celebrating 60 years

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celebrating 60 years
harry
A MAGAZINE FOR MEN BY HARRY ROSEN MENSWEAR
PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40051686 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:
Harry Rosen Inc., 77 Bloor Street West, Suite 1600, Toronto, ON M5S 1M2
A MAGAZINE FOR MEN BY HARRY ROSEN MENSWEAR
harry
}
CELEBRATING
60 YEARS
AND LOOKING BETTER THAN EVER
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
$5.00
SPRING/SUMMER 2014 $5.00
Contents
Spring/Summer 2014
72/
GIORGIO ARMANI
jacket, $2,495,
and shirt, $595.
Fashion
h
Fashion
Videos
54 THE GENTLEMAN’S BOMBER
72 INTO THE LIGHT
Please find all our videos at
www.harryrosen.com
The fit of a suit
h
An interview with
Patrick Chan
Building a shoe
wardrobe
Vincent Chornet –
Canadian innovator
by Adam Leith Gollner
Tying a bow tie
An interview with
Robert Tateossian
EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER AND
CEO, HARRY ROSEN INC.
LARRY ROSEN
PHOTOGRAPHY, CHRIS NICHOLLS
PUBLISHER
SANDRA KENNEDY
EDITOR
JAMES CHATTO
ART DIRECTORS
BOB HAMBLY
BARB WOOLLEY
HAMBLY & WOOLLEY INC.
DESIGNERS
BARB WOOLLEY
AARON RINAS
PRODUCER
LUCIE TURPIN
PRODUCTION MANAGER
SONJA KLOSS
Dr. John Dempster –
Canadian innovator
by Christine Langlois
108 GARBAGE INTO GOLD
The latest
BOSS collection
CONTRIBUTORS
TOM ARBAN
BARRY BLITT
TREVOR COLE
YANICK DÉRY
ANNE DESBRISAY
ANITA DRAYCOTT
JOHN GILCHRIST
JAIME HOGGE
ANNA KOHN
CHRISTINE LANGLOIS
JACLYN LAW
ADAM LEITH GOLLNER
JOSH MACTATE
KAGAN MCLEOD
CHRIS NICHOLLS
BRIAN SANO
DANTE TERZIGNI
JESSICA WONG
The shape of clothes to come
by Barry Blitt
28 60 YEARS OF FIRSTS
48 THE ROAD TO THE PODIUM
106 A HEALTHY BALANCE
Folding a pocket square
Mark Teixeira – Canadian innovator
by Josh MacTate
111 SIXTY YEARS ON
Features
Patrick Chan gave his all
by Trevor Cole
An interview with
model Adam Senn
58 ANATOMY OF A STORE
EXECUTIVE
FASHION DIRECTOR
JEFF FARBSTEIN
FASHION DIRECTORS
PAUL E. SMITH
SHANNON STEWART
ADVERTISING SALES
MANAGER
JUDY SOLWAY
PHONE 416 935 9202
EDITORIAL COORDINATORS
MARIA DELOREY
MEGHAN JANSSEN
PUBLIC RELATIONS
MANAGER
TIM GALLANT
PHONE 416 935 9224
HARRY ROSEN INC.
77 BLOOR STREET WEST
SUITE 1600
TORONTO, ONTARIO
CANADA M5S 1M2
PHONE 416 935 9200
HAMBLY & WOOLLEY INC.
DESIGN COMMUNICATIONS
121 LOGAN AVENUE
TORONTO, ONTARIO
CANADA M4M 2M9
PHONE 416 504 2742
COVER
PHOTOGRAPHY, CHRIS
NICHOLLS; STYLING, LEE
SULLIVAN, PLUTINO GROUP;
GROOMING, JAMIE HANSON,
LANG MANAGEMENT
COPYRIGHT 2014
HARRY ROSEN INC.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
THE PUBLISHERS ACCEPT
NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR
ADVERTISERS’ CLAIMS,
UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS,
TRANSPARENCIES OR
OTHER MATERIALS.
Departments
27
34
42
112
115
117
118
LETTER
NOTEBOOK
ASK HARRY
CITIES
SERVICES
GUIDE
THE WORLD OF…
ROBERT TATEOSSIAN
AT HARRY ROSEN, WE HOLD
YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION
IN STRICTEST CONFIDENCE,
IN FULL ACCORDANCE WITH
PROVINCIAL PRIVACY
GUIDELINES. FOR FURTHER
DETAILS, ACCESS
WWW.HARRYROSEN.COM.
TO OPT OUT OF FURTHER
COMMUNICATIONS, E-MAIL US AT
[email protected]
OR CONTACT OUR PRIVACY
OFFICER AT 416 935 9221
OR E-MAIL
[email protected]
NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE
MAY BE REPRODUCED
WITHOUT WRITTEN
PERMISSION OF THE
PUBLISHERS.
COLOUR SEPARATIONS AND
PRINTING PROVIDED BY
TRANSCONTINENTAL
O’KEEFE TORONTO.
VOLUME 18, ISSUE 1
CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS MAIL
PRODUCT SALES
AGREEMENT 40051686
CANADIAN POSTMASTER
SEND ADDRESS CHANGE
NOTICES AND
UNDELIVERABLE COPIES TO:
HARRY ROSEN INC.
77 BLOOR STREET WEST
SUITE 1600
TORONTO, ONTARIO
CANADA M5S 1M2
FOR A CHANGE IN
ADDRESS, PLEASE WRITE
OR E-MAIL US AT:
HARRY ROSEN INC.
77 BLOOR STREET WEST
SUITE 1600
TORONTO, ONTARIO
CANADA M5S 1M2
E-MAIL
[email protected]
HARRY MAGAZINE IS PRINTED
ON PAPER FROM WELLMANAGED FORESTS, CONTAINS
10 PERCENT POST-CONSUMER
CONTENT AND IS CHLORINEAND ACID-FREE. OUR
POLYBAGS USE 25 PERCENT
RECYCLED PLASTIC.
Harry’s Letter
AS HARRY ROSEN
CELEBRATES ITS 60TH
ANNIVERSARY, it amazes me to
think that the company was created before
I was even born. Needless to say, it was a
huge part of my childhood. I have vague
memories of sitting in the first little store on
Parliament Street (it was closed when I was
five) and of trying to push open the
incredibly heavy doors of the Richmond
Street store. I remember my mother laying
out the newspaper and saying, “Look,
here’s your daddy’s advertisement.” I vividly
recall my first part-time job at the age of
13 in our Yorkdale store’s stockroom and
the day in 1978 when I was working at
our Sherway Gardens location and heard
that I had been accepted into law school.
Seven years later, I left a promising
career as a lawyer and joined my father
in this business. Why? Because I was
tremendously proud of what he was
creating – this iconic Canadian
institution, built to his standards and his
vision – and I wanted to be part of it.
It has been quite a ride. Not a day has
gone by in the last 29 years when I haven’t
enjoyed my interactions with clients, with
our associates and our vendor partners.
I love the sense of community and the
shared passion for excellence that
pervades our company, the customercentric focus that is my father’s legacy. Our
people tend to stay with us, to make their
careers with Harry Rosen, and I’m so
grateful for that. Working alongside these
really experienced veterans we have young,
enthusiastic people with great new ideas.
I tell them to set aside their natural Canadian
modesty and be proud of the fact that
together we have made Harry Rosen something special – not just a great Canadian
success story but also one of the leading
luxury menswear retailers in the world.
Of course, that world is constantly
changing – and we are evolving with it. We
were the first Canadian company in our
particular field to enter into e-commerce
— and the virtual side of our business,
from our online presence to the way we
communicate with our clients, grows
increasingly rapidly. Meanwhile, we are also
in the midst of our largest physical
expansion program to date, enlarging
and renovating more stores than ever
before. As we forge ahead, we will continue
to enhance our expertise and fine-tune our
customer service, but I promise you one
thing will never change: we will stay true to
the passion and the values that my father
built into the company from the beginning
and that have stood us in such good stead
for the last 60 years.
Spotted at Pitti Uomo in Florence, Brunello Cucinelli
(right) waxes passionate as he shows his collection to
Jeff Farbstein, EVP Merchandise at Harry Rosen (left),
and Larry Rosen.
Larry Rosen, his wife, Susan Jackson, and their sons
(from left) Daniel, Ian and Graham at the Ivey Business
School at Western University in London, Ont., for
the inauguration of the Harry Rosen Lounge, named
in honour of Harry Rosen.
Larry Rosen, chairman and ceo
harry rosen inc.
A typical Saturday morning at our Bloor Street West
store in Toronto. Before the doors open, a meeting
provides a great opportunity for new product
knowledge training.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
27
In 1962, Harry Rosen’s firstever advertisement showed
Harry from behind.
1954
SIXTY
YEARS
1961
OF
FIRSTS 1968
Harry and Lou Rosen
open their first menswear
store on Parliament Street
in Toronto’s Cabbagetown,
with a $500 loan, offering
made-to-measure garments.
Unusually for the time, the
brothers keep records of
individual customers and
their purchases.
Looking back
at Harry Rosen’s
first 60 years,
we reminisce
about some of our
more innovative
retail ideas.
1957
Harry travels to New York.
Inspired by the American
“natural shoulder” look,
he buys a suit and has
Coppley, a Canadian maker,
produce a similar garment.
So different from the very
structured, staunchly British
look that dominated Canada,
it is a huge hit amongst
younger business executives,
particularly in the advertising
and publishing fields.
Harry Rosen moves to Richmond
Street to serve the denizens of
Bay Street with Toronto’s largest
menswear store.
Opens second store in
Yorkdale mall, becoming a
multi-store operator.
1970s
Develops a reputation
for tongue-in-cheek
advertisements.
1963
Introduces the famous
“Ask Harry” ads. This
Madison Avenue approach
to branding is unique in
Canada at the time, especially
for a menswear retailer.
28
HARRY
1981
1981- 1985- 1991
1987 1990
2006
Becomes the first retailer to launch a lifestyle
magazine – The Harry Rosen Report on Men’s Wear,
forerunner to harry magazine.
Introduces the Ralph Lauren collection to Canada.
Pioneers a computerized Customer Relationship
Management system to allow clothing advisors to
better keep records and provide service to customers,
winning numerous technology awards.
Becomes the first topquality menswear retailer to
go national, opening stores
in Edmonton, Vancouver,
Ottawa, Montreal, Calgary
and Winnipeg.
Seeks out and imports
world-famous labels
Ermenegildo Zegna,
Brioni, Kiton and many
more, becoming the first to
introduce Canadian men
to European fashion.
2007
1987
Opens the largest topquality menswear store
in the world on Bloor Street,
in Toronto – 32,000 square
feet over three floors.
Pioneers shop-in-shop
boutiques, supporting
brands such as Giorgio
Armani, Hugo Boss and
Ermenegildo Zegna.
Using unique engineering techniques, Harry
Rosen adds two floors to
its flagship store on Bloor
Street in Toronto and
renovates the entire store
while remaining open and
continuing to serve clients.
The 54,000-square-foot
store is now the largest topquality menswear store in
the world.
Harry Rosen is the first menswear
retailer to be designated one of the
Deloitte’s 50 Canada’s Best Managed
Companies.
Inception of Harry’s Spring
Run-Off in support of prostate
cancer research. Over $3 million has
been raised to date.
20122017
Embarks on the company’s
largest capital expansion
program to date, with plans
to increase our retail footprint
by 40 percent over the next
five years.
Champions Canadianmade top-quality clothing and introduces the
J.P. Tilford by Samuelsohn
clothing line and J.P. Tilford
dress shirts, exclusive to
Harry Rosen, in support of
Canadian manufacturing.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
29
Notebook
Sharing information;
tracking the new and
noteworthy
01
The Spirit
of Milan
ALLOW US TO INTRODUCE A NEW
COLLECTION THAT PERFECTLY
REPRESENTS THE COOL,
NUANCED, MODERN ITALIAN VIBE:
Maurizio Baldassari.
Established in 1982, the family
firm takes its inspiration from the
Bohemian caffes and galleries of
Milan’s Brera quarter, but while
the look might be studiedly
casual, the quality and attention
to detail are anything but.
Consider this reversible vest – one
side supple navy leather, the other
tan-coloured nylon – a perfect
piece for spring. Wear it over a
jacket tailored in the weightless,
unstructured Neapolitan style and
a trim pair of washed-out chinos
and you’ll be channelling the
Brera style. Elegant but never
stuffy, Baldassari has already
taken Asia by storm; now it’s
Canada’s turn. Available at
selected stores.
REVERSIBLE
VEST
34
HARRY
PHOTOGRAPHY, CHRIS NICHOLLS; STYLING, LEE SULLIVAN, PLUTINO GROUP
MAURIZIO BALDASSARI vest,
$1,398, jacket, $1,098, shirt, $250,
and pants, $250.
02
The Ultimate
Summer Shirt
PYA PRESENTS THE EPITOME OF THE LINEN
(ON FIGURE) PHOTOGRAPHY, CHRIS NICHOLLS; STYLING, LEE SULLIVAN, PLUTINO GROUP. (OFF FIGURE) PHOTOGRAPHY, BRIAN SANO; STYLING, DEE CONNOLLY
SHIRT – cool, lightweight, soft to the touch –
perfect for a summer day with the sleeves rolled
up and a pair of shorts, chinos or jeans. But
these modern-fit shirts also look cool under a
blazer and pack plenty of details to delight the
shirt connoisseur. Contrasting buttons are
balanced by tone-on-tone contrasting fabric on
the sleeves and collar while the breast pocket is
just what you need for a hotel card or as a place
to hang your sunglasses. The names of the
seven colours we carry say it all: white, starlight,
Bermuda pink, midnight, bright coral, breezy
blue and fog grey. $155.
03 Win in a
Walk-Over
LEVI KEITH MADE HIS FIRST PAIR
OF SHOES IN BRIDGEWATER,
MASSACHUSETTS, IN 1758. Five
generations of shoemakers later,
in 1874, George Eldon Keith
made it official and set up a
shoemaking company with 10
employees. It took him another
25 years to come up with a name
for the thriving business: WalkOver Shoes. The firm is still
going strong and still making its
shoes in the U.S. – rural
Pennsylvania, to be precise – to
very exacting standards. But
while Walk-Over’s values may be
old-fashioned, these suede bucks
are anything but. Brightly
coloured, high-traction soles and
tonal laces add contemporary
pop to grey, cobalt or midnight
bucks; or check out the slightly
more conventional midnight or
tan versions with brick red soles,
all of them exclusive to Harry
Rosen. $340.
04
The Equation
of Style
THE FORMULA READS AS FOLLOWS:
two identical twin brothers, Dean and
Dan Caten, born in Toronto in 1964,
both become successful fashion
designers. In 1991, they move to
Milan to work for Gianni Versace and
Diesel denims, then launch their own
menswear brand, DSquared2, in
1994. The combination of Milanese
cool with a Canadian twist has won
them a huge following. Fans love the
dramatic contrast of looks like these
extremely distressed, paint-spattered
jeans and pristine black leather jacket,
mixed-fabric sweats and shirts, and the
embroidered logo of a Boston terrier
on their edgy polo knits. DSquared2 +
HR = very cool indeed. Available at
our Yorkdale, Toronto, store.
DSQUARED2 bomber, $2,935,
shirt, $315, and jeans, $475.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
35
Notebook
COOL,
COMFORTABLE
05
No Socks Required
IT SEEMS PRADA’S IDEAS ABOUT THE COMING SUMMER
COINCIDE NEATLY WITH OURS. These leather driving loafers
and suede slip-ons come in colours that work beautifully with
the season’s spectrum of blues and naturals. Casual but chic,
they’re ideal for sporting sockless around town or just relaxing
by the water. The loafers are made with Prada’s patented
36
HARRY
Saffiano leather, famously scratch-resistant and hard-wearing.
The suede slip-ons have elasticized gores that comfortably
hug your bare feet. They also feature a 360-degree jute
rope outsole, lending a relaxed espadrille look but with the
comfort of a cushioned rubber sole. Loafers, $620, suede
slip-ons, $450.
PHOTOGRAPHY, BRIAN SANO; STYLING, DEE CONNOLLY
SUMMER SLIP-ONS
06
The Lanvin Look
YES IT’S THE SAME LANVIN YOUR
GREAT-GRANDMOTHER MAY HAVE
MENTIONED, A COMPANY
ESTABLISHED AS A MILLINER’S
(ON FIGURE) PHOTOGRAPHY, CHRIS NICHOLLS; STYLING, LEE SULLIVAN, PLUTINO GROUP. (OFF FIGURE) PHOTOGRAPHY, BRIAN SANO; STYLING, DEE CONNOLLY
BOUTIQUE IN PARIS IN 1889. Not sure
she would have recognized the
latest menswear collection, however.
Futuristic yet elegant and very precisely
constructed, it’s still quintessentially
Parisian. Designer Lucas Ossendrijver
revels in the mix of luxury tailored
clothing and edgy sportswear, ranging
from an impeccable tuxedo to a V-neck
sweater in a cashmere-silk-wool blend
to fascinating mixed-fabric T-shirts.
This suede field jacket is so finely
finished it feels as soft as silk to the
touch. Available at our 82 Bloor Street
West store in Toronto.
LANVIN jacket, $4,295, shirt, $725,
pants, $575, and shoes, $880.
07
Just the Shirt
THE LATEST DRESS SHIRTS
FROM ETON, J.P. TILFORD
AND BOSS MAKE A MOST
CONTEMPORARY POINT: even
with a suit or sports jacket, you
don’t always need a tie. Small
checks and gingham patterns
are a touch more subtle than
last year and colours aren’t
quite as bold, but all these
examples are perfectly pitched
to look polished and
sophisticated without neckwear.
(left to right, top to bottom) CANALI, $285;
ETON, $265; THOMAS MASON BY
SAMUELSOHN, $178; ETON, $275;
BOSS, $185; THOMAS MASON BY
SAMUELSOHN, $178.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
37
Ask Harry
Sometimes even the most
sartorially confident man
needs an expert opinion
“People say I look good in my
new suit. How can I wear it outside
the boardroom?”
THERE ARE A COUPLE
01
OF REASONS WHY THE
SUIT, in its current
incarnation, has been
going strong for over
100 years. As your
question suggests, it’s
really the perfect outfit
for business – smart,
authoritative, flattering
and formal but still a
platform for subtle selfexpression. The other
reason is its timeproven versatility.
Depending on how you
accessorize it, a suit
can take on many
different personalities,
looking great in a
surprising variety
of situations. Think
of yourself as an
artist with the suit as
your canvas; your
shirts, ties, pocket
squares and other
accoutrements
become your paints.
One Suit
Four Ways
42
HARRY
02
LOOK 1
LOOK 2
The office
The evening event
The suit in its natural habitat.
Add a dress shirt, tie and pocket square
and you are impeccably dressed for a
business meeting with clients.
Take your suit out on the town.
A crisp, white, French-cuffed dress shirt
with a tie and pocket square lets you express
yourself in a more elegant way.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT THE FIT OF A SUIT,
please go to www.harryrosen.com.
PHOTOGRAPHY, CHRIS NICHOLLS; STYLING, LEE SULLIVAN, PLUTINO GROUP
03
04
LOOK 3
LOOK 4
Casual business
The unexpected
For dressed-down working days.
We see it increasingly often – the suit with a
great, open-collared shirt and no tie.
A pocket square dresses it up a little.
Creative self-expression.
Sure, it’s unorthodox, but that’s the point.
The same suit can also be the heart of a
most distinctively individual look.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
43
Ask Harry
“I see you’ve introduced something
called the Sartoria Recognition Program.
What’s this all about?”
IN THE 60 YEARS OUR
COMPANY HAS BEEN IN
BUSINESS,
we have enjoyed
the loyalty of innumerable
customers. This program is
our way of ensuring that
every one of our customers,
from the occasional shopper
to the most loyal client, is
perpetually re-inspired by our
providing the most rewarding,
most personal menswear
experience in Canada.
As with many recognition programs, our Sartoria
Recognition Program
acknowledges different customer purchase levels through
the use of Bronze, Silver, Gold,
Platinum or Platinum Elite
tiers. For the launch of our
program in February 2014, we
based our tiers on the last three
years of purchase levels, so that
no one would be forgotten for
their past patronage. Each of
our five tiers provides a menu of
above-and-beyond services.
We already set the standard for exceptional personal
service, from our unparalleled
return policy and Lifetime
Maintenance Guarantee to
our free closet cleanups and
exclusive private designer
functions. The Sartoria
Recognition Program raises
those standards even higher by
introducing a layer of unforeseen benefits provided by our
44
HARRY
associates that reinforce our
commitment to caring for
your investment in your wardrobe. And there will be other
enhancements to the program
for our Gold, Platinum and
Platinum Elite levels that will
become known over time.
Our goal with the program
is always to build on our unique,
60-year, industry-leading
heritage and continually earn
your business by providing
you with service excellence,
menswear expertise and
unparalleled selection.
You can review the Sartoria
Recognition Program at
your convenience online at
www.harryrosen.com. When
you shop at Harry Rosen, you
are automatically enrolled in the
program, but in order to ensure
that you enjoy all the benefits,
we require your telephone
number, e-mail address and
home address — all of which
can be updated online.
Please feel free to provide
any feedback or questions to
our Customer Service Team at
1 800 917 6736.
EXCEPTIONAL
PERSONAL
SERVICE
Harry Rosen’s
Richmond Street store,
circa 1970.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
45
48
HARRY
By Trevor Cole
PHOTOGRAPHY, CHRIS NICHOLLS
Three-time world champion PATRICK CHAN
gave his all at the Sochi Olympics and his two
silver medals made Canada proud. For us, there are
lessons to be learned from his journey.
PHOTOGRAPHY, TK; STYLING, TK
MACKAGE coat, $698; CULTURATA
shirt, $220; AG jeans, $298.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO INTERVIEW WITH PATRICK CHAN,
please go to www.harryrosen.com.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
49
WHEN YOU’RE
CONFIDENT
IN YOUR
ABILITIES,
RISK IS YOUR
FRIEND.
Imagine this: you’re about to make an
immensely difficult presentation. Your
audience will be alert for mistakes every
second, watching for the slightest hesitation in your delivery, the tiniest slip
in your confidence. You’ve been waiting
years to make this presentation, and
though it will last only a few minutes,
it will determine your entire future.
Oh, and there’ll be no second chances.
Do it now, perfectly, or else. Go.
That’s exactly the kind of pressure
Patrick Chan, Canada’s top figure
skater, was dealing with when he hit
the ice in February for the Winter
Olympics in Sochi, Russia.
Among sports, the intensity of
figure skating’s performance challenge
is unique. Team players get to share
the burden of pressure. Athletes in
explosive sports such as sprinting or
ski jumping needn’t remember
complicated routines or execute multiple athletic feats with such exacting
precision. And that’s why someone like
Chan, who has shown he knows how
to handle that pressure – winning gold
in the World Figure Skating
Championships for three consecutive
years – has something to teach us. We
can apply his methods and approaches
in our own high-pressure arenas.
Chan certainly doesn’t look like
someone weighed down by stress. When
you meet this 23-year-old, he seems
relaxed and is quick to smile, and he
gives thoughtful answers to questions
that try to delve into the reasons behind
what he does. Why, for example, he
started figure skating in the first place.
“I loved going fast,” he says,
grinning. As a three-year-old, Chan
began downhill skiing on the slopes of
Mont Tremblant, where his parents
owned a condo. But when his family
moved to Toronto, where there are
exactly zero decent ski hills, he
switched to skates, enrolling in figure
skating classes at his local arena.
50
HARRY
BELSTAFF coat, $1,450,
shirt, $375, and jeans, $395.
“There was no technique,” he says. “It
was pure joy, and pure daredevilish
acts. I could jump and throw my body
in the air and see what happened.”
There was no pressure on him at
this stage, of course, because there
were no expectations. As he learned,
Chan’s goal was simply to improve. It
was only when, at age 12 or 13, he saw
Elvis Stojko winning medals on TV
that he began to think, “Man, a medal
would be cool.”
And yet, a decade later, with years
of training and those three world
championships under his belt, Chan
says the medals are at most a secondary satisfaction. “Every time I’ve been
on the podium and they put the medal
on me, I’ve never remembered that
moment,” he says. What stayed with
him the most? “The moment when
I finished skating.” When he knew,
before any marks were posted, how
well he’d done.
Chan says his goal, going to the
Olympics, was to think not about the
medal, but about how he wanted to
skate. “I’m going there for personal
gratification,” he told us before the
Games. He was sure that if he could
“finally nail this perfect skate where it
counts, at the Olympic Games,”
the gold medal would come along.
So that’s the first take-away from
the Patrick Chan files on how to deal
with pressure: focus on personal
satisfaction, not outward symbols of
success. But then there’s that goal –
achieving the “perfect skate where it
counts.” How on earth do you do that?
Training, of course, is vital. You
have to know your stuff. Chan starts
his workday at 10 in the morning,
warming up for an hour in the gym.
Then he trains on the ice for three
45-minute sessions. After that, he goes
back to the gym for a half-hour of
weight-training, and then heads to a
studio for an hour of dance with his
coach, the Juilliard-trained Kathy
Johnson, once a member of Martha
Graham’s modern dance company.
The total time Chan spends working on his skating may be less than you
COMING HOME
FROM SOCHI WITH
TWO OLYMPIC SILVER
MEDALS around your
neck is an extraordinary
accomplishment —
and yet Patrick Chan
expressed more
disappointment than
joy immediately after his
free program. A flawless
skate would have sent
him past Japanese
phenom Yuzuru Hanyu
and won him the gold.
Back home in Canada
and from his worldwide
legions of fans in the
twitterverse there was
nothing but admiration
and support for his
achievement – and
questions about whether
Chan will set his sights
on the next winter
Olympics in Pyeongchang
in 2018. Meanwhile, he
has joined a very select
group of Olympic
double-silver medallists
in Canadian men’s figure
skating — Brian Orser,
Elvis Stojko and now
Patrick Chan.
52
HARRY
imagined – it’s a way to create consistency and avoid fatigue late in the
season. But does that change when he
gets close to competition time? Does
he ramp it up? Increase the hours, the
duration, the intensity? “No,” he says
firmly. “It stays the same.” So that’s
the second take-away for dealing with
pressure: stick with your routine.
But surely something must be
different as you’re heading into competition. How do you get into the right
mindset to perform your best when
you absolutely must?
Chan works against his natural
tendency to self-critique. “Negative
thoughts will make it 20 times more
difficult,” he says. Instead of worrying
or chastising himself if he fails to land
a quad jump, he feeds himself a steady
stream of positive feedback. “Hey, I’ve
done quads for the past three years,”
he tells himself. “I can do this program
like I do every day.”
In the same vein, he also makes
sure to surround himself with a team
that he calls “uplifting and distracting.” They’re outgoing, positive people
who keep him from dwelling on the
pressures. “I don’t like introverts,”
Chan says. “When people are too
quiet, especially in nervous, stressful
times, it just makes the problem
seem bigger.”
The take-away: stay loose and stay
positive. Find ways to take your mind
off what’s ahead.
What about the content of the
presentation? When there’s so much
at stake, is it smarter to make prudent
choices and avoid unnecessary risk, or
gamble for the bigger score?
Chan’s sport is all about risk –
throwing his body into a twisting leap
and hoping to land perfectly on a
knife’s edge – and he embraces it. Most
skaters at his level now incorporate
one quad jump into their long program. Chan includes two. Why? “The
thrill of it,” he says, his eyes widening.
“The days I’ve landed the second
quad, it’s like, wow. I just killed it. Just
to see people’s faces and reaction to
that is really satisfying and exciting.”
In 2012, many in the figure-skating
world thought Chan was taking some
big risks. After winning his second
championship, he changed his training
team, with two new choreographers
and dance-trained Kathy Johnson
as his new primary coach. And he
took on the challenge of learning two
entirely new programs. It was rough
going for a while, with some up-andcoming skaters beating him in lesser
competitions. But when it came time
for the 2013 world championships, it
was Chan again on top.
The take-away: when you’re confident in your abilities, risk is your
friend. Be bold. And when the moment
comes and it’s time to perform, how
does Chan get through the allimportant four minutes and 40 seconds
of his long program? How does he
begin, knowing all those jumps and
spins are ahead of him? How does he
continue, despite rising fatigue and
cramps in his legs? He has a strategy.
He thinks of all the elements in the
program as a checklist. “I just check
one element at a time and focus, and
give myself mental cues for each element,” Chan says. He goes from cue to
cue, element to element, checking them
off his mental list. Before he knows it,
he’s three-quarters of the way done.
“Instead of rushing through
moments and reading them, you tackle
it one element at a time, enjoying
every moment,” says Chan.
The take-away: don’t worry about
what’s to come, or what mistakes you
might have made in the past. Trust
your preparation, and stay in the
moment. And all those people you’re
trying to impress? The people watching
you, judging you, waiting for you to
blow it? Don’t fear them. Ignore them.
“Fear can destroy you,” says
Chan. He stays focused on each
element, knowing that if he performs
each to the best of his ability, the
judges will be forced to give him the
marks he wants. He takes it out of the
judges’ hands.
“That’s amazing,” says the world
champion. “That’s power.” h
B
Brioni
IMPECCABLY CRAFTED
with no discernible structure,
shaped only by the skill with
which it is cut and stitched, this
pure silk bomber from Brioni
weighs about as much as a
shirt. It’s reversible — a rich
purple on one side, a glossier
cerulean blue on the other. The
purple side offers black leather
piping beside the zipper,
around the pockets and across
the yoke, a detail that shows as
chevron stitching when you
turn the jacket inside out and
reveal the blue. $3,695.
The
Gentleman’s
Bomber
Four top Italian design houses present unique –
and uniquely luxurious – interpretations of the bomber,
all of them lightweight enough for summer.
54
HARRY
MORE A HIP-LENGTH
jacket than a true bomber,
this masterpiece in mocha
lamb suede is cut and sewn
entirely by hand. Superfine
stitching on the sleeves and
around the elbow patches
adds a richness of detail, as
do subtle corner pleats that
prevent the patch breast
pockets from bulking. The
lining is a cotton-linen blend
like an oxford shirting fabric
in robin’s egg blue — cooler
than satin or Bemberg would
be. $7,995.
K
Kiton
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
55
E
Ermenegildo
Zegna
ZEGNA’S RENOWNED
Trofeo fabric, made from the
wool of prize-winning
Australian merino sheep, is
usually reserved for suits —
but not this time! The
company has given it the
Elements treatment,
applying a membrane to the
back of the fabric, rendering
it windproof and waterrepellent. Steering clear of
bells and whistles, the
bomber has clean-cut,
sophisticated, urban lines,
though there are plenty of
subtle details, from a
discreet knitted inner collar
to leather piping on the
checked Bemberg lining. A
hidden drawstring allows
one to tighten the hem.
Available in midnight blue or
charcoal (and as a trench or
three-quarter-length coat).
$1,595.
56
HARRY
EXCEPTIONALLY THIN,
supple chestnut suede feels as
soft as the jersey lining, a warm
blend of silk and cashmere.
Together, they form a bomber
that is no more substantial than
a sweater, and is just as easy to
wear. A slightly elasticized hem
gathers the suede a little at the
hip. Interior pockets are
trimmed with silk and the
hidden cellphone pocket is
lined with a radiation barrier.
$5,425.
Loro
Piana
L
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
57
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58
HARRY
PHOTOGRAPHY, TOM ARBAN
T
HEY SOUND PRETTY GOOD — two dudes in their 50s,
jamming on guitars at the Cherry Beach studios in
downtown Toronto. It’s something they do together
from time to time, swapping riffs for hours, taking
musical ideas and seeing where they lead, getting inside each
other’s heads. The guy with the left-handed Fender Stratocaster is
Larry Rosen, CEO of Harry Rosen Inc.; the other rocker is
Mark Teixeira, the man who has designed each Harry Rosen store
across the country since the early 1990s. Their most recent hit is
the new, 30,000-square-foot flagship store at the Yorkdale Shopping
Centre in Toronto.
Every Harry Rosen store is unique, created with the location and
its specific clientele very much in mind – a bespoke retail experience,
if you will. Yorkdale’s reinvention began two years ago when space
adjacent to the existing Harry Rosen store became available,
potentially doubling its size. Even before the papers were signed,
Larry Rosen and Teixeira had begun to discuss the possibilities.
Part of the dramatic
façade of Harry Rosen’s
new flagship store at the
Yorkdale Shopping Centre
in Toronto.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
59
Harry Rosen’s Yorkdale
store: (clockwise from
left) the Ermenegildo
Zegna shop-in-shop.
Abundant displays
of merchandise.
Shoes have their own
acreage. Stacey Murty
and Mark Teixeira in
consultation.
“
WE ALWAYS START FROM SCRATCH,” explains
Teixeira, “with an empty outline of the space – the
first of thousands of drawings.” We are in his office,
and his desk and draftsman’s table are deeply buried beneath piles
of blueprints and architect’s papers. Teixeira’s manner is laid-back
and soft-spoken, but his passion and the pleasure he takes in his
work are palpable. “We design our stores from two directions at
once,” he says. “From above, with the grand concept of how it fits
into the community and the local retail environment and which
menswear designers we think will do well there. Larry is really
good at reading those kind of things and defining a theme for the
store. I come at it from the other direction, from all the details, the
physical environment and flow of the store and from the merchandise itself.”
It was merchandise and display that brought Teixeira into the
company, in 1975. He was 20 years old, a rock musician gigging
and touring with a number of different bands. One day he was
at Fairview Mall having a coffee when he noticed the windowdressers working in the Harry Rosen window. “I thought, man! If
I were ever to have a steady job, I would do that one,” he recalls.
“So I went to speak to the guy and next morning I was hired.”
Over the next few years, Teixeira noticed that Harry Rosen himself
would sometimes come and study the work he was doing. He was
25 when Harry offered him a full-time job designing the display
for all six Harry Rosen stores.
As the company grew, so did Teixeira’s role within it. Harry
took him travelling to the U.S. for inspiration and encouraged him
to study architectural drawing and furniture design. In the 1980s,
when the firm began to open stores in other Canadian cities,
Teixeira trained a team of 22 display experts across the country.
In 1991, he found himself with a new job description as Harry
Rosen’s full-time, in-house store designer.
Just what does he bring to the table? The best way to answer
that is to take a walk through the Yorkdale store. You won’t see
bare racks of suits or fixtures arranged with stern geometric symmetry or half a dozen pristine shirts set out in a glass display case
60
HARRY
as if they were objects in a museum. What you will see is a generous abundance of merchandise – piles of shirts and polo knits
in every conceivable colour, stacks of cashmere sweaters artfully
arranged to encourage you to touch them, everything organized to
catch your eye and draw you deeper into the store.
Yorkdale, for instance, has three entrances. Go through one and
the first thing you see is an extravagant cascade of shirts and sweaters
from Burberry Brit. Look up and the wall of Dolce & Gabbana
clothing is beckoning, 60 feet away. Did you notice the gorgeous
floor of veined and polished limestone beneath your feet? Ten steps
in and the BOSS area opens up to the left with its distinctive armchairs and dark-wood changing rooms – it looks like a luxurious
little condo, inviting you over. And what’s this? Z Zegna’s collection
is suddenly there on the right.
“We take enormous trouble with this,” says Teixeira. “With
blocks of contrasting colour, with lighting, with the geography of
the store, we lead your eye forward from one focal point to the
next.” This is the “flow” that lies at the heart of a Harry Rosen
experience, a sensory journey that meanders with its own invisible
but precise logic, like a piece of music progressing from one idea
to the next. The sock cove. The denim area with its moody lighting
and industrial ceiling. And, of course, the shop-in-shops, a concept
Harry Rosen pioneered; they allow a great design house to build
its own miniature shop, complete with custom décor, fixtures,
lighting and ambience, inside a Harry Rosen store. At Yorkdale,
there are three – from Canali, Ermenegildo Zegna and Giorgio
Armani – as well as various “soft shops” that use the store’s ceiling and floor but provide their own display fixtures to create a
separate identity. The decision to add one for English jewellery
designer Robert Tateossian came late in the day at Yorkdale, but
Teixeira knows to expect surprises and builds a degree of wiggle
room into his plans. “We never get euchred,” he says. “Everything
can be adjusted and converted, if need be.”
Is all this effort worthwhile? For years, clothing advisors at the
old Yorkdale store believed they could boost sales of Canali if only
they had a dedicated shop-in-shop for the brand. They broke all
records the very first week after the reno. The same goes for made
to measure. Moving the department into the hushed privacy of
an upstairs area has let clients relax away from the crowds and
has done wonders for sales. Meanwhile, below the main floor,
out of sight of the customers, another 3,000 square feet of space
is devoted to the staff area and dining room, the tailoring shop,
stockrooms and shipping dock.
One other, not-so-minor miracle is that the Yorkdale store
stayed open throughout its year-long renovation. Again, the secret
was to keep things in house. Instead of hiring an outside general
contractor, Harry Rosen has its own manager of store construction, Stacey Murty, a hands-on genius who has brought in every
project on time and on budget for the last 15 years. Larry Rosen
refers to her as “our secret weapon.” At Yorkdale, she built an
office on wheels in the construction space and could sometimes be
found there at 2 a.m., waiting for a delivery of lumber or millwork.
She’s an expert in erecting and soundproofing temporary walls
that are camouflaged with shelves of merchandise so work can
carry on unseen. Often she and her team will clear a whole area of
the store, spend all night installing a ceiling, then put everything
back into place before the first customer appears the next morning.
God is in the details (as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe used to
say) – and so is Mark Teixeira. Look closely at the dramatic frosted
glass façade of the store: those abstract lines are the extrapolated
outline of the photo of Harry from the company’s first-ever ad.
Check out the way each of the 500 halogens and LED lights in the
ceiling are angled so precisely onto the merchandise. Teixeira did
that himself as carefully as any theatre lighting designer. “But our
stores are theatres,” he exclaims. “The show is the merchandise
and the actors are our clothing advisors. If I overdesign the space
it might shut down all that activity and the magic would be gone.”
Yorkdale’s reinvention is finished now but there are new
projects already underway – Ottawa, Toronto’s Sherway Gardens,
Montreal, Edmonton… Calgary’s Chinook store opened only two
years ago but is already so successful it needs to expand. By the
end of 2014, Teixeira will have recreated every Harry Rosen store
in Canada – each one different, each one as personal as a new
song picked out on a guitar, to be orchestrated by an expert team,
every note pitch-perfect. h
THE “FLOW”
LIES AT THE HEART
OF A HARRY ROSEN
EXPERIENCE
(clockwise from top) The
Tateossian wall of cufflinks.
The Brunello Cucinelli
“soft shop.” The Giorgio
Armani shop-in-shop. All
are inside Harry Rosen’s
Yorkdale store.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
61
SPRING IS
COMING…
WE HAVE IT ON
GOOD AUTHORITY.
SUMMER TOO. AND THERE WILL BE
SUNSHINE AND WARMTH AND
LONG WEEKENDS RELAXING BY THE
WATER. YOU’RE GOING TO NEED
SOMETHING TO WEAR…
In anticipation of the glorious months that lie ahead,
we offer a sampling of our new spring and summer
collections that we hope will prove inspiring.
Blue is everywhere this season – all kinds of blue,
in suits, jackets and sportswear, extending the
spectrum far beyond the customary navy and
indigo. And beside it is another summer palette,
the warm, natural tones of earth and ochre, sand
and stone. The clothes themselves determined
the locations for our shoots. Some outfits called
for sea and sky, others for the contrast of white
architectural space; still others for the brightness
of a studio with graphic, abstract backdrops that
echoed the patterns or the textures of different
fabrics. But there was one clear message that all
these collections shared: the best way to make
them shine was to take them into the light.
To see a behind-the-scenes video of our fashion
shoot, please go to www.harryrosen.com. h
On-figure photography by Chris Nicholls;
styling by Lee Sullivan, Plutino Group;
grooming by Jamie Hanson, Lang Management.
Off-figure photography by Brian Sano;
styling by Dee Connolly.
72
HARRY
LBM jacket, $698;
PYA Black Label T-shirt, $75;
Jacob Cohën jeans, $575;
Salvatore Ferragamo belt, $420.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO INTERVIEW WITH
OUR MODEL, ADAM SENN, please go
to www.harryrosen.com.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
73
RL BLACK LABEL
This lightweight, midnight blue cotton
jacket has a classic masculinity that’s
typical of Ralph Lauren Black Label. The
broad belt, reinforced waxed-cotton
shoulders and flap pockets allude to
1960s biker jackets but still seem entirely
contemporary. It’s a great transitional
piece for late spring and early summer.
Ralph Lauren Black Label
jacket, $1,598, and pants, $298.
74
HARRY
EYEWEAR, CUTLER & GROSS
Canali suit, $1,798,
shirt, $285, and tie, $155.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
75
Isaia suit, $1,850, shirt, $255,
and tie, $155.
TOD’S
Brightly coloured shoes are made to
be noticed. Instead of matching them
to the colours of an outfit, let them
stand out in all their eye-catching
glory. With its sole of 133 rubber
pebbles, the Gommino moccasin from
Tod’s has been the European jet set’s
must-have driving shoe since the
1970s. The company collaborated with
Harry Rosen to produce Gommini in
five new colours exclusive to Harry
Rosen – three shades of blue, a pale
grey and a green.
Tod’s shoes, $520.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT BUILDING
YOUR SHOE WARDROBE, please go
to www.harryrosen.com.
76
HARRY
ISAIA
Many Neapolitan designers have shown
an enthusiasm for green this year,
including Isaia. This sporty, exceptionally
lightweight jacket is tailored in a smooth
blend of wool, silk and linen but it’s the
colour and pattern of the fabric that really
draw attention — a kelly green and royal
blue plaid.
Isaia jacket, $3,995, and tie, $295.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
77
Armani Collezioni jacket, $2,795,
and pants, $395.
78
HARRY
Brunello Cucinelli jacket, $2,795,
vest, $995, shirt, $595, and pants, $675.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
79
BOSS jacket, $650, knit, $175,
shirt, $205, and pants, $185.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT THE LATEST
BOSS COLLECTION, please go
EYEWEAR, SIRE’S CROWN, L.A.
to www.harryrosen.com.
80
HARRY
J.P. TILFORD BY
SAMUELSOHN
The windowpane check adds rich visual
texture to this grey suit in Samuelsohn’s
Performance fabric (pure wool,
exceptionally comfortable, wrinkle-,
water- and stain-resistant, it’s perfect for
travellers). Bring it to life with the colour
pop of a cranberry gingham shirt and
blue pin-dot tie.
J.P. Tilford by Samuelsohn
suit, $1,198; Eton shirt, $275;
Canali tie, $155.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
81
VERSACE
Look closely at the fabric of this Versace
bomber: the midnight blue nylon is
printed with an abstract dotted diamond
pattern that adds extraordinary visual
richness. Another luxe detail? That zipper
tag is gold-plated.
Versace Collection
EYEWEAR, CUTLER & GROSS
bomber, $795.
82
HARRY
TOM FORD
It’s the season’s most self-confident
statement — Tom Ford’s tuxedo in
shimmering blue-and-turquoise
floral-patterned silk. The bow tie, tuxedo
shirt and pants are relatively orthodox.
Not so these black patent shoes;
wearing them without visible socks
confirms that this man is out to make
an impression.
Tom Ford jacket, $5,595, shirt, $550,
bow tie, $265, and pants, $1,495.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT HOW
TO TIE A BOW TIE, please go to
www.harryrosen.com.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
83
J.P. TILFORD
BY SAMUELSOHN
Typifying the new season’s attitude to the
sports jacket, this example shows off a
bold blue-and-grey check pattern woven in
pure-wool Performance fabric (see page 81).
Î OPTIONS
A range of accessories offers all sorts of
options for adapting the look. How about a
navy knit and navy loafers instead of the dress
shirt and dark brown shoes — with a belt to
match and a selection of pocket squares? Pack
them into the BOSS hold-all when you travel.
EYEWEAR, SIRE’S CROWN, L.A.
J.P. Tilford by Samuelsohn jacket,
$950; Ermenegildo Zegna shirt, $325;
Canali pants, $375; Simonnot
Godard pocket square, $65.
84
HARRY
Î
OPTIONS
Multiply your options
with other coordinated
accessories
Simonnot Godard pocket squares, $65;
Ermenegildo Zegna dress shirt, $395, and
tie, $195; Brunello Cucinelli polo, $575;
Canali belt, $295; Canali belt, $195; BOSS bag,
$995; Salvatore Ferragamo loafers, $620.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT WAYS TO
FOLD A POCKET SQUARE, please go to
www.harryrosen.com.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
85
(left to right) BOSS suit, $998,
and shirt, $205; BOSS suit, $998,
and shirt, $225.
86
HARRY
Z Zegna suit, $1,398, shirt, $275,
tie, $135, and belt, $325.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
87
Showing supreme richness and depth,
shades of brown continue to prevail in
dress shoes. Designs are streamlined,
with trim contours that match the slim
silhouettes of today’s trousers.
(from top to bottom) Canali, $650;
Canali, $650; Ermenegildo
Zegna, $765; Salvatore
Ferragamo monk strap, $540;
To Boot New York, $398.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT BUILDING
YOUR SHOE WARDROBE, please go
to www.harryrosen.com.
88
HARRY
ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA
You don’t have to wait until summer to
wear a suit like this. That mocha tone
with its subtle blue windowpane check
looks right anytime from the end of
March on. The blue checked shirt and a
tie in brown silk with a pale blue stripe
are perfectly coordinated.
Ermenegildo Zegna suit,
$3,195, shirt, $375, and tie, $195.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
89
MONCLER
Moncler jacket, $420;
BOSS pants, $185.
90
HARRY
EYEWEAR, SIRE’S CROWN, L.A.
Renowned for the quality of its nylon,
Moncler is also making a new name for
its mixed-media hybrid pieces. Here,
navy nylon provides the sleeves and back
while the front is a jersey knit. The placket
and pockets show the telltale tricolor trim
that is a Moncler hallmark.
POLO RALPH LAUREN
An almost weightless cotton seersucker
blazer, an oxford shirt, a pair of madras
shorts… The classic American East
Coast look has been trimmed to show a
contemporary silhouette — ageless and
cool in every sense of the word.
Polo Ralph Lauren jacket, $560,
shirt, $125, and shorts, $98.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
91
Blue isn’t restricted to clothing this
season; it’s also a great colour for casual
spring and summer shoes. Loafers and
moccasins show up in a variety of
shades and many different textures and
fabrications from caviar-grain leather
to supple suede. All are delightfully
comfortable and easy to slip on and
off — perfect for travel or a relaxing
weekend. Match them to trousers in tan,
grey or a different shade of blue.
(clockwise from left)
To Boot New York, $320;
BOSS, $285;
Salvatore Ferragamo, $540;
Salvatore Ferragamo, $640;
Salvatore Ferragamo, $620.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT BUILDING
YOUR SHOE WARDROBE, please go
to www.harryrosen.com.
92
HARRY
BOSS jacket, $898; Culturata shirt, $198;
AG jeans, $275.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT THE LATEST
BOSS COLLECTION, please go
to www.harryrosen.com.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
93
ETRO
The linen safari jacket has long been
a keystone of Kean Etro’s spring
collections; this year, he has shortened
the cut and added a peak lapel, giving
it a decidedly urban appeal. Where’s
that signature Etro paisley? On the
subtle waistband of the brown linen
trousers and as a white tonal print on
the linen shirt.
Etro jacket, $1,450, shirt, $398,
and pants, $398.
94
HARRY
EYEWEAR, CUTLER & GROSS
John Varvatos Star USA
cardigan, $298, shirt, $175,
and pants, $185.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
95
CORNELIANI
ID is Corneliani’s luxury sportswear
division, typified by this cocoa herringbone jacket in a linen-wool blend. The
approach is sporty, but masterful tailoring
details show the company’s sartorial
roots. A removable gilet and throat latch
take you from spring into summer.
Corneliani jacket, $1,698;
Duchamp shirt, $250;
Brax pants, $225.
96
HARRY
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT BUILDING
YOUR SHOE WARDROBE, please go
to www.harryrosen.com.
Once upon a time, suede and nubuck were considered too delicate for mainstay
footwear. Now, significant advances in quality and durability have made them
go-to fabrications for many shoe designers, who choose them for their resilience and unparalleled softness. Lightweight and elegant, these chukka boots
provide a sophisticated pairing for cotton, linen or tropical-weight wool trousers.
(clockwise from left) John Varvatos, $298; Salvatore Ferragamo,
$395; Cole Haan, $275; To Boot New York, $380; BOSS, $325.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
97
Î
OPTIONS
Variations on a theme:
components of
coordination
BOSS Orange flip-flops, $85; Anderson’s Belts,
Varvatos Star USA polos, $98;
Sperry Top-Siders, orange ombre, $110, or blue,
$180; Swims loafers, $160; 34 Heritage shorts, $98.
$135; John
98
HARRY
CIRCOLO
The look brings together many of 2014’s essential
elements. The boldly patterned sport shirt is in
dramatic contrast to the white pants. Blue loafers
(no socks required) pick up on the colour palette.
Circolo’s knit fabric jacket is as soft, unstructured
and comfortable as a cardigan, its casually rumpled
look still holding the lines of a blazer.
Î OPTIONS?
A John Varvatos knit (we love the “peace sign” logo)
and a pair of shorts. Maybe BOSS Orange flip-flops
or a pair of Sperry Top-Sider coloured canvas
deck shoes. And an ice-cold Peroni, of course...
Life is good.
Circolo jacket, $598; Michael
$195; Brax pants, $225.
Kors shirt,
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
99
Paul & Shark jacket, $925,
shirt, $250, and pants, $195.
100
HARRY
(from left to right, top to bottom)
Burberry Brit polo, $160;
Brax pants, $198;
Burberry Brit polo, $185;
BOSS polo, $165; Brax pants, $198;
Burberry Brit polo, $160;
Paul & Shark polo, $225;
Brax pants, $198;
Paul & Shark polo, $250;
Paul & Shark polo, $280;
Brax pants, $198;
Paul & Shark polo, $280.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
101
EYEWEAR, SIRE’S CROWN, L.A.
Canali jacket, $1,698,
and shirt, $250; Eton tie, $125.
102
HARRY
Dolce & Gabbana jacket, $1,950,
vest, $475, shirt, $645, and jeans, $495.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
103
Burberry Brit sweatshirt, $310,
shirt, $265, and pants, $200.
104
HARRY
BOSS ORANGE
Leather jackets come in brown or black,
right? Not this one. BOSS Orange
prefers distressed navy leather with a
weathered masculine look.
BOSS Orange bomber, $995,
and shirt, $175.
h
TO SEE A VIDEO ABOUT THE LATEST
BOSS COLLECTION, please go
to www.harryrosen.com.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
105
CANADA'S
YOUNG
INNOVATORS
DR. JOHN DEMPSTER TORONTO
A HEALTHY
BALANCE
By Christine Langlois
At Harry Rosen,
we have a soft spot for
Canada’s
courageous young
innovators.
Stories of risk-taking
entrepreneurs
who know how to read
their audience and the
spirit of the times, who
can see a need for
something in Canada’s
future and are
prepared to step up…
They remind us of
Harry himself when he
was just starting out.
Naturopathic doctor
John Dempster
and environmental
entrepreneur
Vincent Chornet are
striving for excellence
by pushing the limits
of their fields.
Who knows what they
will achieve in the
next 60 years?
106
HARRY
T
ORONTO NATUROPATHIC DOCTOR JOHN DEMPSTER was just a
kid when he first showed his passion for understanding the
healing power of the right foods and a healthy lifestyle. He
grew up in a family where good nutrition was the rule – his mom
and dad allowed no junk food and doled out fish oil before breakfast and vegetable juice before dinner. So when two uncles he was
close to died prematurely of chronic diseases, he naturally asked
why and whether nutrition could have made a difference. “From a
young age, I asked a lot of questions,” he says.
That boyhood curiosity eventually led to an undergraduate
degree in biological sciences, then a degree in naturopathic medicine
at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (CCNM) and
recently a two-year advanced fellowship in anti-aging, regenerative
and functional medicine with the American Academy of Anti-Aging
Medicine. Today Dempster serves a wide range of clients at his
eponymous Yorkville clinic, including the city’s most powerful and
well connected as well as out-of-town rock stars, athletes and actors
who make a stop at the Dempster Clinic part of their Toronto visits.
What drew him to naturopathic medicine rather than traditional
medicine was its emphasis on the body’s natural ability to heal and
on treating the root causes of illness. Naturopathic doctors spend
lots of time with their patients asking questions and doing a range
of tests to understand where the body may be out of balance.
Treatment is tailored to the individual. “We work with you to put
your body back into a balanced state of health,” is how Dempster
describes it on his website. But while naturopathic medicine is a
vital part of patient care for treating all kinds of disease and preventing illness, he believes it’s only one piece of the puzzle. Dempster
consults often with medical doctors and other health care providers – chiropractors, osteopaths and physiotherapists. “When we
work together, we create awesome plans for our patients,” he says.
Dempster’s professional reputation has also grown internationally; he has patients in 17 countries who, after an initial face-toface visit with him, get their advice over Skype and their treatment
kits sent in the mail to their local health-care provider. He also
makes regular media appearances offering health advice, appears
at health events such as the recent Whole Life Expo in Toronto
where he gave a talk on “leaky gut syndrome” and writes a column
for The Huffington Post.
PHOTOGRAPHY, JAIME HOGGE
“We work with you to put
your body back into
a balanced state of health”
As he has built his practice, Dempster has been on a mission to
raise the profile of naturopathic medicine as an important complement to traditional medicine. He mentions type 2 diabetes – a
chronic illness linked to a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet – as a
good example of a condition that can be vastly improved using
naturopathic medicine. “We’re getting tremendous results with
type 2 diabetes. It’s largely reversible,” he says.
All the regimes and techniques Dempster recommends to
patients are based on solid scientific evidence of effectiveness.
“There are a lot of misconceptions about naturopathic medicine,”
he explains. “It’s important that everything we do is evidencebased.” That includes the latest trend that celebrities from
Justin Bieber to Suzanne Somers have been touting on television –
injections and intravenous infusions of vitamin and antioxidant
cocktails. Dempster offers a range of IV infusions to treat various
conditions and imbalances. They can be used as an adjunct to
other treatments such as chemotherapy, and they are being used
more and more as a way to prevent illness and improve performance.
One intravenous infusion treatment that has received considerable attention is glutathione. Glutathione, a substance made naturally in the liver, has only recently been identified as a powerful
antioxidant able to rid the body of toxins and help repair damaged
or oxidized cells. Glutathione can be depleted by stress, environmental toxins, chronic illnesses such as diabetes or Parkinson’s,
and aging itself. A glutathione infusion takes about 10 minutes.
A visit to the Dempster Clinic is meant to be soothing. The
waiting room, in shades of cream and chocolate, is modern and
elegant. And the doctor himself is low-key and casual with the
glowing good looks and lanky build that suggest he follows his
own advice. While Dempster works hard, he balances the long
hours with time to unwind and disconnect, including a trip into
Canada’s remote north with friends. Since he was 16, he has made
a trek to the Arctic every summer to paddle one of the northern
rivers. What began as a summer job as a guide has become a yearly
opportunity to retreat into the wilderness where he is more likely
to have his fly-fishing rod in his hand than his cellphone. The
first couple of days of being unplugged are tough, he says. “I feel
anxious, worried. And then, it’s ‘wow,’ I can breathe again.” He
also mentions his volunteer work – he’s a member of the board of
directors of a naturopathic clinic that serves tribal communities in
Kenya – and time with his family as other ways to stay grounded.
Family is clearly important to Dempster. When you sit down to
talk to him about his work, he doesn’t mention the demands of his
famous clients – he’d rather talk about the influence of his parents
and the inspiration of his 87-year-old grandfather who still works
full-time as an engineer and plays tennis three days a week. “My
grandfather is my mentor,” he says.
Ultimately Dempster is looking to help his patients achieve
balance, something he is also working hard to achieve for himself.
“We all have a different journey in life,” he explains. “Finding the
right balance is important.”
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
107
YOUNG
INNOVATORS
GARBAGE
INTO GOLD
By Adam Leith Gollner
V
INCENT CHORNET, ENTREPRENEUR, innovator and dynamic
young Canadian success story, is sitting inside a white
construction trailer on the outskirts of Edmonton. The
team of people managing the $100-million project have given him a
20-minute break in which he has agreed to tell harry magazine about
his Montreal-based company, Enerkem, and how it is changing the
standards in both the waste industry and the biofuels industry.
It’s not too complicated to explain what Enerkem does. The
company turns waste into ethanol, which is used as fuel for vehicles. Its environmentally friendly proprietary technology platform
is making it the first large global producer of a renewabletransportation fuel made from garbage – and Edmonton is the site
of its first fully operational facility, which the company has been
working on for 15 months and will be opening any day now.
With this plant, the city of Edmonton will now divert
90 percent of its waste from landfilling, either recycling it or,
through Enerkem’s technology, converting it into ethanol. This is
the highest waste-diversion rate in the municipal urban world,
something Chornet is clearly thrilled about. “It’s coming to an
inflection point,” he says. “We’ve been building an innovation
and it is becoming a commercial reality that can now be used by
society. We’re starting to touch it.”
Chornet speaks elegantly and lucidly, with the great gift of
rendering complex technicalities into easy-to-understand language.
He has the personality of a leader, a quality he says manifested
itself early on in his life. “It was there very clearly from the onset,”
he explains, “in my ability to motivate people and move them to
the objective. Whether in sports or in class projects, it was always
just who I was.”
The Enerkem process, as Chornet describes it, primarily entails
gasification. Waste is turned into gas, and that gas is converted into
liquid methanol, using a catalyst. Then the chemical makeup is
rearranged to attain ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline
to yield transportation fuel. The whole process, from waste to
ethanol, takes only four minutes.
After Edmonton, there are plans to start building a plant in
Varennes, on the south shore of Montreal, by the end of 2014.
“We have a lot of requests for transactions in China and Europe,”
Chornet explains. “We’re just being careful in how we want to
sequence our growth.”
108
HARRY
PHOTOGRAPHY, YANICK DÉRY
VINCENT CHORNET MONTREAL
That growth has been stupendous. Chornet, who is only
40 years old, has already taken Enerkem onto Fast Company’s
Top 50 list of the most innovative companies. He’s raised more
than $245 million in equity investments, and is the largest recipient of clean-tech venture capital in Canada. Chornet has even
loftier ambitions: he sees Enerkem becoming the first authentic
producer of a green fuel in large volumes that is both affordable
and universally acceptable. And cheaper than gasoline.
Best of all, there doesn’t appear to be any downside to the
technology. “It’s win-win,” Chornet says. “For societies, for
communities, for investors. The margins are high, it creates jobs
and it’s good for the planet. The world certainly needs that and
the world was just waiting for us.”
Interestingly, Enerkem’s rise is also a family success story.
Vincent’s father, Esteban Chornet, is a prominent scientist specializing in the thermal conversion of biomass. He spent the 1990s
developing gasification methodologies at the University of
Sherbrooke. “Before he retired, my dad was a world-calibre, highreputation professor,” Vincent explains. “He remains without an
inch of pretension, just a very nice, good person and father. On one
side, as a scientist, he has his standards and his discipline, but on
the other he is just such a fantastic guy. He’s a great person to live
up to on both counts.” (To this day, Esteban is still involved in the
company as its chief technology officer.)
Vincent had long been attracted to the idea of building a major
business. After graduating from HEC Montréal in 1995, he
worked in the financial sector – and when his dad explained
the potential of his own discoveries, Vincent recognized an opportunity. In 2000, he acquired the rights to his father’s intellectual
property from the University of Sherbrooke. Then he assembled a
first venture capital round of about $6 million, which he used for
the pilot phase, allowing him to test what his father did at the
university at a bigger level. Success let them move to an industrialsized demonstration facility in Westbury, Que., in 2006, which
again had extremely positive results, attracting the notice of major
venture capital groups. The first fruit of all that research is this
full-scale, fully operational plant in Edmonton.
As huge as the project is, Chornet never wavered in his
conviction that it would get to this point – and beyond. “I’m an
entrepreneur so I’m always confident. As an entrepreneur, you’re a
mixture of very confident and very paranoid. I’ve always been
very careful with the decisions that needed to be made to get us to
this point.”
The most important thing he has learned, he says, is “hard
work, resilience and communication. Working hard and making
sure everyone knows what’s going on – both in terms of your
vision and what directions you’re giving.”
PHOTOGRAPHY, TK; STYLING, TK
“It’s win-win. For societies, for communities,
for investors. The margins are high,
it creates jobs and it’s good for the
planet. The world certainly needs that
and the world was just waiting for us.”
Another key to his success, Chornet explains, is his family. “My
daughters are outstanding. Amelie and Michelle, 11 and 9 years
old, are an everyday event for myself and my wife, Sophie Aird. We
have so much fun with our daughters. Spending time with them is
what I do outside business.”
He also loves playing blues and jazz guitar, is building his own
studio and is the proud owner of a series of collection-grade, vintage
guitars. “I really like the Godin, a French-Canadian guitar,” he
says. “The Godin ‘Montreal’ is quite a piece of art. It’s not all that
rare, but it’s such a nice boutique-type of guitar. I love it.”
He also clearly loves his work. Chornet believes that, within a
decade, Enerkem will be competing with petrochemists and
large oil companies “but without the petro – just with the bio. I’m
confident that we’ll grow as large as some of the big oil and fuel
producers.” And big oil is also looking at Enerkem closely these
days. “I think at this point they’re intrigued,” Chornet says. “They
went from ‘This will not happen’ to ‘We need to create a dialogue
with Enerkem.’”
Chornet is optimistic that our planet will soon be able to stop
using landfills. “There’s just no logic to throwing that garbage –
which has good usable carbon in it – into a hole in the ground,”
he explains. “It should become feedstock so that we don’t need to
use as much oil and coal as we’ve been using for decades now.
Innovation has given us technology to harness carbon from waste.
So we should stop landfilling. We should recycle what we can –
good plastics, good textiles and fibres, as we’ve been doing for
15 years now. What we can’t recycle, we should convert into
ethanol so we don’t use as much fuel.”
Thanks to Enerkem, that possibility will soon be a reality. h
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
109
The Future by Barry Blitt
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
111
Cities
Local expertise and
information for the
business traveller
Not so much Cities in this issue of harry as sun-drenched getaways. These are destinations where many Canadians settle.
Some even end up buying second (or third) homes. We asked our expert team of travelling food writers to recommend a great
restaurant in each location. To see the latest updates on Canadian cities, please go to www.harryrosen.com. h
RESTAURANTS IN THE SUN
Î Providenciales, Turks and Caicos:
COCO BISTRO
the hour. If you haven’t tried monchong,
chorizo, refried beans, eggs and fire-roasted
butterfish or opah, this is the place. Aloha.
salsa and his chilaquiles verdes, topped
4100 Wailea Alanui Dr., 808 875 2210,
Chef Stuart Gray coaches little league
with queso Oaxaca and green chili sauce.
www.korestaurant.com
hockey and plays every Monday night with
He even perks up his steak-and-egg combo
by Anita Draycott
a bunch of Canadian expats, on rollerwith ranchero sauce and guacamole.
blades. Growing up on skates in Ontario,
Gallo Blanco is a bright, casual room where
Gray began his culinary apprenticeship at
the coffee flows and fine orange juice is
Î Miami South Beach: OLA
Argentinean chef Horacio Rivadero
the Windsor Arms Hotel in Toronto. Coco
pressed. And to set you up for your round,
describes his cuisine as “Nuevo Latino”
Bistro is a stunningly beautiful restaurant,
Arnold Palmers (fresh-squeezed lemonade
though foie gras makes several appearances
the tables wrapped around a tamarindand brewed ice tea) are always at the ready.
– in a sublime sherry sauce over Kobe
401 W. Clarendon Ave., 602 327 0880,
coloured building beneath a canopy of
meatballs, with a kumquat-yuzu-laced tuna
www.galloblancocafe.com
lanky coconut palms that shimmer with
ceviche, or slipped into dry-cured duck
by John Gilchrist
fairy lights. The herbed ravioli of conch
empanadas with anise-spiked pastry. From
and roasted peppers is a lovely dish.
the extensive ceviche menu, Fire & Ice, a
Superior too is the Thai curry of blackened Î Grand Cayman: OSETRA BAY
pairing of cobia marinated in sour orange,
Draped in white and perched on the edge
mahi or the local lobster, simply grilled.
onion, cilantro and jalapeño with a pear
of the Caribbean, Osetra Bay feels like a
Save room for coconut cream pie: it’s
granita, garners rave reviews. Finish your
yacht at anchor. The sound of the surf outalarmingly good.
OLA odyssey with a fine cigar: it’s actually
Grace Bay Rd., Providenciales, 649 946 5369,
side provides the perfect soundscape for a
Rivadero’s signature chocolate presentation,
www.cocobistro.tc
contemporary Cayman menu that includes
complete with edible matches. Open for
by Anne DesBrisay
local delights such as conch, mahi and
dinner only, either indoors or on the patio.
callaloo. Located a short (left side) drive
OLA is part of the boutique Sanctuary Hotel.
Î Scottsdale, Arizona: TALAVERA
from Georgetown – make sure you have
1745 James Ave., 305 695 9125,
The view through the saguaro cacti across
good directions and a GPS – the place also
www.olamiami.com
the desert valley is reason enough to visit
feels like a secret pirate hideaway. But
by Anita Draycott
Talavera, but the contemporary steakhouse
Osetra Bay is relentlessly democratic,
menu (Wagyu short rib ravioli, venison loin
providing weekend family brunches, elegant
with foie gras and mole, ahi tuna tartare)
dinners and late-night cocktails. It’s com- Î Sarasota: SHORE DINER
Located near St. Armands Circle, Sarasota’s
can almost take your mind off the beautiful
fortable, classy and casual, and it’s a place
answer to Rodeo Drive, Shore Diner is not
scenery. Add meticulous Four Seasons
where white never goes out of season.
your average greasy spoon – nor is it on the
Morgan’s Harbour, West Bay, 345 623 5100,
service, a “resort casual” attitude and an
water. The inviting interior gives a nod to
www.osetrabay.com
outstanding wine list and you have one of
1950s-style architecture while the patio
by John Gilchrist
Scottsdale’s finest restaurants. Executive
overlooks Sarasota’s touristic hot spot. Chef
chef Mel Mecinas sources locally and
Casey Lund puts a sophisticated spin on
brings a southwestern sensibility to the
Î Maui: KO
such diner standards as meatloaf, ribs and
Sunset on Maui. The sky is tinged with
table. And how can you resist the best
tangerine and magenta, flowers perfume the fried chicken. His vegan kale Caesar is
Margarita we’ve had in a land renowned
crunchy perfection. Piscean platters of Thai
air and the traditional torch lighting cerefor Margaritas?
10600 E. Crescent Moon Dr., Scottsdale at Troon
mony ushers in an enchanted evening at the curry mussels, crusted tuna and kung pao
calamari flaunt a distinct Asian kick.
North, 480 513 5085, www.talaverarestaurant.com Fairmont Kea Lani’s poolside Ko restauMixologist Mike Yoder infuses vodkas with
by John Gilchrist
rant. Chef Tylun Pang’s menu was inspired
by Hawaii’s sugarcane era, when the cuisines berries, ghost peppers and bacon. His
barrel-aged cocktail pairs Jura single malt
of plantation workers of many nationalities
Î Phoenix, Arizona: GALLO BLANCO CAFÉ
with a nip of apple, pear and cherry nectars
Pre-golf breakfasts are big in Phoenix and
became a sort of Hawaiian melting pot. Ahi
and a dash of bitters.
no one does it better than Gallo Blanco in
On the Rock comes to the table with a hot
the funky Clarendon Hotel. Chef-owner
stone so you can sear sashimi-grade tuna to 465 John Ringling Blvd., 941 296 0301,
www.dineshore.com
Doug Robson infuses modern Mexican
your liking and then dip it in orange-miso
flavours into his breakfast burrito of
sauce. Catch of the day is more like catch of by Anita Draycott
112
HARRY
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
113
ILLUSTRATION, DANTE TERZIGNI
Services
At Harry Rosen,
the fine print can
help you out
style magazine is printed
twice a year and is available
online 24/7.
Our own recognition
CANADA’S 50 BEST MANAGED
COMPANIES PLATINUM CLUB
HARRY’S BLOG
Look for weekly updates
regarding new arrivals,
designer appearances,
in-store events, customer
events, new designer
collections and more at
www.harryrosen.com.
Keep us informed as
to your preferences
CONTACT INFORMATION
Harry Rosen provides
a menu of above-andbeyond services
LIFETIME MAINTENANCE
PHOTOGRAPHY, TOM ARBAN
GUARANTEE
We offer complimentary
maintenance and repairs for
the lifetime of all our garments. We want to ensure
that you look and feel your
best in every garment you
purchase from us. That’s why
we provide complimentary
maintenance and repairs to
you, the original owner, for
the lifetime of each garment.
If you ever find yourself in
need of having a button
replaced, a seam fixed or
other minor repairs, simply
bring the item into any of our
stores, where professional
tailors will attend to it as
soon as possible (let us know
if you’re in a hurry), on-site
and free of charge. What’s
more, should your garment
require alterations due to
weight loss or — heaven forbid — weight gain, we will
make the necessary adjustments for you to a maximum
of one size up or down, also
at no charge. Health regulations require that you have
the garment dry-cleaned
before bringing it in for either
of these services.
ULTIMATE RETURN POLICY
If one of our garments fails to
live up to reasonable expectations, please bring it back.
Whether it requires a refund,
replacement or repair, we’ll
happily do whatever is needed to give satisfaction.
SHOP BY APPOINTMENT
For your convenience, a
clothing advisor can preselect items, even an entire
wardrobe, and have them
ready for your consideration.
EMERGENCY SERVICES
Call us and we’ll immediately
resolve issues such as
missing buttons, replacing a
shirt, last-minute alterations,
et cetera.
we’ve provided outstanding
service in every respect.
SHOP ONLINE OR IN-STORE
We offer an array of the best
merchandise online at
www.harryrosen.com.
New designers and exclusive
online offers are just part of
the mix. Now you can start by
looking online for an item you
need, then either find it at the
store or order it online. You
can also send an e-mail
about the item to your clothing advisor, or check online
for your advisor’s hours.
We endeavour to keep
you informed
ADVANCE NOTICE OF SALES &
ALTERATIONS
EVENTS TO OUR CUSTOMERS
Our on-site tailors provide
world-class alteration
services free of charge on
regular-priced items.
Alteration charges on sale
merchandise are waived for
customers in the Silver or
higher tiers of our Sartoria
Recognition Program.
To give you greater shopping
opportunities, you’ll be notified before the general public.
SATISFACTION FOLLOW-UP
After every purchase we’ll
contact you to offer any additional assistance you may
require and to ensure that
ASK HARRY
Please notify us at the store
or at [email protected]
of any change in your e-mail
address, telephone number
or mailing address, and we’ll
update your file.
In 1993, Deloitte established
the Canada’s Best Managed
Companies business awards
program, recognizing excellence in Canadian-owned
and -managed companies
with revenues over $10 million. Every year, hundreds of
entrepreneurial companies
compete for this designation
in a rigorous and independent process that evaluates
the calibre of their management abilities and practices.
Companies that win for six or
more consecutive years
receive the Platinum Club
award. Harry Rosen is one
such company.
FOLLOW US
Introducing Harry’s
Sartoria Recognition
Program
This program is our way of ensuring that every
one of our customers, from the occasional shopper to
the most loyal client, is perpetually re-inspired
by our providing the most rewarding, most personal
menswear experience in Canada. As with many
recognition programs, it acknowledges different
customer purchase levels through the use of Bronze,
Silver, Gold, Platinum or Platinum Elite tiers. Each tier
provides a menu of above-and-beyond services and
introduces a layer of unforeseen benefits provided by
our associates that reinforce our commitment to
caring for your investment in your wardrobe.
You can review the Sartoria Recognition Program at
your convenience online at www.harryrosen.com.
While our clothing advisors
provide impressive expertise
on all sartorial matters, you
can also Ask Harry online
and we’ll respond at
www.harryrosen.com.
HARRY MAGAZINE
Our substantial and internationally respected men’s
h
FOR AN INTRODUCTION TO OUR STORES,
OUR PHILOSOPHY AND OUR SERVICES,
please go to the Customer Journey page at
www.harryrosen.com.
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
115
Guide
Looking for a specific label? A favourite
designer? You’ll find it below, together with
our store directory.
Available at all
Harry Rosen Stores
Adriano Goldschmied Denim
Armani Collezioni
Benson
BOSS Black
Brax
Bugatchi
Burberry Brit
Canada Goose
Canali
Citizens of Humanity
Coppley
Corneliani
Dion
Ermenegildo Zegna Ties
Eton
J.P. Tilford by Samuelsohn
John Smedley
John Varvatos Star USA
Moncler
Paul & Shark
PYA Black Label
RLX GOLF
Sand
34 Heritage
Toronto Mississauga Square
One, Sherway Gardens
Montreal Carrefour Laval
Winnipeg Polo Park
Calgary Chinook Centre
Alberto
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, First Canadian
Place, Sherway Gardens,
Yorkdale
Ottawa Rideau Centre
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Calgary CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Oakridge Centre,
Pacific Centre
Belstaff
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Yorkdale
Vancouver Pacific Centre
Brioni
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West
Brunello Cucinelli
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Yorkdale
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Calgary CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Pacific Centre
Burberry London
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Yorkdale
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Vancouver Pacific Centre
DSquared2
Toronto Yorkdale
Dolce & Gabbana
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, Yorkdale
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Calgary CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Pacific Centre
Ermenegildo Zegna
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
First Canadian Place,
Sherway Gardens, Yorkdale
Ottawa Rideau Centre
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Calgary CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Oakridge Centre,
Pacific Centre
Etro
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, Sherway Gardens,
Yorkdale
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Calgary CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Pacific Centre
Isaia
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West
Vancouver Pacific Centre
John Varvatos Collection
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, Yorkdale
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Vancouver Pacific Centre
Kiton
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West
Lanvin
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West
Loro Piana
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West
Vancouver Pacific Centre
Maurizio Baldassari
Toronto Sherway Gardens,
Yorkdale
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Vancouver Oakridge Centre,
Pacific Centre
Michael Kors
Toronto Eaton Centre, First
Canadian Place, Mississauga
Square One, Sherway Gardens
Winnipeg Polo Park
Calgary Chinook Centre,
CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Oakridge Centre
Parajumpers
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, Mississauga
Square One, Yorkdale
Montreal Carrefour Laval,
Les Cours Mont-Royal
Winnipeg Polo Park
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Calgary Chinook Centre,
CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Oakridge Centre,
Pacific Centre
Polo Ralph Lauren
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, Mississauga
Square One, Yorkdale
Montreal Carrefour Laval
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Vancouver Oakridge Centre,
Pacific Centre
Ralph Lauren Black Label
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Yorkdale
Vancouver Pacific Centre
Ralph Lauren Double RL
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West
Robert Graham
Toronto Eaton Centre,
First Canadian Place,
Mississauga Square One,
Sherway Gardens, Yorkdale
Ottawa Rideau Centre
Montreal Carrefour Laval
Winnipeg Polo Park
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Calgary Chinook Centre,
CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Oakridge Centre,
Pacific Centre
Robert Talbott
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, First Canadian
Place, Sherway Gardens,
Yorkdale
Ottawa Rideau Centre
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Calgary Chinook Centre,
CORE - TD Square
Tom Ford
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Calgary CORE - TD Square
Vilebrequin
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, First Canadian
Place, Sherway Gardens,
Yorkdale
Ottawa Rideau Centre
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal
Calgary CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Pacific Centre
Z Zegna
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, First Canadian
Place, Mississauga Square One,
Sherway Gardens, Yorkdale
Ottawa Rideau Centre
Montreal Les Cours Mont-Royal,
Carrefour Laval
Calgary Chinook Centre,
CORE - TD Square
Vancouver Oakridge Centre,
Pacific Centre
Shoes
Allen Edmonds
Armani
Brunello Cucinelli
BOSS
Canali
Church’s
Cole Haan
Dolce & Gabbana
John Varvatos
New Balance
Prada
Salvatore Ferragamo
Sperry
To Boot New York
Tod’s
Versace
All shoes not available at all
stores. Please speak to one
of our associates or visit
www.harryrosen.com.
We try to keep everything in
stock, but some merchandise in
this book may not be in our
stores at all times. If you have any
questions, please contact your
clothing advisor or store
manager at any of the stores
listed here. Prices may be
subject to change without notice.
Harry Rosen
Store Directory
Toronto
82 Bloor Street West
416 972 0556
Eaton Centre
416 598 8885
First Canadian Place
416 981 9097
Mississauga Square One
905 896 1103
Sherway Gardens
416 620 6967
Yorkdale Shopping Centre
416 787 4231
Ottawa
Rideau Centre
613 230 7232
Montreal
Les Cours Mont-Royal
514 284 3315
Carrefour Laval
450 688 4123
Winnipeg
Polo Park Shopping Centre
204 786 2368
Edmonton
West Edmonton Mall
780 444 1637
Calgary
Chinook Centre
403 252 2848
CORE - TD Square
403 294 0992
Vancouver
Oakridge Centre
604 266 1172
Pacific Centre
604 683 6861
If you enjoy receiving your copy
of harry but have had a change of
address, please advise us of your
new mailing address by e-mail at
[email protected] or
write to us at:
Harry Rosen Inc.
77 Bloor Street West
Suite 1600
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M5S 1M2
Versace Collection
Toronto 82 Bloor Street West,
Eaton Centre, Mississauga
Square One, Sherway Gardens,
Yorkdale
Ottawa Rideau Centre
Montreal Carrefour Laval
Winnipeg Polo Park
Edmonton West Edmonton Mall
Calgary Chinook Centre
Vancouver Oakridge Centre,
Pacific Centre
SPRING/SUMMER 2014
117
The World of...
Robert Tateossian
raised in Rome and educated in
the U.S., Robert Tateossian
speaks seven languages. After
university he moved to London
and worked for Merrill Lynch
for seven years before autonomy beckoned. He began
designing cufflinks – whimsical,
beautiful, extraordinary
cufflinks – and found the world
loved them. Last fall, he
opened a shop-in-shop in the
Harry Rosen store at Toronto’s
Yorkdale Shopping Centre,
offering the full range of his
jewellery and accessories.
Though he’s based in London,
it turns out he is rarely there…
h
TO SEE A VIDEO INTERVIEW WITH
ROBERT TATEOSSIAN, please go to
“My home? Terminal 5 at
Heathrow Airport. I spend
more time at T5 than anywhere else. Seventy percent
of my life is spent travelling.
I was truffle hunting in Alba
earlier this week. Off to Milan
tomorrow then Tokyo and
Osaka for a week. I do a trunk
show there. It’s always nice to
meet the ultimate consumers
– the men who actually buy
and wear my things.”
“Most companies are
London, Paris, New York…
We’re London (where we
have five stores) and
Yerevan, Armenia. Plus
corner concepts in Moscow,
Kuwait and now Toronto!
Quite eclectic. Yorkdale is
our first North American
corner and it’s a replica of
our store in London. Next
will be Xian in China.”
www.harryrosen.com.
“I don’t think I could do what I
do if I didn’t love travel. I have
some of my best ideas on an
aircraft where I’m isolated, or
landing in a city at 10 o’clock
at night and having dinner by
myself. I can’t really create
when I’m surrounded by
people. And when you travel
you’re exposed to art, architecture, furniture, the people
around you… It’s inspiring.”
118
HARRY
“I suppose I look at the
world in a different way,
my eye seeking out form
and shape. I’m always
miniaturizing things as
I look at them, asking
myself how can this be
turned into a piece of
jewellery. Sometimes
it works, sometimes it’s
a fiasco.”
“In the latest collection
we have some cufflinks
made from pyritized
ammonite fossils from
Russia, set in silver, that
are literally millions of
years old. Others have
agates from Kazakhstan
or pieces of meteorites
from Argentina and
Sweden. We’ve had an
incredible reaction to
that from customers
because they’re actually
wearing a piece of history
on their cuff. We also
have something we call
Pandora’s box – miniature
boxes turned into cufflinks. I put different things
inside – baby shells or
shark’s teeth, fragments
of mammoth tusk or
dinosaur bone.”
“Who do I wear? Etro and
Neil Barrett. They’re both
friends and Neil will convert all
his shirts for me to give them
French cuffs. I like Z Zegna too.
And Alessandro Gherardeschi
shirts – they’re a husband and
wife team in Florence who do
the most spectacular, superfunky cotton shirts – some
prints, some hand-painted.”
“I’ve been to Japan more
than 60 times over the years
and I can understand
Japanese and say enough
phrases to get by, but my one
objective before I die is to
learn Japanese properly.”
“Rules to live by? We’re on
planet Earth once so just
make the best of it. Enjoy life
and wear Tateossian.”
ILLUSTRATION, KAGAN MCLEOD
B
orn in Kuwait
to LebaneseArmenian and
Palestinian parents,

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