts covered using technology include: International Business, Business Planning, Human Resources, Leadership, Law and Ethics, and
Project Management. This class is taught in a computer lab and iPads
and tablet technology is integrated throughout the course. Coursework is
completed in class.
Senior Math Credit
VPA Credit
43
1600– Child Development
(1st Semester)
Grades 10-12
Young men and women learn skills necessary for being an effective
parent. The course includes the study of supportive families, pregnancy, family planning, childbirth, the newborn baby, infant simulation,
brain development, creative play activities, and developmental processes. Upon completion, students will be able to identify developmental milestones, plan experiences to enhance development, describe appropriate interaction techniques and identify environments for
typical and atypical development. The student will have an opportunity
to participate in a baby simulation experience. This course is necessary to earn college credit at Schoolcraft College.
Family and Consumer Sciences
Philosophy of the Department
Family and Consumer Science (FCS) prepares students for family life, work
life and careers in Family and Consumer Sciences by empowering students
to manage the challenges of living and working in a diverse global society.
The Family Consumer Science curriculum will assist individuals in attaining
their maximum potential through the development of essential living skills.
Students will:
• Develop an understanding of themselves and their relations with others
• Explore the complexity of parenting skills and child development
• Practice consumer skills
• Become informed decision makers
• Adopt healthy lifestyles
• Implement coping and stress management techniques
• Learn problem solving and conflict resolution skills
2601 – Parenting
(2nd Semester)
Grades 10-12
Students will learn effective parenting skills for the infant through preschool age child. Units of study include: adjusting to parenthood,
physical care of infants and children, social and emotional growth of
children, positive parenting practices, preparing for emergencies with
children, guiding children, selecting child care, providing brain based
learning activities for children and hands on experience with a computerized "RealCare" infant simulator. This course is necessary to earn
college credit at Schoolcraft College.
RECOMMENDED COURSES BY LEVEL
All Courses are open to both male and female students.
With appropriate prerequisites usually taken in grades indicated.
Core Course Numbers and Names
1600 – Child Development (1st semester) .............
2601 – Parenting (2nd semester) ...........................
1602/2602 – Child Care Professional (1 year) .......
1604/2604* – Sewing 1 ..........................................
1605/2605*– Sewing 2 ...........................................
1606/2606*– Open Sewing ....................................
2608* – Creative Design (2nd semester) ...............
1610/2610*– Food and Nutrition 1 .........................
1611/2611*– Food and Nutrition 2 .........................
1612/2612* – Food and Nutrition 3 ........................
1615/2615 – Personal Living .................................
1616 – Family Living (1st semester) .......................
1617/2617* – Interior Design .................................
1618/2618 – Life Management ..............................
10
10
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
11
11
11
12
12
12
1602/2602 –Early Childhood Professional
Grades 11-12
Prerequisites: Child Development or Parenting
Recommended: Child Development and Parenting
College credit offered though Schoolcraft College for students
completing Child Development , Parenting , and Early Childhood
Professional with a grade of B+.
Early Childhood Professional is a one-year program designed to meet
individual interests in careers where knowledge of child growth and
development are important. Students have both class and lab experiences. Lab experiences occur in our state licensed preschool that provides students a simulation experience of being employed in a child
related field. The preschool is in operation three days per week and is
open to children 3-5 years of age. The high school student will develop
a portfolio, formulate observations of the growth and development of
children, learn child care licensing laws of the State of Michigan, plan
lessons, teach children and practice health and safety procedures.
The course is recommended for students pursuing careers in teaching, childcare, nursing, psychology, recreation, etc. Upon completion,
the student will receive an early childhood competency certificate.
*Denotes courses that count as 0.5 Applied Arts credit.
*Students are required to have a Department of Human Services
background screening completed before working with children.
44
1604/1604 – Sewing 1
Prerequisites: None
Sewing 1 is a class for beginning level sewing students. Students will
learn: basic hand and machine sewing skills, application of design principles, study of textiles, and integration of math applications. The student is responsible for 2 teacher approved and skill appropriate projects.
1612/2612 - Foods and Nutrition 3
Prerequisites: Foods and Nutrition 2
This class expands on the nutritional information and skills learned in
Foods 1 and 2. Units of study will include exploring culinary careers, international cuisine, entertaining and specialty desserts. A lab donation is
requested to help defray the cost of ingredients.
1605/2605 – Sewing 2
Prerequisites: Sewing 1 or teacher approval
Sewing 2 is a class for students to practice more advanced sewing and
design skills. The student will select and is responsible for 2 teacher
approved and skill appropriate projects.
1615/2615 – Personal Living
Prerequisites: None
Grades 9 & 10
In the Personal Living course, importance is placed on the individual and
his or her relationship with others. Students will learn to better understand themselves and to develop skills in effective communication and
conflict resolution. Class lead discussions will focus on contemporary
issues applying to teens and society. Students will be engaged in goal
setting and developing plans for reaching those goals.
1606/1606 – Open Sewing
Prerequisites: Sewing 1 or Sewing 2
Open Sewing is a class for the advanced sewing student. Students will
create projects that utilize a variety of fabrics and higher level sewing
techniques. The student will select and is responsible for two teacher
approved and skill appropriate projects.
1616– Family Living
(1st Semester)
Prerequisites: None
Recommended for Grades 11 & 12
This course explores the need to build a strong family and the role of the
family in society. Relationships with family and friends, mate selection,
marriage, divorce, violence, substance abuse, and aging will be key topics. Practical information is given to help students with decision making
and dealing with family issues.
2608—Creative Design
(2nd Semester)
Prerequisites: None
This course is designed for students to discover the rewards and benefits of using personal creative skills. Students will be introduced to a variety of crafts that will appeal to individual needs and talents. The focus of
this course will include hands-on projects such as machine sewing, quilting, embroidery, knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch, needlepoint, and
beading. Students will be required to supply their own project materials.
1617/2617—Interior Design Prerequisites: None
Interior Design will focus on how to apply the principles and elements of
design to interior living spaces. An architectural history of housing and
furniture will be studied. Emphasis is placed on the way a home can
express and enrich the lifestyle of family members.
1610/2610 - Foods and Nutrition 1
Prerequisites: None
Students will learn nutritional guidelines for healthy living, kitchen safety
and sanitation. This is an activity- based class where food preparation
basics are taught and practiced. A lab donation is requested to help defray the cost of ingredients.
1618/2618 – Life Management
Prerequisites: None
Recommended for Grades 11 & 12
Students will develop personal survival skills that they will use when they
move out on their own or go away to college. Selections will include information on communication skills, money management, employment,
career and college planning and consumer issues.
1611/2611 - Foods and Nutrition 2
Prerequisites: Foods and Nutrition 1
Students will build on food preparation skills and concepts presented in
Foods 1. Units of study will include kitchen safety and sanitation, meal
planning and nutrition. A lab donation is requested to help defray the
cost of ingredients.
45
The School of Global Education
CURRICULUM OF THE SCHOOL OF
GLOBAL EDUCATION
(An alternative to regular school)
The School of Global Education offers a four-year curriculum in Language Arts and Social Studies, open to any interested student who may
wish to apply for enrollment. The curriculum offered in the Global Education program is both exciting and challenging, designed to prepare students for the rigors of a university education. It is strongly recommended
that students who select Global Education should be at or above reading
level for their respective grade. Global education is an interdisciplinary
approach to cultural, political, scientific, and economic issues, in an arrangement different from what is offered in the traditional Language Arts
and Social Studies curriculum. It seeks to promote an understanding of
the values and priorities of the many cultures in the world, and of our
American foreparents.
Sequence 1
(NCAA)
1120/2120 Global English/World Literature: Development of language, writing, and communication (including basic composition, speaking, and research skills), mythology, the beginnings of drama, and creativity. (All sequences include work in humanities.)
1121/2121 Global World History: Introduction to archaeology, world
history, sociology, geography, anthropology, psychology, economics,
and political science.
Sequence 2
Students who enroll in the School of Global Education should understand they are making a full-year commitment to the program. There
are significant differences in the scope and sequential nature of the
Global Education curriculum from that of the traditional Language Arts
and Social Studies courses. Students should consider this carefully
when enrolling in the School of Global Education initially, or when they
register during second semester for the following year. The decision to
leave the program is not one to be taken lightly and both parents and
students should be aware of this policy. If a student is struggling academically, they should first seek help and advice from their classroom
teachers, their counselor and the director of the program. Students
should recognize that they have an obligation to meet their academic
responsibilities, especially in a special program of study like Global Education. Students should understand that there are additional expectations that accompany participation in the Global Education program.
These include, but are not limited to additional reading, writing, and
speaking assignments and projects, participation in cultural events, roleplay simulations, summer assignments, and the opportunity to explore
topics in more depth through extracurricular field trips. There is also the
opportunity to earn college credit for SIMUN, MAMUN and the summer
travel experience through Madonna University. To benefit fully from this
program, students must be willing to complete the entire year of study.
(NCAA)
1122/2122 Global English/American Literature: American literature
with world literature and the development of the novel, short story, poetry, and drama. (This will include writing skills and optional creative writing.)
1123/2123 Global American History: American pluralism in history,
native and immigrant trends, and foreign policy.
Sequence 3
(NCAA)
1124/2124 Global English 3: Contemporary world literature, trends and
notable authors, new directions in drama, the novel, poetry and nonfiction, science fiction, and futurism. (This will include writing skills in research and rhetoric.)
1125 Global Government/ 2125 Economics: Studies in U.S. government issues of global political and economic interdependence and futurism.
Questions regarding this policy should be directed to the program director Judy Bergeski at: [email protected]
46
Sequence 4
Prerequisite: Sequence 3
NOTE: In all four sequences, the possibility of credit for community activities on an individual basis can be explored by students, teachers, and
community members. The interdisciplinary approach used in the School
of Global Education promotes better understanding of both the past and
the present world and offers guideposts to the future. It is hoped that
such an approach to education and such a global focus on humanity will
help lessen the fear and suspicion in tomorrow's world.
(NCAA)
1126/2126 GLOBAL ED. ENGLISH 4
(1 credit in English)
This course is designed for students who have already been introduced
to beginning research techniques in Sequence 3. Students will conduct
research on a problem or issue of a global nature that also has local implications. Students are also expected to have actively contributed,
through a community service project, under faculty guidance, to addressing the problem at a local level. The majority of the written paper
will be completed first semester along with four hours of the community
service requirement of the Senior Project. Students will also read several
novels/plays and critique both in writing and through class discussions.
They are expected to fully participate in the activities of the School of
Global Education. This course includes instruction in theory and physiology of speech followed by application in public speaking, debate, and
oral and written critiques of public speakers. Second semester, students
will also learn skills in simulation design and prepare original simulations
for use in the Stevenson Intramural Model United Nations (SIMUN). Students will complete a final draft of the research paper for the Senior Project and also complete the remainder of the community service project.
Finally, students will transform their written research into an oral presentation to be given in front of staff and students. All students are expected
to fully participate in the activities of the School of Global Education.
The operation of the school is under the Global Education teaching and
administrative team at Stevenson High School advised by a community
(parent) committee. In addition, a Student Advisory Council assists in the
planning of activities. There is developed, then, a close relationship between teachers, students, and the community. Out-of-school activities
and field trips help foster connections to the community.
Students in the School of Global Education may also choose other
courses in Stevenson High School as electives to fill a school day. In this
manner, they can keep in contact with friends in other parts of the
school. They are encouraged to continue when possible, the development of skills and talents already identified and to explore new opportunities.
Additional questions regarding the Global Education program may be
addressed to the school's director at (734)744-2660 ext. 48130.
1127/2127 Social Studies: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS/
COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTS
(1 credit in Social Studies)
International Relations is considered to be the capstone course for students who have been enrolled in the School of Global Education while at
Stevenson. Students will study and evaluate the workings of international organizations and governments, diplomacy, law, and politics as well
as the changing role of the United States in world affairs. This course will
rely on historical examples to help students analyze and understand current events. Students will also use a variety of electronic media such as
the Internet to conduct some independent research and publish their
findings in written format and oral presentation. Together with the GE
English 4 class, students will have an opportunity to "think globally and
act locally."
WORLD LANGUAGE: While foreign languages are not taught within the
School of Global Education itself, it is highly recommended that global
education students study at least one world language while at Stevenson High School. The choice can be one or more from French, German,
Japanese, or Spanish.
47
Special Notes For All Physical Education Students
Health and Physical Education
Physical Education is required of all students unless excused for health
or religious reasons. If a student is to be excused from P.E. for health
reasons, the following procedure must be followed:
Philosophy of the Department
We believe that physical education is a sequential, developmentally appropriate program that provides students with the knowledge, skills, fitness, and attitudes needed to live a healthy, productive life.
a. Temporary Excuse—If a student is to be excused from class for 1-3
days the parent should write a note the first day. If the excused period
is going to be longer than 3 days, it is necessary to have a note from
the doctor indicating the length of the excused period.
It is the goal of the physical education department that all students will
show competence in the following six content standards: (Adopted from
the Michigan Merit Curriculum)
Standard 1 - Demonstrate competency in motor skills and movement
patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities.
Standard 2 - Demonstrate understanding of movement concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply to the learning and performance of physical activities.
Standard 3 - Participate regularly in lifelong physical activity.
Standard 4 - Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical
fitness.
Standard 5 - Exhibit responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others in physical activity settings.
Standard 6 - Value physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge,
self-expression, and social interaction.
b. Permanent Excuse—The student must procure a medical excuse
from the Guidance Department and have it filled out by the family
doctor. If approved by the principal, the form should be returned to the
counselor who will file the excuse in the student's
permanent record.
c. Religious Excuse—A written request from the student's church must
be procured if this student is to be excused for religious reasons. This
request should be returned to the counselor.
1464/2464—Personal Fitness (1 Semester) Graduation Requirement
(Typically taken in ninth grade year)
This one-semester required course is aligned to the Michigan K-12
Physical Education Content Standards and Benchmarks and is specific
to Livonia Public Schools. It is a "sequential educational program that
provides students with the knowledge, skills, fitness, and attitudes needed to lead a healthy life:. Personal Fitness is comprised of the following
areas:
1. Health-Related Fitness - 1/3 of the total class time will be filled with
fitness activities such as Fitnessgram Testing, Fitness Center, Free
Weight Room, Yoga/Pilates, Aerobic activities, Bands/Tubes/Balls as
well as classroom learning opportunities.
2. Aquatics - Three weeks will be spent in the pool. Students will learn
Front Crawl, Backstroke, and Breaststroke. Students will also learn
basic lifesaving and pool safety guidelines.
3. Net/Wall Games - tennis and Volleyball.
4. Invasion Games - Soccer and Basketball.
5. Striking and Fielding - Softball and/or Kickball.
Physical Education and Health - Requirements
All students who graduate from a Livonia Public High School must successfully complete the following two courses: 1464/2464 Personal Fitness and 1468/2468 Health. It is recommended that Personal Fitness be
taken in the ninth grade year and Health be taken in the tenth grade
year.
Physical Education Requirements:
• All students must wear appropriate workout attire when participating in
class.
Appropriate attire includes a T-shirt, shorts or athletic pants, socks and
athletic shoes.
• All students will need to provide a lock deposit which is returned at the
end of the semester if the same lock is returned.
Students will be assessed in every physical education area. Students
will demonstrate proficiency on the Michigan K-12 Physical Education
Content Standards through on-going assessments, observations and
tests.
48
1467/2467—Whole Self Fitness (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Personal Fitness
This course is designed for students who would like to explore gentle,
noncompetitive forms of exercise. Emphasis will be placed on the
following forms of exercise: yoga, Pilates, and stretching. From this
class, students will learn personal tools for stress management, improve
muscle tone, balance and coordination. They will also build self-esteem
and confidence, and enhance cardiovascular strength.
1471/2471—Team Sports 2 (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Personal Fitness
This course will allow students the opportunity to improve their skills to
maintain a moderate level of fitness and to develop stress reduction
techniques through the enjoyment and pleasure they receive in participating in the following activities: team handball, indoor soccer, slow pitch
softball, basketball, volleyball, tennis, eclipse ball, flag football, spikeball,
and floor hockey. Heart rate monitors may also be used from time to
time.
1468/2468—Health (1 Semester) Typically taken in 10th grade
Note: Health is a graduation requirement. This one-semester course will
enable students to become better
informed regarding decisions about the care and maintenance of their
personal health. Students will be instructed in the following units:
• Nutrition and Physical Activity
• Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
• Social and Emotional Health
• Personal Health and Wellness
A unit on human sexuality and reproduction will also be taught to develop student self-awareness and coping with personal feelings in everyday
problems and situations. A parent/guardian meeting will be held for
review of materials and course outline. If a parent/guardian requests
that their child be excluded from this unit, alternate assignments for this
unit will be available upon parent/guardian request.
1472/2472—Weight Training 1 (1 Semester)
This class is designed to introduce students to several introductory
weight-lifting programs. Students will learn correct free-weight lifting
techniques along with instructions on how to use all equipment in the
weight room. Students will also gain knowledge of the different muscle
groups and which piece of equipment builds these specific muscle
groups. Students will participate in four days of weight training and one
day of cardiovascular fitness.
1473/2473—Weight Training 2 (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Personal Fitness and Weight Training 1
Once the student completes the pre-lifting phase, he/she is to select a
program of exercise including upper body, lower body and abdominal
exercises. The instructor reviews each exercise program to see that the
program is balanced and will not overemphasize specific muscle groups.
Depending on the student's personal exercise goal, the student will
select the appropriate program intensity. Students will participate in four
days of weight training and one day of cardiovascular fitness. Student's
progress is monitored regularly and adjustments are made when necessary.
1470/2470—Team Sports 1 (1 Semester)
Prerequisite: Personal Fitness
This class will allow the student the opportunity to improve his or her
skills, maintain an appropriate level of fitness, and develop stressreduction techniques through the enjoyment and pleasure received by
participating in the following sports: volleyball, softball, tennis, basketball, soccer, swimming, eclipse ball, team handball, passing league football, and spikeball. Heart rate monitors may be introduced with certain
activities.
49
1474/2474—Cardio Sculpt (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None
This class will expose students to a variety of instructor-led fitness
activities, designed to improve cardiovascular fitness, muscle tone, and
body image. Examples include kickboxing, step aerobics, interval
training, fit balls, body bars, and more. Students will improve appearance, and stay fit by exercising all of his/her body by regulating food intake and maintaining a healthy attitude for change. The class will help
students reach and maintain a training pulse rate. The activities could
include low-impact aerobics, fitness walking, circuit aerobics, step training, slide training, resistance activities, and kickboxing, POUND, HIIT
workouts, and Zumba.
2476—Advanced PE/Conditioning
(2nd Semester)
Prerequisites: Weight Training 1, Weight Training 2 & Personal Fitness
Students will participate in a five-day multi-exercise program, which will
consist of three days of weight training and two days of conditioning.
The weight training will incorporate the bigger, faster, stronger program,
which is a highly intensive program geared toward development of a
student's explosive power. The two days of conditioning will involve a
combination of a number of different types of training. These will include
cardiovascular training (use of bikes and distance running), plyometrics
(jumping), speed training (sprinting and sprint technique), power training
(stairs and parachutes), and agility drills (foot work). Students who enroll
in this class are expected to be very motivated and willing to participate
in a highly intensive environment.
1475/2475—Lifeguarding (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Personal Fitness 1
This Advanced Physical Education course is designed to provide the
student with knowledge and skills necessary to save his/her own life or
the life of another in the event of a water emergency. An American Red
Cross Lifeguarding card and CPR for the Professional Rescuer card will
be issued to those students meeting all of the requirements set by the
Red Cross. The class will involve classroom time as well as pool time.
Students receiving their ARC Lifesaving certificate will be ready for employment as a lifeguard. (Students must be at least 15 years old by the
end of the semester). Students signing up for this class must be able to
swim 500 yards, and also be able to swim the front crawl and breast
stroke. There is a $35.00 fee for those students who earn certification.
This covers the cost of the cards.
1491 - Health (7th hour)
2492 - Personal Fitness (7th hour)
1476—Adv PE/Weight Training & Conditioning
(1st Semester)
Prerequisites: Weight Training 1, Weight Training 2 & Personal Fitness
This course will offer the student a highly intensive cardiovascular
workout along with a challenging plyometrics jump training circuit. These
workouts will specifically be designed to improve agility, reaction time,
quickness, power, strength, and fast-twitch muscles. The course incorporates 3 days of advanced strength training in which the bigger, faster,
and stronger program is implemented. This program is designed for
serious strength training for the highly motivated student. The other 2
days of the week the student will develop fast-twitch muscles that
include the use of plyometrics drills that promotes speed, quickness,
power, agility and reaction time.
50
Industrial Technology
2621—Intro to Auto Technology (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None
Grades 10-12
This is a one-semester course offered for one hour a day to students
who may or may not be interested in specializing in automotive repair.
Course content covers the terminology and operation of the basic components and system of the automobile. The engine, fuel system, brakes,
etc., will be covered. Approximately 20% to 40% of the student's time
will be spent working on various automotive components and learning
the proper use of hand tools. The course is a prerequisite for all advanced automotive courses and will be required for all students intending to specialize in this area.
Philosophy of the Department
All students, regardless of gender, can benefit from experiences in Industrial Technology. Students may enroll in one semester exploratory
courses without making long-range commitments. Traditional and modern technology courses are available for career and vocational goals.
Exploratory and sequential programs are aligned with career pathways
in automotive technology, construction technology, architectural, engineering, and manufacturing technology are available. Successful completion of any sequential program should provide the student with sufficient knowledge and skill to qualify for entry level employment, vocational courses at the Career Technical Center, or educational/technical training programs after high school.
Automotive Technology
Career Pathway
Construction Technology
Career Pathway
Recommended Prerequisites
Small Engines
Recommended Prerequisites
Intro Drafting
Core Courses
Intro Woods
Advanced Woods
*Construction Trades 1 (1 yr)
*Construction Trades 2 (1yr)
Core Courses
Intro Auto
Auto Repair & Maintenance
**Automotive Technology (1 yr) SHS
*Automotive Technology 1 (1 yr)
*Automotive Technology 2 (1 yr)
2622— Auto Repair & Maintenance (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Intro to Auto
Grades 10-12
Auto Repair & Maintenance is primarily a terminal course for students
who do not plan to earn a living as a mechanic, but would like to learn
how to repair and properly maintain their own automobile. However, students electing Auto Repair and Maintenance may proceed to the technical program in those instances where additional automotive instruction
is desired. Auto Repair and Maintenance is a course covering tune-up,
general maintenance procedures, brakes, emission controls and drive
trains. Approximately 50 percent of the student's time will be spent in
lecture and study sessions and the remaining 50 percent will be spent
working in a laboratory on live units.
Architectural, Engineering, and Manufacturing Technology
Career Pathway
1660/2660—Small Engine Service (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None - Should be taken before 1621 Intro to Auto
Students in this one semester course will learn the fundamentals of
small two-stroke-cycle and four-stroke-cycle gas powered engines. The
course will include units of instruction in service, maintenance and repair
of small engines used on lawn mowers, snow blowers, power generators, chain saws, snowmobiles, and garden equipment. Proper use of
tools, trouble shooting, and testing will be emphasized.
Recommended Prerequisites
Intro Drafting
Architectural Technology Core Courses
Architectural Drafting/CAD
*Architectural Design (1 yr)
Engineering Technology Core Courses
Mechanical Drafting/CAD
*Engineering Design (1 yr)
Manufacturing Technology Core Courses
Manufacturing Technology (1 yr)
* Career Technical Center Course
** This course taken in the senior year may be applied towards senior math credit.
51
1634/2634—Introduction to Drafting (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None
Introduction to Drafting is an exploratory course for students who hope
to obtain a basic knowledge of mechanical and architectural drafting and
an introduction to CAD. The course content is organized to provide the
student with basic skills in reading and creating drawings that will be of
benefit to the student in other industrial technology courses.
0936/2936—Auto Technology 1 (1 Year)
Prerequisites: None
This one-year course may be offered at the Livonia Career Technical
Center or at the home high school. This course is designed to prepare
the student for entry into the automotive mechanic occupation. This will
be done by the student performing the tasks associated with the auto
servicing field
Included are the disassembly, inspection, repair and reassembly of specific components of the automotive engine and chassis. The student will
also be given an opportunity to practice and improve skills in the standard automotive services.
1636/2636—Architectural Drafting/CAD (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Intro to Drafting
Note: Students may take Architectural Drafting/CAD for two semesters.
Architectural Drafting/CAD is a course for students interested in architecture, design, and/or construction technology. Course content includes
scale reading, architectural drawing, dimensioning techniques, and
CAD.
0937/2937—Auto Technology 2
(Livonia Career Technical Center - see blue section)
1638/2638—Mechanical Drafting/CAD (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Intro to Drafting
Note: Students may take Mechanical Drafting/CAD for two semesters.
This course is for future designers and engineers. Course content includes mechanical drawing, dimensioning techniques, CAD, career opportunities, and educational technical programs.
Construction Technology
1652/2652—Intro to Woods (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None
Introduction to Woods is a one-semester course with product-centered
activities and an emphasis on understanding the following areas of instruction: shop safety; basic hand tool manipulation; machine operation;
planning; measuring; finishing; minor home maintenance and consumer
knowledge.
0940—Architecture Design
(Livonia Career Technical Center - see blue section)
1653/2653—Advanced Woods (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Intro to Woods
Note: Students may take Advanced Woods for two or more semesters.
Advanced Woods is an advanced course with additional concentration
on those areas mentioned in Intro to Woods. Project selection will be
more challenging with increased emphasis on individual planning and
problem solving.
0942—Engineering Design
(Livonia Career Technical Center - see blue section)
0910 Construction Trades 1
(Livonia Career Technical Center - see blue section)
0914 Construction Trades 2
(Livonia Career Technical Center - see blue section)
52
The foreign language is used as the vehicle for communication. Pertinent culture, grammar, and syntax are presented and applied in context.
Students must maintain a portfolio of written work and produce oral
presentations throughout the course. Both written and oral assessments
are required. IB monitoring of student work begins at this level of study
for juniors using portfolio and recorded samples Students will sit for the
IB exam in May of their senior year.
International Baccalaureate Program (IB)
IB (International Baccalaureate) Program at Franklin High School will
allow selected 11th and 12th grade students to earn an IB diploma in
addition to their regular high school diploma. The IB curriculum is recognized for its academic rigor and its "international mindedness" exposure.
Students working for an IB diploma will be required to take a full IB
schedule that includes courses in Language 1 (English), Language 2
(Spanish), Individuals and Society (Social Studies), Mathematics, Experimental Science, and Visual Arts. Students will also take end-of-course
exams that will be assessed using international standards. The IB program has additional requirements of an extended essay, a Theory of
Knowledge course, and 150 hours of documented creativity, action, and
service.
There will be seats available for students currently attending Stevenson
or Churchill High Schools, but those students would have to transfer to
Franklin before their junior year. Applications are accepted beginning in
the student's eighth grade year.
1882/2882-IB History of the Americas: Higher Level (HL) - Grade 11
1892/2892-IB History of the Americas: Higher Level (HL) - Grade 12
International Baccalaureate History of the Americas is a two-year course
to prepare students to fulfill the group three requirement. During Year
One, students will study Anglo-America and Latin America for the purpose of comparing/contrasting the similarities and differences in cultural
roots, political-economic-social development, and modern international
relations. A focus on critical issues in United States History will serve as
part of the course to meet state requirements. Year Two will focus on
topics of the 20th century. Students will prepare for IB examinations during both years and exams will be taken in May of their senior year.
1880/2880—IB English: Higher Level (HL) - Grade 11
1890/2890—IB English: Higher Level (HL) - Grade 12
International Baccalaureate English is a two-year course of study to prepare students to fulfill the group one requirement. Works are selected
according to IB requirements and from Prescribed Book Lists so as to
cover all genres and time periods of World and Western Literature within
the two-year course. Numerous written and oral assignments are graded
both internally and externally by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The two internally assessed oral components are the formal oral
presentation on Part IV works and the formal oral commentary on Part II
works. The formal oral presentation is completed in the first year of the
program, and the formal oral commentary is completed in the second
year of the program. In the second year of the program, students will sit
for the IB exam which consists of two papers, one on Groups of Works
and the other a written commentary on either a piece of prose or a poem.
1881/2881—IB Spanish: Standard Level (SL) - Grade 11
1891/2891—IB Spanish: Standard Level (SL) - Grade 12
Prerequisite: Students must complete Spanish 1 and 2 before
entering the program.
This is a two-year course to prepare students to fulfill their IB Language
B (group 2) requirement. In this course students develop increased proficiency in the foreign language. The development of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing skills continues through questions, discussions, and
presentations.
1883/2883—IB Biology: Higher Level (HL) - Grade 11
International Baccalaureate Biology is a two-year course of study to prepare students for the group four requirement. The course emphasizes
basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetic patterns of inheritance, plant form and function, evolution, ecology, animal physiology
and the international nature of science. An interdisciplinary group project
helps students realize that one discipline is not isolated from another
and that scientists can work together on problems to discover solutions
to a common goal. Requiring structured labs, research papers and experimental design projects emphasizes laboratory work. Instruction is
student-centered with cooperative learning as well as teacher directed,
thus offering the student a college-level biology experience. Students
will sit for the higher level International Baccalaureate Biology exam in
May of their senior year.
1884/2884—IB Biology: Standard Level (SL) - Grade 11
International Baccalaureate Biology is a two-year course of study to prepare students for the group four requirement. The course emphasizes
basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetic patterns of inheritance, plant form and function, evolution, and an interdisciplinary group
project helps students realize that one discipline is not isolated from another and that scientists can work together on problems to discover solutions to a common goal. Requiring structured labs, research papers and
experimental design projects emphasizes laboratory work.
53
Instruction is student-centered with cooperative learning as well as
teacher directed, thus offering the student a college-level biology experience. Students will sit for the standard level International Baccalaureate
Biology exam in May of their senior year.
The course includes a project requiring significant personal research
involving the collection, analysis, and evaluation of data. Additionally,
students completing this course will sit for the external IB Mathematical
Studies exam in May of their senior year.
1885/2885—IB Environment Systems and Societies: Standard Level
(SL) - Grade 11
IB Environmental Systems and Societies (ESS) is a one year course of
study to meet the students' group 4 requirements. Through studying
environmental systems and societies students will be provided with a
coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental
systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that
they will inevitably come to face. The teaching approach is such that
students are allowed to evaluate the scientific, ethical and socio-political
aspects of issues. The course aims to foster an international perspective, awareness of local and global environmental concerns and an understanding of the scientific methods.
1888/2888—IB Visual Arts: Standard Level (SL) - Grade 11
International Baccalaureate Visual Arts is a two-year course of study to
prepare students for the group six requirement. It is structured to encourage individual exploration of one's artwork and personal impressions.
Students will create two separate journals, one visual and one written.
The written journal will reflect the student's personal choice of concentration in both a period of art history or artist and in an artistic medium in
which they choose to work. The assessment in IB Visual Arts will consist
of an external evaluation of the journal by IB Examiners as well as an on
-site exhibition of a student's portfolio in addition to an interview with the
examiner.
1889/2889—IB Visual Arts: Higher Level (HL) - Grade 11
1899/2899—IB Visual Arts: Higher Level (HL) - Grade 12
International Baccalaureate Visual Arts is a two-year course of study to
prepare students for the group six requirement. It is structured to encourage individual exploration of one's artwork and personal impressions.
Students will create two separate journals, one visual and one written.
The written journal will reflect the student's personal choice of concentration in both a period of art history or artist and in an artistic medium in
which they choose to work. The assessment in IB Visual Arts will consist
of an external evaluation of the journal by IB Examiners as well as an on
-site exhibition of a student's portfolio in addition to an interview with the
examiner, which takes place in the senior year.
1886/2886—IB Mathematics: Standard Level (SL) - Grade 11
1896/2896—IB Mathematics: Standard Level (SL) - Grade 12
International Baccalaureate Mathematics Standard Level is a two-year
course of study to prepare students for the group five requirement. IB
Mathematical Standard Level is a rigorous, two-year course of study.
The first year encompasses pre-calculus, which establishes a foundation
for the second year. The second year is an introduction to the study of
differential and integral calculus with emphasis on application and extends concepts of vectors, probability, statistics, exponential, and logarithmic functions. This course requires college-level performance and
work habits. A three and one half-hour external IB examination is given
in May of their senior year.
1893/2893—IB Theory of Knowledge 1 and 2
Theory of Knowledge 1 and 2 explore the origins, validity, and values of
various forms of knowledge. It considers sources of knowledge and the
varying ways in which we as individuals perceive and process the
knowledge that we acquire. The content includes the courses study in
IB and what you experience outside of the classroom. The center of this
course is critical reflection. The purpose of this course is to reconsider
and reevaluate information you already possess. The class will also
provide experiences to assist students with the development of their Extended Essay and their Creativity, Action and Service requirements for
their IB diploma. This course is open to IB Diploma Program students
only.
Theory of Knowledge 1 is scheduled for the second semester of junior
year (2893) and Theory of Knowledge 2 is scheduled for first semester
1887/2887—IB Math Studies: Standard Level (SL) - Grade 11
1897/2897—IB Math Studies: Standard Level (SL) - Grade 12
International Baccalaureate Math Studies is a two-year course of study
to prepare students for the group five requirement. The course is designed for IB students of varied backgrounds and abilities whose future
careers will not include a focus on mathematics. The skills needed to
cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society are developed, and emphasis is placed on the application of mathematics to
real-life situations. Topics developed throughout the two years include:
families of functions, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, probability, financial mathematics, and an introduction to differential calculus.
54
history as well as contemporary perspectives. Numerous impromptu
and formal essays are required. By using more challenging texts and
moving at a faster pace, students will improve in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and expressing. Outside reading, formal and informal speeches, and in-class participation are requirements of this
course.
Language Arts
Graduation Requirements
All students will take two semesters of English all four years of high
school. Other classes are offered within the department which do not
meet specific English Language Arts requirements but for which students may receive graduation requirement credits.
1106/2106—Accelerated Language Arts 11 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Accelerated Language Arts 10
with a grade of C or better.
Required English Courses: You need to have earned credit in an accelerated, college preparatory, or general level in each of the following
courses.
Language Arts 9: 9th Grade
Language Arts 10: 10th Grade
One composition course & a junior literature course: 11th Grade
Two semesters of senior ELA courses: 12th Grade
This is a two-semester, college preparatory course for high-achieving
junior students. Basic content of the course is centered, but not limited
to, British literature and composition. Emphasis is placed upon the study
of the essay, drama, novel, poetry and short story. Required readings
will explore literary history as well as contemporary perspectives. Numerous impromptu and formal essays are required. Outside reading and
in-class participation are requirements of this course.
In the Language Arts required courses, students will receive a minimum
of 1 hour per semester in a structured online learning activity that utilizes
technology with Internet-based tools and resources as the delivery
method for instruction, research, assessment, and/or communication.
1107/2107—Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition
(NCAA)
Prerequisites: Admission to Accelerated English and semester grade of C
or better in Accelerated Language Arts 11.
Advanced Placement English 12 is a two-semester college-preparatory
course for mature, previously-screened, high-ability senior students. A
highlight of the course for most students is taking the Advanced Placement Exam in English Literature and Composition. Major content of the
course is the study of the essay, novel, drama, and poetry. Listening,
discussing, writing, and rewriting are major activities each week. Outside
reading is required. Students will also focus on district-required goals of
viewing, representing, and making applications.
Accelerated Courses
Accelerated Courses: For all accelerated courses, to continue to the
next semester, a student must have a grade of C or better.
1102/2102—Accelerated Language Arts 9 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: By invitation based on eighth grade ELA teacher's recommendation, and standardized test scores in language arts and abstract
reasoning.
This is a two-semester, college preparatory course for high achieving
incoming freshmen. Emphasis is placed on the study of the essay, drama, novel, poetry, and short story. Required readings will explore literary history as well as contemporary perspectives. By using more challenging texts and moving at a faster pace, students will improve in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and expressing. Outside reading and participation are requirements of this course.
College Preparatory Courses
1101/2101—Language Arts 9 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: None
Through a thematic approach to classic and contemporary narrative and
informational texts, students will strengthen skills in six strands: reading,
writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing. Ninth graders will
connect with and respond to texts by analyzing relationships within and
across families, communities, societies, governments, and economies.
Through the lens of Inter-Relationships and Self-Reliance, they will consider how they build relationships, how their relationships impact others,
and how they are responsible to society.
1105/2105—Accelerated Language Arts 10 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Accelerated Language Arts 9 with
a grade of C or better
This is a two-semester, college preparatory course for high achieving
sophomores. Basic content of the course is centered on American Literature. Emphasis is placed on the study of the essay, drama, novel, poetry, speech and short story. Required readings will explore literary
55
literature and develop a better understanding of others through memoirs,
articles of the week, and other texts. Students will be required to read
independently, think critically, and reflect on various themes.
1108/2108—Language Arts 10 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Tenth grade status
In Language Arts 10, students will extend their studies of classic and
contemporary narrative and informational texts with a special focus on
American literature. By connecting with and responding to texts through
critical response and stance, students will assess and modify their beliefs, their views of the world, and the powers that impact them.
1131/2131 - World Views Literature
(NCAA)
(1 Semester)
Prerequisite: At least Junior status
Building on the skills of ELA 9 and 10, students will explore different perspectives in a changing world through a variety of texts and writing experiences. This course will focus on diversity in nationality, gender, age
and era. Texts will include various viewpoints from multiple cultures.
JUNIOR LEVEL: TWO SEMESTERS REQUIRED
1111/2111—Composition
(NCAA)
(1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELA 10
This course assists students in developing their writing skills in more
formalized language situations. Students will study elements of composition such as usage and punctuation while practicing forms such as persuasion, comparison, and personal narrative. Students will examine
various texts – such as articles, essays, and short stories – for style,
structure, audience, and tone. Students will also develop strategies to
read critically and successfully manage reading and writing tasks on
standardized tests. Emphasis will be on journals, multi-paragraph essays, basic research skills, documentation form, and the process of revision and rewriting.
1132/2132 - Visionary Literature
(NCAA)
(1 Semester)
Prerequisite: At least Junior status
Building on the skills of ELA 9 and 10, students will explore different perspectives in a changing world through a variety of texts and writing experiences. This course will focus on the visionary writers and innovative
thinkers through various time periods, the visions of the future, the journey of the self, and the creation of new ways of thinking.
SENIOR LEVEL: TWO SEMESTERS REQUIRED
1195 – Humanities I
(NCAA)
(1st Semester)
Prerequisite: Senior status
Students will explore human nature and leadership qualities through the
study of literature, art, music, architecture, philosophy, theater, science,
sculpture and dance. Beginning with early human cultures and advancing through the Middle Ages, students will experience the arts through
various projects, readings, viewings and interactions. Analytical writing is
emphasized, in addition to oral presentations and research. Students
may also take Humanities second semester, but it is not required.
1119/2119—Advanced Composition
(NCAA)
(1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ELA 10 with a B or better or by
teacher recommendation
This rigorous course offers students a chance to refine their writing and
further develop their literary skills. It is recommended for college-bound
students. Like the composition class, students will study elements of
composition such as usage and punctuation while practicing essay
forms such as persuasion, comparison, and personal narrative. Students will examine various texts – such as articles, essays and short
stories – for style, structure, audience and tone. Students will also develop strategies to read critically and successfully manage reading and
writing tasks on standardized tests. Emphasis will be on journals, multiparagraph essays, research skills, documentation, revision and rewriting.
2195 – Humanities II
(NCAA)
(2nd Semester)
Prerequisite: Senior status
Students will explore human nature and leadership qualities through the
study of literature, art, music, architecture, philosophy, theater, science,
sculpture and dance. Beginning with the Renaissance and advancing to
the present era, students will experience the arts through various projects, readings, viewings and interactions. Analytical writing is emphasized, in addition to oral presentations and research. Students may also
take Humanities first semester, but it is not a requirement.
1130/2130 - Reality Literature
(NCAA)
(1 Semester)
Prerequisite: At least Junior status
Building on the skills of ELA 9 and 10, students will explore different perspectives in a changing world through a variety of texts and writing experiences. This course is centered, but not limited to, nonfiction literature and composition. Students will make real life connections to the
56
1196 – Conflicts and Compromise
(1st Semester)
Prerequisite: Senior status
Through both fiction and nonfiction, students will explore and discuss
conflicts and comprises in current interpersonal, personal, and world
issues. Students will be active participants and presenters as they develop their own leadership abilities. Students will share their insights and
understanding of leadership and their views of the modern world.
1109/2109—Language Arts 10B
Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of Language Arts 9B or by teacher recommendation and approval of department chair.
This course follows the goals of Language Arts 10 with emphasis on
continued improvement of basic skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing.
2196 – Researching Contemporary Issues
(2nd Semester)
Prerequisite: Senior status
Through lively and spirited discussion, students will discover their own
voices as potential leaders. Students will be taught the rules of argumentation and gain a greater understanding of research techniques
through a variety of speaking and writing activities.
1117/2117— Composition B
(1 Semester)
(satisfies junior comp requirement)
Prerequisites: Completion of ELA 10B or by teacher recommendation and approval of department chair.
Students will write, revise and edit papers and letters for a variety of purposes. This class will continue to focus on reading comprehension and
written expression.
1197- Leadership and Literature
(NCAA)
(1st Semester)
Prerequisite: Senior status
Students will examine leadership issues past and present through managed literature choices. Students will explore their own leadership qualities and enhance their leadership potential by reading, writing, discussing, and interacting with texts and each other.
Students in Senior Standing, must select a course from
1195, 1196, or 1197; and must select a course from
2195, 2196, or 2197
Elective English Courses
2197- Media Literacy
(2nd Semester)
Prerequisite: Senior status
Students will engage in a critical examination of the media in forms such
as television, internet, advertising, radio and periodicals to understand
how each is constructed. Students will analyze and evaluate message
design strategies, the effects of media consumption, information fatigue,
and the influences of bias and economic forces on media content.
1198/2198—Writing for Publication
(NCAA)
(1 Year)
Prerequisite: Senior Status
Credit: .5 credit/semester
Strongly Recommended: Advanced Composition /Visionary Lit
In Writing for Publication, students will focus on the processes involved
in: news gathering, reporting and writing news stories, as well as opinion/editorial writing and creative pieces. In addition, the legal, social, and
ethical responsibilities involved publishing will be covered. This course
includes instruction and practice in effective journalistic writing forms and
techniques as well as layout, design, photojournalism, and typography.
This course will also include extensive reading of models of excellent
journalistic techniques and will evaluate and analyze journalistic writing
through discussion and critiques. Fiction and non-fiction pieces will be
analyzed for the purpose of writing critical reviews. Ultimately, this
course provides practice in and the study of gathering, reading, and analyzing information, interviewing, and note taking for the purpose of: (1)
writing, (2) editing, and (3) designing publishable material, including actual student publications, such as the yearbook, literary magazine and
the newspaper.
General Courses
1103/2103—Language Arts 9B
Prerequisites: Recommended for students based on eighth grade
reading scores and/or recommendation by eighth grade teacher.
Through a thematic approach, students will improve basic skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and representing.
1109/2109—Language Arts 10B
Prerequisites: Successful completion of both semesters of Language Arts 9B or by teacher recommendation and approval of department chair.
This course follows the goals of Language Arts 10 with emphasis on
continued improvement of basic skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing.
57
1116—Creative Writing
(NCAA)
(1st Semester)
Prerequisites: English 10
Creative Writing offers students a chance to compose original writings in
several literary forms such as poetry, short story, drama, and personal
narrative. Students will be asked to write daily, share orally, keep a notebook of ideas, and submit entries to contests or our school literary magazine. Attention will be given to clear, effective, and appropriate expression and useful literary devices.
1138—Mythology
(NCAA)
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Status
1184/2184—Radio and TV
(1 Semester)
Prerequisites: None
Radio & TV familiarizes the student with production techniques of radio
and television programs. Since radio and television are vocal media,
they emphasize the importance of vocal control. With the introduction of
simple production exercises, students are given tools for evaluating both
radio and television programming. In addition to writing, producing and
directing their own programs, students take part in exercises to improve
their vocal and technical proficiency.
(1st Semester)
Mythology provides students an opportunity to read and enjoy stories,
myths, fables, and legends that man has told through the ages in an attempt
to explain his origins, his relationship to divine powers, and his relationship
to his fellow man. Emphasis will be placed upon Greek & Roman
mythologies and their influence upon the arts and literature of Western
civilization. Supplementary reading and writing assignments are required.
1185/2185—Advanced Radio and TV
(1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Radio and TV, and/or approval of instructor
Advanced Radio & TV will emphasize production of videos, technical
knowledge, proficiency, editing skills, field production, and individual creativity. Second semester will also produce the Spartan Idol show.
2150—Science Fiction
(NCAA) (2nd Semester)
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Status
Science Fiction is open to students who can read independently and are
interested in stories about the strange, the unexplained, or currently
impossible. Activities will focus on a variety of print and non-print media.
1186/2186 Advanced Radio and TV 2
(1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Advanced Radio and TV
This course will allow students to further develop their video production
and editing skills. Students will also film and edit the video yearbook as
well as various school projects and have the opportunity to enter student
video competitions.
1178—Drama
(1st Semester)
Prerequisites: None
Dramatics is designed to introduce students to the theater and basic
acting techniques. The course includes reading plays, performing
pantomimes and acting out simple scenes.
1194/2194—Yearbook
Prerequisites: Permission of yearbook advisor
This is a year-long, challenging photo journalism course which requires
involvement beyond the regular school day. Students learn journalistic
copywriting, magazine style layout, photographic and artistic design, and
financial responsibility. The end product of this ambitious involvement is
our traditionally excellent high school yearbook. Credit may be earned
each semester Yearbook is taken; however, the course does not fulfill
English requirements for graduation.
2179—Advanced Drama
(2nd Semester)
Prerequisites: Drama
This course deals with advanced theater techniques and is designed for
students who have a more serious interest in dramatics. Students are
involved in acting and directing scenes. A unit on the history of the
theater is also part of this course.
58
LMC (Learning Materials)
Philosophy of the Department
1724/2724–Learning Materials 3 (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Must have passed Learning Materials 1 and 2
Students will continue to build on the skills learned in LMC-2.
Students will complete an individualized study program covering advanced research techniques. Completion of projects will verify learning
outcomes.
Learning Materials offerings differ somewhat from the conventional academic course. The school LMC is a service agency designed to assist
both students and teachers in achieving a well-rounded curriculum. To
accomplish this purpose, the courses in Learning Materials training carry
one-half credit per semester.
For the academic training, LMC assistants are given individualized instruction in the basic organization of the LMC, its resources and equipment. Emphasis is placed on the role of the LMC in the entire curriculum. Students are encouraged to apply skills they are learning to other
subject areas.
1726/2726–Learning Materials 4 (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Must have passed Learning Materials 1, 2, & 3
Students will assume the greatest degree of responsibility in carrying out
both general and specialized functions in the library. The specialized
function(s) assigned by the media specialist will be determined on the
basis of each student's aptitude and interest as demonstrated during the
previous three semesters. The academic requirement will consist of an
individualized study program. Suggested topics may include career exploration, improve use of electronic resource skills, and independent
reading.
Students in any one of the four semesters offered are involved in the
same necessary routines, but the training and skills demanded become
more complex with each semester.
1720/2720–Learning Materials 1 - LMC Procedures (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: 2.0 or better GPA
The student will be able to carry out routine circulation, retrieval, and
shelving of print and non-print materials. The student will also be able to
set up and operate several basic types of audiovisual equipment. Further, the student will be able to locate material through use of several
electronic databases. Completion of projects will verify learning outcomes.
1722/2722–Learning Materials 2 (1 Semester)
Prerequisites: Must have passed Learning Materials 1
The student will continue to build on the procedures and skills learned in
LMC-1. Students must demonstrate to media specialist their mastery of
skills learned in LMC-1. A review of these routines is provided to those
who cannot demonstrate mastery. Students will demonstrate effective
skills in use of selected print and electronic resources with the completion of required projects.
59
Accelerated Program
Mathematics
The Mathematics Department offers three programs of study dependent
on your ability, achievement, and interest in mathematics.
ACCELERATED PROGRAM - is for those students who have outstanding ability, achievement, and interest in mathematics and who have
been highly successful in previous mathematics classes. Students must
be invited into this program by the Mathematics Department. Interested
students may request such an invitation if not originally invited.
MATHEMATICS REQUIRED COURSES:
You must have earned credit in an accelerated, college preparatory or
general level in each of the following areas:
Geometry
Algebra 1
Algebra 2
Math/Math related course must be taken each semester in senior year.
Accelerated
Geometry
Students in an accelerated math program may not need to enroll in the
above courses if they have already taken the courses in middle school
and have these courses already listed on their transcripts.
Accelerated
Algebra 2
Accelerated
Precalculus w/
Trigonometry
Advanced Placement
Calculus AB
The Accelerated Program in Mathematics includes the content recommended by the Commission on Mathematics of the College Entrance
Examination Board (CEEB). This sequence of courses is offered to outstanding students who might receive college credit for the 12th grade
course (Advanced Placement Calculus). All students completing the
12th grade course will be encouraged to take the examination prepared
by CEEB, the scores on which are reported to colleges for possible credit and/or advanced placement in the college. Students should expect the
pace to be faster than similar courses offered in the College Bound Program; an extra honor point is earned for each semester in the Accelerated Program.
In the Mathematics required courses, students will receive a minimum of
1 hour per semester in a structured online learning activity that utilized
technology with Internet-based tools and resources as the delivery
method for instruction, research, assessment and/or communication.
MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS CAN EARN HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT
FOR ALGEBRA 1:
Beginning with the Class of 2011, the Michigan Department of Education
allows districts to grant credit for mathematics courses taken in middle
school that are equivalent to Algebra 1 or higher.
1331/2331—Accelerated Geometry (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and invitation from the high school
Mathematics Department
This course covers the topics from Geometry, but at a higher level and in
more depth. An opportunity is provided to work with abstract mathematical systems by means of geometric content in order to develop logical
thinking processes.
Any Livonia Public Schools middle school student who takes and successfully completes such courses as identified above will receive high
school credit for said courses. These courses will be listed on the high
school transcript indicating that credit was earned; however, the courses
will not be used in the calculation of the student's high school grade
point average.
1321/2321—Accelerated Algebra 2 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Accelerated Geometry (preferred grade of B or better) or invitation by the Mathematics Department and credit issued
for Algebra 1.
This course covers the topics from Algebra 2, but at a higher level and in
more depth. It includes the study of relations and functions; complex
numbers; systems of equations and inequalities; sequences and series;
and data collection and analysis.
Any non-LPS middle school student who completes Algebra 1 or higher
may be granted high school credit at the discretion of the building principal.
Criteria which will be used to determine credit includes middle school
course grades, teacher recommendation, information indicating the textbook used and topics covered, and 80% or higher on the Stevenson end
of course exam for the course in question. This process may be initiated
by contacting the Stevenson High School Mathematics Department
Chairperson or Stevenson Guidance Counselor.
60
1334/2334—Accelerated Precalculus w/Trigonometry (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Accelerated Algebra 2 (preferred grade of B or better) or invitation by the Mathematics Department.
This course covers the topics from Precalculus with Trigonometry but at
a higher level and in more depth.
Next Course: Advanced Placement Calculus AB. Statistics may be selected.
1322/2322—Algebra 1 (NCAA)
Prerequisite: Completion of Geometry or Math Dept chair approval.
This course provides for the study of the real number system and families of functions including linear, exponential, and quadratic. Students
will also develop their knowledge of power (including roots, cubics, and
quadratics) and polynomial patterns of change. Students will develop an
understanding that algebraic thinking is a powerful tool which can be
used to model and solve real-world problems.
1336/2336—Advanced Placement Calculus AB (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Accelerated Precalculus w/Trigonometry (preferred
grade of B or better), or invitation by the Mathematics
Department
This course follows the syllabus prepared by the College Entrance Examination Board for Advanced Placement Mathematics (AP course) and
will prepare the student to write the Advanced Placement examination.
Both differential and integral calculus and a variety of their applications
are included. The content is essentially the same as that in any collegelevel beginning calculus course. Calculus is generally a requirement for
students majoring in engineering, computer science, business, mathematics, science and some other fields.
1326/2326—Algebra 2 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Geometry and credit
issued for Algebra 1.
Algebra 2 expands the study of numbers to include complex numbers
and includes the study of exponents and radicals; rational expressions;
relations and functions, primarily quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric; and data collection and analysis.
1328/2328—Precalculus with Trigonometry (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Algebra 2 & Geometry (preferred grade C or better).
This course provides a further analysis of functions (including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric) and their applications. It incorporates matrices for solving equations, vector definition
and application, polar coordinates, and sequences and series.
College-Bound Program
1329/2329—Calculus (See course 1336 for AP Calculus AB) (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Precalculus or Accelerated Precalculus
w/Trigonometry.
This course is designed to strengthen the student's mathematical background and to give them an introduction to the topics of the calculus. It
will not prepare them to write the AP exam in mathematics.
COLLEGE-BOUND PROGRAM—is for those students who have very
good arithmetic skills and who plan to attend college.
GEOMETRY
ALGEBRA 1
ALGEBRA 2
ALGEBRA 2
PRECALCULUS
PRECALCULUS
CALCULUS
1324/2324—Geometry (NCAA)
Prerequisites: None
The emphasis of this course is on geometric figures (including lines, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, and circles) and their properties.
Relationships between two- and three-dimensional representations, congruence, similarity, transformations, proof, and logic are also studied in
this course. Algebraic concepts are applied and expanded throughout
the course.
General Program
General Program - For students with moderate arithmetic skills and who
may be planning to attend college. Students in this program benefit from
the extended time spent developing key skills.
GEOMETRY B
61
ALGEBRA 1B
ALGEBRA 2B
Elective Math Courses
1343/2343—Geometry B
Prerequisites: Recommendation from the middle school or high
school Mathematics Department.
This course includes covers the topics of geometry at a basic level. Algebraic concepts are applied and expanded throughout this course.
1344/2344
Financial Literacy
Prerequisites: Senior status. Seniors may enroll in this course for
one semester, either first or second, or for the entire year.
The Financial Literacy course concentrates on applying mathematics to
concepts of personal finance and budgeting to help students be financially literate and make sound money decisions. Topics include: income,
banking, credit cards, health insurance, taxes, funding post-secondary
education, transportation costs, housing costs, budgeting and investments.
1342/2342—Algebra 1B (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Geometry B or Math
Department chair approval.
This course provides for the study of the real number system and families of functions including linear, exponential, and quadratic at a basic
level. Students will also begin to develop their knowledge of power and
polynomial patterns of change. Students will develop an understanding
that algebraic thinking is a powerful tool which can be used to model and
solve real-world problems.
1348/2348—Statistics (1 Semester) (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of or concurrent enrollment
in second semester Algebra 2.
Statistics involves the collection, tabulation, and analysis of data using
numerical computations in order to make the data manageable and
meaningful. The course also includes an introduction to probability and
laboratory exercises which underscores the use of statistics in practical
problems. This course does not replace Trigonometry/Precalculus in the
College-Bound Program; however, it is extremely valuable not only to
mathematics majors, but also in non-mathematical fields such as
psychology, biological science, education, business, medicine, social
sciences, etc.
1327/2327 – Algebra 2B (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1B or teacher recommendation.
This course continues to develop the algebraic thinking and skills begun
in Algebra 1B. Students will study the definitions, representations, and
attributes of families of functions including exponential, polynomial, and
logarithmic; systems of equations and inequalities; real and complex
numbers; sequences and series; and data collection and analysis at a
basic level. Students will use algebraic thinking to model and solve real
world problems.
Note: Students may satisfy the senior year math requirement by taking a math or
math-related course during their senior year. A list of the "math-related" courses
can be found on page 17 or refer to the Business section of the Programs of
Study beginning on page 44.
1345/2345 - Trigonometric Explorations (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Algebra 2 with a grade of C or below, Algebra 2B with a
grade of A– or better or teacher recommendation.
This course introduces students to a variety of basic trigonometric topics
such as trigonometric functions, graphs and identities by building on the
algebraic topics taught in Algebra 2 including the families of functions,
complex numbers, conic sections, and sequences and series.
62
MSC (Math/Science/Computers)
MSC BIOLOGY is a one-semester course which studies the interrelationships of
living things. Its course content is meant to be an introduction to AP Biology.
Emphasis will be placed on biochemistry, cellular anatomy, and physiology.
(NCAA)
An Alternative Concept
The Livonia Public Schools School District provides an alternative program
which offers the opportunity for students to experience an appropriately accelerated, integrated curriculum in math, science, and computers. Students enter this
program only by invitation. Therefore, interested students need to apply to the
MSC facilitators.
ACCELERATED ANALYSIS is a two-semester course covering topics in Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, as well as beginning topics in Calculus. (NCAA)
11th Grade Courses
The curriculum of MSC is specifically designed for the academically talented
student. The content is taught at a faster pace and in greater depth. The Advanced Placement (AP) Program is an instrument of cooperation that extends
the educational opportunities available to students by effectively relating collegelevel courses at thousands of schools to appropriate credit and placement at the
colleges that the students eventually attend.
AP BIOLOGY is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology
course taken by first-year biology majors. Topics covered include biochemistry,
energetics, genetics, plant and animal anatomy and physiology, cytology, diversity of life evolution, and ecology. (NCAA)
AP PASCAL covers topics normally comprising six or more semester hours of
college-level computer science course work. Students will understand wellknown algorithms and data structures, develop and select appropriate algorithms
and data structures to solve problems, and code fluently in a well-structured
fashion using an accepted high-level language. (NCAA)
CURRICULUM OF MSC
9th Grade Courses
ACCELERATED ALGEBRA is a two-semester course which studies the traditional Algebra 2 topics with emphasis placed on unusual and innovative solution
processes and problem-solving techniques. (NCAA)
AP CALCULUS (BC) is an intensive full-year course in the calculus of functions
of a single variable. Topics covered include a thorough study of elementary functions, derivatives and integrals and their applications, and a study of sequences
and series of real numbers and elementary differential equations. (NCAA)
MSC COMPUTER MATH studies multi-environmental programming methods
using current technologies that enhance and supplement learning. Students will
develop programs to solve problems, create presentations, automate procedures
within applications, and explore topics in, but not necessarily limited to, mathematics. Students will begin the study of the computer science that will be continued in the AP Computer course. (NCAA)
12TH Grade Courses
AP PHYSICS is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory physics
course for students majoring in the physical sciences, engineering, premedicine, business, or law. Topics to be covered in depth include mechanics,
electricity, magnetism, optics, and wave mechanics. Emphasis will be placed on
the use of calculus to solve challenging problems both in the laboratory and at
home. (NCAA)
MSC CHEMISTRY is a two-semester overview of the college preparatory chemistry class. Laboratory experiences are an integral part of this course. (NCAA)
10th Grade Courses
ACCELERATED GEOMETRY is a one-semester course which studies the topics normally covered in two semesters of Plane Geometry. Students who have
previously completed geometry may choose an elective outside the MSC curriculum. (NCAA)
AP CHEMISTRY is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry
course usually taken during the first year of college. Topics such as the structure
of matter, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, and the
basic concepts of thermodynamics will be presented in considerable depth.
(NCAA)
MSC PHYSICS is a two-semester overview of the college preparatory physics
course. Students will apply geometric, algebraic, and trigonometric skills to solve
problems in classical physics. Laboratory experiences are an integral part of this
course. (NCAA)
ADVANCED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS is a two-semester course consisting
of one semester of Discrete Mathematics and one semester of Calculus Based
Statistics. (NCAA)
63
Music
1735/2735 Wind Ensemble
Prerequisite: The Wind Ensemble is an ensemble of students with
exceptional musical ability, which is determined through a special
audition given by the director.
The Wind Ensemble is a selective performing ensemble offering advanced training in musicianship, tone production, sight reading, and music theory. This ensemble will perform frequently at school and community functions and competitive events. After school rehearsals and concerts are required.
Philosophy of the Department
The aim of the Music Department is to develop and make available to
students a music curriculum of comprehensive scope, which provides a
wide variety of musical experiences for both students having a limited
background and for those with more advanced musical preparation.
Objectives include:
To enrich the lives of the students through creative and expressive experiences gained through study and performance.
To provide instruction leading to a more complete understanding and
appreciation of the fine arts.
1737/2737 Orchestra
Prerequisite: Orchestra is open to students who have previous
training and possess acceptable performance skills on violin, viola,
cello, or double bass.
The Orchestra offers continued training in basic and advanced techniques on string instruments, music theory, and sight-reading. This ensemble will perform frequently at school and community functions and
competitive events. After school rehearsals and concerts are required
unless excused by the director.
1732/2732 Concert Band
Prerequisites: The Concert Band is open to 9th grade students with
previous experience on a band instrument or other grade levels
with permission from instructor.
The Concert Band offers continued training in basic techniques on wind
and percussion instruments, music theory, and sight-reading. The Concert Band will perform frequently at school and community functions
throughout the school year. After school rehearsals and concerts are
required unless excused by the director. This course is intended to precede the student's entry to Symphony Band and/or Wind Ensemble.
1740/2740— Singing Spartans
Prerequisites: None. Open to all girls & boys Grades 9, 10, 11, & 12
without an audition. Especially open to those who would like to
sing but have had little or no formal training.
This choral ensemble offers training in voice production, sight singing
and music theory. The chorus performs frequently at in-school and outof-school functions, choral festivals, and contests, singing various kinds
of choral music, both sacred and secular. After school and evening rehearsals and concerts are required unless excused by the director.
1734/2734 Symphony Band
Prerequisites: The Symphony Band is a musical ensemble open to
all students with previous experience on band instruments. Students must be auditioned by the director before being admitted.
The Symphony Band offers advanced training in musicianship, tone production, sight reading, and music theory. This ensemble will perform
frequently at school and community functions throughout the school
year. After school rehearsals and concerts are required.
64
1754 - Music Theory and Appreciation 1 (1 semester)
Prerequisites: None - prior musical experience or involvement in a
performing group would be helpful. Open to all grades
1746/2746—Select Girls Chorus
Prerequisites: Open to all girls Grades 10, 11, & 12 by an audition
with the director. Girls will be accepted into Chorale based on vocal
and sight reading ability and the need in Chorale for their voice
part.
The Music Appreciation course will introduce the student to the basics of
music theory, music history, and famous composers. Students will become familiar with music notation, music composition, famous composers and their music. Music from medieval times through the 20th Century
will be studied. There will be opportunities for small group performances
and composition. The course will be designed around the musical background of the students. College-bound music majors will find this course
very helpful in preparing them for freshman music theory and history
courses.
This choral ensemble is a selective performing organization offering advanced training in musicianship, voice production, sight reading and music theory. The choir is limited in number by sectional balance. The choir
will perform frequently at school and community functions and choral
festivals. The finest choral repertoire, both sacred and secular, will be
offered. After school and evening rehearsals and concerts are required.
1747/2747–Symphonic Choir
Prerequisites: Open to all girls and boys Grades 10, 11, & 12 by an
audition with the director.
2754—Music Theory and Appreciation 2 (1 semester)
Prerequisites: Music Theory and Appreciation 1
Open to all grades
This choral ensemble is a selective performing organization offering advanced training in musicianship, voice production, sight reading music theory. The choir is limited in number by sectional balance. The choir will perform frequently at school and community functions and choral festivals. The
finest choral repertoire, both sacred and secular, will be offered. After school
and evening rehearsals and concerts are required.
The Music Theory and Appreciation II course is a continuation of Music
Theory and Appreciation I. The course will expand on the concepts
learned in first semester.
65
Science
1364/2364 – Biology B (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Placement based on the eighth grade science
teacher's recommendation, eighth grade final grade in science, and
Stanford/OLSAT test scores.
Biology (B) is an adaptive two-semester laboratory-oriented course.
Students will focus on the fundamental biological knowledge needed to
become science literate. This is done through a variety of teaching
methods, labs, group and individual activities, discussions and cooperative learning. Assessment of students will be done through class
participation, group projects, individual projects, labs, homework,
quizzes and tests.
Philosophy of the Department
Students will explore various areas of interest concerning life, earth and
physical sciences. Laboratory oriented courses will enable students to
use reason, memory, imagination and the scientific method of inquiry.
Students will learn the basic principles of each subject area and will be
helped to apply these concepts to everyday life as well as to future
studies. Course selections are designed to accommodate the
capabilities and backgrounds of each student.
SCIENCE REQUIRED COURSES
You must have earned credit in an accelerated, college preparatory, or
general level of each of these sciences.



The focus of this course will be on biological core and essential
concepts of: Inquiry, Reflection, and Social Implications; Organization
and Development of Living Systems; Interdependence of Living Systems
and the Environment; Genetics; and Evolution and Biodiversity.
Biology:
9th grade recommended
Chemistry: 10th grade recommended
Physics:
11th grade recommended
Laboratory investigations are an integral part of this course which will
include the use of computers in science simulations and for gathering,
analyzing, and interpretation of data.
In the Science required courses, students will receive a minimum
of one hour per semester in a structured on-line learning activity
which utilizes technology with Internet-based tools and resources
as the delivery method for instruction, research, assessment,
and/or communication.
1365/2365 – Biology (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Placement based on the eighth grade science teacher's
recommendation, eighth grade final grade in science, and Stanford/OLSAT
test scores.
Introduction to High School Science Course
Accelerated
Adv. Biology Adv. Chemistry
College Prep Biology
General
Biology B
This is a two-semester college preparatory course. Students will focus on a
deep understanding of biological concepts of: inquiry, reflection and social
implications, organization and development of living systems,
interdependence of living systems and the environment, genetics, and
evolution and biodiversity. This is done through a variety of teaching
methods, labs, group and individual activities, discussions and cooperative
learning. Assessment of students will be done through class participation,
group projects, individual projects, labs, homework, quizzes and tests.
Adv. Physics Elective
Chemistry
Physics
Elective
Chemistry B
Physical
Science
Elective
The focus of this course will be on biological core and essential concepts of:
Inquiry, Reflection, and Social Implications; Organization and Development
of Living Systems; Interdependence of Living Systems and the Environment;
Genetics; and Evolution and Biodiversity.
Descriptions
Science education is the link between science and society. Its ultimate
goal is to develop a scientifically literate citizen who will use and understand the impact, knowledge, and process of science. All science courses convey to our students that there are exciting things to discover and
important concepts to learn; therefore, the high school science courses
are designed to encourage students to become involved in
more advanced science offerings.
Laboratory investigations are an integral part of this course which will include the use of computers in science simulations and for gathering,
analyzing, and interpretation of data.
66
The focus of this course will be on chemistry core and essential concepts of:
Inquiry, Reflection, and Social Implications; Forms of Energy; Energy Transfer and Conservation; Properties of Matter; and Changes in Matter.
Laboratory investigations are an integral part of this course which will include the use of computers in science simulations and for gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data.
1366/2366 – Advanced Biology (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Placement based on the 8th grade science teacher's
recommendation, 8th grade final grade in science, and Stanford/
OLSAT test scores.
This is a two-semester college preparatory course that is highly recommended for those students who are planning to major in science, medicine or engineering during their college careers. Students will focus on
a more in depth investigation of biological concepts of: inquiry, reflection
and social implications, organization and development of living systems,
interdependence of living systems and the environment, genetics, and
evolution and biodiversity. This is done through a variety of teaching
methods, labs, group and individual activities, discussions and cooperative learning. Assessment of students will be done through class participation, group projects, individual projects, labs, homework, quizzes and
tests. Laboratory investigations are an integral part of this course which
will include the use of computers in science simulations and for gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data.
1386/2386 - Advanced Chemistry (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Courses: Biology, Geometry, Algebra 1 and/or current enrollment in Algebra 1 and recommendation of Biology teacher.
This is a two-semester college preparatory course that is highly recommended for those students who are planning to major in science, medicine or engineering during their college careers. Students will focus on a more indepth investigation of chemistry concepts of: inquiry, reflection and social
implications, Forms of Energy, Energy Transfer and Conservation, properties of Matter, Changes in Matter. This is done through a variety of teaching
methods, labs, group and individual activities, discussions and cooperative
learning. Assessment of students will be done through class participation,
group projects, individual projects, labs, homework, quizzes and tests.
The focus of this course will be on chemistry core and essential concepts of:
Inquiry, Reflection, and Social Implications; Forms of Energy; Energy Transfer and Conservation; Properties of Matter; and Changes in Matter.
Laboratory investigations are an integral part of this course which will include the use of computers in science simulations and for gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data.
1383/2383 - Chemistry B (NCAA-LAB*)
Prerequisites: Biology B and recommendation of Biology teacher.
Chemistry (B) is an adaptive two-semester laboratory-oriented course. Students will focus on the fundamental chemistry knowledge needed to become
science literate. This is done through a variety of teaching methods, labs,
group and individual activities, discussions and cooperative learning. Assessment of students will be done through class participation, group projects, individual projects, labs, homework, quizzes and tests.
The focus of this course will be on chemistry core and essential concepts of:
Inquiry, Reflection, and Social Implications; Forms of Energy; Energy Transfer and Conservation; Properties of Matter; and Changes in Matter.
Laboratory investigations are an integral part of this course which will include the use of computers in science simulations and for gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data.
1387/2387 - Physical Science (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and/or current enrollment in Algebra 2B
or Algebra 2 and recommendation of the Chemistry teacher.
Physical Science is an adaptive two-semester laboratory-oriented course. Students will focus on the fundamental physics knowledge students need to become science literate. This is done through a variety of teaching methods, labs,
group and individual activities, discussions and cooperative learning. Assessment of students will be done through class participation, group projects, individual projects, labs, homework, quizzes and tests. The focus of this course is on
the physics essential concepts of: Inquiry, Reflection, and Social Implications,
Motion of Objects, Forces and Motion, Forms of Energy and Energy Transformations. Laboratory investigations are an integral part of this course which include the use of computers in science simulations and for the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data.
1384/2384 - Chemistry (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Courses: Principles of Biology, Geometry, Algebra 1 and/or
current enrollment in Algebra 1 and recommendation of Biology teacher.
This is a two-semester college preparatory course. Students will focus on a
deep understanding of chemistry concepts of: inquiry, reflection and social
implications, Forms of Energy, Energy Transfer and Conservation, properties of Matter, Changes in Matter. This is done through a variety of teaching
methods, labs, group and individual activities, discussions and cooperative
learning. Assessment of students will be done through class participation,
group projects, individual projects, labs, homework, quizzes and tests.
67
Science Electives
1389/2389 - Physics (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites Courses: Algebra 1 and current enrollment in Algebra 2 and recommendation of Chemistry teacher.
1367/2367 - Bioethics (one semester) (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Grade 11 or 12. Successful completion of Biology
and Chemistry with a grade of B or better in both.
This is a two-semester college preparatory course. Students will focus on a
deep understanding of physics concepts of: Inquiry, Reflection, and Social Impli-
This course will examine current ethical dilemmas using biological case studies. Students will practice using and building upon their critical thinking and
problem solving skills as they discuss and debate the role of scientific advancements, as well as the ethics of the cases. Topics include, but are not limited to,
cloning, transgenic therapy, euthanasia and stem cell research, just to name a
few. This is a seminar-style class that requires public speaking and group
discussion. In addition to discourse, students will be expected to write position
papers, essays, and to collaborate on a student project.
cations, Motion of Objects, Forces and Motion, Forms of Energy and Energy
Transformations. This is accomplished through a variety of teaching methods,
labs, group and individual activities, discussions and cooperative learning. Assessment of students will be done through class participation, group and individual projects, labs, homework, quizzes, and tests. The focus of this course is on
physics essential concepts and selected core concepts that comprise the state's
high school content expectations for science. Laboratory investigations are an
integral part of this course which will include the use of computers in science
simulations and for gathering, analyzing, and interpreting data.
2370 - Ecology (2nd Semester) (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Advanced Biology or Biology, Advanced Chemistry or Chemistry, and Algebra.
The student will survey through reading, laboratory work, class discussion, visual aids, outdoor activities, technology, and lecture in the following areas: nonliving elements of the environment, animal behavior, interactions between members of the same species, interactions between
members of different species, succession, biomes, biochemical cycles,
and current local and global environmental problems (i.e. invasive species, ocean acidification, climate change/global warming). Students will
receive a minimum of two hours in a structured online learning experience.
1390/2390 - Advanced Physics (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites Courses: Biology, Chemistry, Geometry, Algebra 1
and or current enrollment in Algebra 2 and recommendation of
Chemistry teacher.
This is a two-semester college preparatory course that is highly recommended
for those students who are planning to major in science, medicine or engineering
during their college careers. Students in Advanced Physics will focus on a more
in-depth investigation of Physics concepts of: Inquiry, Reflection, and Social Implications, Motion of Objects, Forces and Motion, Forms of Energy and Energy
Transformations. This is done through a variety of teaching methods, labs, group
and individual activities, discussions and cooperative learning. Assessment of
students will be done through class participation, group projects, individual projects, labs, homework, quizzes and tests. The focus of this course is on the
physics essential concepts, selected core concepts and recommended concepts that comprise the state's high school content expectations for science.
Laboratory investigations are an integral part of this course which includes the
use of computers in science simulations and for the gathering, analyzing, and
interpretation of data.
1368 - Genetics (1st Semester) (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Advanced Biology or
Biology, Advanced Chemistry or Chemistry, and Algebra.
This course will encompass the study of heredity in plants and animals
with Human genetics as the main focus. The scope of the class will include cellular/molecular genetics, the mechanisms involved in the transmission of traits from one generation to another, principles of genetic
engineering and biotechnology, epigenetics, stem cell research and applications, gene therapies, and bioethics. Students will practice and develop their critical thinking and problem solving skills during laboratory
activities and human genetic case studies (i.e. hereditary hemochromatosis, sickle cell disease, Fanconi anemia, osteogenesis imperfecta).
Students will receive a minimum of two hours in a structured online
learning experience.
68
1374/2374—Advanced Placement Biology (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Advanced Biology/Advanced Chemistry with a
grade of B or better and/or recommendation of Biology and Chemistry instructors.
Advanced Placement Biology is a challenging two semester course
equivalent to an introductory college-level biology course. In May, students can take the A.P. Biology exam given by the College Board.
Based on his/her score on the exam, college credit may be given by the
college or university that the student will be attending. It is important to
note that regardless of the A.P. exam results, students who complete
the A.P. Biology course will be well-prepared for college courses in biology.
Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based
investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular
processes, energy and communication, genetics, information transfer,
ecology and interactions. This course requires hands-on laboratory
work that provides students with opportunities to apply the science practices.
The class requires a large amount of reading, independent review and
lab work. Students in an A.P. Biology course should spend at least five
hours a week in individual study outside of the classroom.
1388/2388—Advanced Placement Chemistry (NCAA-LAB)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry with a
grade of B or better and/or recommendation of the Chemistry instructor.
Advancement Placement Chemistry is a two-semester laboratory based
course designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college chemistry
course. In May of each year, students take the AP Chemistry exam given by
the College Board and based on his/her score, college credit or no college
credit may be given by the college and/or university that the student will be
attending. it is important to note that regardless of the AP exam results, students who complete the AP Chemistry course will be well prepared for college courses in Chemistry.
The two main goals of AP Chemistry are to help students develop a conceptual framework for Modern Chemistry and an appreciation of science as a
process with the focus being on:
Structure of Matter - 20%, States of Matter - 20%, Reactions - 35-40%,
Descriptive Chemistry - 10-15%, Laboratory - 5-10%.
The class requires a large amount of reading, notes, and lab work. Students
in an AP Chemistry course should spend at least five hours a week in
individual study outside of the classroom.
1393/2393-Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanical
(NCAA-LAB)
1379/2379—Natural Disasters (one semester) (NCAA-LAB)
Take a journey through the amazing processes that occur on our own
planet. Natural disasters play a fundamental role in the sculpting landscapes and structuring natural and human based ecosystems. This
course will explore the natural and social implications of natural disasters by studying their causes, their ecological and social consequences
and the role of human behavior in causing and dealing with natural disasters. Specific units on volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides,
flooding, hurricanes, tornadoes, extreme weather, and meteorite impacts
will be studied.
Students will receive a minimum of two hours in a structured online
learning experience.
Prerequisites: Physics and Calculus with a grade of B or better both
semesters. (Calculus concurrently)
AP Physics is a two-semester laboratory course designed to be the
equivalent of an introductory college physics course in Newtonian Mechanics. Each year in May, students take the AP Physics C: Mechanical
exam given by the College Board. Based on his/her score on the exam,
college credit may be given by the college or university that the student
will be attending. It is important to note that regardless of the AP exam
results, students who complete the AP Physics course will be well prepared for college courses in physics.
Emphasis will be placed on the use of calculus to solve challenging
problems. This will be accomplished through the in-depth study of the
following topics:
Kinematics - 18%, Newton's Laws of Motion - 20%, Work, Energy, and
Power - 14%, Systems of Particles, Linear Momentum - 12%, Circular
Motion and Rotation - 18%, Oscillations and Gravitation - 18%.
1380/2380—Astronomy (one semester) (NCAA-LAB)
Take a journey through Space and Time in this semester-long Astronomy Course. The principles of life, chemistry, Earth, and physical science
are integrated in this study of the cosmos. The moon, sun, solar system,
minor planets, constellations, and formation of stars are the major topics
of study. Observational astronomy skills and critical thinking are cultivated through laboratory and field activities.
Students will receive a minimum of two hours in a structured online
learning experience.
The class requires a large amount of reading, problem solving, and lab
work. Students in an AP Physics course should spend at least five
hours a week in individual study outside of the classroom.
69
1409/2409 – U.S. History (NCAA)
Social Studies
Prerequisites: None
The development of the United States from 1865 to the present is
emphasized in this two-semester sequential course. Students develop an
understanding of political, economic, religious, social, intellectual, and geographic relationships affecting the United States in history and in today's
world. Using the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the amendments, and other historical documents, student develop knowledge, understanding and application of the core democratic values given in these
documents.
Philosophy of the Department
Livonia high schools offer a full range of social studies courses which are
planned to meet the needs and interests of all students. In social studies, our
goal is to prepare students to become active and responsible citizens who will
participate in community, state, and national activities. The social studies
curriculum is designed to prepare our students to meet the standards set by the
State of Michigan for high school social studies.
Department Requirements
The minimum requirements in social studies are 3.0 credits for graduation.
Required Selection of Courses
World History: 9th Grade recommended
U.S. History: 10th Grade recommended
Government: 11th Grade (one semester) required
Economics: 11th Grade (one semester) required
1411/2411 – U.S. History B (NCAA*)
Prerequisites: Admission to U.S. History B by teacher recommendation
and approval of department chair.
This one-year course is for those students experiencing difficulty in reading
comprehension. This course looks at the basic chronological development
and history of the United States as a nation from 1865 to present, and emphasizes the development of study skills, thinking skills, and reading comprehension skills. Using the ideas in the Declaration of Independence, the
Constitution and the amendments, students will develop knowledge and
understanding of the core democratic values given in these documents. The
course also includes vocabulary development and practice in acquiring information. Students develop an understanding of political, economic, religious,
social, intellectual, and geographic relationships by the study of history.
In the Social Studies required course students will receive a minimum of 1 hour
per semester in a structured online learning activity that utilizes technology with
Internet-based tools and resources as the delivery method for instruction,
research, assessment, and/or communication
Additional Electives (one semester each)
General Psychology
International Relations
Law and Justice
Psychology
Sociology
In addition, we offer Advanced Placement (AP) courses in American
Government and Politics, U.S. History, Macroeconomics,
Microeconomics, and Psychology.
1420/2420 - American Government (1 Semester) (NCAA)
Prerequisite: None
In this one-semester course, students will study the foundations, structure
and responsibilities of the United States Government. An understanding of
the rights and responsibilities of citizens and the elections process will be
included. Emphasis will be placed on motivating the student to become active in the democratic political process through a service-learning project.
1402/2402 – World History B (NCAA*)
Prerequisites: Recommended for students based on eighth grade reading
scores and/or recommendation by counselor or teacher.
1421/2421 - American Government B (1 Semester) (NCAA*)
Prerequisite: Admission to American Government B is by teacher recommendation and approval of department chair.
This course will focus on the development of reading strategies and study
skills through the scope of world history. This course will develop a student's
understanding of the political, economic, religious, social, intellectual, and
geographic development in civilizations of both the Eastern and Western
Hemispheres. Making use of a variety of resources, including an online
learning component, the course will cover pre-history through modern times.
This one-semester course is for those students experiencing difficulty in
reading comprehension. In this course, students will study the foundations, structure and responsibilities of the United States Government. An
understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizens and the elections process will be included. Emphasis will be placed on motivating the
student to become active in the democratic political process through a
service learning project.
1403/2403 – World History (NCAA)
Prerequisites: None
This course will develop a student's understanding of the political, and
geographic development in civilizations of both the Eastern and Western
Hemispheres. Making use of a variety of resources, including an online
learning component, the course will cover pre-history through modern times.
70
2441 - Economics B (1 Semester) (NCAA*)
Prerequisite: Admission to Economics B is by teacher recommendation
1422/2422 - Advanced Placement U.S. Government & Politics
(NCAA) (1 Semester)
and approval of department chair.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Placement U.S. History
or selection is based on social studies and language arts classes, tests,
interest and staff recommendations. Students will be invited only if they
qualify.
This one-semester course is designed to accommodate students who
have reading comprehension challenges. This course will include the
study of American and global economic systems. The course covers
basic economic concepts and thorough examination of micro and macro
economic theories.
This is a one-semester course that is designed for students that have
demonstrated exceptional interest and outstanding performance in Social Studies. Advanced Placement U.S. History is not required, but it is
recommended. Students are required to read and research intensively in
American Government. Supplemental readings to the textbook are required. Analytical writing and critical thinking processes are incorporated
in class work. A successful course is directed toward preparation for the
College Board Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics examination. Actual performance on the exam determines whether college
credit will be earned. The successful completion of Advanced Placement American Government meets the graduation requirement for
American Government. Emphasis will be placed on motivating the student to become active in the democratic political process through a service learning project.
1442/2442 Economics (NCAA) (1 Semester)
Prerequisite: None
This course is a one-semester course of study on American and global
economic systems. The course covers basic economic concepts and a
thorough examination of micro and macro economic theories.
Social Studies Electives
1404/2404 Accelerated World History
Prerequisites: Selection for course is based upon Social Studies and Language Arts class achievement, standardized test scores, and staff recommendations. Students will be invited if they qualify. This two-semester
course is designed for students who have demonstrated exceptional and
outstanding performance in social studies. Students are required to
read and research intensively in World History. Analytic writing and critical thinking processes are incorporated in class work. Successful
course work is directed toward preparation for Advanced Placement
(AP) courses, including AP U.S. History. Students will develop an understanding of political, economic, religious, social, intellectual, and geographic development in civilizations of both the Eastern and Western
Hemispheres. Making use of a variety of resources, including an online
learning component, the course will cover history through modern times.
2443 - Advanced Placement Macroeconomics
(NCAA) (1 Semester)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Placement U.S. History
or selection is based on social studies and language arts classes, tests,
interest and staff recommendations. Students will be invited only if they
qualify.
This course is designed is to give students a thorough understanding of
the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a
whole. This course places particular emphasis on the study of national
income and price-level determination, and also develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth and international economics. Supplemental readings to the textbook are required. Analytical writing and critical thinking processes are incorporated in class work. A successful
course is directed toward preparation to the College Board Advanced
Placement Macroeconomics examination. Actual performance on the
exam determines whether college credit will be earned. The successful
completion of Advanced Placement Macroeconomics meets the graduation requirement for Economics.
1418/2418—Advanced Placement U.S. History (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Selection for the course is based upon performance in Social Studies and English classes, tests and interest. Students will be invited only if they qualify. The successful completion of AP U.S. History meets
the graduation requirement for U.S. History.
This two-semester course is designed for students who have demonstrated exceptional interest and outstanding performance in social studies. Students are required to read and research intensively in United
States History. Analytic writing and critical thinking processes are incorporated in class work. Students will focus on the historical thinking skills,
key concepts, and themes as dictated by the course description set forth
by the College Board. Successful course work is directed toward preparation for the College Board Advanced Placement U.S. History examination. Actual performance on the exam determines whether college credit
will be earned.
71
2434—International Relations (1 Semester) (NCAA)
1440/2440—General Psychology (1 Semester) (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Junior or senior status. At or above grade level reading recommended.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior status recommended.
This course is designed to increase students' understanding of themselves and others. Through group interaction and self-reflection,
students explore a wide variety of topics including feelings; self-concept;
friendship; marriage; family; parent-teen relationships and an
understanding of personal values. Throughout the course students
develop communication, problem-solving and goal-setting skills.
International Relations offers the inquisitive student an opportunity to
examine and investigate the role of the countries throughout the world
and international organizations in order to better understand how they
operate in policy areas including diplomacy, conflict resolution, strategic
thinking, non-state actors, and the global economy. Through discussion,
research, multimedia engagement, geographical infusion, independent reading and reaction, and use of technology, students will be able to
not only become well versed in the language and theory of international
relations, they will also then be able to use this knowledge to examine
and evaluate historical IR case studies. As such, a strong background
and love of history will be beneficial to a student who wishes to be successful in the course.
1444/2444—Law and Justice: (1 Semester) (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Junior or senior status recommended.
Rights and application of the Constitution are the core of Law and Justice. This course features mock trials and simulations to illustrate key
concepts of the law. Practical experiences, critical thinking, research and
student involvement are required. Students examine criminal and civil
law and contemporary legal issues. In addition to understanding the
laws that affect you, this course is an excellent opportunity for exposure
to law-related careers.
1436/2436—Sociology (1 Semester) (NCAA)
Prerequisites: None
This one-semester course deals with the study of the United States
society and behavior of groups, the relationship of individuals to others
in a group, social institutions and current social problems.
1447 - Advanced Placement Microeconomics (1 semester) (NCAA)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Macroeconomics and senior
status recommended
This course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of
the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic
system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of
government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. A
successful course is directed toward preparation to the College Board
Advanced Placement Microeconomics examination. Actual performance
on the exam determines whether college credit will be earned
1437/2437 Advanced Placement Psychology (NCAA)
Prerequisite: Senior status recommended
This two-semester course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of psychology that includes theories of learning and personality development, abnormal psychology and treatment, motivation, research methods, sensation and perception, and other aspects of human
behavior. Students are required to read and research psychology topics. Writing and critical thinking processes are incorporated in class
work. Students should expect a minimum of one hour of homework
each night that includes reading, studying, and labs. Successful course
work is directed toward preparation for the College Board Advanced
Placement Psychology examination. Actual performance on the exam
determines whether college credit will be earned. Students that plan on
enrolling in this course should not enroll in psychology or general
psychology.
Special Education Development
1248/2248—Study Skills
9th, 10th, 11th, & 12th grade
This course is designed to develop individual abilities in proper study
procedures such as organizing time and materials, time management,
keeping notebooks, taking notes, and outlining. Lessons will utilize
assignments from other classes whenever possible.
1438/2438—Psychology (1 Semester) (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Junior or senior status recommended.
In this one-semester course, students will become involved in an
advanced study of abnormal psychology, biopsychology, the theories of
learning and personality development, and other aspects of the study of
human behavior.
72
1256/2256—French 4 (NCAA)
World Languages
Prerequisites: French 3 (Recommended C or better)
French 4 presents an in-depth study of grammatical structures and vocabulary
necessary to promote oral and written proficiency. Additional verb tenses are
presented and there is significant vocabulary work. Students are encouraged to
communicate exclusively in the target language. Francophone literature, culture,
art, and history are an important part of the course.
District Goals in World Languages






Understand that language is functional.
Understand that language skills develop interdependently.
Understand that language learning is cultural learning.
Understand that language proficiency develops through meaningful use and interaction.
Understand that language acquisition is a long-term process and occurs at different rates.
Understand that language proficiency develops in varied ways.
1258/2258—French 5 (NCAA)
PHILOSOPHY OF THE DEPARTMENT
Prerequisites: French 4 (Recommended C or better)
French 5 continues the development of French conversational skills through
communication exclusively in the target language. Students will read short readings on French history, literature, and art. They will also read several short novels & plays. Students are expected to reach Intermediate-Mid Proficiency Level.
The philosophy of the SHS World Language Department is to encourage every student to
become a life-long learner of at least one additional World Language. As the nation and
state encourage language proficiency, so do members of the World Language Department
here at SHS. Our goal for all students is to meet the State of Michigan-required NoviceHigh* Proficiency Level by the end of the second year of study. As this is the minimum
requirement, we highly encourage those college-bound students, and those with a love of
language, to continue their studies in order to enrich their knowledge and skills and make
themselves more marketable in a global economy. Those engaged students will advance
their culturally appropriate communication skills to the Intermediate-Mid Proficiency Level.
1262/2262—German 1 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: None
This course is designed to give the student a foundation in listening, speaking,
reading, writing, and viewing of the German language and culture. Communication in a variety of common "real life" settings is the primary goal for a beginning
student so students should demonstrate a willingness to perform and participate.
In addition, the course helps students develop language learning strategies as
they are introduced to the basic structures.
Note: LPS middle school students that have successfully completed French 1,
German 1 or Spanish 1, will earn high school credit. These students should
enroll in French 2, German 2 or Spanish 2.
1250/2250—French 1 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: None
This course is designed to give the student a foundation in listening, speaking,
reading, writing, and knowledge of the French language and culture. Communication in a variety of common "real life" settings is the primary goal for a beginning student so students should demonstrate a willingness to perform and participate. In addition, the course helps students develop language learning strategies as they are introduced to the basic structures.
1264/2264—German 2 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: German 1
As a continuation of German 1, German 2 is designed to strengthen the listening, speaking, reading, writing, and reviewing skills acquired in the first year. The
variety of situations in which the student must communicate is broadened and
more complex structures are added to the student's repertoire. Students will use
a variety of resources to broaden their knowledge of German culture and geography. Students are expected to reach the Novice-High Proficiency Level.
1252/2252—French 2 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: French 1
As a continuation of French 1, French 2 is designed to strengthen the listening,
speaking, reading, writing, cultural and linguistic skills acquired in the first year.
The variety of situations in which the student must communicate is broadened
and more complex structures are added to the student's repertoire. Students will
use a variety of resources to broaden their knowledge of French culture and
geography. Students are expected to reach the Novice-High Proficiency Level.
1266/2266—German 3 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: German 2 (Recommended C or better)
German 3 is a continuation of German 2. The student will further refine communication and writing skills, while adding more sophisticated structures for the
situations in which the student must "perform". Students will continue to improve
their overall grammar and cultural knowledge of the language. Students will read
some short texts and short novels edited for language learners. Additional focus
is on vocabulary work and advanced grammatical structures.
1254/2254—French 3 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: French 2 (Recommended C or better)
French 3 is a continuation of French 2. The student will further refine communication and writing skills, while adding more sophisticated structures for the situations in which the student must "perform". In this course, students will continue
to improve their overall grammar and cultural knowledge of the language. Students will read some short texts and novels edited for language learners. Additional focus is on vocabulary work and advanced grammatical structures.
1268/2268—German 4 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: German 3 (Recommended C or better)
This year provides the student with many opportunities to refine and strengthen
communication and writing skills. This is done through a variety of spoken contexts as well as literature and exposure to historical and artistic highlights from
the German culture.
Advanced grammatical structures are studied and
developed, along with an intensive vocabulary study and practice.
73
1276/2276 Spanish 1 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: None
This course is designed to give the student a foundation in listening, speaking,
reading, writing, and viewing of the Spanish language and culture. Communication in a variety of common "real life" settings is the primary goal for a beginning
student so students should demonstrate a willingness to perform and participate.
In addition, the course helps students develop language learning strategies as
they are introduced to the basic structures.
1269/2269—German 5
Prerequisites: German 4 (Recommended C or better)
German 5 continues the development of conversational skills through communication exclusively in the target language. Students will read short readings on
German history, literature, and art. They will also read several short novels and
plays. Students are expected to reach the Intermediate-Mid Proficiency Level.
1270/2270—Japanese 1 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: None
This course is designed to give the student a foundation in listening, speaking,
reading, writing, and viewing of the Japanese language and culture. Communication in a variety of common "real life" settings is the primary goal for a beginning student so students should demonstrate a willingness to perform and participate. In addition, the course helps students develop language learning strategies as they are introduced to the basic structures including Japanese syllabary
and some characters.
1277-2277 - Fundamentals of Spanish I
Prerequisite: Performance in other courses and staff recommendations
This course emphasizes communication through a variety of media while introducing essential language mechanics. Depth of study will include aspects of
basic communication and language learning strategies as well as an exploration
of a variety of cultural topics.
1278/2278—Spanish 2 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Spanish 1
As a continuation of Spanish 1, Spanish 2 is designed to strengthen the listening, speaking, reading, writing, and reviewing skills acquired in the first year. The
variety of situations in which the student must communicate is broadened and
more complex structures are added to the student's repertoire. Students will use
a variety of resources to broaden their knowledge of Spanish culture and geography. Students are expected to reach the Novice-High Proficiency Level.
1271/2271—Japanese 2 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Japanese 1
As a continuation of Japanese 1, Japanese 2 is designed to strengthen the listening, speaking, reading, writing, and reviewing skills acquired in the first year.
The variety of situations in which the student must communicate is broadened
and more complex structures are added to the student's repertoire including
more Japanese characters. Students will use a variety of resources to broaden
their knowledge of Japanese culture and geography. Students are expected to
reach the Novice-High Proficiency Level.
1280/2280—Spanish 3 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Spanish 2 (Recommended C or better)
Spanish 3 is a continuation of Spanish 2. The student will further refine communication and writing skills, while adding more sophisticated structures for the
situations in which the student must "perform". In this course, students will continue to improve their overall grammar and cultural knowledge of the language.
Students will read some short texts and short novels edited for language learners. Additional focus is on vocabulary work and advanced grammatical structures.
1272/2272—Japanese 3 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Japanese 2 (Recommended C or better)
Japanese 3 is a continuation of Japanese 2. The student will further refine communication and writing skills, while adding more sophisticated structures for the
situations in which the student must "perform". In this course, students will continue to improve their overall grammar and cultural knowledge of the language.
Students will read some short texts edited for language learners. Additional focus is on vocabulary work, Japanese syllabary, and advanced grammatical
structures.
1282/2282—Spanish 4 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Spanish 3 (Recommended C or better)
Spanish 4 presents an in-depth study of grammatical structures necessary to
promote oral and written proficiency. Spanish literature, culture, and history are
studied through special readers and projects. At this level, the student is encouraged to communicate exclusively in the target language.
1273/2273—Japanese 4 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Japanese 3 (Recommended C or better)
Japanese 4 furthers students' language skills and cultural knowledge. Students
will add to the complexity of language use, both written and verbal while expanding their knowledge of the Japanese people and culture. Students are expected
to reach the Intermediate-Low Proficiency Level.
1284/2284—Spanish 5 (NCAA)
Prerequisites: Spanish 4 (Recommended C or better)
Spanish 5 encourages creative application of oral and written skills through independent projects and group discussions in the target language. Review and refinement of grammar skills are emphasized as the student moves toward mastery of the Spanish language. Students are expected to reach the IntermediateMid Proficiency Level.
Note: LPS middle school students that have successfully completed Spanish 1
will earn high school credit. Students successfully completing Spanish 1 through
the LPS Shared Time Program will be eligible for high school credit provided the
students have successfully completed the equivalent of the full year course and
taken the LPS common assessment. These students should enroll in Spanish 2.
74