02-07-13SM LR

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02-07-13SM LR
February 8-March 7, 2013 • ONE COPY FREE
Scottsville Monthly
Your News Source For Scottsville On The James
The Eclectic Designs of
D. Wiley Anderson
Page 4
This Month in the
greater Scottsville. One copy is free, additional copies are $1
each payable in advance to the publisher.
Scottsville
Subscriptions: Copies will be mailed for the subscription
price of $35 per year. Please mail a check and a note with
your name and address to: Subscriptions Dept., P.O. Box
59, Palmyra, VA 22963.
MONTHLY
Scottsville Monthly
Your News Source For Scottsville On The James
Contemporary worship at
Scottsville United
Methodist...Page 8
Editor
C.M. Santos
valleyeditor@embarqmail.com
Submissions, tips, ideas, etc.: The Scottsville Monthly
encourages submissions and tips on items of interest to
Scottsville citizens. However we reserve the right to edit submissions and cannot guarantee they will be published. The
Scottsville Monthly will not be responsible for returning submitted materials. Please include S.A.S.E. if you would like items
returned. Please keep calendar submissions to 50 words or less,
letters to the editor to 300 words or less and feature stories to
500 words or less. Mail submissions to: The Scottsville
Monthly, P.O. Box 59, Palmyra, VA 22963.
Advertising Director
Judi Price
valleysales@embarqmail.com
Advertising Accounts Manager
Diane Eliason
Classified ads: Please send a written or typed copy of the
ad with a $10 check to: Classifieds Department P.O. Box
59, Palmyra, VA 22963. You can also email
valleyads@embarqmail.com and pay by credit card. Please
specify the category it should appear under. Ads must be 30
words or less. Sorry, classifieds will not be taken by phone.
Graphic Designer
Marilyn Ellinger
Art show all in the
family...Pages 7
Staff Writers
Ruth Klippstein
Marianne Ramsden
Ronald Smith
Next advertising deadline: February 27 for March 8 – April
4, 2013 issue.
© Valley Publishing Corp. 2013 All rights reserved.
Contributors
Scottsville Library, Scottsville Museum, Martha Louis
Laurel Greene, Lisa Bittner, Sunny Lenz
One of
D. Wiley
Anderson's
Victorian
designs,
Holley Lawn,
in Richmond.
Photo
courtesy
Keith Van
Allen.
Email: valleyeditor@embarqmail.com
Homeschoolers
read at the
library...Page 10
Photo Submissions:
valleyeditor@embarqmail.com
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 59, Palmyra, VA 22963.
Location: 2987 Lake Monticello Rd., Palmyra
Phone: (434) 591-1000
Fax: (434) 589-1704
Disclaimer: The Scottsville Monthly does not endorse or recommend any product or service and is not responsible for any warranties or claims made by advertisers in their ads.
What is the flu?...
Page 12
Cover designed by
Marilyn Ellinger
General: Scottsville Monthly is published monthly by Valley
Publishing Corp. It is the only paper that covers Scottsville
exclusively. A total of 3,500 copies are circulated throughout
Barnett Real Estate
383 Valley Street, Scottsville ✦ Office: (434) 286-9900 ✦ Fax: (434) 286-9393
www.barnettre.com
UNDER CONTRACT
MLS 504025
$279,500
One-of-a-kind log cabin on 19 acres, just 5 minutes from Charlottesville. This property features
hand-hewn chestnut logs & stone. In need of total
restoration, but appears to be solid for its years.
To be sold as-is. Call Victor.
JAMES RIVER RD.
$119,900
Only 5 minutes from the bustling & historic town of Scottsville you'll find a beautiful 10 ac. parcel of land ideal for your
next home. Neighboring farms add
charm & spaciousness to the list of reasons for you to see this property, known
as Triple Poplar Farm. 30 minutes from
Charlottesville. Call Victor.
SOUTH FORK FARMS LAND
Larry Barnett
434-960-6038
BROKER
$575,000
Only 10 min. from UVA, 21 AC of extraordinary views! Mostly
open land, some hardwoods, and 4-board fencing. 15 gal/min
well, survey, and 5 BR perc report available. Numerous sites for
your dream home. Call Victor.
2 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • February 8–March 7, 2013
Old Lynchburg
UNDER CONTRACT
$44,900 MLS 500093
$134,900
Best Price in Albemarle Co. 3 BR doublewide Charming ranch with open floor plan and split
on 2 acres in need of TLC. Close to large over- bedroom design. Covered front porch and
head power lines. Call Sarah
spacious back deck. Located on quiet lane, in
a sunny private location. Spacious front yard
with well established gardens. Call Sarah.
ROLLING ROAD ESTATES
$79,560
Over $30,000 price reduction on this beautiful, very private 10 acre estate lot with huge white oaks. Great
covenants to protect property values. Approx 16 miles
and 25 minutes to Charlottesville. Two other 10 acre lots
available for $69,560. Call Larry.
Sarah Churchill
434-882-2980
REALTOR®
Victor Ray
434-962-2628,
ASSOCIATE BROKER
Notes from the Chamber
Contributed by Cynthia Bruce, president, Scottsville Community Chamber of Commerce:
First - we had another lovely Sunday at Brian & Linda LaFontaine's house (last
month)! Thank you to them for hosting, and to all who attended - I always wish
more of you would attend, it's a great time to network, and to meet other local small
business owners, to let them know what you are planning and to find out what is
happening with them. Our Business After Hours this year have been pretty finalized, and I hope everyone can make time to attend - it's good for your business!
Congratulations to our Raymon Thacker Citizen of the Year award recipients, Bill
& Bonnie Cooper. They have been a very valuable part of our community for many
years, giving countless volunteer hours to community service organizations. They
are wonderful examples of how we can all help make a difference in our area!
Our next meeting is scheduled for Tuesday February 19th, at 7:00, at the Visitor's
Center and Chamber Office.
I am looking for help with a few remaining projects needed at the Visitors Center:
1) Someone to take on the task of signage. We have a small budget for a large
sign to be seen from both directions on Rte 20, mounted somewhere on the roof.
This job would entail finding a sign company, working with them for a design consistent with ARB requirements, and seeing that the sign is installed properly. We
also have a 'sandwich board' type sign that needs permanent lettering indicating
when we are open, that we can set out onto the street. This job is important, and
needs to happen soon. I'd be grateful to anyone who can take this on.
2) There has been much discussion regarding the roofline of the the old jail.
There has been some sketchwork done of a possible improvement to the silhouette
of the building, with the addition of a metal roof facade. The estimates to add this
are around $1,000. Also in the discussion was perhaps the addition of a hip roof,
to make the building more in tune with the police station. Either one would require
a fundraising committee, to pursue this. Is anyone up to this specific fundraising
task?
3) When the Town has reconfigured the chainlink fence at the back of the building, we need to affix a wooden fence to it, as a privacy screen. It will be painted
the same sage green as the building. Landscaping is planned for early April, and
hopefully that fence will be completed by then as well. We also still have the steps
to the public parking area to frame and pour (I was under the impression that this
was included in the sidewalk improvements out front, which was paid for by contributions from James River Brewery, the Chamber, and the Town...I was mistaken,
and this now clearly needs to be addressed.) Is there someone who can take charge
of any/all of these exterior improvements, keeping in mind there will be some funding needed? The Chamber has a small budget for this - bids for the work are welcome.
That's it for now - Thank you to our Friday Visitors Center Volunteer, Liz
Knotts and Saturday Volunteer Jack Patteson.
St. Anne’s Episcopal Parish Services and Suppers
Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper: St. Anne’s Episcopal Parish invites the
Scottsville community to a Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper on February 12th, 5:00
p.m. - 7:00 p.m. meeting in the Christ Church Parish Hall on Glendower Road.
Bring a friend and enjoy a hearty meal of pancakes and sausage with apples. Ticket
prices are still $5.00 for adults and $2.50 for children under 12. Proceeds will benefit the Bread of Life Ministry. For more information please call the parish office at
286-3437.
Ash Wednesday services: On February 13, 2013, St. Anne’s Episcopal
Parish will hold two Ash Wednesday services with imposition of ashes and Holy
Eucharist at Christ Church on Glendower Road. There will be a daytime service at
12 o’clock noon and the evening service will take place at 7:00 p.m. Please call the
parish office at 286-3437 if you have any questions.
St. Anne’s Episcopal Parish will lead us on a Wednesday Evening Lenten
Pilgrimage (February 20-March 20). A pilgrimage is a sacred journey one embarks
upon so that the soul may move toward wholeness, in search for home that is in
God. On Wednesday evenings during the Lenten season, as we make our way
toward Holy Week, we will explore a variety of pilgrimage experiences. The program will meet at the Christ Church Parish Hall on Glendower Road at 7:00 p.m.
On February 20, we will explore “Pilgrimage in Service with guest speaker Malcolm
Warfield who will talk with us about the S.E.E.D Ministry International: Sowing
Edibles & Evangelical Deeds, a food sustainability ministry.” On February 27, the
Rev. Gordon Lindsay will share with us “Pilgrimage in Silence.” For more information please call the parish office at 286-3437.
•••
Scottsville Churches to Hold Evening Prayer Services During Lent
S
ix Scottsville churches will join
forces to hold a weekly evening prayer service
for the community during Lent. The half-hour
services will take place in the sanctuary of the
Scottsville United Methodist Church on
Tuesday evenings beginning at 6:00 p.m. A
light supper will follow in the fellowship hall
after the service.
“These ecumenical Lenten prayer services
The Rev.
have become a cherished Lenten tradition
Greg Smith
here in Scottsville,” says the Rev. Greg
Smith, pastor of Antioch Baptist Church. “We can all join together in renewing our faith during these weeks leading up to Easter.”
The six participating churches are: Antioch Baptist, Mount Zion
United Methodist, Scottsville Baptist, Scottsville United Methodist,
Scottsville Presbyterian, and St. Anne’s Episcopal Parish. The
schedule of worship leaders and supper providers is as follows in
the chart to the right.
Date
Worship Leader
Providing the Supper
February 19
The Rev. Greg Smith
Antioch Baptist Church
Pastor, Antioch Baptist
February 26
The Rev. Gordon Lindsey
Pastor, Scottville Presbyterian
March 5
The Rev. Bruce Lugn
Pastor, Scottsville United Methodist
and Mount Zion United Methodist
March 12
The Rev. Katie McKown
Scottsville Presbyterian
Church
Scottsville United Methodist
and Mount Zion United
Methodist Churches
Scottsville Baptist Church
Pastor, Scottsville Baptist
March 19
The Rev. Ellen White
St. Anne’s Episcopal Parish
Priest in Charge, St. Anne’s
February 8–March 7, 2013 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • 3
Cover Story
Victory Hall, c.1925. Photographer: William E. Burgess. Courtesy of Scottsville Museum.
D. Wiley Anderson:
Inventor, Purveyor, Designer
By Ruth Klippstein
Correspondent
D.
D. Wiley Anderson as a young man.
Photo Courtesy of Keith Van Allen.
D. Wiley Anderson's home, Albevanna Springs,
near Scottsville.
Wiley Anderson, inventor, bottler
and
purveyor
of
Albevanna Springs water,
designer of the Jackson Street
house The Terrace and of
Victory Hall, as well as residential and civic
buildings from Brooklyn to Georgia, had
strong ties to the Scottsville area, where he
grew up and raised his family. His daughter Mollie, born in 1915 and now living in
Richmond with her son Keith Van Allen,
recently buried her older sister Patsy
(Phyllis Anderson Davis) in the Scottsville
Cemetery; “I get so homesick sometimes,”
she said.
D. Wiley (David, named for his Civil War uncle, later
a member of the House of Delegates from Fluvanna)
grew up in the thick of Cap’n John Bledsoe Anderson’s
clan. Cap’n John, 1819-1911, married Mary Elizabeth
Morris in 1843, after his first wife died. He inherited
about 1000 acres of land on the Albemarle-Fluvanna
border along the Hardware River; here he raised D.
Wiley and his 10 other children. Much of what we
know about this strong-willed patriarch, who always
stood by his word—a builder and expert carpenter—
comes from a grandson-in-law, Thomas Cleveland
Sadler, whose “Memories of Bygone Days” has been
often referenced here. The Cap’n was, Sadler says,
“very rough spoken and might scare you to death if you
did not know him,” though he was in fact a kind and
tender-hearted man, for whom religion and music and
family were important. “Many old houses in and around
Fork Union are still standing that he built.”
His son D. Wiley joined him in this work during the
summers, and this was D. Wiley’s initial training for his
4 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • February 8–March 7, 2013
later architectural career. Dr. Susan Frazer, VCU, the
first writer to consider D. Wiley Anderson’s designs in
an academic framework, resurrects him from “obscurity” with her thesis that Anderson, “after being trained as
an artisan-builder in rural Virginia and then completing
a
six-year
architectural
apprenticeship
in
Richmond…became an accomplished building technologist, an excellent draftsman and a competitive regional architect.” Frazer, who presented this material at the
Scottsville Museum in 1997, says that Anderson’s “stylistic evolution” allowed him a long, important career.
From his father, we presume, D. Wiley learned drafting and business practices, as well as building skills. D.
Wiley was a quick student at Scottsville’s Stony Point
School, always reading; he liked math and drawing. His
father’s imprint on his work ethic was strong; he taught
all his children the various skills still being employed by
the slaves who had stayed on at the family’s farm.
In1889 he went to Richmond and got a job with architect George Parson. He opened his own business in
1895.
This is only a generation after the Civil War, when
Richmond had been ruined and people in the South had
very little money. D. Wiley had been exposed to the
architecture of Jefferson, and it is possible that he heard
Ralph Waldo Emerson speak at the University of
Virginia; he later took part of a quotation from Emerson
as his business motto, “Not a mouse trap man, but the
world beats a path to his door.” (Build a better mouse
trap, Emerson had said, and the world beats a path to
your door.) Anderson was outgoing and handsome,
with entre into Richmond society through Parson and
his well-off client Lewis Ginter, whose mansion he built,
See Anderson Page 5
Cover Story
and through the Civil War veterans who
revered his uncle.
When he started his own firm, D. Wiley
Anderson was designing in the high Victorian
style. Several of his three-storey, wrap-around
porch, gabled, turreted, and crenellated houses are in the Fan and Hermitage Road
District, redolent of the elegance of the upper
class as the Richmond population boomed.
As land northwest of the city was developed,
D. Wiley began to add the newer architectural trend, Colonial Revival—with its symmetry
and elaborated front doors, often with fan
lights and porticoes with columns—to his
Victorian designs, including Queen Anne (the
painted
ladies)
and
Richardsonian
Romanesque (with round-topped arches and
square-cut stone work).
This eclectic approach, while it has been
described as an expression of Anderson’s lack
for formal training, was very popular at the
time, and he was offered many commissions
from various prominent families in Richmond
for large, expensive houses. These include
Montrose, Bleniquhain, and Rosedale.
As the twentieth century progressed, D.
Wiley Anderson began to design public buildings, churches, movie halls, and train depots.
He offered a design in the competition for a
new State Capitol in Richmond. While it didn’t win, it was considered impressive and
important; Anderson used its inspiration
Keith Van Allen, holding photo of his grandfather D. Wiley
later when he designed the Louisa County
Courthouse. D. Wiley also designed the Anderson; and Mollie Anderson Van Allen, D. Wiley's daughter and
Keith's mother, at home in Richmond. Photo by Ruth Klippstein.
wooden, 10,000-seat Exposition Hall for the
United Confederate Veterans reunion, a “huge
event,” says Frazer, and a big boost to his popularity; as well as a Jewish temple, movie theatres, warehouses. Keith Van Allen’s favorites include his
grandfather’s Italianate Confederate soldiers’ homes
in Richmond.
Anderson’s son John worked with his father during this time, and was being groomed to take over
the business. Keith Van Allen thinks that John
designed the small Bird Street Scottsville elementary
school that burned down in 1981. John was killed
in the dreadful carnage in France during World War
I, and his loss and its affect is still remembered by his
half-sister Mollie.
Susan Frazer notes D. Wiley’s ability to blend stylistic architectural elements and to utilize the newlyavailable manufactured pieces that could be added to
a building according to the client’s taste and budget.
Perhaps this is how he arrived at his late Victorian
commercial design for Victory Hall. As Bob Spencer
says, D. Wiley was “of course involved with the idea
of having a performance area in Scottsville so the
local drama coach, Marion McKay—championed by
Mayor Jackson Beal—could stage her shows.”
When silent movies were available, Willie Burgess
put in piano and screened movies, 20 cents a ticket.
Later, Chautauqua and travelling vaudeville acts performed there, with many famous entertainers coming to Scottsville.
The Victory Hall Company Corporation was
founded, with banker Jacinto V. Pereira as treasurer
and D. Wiley one of the stockholders, and “everyone in town was asked to contribute,” Bob says.
See Anderson Page 6
THE FLUVANNA ARTS COUNCIL PRESENTS THE 2012-2013 SEASON
AT
CARYSBROOK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
February 23 - 8:00 PM
Big Ray & The Kool Kats
March 9 - 1:00 PM-6 PM
To brighten up those dismal days in
February we have the jazzy and swinging music of Big Ray and the Kool Kats
on Feb. 23. Big Ray has entertained in
Vegas, at DC Inaugural Balls, and the
Greenbrier Resort just to name a very
few. Classy and Professional is this
group!
Fluvanna’s Got
Talent Auditions
Get ready for the Second Annual Fluvanna’s Got Talent on April 27. Auditions will be
held March 9. Applications will be available on our website as well as in local places
of business plus the Fluvanna County Library. Contestants only, no spectators
Tickets: ★$18 presale ★ $20 at the door ★ $10 Students
March 16 - 7:30 PM
Upcoming
Event...
Celtibillies perform at mix of Appalachian and Celtic Music
Take four musicians steeped in their native Appalachian music, add in the beautiful repertoire of Celtic music and the
result is—Celtibillies. “A band of great imagination and versatility.”
Tickets: ★$12 presale ★ $15 at the door ★ $10 Students
For Tickets, call (434) 842-1333 ★ Season Tickets $75.00 a $18.00 savings over advanced tickets
Carysbrook Performing Arts Center
8880 James Madison Highway (Hwy 15)
Fork Union,VA 23055
(434) 842-1333
For Tickets Online: www.Carysbrook.org
Email:FluvannaArtsCouncil@comcast.net • www.fluvannaartscouncil.com
February 8–March 7, 2013 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • 5
Anderson from page 5
Bricks for the building were made in the John
window opener, paid for this, Keith says. Mollie also remembers
Martin foundry across the James River, in the low
Scottsville High School, where she revered W.D. Smith. It was
ground of Snowden south of the current bridge.
there she met her future husband, Russell Van Allen. “Stop
The project, commemorating the Armistice,
looking at me,” she told the brash young man. “It’s OK--I’m
began in 1918; the building was dedicated in
going to marry you,” he replied. Mollie went to the D. Wylie1920. “As Mr. Anderson designed it, Victory Hall
designed Smithdeal-Massey Business School in Richmond, later
was like an old opera house. It had a balcony and
worked at Buckingham Slate, where in her interview, the owner
a lovely proscenium. There were 386 seats that
learned of her connection to D. Wiley Anderson and said, “Oh,
folded down (“usually filled on Saturdays,” Bob
you can have the job; he’s specified enough of our slate to reach
say), and a floor sloping toward the stage. The
around the world.” Her father would sometimes talk business
box office opened to the street, and there was a
with her, calling her “my little secretary.”
neon sign. While the high school had its senior
But it’s D. Wiley’s love of life, his story-telling, singing, piano
class plays here, Bob says, “Victory Hall played
playing, and jokes and stories that Mollie remembers best. All
many roles in the history of Scottsville.”
her cousins would “flock over” to Albevanna Springs to see D.
Fred Schneider of the Scottsville Architectural
Wiley drink Worchester sauce “right out of the bottle.” The last
Review Board notes, “Victory Hall is clearly the
house D. Wiley designed was in Fork Union, next to one his
most impressive of the building found along Valley
father built. He died of bronchitis. (“If you have your health
Street at this time, the larger braid factory building
you’re a millionaire,” she recalls him always saying.)
The Victory Hall Theatre.
[at the north end of the street] notwithstanding.
D. Wiley Anderson concentrated on his inventions during the
Its prominence is due primarily to the building deeply-recessed arched entry, it most
latter years of his life. He received 16 U.S. patents, one Canadian, and was able to
distinctive feature. With this grand gesture to the public, Victory Hall invites us both
attract enough investors to produce his Multifix brick, a flashing brick. He invented
into the new civic meeting place called the cinema and into the twentieth century
a Murphy-type bath tub for crowded apartments and other building-related ideas.
itself.”
Keith says he predicted fast food.
D. Wiley Anderson designed the brick house Cliff View, owned by George and
Anderson bottled and sold Albevanna Springs Ponce de Leon water from 1911;
Lucinda Wheeler, originally built for Senator Martin, on Bird at Page Street. Keith
he was still sending it as far as N.C., N.Y., and Ohio in 1935. Mollie remembers
Van Allen says the interior is a mirror image of the house Anderson built for his own
gazing into the pooled water of the nine springs on the property; “Theodore
family at Albevanna Springs, three miles northeast of Scottsville. T.E. Bruce, sr.,
Roosevelt bought that water,” Keith says, “when he was at Pine Knot.” D. Wiley
Scottsville pharmacist, asked Anderson to redesign the 1832 Carlton Hotel at the
hoped to develop the property as a “hotel-sanitarium or a large hydro-electric power
corner of West Main and Valley as his drugstore and soda fountain. Anderson preplant,” according to Susan Frazer; the Depression had other ideas. Despite his
pared drawings for restoration and additions at Fair View Farm, on Rt. 20; this
pleasant, joking ways, D. Wiley Anderson fell into debt. He went to work as a staff
burned in the 1930s. D. Wiley also designed homes for J.L. Pitts and W.E. Moon,
architect for a Richmond production builder, living at his daughter Marie’s while in
and The Terrace, for the D. P. Powers family, today restored to its former glory and
Richmond, taking the train home to Scottsville on weekends. Sometimes he had to
most recently the home of Haden Anderson.
borrow the fare from her.
Nearby, Anderson did “a beautiful little church” at Bremo Bluff; renovations of
Albevanna Springs was sold out of the family in the 1970s. Lingering memories
the Boxley House in Louisa; and Ednam—his Albemarle masterwork—in
include D. Wiley and his pet duck under the garden arbor; the dances they’d have
Charlottesville, 1902. Keith Van Allen says that the Boxley project, transforming
in the big front parlor or parties on the lawn with Japanese lanterns lighting the
an antebellum house into “a charmingly exuberant expression of Colonial Revival,
evening. D. Wiley would hunt for frogs in the pond he designed by the spring
flipping the staircase around, making a wild flying balcony underneath the grand
house; the cook fixed them for his supper. Anderson would love it when his daughportico,” was one of “D. Wiley’s most fun jobs.” The architect and the owner were
ter Virginia, or any of the family, rubbed and soothed his head when he was home
“cracking jokes the whole time they worked on it.” D. Wiley also designed the manfrom Richmond on weekends.
sion in southern Albemarle called Nydrie.
Keith Van Allen, who has done a great deal to preserve and document the life and
D. Wiley’s wife died and her remarried. He lived various places in Richmond,
work and legacy of D. Wiley Anderson, recalls, “It was impossible when I was grow1900-1913, then moved to Albevanna Springs. Here Mollie’s memories center, as
ing up to get a bunch of Andersons together without a barrage of jokes spewing
she recalls her ebullient, happy-tempered father and, eventually, 12 siblings and
forth, each person trying to top the other. But at the same time talk of building or
half-siblings, roaming free (“Our mother knew we were safe”) on the hills and in the
scientific study or philosophy could be spouted out equally. All this before eating.
woods. They drove a Model T around the countryside and to Scottsville High
Family reunions at Albevanna were wonderful, with several styles of chicken to
School, and also took shortcuts through the woods to walk to Scottsville.
chose from, then various country meanderings afterward. I miss all that.”
They still stopped regularly to talk to “Aunt” Fanny Mundy, who had been a slave
on the Cap’n John property, and whom “everybody loved.” Mollie had lots of
[If you have access to Facebook, look at Keith’s extensive D. Wiley
cousins, who enjoyed the freedom and jollity of Albevanna Springs and often came
Anderson posts and the comments by relatives. He has helped to
to borrow Frank, one of the horses. They’d ride him to town, then “pat him on the
recapture the career of an important Virginia architect and
back and send him home. He’d go into the barn by himself.”
Scottsville citizen, bringing to life a part of our history. Thanks to
Mollie remembers the garden in front of the house on the 133 acres D. Wiley
Keith and his mother Mollie for their time and enthusiasm; and to
eventually acquired. Money from one of his inventions, an automatic thermostat
Bob Spencer and Fred Schneider for their contributions.—rk]
Did
You
Know...
6 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • February 8–March 7, 2013
You can view the entire
Scottsville Monthly’s online by going to
fluvannareview.com
Arts
A Family Affair
By Martha Louis
Correspondent
I
t is not unusual for three artists
her family she eventually began her own business
to exhibit their works of art
called “Dogart”. She is known for her amazing
together, but it is unusual when
human portraits in pastel and oil and her life like
they are a mother and two daughters, all
portraits of every breed of dog known . Her work
accomplished artists. This scenario is the
is sent out to Japan, England, Finland and all across
case during the months of February and
the United States. Her beautiful work is used at
March at The Tavern on the James
some of the biggest dog shows as trophies. Nan is
Restaurant in Scottsville. The show titled
current President of the Buckingham Chamber of
“A Family Affair” will open on February
Commerce and a supporter of “Shop Locally”. Nan
10th with a reception from 2:00pm to
is a member of AVA and exhibits at “Borrowed
4:00pm in the Banquet Room. Come
Space” in Farmville and also teaches an art class.
meet Nan and Martha and see their work
Martha Pennington Louis, daughter, always was
and the beautiful work of their mother.
a doodler in school. She took every school art class
The mother, the late Margaret Allen
offered in elementary and high school. Then she
Pennington, was an accomplished artist
went off into a medical career in Radiologic
in oils and in pen and ink. Her ink drawTechnology which she still works in at CVCHC for
ings illustrate over 300 homes and buildthe last 38 years. In the early 1970s , Martha, Nan
ings in Buckingham County in “The
and their mother would go together to outdoor art
Courthouse Burned”vol.1 and vol. 2. She
shows
in Waynesboro, Colonial Beach, and
"Eastern Shore Virginia" by the late Margaret Allen Pennington.
wanted to be a medical illustrator in the
Petersburg. In 1974, Martha helped to head up the
1930s already being an accomplished
first outdoor show in Farmville which would become
artist at an early age. She began taking classes at MCV in Richmond because of the
The Heart of Virginia Festival. Over 70 artists came into Farmville every year durdepression era and switched into the medical field. She graduated in 1937 from
ing those 20 years she and co-chair Bev Hines worked with the show. Martha now
MCV as a Medical Doctor and began a practice of medicine with her husband that
teaches two classes in watercolor and paints herself not only in watercolor and
would span almost 50 years - thirty nine of those years were in Buckingham County.
acrylic, but draws in pen and ink and and graphite. She squeezes her own painting
But her love of art would never be far away. She organized a painting class in her
time in between her commitments to the local historical group and other groups.
basement and produced many paintings during those years. As her children grew up
Like her mother, art and history are her passions.
and left home , she became involved with the historic society and she went to pen
Both daughters learned much from their mother about drawing and also live by
and ink as her medium of choice. Two of her daughters inherited her love of art and
her philosophy which is that we are all given 24 silver dollars(hours) each day, if we
also began drawing at early ages.
are lucky, and how we spend them is up to us.
Nan Pennington Holt , daughter, loved animals from an early age. After raising
• • •
Scottsville Branch Library Events
Dim Sum Party, for grades 1 and up.
Tuesday, March 19 at 4 PM.
Registration required and begins March 1. Limit of 15
participants.
Toddler Time! Wednesday, February 13 to
April 24, 10 AM
A story time especially for babies and toddlers emphasizing simple concepts, patterns, and unconditional
acceptance. We stress “I Love You” rituals that help optimize you child’s brain for success at school and in life.
This 20 minute program includes books, songs, finger
plays, and flannel board stories. No registration required.
Yum Cha, tea tasting, began on the ancient Silk Road in China for
travelers needing a place to rest. Thus teahouses were established
along the road. Later food was added as a relaxing respite. Dim sum
(literally meaning: touch the heart) was offered as a snack, not a main
meal, and therefore only meant to touch the heart. Our traditional dim
sum will include a variety of dumplings, steamed buns and vegetables.
Preschool Storytime! Wednesday, February 13
to April 24, 10:30 AM. An independent activity for
children ages 3-5. This 30 minute program of books,
songs, and flannel board stories introduces more complex
concepts and ideas, increases vocabulary, improves listening skills, and promotes reading readiness. No registration
required.
Celebrate National Poem in Your Pocket
Day,Thursday, April 18. Take little scroll with a poem
inside from our basket, unroll it, and share it with your
family and friends.
Closed for the following holidays:
Presidents’ Day, Monday, February 18.
Thomas Jefferson’s Birthday, Friday, April 12.
Thanks to the Friends of the Library for their support.
Library Hours: Monday and Tuesday 1-9 PM
Wednesday thru Saturday 9 AM to 5 PM
Inklings: A Book Club for
11-18 year olds.
Join the Scottsville Library’s longrunning teen book club, The
Inklings, for a fun and lively conversation. Snacks provided. Pick up
your book at the circulation desk.
February 19 – “Princess
Bride”, March 12 – “Little White
Duck.”
Stamped Silk Scarf, for grades 6 and up.
Saturday, March 16 at 11 AM.
Registration required and begins March 1.
Limit of 10 participants.
The continent of Asia has a long history of decorating fabrics.
Printing blocks have been discovered which date back to around
3000 BC! As trade routes began to develop, these beautifully patterned fabrics were traded throughout Asia, Egypt and Greece,
Europe and Africa. To make your own treasure, we will carve a
Chinese character onto a rubber stamp, and then use it to print on a
15-60 inch white 100% Chinese silk scarf.
See Library Events Page 11
February 8–March 7, 2013 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • 7
Community
Covering All the Bases
By Ron Smith
Correspondent
Scottsville United Methodist Church has added a contemporary service to it’s schedule.
S
Sarah and Mark Adair and The Rev. Bruce Lugn.
All photos by Ron Smith.
8 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • February 8–March 7, 2013
ince its beginnings in 1833, Scottsville
United Methodist Church has been known
as a “traditional” Methodist Church. The
church has been central to the life of Scottsville and
the community since that time.
But, the times, “they are a changing” and while a
traditional form of worship offers a valuable experience for many, it does not “cover all the bases” with
respect to what many, particularly younger individuals,
are seeking. While the churches were beginning to
see the exodus of younger members, a phenomenon
known as “contemporary worship” emerged from the
Jesus Movement in North America and the
“Charismatic Renewal Movement” in Australia and
New Zealand in the ‘70s and 80s. The function of
music in services, the style of songs, their performance, the theology of the lyrics help to distinguish the
“contemporary service” from the traditional.
Thanks to the help and encouragement of church
members Mark and Sarah Adair, Scottsville United
Community
Methodist Church has added a Contemporary Service to their schedule. Each
Sunday at 5:00 pm, in an informal setting in the church’s Social Hall, a number of
worshipers gather to have coffee, a snack, but most of all to enjoy Christian Praise
Music, the lyrics to which are displayed on a large screen, along with words of scripture, prayers and message. The informal atmosphere of the meeting allows for not
only discussions of a religious or spiritual nature, but general conversations about
day to day subjects and personal concerns. Praise music played and sung is by
Christian groups such as Third Day, Building 429, Chris Tomlin and others.
Dress is informal (jeans, etc.) and
children are welcome. There are activities for the children and they have
The church is located at 158
their own “special area” for these
E. Main Street in Scottsville
activities. Childcare is provided for
and has a website at
children too young to take part in the
www.sumc-va.org
activities.
The Sunday Contemporary Service
and a face book page at
is not the only thing new to the sched- www.facebook.com/ScottsvilleUMC.
ule. Scottsville UMC is also offering a
Taize Worship Service each first All are welcome to any of the three
services of worship.
Thursday evening of the month at
7:00 pm.
This form of worship, a service of
prayer and song, began in Taize,
France in 1940 and today has a tremendous following. Few in Scottsville are aware
of this style of worship. Singing is one of the most essential elements found in Taize
worship. Short songs, repeated several times, give it a meditative character. Using
just a few words, a basic reality of faith is expressed. The Taize website states that
“to open the gates of trust in God, nothing can replace the beauty of human voices
united in song. This beauty can give us a glimpse of ‘heaven’s joy on earth,’ as
Eastern Christians put it.”
The traditional worship service continues each Sunday at 11:00 am. Now, with
all the bases covered, the Rev. Bruce Lugn, hopes to see those who have been seeking the type of worship experience meaningful to them but, until now, haven’t been
able to find it.
Free Community Dinner Served
Free Monthly Community Dinner on Sat 2/9/13 @ 5 pm at Scottsville
United Methodist Church. Brunswick Stew is on the menu and will be available for purchase by the quart after the Dinner. Proceeds go to the missions of
the Scottsville United Methodist Church Men's Group."
Photo of the Month
Whipping Up
Something Great
Craig McPherson, retired chef with
45 years experience, is whipping up
some great culinary classes at Ellis Acres
Memorial Park during February and
March. Monday night classes 6:00 to
9:00pm will begin Feb 11 just in time
for Valentines Day and concentrate on
gumbos,stews, regional soups and
more.
The Tuesday night class will begin Feb
12th, also 6:00 to 9:00pm, and will
focus on foods you can cook alone or
with your honey including Southwest,
Chinese, New England, Italian, seafood
and more!
There is limited class space so hurry
and register by calling: (434)736-2004
or 2008
Photo courtesy of Martha Louis.
SC
TTSVILLE
United Methodist Church
February 8–March 7, 2013 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • 9
The Library
Homeschoolers
read at the library
By Marianne Ramsden
Correspondent
or over a decade there has been a semiannual literary reading at the
Scottsville library by local elementary school students. Lillian Schafft was the
instigator and wanted to promote literacy, writing and storytelling and she
began by asking teachers to submit one student’s story from each class
throughout the year and leave them in a binder at the library. Once a semester the children and their families and friends were invited to a reading event. It was always
very well attended and all students received a book after they read their piece.
This summer one of the many home schooling parents felt it would be a great idea to let
the home scholars have a stab at it also. Lisa Bittner developed, organized and executed her
idea and it was embraced widely. Beginning in September the students submitted a story
twice a month to the two designated editors who then responded with suggestions for possible revision, and gave much deserved praise and encouragement. The young authors sent
poetry, fiction, non-fiction and opinion pieces all through the fall and winter. The James
River Arts Council sponsored the program and gave gift certificates from Baine’s Books, and
supplied refreshments. The library let each writer choose a book from shelves filled with age
appropriate selections after the public reading.
On Saturday January 19, the Scottsville library hosted the reading with six local homeschoolers. The participants were (in alphabetical order) Lanie Bittner, Shannon Bittner,
James Gunter, Asher Lapham, Peyton Lewis, and Gypsy Macmillian. The authors chose the
pieces they wanted to read.
The readings ran the gamut from explaining the fate of a sausage bagel, the vivid description of a falling-down barn, three poems about baseball, another about being angry and contrary and one about a walk in the forest. Then there were two remakes of well-known fairytales that had the audience in stitches. Lanie’s, Asher’s, Peyton’s and Gypsy’s stories are,
alas, too long to be included in their entirety here. Instead some excerpts from their writings
will follow.
Lanie Bittner read her humorous and comic take of the fairy tale “Rapunzel”, which she
named “Love Comes Along”. Here the hero turns out to be not a prince on a white steed,
but a squire’s stable boy riding a brown pony named “Peanut”. The princess, who had spent
countless hours grooming her hair, and practicing her speech, in anticipation of her prince’s
arrival, is both upset and somewhat confused.
Here is her reaction after she finds out he is no prince:
“The princess paled. There was no prince? All this trouble and no prince?! She was going
to burst into sobs. ‘No,’ she pepped herself. ‘Regain composure. This – this peasant will not
see a princess cry.’ Aloud she exclaimed, ‘Hark! I heareth the step of my captor! Run, underling – I mean squire’ the squire gladly did so, worrying slightly about the mental health of the
lady, but not enough to come back with a ladder and a doctor.”
F
Lanie Bittner
Asher Lapham
Gypsy MacMillian
James Gunter
Shannon Bittner read her poem “Angry” and one called
“In the Forest.” Here is “Angry”:
“My hands are clenched tight in a fist
Some may call me a pessimist
I am an angry shaky girl
My legs are in a fancy whirl
Someone calls my name
But I’m still up to this game
My hands are hot, my legs are cold
But I still don’t want to do what I’m told!!!”
James Gunter read his poetic baseball trilogy:
“The Pitcher,” “The Catcher,” and the very funny “Kitchen Baseball”:
Shannon Bittner
10 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • February 8–March 7, 2013
“Italian squash for a bat
An avocado ball
Frying pans for bases
Pot for a mound
Toast for gloves
Cabbage for helmets
Splaat!
Kitchen baseball”
Peyton Lewis
The Library
Laurel Greene
Promoting
Literacy
Library from Page 7
Asher Lapham shared his evocative story about an old barn in a field, which was
a cherished place of exploration and adventure until the owner deemed it too dangerous to enter. Here is how describes the decrepit building:
“The barn is in the middle of a large field. It looks like it could have fallen out of
the sky because of how damaged it is and how much old farm tools and equipment
is around it. Its roof is peeling like paint off a wall. It curls up like a blanket and
scrapes against the roof like nails of a chalkboard. Half of the boards on the front
of the barn are coming off. Breaking like Popsicle sticks. The door has to be chained
on to the barn so it doesn't fall off. It has a burgundy roof like a dried apricot. There
are vines growing up like snakes. There are newer planks to help hold up the other,
rotting planks. This makes it look like slowly, they are going to rebuild it.”
Peyton Lewis described a fateful morning where her sausage bagel was burned,
and was given to her beagle who, of course, also wanted the bagel that wasn’t
burned. Here is how it ends:
“When the sausage bagel was finally done, I sat down on the couch and started to
eat it and it is rather good. But I don't think I'm the only one who thinks that. My
beagle is giving me the ‘please feed me’ look. I think he wants my sausage bagel. I
told him he had already had my burnt bagel and that was enough.”
Gypsy Macmillian entertained us with a surprisingly hilarious but gruesome take
on “Hansel and Gretel” where the mean old witch is replaced by a kindly old
woman. The meek children we know from the original fairy tale have been turned
into spoiled brats and in the end get their punishment in a cruel, but deservedly just
fashion. Read and learn!
‘I have a good idea,’ the old woman said. Why don’t you two watch the fire for
me, to see if it is hot enough?’
‘If we have to,’ Hansel said in a pained tone. They watched the coals for a few
moments while the old woman kneaded the bread. Gretel leaned in to look at the
coals. “They look like jewels,” she whispered. Suddenly she turned and threw a
handful of ash in Hansel’s face. He shoved her into the fire, but tripped over the fire
poker he had left on the floor after taunting the birds with it. He fell in after his sister, and his foot caught on the oven door and it slammed shut behind him. The old
woman heard the slam, and rushed forward. She threw open the oven door, but all
that remained inside were ashes. She cried a few tears, but then found that the
silence was lovely.
An excerpt from the epilogue recounts the reaction of the parents of Hansel and
Gretel: ‘Ever since they left, there has been much more food,’ said the stepmother.
She had cried for them because she was a very kind and loving woman, but later
found out she didn’t have a constant headache anymore. For the first time they had
enough food and could eat it without screams for sweeties.”
It was a delightful afternoon. Richard Singleton, newsletter editor of JRAC, said:
“We deeply appreciate the organization and hosting that Laurel Greene provided,
and for Lisa Bittner’s preparation of the youth, and thank the parents and others
attending for their support and cooperation. The readings were delightful, full of
imagination and craft. From hiliarious short stories to gentle poetry, the youth
regaled those present with images and adventures that took us to another place.”
All of the readers wrote and submitted many more terrific stories and poems,
unfortunately, time only allowed for the reading of a certain number. There is movement afoot to publish all the stories in a booklet. Watch for it!
Lisa Bittner
Writing
&
Storytelling
Many thanks to the young authors for allowing me to cite their works, and to
Laurel Greene for her introductions and to Lisa Bittner who made this possible.—Marianne Ramsden
Adult Reading
Scottsville Library Book Club
UNBROKEN: A World War II Story of Survival,
Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand
February 15, 2013
1:00 pm
On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber
crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a
spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on
the ocean surface, a face appeared--Lt. Louis Zamperini.
Captured by the Japanese and driven to the limits of endurance,
Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve,
and humor.
Second Saturday: Live & Learn Series
NEDIBLE JEWELRY: FORTUNE COOKIES
part of THE BIG READ
March 09, 2013
2:00 pm
Two characters in The Joy Luck Club worked in a fortune
cookie factory after arriving in the US. Join artist Jessica
Partain in this workshop using polymer clay to create miniature fortune cookies that can be made into earrings or necklaces. Space is limited, so please register at Scottsville
Library: 434.286.3541. For ages 12 to adult.
THE JOY LUCK CLUB by Amy Tan
THE BIG READ
March 15, 2013
1:00 pm
In 1949, four Chinese women--drawn together by the shadow of their past--begin meeting in San Francisco to play Mah
Jongg, invest in stocks and "say" stories. They call their gathering the Joy Luck Club--and forge a relationship that binds
them for more than three decades.
February 8–March 7, 2013 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • 11
Making News
Serenade This
Lion’s Club Musical Valentine:
Have Your Loved One Serenaded
this
Valentine’s
Day.
The
Scottsville Lion’s Club is sending
out troubadours on Valentine’s Day.
They will sing and play for your loved
one anywhere within a 20 mile radius of
Scottsville for a donation of $20 to the
Outreach Fund that supplies eye glasses and hearing aids
for those who cannot afford them. Nursing homes, restaurants, or at your home or office, no matter; they will come
to you. You have your choice of violin, keyboard, or guitars and, also, a flower and sweet will be provided. Call
and make your reservation for a time between 11am and
7 pm. on Valentine’s Day. Deadline for reservations is
Monday, February 11 at 5 pm. Call Laura @434-9532294
Showtime at The Appomattox
Courthouse Theatre
Be ready for a night of high jinks as the Appomattox
Courthouse Theatre presents Right Bed Wrong Husband
by Neil and Caroline Shaffner. Don’t let the title fool you it
will be a night of good clean fun and old fashioned mishaps
until no one knows who is who! One little white lie leads
to another when Uncle Martin drops in to visit Ted and his
wife. Problem is Ted isn’t married and his fiancé is
nowhere to be found! Enter a pretty girl, her jealous husband, a too helpful maid and things couldn’t get worse, or
could they? Don’t miss this wonderful farce that will keep
you in stitches!
Performance dates are February 1-3, 8-9, 2013.
Friday and Saturday show times are 7:30 pm and
Sunday 2:00 pm. Tickets are $10 for adults and
$7 for students. Tickets can be purchased in
advance at Baines Books and Coffee in
Appomattox and the Appomattox Visitor
Information Center, on line at www.lynchburgtickets.com or by calling 434-352-7611. You can also
visit the theatre website www.appomattoxcourthousetheatre.com. The Appomattox Courthouse
Theatre is located at 331 Court Street, Appomattox, VA.
12 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • February 8–March 7, 2013
The flu season is here
Contributed by Sheena Mackenzie, Development Director, Central Virginia Health Services
With the Flu Season upon us, here are
answers to questions you may have:
1.What is the flu? A respiratory illness
caused by influenza viruses.
2.What are the signs and symptoms?
Fever or feeling feverish/chills; cough;
sore throat; runny or stuff nose; muscle or body aches; headaches; feeling
very tired (fatigued); and vomiting and
diarrhea can occur but most commonly
in children.
3.Is this contagious? Yes,
very!
4.When is someone
contagious? For most
healthy adults,1 day
before symptoms occur
and up to 5 to 7 days after
developing
the
illness.
Children and adults with weakened immune systems are weak
may infect others longer.
5.How does it spread? On a droplet,
spread by coughing, sneezing, or talking.
Touching surfaces with the flu virus on it, then
touching your nose or mouth can make you
sick.
6.What type of illness can occur? Mild
to severe illness; sometimes even death.
7.Who is at high risk? Adults 65 and
older; children less than 5, especially under
age 2; pregnant women; and people with
other medical problems – ask your
doctor.
8.How can I help prevent
getting the flu? Wash regularly
with soap and water (Sing Happy
Birthday twice). Use an alcohol base
hand cleaner if you can’t wash. Do
not share drinking cups, eating utensils and dishes and keep them clean.
GET the FLU Vaccine!!
9.Who should get the flu vaccine? Everyone 6 months and older
each year.
10.Who should avoid the flu
vaccine? People with severe allergy
to chicken or eggs, who’ve had a reaction
to a flu vaccine previously, children under 6
months, or those with a history of GuillainBarre’ Syndrome. People who are sick with a
fever should wait until symptoms lessen.
Brought to you by Central Virginia
Community Health Center Resource information: Center for Disease Control.
Get Connected to
Scottsville Monthly on
Prices good through February, 2013
127 Irish Road (Hwy. 6) • Scottsville • 286-2521
Visit our website: www.wfpaulettace.com
Visa, MasterCard, Discover
and American Express
Honored at participating Ace Stores
Prices are valid through February 28 2013, while supplies last.
February 2013
February 8–March 7, 2013 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • 13
Central Virginia Gardening
By Sunny Lenz
Home grown for the table
Having had some success growing the normal
assortment of fruits and vegetables, I now include
some more exotic homegrowns. Many gardeners
have thornless blackberries which are big and
juicy and dependable. The same is true for the
paw paws, popular for their custard like flavor
and consistency. The hard seckel pears are producing well this year and I use them for chutney
but I'd rather make brandy. Young bamboo
shoots are steamed and served. Currants and
gooseberries, goji berries and josta berries are all
grown here in Virginia. Even a non-bog type of
cranberry graces my garden though my first harvest was less than a cup. My new shiitake mushrooms will take a bit longer to produce.
Paw paw fruits.
I started collecting unusual varieties when I saw
what has been growing on historic estates for
many years. I took cuttings from figs on an old plantation where I was working at
restoring the gardens. It was said the Jefferson had planted the figs growing against
a brick wall so I feel that I have a piece of history. Figs are easy to grow and reproduce well from cuttings. Clip the end of a branch which has new green growth and
include 3 or 4 sets of leaves. Remove 2 sets of leaves from the bottom of the cut-
Where can I pick up my Scottsville Monthly?
Scottsville Monthly Office
Vintage Market
Green Mountain Store
Piedmont Vet
Scottsville Elementary School
Augusta Co-op
Lumpkins Restaurant
BB&T Bank
Scottsville Post Office
Chester B&B
WF Paulett (Ace Hardware)
Albemarle Family Practice
Yancey School
Brown’s Market
Howardsville Store
Glenmore Store, Tr. 655
Midway Market
Faulknier Country Store
Spangler’s
P & S Market
James River Vet
Scottsville Library
A. Scott Ward Realty
Municipal Building
Esmont Post Office
Evolve Hair
Barnett Real Estate
Colemans Outdoors
Bruce’s Drug Store
Goco
Scottsville Coin Laundry
Kidds Store, Rt. 6
Old Times
14 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • February 8–March 7, 2013
ting, moisten and dip in
a rooting powder to coat
the stem where the leaves
had been growing. Tap lightly to
knock off excess powder. Place
the cutting in a hole made in
damp potting soil. Be careful
not to brush off the rooting
powder when you place it in the
pot. Press soil up around the
stem and keep it moist.
Leave it in the pot until it has
a chance to root out. I usually
leave it in the pot for a year
before I'm convinced it is a viable
plant. Protect the new plants
through the winter. My figs
are now 9' tall and are covered with figs this
year due to a mild winter and temperate
spring. A cold winter may cause the stems to
die back but new growth will come from
Figs on tree.
the base. If the season is not long enough
to get many figs from this new growth, the
plant will survive to try another season. The older the plant, the more consistently
it will produce.
I also took cuttings from a trifoliate orange growing on the old estate. It has a
bitter fruit that can be used to make marmalade but the thorns are huge and there
are many seeds. This plant is more often used as a barrier hedge to discourage
intruders. I am now trying the yuzu hardy citrus and the olinda valencia orange. If
not protected, a cold winter would knock them out but so far, they have flourished.
There is a nice pomegranate in my garden covered with fruit this year. I have
had it through 2 winters and have produced 3 pomegranates in total in the last 2
seasons. The only plant I have managed to grow was purchased from Edible
Landscaping at a heritage farm show. The plants I got from Georgia did not live and
the bigger the plant when I bought it, the quicker it died.
Having failed with lingonberries, wintergreen, and jujube, I am not discouraged.
This year, I have added a Meiwa kumquat and 2 kinds of pecans. I bought a passion flower also, only to have my friend with back woods know-how ask why I would
want a native 'maypop' when they are so invasive!
Sunny Lenz is a professional gardener and landscape painter working in and
around central Virginia.
HOW M UCH DOES IT COST
TO ADVE RTIS E I N
SCOTTSVI LLE MONTH LY?
Find out how easy and affordable it is,
Call Judi Price 434-207-0223 TODAY!
C L A S S I F I E D A DV E R T I S I N G
SERVICES
INSIDE/OUT PAINTING PLUS:
Interior/Exterior Painting, 2500 PSI
Powerwashing, renovation and
restoration. Locally owned/operated
for 25+ years. Lake resident since
l995. Fluvanna County Chamber of
Commerce member since 2001. Call
434-906-1898 / email info@insideoutpaintingplus.net. Visit my website
to view portfolio - www.insideoutpaintingplus.net
FOR SALE
CEMETERY
SITES:
Holly
Memorial Gardens and Monticello
Memory Gardens. Significant savings. Call 434-295-1750.
DRIVEWAY STONE: 9-ton Slate
Crush Run $150, Stone $200
(Average). Includes delivery and
spread. Call 434-420-2002.
ITEMS FOR SALE: Yamaha PW80
mini-bike, $500. Bass Tracker boat,
needs work, no engine, good trail-
Scottsville Town
Council Meetings
er, $525 OBO. Almost new 2010
Sears white refrigerator with icemaker, $500. Call Sheila at 434466-5564 or Mike at 434-3052518.
LEATHER FURNITURE: Leather
love seat and ottoman, burgundy
color. Good condition. $250. Call
434-589-5554 or 434-409-2427.
PREMIUM FIREWOOD FOR
SALE, $85 for a pick-up truck load.
Please call Dane or Andrea at
Smith Tree Surgeons. Home 434589-2689 or Cell 454-872-3814.
EVENTS
Monday, February 11
Town Council Work Session
7:00 PM-8:00 PM
Victory Hall, 2nd floor.
Monday, March 4
Planning Commission
7:00 PM-8:00 PM
Victory Hall, 2nd floor.
Thursday, February 14
Government
Services
Committee
6:00 PM-7:00 PM
Victory Hall, 2nd floor.
Tuesday, March 14
Government
Services Committee
6:00 PM-7:00 PM
Victory Hall, 2nd floor.
Tuesday, February 19
Town Council Regular Session
7:00 PM-8:00 PM
Victory Hall, 2nd floor.
Wednesday, March 20
Enhancement Projects
Oversight Committee
6:00 PM-7:00 PM
Victory Hall, 2nd floor.
Wednesday, February 20
Enhancement Projects
Oversight Committee
6:00 PM-7:00 PM
Victory Hall, 2nd floor.
LAKE MONTICELLO FIRE &
RESCUE BINGO: $1,000 Jackpot
Thursday.
New
every
Progressive Game. Doors Open
at 5:30pm, Early Bird 6:45pm. 10
Slice Road, Palmyra (Off Rt.
600, near CVS) Questions? Call
434-591-1018.
Monday, February 25
Maintenance Committe
5:00 PM-6:00 PM
Victory Hall, 2nd floor.
SERVICE DIRECTORY
C
obb Construction, Inc.
3535 Carys Creek Rd.
Fork Union, VA 23055
CUSTOM HOME
BUILDER
Cecil L. Cobb
434-842-3953
Mobile: 434-962-4626
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your gutters cleaned.
Free estimates.
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434-989-4152
Smith’s Tree
Surgeons
Topping • Pruning • Cabling
Brush Chipping • Stump
Removal
Professional Take Downs
Firewood • Free Estimates
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INSURED
Dane Smith
(434) 589-2689 (434) 872-3814
Palmyra, VA 22963
Robert Evans
Owner • Master Plumber
Licensed & Insured
434-589-3461
Cell:434-962-1378
vpsystems@embarqmail.com
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REASONABLE
RATES
“QUALITY YOU CAN COUNT ON”
FUEL COMPANY
ww.tigerfuel.com
1-434-983-2718
1-877-529-5556
PROPANE– FUEL OIL
GASOLINE – KEROSENE
•
24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
AUTOMATIC FUEL DELIVERY
CONVENIENT BUDGET PLAN
•
SERVING CENTRAL VIRGINIA
WITH QUALITY PRODUCTS
AND SERVICES
February 8–March 7, 2013• SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • 15
LOVELY 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH BRICK
3 BR, 2 BATH 1104 SF HOME
RANCH HOME ON 3 ACRES. HOME IN
ON 1.20 ACRES. SPLIT BEDEXCELLENT CONDITION, CLEAN AND
ROOM DESIGN. KITCHEN HAS
READY FOR NEW OWNER. UNFINISHED
LARGE CENTER ISLAND CONBASEMENT WITH WOOD BURNING
TAINING SINK AND DISHWASHSTOVE COULD EASILY BE FINISHED TO
ER. BRICK FOUNDATION. TWO
DOUBLE THE LIVING SPACE. NEWER
SHEDS AND ALL APPLIANCES
CONVEY. LOCATED ON ROUTE 20 ROOF, WATER PUMP, HVAC, AND 200 AMP SERVICE. WALKING DISTANCE TO
S. 5 MINUTES FROM SCOTTSVILLE. 30 MINUTES TO CHARLOTTESVILLE. ASKING TOWN OF SCOTTSVILLE. ASKING $ 181,500. CALL SCOTT WARD, JR, 434286-2022 OR 434-981-3343. MLS # 502444
$116,000. CALL JUNE WARD SEAY 434-286-2022 OR 434-981-9038. MLS # 505934.
NEW LISTING!
SOLD!
960 SF RANCH 3 BR, 1 BATH LOCATED IN RUCKERSVILLE. ESTABLISHED NEIGHBORHOOD. PRIVACY
FENCE AND NICE TREES WHICH
PROVIDE SHADE. LR HAS HARDWOOD FLOORS. FLUE FOR WOOD
STOVE. 10 MINUTES FROM CHARLOTTESVILLE AND CLOSE TO NGIC.
$119,000. CALL JUNE WARD SEAY
434-286-2022/981-9038. MLS
#
504753.
LOVELY HOME ON 7 ACRES IN SCOTTSVILLE
AREA OF FLUVANNA. 3 BR, 2 BATHS, 1472 SF
HOME BUILT IN 2004. RECENTLY RENOVATED WITH
NEW WOOD FLOORS, CARPETING, KITCHEN APPLIANCES, CABINETS AND COUNTERTOPS. FRONT
PORCH DECIK AND DET 2 CAR GARAGE. $239,900.
CALL SCOTT WARD, JR 434-286-2022/9813343. MLS # 504651.
NEW LISTING!
BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY HOME WITH OPEN
FLOOR PLAN. FRONT PORCH. SCREEN
PORCH. NATURE ALL AROUND. WALK TO
JAMES RIVER. IDEAL LOCATION FOR THOSE
WANTING PRIVACY. 5 MINUTES TO
SCOTTSVILLE AND 30 MINUTES TO CHARLOTTESVILLE. 2100 SF HOME WITH 2 BRS, 2
FULL BATHS, GREAT ROOM, KIT, UR. GAS
FIREPLACE, OUTBUILDINGS. ASKING
$218,000. CALL A. SCOTT WARD, JR 434-2862022 OR 434-981-3343. MLS # 501581.
1244 SF HOME, 2 BR, 1 BATH, LOCATED IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN SCOTTSVILLE. WALK TO
EVERTHING IN DOWN TOWN AREA, COULD BE
COMMERICAL. WOULD MAKE A NICE RETAIL
SHOP. PRICE AT $114,900. CALL SCOTT
WARD, JR 434-286-2022 OR 434-981-3343,
MLS # 497209
THIS HOUSE IS IN BETTER-THAN-NEW CONDITION, 3 BR, 2 BA, 1288 SF HOME LOCATED ON
SLIGHTLY OVER AN ACRE! NEW HVAC, HOT WATER
HEATER, PAINT, FLOORS, NEW KITCHEN CABINETS,
COUNTER TOPS AND APPLIANCES. 2. 8 MILES
FROM TOWN OF SCOTTSVILLE. ASKING
$139,900. CALL A. SCOTT WARD, JR 434-2082022 OR 434-981-3343. MLS # 500281.
PRICE REDUCED!
FANNIE MAE HOPEPATH
PROPERTY. 3 BR, 2.5 BATHS
CAPE COD. BUILT IN 2006.
BASEMENT WITH ROUGHED
IN BATHROOM. WHEN FINISHED COULD ADD 1288 SF
TO LIVING SPACE. PURCHASE FOR AS LITTLE AS
3% DOWN.
PRICE BELOW ASSESSEMENT FOR $159,900. CALL
SCOTT WARD, JR 434-2862022/434-981-3343.
MLS#504663
PRICE REDUCED!
PRIVATE WELL KEPT 3 BR, 3 BATH HOME
ON QUIET DEAD END STREET ONLY MINUTES TO WALMART, LOWES AND QUICK
DRIVE TO NGIC. EAT IN KITCHEN, WITH
DOOR TO REAR DECK. DOWNSTAIRS
BONUS ROOM COULD BE A 4 TH BEDROOM. FAMILY ROOM IN BASEMENT
WITH WOOD STOVE. STREAM RUNS
THRU THIS PRIVATE GENTLY ROLLING
LOT WITH MATURE TREES AND LARGE
YARD. LARGE ATTACHED TWO CAR
GARAGE WITH STORAGE SPACE. THIS IS
A HOUSE YOU SHOULD NOT MISS!
$225,000. CALL JUNE WARD SEAY 434286-2022
OR 434-981-9038. MLS #
504096.
SCOTTSVILLE'S
Office: 434-286-2022
Toll Free: 800-818-1693
Fax: 434-286-3554
ascottward@aol.com
www.scottward.com
PRICE REDUCED!
39.68 ACRES WITH MAIN HOUSE AND COTTAGE. EXCEPTIONAL HORSE PROPERTY. 3
STALL BARN, 3 BOARD FENCE, RIDING RING,
ROUND RIDING PEN, TRAILS AND LARGE
POND. 2 BR COTTAGE WITH ATTACHED
GARAGE. OUTDOOR 12 X 20 POOLROOM/PLAYROOM AND GREENHOUSE. MAIN HOUSE IS 2
STORY BRICK THAT IS APPOINTED FOR GRACIOUS LIVING. YOU MUST SEE... ASKING
$419,500. THIS IS A FANNIEMAE FORECLOSURE. CALL A. SCOTT WARD, JR 434-286-2022
OR CELL 434-981-3343. MLS # 502628.
WELL MAINTAINED BRICK RANCHER. 1512 SF, 3
BR, 2 BATH, W/ATTACHED GARAGE ON 2.41 ACRES.
LOVELY PASTORAL VIEWS. LARGE EIK, BRICK FIREPLACE W/INSERT. WOOR KITCHEN CABINETS. ALL
APPLIANCES CONVEY WITH INCLUDES WASHER,
DRYER ANDF FREEZER. SEPARATE DR, LARGE LR, 3
SPACIOUS BEDROOMS, EASY DRIVE TO DILLWYN,
SCOTTSVILLE, FARMVILLE AND CHARLOTTESVILLE.
ASKING $ 149,900. CALL JUNE WARD SEAY 434286-2022 OR 434-286-3139. MLS# 498516.
LAND-LAND-LAND
• ALBEMARLE/SCOTTSVILLE----2.01 ACRES $35,000.
• FLUVANNA/SCOTTSVILLE----5.38 ACRES $50,000.
• BUCKINGHAM/SCOTTSVILLE----9.86 ACRES $40,000.
• ALBEMARLE/SCOTTSVILLE----21 ACRES $325,000
OLDEST LOCALLY OWNED
SCOTT & FRANKIE WARD,
BROKERS/OWNER
16 • SCOTTSVILLE MONTHLY • February 8–March 7, 2013
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
A. SCOTT WARD, JR,
REALTOR,
JUNE WARD SEAY,
ASSOC. BROKER

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