Chapter 17: The 17th and 18th Centuries

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Chapter 17: The 17th and 18th Centuries
PART FIVE
Chapter 17: The 17th and 18th Centuries
Art Periods for this chapter include:
Baroque and Rococo
Key Terms for this chapter include:
• Genre painting
• Secularism
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Baroque
Baroque art is full of emotion, energy,
and movement. Colors are more vivid
and contrasting than in Renaissance
art. There is a strong presence of
light in much of the artwork.
Insert visual(s).
Suggestions:
17.1 Cornaro Chapel
17.2 St. Teresa in Ecstasy
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Baroque
The Baroque style is characterized by
the work of the following artists:
Bernini, Gentileschi, Caravaggio,
Rubens, Poussin, Velasquez,
Rembrandt
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Baroque
Baroque art in general favored rich
and complex ornamentation. It has
been called dynamic and theatrical.
Each European country developed its
own style.
• Bernini: An Italian sculptor and architect;
his Cornaro Chapel combined
architecture, painting, sculpture, and
lighting to create a theatrical experience.
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Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria
delia Vittoria, Rome. 1642-52
*St Teresa in Ecstasy,
Gianlorenzo Bernini, Cornaro
Chapel, 1645-52
Façade of San Carlo,
Borromini, 1665
Completion of St
Peters was one of
great projects of
Baroque Rome.
Used oval form and
convex and concave
curves to enhance
effects of light
Baroque
• Gentileschi: An Italian painter; her
work of art, Judith and Maidservant
with the Head of Holofernes
combined dramatic lighting with rich
primary colors to enhance the visual
experience.
Insert visual(s).
Suggestion: 17.5 Judith and Maidservant
with Head of Holofernes
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*Judith and Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes,
Atermesia Gentileschi, 1625, oil
Baroque
• Caravaggio: An Italian painter; he
influenced many other Baroque
artists with his use of dramatic
lighting. Entombment of Christ is
one example of his technique.
Perspective was used to control the
eye level of the viewer.
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*Entombment of Christ,
Caravaggio, 1604, Oil
Baroque
• Rubens: A Flemish painter; The Raising of
the Cross is typically Baroque in its use of
an S-curve for Christ’s body and the
overall sense of movement.
• Poussin: A French painter; his work The
Ashes of Phokian represents the French’s
more restrained and classical style of
Baroque.
Insert visual(s).
Suggestions:
17.7 The Raising of the Cross
17.8 The Ashes of Phokion
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*The Raising of the Cross, Peter Paul Rubens,
1609-10, Oil
The Ashes of Phokion, Nicolas Poussin, 1648, Oil
Baroque
• Velasquez: A Spanish court painter;
his masterpiece Las Meninas used
light to create drama and emphasis,
and help organize a complex
composition.
Insert visual(s).
Suggestion: 17.11 Las Meninas
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*Las Meninas (The Maids of Honor), Diego
Velazquez, 1656, oil
Baroque
• Rembrandt: A Dutch painter; his work The
Night Watch represents the Dutch interest
in social organizations and community.
• His innovation was to paint individual portraits
within the context of a larger activity.
• Genre painting: Painting that focused on scenes
of everyday life.
Insert visual(s).
Suggestions:
17.12 The Night Watch
17.13 Self-Portrait with Saskia
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*The Night Watch, Rembrandt, 1642, oil
Self-Portrait with Saskia in the Parable of the Prodigal Son,
Rembrandt, 1635-39
Carousing Couple, Judith Leyster
Genre painting – scenes of
everyday life. Leyster was highly
regarded as genre painter during
her life. Virtually forgotten after
her death, and most paintings
were attributed to more famous
artist Frans Hals. “Merry
company” scene where 2 look
as if they have had too much to
drink. We are supposed to fear
so we may not give ourselves
over to life of pleasure instead of
pursuing good.
View of Ootmarsum, Jacob van
Ruisdael, 1660-65
Baroque
Palace at Versailles
Redesigned and enlarged by King Louis
XIV, the exterior of the palace reflects the
classical tendencies of French Baroque.
The interior reflects the rich ornamentation
of fully Baroque architecture.
• Versailles: Occupies about 200 acres and more
than a quarter mile wide; it includes extensive
formal gardens and several grand châteaux.
• Hall of Mirrors: 240 feet long and lined with
large reflective glass mirrors.
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Palace of Versailles, 1669-1685
France was artistic and literary center of Europe. King Louis
XIV ruled 72 years. Rebuilt palace and moved court there. ¼
mile wide structure.
Hall of Mirrors, Palace of
Versailles , 1680
Rococo
The first half to three-quarters of the
18th century is often referred to as
Rococo, a development and extension
of Baroque style.
• Rococo: French word meaning “rocks”
and “shells”.
Insert visual(s).
Suggestion: 17.15 Mirror Room
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Rococo
Like the Baroque, Rococo is an
aristocratic, ornate style. Pastel colors
and lighthearted secular subjects that
are smaller in scale represent this
period.
• Secularism in art: Nonreligious or the
exclusion of religious subject matter in
works of art.
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Rococo
The Rococo style is characterized by
the work of the following artists:
Cuvillies the Elder, Watteau, and
Fragonard.
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Rococo
Rococo style of architecture is
sophisticated. It originated in France
but was soon exported to other
European countries.
• Cuvillies the Elder: An architect;
Mirror Room is visually elaborate and
profuse with its twisting, almost
visibly growing decorative forms.
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Mirror Room, Francois Cuvillies the Elder, 1734-39
Rococo
Watteau and Fragonard
Both of these French painters
express through their work the
dreamlike aristocratic qualities that
appealed to the wealthy during the
18th century.
Insert visual(s).
Suggestions:
17.16 The Pursuit
4.10 Embarkation for Cythera
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*The Pursuit, from the
Progress of Love, Jean-Honore
Fragonard, 1771-1773, Oil
Embarkation for Cythera,Watteau,
Revolution
The end of the 18th century in Europe is
characterized by the French Revolution.
Neoclassicism became the official style
of this Revolution. Jacques-Louis David
was its official artist.
• In America, the artist John Singleton Copley
would paint famous revolutionaries like Paul
Revere.
Insert visual(s).
Suggestions:
17.19 The Death of Marat
17.20 Paul Revere
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Marie-Antoinette and her Children, Elisabeth
Vigee-Lebrun, 1787
Painted to change views of public about queen.
*Oath of the Horatii, Jacques Louis David, 1784-85,
oil
*Death of Marat, Jacques Louis David
Paul Revere, John Singleton Copley, 1768-70
The 17th and 18th Centuries:
SUMMARY
Art Periods and Key Terms covered:
Baroque: Genre painting
Rococo: Secularism
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