Swift Current - Prairie Post

Comments

Transcription

Swift Current - Prairie Post
Morse unveiled its
new cenotaph on
Remembrance Day
...PAGES 14-15
E A S T
E D I T I O N
Friday, November 16, 2012
www.prairiepost.com
HEAVY HITTERS: The Initiation level of Swift Current Minor Hockey
showcased their talents Nov. 10 during one of the intermissions at
the Swift Current Broncos/Prince Albert Raiders Western Hockey
League tilt. Here, the Swift Current Canadiens battled the Swift
Current Sharks in “Timbits” action. Canadiens' #10 Jonah
Stechyshyn skates away with the puck as a member of the Sharks
slides on by after falling. Left, Canadiens' teammates' #11 Aidan
Robinson and #16 Riley Schafer ran into each other which sent
Photos by Brad Brown
them sprawling after the accidental collision.
City’s director of engineering happy with snow removal crew
[email protected]
Swift Current residents got their first real taste of
winter last weekend when a storm covered the entire
southern Saskatchewan with a blanket of snow that
measured from 15 to 30 centimetres in different areas.
City of Swift Current Director of Engineering Mac
Forster said the Environment Canada warnings of
heavy snowfall gave the snow-clearing crew ample time
to be prepared.
“Our crew was ready, they were willing to work the
long weekend and they put in some pretty productive
hours,” he mentioned. “I felt they did a great job and we
got a real leg up on this recent snowfall.”
The storm system started to move in over southwest
Saskatchewan during Thursday evening, Nov. 8.
There was a steady snow fall during the entire Friday
and also for most of Saturday in Swift Current.
“Typically, we don’t get this type of snowfall until later
in the season,” he noted. “At this time of the year we’re
usually dealing with slippery roadways and so sanding
is the predominant activity we undertake, but
fortunately our equipment was fully serviced and ready
to go.”
According to Forster, the City deployed its equipment
during the snowfall Nov. 9, something they would not
normally do.
“We usually like to minimize operations during low
visibility,” he said. “We did put out some blading
equipment on Friday, particularly along the service
roads near the Trans-Canada highway and some other
areas in the city.”
On Saturday morning the entire crew was out with
sanding and snow removal equipment and continued to
work during the day.
“Then that same crew returned at midnight and they
began the downtown clearing operation and they did
that for two consecutive midnight shifts,” he said.
“So they did get a good jump on the cleanup.”
Close to 40 per cent of the City’s planned snow
removal was already done by the end of Tuesday.
Forster said the City cleans about 85 kilometres of
streets, which represents roughly 65 per cent of the
roadways within the community.
“We’ll have a lot of it completed by this weekend,” he
added.
While the weather forecast was indicating a warming
trend towards the weekend, Forster said they will
continue to clean away as much snow as possible.
“If we leave material on the street, it tends to ice right
on it, so there’s certainly a benefit to continue removing
this snow off the major streets,” he explained.
The City’s focus is on clearing main and arterial
roads, which means local residential streets and lanes
will receive little attention.
“The only time we would move into those areas is
if there’s really large amounts of snow that hit our
community,” he said. “We were finding that in the local
streets the snow is packing down pretty well, so we’re
focusing on the higher volume streets right now.”
The milder winter conditions at the start of the year
means the City’s 2012 snow removal budget is still solid.
During the past two years, the City’s budget for snow
removal operations was close to $500,000 and a similar
amount is available for 2012. So far only about one third
of this year’s budget has been spent.
“Barring any significant additional snow falls before
the end of the year I think we’ll come in well under
budget,” he said.
While the City clears sidewalks in front of its own
properties, a bylaw requires property owners to clear
sidewalks.
Forster said the City does not have the resources to do
sidewalk clearing throughout the entire city and
residents are generally doing their part to keep
sidewalks clean in front of their properties.
“We only always remind them though that snow is to
be placed from driveways and sidewalks behind the
walk or on the yard,” he added. “Every once in a while,
we may see somebody either shoveling or blowing snow
onto the street and under the bylaw that is not
permitted.”
The downtown commercial core is the only area
where snow from sidewalks can be placed in the street
because there is nowhere else to put it.
“So, we usually delay the downtown cleanup until a lot
of the business owners had an opportunity to push that
snow into the gutter and then we remove it with the
street snow,” he said.
The bylaw contains penalties for property owners who
do not clear their sidewalks, but Forster is not aware of
any fines for such infractions. The City’s approach is to
rather encourage an individual to abide with the bylaw.
“There are a few areas where we get the odd complaint
and we usually follow up with just contacting the
property owner and requesting that they tend to the
matter,” he said.
(See photos from the snow storm on Page 4)
LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT
» Now booking
Fall 2012 &
Spring 2013
auction dates
Call today
O-OP SERVICE CENTRE
800.491.4494
» GET UP-TO-DATE LISTINGS
AT rbauction.com
41087866•11/02/12
ER 10TH • 11AM-3PM
Ear Tags
• VARIOUS SIZES & COLORS TO
CHOOSE FROM
1/2 Tub with
Load-Out Funnel
SEE US TODAY FOR ALL YOUR LIVESTOCK HANDLING NEEDS
S
MEDICINE HAT CO-OP SERVICE CENTRE
969 - 16th Street SW, Medicine Hat, AB
(403) 528-6609
Visit us at:
www.medicinehatcoop.ca
41110070•11/16/12
“Moving Ahead By Giving Back”
Let me
assist you
with your
vehicle
purchase!
41087864•11/02/12
B Y M ATTHEW L IEBENBERG —
Ralph Richardson
1270 Trans Canada Way | Medicine Hat, AB
403-527-1141
2 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Swift Current
Inside this week:
The town of
Morse had an
extra-special
Remembrance
Day service this
year with the
unveiling of the
new cenotaph.
Pages 14-15.
What to know this week:
From Nov. 22-25, the 18th Annual
Festival of Trees takes place at the Brooks
Heritage Inn & Convention Centre: A
Christmas wonderland of decorated trees
and wreaths, silent auction, gift and craft
shop, Santa’s Canteen, Festival Stage
Entertainment and more. For more call the
Diabetes Association at 403-362-5914.
What to do this week:
November 23, at the
Lyric Theatre, Blenders
presents Genticorums.
The popular traditional
Québécois musical trio
which fuses modern
composition with
classic folk elements.
Contact Shann at 306778-2686.
What you thought last week:
We asked this week: Should the drinking
age in Sask. be lowered, following a
resolution made by the Sask. Party’s
youth wing?
Results: Yes, about time. — 18.2%; No, not
a chance. — 72.7%; Not sure. — 9.1%
Next week: Do you have sympathy for
anyone on strike?
Look for the new poll question every
Thursday on: www.prairiepost.com
Here’s what we featured
online this week:
We’ll be-friend you:
Ask to be Prairie Post’s
friend on Facebook. Go to
www.facebook.com and search
for PrairiePost Swift Current.
Daily updates available:
Follow us on Twitter to get
up-to-date news and info in
140 characters or less!
STAY POSTED
7 DAYS A WEEK
www.prairiepost.com
File photo
Corla Rokochy’s Snappy Socks business venture just received another boost as it made an appearance on a popular NBC morning show.
Swift Current’s snappy socks
hits major U.S. TV airwaves
B Y J ESSI G OWAN — [email protected]
Local photographer Corla Rokochy’s solution to her
family’s missing sock issue has kicked off a successful
second business for the busy mom of five, whose unique
product Snappy Socks was recently featured on a segment
on NBC’s Today Show.
“I just got so sick of sorting socks, and dealing with lost
sock piles, I thought there had to be a better way to keep
socks together,” Rokochy said. “I was complaining on my
blog about having to do the laundry, and made this joke
about going on Dragon’s Den with my idea for ‘idiot socks’
that were tied together with string. It was a total joke, at
the time.”
However, when Rokochy heard that the show would
be visiting Saskatoon to audition ideas, she started to
consider the true merits of her joke. The night before the
auditions, Rokochy bought a cheap pair of socks to make a
$5 prototype of her idea.
After Rokochy was selected to appear on the show, she
had to decide whether the financial commitment of flying
her family to Toronto was worth it for a ‘joke idea’ that
she put together on a whim.
“I found out that they only picked about 400 people out of
10,000, so this was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that
9,600 other people wanted to have and didn’t get,” she
explained. “I realized that I needed to take this seriously,
so I started talking to other business people and really
doing my research. This had the potential to be a big
thing, but we might also be completely humiliated.
There are just no guarantees.”
From humble beginnings, Rokochy’s Snappy Socks have
grown to international distribution through a partnership
with Barry Mann. Mann is another Swift Current native
who came up with a concept for a new kind of a shoe, and
launched Dawgs Footwear with his brother, Steve.
“It’s two Swift Current success stories coming together,”
Rokochy said. “He’s helped take over my marketing, and
is really the one responsible for us getting on the
Today Show. It’s been a great partnership, though, and
everything still has my name — Snappy Socks by Corla.”
Rokochy feels incredibly proud her small idea has
turned into such a success, and admits that it didn’t
happen overnight. While the kickstart from Dragon’s Den
was a great beginning, she still works hard to keep her
business growing.
“Everyone has an idea like that, something that could
make their lives easier, but we rarely have the opportunity
to actually make that happen,” she said. “It’s been pretty
exciting, seeing our product going out to so many viewers
across America.”
Snappy Socks are available in Swift Current at Babble
and at Sputtergotch, but Rokochy is still looking for a
retail location for her new adult socks. She noted
Christmas is a busy time of year.
“I think everyone expects to get underwear and socks in
their stockings or under the tree, so it’s a great time of
year for us — especially since we just got some new stock
in,” Rokochy said. “It’s Canada, so people here spend quite
a bit of the year needing socks.”
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 3
Education
Prairie Rose students qualify for RAP scholarships
B Y R OSE S ANCHEZ — [email protected]
Eight Prairie Rose School Division (PRSD) students
will receive $1,000 Registered Apprenticeship Program
(RAP) scholarships from the Alberta government.
Brad Volkman, assistant superintendent, shared the
list of winners with board trustees at the Nov. 13 regular
meeting.
He said there are 500 scholarships available in Alberta,
and the government often doesn’t hand them all out.
Eligible students have to have been a registered
apprentice and completed 250 hours of work during
their high-school careers, earned their high-school
diplomas and are planning to continue on with their
trades of choice.
“We continue to promote it,” added Volkman about the
program. “We know (provincial officials) still talk about
a shortage of these kinds of workers (trades workers) in
Alberta.”
Those students from the 2011-12 school year eligible for
the scholarships include:
• Justin Lutz, heavy equipment technician, Eagle Butte
High School;
• Steven Heeg, welder, South Central High School;
• Jared Carroll, welder, South Central High School;
• Zach Hunt, automotive service technician, South
Central High School;
• Braydn Ross, autobody technician, South Central
High School;
• Niek Lamberts, automotive service technician,
Senator Gershaw High School;
• Cody Krooshoop, agricultural equipment technician,
Senator Gershaw High School;
• Travis Tewsley, welder, Foremost High School.
Electoral boundaries review
After a review and discussion with parents and school
officials, the board agreed the electoral boundaries for
Prairie Rose will remain the same heading into the next
election.
A review of the electoral boundaries was slated for this
year and officials agreed the response from most of
those involved in the discussion was to leave the
representation as it is.
“I’m not advocating to change anything, but (a review)
reminds us it’s representation by population and it is
a democratic process,” said Trustee Arnold Frank.
“To continue sustaining these positions (trustee seats),
I think it’s important to review this.”
Superintendent Doug Nicholls agreed there didn’t
seem to be a reason to make any adjustments.
“There’s certainly not an appetite in the room for a
big change ... (and it was) clear from the meeting, the
representation model we’re currently using was
satisfying their needs,” said Nicholls.
High-Aptitude Learners Symposium
Prairie Rose will host a special High-Aptitude
Learners Symposium Nov. 22 at the division office in
Dunmore with between 30 to 35 individuals in
attendance.
“We’re committed to taking a look at this part of our
education delivery,” said Nicholls. “We want to discuss
what the delivery model looks like for high-aptitude
learners.”
A high-aptitude learner is one who has the potential to
achieve at a high level and perhaps even at a higher level
than he or she currently is.
“What can we do as a division to support that learning
model? What’s working and in some cases what’s not
working for them?” asked Nicholls.
Those are just some of the areas that will be discussed
during the day-long symposium.
Also in discussion for Prairie Rose is how to partner
with Prairie Land and Livingstone Range school
divisions in order to promote the idea of ‘anywhere,
anytime, anyplace learning,’ specifically through the use
of video conferencing.
“Our teams are going to get together and start looking
at what might be possible,” said Nicholls.
Officials from all three divisions hope they can expand
on a proposal to Alberta Education to offer more courses
using video conference technology and there may be
some possible funding for a pilot project.
New teacher induction program
Volkman shared some of the positive comments he has
received from individuals involved with their third year
of the teacher induction program.
Prairie Rose has had a program for new teachers for
the past nine years, in order to offer them support in
their positions and learn how best to do their jobs
working within PRSD.
Comments from the teachers involved for their thirdyear straight were positive. Many were glad to have a
mentor to go to to ask questions of and share ideas. They
felt supported and like they had resources available to
them. They also liked the fact it is a three-year program
and not just a few days during the summer months as at
other school divisions in the province.
“It does cost us some dollars, but this is the payoff,”
said Volkman. He added the program helps keep Prairie
Rose’s attrition rates lower than that of the province.
“Our hope is that there will be some provincial support
for teacher induction,” he added.
PRSD commits to wind power
B Y R OSE S ANCHEZ — [email protected]
Prairie Rose School Division (PRSD) board
trustees agreed to commit to signing a 25-year
contract to be supplied electricity through a
potential wind power project.
The proposed project, headed up by
BluEarth Renewables Inc., and Alberta
Schools Commodity Purchasing Consortium
(CPC) was discussed at the Nov. 13 regular
meeting.
Earlier this year in January, PRSD trustees
agreed in principle to a 25-year contract, but
at the most recent meeting, moved to do so if
or when the time comes. This would only
effect facilities which are not using electricity
purchased from the City of Medicine Hat.
“The advantage is predictable power costs,”
said Patricia Cocks, secretary-treasurer, at the
Nov. 13 meeting. “The other advantage is it is
green power.”
The wind power initiative is being
undertaken by the CPC. About a decade ago
when deregulation of the power industry
came into play, school divisions in the
province felt they could get a better price for
electricity if there were more of them
working together to purchase power.
The consortium was formed with about 40 of
the 60 school districts in Alberta taking part.
The most recent agreement for electricity
was completed three years ago at a fairly good
price, but it expires Jan. 1, 2014, Brian Frey,
maintenance supervisor with Prairie Rose,
said in an earlier interview. He also sits on the
management committee for the consortium.
Officials with CPC have partnered with
Calgary’s BluEarth Renewables Inc.
Seven companies sent in proposals for wind
power projects to the CPC and BluEarth was
chosen as the best option.
That company will build the proposed
160 MW wind power project south of
Lloydminster along the Saskatchewan border.
The power created will be used by the school
divisions in the consortium plus any
additional divisions who want to take part.
There will be two opportunities for school
divisions. The first is to simply sign on for a
25-year contract and purchase the electricity
at a fixed rate. That is what division boards
are now agreeing to.
A second option, which is still being studied
and pursued, may include divisions having
the opportunity to invest in the wind farm.
Board trustees were in favour of committing
to a 25-year contract to receive power from a
wind power project, if it moves forward.
“This looks very promising,” said Trustee
Stuart Angle. “There is the potential here for
some significant savings and it is sustainable.
It’s a benefit to Prairie Rose.”
Westview
Estates
Country residential
lots available 1 mile
South of Swift Current
Photo by Matthew Liebenberg
GREAT PARENTAL RESOURCE: Wayne Cormier, the new executive director
of the Swift Current and District Early Childhood Intervention Program,
checks the shelves of their well-stocked toy lending library in their office,
which is located at 1705 Chaplin Street East in Swift Current. A profile of
Cormier and the program is on www.prairiepost.com and will be in the
Nov. 23 issue of Prairie Post.
Medicine Hat’s Largest Buffet Selection
BUFFET MEDICINE HAT
Business Hours
• Mon-Thurs: 11:00am - 9:00pm
• Fri & Sat: 11:00am - 10:00pm
• Sunday: 10:00am - 9:00pm
SOLD
41129187•11/16/12
For more information call
•Lunch and Dinner Buffets
•Western & Oriental Cuisine
(306) 778-3231
111-3215 Dunmore Road SE
(Between Bank of Montreal & KFC in Carry Plaza)
Medicine Hat, AB
(403)528-3399
41110069•11/16/12
4 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Swift Current
snow
day
A man clears the
sidewalk in
Swift Current
on Saturday
morning.
Above, a person walks down
a snow-covered street
near downtown.
Workers clear away snow from the railway yard office in Swift Current. Below,
Winter driving conditions were in effect across southwest Saskatchewan
during the Remembrance Day weekend after a storm system, which developed
over the American Rockies, blanketed the entire area with snow.
The prairies were hit hard by a snowstorm
last week. Swift Current was in that snow
zone and residents were hard-pressed to dig
themselves out. Reporter Matthew
Liebenberg got these shots of the nasty
weather which dumped at least 15 cm on
southwest Saskatchewan.
Right, Miles Huxted was
clearing the sidewalks along
the Great Plains College
parking lot on Nov. 10.
Once he was done there,
he was going to continue
his snow clearing duties
at the college campus.
City of Swift Cur
rent work crew
s were at work
Saturday morni
along Chaplin St
ng, Nov. 10, to
reet on
clear away snow
.
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 5
Swift Current
Swift Current’s United Way gets off to an uplifting start
B Y J ESSI G OWAN —
[email protected]
41129232•11/09/12
The Swift Current United Way hosted
their annual kickoff breakfast for their
2012 campaign on Nov. 9, featuring a
presentation by Dr. Dean Vause.
It was also an opportunity for new
Executive Director Darla Lindbjerg to
introduce herself to the community and
talk about some of the organization’s
goals for their 2012 fundraising season.
“I have lived in Swift Current for
about a decade now; I grew up around
here and I’m raising my family here,”
Lindbjerg said. “I’ve got three kids
under the age of 10, so I care very
much about the social aspect of this
community — making sure my kids
have a community to grow up in.
Working with the United Way helps me
address some of the issues they might
have to face, and gives me a platform
to make a difference within the
community.”
The United Way has been in Swift
Current since 1966, and although the
organization has a great reputation
across Canada, Lindbjerg admitted
many people didn’t realize Swift
Current has a local branch.
For her, the lack of information was
both negative and positive.
“The negative side to this is that it is
hard to support something that people
don’t know about, but on the flip side,
when I inform them and educate them
on what we do, people can make an
informed decision,” she said.
“It’s my job to educate and raise
awareness about what we do, so that
people can make an informed choice
about offering us their support.”
Money raised by the United Way is
distributed to their 12 member
agencies, and remains within the local
area. Although many organizations
have head offices outside of Swift
Current, their representatives help out
within the community, and offer
important services to local residents.
“A lot of people think that money
goes across the country or even the
world, and that is really not the case,”
Lindbjerg explained. “The agencies
that we fundraise for have limited
resources, and this allows them to
spend their time and resources
investing in the community through
programs and services.”
Currently, the Swift Current United
Way supports Canadian Mental
Health, Canadian National Institute
for the Blind, Canadian Paraplegic
Association, Canadian Red Cross,
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Early
Childhood Intervention Program,
Laleche League, Multiple Sclerosis
Society, SK Abilities Council,
Southwest Crisis Services, and St John
Ambulance. They also have four more
local organizations applying for
agency status, as well.
“We do receive some larger corporate
donations every year, and that’s huge.
We appreciate them tremendously,”
added Lindbjerg. “We are steadily
supported by Innovation Credit Union,
and this year also received substantial
donations from Gibson Energy and
RBC, but have a ways to go to reach
our goal of $100,000.”
In addition to raising funds,
Lindbjerg is also aiming to raise
awareness within the community of
the important role the United Way
plays. They have several events
throughout the year to engage
Photo by Jessi Gowan
The Swift Current United Way hosted a breakfast at Sky Centre on Nov. 9, to kick off their 2012
fundraising campaign. The event featured music by Eliza Doyle, Myshel Pajuaar, and Mark
Penner while the sold-out crowd enjoyed their meal. Breakfast was followed by a presentation
by Dr. Dean Vause, whose role with the Alberta Adolescent Recovery Centre in Calgary for the
past 21 years made him the perfect candidate to talk with the audience about youth addiction
within the community.
the community.
“One of our main objectives this
year is to get more organizations to
participate in workplace campaigns,
where people can have donations taken
right out of their paycheques,” she
explained. “People often don’t know
how to give, and that’s such an easy
way to give back to the community.”
The group is also looking forward to
their ‘Week of Caring’ in the summer,
when they will pair up community
organizations in need of help with
corporate volunteers who are willing
to make a difference.
They are also organizing a golf
tournament in the spring, and are
currently selling tickets for their trip
lottery.
“It’s our third year running it, and
we are really hoping to sell out this
year,” Lindbjerg said. “We’ve only got
999 tickets, but if we sell them all we
could be giving over $20,000 back to
our agency members. If we can do
that, that’s a big thing.”
Tickets for the trip lottery can be
purchased from United Way board
members, from their website at
www.swiftcurrentunitedway.ca, or by
calling their office at 306-773-4828.
The United Way will be represented
at local events and tradeshows
throughout the holiday season.
www.swiftcurrent.ca • 177 1st Ave. N.E. • Access to all departments 778-2777
Blenders presents
Library Events
MON. NOV. 19
@ 10 or 12am
MON. NOV. 19
@ 6:30
TUES. @ 2PM
MAKE YOUR OWN
CHRISTMAS CARD
CREATION
TUES. NOV. 20 @ 7PM
Please Register! Cost-$2.00
COMPUTER BASICS:
KEYBOARDING AND MOUSE
MS SOCIETY SUPPORT
GROUP MEETS
STORY TIME
WED. NOV. 21
@ 1 PM
WED. NOV. 21
@ 2 PM
KNITTING/CROCHETING
GROUP
PARKINSON’S SUPPORT
GROUP
WED. NOV. 21
@ 3 PM
CONQUERING THE CLASSICS:
Don Quixote
WED. @ 6:30
THUR. @ 10 AM
THUR. NOV. 22
@ 7 PM
FRI. @ 10 AM
LEAPS & WIGGLES
BABY STEPS
LEARN TO MAKE A HEMP
BRACELET - Please Register!
RHYME TIME
www.swiftcurrent.ca/library
Call us for more information: 306-778-2752
Dreaming Ourselves
as Each Other:
Carl Beam & “The Columbus Suite”
Exhibition:
November 3 to December 30
A series of twelve hand-made prints by
well-known Canadian artist Carl Beam
created in response to the 'celebration' of the
500th anniversary of the European 'discovery'
of the Americas.
Public Tour:
Friday, November 30 starting at 4 pm
Free admission and everyone welcome.
Refreshments served.
Coffeehouse Evening:
Friday, November 30 7:30 pm $5
Walk & talk tour of the exhibition with Gordan
Novak, friend and printmaker for the artist.
Hors d' oeuvres, cash bar, and live music.
Sponsored by Innovation Credit Union
411 Herbert St. E.
778-2736
www.artgalleryofswiftcurrent.org
Free guided tours for groups and schools.
Blenders presents
Genticorum
Over the last few years, Genticorum has become one of the most
sought after proponents of Québécois musical culture, touring in over
15 countries. This energetic ‘power trio’ weave intricate fiddle and
flute work, gorgeous vocals, energetic foot percussion, guitar and
bass into a big and jubilant musical feast. Their distinctive sound,
sense of humour, and stage presence make them a crowd pleaser.
Friday, November 23 at the Lyric Theatre
Doors: 8pm Music: 9pm $25 Tickets at Pharmasave or call Shann at 778-2686
DEL BARBER
Del Barber is an independent folk,
folk rock, Americana, and alt-country
singer-songwriter, musician, and
record producer. He was nominated
for a 2011 Juno Roots & Traditional
Album Award and won two Western
Canadian Music Awards for
Independent Album and Roots Solo
Recording. His latest album is a set
of prairie parables that lead through
finely crafted confessionals and
twang-kissed tales of desires
lived, left, and lost.
Saturday, December 8
at the Lyric Theatre
Doors: 8pm Music: 9pm $25
Tickets: Pharmasave or Shann at 778-2686
6 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Swift Current
New system of parent-teacher conferences coming to Chinook
B Y J ESSI G OWAN — [email protected]
Students in the Chinook School Division will be
more involved in their learning, with the new format
for parent-teacher conferences rolling out this
month.
Beginning this year, interviews will be more
student-led than teacher-directed, allowing students
to share what they’ve learned instead of focusing on
marks and assignments.
“This moves from the traditional interview, to
change the focus on grades to be more about student
knowledge,” explained principal Scott Mayall at
SCCHS. “Our conferences are coming up later this
month, as a pilot.”
The initiative aims to involve more students in the
conference as a way to get them more responsible for
their own learning.
Having a student analyze their own learning and
find ways to improve their grades helps them feel
like they are a part of the process, and allows them
to take a bit more control of their education.
Mayall is hoping the new format will encourage
more participation from older students.
While Grade 9 students still attend their
interviews, Mayall admitted that participation
declines drastically in higher grades.
“This is another thing we are trying, getting them
to attend,” he added. “The first step is getting them
through the door.”
Swift Hearing Centers Inc
As students near the end of their high school
years, Mayall believes parents begin to feel like their
children are responsible for their own learning, and
let them do what they need to do in class.
Although some parents are still actively involve
and want to be a part of the process, many parents
opt out of the conferences.
“Some kids are really struggling in certain areas,
and it helps to talk with the teachers to see how
parents can help their child get better marks,”
Mayall said. “It gives everyone the opportunity to be
in the same room, to let the students look at what
they’ve done and analyze it.”
He feels the new format will give students a
broader and more comprehensive understanding of
their strengths and weaknesses, and help them set
some goals to improve in their weaker areas to be
more successful as students.
After their first set of conferences at the end of
November, they will have a better idea of how the
new system will help.
“We’ve asked teachers to select six students from
their classes to try out the new conference, to
experience the process,” explained Mayall. “We are
looking at this as an opportunity to test it out,
debrief, and see where we might want to go from
there. I feel that once students are responsible for
their own learning, it will be less artificial for them.
They can really start to focus on what they can do to
become better students.”
Swift Hearing Centers Inc.
Licensed with Sask. Health
Blair, Gripp, Stubbs and Associates are pleased and excited to announce the
opening of their new Satellite Diagnostic Imaging Centre located on the ground
floor of the Newell Associate Clinic, 220- 4th Street W., Brooks, Alberta.
We will be providing Ultrasound services based on two (2) sonographers/3 days
per week for the Brooks, Newell County and surrounding region. The first day of
operation was Tuesday, October 30th, if you are scheduled for an Ultrasound in
Medicine Hat, you are invited to reschedule it to the new centre. You can do so by
calling 403-527-7334 extension 3.
It’s Not Just the Quality Of Your Hearing.
It’s the Quality of Your Life
KNOW YOUR OPTIONS
• Do you know if you’re at risk for hearing loss?
• Do you know the symptoms of hearing loss?
• Do you know who to trust with your hearing
care?
• Do you want to know more about advanced
hearing aid technology?
Adele Wiegers, BC-HIS/Diploma/practitioner
106-12 Cheadle St W. (prof bldg) Swift Current SK
Phone: (306) 773-1425 Fax: (306) 773-1507
TOLL FREE: 1-866-773-1657
Physicians of Brooks and surrounding areas, please contact us at 403 527-7334
ext 3 for your requisitions and instruction packages.
41110201•11/09/12
This week’s column courtesy:
41110068•11/16/12
Jim Reiter
Rosetown - Elrose MLA
Phone: 306-882-4105
Box 278
Rosetown, SK
S0L 2V0
58% report that ads in newspapers and
their sites are most likely to help source
a bargain (more than any other media.)
— Source:Totum Research 2010
Sask. MLA Report
Saskatchewan has always been a province
rrooted in the agricultural industry; we have
a history of using our natural resources to
p
provide for the people of the province. The
SSaskatchewan Plan for Growth: Vision
22020 and Beyond sets some bold targets to
ggrow this industry. Our goal is to increase
eexports to $15 billion by 2020. To obtain
tthis type of growth we must engage the
iindustry on all fronts, we must ensure the
needed infrastructure is in place and that we
n
aare developing innovations throughout the
iindustry.
D.F (Yogi) Huyghebaert
Wood River MLA
Phone: 1-306-266-2100
306-642-4744
Box 187
Glentworth, SK S0H 1V0
www.swifthearing.com
To that end, Regina will be hosting an
Agricultural Awareness Summit on February
A
5-6, 2013. This is a great time for our
province to host such a summit. We are
Canada’s top agri-food exporting province
with more than $10 billion worth of exports
Lyle Stewart
Thunder Creek MLA
Phone: 1-306-693-3229
207-310 Main St.
Moose Jaw, SK
S6H 5S8
Bill Boyd
Kindersley MLA
Phone: (306) 463-4480
Toll Free: 1-866-463-4480
116C Main Street, Box 490
Kindersley, SK S0L1S0
in 2011; this is a 60 per cent increase since
2007. This summit will bring together
industry leaders to discuss the public
perception of the agricultural industry.
Our government is supporting agricultural
innovation with an investment of nearly $1
million to the Prairie Agricultural Machinery
Institute (PAMI). This investment will go
towards researching machinery technology
as well as the PAMI integrated Western
Beef development Center (WBDC), which
conducts beef, feed and forage research. Over
the last five years our government has invested
$7.2 million in research and operational
funding to PAMI and WBDC.
One of the challenges of maintaining
a growing province is providing the
infrastructure to support growing populations
and industries. A few weeks ago, our
D. Wayne Elhard
Cypress Hills MLA
Phone: 1-877-703-3374
Box 308
Eastend, SK
S0N 0T0
Brad Wall
Swift Current MLA, Premier
Phone: 1-306-778-2429
#233 Central Ave, N
Swift Current, SK
S9H 0L3
41129154•11/16/12
NOW WITH TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER!
government released fall tenders for Highway
and Infrastructure construction; this is
the first phase in preparing for the 2013
construction year. This tender includes 40
projects made up of 19 construction contracts,
eight bridges and culverts and more at an
estimated cost of $172.8 million. By starting
early with the tendering phase, we can
potentially start construction earlier in 2013.
As we prepare for the future, it is important
we remember those who have gone before
us, particularly those who have served and
sacrificed to give us the freedom we enjoy.
Remembrance Day has passed, but I wanted
to take a moment to personally thank those
women and men who are currently serving or
have served in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Last week, the Saskatchewan Scholarship
of Honour recognized 83 recipients for the
one-time $5000.00 scholarship to go towards
post-secondary education. This Scholarship
was created to pay tribute to our Armed Forces
by providing funding to returning soldiers
as well as the spouses and children of injured
or fallen soldiers. We know the debt we own
these brave women and men can never be
repaid however this educational funding will
provide help for those who are building their
futures right here at home.
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 7
Saskatchewan
Mixed response to Sask Party resolution on lower drinking age
[email protected]
The debate about the legal drinking age in
Saskatchewan has been revived after a resolution was
passed at the Saskatchewan Party convention on Nov. 3
in support of lowering the drinking age from 19 to 18.
The resolution was introduced by the party’s youth
delegates, but Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming
Authority Minister Donna Harpauer spoke against it.
Afterwards Premier Brad Wall said the government
will carefully consider the issue before introducing any
proposals for changes to the existing law.
“I know the minister doesn’t agree and I think there
are some real concerns about it,” he said during a media
scrum. “We’re going to go through a consultation
process before we’ll even consider any kind of change
like that. We take resolutions at the convention very
seriously.”
He indicated there are two sides to the argument that
will have to be considered before any decision is taken.
“Someone can serve their country and be in harms
way, someone can choose their government and yet that
person serving his country can’t go to the Legion and
have a beer legally, so we understand that,” he told
reporters. “On the other hand, do we want to broaden
the access to alcohol for young people?”
The universities of Regina and Saskatchewan student
unions both indicated their support for lowering the
drinking age, as it would prevent 18-year-old students on
university campuses from finding unsafe ways to drink.
Nathaniel Cole, the president of the Saskatchewan
Young New Democrats, was surprised at the amount of
media attention given to this SaskParty resolution.
“I don’t think it’s an important resolution to be making
at a convention as such,” he said. “We spend most of our
time talking about the politics of social justice and the
politics of creating an inclusive economic structure.
I think this is really a non-important issue that’s kind of
a distraction from the real issues.”
Louise Twerdy, the chapter services manager for
MADD Canada (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) in
the prairie provinces, said the organization is against
lowering the drinking age in Saskatchewan.
“You would be taking an age group that’s already
at an increased risk of alcohol-related harm, including
impaired driving, and making it easier for them to
legally obtain alcohol,” she mentioned. “So it’s not a
wise direction to move in.”
In only three provinces — Alberta, Manitoba and
Quebec — it is currently legal to drink at 18. In all the
other provinces and territories the legal drinking age is
19. Twerdy felt it can make a difference if that legal age
is reduced with one year.
“Currently in Saskatchewan they come off the
graduated licensing program just before they turn 18
and then they would be legal to drink,” she said.
“That just hasn’t instilled enough of separating the
drinking from the driving.”
She referred to the example of other provinces, such as
Ontario, with its graduated licensing program and a
zero tolerance approach towards drinking and driving
until the age of 21.
“Their drinking age is at 19, but it’s still zero tolerance
to the age of 21 or their first five years of driving,” she
explained. “We see a huge decrease in the number of
alcohol-related crashes and other things such as suicides
and binge drinking.”
She referred to MADD Canada’s latest provincial and
territorial review, which indicated Saskatchewan has
the worst impaired driving record and the highest rate of
Fourth
Quarter Jingle
make your
Bring more traffic to your door this season
n
with targeted advertising in our November
and December issues of the Prairie Post.
impaired related crash deaths per capita at 8.44 deaths
per every 100,000 people.
MADD Canada’s suggestion to the Saskatchewan
government would be to keep the legal drinking age at
19 and to introduce a graduated licensing program with
a zero blood alcohol content (BAC) for all new drivers
until the age of 21.
“So that they have driven for a considerable length of
time with the zero BAC and they’ve learned to separate
the drinking from the driving,” she emphasized.
According to Twerdy, the legal drinking age in most
U.S. states are 19 or 21. In New Zealand, a recent study
suggested the high death rate among young people is
partly due to an alcohol buying age of 18.
“The authors of this report address alcohol use and
binge drinking in young people in New Zealand as one
of the most obvious avenues to reduce both suicides and
traffic mortalities,” she said.
Wade Jensen, the owner of the Boston Pizza franchise
T
U
I
P FOR
P
A
R
W
CHRISTMAS
PUT A PONY
UNDER YOUR
CHRISTMAS TREE!
2008 FORD F150 LARIAT 4X4 SUPERCREW
STK#: C132B
STK#: U1663
STK#: U1672
Auto, PONY PACKAGE!! 103,000Kms
9,900
$
Auto, V8, leather, roll top! 113,000kms
21,900
$
2008 MUSTANG GT COUPLE
2011 FORD EDGE LTD AWD
2005 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 4X4 CREWCAB
STK#: C094A
STK#: U1664
STK#: C144A
Leather, auto, V8,
Performance Upgrades!, 46,000kms
Auto, V6, leather, pano roof, 19,000kms
37,500
19,900
$
$
Auto, V8, lifted! 121,000kms
16,900
$
2005 MUSTANG GT CONVERTIBLE
2008 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED 4X4
2010 FORD F150 LARIAT 4X4
STK#: C167F
STK#: C130A
STK#:C184A
Auto, V8, Red Leather, low low kms!
119,000kms
Auto,V6, 4x4, sky roof! 54,000kms
18,500
17,900
$
$
Long Box, Leather, Loaded, 101,000kms
24,900
$
2010 MUSTANG GT CONVERTIBE
2008 SATURN VUE XR AWD
2010 GMC SIERRA 1500 4X4
STK#: D006A
STK#: D024A
STK#: B131A
Auto, V8, leather, grabber blue!
42,000Kms
Auto, V6, AWD, leather, 39,000 kms
17,900
25,900
$
$
2008 MUSTANG GT COUPE CALIFORNIA SPECIAL
2010 FORD FUSION AWD
Short box regular cab! 30,000kms
25,900
$
2010 FORD F150 KING RANCH 4X4 SUPERCREW
ON!
STK#: C124B
publishin
Auto, V6, leather, pano roof, manager’s
demo, bordeaux red! 30,000Kms
35,500
$
For more information and to reserve
your ad space, in Alberta phone
Jason Rinke at 403-504-7116
or Jamie Fode at 403-528-5761
er
in the g throughout Decemb
HOW ABOUT A TRUCK
TO PICKUP THE
CHRISTMAS TREE?
2011 FORD EDGE LTD AWD
COMING SO
S
G
N
I
T
E
E
R
G
Y
A
D
HOLI
HOW ABOUT
AN SUV?
2005 MUSTANG V6 PREMIUM COUPE
This is the perfect opportunity to wish your
customers a Merry Christmas and glad
tidings for the new year!
In Saskatchewan, phone
Stacey Powell at
306-773-8260
in Swift Current, said lowering the drinking age will not
make much of a difference to his business.
“It would probably increase our sales a little bit
because it does increase the demographic of our
lounge,” he mentioned. “From a business perspective,
the more people that can drink, the the busier the lounge
will be.”
But any increase in the number of patrons also
results in a higher level of general maintenance at the
establishment.
“There’s more repairs because you put more bodies
through,” he said.
On a personal level, Jensen is in favour of lowering the
drinking age, because 18 is in any case the age when
young people can vote or serve the country in the armed
forces.
“What is one more responsibility and that’s really
what drinking comes down to,” he said. “You have a
responsibility to not do stupid things.”
STK#: U1665/B134A
6 speed, leather, GT CS package
STK#: C187A
Both fully loaded,
both ready for winter NOW!
STARTING AT
18,900
$
Leather, sunroof, navigation! 138,000kms
26,500
$
Taber Ford Sales
4402-46 Avenue, Taber, AB
(403) 223-9654
“Good People, Good Service”
www.taberford.ca
Silvano (Sal) Dippolito Robb Alexander
General Manager Business Manager
Randy Gibson
Product Advisor
Don Dodge
Product Advisor
41110073•11/16/12
B Y M ATTHEW L IEBENBERG —
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 7
Saskatchewan
Mixed response to Sask Party resolution on lower drinking age
[email protected]
The debate about the legal drinking age in
Saskatchewan has been revived after a resolution was
passed at the Saskatchewan Party convention on Nov. 3
in support of lowering the drinking age from 19 to 18.
The resolution was introduced by the party’s youth
delegates, but Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming
Authority Minister Donna Harpauer spoke against it.
Afterwards Premier Brad Wall said the government
will carefully consider the issue before introducing any
proposals for changes to the existing law.
“I know the minister doesn’t agree and I think there
are some real concerns about it,” he said during a media
scrum. “We’re going to go through a consultation
process before we’ll even consider any kind of change
like that. We take resolutions at the convention very
seriously.”
He indicated there are two sides to the argument that
will have to be considered before any decision is taken.
“Someone can serve their country and be in harms
way, someone can choose their government and yet that
person serving his country can’t go to the Legion and
have a beer legally, so we understand that,” he told
reporters. “On the other hand, do we want to broaden
the access to alcohol for young people?”
The universities of Regina and Saskatchewan student
unions both indicated their support for lowering the
drinking age, as it would prevent 18-year-old students on
university campuses from finding unsafe ways to drink.
Nathaniel Cole, the president of the Saskatchewan
Young New Democrats, was surprised at the amount of
media attention given to this SaskParty resolution.
“I don’t think it’s an important resolution to be making
at a convention as such,” he said. “We spend most of our
time talking about the politics of social justice and the
politics of creating an inclusive economic structure.
I think this is really a non-important issue that’s kind of
a distraction from the real issues.”
Louise Twerdy, the chapter services manager for
MADD Canada (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) in
the prairie provinces, said the organization is against
lowering the drinking age in Saskatchewan.
“You would be taking an age group that’s already
at an increased risk of alcohol-related harm, including
impaired driving, and making it easier for them to
legally obtain alcohol,” she mentioned. “So it’s not a
wise direction to move in.”
In only three provinces — Alberta, Manitoba and
Quebec — it is currently legal to drink at 18. In all the
other provinces and territories the legal drinking age is
19. Twerdy felt it can make a difference if that legal age
is reduced with one year.
“Currently in Saskatchewan they come off the
graduated licensing program just before they turn 18
and then they would be legal to drink,” she said.
“That just hasn’t instilled enough of separating the
drinking from the driving.”
She referred to the example of other provinces, such as
Ontario, with its graduated licensing program and a
zero tolerance approach towards drinking and driving
until the age of 21.
“Their drinking age is at 19, but it’s still zero tolerance
to the age of 21 or their first five years of driving,” she
explained. “We see a huge decrease in the number of
alcohol-related crashes and other things such as suicides
and binge drinking.”
She referred to MADD Canada’s latest provincial and
territorial review, which indicated Saskatchewan has
the worst impaired driving record and the highest rate of
Fourth
Quarter Jingle
make your
Bring more traffic to your door this season
n
with targeted advertising in our November
and December issues of the Prairie Post.
This is the perfect opportunity to wish your
customers a Merry Christmas and glad
tidings for the new year!
For more information and to reserve
your ad space, in Alberta phone
Jason Rinke at 403-504-7116
or Jamie Fode at 403-528-5761
S
G
N
I
T
E
E
R
G
Y
A
D
HOLI
In Saskatchewan, phone
Stacey Powell at
306-773-8260
er
in btlihsehing throughout Decemb
pu
impaired related crash deaths per capita at 8.44 deaths
per every 100,000 people.
MADD Canada’s suggestion to the Saskatchewan
government would be to keep the legal drinking age at
19 and to introduce a graduated licensing program with
a zero blood alcohol content (BAC) for all new drivers
until the age of 21.
“So that they have driven for a considerable length of
time with the zero BAC and they’ve learned to separate
the drinking from the driving,” she emphasized.
According to Twerdy, the legal drinking age in most
U.S. states are 19 or 21. In New Zealand, a recent study
suggested the high death rate among young people is
partly due to an alcohol buying age of 18.
“The authors of this report address alcohol use and
binge drinking in young people in New Zealand as one
of the most obvious avenues to reduce both suicides and
traffic mortalities,” she said.
Wade Jensen, the owner of the Boston Pizza franchise
in Swift Current, said lowering the drinking age will not
make much of a difference to his business.
“It would probably increase our sales a little bit
because it does increase the demographic of our
lounge,” he mentioned. “From a business perspective,
the more people that can drink, the the busier the lounge
will be.”
But any increase in the number of patrons also
results in a higher level of general maintenance at the
establishment.
“There’s more repairs because you put more bodies
through,” he said.
On a personal level, Jensen is in favour of lowering the
drinking age, because 18 is in any case the age when
young people can vote or serve the country in the armed
forces.
“What is one more responsibility and that’s really
what drinking comes down to,” he said. “You have a
responsibility to not do stupid things.”
"! "
"! "
"! "
"
‡
"
‡
‡
.-,.
Regier Honda In Swift Current
‡MSRP is $27,630.00/$35,560.00/$36,630.00 for a 2012 CR-V LX 2WD, model RM3H3CES/
2012 PILOT LX 2WD, model YF3H2CE/2012 RIDGELINE DX, model YK1F2CEZ and includes $1,640.00/
$1,640.00/$1,640.00 freight and PDI. Taxes, license, insurance, environmental fees and registration are
extra. Retailer may sell for less. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers valid from November 1, 2012
through November 30, 2012 at participating Honda retailers. Offers valid only for Saskatchewan residents
at Honda Dealers of Saskatchewan locations. Offers subject to change or cancellation without notice.
Visit HondaSask.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.
%)( &*!%
+!()&&$(
'"'
&!& %$%#
s
B Y M ATTHEW L IEBENBERG —
8 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
The Prairie Post is holding a
Christmas Colouring Contest
We're hoping some local children can help us out and ensure our front page
picture for the Dec. 21 issue of the Prairie Post is colourful. Just colour the
picture on this page and send it back to us by Friday, Dec. 7 at noon.
Mail your entries to: Rose Sanchez, Prairie Post, 3257, Dunmore
Contest Entry Form
Road, SE, Medicine Hat, AB, T1B 3R2, or drop them off at our
Child's Name: _____________________
Swift Current office at 600 Chaplin Street.
Age: ____________________________
The winning
entry will be on
the front of our
Dec. 21 issue
Address: _________________________
________________________________
Phone: __________________________
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 9
Rosebud
Rosebud is a living, breathing Christmas card
[email protected]
When one hears of the description of a
cosy town settling in for Christmas, many
times it’s just fiction like in the movies,
theatre or even songs such as Bing
Crosby’s iconic White Christmas.
The community of Rosebud is as close
as one can get to experiencing an oldfashioned Christmas experience.
While Rosebud is home to an active
theatre and performing school of the arts,
there is something else Rosebud is known
for — an overall fun experience which
can be experienced all year round.
This enjoyable time is referred to as the
‘Rosebud Experience.’
Sue Miller, owner of the Rose Cottage
Bed and Breakfast in Rosebud, said
the entire community is into creating
Christmas spirit.
In a phone conversation, she cheerily
describes all of the snow on the ground
with the sun glistening off of it, making it
picture perfect — just like a Christmas
card. She agreed there is something
different about Rosebud, especially at
Christmas time.
“We do it together as a community,
that’s how it comes together ... It’s a town
thing; we’re into creating an experience
for people when they come here,”
explained Miller who was originally from
Seven Persons. “We want everyone to get
that ‘Rosebud Experience.’ It’s not just to
come to the theatre either.
“It’s not a job here; it’s a lifestyle.
Rosebud is like the town that time forgot.”
While the theatre is obviously the
main attraction, especially with a
popular Christmas-themed show, Miller
complimented the different businesses in
town which are tourist friendly and are
definitely geared towards the arts.
At Christmas time, they put forth their
best efforts to create an old-fashioned
Yuletime experience.
Miller says a lot of the planning begins
in October and the locals together
generate Christmas-themed activities.
The community has a group called
Recess which meets to discuss various
plans and the follow through of those
ideas.
What’s more Christmas-y than a drink cart
which serves people hot apple cider
outside? It’s one of the little touches the
Rosebud Theatre has added to his
Christmas-themed Rosebud experience.
This year, besides the shopping at the
different gift stores, all of Rosebud
including those who work in the Theatre
are pulling out the stops to give visitors a
taste of the Christmas spirit.
Mark Lewandowski, general manager
of the Rosebud Theatre and who does a
lot of the marketing for the company,
said opening night for the Christmasthemed production of May and Joe Nov. 2
had carollers singing and a firepit to
warm up and enjoy the outdoors as well
as a Fridays with Morris which allows
theatre-goers to have a chance to talk to
Morris Ertman, artistic director of the
theatre and co-writer of May and Joe.
“What we are trying to do is engage the
audience in different ways,” explains
Lewandowski. “It’s something they
really enjoy ... meet the actors, talking to
the students.”
Lewandowski added they also have a
Find the Angels in Rosebud contest and a
Nativity Scene contest.
There’s even some incredibly delicious
hot apple cider and hot chocolate served
during the evening. For an added touch,
the hot drinks are being served in a cart
which doubled as an ice cream cart in the
summer.
Adam Furfaro, the executive director of
the Rosebud Theatre added the gift shop
is brimming with Christmas trinkets,
pictures and Nativity sets.
“The gift shop is a display experience
in itself,” Furfaro added.
Furfaro added the food created by
Patrick Murphy who is the Theatre’s
hospitality director and executive chef of
WildHorse Jack’s Bistro and Grill, which
serves the pre-theatrical production
meal, also adds to the Christmas spirit.
Homemade cranberries, turkey, carved
lamb and a homemade mint jelly all lend
itself to creating that atmosphere for
people.
There are no less than 12 different
artistic attractions listed at
www.rosebud.ca and about 10 bed and
breakfasts in town, which is amazing
considering the actual population of the
community according to the 2011 Census
is 88.
Rosebud officials state that “annually
more than 40,000 patrons enjoy the
‘Rosebud Experience’ of professional
theatre, complemented by unique dining,
art galleries, museums and shopping.”
Lewandowski said he sent out emails
to people who attended the theatre’s
opening night for its Christmas
production and he said the reviews
ranged from extremely positive to “rave.”
The community’s attention to making
the tourists feel welcome is garnering
attention from across the province as
Rosebud has earned Travel Alberta’s
“Alberta Pride” ALTO Award, the
“Rural Tourism Champion” award and
the Rozsa Award.
(Those wanting more info on
Rosebud, can check out the website
at: www.rosebudtheatre.com or
www.rosebud.ca or check out various
segments on YouTube)
Photos contributed
The Rosebud Opera House helps create a positive Christmas glow for evening theatre goers to
the Yuletide-themed production of May and Joe.
12113DS00
41129238•11/16/12
B Y RYAN DAHLMAN —
It’s Time To Experience Modern Warmth
Visit Our
Showroom Today!
6 St. SE
So
uth
ilw
ay
S
t.
8 Ave. SE
REGENCY ALTERRA CS1200
REGENCY PLATEAU PT030
REGENCY HORIZON HZ54E
Contemporary Wood Stove
Outdoor Firetables
Linear Gas Fireplace
“A Fireplace for Every Decor”
Ra
7 St. SE
41110078•11/16/12
Hat
Fresh Air
Home Centres
676 South Railway St. S.E. • Medicine Hat, Alberta
(403) 527-8107
Until November 26, 2012
Receive a FREE Blower, Remote or Thermostat.*
This is a retail value of up to
*not valid with any other offer.
$57800
PRAIRIE
10 - Friday, November 16, 2012
www.prairiepost.com
The Great War took its toll on Alberta’s southeast
It has been said the Canadian nation
In this atmosphere of suspicion, the
JONATHAN province’s Austrian, German and
was born on the battlefields of Europe
during the First World War.
Ukrainian settlers were singled out for
KOCH
While the end of the war in 1918
abuse. Labeled “enemy aliens” and
FORGOTTEN required to register and report monthly
marked a new beginning for Canada,
ALBERTA:
its commencement four years earlier
Sights and to authorities or risk internment, some
signaled the beginning of the end
Stories of the concealed their ethnicity by adopting
Southeast English-sounding surnames.
for many southeastern Alberta
communities.
Two southeastern communities with
Following the declaration of war in
German-sounding names, Carlstadt and
1914, overseas investment in mines,
Bingen, underwent a patriotic rebirth
farms, railways and irrigation projects
in 1915, becoming Alderson and
across Palliser’s Triangle dried up nearly overnight.
Nemiskam respectively.
The economic and social fallout that ensued forever
Undeniably, there were “aliens” who remained
altered the landscape of Alberta’s southeast, and
loyal to the “Fatherland.” One group, 40 German
helped inflame ethnic tensions that smoldered long
farmers from Hussar, attempted to return to
after conflict ceased.
Germany to enlist, only to be detained en route
As detrimental as the entire episode seems today,
and imprisoned for the remainder of the war.
back in the summer of 1914, declaration of war was
The sad reality was that the war’s destructive
seen as cause for celebration.
effect did not discriminate. On the home front, every
“War excitement is running high,” reported the
settler suffered, regardless of their ethnicity, when
Bassano Mail in early August 1914. “No matter what
rail and irrigation projects were postponed or
hour of the night there will be found small groups of
cancelled as a result of war in Europe.
citizens on every corner talking over the situation and
Farmers west of Redcliff, having endured drought
wondering what the crazy Emperor of Germany will
and economic downturn prior to the war, were left
do next.”
high and dry when war prompted the bankruptcy of
Within weeks, men were marching off to war.
a nearby irrigation project in July 1914.
Those who stayed behind canvassed for the Red Cross
Hundreds of homesteaders, and villages such as
and Patriotic Funds, formed militias and home guards, Bow City, Retlaw and Suffield, whose prosperity was
and remained vigilant against German invasion.
dependent on the establishment of irrigation, would
Indeed, wartime fervor bred paranoia, with common
never recover.
sense becoming the first casualty In August 1914,
Settlers from the steppe north of Redcliff — in the
the Bow Island Review reported a man with a
vast territory known today as C.F.B. Suffield — were
“strong German accent” stepped off the train in
marooned when construction of a railway running
that community, with a package local observers
north from Medicine Hat was delayed in 1914,
speculated was dynamite. Police intervened, only to
and later abandoned. Work on another railway
discover the stranger was no German anarchist bent
stretching from Suffield west to Blackie was halted
on blowing Bow Island to bits, but a Norwegian
at Lomond in 1914, leaving farmers from Armada to
Lutheran Minister on his way to Swift Current.
Arrowwood to wait another decade for rail to arrive.
His package? A lantern and slides for illustrating
Buffeted by drought and written off as a bad
lectures.
investment, thousands of homesteaders — many
Photo submitted
The cenotaph at Enchant, Alberta marks the contributions of
area men and women in two world wars.
whose sons, husbands and fathers had gone off to
war, never to return — had little recourse but to
abandon the prairie outright.
Today throughout much of Alberta’s southeast,
discarded rail beds, orphaned irrigation works,
weathered shacks and overgrown cellar holes are the
only monuments to a generation’s dreams and
potential, wiped out by war.
Lest we forget.
(Jonathan Koch is an avid historian with his own
website called Forgotten Alberta: Sights and Stories of
the Southeast. You can view his website online at:
http://forgottenalberta.com/)
Small town fall suppers are true works of art
Last weekend, I was reminded that
a group of pink apron-wearing, fixedup hair, fancy jean-wearing women
from rural Alberta are nothing to
mess with.
Resourceful, strong and can work a
draft horse under the table, these
women are reminiscent of a small
army. Oh my! Don’t get in their way.
Across our wind-sculpted prairies
some old traditions hold current
today. Years ago fall suppers, where
folks gathered in churches to chow down on chicken,
salads, and potatoes, were an important way to
connect after the grueling days of harvest were over.
These meals were all prepared without running
water and electricity and ladies’ groups, did just that
— grouped together and cooked. As fundraisers for
the women’s clubs in churches, fall suppers were a
place where neighbour after neighbour would show
up to visit, eat, and enjoy a short program.
My Grandma remembers as a child being all shined
up and waiting upstairs with a nervous stomach, for
her number to be called to eat. The nerves weren’t
for the meal, but for the program afterwards that the
children helped put on.
Now, our fall suppers are generally a buffet style
spread of deliciousness. Turkey is served instead of
chicken, and potatoes, vegetables and salads adorn
the plates. Accompanied with coffee and pie, it’s too
bad that there weren’t couches to have a snooze on
afterwards. Women’s organizations from churches,
as well as town and country clubs from our small
rural communities unite to make money and serve
up a full meal. As a girl, I washed dishes in the back
with other young girls from the community.
You always wondered who you would get to chat with
while going through tea towel after soaking wet tea
towel, drying dishes.
CHEYENNE A few days ago, I washed my girls
up, getting ready to haul them into
STAPLEY our nearest community, a place
where less than 100 people reside,
RURAL
probably counting kittens and pups
ROUTE
all around.
The sun blazed down on the snow
left over from two weeks of ice fog
that had caused power outages.
Folks rendered themselves a little
crazier than before, from the lack of
brightness in the sky, and the sunshine was
welcomed. We plowed across muddy gravel roads,
with a sort of tricky spring feel in the air with the
snow turning into liquid in the ditches.
Heading into the hall, we were greeted with the
sound of dishes crashing, and a dim room with a few
candles on the tables stretched out before us.
We might live in the boondocks, but these aren’t the
pioneer days, no sir, the power was still having major
glitches after the hokey weather of the past few
weeks. Apparently on this day, of all days, there was
an outage for several hundred miles and women
gasped in the morning, not daring to open their ovens
as turkeys were being browned to perfection.
You can imagine the scene being set; nerves were
racked and nails tapped maniacally on the counter
with eyes on the clock, waiting for light to flicker in
the kitchen.
These women were something! I have never seen the
like, and you would think that I would have been
prepared, having grown up in this area — moulded,
raised, and supported by these ladies. When the
power went out, a stern phone call was placed to our
local electricity provider and a reminder was made to
put our teensy hamlet on priority.
Forget those communities with hospitals in them,
there is near 300 pounds of turkey cookin’ around
here. In the hall murmured conversations led to
phone calls and a general consensus of “this show
must go on!” People joke about gas-powered blenders,
but folks, with my very eyes I saw extension cords
hauled around and generators brought in, and gas
powered blenders were indeed used.
Warnings of “Watch your step!”; blenders whirring
to mash potatoes; and electric knives coming to life,
the women worked at Mach speed to make up time
lost to black.
A cheer went up when the lights came on, and
almost like something out of a storybook, a collected
sort of ‘awwwww!!’ when the power went off again.
Like an army of ants, these women put a spread on,
but I tell you, the process was somewhat scary to get
there. I have an awed sort of respect for these gals, in
a, “Heck yes, ma’am, I’ll do whatever you say! I know
that pink apron means business!” — kind of way.
If you want to experience a piece of prairie history,
find a small town in the fall, ask about their turkey
supper and you surely won’t be let down as you help
celebrate the completion of harvest and support a
women’s organization. You might sit down next to
your Grandpa’s old neighbour who can tell you tales
of round ups from years past, or you might meet the
tiniest, newest neighbour to the community,
swaddled up tight. No matter who you cross paths
with there, you will be better for it. It might not be as
exciting as our last one was, but it will have some
sort of tasty pie to punctuate whatever adventure it
will hold and trust me — all are welcomed.
Happy Fall!
(Cheyenne Stapley helps operate her mixed farm
in Central Alta. with her husband and family.
Her column Rural Route will appear monthly
in Prairie Post and is also on our website at
www.prairiepost.com)
PRAIRIE
CANADIAN
COMMUNITY
NEWSPAPER
AWARD 2012
PRAIRIE POST — www.prairiepost.com
Friday, November 16, 2012 - 11
OUR OPINION:
Despite our greedy
natures: selflessness
should prevail
The political cartoon said it all: an NHL player at an ATM
machine looks at his bank statement screams “I’m down to
$10 million, arrrrgh!” as someone standing nearby observed,
“the NHL players are starting to weaken.”
Canadians have almost exhausted
all patience about listening to
the ear-bleeding talk about the
Collective Bargaining Agreement
RYAN
(CBA) between the National Hockey
DAHLMAN League and the NHL Players’
MANAGING Association.
EDITOR
Fortunately, Christmas season is
upon us and all of the hockey media
members who are trying to stay
relevant, can mercifully fade to
black. A huge dump of snow across
the prairies and fallen temperatures have allowed people to start to
thinking about Christmas despite the fact people aren’t talking
about their professional favourite hockey teams.
With all of the talk about large fractions of a billion dollars in
revenue it’s hard not to look at the opposite side of the pendulum
with so many people struggling to make ends meet.
Whether you believe the billionaire owners raking in piles of
money with marketing of merchandise and broadcast deals have
more than a case than the multi-millionaire players who are
playing a child’s game and getting paid handsomely for it, most
would agree the factor stopping both sides from signing a new
CBA is greed.
The never end search for wanting more money, material goods
etc. is unfortunately something becoming far too common in
North American society. As the relevancy of Christianity is
unfortunately waning, the idea of people ignoring the dangers of
the most common of Christianity’s seven deadly sins, a.k.a.
Capital Vices or Deadly Sins — greed — is becoming all too
common. It’s sad. In a world which is now about getting rich quick,
those who have fallen on hard luck or made some bad choices and
failed to recover, struggle for any semblance of an existence.
Within the economy’s structure, the gap between rich and poor is
widening. While we whine about those rich people in North
America as compared to middle and lower-income households,
even the poorest in North America are still far wealthier than a
vast majority of the world. We shouldn’t forget those who feel
fortunate if they get a meal a day or have someplace safe to sleep.
While it’s common for people to be charitable at Christmas time
because it’s the right thing to do or it’s tradition, they should stop
and think about the attitudes they hold through the whole year.
Why not give a gift which helps the whole year or perhaps make
a concerted effort and promise to be generous through the whole
year? Whether that means donating good quality clothes and toys
to the local Salvation Army, food or cash to the local food bank on a
consistent basis or if you’re a little low on cash yourself, donate
some time and help out at a seniors’ home or day care. With Credit
reporting agency TransUnion’s Nov. 14 announcement the average
(not including mortgages) debt in Canada is over $26,000 per
household, money is quickly becoming tight.
Be generous and give consistently. While groups like the NHL
fight over millions of dollars, large companies and their
shareholders get rich with multi-million dollar mergers or highranking officials in provincial and federal governments live it up
on the taxpayers’ dime, it’s time we start looking after each other.
Congratulations to those who consistently do their best for
others already. For the rest of us, let’s make Christmas 2012 a
turning point so as to help make the world a better place every day.
Ryan Dahlman is managing editor of the Prairie Post.
Contact him with your comments about this opinion piece at
[email protected]
PRAIRIE POST is published for Alberta and
Saskatchewan by the proprietor Alta. Newspaper
Group LP. at: 3257 Dunmore Rd. S.E., Medicine Hat,
Alta., Canada T1B 3R2
Second Class Mail / Registration Number 0281
To advertise in PRAIRIE POST:
Swift Current: 306-773-8260; 600 Chaplin St. E.
Medicine Hat: 403-504-7116
Prairie Post West: 403-380-7589
For toll-free long distance from Alberta
or Sask.: 1-800-682-2476
Website: www.prairiepost.com
YOUR OPINION:
Swift Current school has pluses and minuses
Editor:
I was filled with optimism as I read about the
groundbreaking for the new school project.
It is a lofty goal and a dream I hope makes this
‘joint-use’ school markedly different from
others in the province.
When the idea for the joint school was first
presented to the public, we were told this would
be a more effective use of space as a joint
school could share a gym, library and other
areas instead of requiring the building of
separate space for these in each school.
This was misleading, as in fact, these schools
require separate libraries. This has been
confirmed with the school boards.
While mention of joint use of a library
disappeared as discussion continued, many
people still believe a joint-school library is part
of the plan.
In existing joint schools in the province, the
original joint-use space has caused conflict to
the extent that walls have since been erected
dividing the gym, fences now divide the
playground and even arrival and dismissal
times have been adjusted to eliminate the
mingling of the students. I wonder how the
challenges of ‘sharing’ space will be addressed
in this school. What plan is in place that will
make this school different and prevent these
issues in the new school?
The Government of Saskatchewan press
release stated “Once completed, the integrated
facility”…….offering “a fieldhouse and
wellness centre, a library and art gallery, a
hospital and long-term care facility, and an
aquatics centre…..”
Why is this being stated as fact, when the City
insists this is simply a proposal? I have not seen
or heard a statement from the City correcting
this statement. When we, the citizens, voice
concerns about the ‘grand’ plans that are being
presented, the City has been quite adamant
in stating this is a ‘proposal’.
I have consistently referred to this as a
proposal, but on many occasions, the City
neglects to include the word proposal, when
presenting ‘their’ dream. Now we have the
provincial government issuing a press release
about what will make up the integrated facility
and there is no mention of a proposal at all.
It is our tax dollars that are being spent to
“advertise and sell” this dream to us and others
in the province. Remember it will also be our
tax dollars that will pay for it. Let’s insist this
proposal be realistic and affordable and we
have a say in what is included.
At the recent open house for the City’s
Housing Plan, it was interesting to note the
consulting firm that drew up these plans chose
to use the middle rate of projected population
growth, instead of the highest rate the City is
using for city development. Middle rate is
1.54 per cent and the highest rate is 2.27 per
cent over 20 years, resulting in a population
of 20,308 and 23,435 respectively in 2026.
Is it conceivable that we will grow to over
23,000 people by 2026? If the City believes this,
then would it not be wise to plan for housing
development for that number?
I believe we have a great city and we need to
look forward, but we need to remain interested
and informed in what is happening.
Thank you to all who ran in the recent
election and congratulation to the new council.
I hope that you will work to represent the
citizens of Swift Current and look carefully at
plans as they are being made.
Shirley Ens, Swift Current
MICHAEL J. HERTZ
Senior Vice-President
DOUG EVJEN
Director of Sales and Marketing
GORDON WATERHOUSE
Distribution and carrier queries
— 403-528-5667
ADVERTISING TERMS AND CONDITIONS: The following terms and conditions apply to all advertising
and other material printed by or distributed in the Prairie Post. All copy and type arrangements are subject
to the approval of the Publisher on behalf of the Prairie Post, who has to right to refuse any advertisement
JASON RINKE
ADVERTISING
SALES-ALTA.
STACEY POWELL
INSIDE SALES,
SASK.
JAMIE FODE
RYAN DAHLMAN
INSIDE
SALES
MANAGING
EDITOR
or insertion. The advertiser agrees that the liability of the Post or its employees for damages or costs arising out of error in printing or insertion of advertisements or any other material is limited to the actual
amount paid for the space used by that portion of the advertisement containing the error or the actual
ROSE SANCHEZ
ASSISTANT
MANAGING EDITOR
MATTHEW
LIEBENBERG
REPORTER
JESSI GOWAN
REPORTER/
PHOTOGRAPHER
cost paid to have the advertisement or any other material inserted in the Post. Notice of error is required
before the second insertion. The Post will not be liable for any other claims of damages from not printing
or non-insertion of any advertisement of other material.
12 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Swift Current
New video recalls Swift Current’s wartime aerodrome
B Y M ATTHEW L IEBENBERG —
[email protected]
For a young English soldier a Second World War
trip across the Atlantic to a prairie town, he has
never heard of what the start of a new life in
Swift Current.
A new documentary about the history of the
Royal Air Force (R.A.F.) aerodrome in Swift Current
tells the story of the city’s contribution to the Allied
war effort through the eyes of Roy Spence.
The video was screened for the first time during a
function at the Swift Current Museum on Nov. 8.
It is the second one in the museum’s Stories from
Saskatchewan’s Great Southwest video series.
Spence, now 92-years-old and a long-time resident
of Swift Current, was the special guest at the event.
He shared his memories with the audience after the
screening and also answered their questions about
life during the war.
Born in Yorkshire, he was stationed at R.A.F.
Station Snaith in 1941 when a fellow soldier was told
he had been posted overseas.
“I could see he was really hit hard with that,” he
recalled. “He was married and he had children.
So I told the flight sergeant he could put my name
down because I wasn’t married and didn’t even have
a girlfriend, so I was free to go.”
The 20-year-old Spence was one of the first soldiers
to arrive in Swift Current at the new aerodrome,
where airmen received advanced flight training.
But he had no idea where he was going when he
boarded a ship in Liverpool Harbour in 1941.
He thought he was joining the war in the Middle
East, but the convoy of about 20 ships carried on
across the Atlantic until it reached Halifax harbour
after 13 days.
“We were really puzzled then,” he said. “Why are
we coming here, there’s no war in Canada?”
Their journey towards the prairie continued for
another five days by train. From Halifax to Montreal
they travelled in railway cars with wooden seats,
but then switched to a CPR train with first-class
carriages.
“And then in November 1941, we stopped
at this little place,” he said. “It looked a desolate
place really, and it was in November, really cold, and
that was Swift Current, Saskatchewan.”
Spencer was part of the advance party responsible
for preparing the aerodrome to receive airmen and
planes. Despite the cold, the conditions at the camp
exceeded their expectations.
“We were living in camps that were built in the
First World War in England,” he said. “Here, it was
a brand new camp built for us and it was central
heated, warm water. We had to shave with cold water
in England. This was a real soft camp to be in.”
The No. 39 Service Flying Training School (SFTS)
in Swift Current opened in December 1941.
It provided advanced pilot and navigator training
to more than 1,900 men. It was part of the British
Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP) that
trained more than 130,000 aircrew in Canada from
1941 to 1944.
Spencer spent most of the war at the Swift Current
aerodrome, where he was assigned to administration.
He joined the R.A.F. as an aircraftsman second class
and during the war received promotions to be
an aircraftsman first class and then a leading
aircraftsman.
While 17 men were killed during flight training
accidents, life at the base was peaceful.
Swift Current residents quickly realized the
economic benefits of having all the airmen on their
doorstep and welcomed them to the community.
There were many social occasions, including
dances, and Spencer met his future wife Lucille in
Swift Current.
In April 1944, the No. 39 SFTS was closed and
Spencer was send to a new posting in England,
where his wife joined him a few months later.
They returned to Swift Current after the war to
raise a family here.
Swift Current Museum Curator Lloyd Begley was
pleased with the video’s reception by a large
audience who attended the screening.
Roy Spence shares his
memories after the showing
of the Swift Current
Museum’s latest historical
video Nov. 8. Looking on, at
right, is the museum’s
curator, Lloyd Begley.
“It’s always exciting to see folks come out and
experience their past and their history,” he said.
“The airport is a place that people recognize but
don’t always know what the story is.”
The R.A.F. aerodrome is part of Swift Current’s
significant military history that stretches back as far
as the 1885 North-West Resistance.
“People are coming forward more and more often
now with military stories about Swift Current or
even items that they’ve been able to find or artifacts
that were handed down in their families,” he said.
The video screening only a few days before
Remembrance Day was part of the museum’s efforts
to honour veterans. It continued with a presentation
on Nov. 14 at the museum by Lieutenant Colonel
Gerry Carline from Moose Jaw about the 8th
Reconnaissance Division, which was stationed in
Swift Current until 1968.
According to Begley, the use of video material is a
useful way to keep the city and region’s history alive
for future generations.
“The video component or some kind of visual
imagery is so important in getting that story
across,” he said. “People can come and sit down
and watch and learn and identify. It’s a good
medium to use to get that story out and so we’ll
continue to use it.”
The museum is already working on a few
ideas for their next video and they will
welcome any ideas from residents for future
documentaries.
“We may go outside the community
next time because our mandate is the
southwestern part of the province and so
maybe there’s something out there that
somebody has an idea of that we can focus
on next time,” he said.
B
I
R
T
H ANNOUNCEMENTS
PHILLIPS/WILLS: Born to Breanne Phillips
and Travis Wills of Eastend, a baby boy born
November 10.
HAMILTON: Born to Karla and Gordon
HAMILTON:
Hamilton of Swift Current, a baby girl born
November 6.
KLASSEN: Born to Kelli and Logan Klassen
of Shaunavon, a baby boy born November 8.
FUNK: Born to Renee and Joel Funk of
Wymark, a baby girl born November 2.
PENNER/KOHLMAN: Born to Dezirae Penner
and Sheldon Kohlman of Elrose, a baby girl
born November 7.
MANDEL: Born to Lisabeth and Isaac Mandel
of Tompkins, a baby boy born November 3.
HOFER: Born to Martha and Jason Hofer of
Spring Lake, a baby girl born November 6.
41129244•11/16/12
12113PP00
THORING: Born to Kristy and Chase Thoring
of Frontier, a baby girl born November 5.
4 330 Central Ave N
Swift Current, SK S9H 0L4
306.778.2223 (BABE)
[email protected]
www.babblebabyshop.com
Want to find out what’s really going on in your community?
Turn to us to learn the real story and not just a press release or five-second clips.
With our new website, we’re seven days
a week. Up-to-date news, an all-inclusive
events calendar, as well as previews of
Swift Current Broncos’ home games and
post-game wrap-ups.
Check us out:
41129249•11/16/12
.com
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 13
Swift Current
41129240•11/16/12
12113RR00
Photos by Jessi Gowan
SILENT REFLECTION: While many residents opted to attend the Remembrance Day ceremony
at the Swift Current Comprehensive High School, Memorial Park remains a popular spot for
those wanting to enjoy a moment of silence in the snow — despite the frigid weather.
When you make influenza
immunization an annual event,
you protect yourself, your
family, and our community.
Influenza Immunization
WITH VERY
SPECIAL GUESTS
Influenza immunization is now available, free of charge,
to all Albertans 6 months of age and older.
UPCOMING LOCAL CLINICS
STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE ™ and related trademarks © 2012 Those Characters From Cleveland, Inc. DOODLEBOPS™ Cookie Jar Entertainment Inc.
Time:
Location:
Tuesday, November 13
9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Oyen Community Health Services,
315 3 Avenue E, Oyen
Thursday, November 15
Thursday, December 13
10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Foremost Medical Clinic,
212 Main Street, Foremost
Tuesday, November 27
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday, December 11
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Monday, January 21
Esplanade Arts and Heritage Centre
Bow Island Community Health
Services, Provincial Building,
802 6 Street E, Bow Island
Please bring Alberta Health Care Card. Short sleeves recommended.
For more info, including local clinic details, visit www.albertahealthservices.ca
or call Health Link Alberta at 1.866.408.5465 (LINK).
2ND SHOW ADDED
ON SALE NOW
Call 403.502.8777 or visit www.tixx.ca
www.StrawberryShortcakeOnTour.com
yo
Media Partners
ur
at
work statio
n
Date:
41093650•11/16/12
41105823•11/16/12
FALL INTO THE ROUTINE
14 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Morse
Morse honours soldiers with new cenotaph
[email protected]
It was a special Remembrance Day for the
community of Morse this year, as a new cenotaph was
unveiled to honour 480 men and women from the
district who have served in the Canadian military
since the First World War.
The cenotaph, which is located on the main street
next to the town office, was officially unveiled Nov. 11
after the Remembrance Day ceremony in the nearby
community hall.
The dignitaries who spoke at the event included a
brother and sister who grew up in Morse and who are
currently serving in the Canadian armed forces —
Lt.-Col. Carla Harding and Capt. Warren Hruska.
Also present were Cypress Hills-Grasslands MP
David Anderson, Thunder Creek MLA and Sask.
provincial Minister of Agriculture Lyle Stewart as
well as the Royal Canadian Legion Dominion
Command Vice-President Peter Piper.
Harding thanked the community for the privilege
and honour to be asked to attend the ceremony.
“As we stand today to honour the unveiling of
the cenotaph, we remember the courage and the
commitment of the members of our town who served
Canada,” she said.
She felt the monument is an important reminder of
the contribution by the community of Morse and by
Canada as a whole to make the world a better place.
“On behalf of all the men and women who have
served or are serving, I’m eternally grateful that this
community, a place I still call home 22 years after I
have left, cares enough to show your support to us, the
men and women serving in uniform today and our
endeavours,” she said.
Stewart, who is the MLA for the area, spoke about
the high cost of freedom and peace on individual
families and on an entire community.
“When we reflect on what this cenotaph represents,
we begin to realize it not only honours the lives lost
and disrupted and damaged but the devastating effect
conflict has on the community at home,” he said.
The construction of the cenotaph was made
possible through a $25,000 grant from Veteran Affairs
Canada’s Community War Memorial Program.
“We’ve been able to and glad to be working with
you on this project by providing funding to the
community of Morse so that you have a very real, a
very obvious and a very lasting monument to your
heroes,” Anderson said.
Lt.-Col. Harding is a logistics specialist who is
currently stationed in Jerusalem in the Middle East,
where she is assisting the Palestinian Security Force
to establish a logistics system.
Speaking after the cenotaph unveiling, she said it
was not difficult to re-arrange her schedule to return
to Morse.
“I currently work for a general in Jerusalem who
believes that regardless of what we do, we can’t do
what we do without the support of our community,”
she mentioned.
She is in her 23rd year of military service and in
June 2013, she will become the commanding officer
of 2 Service Battalion in Petawawa, the first female
commander of that unit. Her brother, Capt. Warren
Hruska, joined the military first and he was an
important role model.
Continued on Page 15
make your
Fourth
Quarter
Jingle
Bring more traffic
to your door this
season with targeted
advertising in our
November and
December issues of
the Prairie Post.
12113PB00
This is the perfect
opportunity to wish
your customers a
Merry Christmas and
glad tidings for the
new year!
41129239•11/16/12
B Y M ATTHEW L IEBENBERG —
To reserve
your ad space,
in Alberta phone
Jason Rinke at
403-504-7116
or Jamie Fode
at 403-528-5761
In Saskatchewan,
phone Stacey Powell
at 306-773-8260
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 15
Morse
New Cenotaph helps marks Morse’s centennial year
Continued from Page 14
pilot in World War Two, so it just adds more meaning.”
Conn, who is the owner of Grassland Memorials,
“Prior to Warren, the only other person I’d known in
approached the town council a year ago with the idea
the military had been Dwight Weinbender who’s also
of a new memorial after hearing about the Community
from here,” she said. “To me, it was special not only
War Memorial Program at a granite convention in
having my brother, but my two sisters and my mother
Toronto.
here as well.”
He has been involved with the creation of similar
Capt. Hruska has been serving in the Canadian
cenotaphs in other communities in Saskatchewan, but
military since 1988. He is currently stationed at
this one has special meaning to him.
1 Canadian Air Division headquarters in
“This is my hometown and I have family on
Winnipeg, Manitoba. In 1991 he served on
the memorial,” he said.
the Golan Heights between Israel and
Morse’s cenotaph is also quite unique because
Syria as part of the United Nations
so many names are inscribed on the granite
Disengagement Observer Force.
stone. It includes the names of those who are
“It's a great honour for us to be here to do
currently serving in the military.
this,” he told the Prairie Post. “The town
“We struggled with some of the outlying
has done a fantastic job with this. It’s a
areas and back in World War One there was a
great reflection of the dedication of the
lot more communities,” Conn said. “That was
community to the military and to the
the biggest struggle, to find out whose names
history of the military and to our veterans
Lt.-Col.
Carla
should be on and which area.”
who have served before us.”
Harding, who grew
According to Toews, the list of names were
The unveiling ceremony was also an
up in Morse.
compiled by three people who went through the
important moment for the four members of
history books of Chaplin, Morse, Hodgeville
the Morse Cenotaph Monument Committee
and Ernfold. The aim was to identify those from Morse
— Joyce Adamson, Rick Conn, Louis Fafard and Linda
and the surrounding area who have served in the
Toews.
military.
“It's Morse’s 100th anniversary, it’s our first year with
The new cenotaph replaces an old monument that
our cenotaph,” Toews said. “It’s very special, for me too.
was located at the playground. The committee decided
My husband’s father was in the armed forces. He was a
Photos by Matthew Liebenberg
Cypress Hills-Grasslands MP David Anderson lays a wreath
at the new cenotaph in Morse on Remembrance Day. Looking
on behind him are, from left, cenotaph committee members
Rick Conn and Louis Fafard.
to use the new site on the town’s main street to make it
more visible to visitors.
Toews said the town also contributed $25,000 to the
total project cost. To recoup this cost, the bricks in the
granite walkway are sold to people who can use these
squares to remember their family members.
Anyone interested in purchasing a cenotaph brick
can contact the town office at 306-629-3300.
2012 HEAVY DUTY TRUCK
HEAVY DUTY SAVINGS
2012 GMC 2500HD
CREW CAB 4X4
2012 CHEV 2500HD
CREW CAB 4X4
6.6L Diesel, Allison auto, cloth, silver
6.0L Gas, auto, cloth, greystone
MSRP $65,565
DISCOUNT – $13,221
CASH 4 CLUNKER – $3,000
$
MSRP $50,130
DISCOUNT – $11,800
CASH 4 CLUNKER – $3,000
$
2012 CHEV 2500HD
CREW CAB 4X4
2012 CHEV 2500HD
EXT CAB 4X4
6.6L Diesel, Allison auto, cloth, white
6.0L Gas, auto, cloth, silver
MSRP $65,435
DISCOUNT – $14,285
CASH 4 CLUNKER – $3,000
$
MSRP $51,495
DISCOUNT – $13,365
CASH 4 CLUNKER – $3,000
$
SALE PRICE
49,344
48,150
35,950
SALE PRICE
SALE PRICE
35,130
$)&730-&5t#6*$,t(.$
MAPLE CREEK, SK
(306)
662-2622
41110076•11/16/12
SALE PRICE
16 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Entertainment
Genticorum at the Lyric Nov. 23
B Y J ESSI G OWAN — [email protected]
Twelve years ago, three young Canadian musicians
discovered a shared interest in traditional Québécois and
Irish music.
After meeting frequently at the same parties, festivals,
and live shows, the group decided to form their own
band, and began sharing their love of traditional music
with audiences across the country. Now, Genticorum
has recorded four albums and have played close to
900 concerts over the past decade.
“We made a very good match from the beginning,”
explained Alexandre de Grosbois-Garand, vocalist and
multi-instrumentalist with the group. “We all enjoy each
other’s company, which is very important for a band.
We enjoy the music that we play together, because it’s
our music. No one is hired to fill in just for the gig — it’s
our band, playing what we want, and that makes a big
difference. Our music belongs to the three of us.”
Genticorum (which is Latin for ‘Of The National Men’)
strive to share traditional Québécois music, but also
create their own new traditional sounds.
Québécois music has a Celtic style, with the melodies
and tunes taking roots in Irish and Scottish music.
However, Québécois music also features a Latin aspect.
“All of this mixed over centuries gives us most of what
we play,” noted de Grosbois-Garand. “It’s like Latin
music of the north. Since we are a Nordic nation, we
have to keep warm during the long, cold winters with
dancing, foot stomping, house parties, and story telling.
It’s good music, groovy music, and people seem to enjoy
it.”
He added it’s not only Québécois audiences who
appreciate the traditional style — Genticorum has
developed a wide fan base across the globe. He loves
seeing the great response from audiences, and loves
performing onstage with the group.
“It’s the best occasion for music to happen, to be there
Photo submitted
Genticorum will perform at the Lyric Theatre in Swift Current
Nov. 23 as part of the Blenders concert series.
and have that communion with the audience and have
the magic happen,” de Grosbois-Garand said.
“People like the liveliness, the joie-de-vivre that this style
of music has. Something about it really speaks to people,
and they give us the same energy back.”
Although the songs are in the French tradition, the
group works hard to make sure they entertain nonFrench speaking audiences, as well. Their shows feature
a variety of high-energy songs mixed with some slower
selections, as well.
“We try to create a different kind of ambiance,”
explained de Grosbois-Garand. “We have only three
members, but we play with a lot of instruments and
make a lot of different sounds. It’s kind of like a musical
voyage into the universe of traditional music.”
Genticorum will perform at the Lyric Theatre Nov. 23
as part of the Blenders concert series.
Tickets are $30, and are available at Pharmasave
or by contacting Shann at 306-778-2686 or email:
[email protected]
Photo by Jessi Gowan
BRINGING YOUR MUSIC HOME: A house concert on Nov. 8
in Swift Current featured some of Saskatchewan’s greatest
rising folk talents in an intimate setting. The evening
kicked off with a performance from The Deep Dark Woods’
Ryan Boldt, who was followed up by an impressive show
from Wood Mountain, Sask. artists Kacy and Clayton.
Here, Kacy Anderson sings during the concert.
World-famous tenor returns to Swift Current stage Nov. 20
C ONTRIBUTED
The Swift Current Allied Arts Council is pleased
internationally-acclaimed tenor Ben Heppner will be the
third performance for the 2012–2013 season of Stars for
Saskatchewan on Nov. 20.
Heppner is renowned worldwide for his portrayals in
the dramatic tenor repertoire. His illustrious career has
taken him to opera stages and concert halls around the
world. He is acclaimed for the beauty of his voice,
incisive musicianship, and his generosity with his
audience. His performances on the opera stage, in
concert with the world’s leading orchestras, in the most
prestigious recital venues, and in recordings have set
new standards in his demanding repertoire.
In the 2012/13 season, Heppner continues his portrayal
of Captain Ahab in Jake Heggie’s Moby Dick a role he
created for the world premiere with Dallas Opera, and
has performed with Calgary Opera and San Diego
Opera. He continues his commitment to recital and art
song with a concert tour throughout his native Canada.
He will be heard in performances of Tristan und Isolde
with the Canadian Opera Company, and in his company
debut with Houston Grand Opera.
In the 2011/12 season, Heppner sang Mahler’s Das Lied
von der Erde with the Bavarian Radio Symphony
Orchestra, and performed in concert with the Elora
Festival Singers in Elora, Ontario and with Music and
Beyond in Ottawa. He made his debut with Welsh
National Opera in May 2012 singing Tristan, including a
performance at the Edinburgh Festival.
Heppner studied music at the University of British
Columbia. He first gained national attention in 1979 as
the winner of the Canadian Broadcasting Company
Talent Festival. In December 1998, CBC television’s
Something Special featured Ben Heppner in an hour-long
portrait of the artist. He is a 1988 winner of the
Metropolitan Opera auditions and received Grammy
Awards in 1998 for his recording of Die Meistersinger and
in 2001 for his recording of Les Troyens with the London
Symphony Orchestra.
The concert takes place Nov. 20 at 8 p.m. at the Sky
Centre. For more information, phone the Swift Current
Allied Arts Council at 306-773-1338 or 1-877-211-2787 toll
free.
make your
12113DS04
Fourth
Quarter
Jingle
Bring more traffic
to your door this
season with targeted
advertising in our
November and
December issues of
the Prairie Post.
This is the perfect
opportunity to wish
your customers a
Merry Christmas and
glad tidings for the
new year!
41129241•11/16/12
To reserve
your ad space,
in Alberta phone
Jason Rinke at
403-504-7116
or Jamie Fode
at 403-528-5761
In Saskatchewan,
phone Stacey Powell
at 306-773-8260
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 17
Swift Current
Sundogs volleyball teams
ready for playoff action
B Y J ESSI G OWAN — [email protected]
Volleyball season is drawing to a close at Great
Plains College, and both the SunDogs men’s and
women’s teams are gearing up for the PAC Provincial
Championship this weekend in Prince Albert.
“We finished second in the league, after travelling to
Moose Jaw last week to play Palliser in what would be
the league final,” explained men’s coach Travis
Cuthbert. “We were ranked one and two going into the
match, and whoever won that match finished first.”
The SunDogs lost the game 4-1, but Cuthbert noted
team is still pleased to be ranked second going into
provincials. It was a difficult game for them in Moose
Jaw, since they were down a player and had another
struggling with a knee injury.
“He still played really well, but Moose Jaw has a
great team,” admitted Cuthbert. “We beat them when
they were here, but in their home gym with their
home crowd, they had a bit of an edge. We are still
feeling good, though.”
The team will kick off provincials with a game
against Bethany on Friday, who are ranked sixth in
the league. They will then compete against Millar
College on Saturday morning, who are currently
ranked third.
“Bethany can come out and play some good ball, and
we don’t want to overlook them, but we definitely have
our eye on Millar,” Cuthbert said. “We’re hoping to
just play strong Friday night and carry that into
Saturday morning, and just take it one point at a
time.”
Cuthbert is pleased with this year’s team, noting
with seasons only lasting a short 2.5 months, it can be
difficult to have everyone understand each other’s
play and style. His main focus has been trying to get
the team to play with a bit more intensity.
“I’ve got a pretty talented group of kids, but at the
end of the day, the best teams and programs in the
world play with extreme intensity, and they are all
extremely loud,” he said. “Some guys think they are
above calling the ball, but I think if we can do that we
can be really successful. We are a good team, but it’s
all about that intensity and talking to each other on
the court.”
The women’s team is currently ranked fifth in the
league, and will compete at the PAC Provincial
Championship this weekend, as well.
Photos by Matthew Liebenberg
ICE TIME: Above left, Swift Current Legionnaires forward Josh Stang (#21) goes down on the ice as he battles against
two Prince Albert Mintos defenders during their Nov. 4 game at the Credit Union iplex. Above right, Swift Current
Legionnaires forward Evan Patrick (#12) moves the puck past a defender. The Legionnaires gave up a 2-0 lead towards
the end of the second period and had to settle for a draw after the Mintos equalized the game late in the third period. The
two teams could not break the logjam during overtime. The Mintos found a lot of holes in the Legionnaires’ defence with
a 8-2 win the previous day. The Legionnaires took a 5-4 win over the visiting Notre Dame Hounds on Nov. 6 and were
scheduled to play two home games against the Saskatoon Contacts, but the Nov. 10 game was postponed due to bad
weather. The Legionnaires lost 5-3 in their Nov. 11 game against the Contacts. After their weekend game the
Legionnaires were in seventh spot in the Midget AAA standings with a 5-5-3-0 record. They will again be in action at the
iplex this weekend with two games against the Battleford Stars.
LAND FOR SALE
7 Miles east of Gravelbourg
MLS #445145
7 – 1/4's cultivated land for sale
D
SOL
Land for sale in Climax, SK
MLS #443952
Cultivated land for sale in the Climax SK
- 7461ac. or 11 sections
5 miles North of Meyronne Sk.
MLS# 442703
2x cult. 1/4 ‘s -house-steel bins
-well treed yard
- 2011 property taxes $3,114
Bert Legault
Royal Lepage Southland • Swift Current, Sk.
Cell: 306-741-1686 • Fax: 306-773-6553
[email protected]
Contact Bert for more information on the above listings
or visit www.saskfarmsales.ca
41129186•11/16/12
MLS # 447845
Grain Farm 5 miles NE of Vanguard, Sk.
R.M. of Glen Bain # 105 Quonset --6 x Metal
grain bins, 10,75 quarters --total assessment
491200
MLS # 448013
Farm for sale
ale
le 4 miles NE of Mankota , Sk.
R.M. of Mankota # 45 130 Ac. Pasture-- 354
Ac. Hayland -Alfalfa -- 1377--Cultivated Ac.
Grain Land House c/w attached 2 car garagebugalow 2,200sq. ft. -8x dugouts--1x dam --5x wells
33,000 Bu. grain storage -Quonset-barn
shop-garden shed
LANE REALTYSCORP.
OLD
41104930•11/16/12
When it’s time to sell the farm, get the best
price & exposure you deserve by calling
Lane Realty Corp., specializing in farm &
ranch property: Call your local agent.
MORLEY FORSYTH 306-741-2393
MARK FORSYTH 306-784-7844
LANE REALTY CORP.
Saskatchewan’s Farm & Ranch Specialists™
“Now representing buyers from across
Canada and around the world!”
www.lanerealty.com
41129254•11/16/12
To view full color feature sheets for
all of our CURRENT LISTINGS Visit our web site at
www.lanerealty.com
Draw, prizes and specials all
night long.
A18 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
41110232•11/16/12
41110080•11/16/12
41110062•11/09/12
41110233•11/16/12
POST SECONDARY EDUCATION 2012
top ranked
and CLOSE TO
home.
41086900•11/16/12
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 19
20 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Sports
First-rounder Gawdin leads B.C. to U16 gold
B Y B RAD B ROWN
Photo by Matthew Liebenberg
41086901•11/16/12
Forward Glenn Gawdin (#19) during the intra-squad game on Aug. 26
that concluded the Swift Current Broncos training camp.
Swift Current Broncos fans know him as the
fifth overall pick in this summer’s Western
Hockey League Bantam Draft.
In B.C., at least for the time being, he’s the
Gawd-father of under-16 hockey.
Glenn Gawdin capped an eventful half-year
earlier this month when he helped Team B.C.
to the gold medal at the Western Canada U16
Challenge Cup with a 9-3 win over Alberta in
the championship game.
“I didn’t make certain expectations for myself
for that tournament,” said Gawdin. “I just took
the role they gave me and tried to build off of
that.
“Coach told us he wanted our line to generate
most of offence and be the go-to line, so that’s
what we tried to do.”
Gawdin finished the tournament with three
goals and four assists, including one goal and
two helpers in the gold medal game — his first
major hockey championship.
“From what I’ve seen of Glenn when he can
play at his best, he was meeting expectations at
that tournament,” said Team B.C. head coach
Ryan Weber, who also coached Gawdin’s
bantam team in 2011-12.
“The biggest thing is he’s just starting to
realize how dominant he can be when he plays
against other players at an elite level.”
Maybe no coincidence then Gawdin has a goal
and three assists in his two B.C. Major Midget
League games since returning from the U16
Challenge.
One of four 15-year-old skaters on the Greater
Vancouver Canadians, Gawdin is second in
team scoring with 12 points in 12 games.
His bigger contribution though may be that,
now, he knows how to win.
“It’s quite important because they kind of
know how to do it,” Gawdin said of players
with winning pedigrees. “They’ve been there
before so they know what it takes and can set
an example for others.”
The past six months have been a bit of a
whirlwind for Gawdin, who was drafted by the
Broncos in June, signed his WHL contract later
that month and was chosen in July to play in
the All-Canadians Mentorship Cup.
It was the culmination of a five-day camp in
Toronto and pitted 42 of the top bantam-aged
players in the country against each other.
There, Gawdin played on a team coached by
Edmonton Oilers’ forward Taylor Hall, scoring
once in a 9-8 shootout loss to a team coached by
John Tavares of the New York Islanders.
Weber says it all boils down to work ethic.
“He takes public transit to get to dry-land
training … he arrives early to get ready for
practice, and he just loves all aspects of hockey.
“He definitely treats it like it’s a job, and
definitely has a very serious approach to that
extent. He’s very mature.”
Mature enough that the Canadians might
already want to start planning for life without
him.
Gawdin says he’s preparing to be a WHL
regular as a 16-year-old next season and, if
history is any indication, should get plenty of
opportunity to do so.
Players to claim a regular lineup spot at
16 under Broncos head coach Mark Lamb have
included Adam Lowry, Reece Scarlett, Dillon
Heatherington and Brycen Martin.
“Glenn has a very high hockey IQ and
knowledge of the game,” said Weber. “He
understands how it’s played and when he has to
step up and play his best. He gets the dynamics
of the game. He’s obviously a big body and uses
that to his advantage, he shoots the puck really
hard and he’s really the complete package as
far as the kind of player you’re looking for at
the next level.”
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 21
Sports
Broncos’ 18-year-olds steer team into second place
B Y B RAD B ROWN
A foot of snow had just hit the ground and the
roads (much like the Swift Current Broncos’ season)
were in questionable condition.
In short, a great time for an 18-year-old to take the
wheel.
Or, in this case, three of them.
Saturday, Coda Gordon scored his first goal in 12
games — the game winner — as the Broncos beat the
Prince Albert Raiders 4-1 at the Credit Union iplex.
Sunday, Levi Bews scored the game’s opening goal,
extending his career-high point-scoring streak to
four games, in a 3-2 Broncos win over the hometown
Brandon Wheat Kings.
And drawing an assist on Bews’ goal was Colby
Cave, who also scored his first Western Hockey
League hat trick Nov. 7 in a 6-5 road loss to the
Raiders.
In all, the three 1994-born players were responsible
for five goals and eight assists — or 36 per cent of
Swift Current’s offence — over the past three games,
as the Broncos (9-9-3-2) won back-to-back games for
the second time all season and moved into second
place in the WHL’s East Division.
“We’re at that pivotal point where we’re not the
young guys, we’re not the old guys and we have to
pick up our end of it,” said Bews. “We can’t depend
on other guys to do our job.”
It wasn’t long ago that there were questions
whether any of them would have a job at all.
These days they’re turning more doubters into
believers every day.
Gordon went undrafted in 2009 after breaking his
femur in his first year of bantam, then parlayed a 30goal rookie season in 2011-12 to a spot on the Calgary
Flames’ draft board in this summer’s NHL Entry
Draft.
Bews, a former second-round Bantam Draft pick,
was traded twice in the first 40 games of the 2011-12
season. This year, he’s tied for the team lead with 10
goals, three away from matching the total from the
first 129 games of his career.
And Cave was deemed by the Kootenay Ice two
years ago to be fair value for one-eighth of Cody
Eakin. With 13 points in 2012-13, Cave is three shy of
last year’s rookie season-total himself. He’s a fixture
Photo by Brad Brown
Colby Cave, right, is one of the three 18-year-olds on the roster who got back on track offensively.
on the Broncos’ No. 6-ranked penalty kill, and is also
on NHL Central Scouting’s preliminary Futures List
of North American skaters to watch for the 2013
NHL draft.
“I know I have thought about it a couple times and
it did affect me a little bit,” said Cave. “But I just
have to realize if it happens, it happens. If it
doesn’t, it doesn’t. And I just have to play a
consistent game and try and contribute to the team
winning.”
Will any of them still be wearing blue and white as
over-agers? Or even at the end of this year for that
matter?
Photo by Brad Brown
Time will tell.
One thing it’s already told is that the kids are
Prince Albert defenceman Harrison Ruopp gets chased by
starting to grow up.
Broncos' Coda Gordon in a game Saturday night.
Sakic, Sundin reconnect at Hall of Fame ceremony
B Y B RAD B ROWN
clutch goal than a guy who
hasn’t scored in over a
month?
Mats Sundin and Swift Current
Broncos forward Josh
Broncos legend Joe Sakic spent
Derko snapped a 19-game
four years as teammates with the
goal-less drought Sunday in
Quebec Nordiques, combining for
Brandon when he scored the
288 goals and 734 points.
game winner late in the
Monday they connected once
second period of a 3-2 road
more at the Hockey Hall of
win.
Fame’s induction ceremony, and
Coda Gordon’s game
were united forever as part of the
winner midway through the
Hall’s class of 2012. Sakic and
second Saturday was also a
Sundin were joined Monday by fellow ex-players
slump buster — he’d gone 11 games
Adam Oates and Pavel Bure.
without a goal — as the Broncos held
Sakic put up 293 points in two seasons with the
on for a 4-1 home win over Prince
Broncos from 1986-88 before embarking on a 20-year
Albert.
pro career, all spent with the Nordiques/Colorado
“There’s always that kind of
Avalanche organization.
Photo by Brad Brown
pressure,” said Gordon, who
He retired in 2008 with 1,641 NHL
Adam Lowry, left. was named captain for Game 6 of the Subway Super Series.
backhanded home a rebound off
points, two Stanley Cups and one
The Broncos will hit the road without the services
Richard Nedomlel’s point shot. “I was just lucky
Hart Trophy as the league’s most
of
19-year-old centre Brent Benson.
the
bounce
worked
out
in
my
favour.”
valuable player.
Benson was injured Nov. 7 on an open-ice hit from
Another Bronco to bust a scoring funk was
The Broncos inducted Sakic to
Raiders defenceman Evan Morden and did not play
over-age forward Ryon Moser capped the
their own Hall of Fame in 2011.
in either of last weekend’s games.
Broncos’ scoring Saturday with his first goal in
••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Broncos head coach Mark Lamb said Sunday that
15
games.
It was a Black Monday for Team
Zac MacKay ended a 17-game slump with a goal Benson is week-to-week with an upper-body injury.
WHL and the Subway Super Series,
After two injury-plagued seasons the Broncos have
Nov. 7 in a 6-5 loss to P.A., and Colby Cave had a
as it was announced Broncos
been more fortunate this year, losing just five manhat trick in the same game after scoring just
centre Graham Black would be
games to injury and three more to illness so far.
once in 14 games prior.
playing in Games 5 and 6 of the
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
series this week.
Swift Current’s win Saturday was a rare
Black had only been scheduled to
Joe
Sakic
was
victory
at the Credit Union iplex.
play in Game 6 on Thursday in
recently inducted into
*up to and including games of Nov. 16
Through nearly a third of the season they have
Victoria but drew into Wednesday’s the Hockey Hall of
won
just
five
times
in
14
tries
at
home,
compared
lineup in Vancouver as an injury
Fame.
• Graham Black — two games from 100 for his
with four wins in nine road games. Only the
replacement.
WHL career;
Saskatoon Blades, Kootenay Ice and Everett
Broncos’ captain Adam Lowry
• Colby Cave — six games from 100 for his WHL career;
Silvertips have a lower winning percentage at home.
also had his number called for both games and
• Reece Scarlett — seven points from 100 for his
The good news for the Broncos is they are about to
Monday was named team captain for Game 6.
WHL career;
embark on a three-game Alberta road swing, with
Lowry’s father Dave, head coach of the Victoria
• Coda Gordon — 10 games from 100 for his WHL career;
games Saturday against the Red Deer Rebels, Sunday
Royals, was slated to be an assistant coach for the
• Daniel Dale — 12 games from 100 for his WHL career;
against the Calgary Hitmen and Tuesday against the
WHL in Thursday’s game.
• Adam Lowry — 14 games from 200 for his WHL career
Edmonton Oil Kings.
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
and 13 assists from 100 for his WHL career.
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Who better to have the puck when you need a
BRONCOS
NOTEBOOK
Milestone Watch
22 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Sports
Southwest Sask. volleyball teams advancing to provincial finals
S UBMITTED
BY
D EB R EAMER — Athletic Co-ordinator
Congratulations to the senior girls teams
advancing to SHSAA provincial volleyball.
Fox Valley girls won the 1A girls regional title at
Frontier Nov. 10 while Herbert girls won the 2A title
at Davidson with Leader finishing third.
At 1A girls’ action in Frontier, Fox Valley went
through undefeated to win the regional title. They
were first in their pool with wins over Consul (2-0)
and Loreburn (2-0). Consul lost both their matches
and did not advance to the playoffs.
In the other pool, the host team Frontier finished 11 with a loss to Elrose (2-0) and a win over Dinsmore
(2-0). In the semi final, it was an all Chinook match
up with Fox Valley taking on Frontier and winning
2-0 (25-10, 25-10). Fox Valley then played Elrose for the
gold and won 2-0 (25-12, 25-19).
Frontier had one more chance to qualify for
provincials by playing in the bronze medal match
against Loreburn, but came up short losing 2-0 (2517, 25-16).
Fox Valley will now travel to Englefeld for the
provincial 1A girls’ championship Nov. 16-17.
At 2A girls’ regional action in Davidson, the
Herbert Laurels captured the regional crown.
The girls finished second in their pool with a
record of 1-1. They had wins over Davidson (2-0) and
a loss to Harvest City (0-2).
In the other pool, Leader finished first with two
wins over Hepburn (2-0) and Asquith (2-1). This set
up another all-Chinook match-up in the semi finals.
Herbert advanced to the final with a two set to one
victory over Leader. The Laurels then played in the
final against Asquith and won another 2-1 set victory
to gain the title. The Leader Saints had another
chance in the bronze medal match and came through
with a 2-0 set victory over Harvest City.
Both Leader and Herbert will now go to Wakaw for
2A girls provincials Nov. 16-17.
Swift Current Ardens were at the 5A girls
regionals at Moose Jaw. The Ardens finished second
in their pool with a win over Estevan (2-0) and a loss
to Balgonie (2-1). In the quarter final, the Ardens
played Moose Jaw Peacock and came through with a
two-set victory (25-14, 25-21). This put the girls in the
semi final against Yorkton. They lost a close two-set
match by scores of 28-26, 25-14. The Ardens had one
last chance to qualify through the bronze medal
match against Weyburn but came up short 25-22, 2516.
Swift Current Colts and their coach Dan Andrie
hosted the 5A boys’ regional championship Nov. 9-10.
Unfortunately, the poor weather and road conditions
caused some disruption on Nov. 9, but all teams were
there for Saturday’s games.
The Colts finished second in the pool with a
forfeited 2-0 victory over Moose Jaw Vanier on
Friday night, win over Moose Jaw Peacock 2-0 and a
loss to Yorkton 0-2. The Colts then went on to win
their quarter final match over Weyburn 2-1 (16-25, 2515, 25-22). This put the Colts in the semi’s against
No. 1 ranked Moose Jaw Central. Central proved to
be the winner 25-10, 25-19.
The Colts had one last chance to qualify for
provincials via the bronze-medal match but came up
short against Yorkton 26-24, 25-15. Thanks to the
Colts and their coach Mr. Andrie for hosting — great
job.
The 1A and 2A boys teams took part in conference
play Nov. 10. At Hazlet, Fox Valley boys captured the
title with a perfect 3-0 record. Second was Consul at
2-1, third was Frontier at 1-2 and fourth Hazlet at 0-3.
Vanguard also hosted. They finished second with a
1-1 record. They had a win over Glentworth 2-0 but
lost to Kincaid 2-0.
Consul will now host the 1A boys regional on
Nov 17. Teams attending will be Consul, Fox Valley,
Kincaid, Vanguard, Beechy and Davidson.
In 2A action, the Leader Saints travelled to Cut
Knife and won the conference title with a perfect 4-0
record. They went through the day undefeated and
beat Luseland, Cut Knife, Hafford and Chief Little
Pine. The boys will now advance to regionals.
In 2A action at Central Butte, Ponteix was in a
three-way tie with Mossbank and Central Butte.
All had 2-1 records. Ponteix had beat Mossbank and
Herbert, but lost to Central Butte. Once points
for/against were figured out, Ponteix ended in third
spot, but will still advance to regionals Nov. 17.
Receive an
additional
10% off all
sale prices
PLUS SAVE
THE GST!
Moonlight
Madness!
Photo submitted
The Herbert Laurels captured the 2A girls regional volleyball
championship Nov. 10 at Davidson. The girls defeated Asquith
two sets to one in the final. The girls will now advance to
Wakaw for the SHSAA provincial championships Nov. 16-17.
Back row: Jen Doll (Assistant Coach), Shayla Cornea, Miranda
Haughian, Jenna Kazeil, Alishia Beach, Natasha Jahnke
(Coach). Middle row: Mataya Heschel, Rachel Selke, Stephanie
Doll, Katie Cannon. Front row: Miranda Redekop, Kristen
Jahnke. Unavailable for photo: Sheryl Siemens (Manager).
Herbert had a 0-3 record and did not advance.
Also playing in regionals next weekend will be the
Shaunavon Shadows volleyball team. They will
travel to Assiniboia Nov. 17.
Follow us on twitter @swacsports.
Colt/Arden of the Week
Colt of the Week: Ryker Wall
Congratulations to Ryker Wall for being
named Colt of the week. Ryker is a third-year
setter on the Sr. Colts volleyball team. He has
been the captain for the past two seasons and
leaves everything on the court. He plays with
intensity and passion. His setting has
improved immensely over the last couple of
years and he has emerged as the best blocker
on the team, stuffing opponents top power
RYKER WALL players time after time. His leadership will be
a big part of this weekend’s south regional
tournament played in Swift Current. Good job Ryker!
Arden of the Week: Tess Vandersteen
Tess has been playing on the Sr. Arden’s volleyball team for the
last two years. Her ability to be placed into
a new position within the last two weeks as
a libero has increased the team’s passing
average which has allowed for some strong
hits in the front row. She is focused on the
court and has shown her commitment to
the sport not only by playing on the high
school team, but also the SunDogs Club
team. As a graduating player this year, the
team looks to her strength and technique
TESS
as we come up to Regionals in Moose Jaw
VANDERSTEEN
next weekend.
Shop early for SAVINGS
christmas
Sat, Nov 24th 10am - 11PM STOREWIDE
Check out our New
Tacori bridal & fine
jewelry selection
Exclusive Dealer for
&
LARGEST DIAMOND
JEWELRY SELECTION IN
SOUTHERN ALBERTA!
we offer in-house
jewelry repair & design
Medicine Hat Mall
403-526-3944
Medicine Hat, AB
Large Selection of
Pandora Bracelets
& Charms
www.wrightsjewellers.com
41110071•11/16/12
41116168•11/02/12
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 23
Don’t look for a magic bullet at weaning time, focus on management
Every fall across
Canada, many farmers
check in with their
veterinarians to see if
they should be using an
antibiotic at weaning to
prevent shipping fever.
With a new long-acting
antibiotic on the market
this fall, as with other
new antibiotics
previously, their interest
in using preventative
antibiotics has been sparked anew.
Unfortunately, in this search of the
“Magic bullet” to prevent disease at
weaning, often producers forget about
management.
So before you go reaching for a bottle of
antibiotics, remember these tips.
Consumers are scrutinizing
antibiotic use in animal production:
While there is a lot of misinformation out
there about how harmful antibiotic use is
in-animal production, antibioticresistant
“super bugs” are real and are impacting
our treatment options already.
Rather than pointing fingers at who's to
blame, it is up to everyone using
antibiotics to use them responsibly. In the
case of animal production, this means
stepping back and determining whether
there is a way to prevent disease through
management, rather than
antibiotics. By ensuring we
are using antibiotics
prudently and responsibly,
to treat or prevent in only
in high risk situations, we
DR. RYAN not only keep consumers
RIDGWAY purchasing our product but
also ensure we have
VETS &
antibiotics available to
PETS
treat diseases in the future.
Most Weaning
Pneumonia (Shipping
Fever) is started by viruses: Antibiotics
never work on viruses. Once the viruses
have damaged the lungs enough, then we
get secondary bacterial infections.
Doesn’t it sound better to think about
preventing the viral damage? Vaccinating
for the viruses that cause shipping fever
builds the animal's immunity to quickly
fight them off, negating the need for
antibiotics.
Vaccines are not antibiotics: Many
people use these terms interchangeably,
and in some instances, would rather give
antibiotics than vaccinate because they
are confused over what vaccines do
exactly or feel they don’t work; vaccines,
done properly, improve your herd's
immunity and thereby reducing their
susceptibility to the diseases for which
they are vaccinated. Increasing their
immunity has two-fold benefits,
preventing disease and improving
treatment success if some do become
visibly sick.
By improving your herd’s immunity,
you also prevent weight losses in the
animals that are fighting the disease
but aren't visibly sick. Preventative
antibiotics, because they only work on
bacteria, often don’t prevent as much
weight loss because they are only
effective once the viral damage has
occurred and the secondary bacterial
pneumonia has set in. By this point,
you’ve already lost weight in your herd.
Most Outbreaks are Due to A Lapse
in Management: Very rarely do
veterinarians get called out to an
outbreak that isn’t because something
has slipped. The most common reasons
we have shipping fever outbreaks are:
• The herd size has expanded to the
point that the current facilities can’t
handle them, leading to overcrowding
and stress;
• Vaccinations have lapsed;
• Purchasing high risk animals without
properly preparing the herd for them.
Most often, vaccines appear to fail
because of these lapses in management.
So this fall, before asking your
veterinarian which antibiotic is best for
shipping fever, ask them what they
should do to prepare the herd for
weaning. We are there to help you
maximize your returns on investment.
Most often, coming up with a plan that
encompasses all the aspects of the herd,
including vaccinations, will be a much
better investment than just purchasing
the best antibiotic for shipping fever and
some vaccine.
(Dr. Ryan Ridgway and Dr. Lynn Smart
own Southwest Mobile Pet Care. Get
more information on the website:
http://www.swmobilepetcare.ca)
We can help bring
\ʝʦɠVWʝʢɨ to life.
Sask. pulse growers head to polls
C ONTRIBUTED
Saskatchewan Pulse Growers (SPG) will
be running an election for two open
positions for three-year terms on its
Board of Directors. Elections will take
place by mail and voter packages will be
sent out the week of Nov. 13 to all
registered pulse growers. Registered pulse
growers have the opportunity to select up
to two candidates from the five nominees.
The five nominees include John Bennett
from Biggar; Vicki Dutton from Paynton;
Robert A. Hundeby from Elbow; Trevor
Simpson from Moose Jaw; and Tim Wiens
from Herschel. Profiles for each candidate
can be found on the SPG website at
www.saskpulse.com. All five candidates
will also be featured on the CJWW 600
Let’s Talk Ag program at 12:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 21.
To be considered a registered pulse
grower, growers must have sold a pulse
crop and paid check-off to SPG in the last
two crop years (between Sept. 1, 2010, and
Aug. 31, 2012). Registered pulse growers
who do not receive a voter package in the
mail should contact SPG’s office at 306-6680590 before Nov. 26. A cash ticket may need
to be produced to confirm eligibility to
vote. Voter packages will include a booklet
with candidate information and the
ballot, an envelope to seal the ballot in,
and a postage paid return envelope
addressed to the SPG Returning Officer at
Ernst & Young LLP. Ballots must be
received by the Returning Officer no later
than 4 p.m. on Dec. 6.
Dylan & TK Biggs
TK Ranch, Hanna, AB
)UʝəSDVʤʦȾɏWɛɿODɀɏ TK Ranch has pioneered a sustainable and
profitable alternative to the conventional
livestock industry. TK Ranch produces and
directly markets their own brand of allnatural, grass-fed beef and lamb, heritage
breed pasture raised pork, and free-range
chicken.
With hard work, dedication, and the support
of AFSC - the Biggs three-generation family
ranch is thriving and shows great promise
for the future of the family farm.
AFSC is Alberta’s Farm and
Business Lender.
We have the financial solutions to help you
reach your goals.
1-877-899-AFSC (2372)
www.AFSC.ca
CHARLTON AUCTIONS
IS NOW ACCEPTING
BOOKINGS FOR OUR
56th
55th AUCTION SALE
SEASON!
#PPLZPVSGBSNTBMFOPXGPSPQUJNVNEBUFT
BEWFSUJTJOHCZDBMMJOH+FGG!
PSWJTJUPVSXFCTJUF
*See the current Spring 2013 listings at
www.charltonauction.com!*
41110231•11/16/12
41105578•11/02/12
An informative 2 day event dedicated to growing agriculture
through leadership, innovation and collaboration
2012 Conference & Trade Show
December 4th & 5th, 2012
MEDICINE HAT EXHIBITION & STAMPEDE
2055 21 Ave. Se Medicine Hat, Alberta
Guest Speakers & Presenters Include:
Keynote/Banquet Speaker: Vik Maraj
Keynote Speaker: Perry Miller
Keynote Speaker: Mike Jubinville
Plus numerous
other special guests
and presenters!
Attend the full
conference for just
$225.
41110181•11/02/12
“Farmers Serving Farmers”
Jeff & Sheryl Van Wert
403-362-2972
$FMMtXXXDIBSMUPOBVDUJPODPN
For further information visit: www.farmingsmarter.com
24 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
COWTOWN LIVESTOCK
Raising replacement heifers
EXCHANGE INC.
MAPLE CREEK, SK
B Y D WAYNE S UMMACH —
means the target weight would
be 770 pounds at breeding. This
weight can be achieved by
targeting a rate of gain of 1.0
The theory behind raising
pound per day from Nov. 1 to
replacement heifers for the
Apr. 21, and providing a rising
last 50 years has been to get
plane of nutrition to move the
them to 65 per cent of mature
rate of gain to 1.75 pounds per
weight by breeding.
day from Apr. 22 to June 22.
Following this rule of
Please note the rations will need
thumb meant the heifers
to be formulated and balanced to
should have reached puberty
DWAYNE SUMMACH provide the appropriate
and begun cycling prior to
nutrients to achieve the targeted
being exposed to a bull.
gains in order for the strategy to be
Recent research has challenged the
successful.
65 per cent of mature body weight
Additional strategies to improve heifer
concept, recognizing over the course of
pregnancy rates include the use of an
time, genetic selection has resulted in
ionophore, such as monensin sodium.
earlier onset of puberty.
It is unknown as to why monensin
Work by Dr. Rick Funston and his
sodium influences conception rates but it
colleagues at the University of Nebraska
routinely reduces the onset of puberty by
– West Central Research and Extension
Centre, indicates a target of 55 per cent of 10 to 14 days of age. The use of dried
distiller’s grains as a supplement has
mature body weight and on an inclining
been shown to improve conception to
plane of nutrition will result in similar
artificial insemination in heifers by 22
pregnancy rates, and may even improve
per cent.
lifetime productivity.
It is speculated the amino acid
In practical terms, this means
composition of the rumen undegradable
producers have an opportunity to target
protein absorbed directly by the small
a lower rate of gain for most of the
intestine plays a role.
winter feeding period, with a higher rate
Detailed information regarding rearing
of gain for two months prior to breeding.
replacement heifers can be found at:
A practical example of the application of
http://www.iowabeefcenter.org/Beef%
this theory would be to compare the
20Cattle%20Handbook/Replacement_
development of a 500 pound heifer calf
Heifer.pdf and http://digitalcommons.
that will be 1,400 pounds at maturity.
Using the traditional target of 65 per cent unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=
1260&context=rangebeefcowsymp or by
of mature weight, means the target
contacting a regional livestock specialist
weight at breeding is 910 pounds, and
with the Saskatchewan Ministry of
will require an average daily gain of 1.75
Agriculture.
pounds per day from Nov. 1 to June 22 for
(Dwayne Summach is the Regional
a calving start date of April 1 the
Livestock Specialist Saskatchewan
following year. Using an alternative
Ministry of Agriculture, Kindersley)
method of 55 per cent of mature weight,
Saskatchewan Agriculture
100% COMMUNITY MINDED”
“Check our website for regular updates:
www.cowtownlivestock.com
Ph: 306-662-2648
Toll Free: 1-800-239-5933
Regular Sales every TUESDAY @ 11:00 a.m.
Presort Sales @ 11:00 a.m. Bred Sales @ 1:00 p.m.
NOVEMBER
Tues., Nov. 20
Regular Sale with Bred
Cows & Heifers
ings
PRESORT
SALES
NOW ON
Thurs., Nov. 22 Bred Cow & Heifer Sale
Tues., Nov. 27
LIVE FEED
Go to our
website!
Regular Sale with Bred Cows & Heifers
LISTED TO DATE:
esort
Lazy J Ranch – 50 Blk Cows exposed
to Blk Bulls on June
20th to Sept 20th
Brent Weiss - 20 Blk Cows
John & Barb Reinbolt -67 head
55 Red Angus/Sim X 2nd calvers bred to
Red & Blk Angus Bulls. Bulls out June 25
12 Red Angus heifers bred to Red & Blk Angus Bulls. Bulls
out June 25
Keith Winzer- 45 Blk/Bbf Mature Cows bred Blk. Bulls out
June 15
Thurs., Nov. 29 Money in the Bank Bred Heifer Sale
LISTED TO DATE:
Ken Armstrong – 40 Red Hfrs
Red Heifers bred to Red Angus low birth weight heifer bull.
Bulls out June 12-August 26
Ryan Holt - 10 Blk/BBF Hfrs exposed to Blk Bulls
Cecil Weisgerber - 50 Blk Hfrs exposed to Blk Bulls
on June 6 - Aug 10
Candace Hanson - 10 Blk Hfrs exposed to Blk Bulls on July
1st.
Tom Pearson -20 head Red heifers bred to Red Bulls. Bulls
out June 17-August 10
Baynton Ranch -15 head Blk heifers bred to Blk Angus
Bulls. Bulls out beginning of June and pulled in August
V Warken Ranching -107 head consisting of
-35 Tan heifers bred to Red Angus bulls. Bulls out June
5-August 13.
-12 Red heifers bred to Red Angus bulls. Bulls out June
8-August 14.
-60 Blk heifers bred to Black Angus bulls. Bulls out June
8-August 14.
Colin & Dodie Greenwald - 30 Head of Blk/BBF heifers
exposed to Blk/ Bulls on June 20 to August 30
XL shutdown has effect on area jobless rate
S OUTHERN A LBERTA N EWSPAPERS
77760427•11/16/12
The temporary closure of the XL
Foods meat-packing plant in Brooks
was likely responsible, at least in part,
for the region having Alberta’s highest
unemployment rate last month.
The Lethbridge-Medicine Hat region,
which includes Brooks, had the
DECEMBER
Sat., Dec. 1
Preconditioned and Freshly Weaned Calf Presort
Tues., Dec. 4
Regular Sale
LISTED TO DATE:
Kevin & Rhonda Weiss – 150 a partial herd dispersal of 2-8
yr old BLK Cows exposed to BLK Angus Bulls on June 24.
The bulls were pulled August 24
Leshures Ranch - 30 Blk Cows exposed to Blk Bulls on
June 28th, the Bulls were pulled on August 20th
West Bench Colony -80 head Blk heifers bred to Black
Angus Bulls. Bulls out July 5 for 60 days
Terry Getz -25 head 8 Red and 17 Blk 2nd calvers bred to
Blk Bulls. Bulls out June 20-August 20
Keith Winzer -25 head Blk heifers bred to Blk bulls. Bulls
out June 15 for 50 days.
Ross Kreutzer -70 head Blk 2nd calvers bred to Black Angus Bulls. Bulls out July 10-August 30.
Tues., Dec. 11
Cowtown Cowmaker Bred Heifer Sale
V Warken Ranching -95 head
-35 Tan heifers bred to Red Angus Bulls. Bulls out
June 5-August 13
-60 Blk Heifers bred to Black Angus Bulls. Bulls out
June 8-August 14
West Bench Colony -100 head Blk heifers bred to Blk Bulls.
Bulls out July 5 for 60 days
Barry Forbes - 60 head of BLK/BBF heifers exposed to Blk
Bulls on June 21 to August 6.
Regular Sale with Bred Cows & Heifers
V Warken Ranching -145 head
-100 Young Blk cows bred to Black Angus Bulls. Bulls out
June 20-August 21
-45 Red Cows bred to Black Angus Bulls. Bulls out
Come Out and Play
KANANASKIS STYLE!
•
•
•
•
•
•
2,412 vertical feet of winter skiing paradise at Nakiska
Complimentary Transportation to Nakiska
On-site Outfitters and Equipment Rentals
Endless cross country and snowshoeing trails
Ice skating and hockey on our outdoor rink
Complimentary outdoor parking and no park fees!
• A wide variety of services and treatments at the Summit Spa and
Fitness Centre, including:
• Indoor/Outdoor whirlpool
• Indoor, 17 metre pool
• Eucalyptus Steam Room
• Fully equipped weight and cardio room
• Full spa treatments in 8 private rooms
• 6 Restaurants and Bars
• Family Focused Activities Daily
• Spa and Ski packages available!
41110072•11/16/12
Thurs., Dec. 6
province’s highest jobless rate in
October, at 5.1 per cent — up from
4.8 per cent in September, according to
statistics released recently from the
provincial department of Human
Services.
It's not a big change from October
2011, when the unemployment rate was
5.2 per cent.
• Pet friendly
• Baby-sitting services
Visit www.deltalodgeatkananaskis.com for packages and special offers.
For more information: 1-888-591-6240 or visit www.deltalodgeatkananaskis.com
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 25
Possible grain act changes:
do they go far enough?
countries don’t require
the quality boasted by
Canadian Wheat, and
aren’t willing to pay the
corresponding premiums.
This means that countries
utilizing more efficient,
simpler grading systems
are benefiting from this
demand for lower quality
grain at Canada’s
expense.
The U.S. is one of those countries.
With its less nuanced grading system, it
relies more on privately-negotiated
specialty contracts to address customer
needs, much in the way that specialty
canola demand is satisfied here in
Canada. Proponents of wheat grading
reform suggest specialty wheat demand
could be satisfied the same way.
Another problem is the Canadian wheat
classification system, based as it is on
visual kernel characteristics, can prevent
promising new cultivars from being
officially recognized if they bear too
much resemblance to any of the
established classes of wheat. It all adds
up to a system that is showing signs of
age.
So is it time for a reconsideration of
wheat grading? Not yet, perhaps.
Reforms so fundamental are not to be
made hastily, but the CGC is no doubt
paying close attention to its critics and
the new market realities that concern
them.
(Dan Hawkins, P.Ag., is an advisor, with
Farm Link Marketing Solutions. Contact
him at: [email protected] farmlink
solutions.ca or phone (877)FRM-LINK or
(306) 774-5954)
41086870•11/02/12
Times certainly are
a-changin’ in the grain
industry, though not fast
enough for some wheat
growers.
August brought the
DAN
enactment of historic
reforms to the Canadian
HAWKINS
Wheat Board, and last
month came the
announcement of
impending changes to the
Canada Grain Act aimed at reducing
regulatory costs in Canada’s grain
handling system.
One of the proposed reforms — the
elimination of mandatory Canadian
Grain Commission (CGC) grading of
grain upon arrival at port — is being
lauded by farmers frustrated with a
system many feel is too heavy-handed.
Some wheat growers, though, argue the
grading system itself is unnecessarily
pedantic given the needs being expressed
by many international buyers.
They may have a point.
Though Canada’s grading system has
earned our wheat a stellar reputation
around the world, that reputation has
come with higher production costs
associated with the complexity of our
sampling, grading, and sorting
requirements. When these requirements
help farmers fetch a higher price, the
system is serving their needs.
The Canadian Grain Commission
maintains this to be the case, but critics
argue some farmers are struggling to
achieve premiums for their product.
At this year’s Wild Oats Grain World
Conference, speaker Lawrence
Yakielashek suggested that many
Balog Auction Services - Lethbridge, Alberta
“Working For You - Working With You”
YOUR BULK FUEL AND FEED DEALER
SEE US FOR ALL YOUR FALL
EQUIPMENT RENTAL NEEDS
Wishek 14ft.
Breaking Disc.
Schulte Heavyduty
15ft. Rotary Mower
We are also Dealers for:
**FARM SALES**
BOOKING YOUR FARM OR MACHINERY SALE
FOR 2013
GIVE US A CHANCE
**40 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN SELLING
SUCCESSFUL FARM MACHINERY AUCTIONS!
**FULLY LICENSED & BONDED IN
ALBERTA, SASK., & BC
** EXPERIENCED STAFF & FINANCIAL
SECURITY FOR YOU THE SELLER!
**WHEN YOU ARE SELLING YOUR ENTIRE
LIFE’S WORK – MAKE SURE
TO GET WHAT YOU DESERVE!!
CALL TO VISIT
• Kerosene
• Diesel Exhaust
Fluid, Fuel and
Lube Dispensing
Systems
• Fuel Tanks
With 9 Locations To Serve You
1-866-784-8890
• Swift Current • Assiniboia • Gravelbourg • Mankota
• LaFleche • Pontiex • Eastend • Maple Creek • Fox Valley
BALOG AUCTION SERVICES INC.
LETHBRIDGE, AB
(403) 320-1980 OR TOLL FREE 877-320-1988
FOR UPCOMING SALES & EVENTS PLEASE CHECK OUR WEBSITE www.balogauction.com
“The Complete Auction Service”
Box 786 •Lethbridge, Alberta •Toll Free 1-877-320-1988 • Phone 403-320-1980
Company License 109042 WEBSITE: www.balogauction.com E-MAIL: [email protected]
41087572•11/04/11
41110077•11/16/12
We supply Petro
Canada Fuel & Lubes.
• Antifreeze
• Glycol
• Methyl Hydrate
• Solvent
26 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Consul
Unique fashion style
created by Consul native
B Y N ANCY-J EAN TAYLOR
Photo contributed
Photo courtesy -Of Storms
Artist Emmelia Taylor models one
of her hoods.
Up and coming fashion designer Emmelia Taylor from Consul discusses her show White
Rabbit with Jeff Robertson and other guests at Studio Intent Boutique and Gallery in Art
Central in Calgary.
MEDICINE HAT TRACTOR SALVAGE INC. & CONSTRUCTION
SPECIALIZING IN NEW, USED
& REBUILT AGRICULTURAL
& CONSTRUCTION PARTS
• Engine Kits
• Reman Clutches
• Cab Upholstery Kits
• Seats • Front End Parts
• Reman Starters
& Alternators
• Reman Water Pumps
• Front & Rear Tractor Rims
NEW BISON LOADERS 80-120 HP,
Self Leveling, Fits 20-50 Series JD
Tractors, Call for Pricing
CALL US AND START
SAVING TODAY!
WE ARE ON A PARTS LOCATOR SYSTEM, IF WE DON’T HAVE IT, WE’LL FIND IT FOR YOU!
VISA, MASTERCARD OR AGRICARD WELCOME
USED EQUIPMENT
SAVE TODAY!
WE STOCK NEW PARTS FOR ALL
MODELS OF TRACTORS & COMBINES
WHY
WHYPAY
PAYDEALER
DEALERPRICES?
PRICES?
CALL US AND START SAVING TODAY!
WE BUY USED TRACTORS, COMBINES &
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
JD 280 Loader, nice shape, w/joystick & valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,950
$9,250
Leon 636
606 Loader, off 2090 Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000
$
Redekop 2050 chopper, off 9500 JD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,250
Rake-Up Pickup, nice shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,950
Ezee-On 2080 Loader, self leveling, Joystick, good shape. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,200
$3,950
JD 224 Platform, rebuilt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500
1015 PU Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500
Victory Super 8 PU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,250
NEW 7 ft Buckets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,350
$995
NEW 6½ ft Buckets HD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,750
$1,195
Kirby Chaff Spreader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500
Case 510 Loader w/Grapple & Control Valve off 5140 Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500
IH 724 Tractor 70HP, Loader, 3PT, runs good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500
Clark Forklift Model CY1408, High MAst 8000lb lift, rebuilt motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000
Now Offering Scrap Metal
Farmyard Cleanup
& Vehicle Removal
NEW ARRIVALS
MX120 CASE MFWD
2-85 WHITE
1680 CASE IH
1682
CASEMFWD
IH
5140
CASE
4250 JD MFWD
IH 454NHHYDRO
TR95 DSL
ATTENTION FARMERS!!
BUY NOW...SAVE NOW!!
41110075•11/16/12
AUGER CLEARANCE SALE
Grimm Fabrications leapt out of the deepest
darkest woods into the heart of downtown Calgary
during the show “White Rabbit” at Studio Intent
Boutique and Gallery in Art Central.
The feature artist, Emmelia Taylor, from Consul, is
a third-year fibre art student attending the Alberta
College of Art and Design in Calgary.
White Rabbit, which was on until the end of
October, featured three lines of wearable art,
designed and created from a variety of materials and
ideas. Taylor’s artist statement for the show provides
the viewer with an understanding about how she is
inspired by stories from the deep dark woods.
“Each piece comes from an inspiration of
cautionary tales, and how such stories have shaped
generations of lives. In a sense, they are heirlooms
and memories, reflecting purity and memories, both
of an individual and of a world,” says Taylor.
Taylor’s interest in cautionary tales, commonly
called fairy tales, began as a little girl herding sheep
in the evergreen and poplar forests in the foothills of
the Canadian Rockies. Wolves and cougars lurked in
the dark shadows; fairies and elves danced in the
sunlight.
It wasn’t until she moved to the open expanses of
southwest Saskatchewan prairies in 2002, where she
was able to witness the curious fox and watch stags
running across the native grass, that her imagination
took flight. The prairie gave her bleached bones,
discarded pioneer treasures, an appreciation of
natural and man-made textures and many
inspirations.
Taylor is best known for her animal hoods.
Black, grey and white faux fur rams, rabbit and
wolves tempt viewers to touch and try on these cozy
hoods. New creations for the show are white,
repurposed lace, embroidered and beaded fingerless
gloves in wooden boxes lined with red satin.
Taylor’s jewelry line features hand-cut brass
necklaces: one of a fox’s silhouette; the other a proud
stag’s head. Another piece, named for the fairy tale by
Hans Christian Andersen, and inspired by winter is
the Snow Queen Collar made of fox fur, vintage lace,
glass beads, chain and ribbon.
Taylor’s favourite piece is the Fox Jaw Fascinator, a
hair piece, created with fox fur, red fox jaw, and
vintage rhinestone splendidly displayed in a glass
case.
At first glance, Taylor’s wearable art pieces seemed
out of place amongst Studio Intent’s sleek, stylish
clothes made by Canadian fashion designers.
When asked about how she came to choose Taylor’s
art, Studio Intent’s owner, Chantal Barchard said she
looks for uniqueness, and Taylor’s art is unique.
Barchard’s website (http://www.studio intent.ca)
expands on the theme of uniqueness.
“The studio showcases designs and art made by
largely independent Canadian artists that cannot be
found at large stores. Independent designers put a lot
of work and heart into what they create. Some of the
lines are not only designed, but also manufactured by
the designers themselves. When you buy from an
independent designer or artist, you are adding
quality, personality, and community to your life. It is
meaningful and lasting.”
If you didn’t make it to Calgary to see Emmelia
Taylor’s White Rabbit show, you can see her wearable
art at: http://www.etsy.com/shop/grimmfabrications.
PAY BY
N!
THE TO
Call Today For
Pricing!
DON’T WAIT...
LIMITED SUPPLY.
CALL TODAY!
DISCCA$H
AVA OUN
T
I
INQLABL S
E
U
TO IRE
DA
Y
Photo contributed
Emmelia Taylor's Snow Queen Collar and Fox Jaw Fascinator
were on display at the White Rabbit show at Art Central In
Calgary.
26 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
Consul
Unique fashion style
created by Consul native
B Y N ANCY-J EAN TAYLOR
Photo contributed
Photo courtesy -Of Storms
Artist Emmelia Taylor models one
of her hoods.
Up and coming fashion designer Emmelia Taylor from Consul discusses her show White
Rabbit with Jeff Robertson and other guests at Studio Intent Boutique and Gallery in Art
Central in Calgary.
comes standard
$
1,500 + 1,000 = 2,500
$
CASH PURCHASE DISCOUNT
+2/,'$<%2186
2012
$
TOTAL CASH PURCHASE SAVINGS
2012
CIVIC SEDAN LX
$
16,735
MODEL SHOWN: FB2E4CEX
‡
CASH PURCHASE PRICE
INCLUDES FREIGHT & PDI
CIVIC COUPE LX
$
17,235
MODEL SHOWN: FG3A4CE
‡
Grimm Fabrications leapt out of the deepest
darkest woods into the heart of downtown Calgary
during the show “White Rabbit” at Studio Intent
Boutique and Gallery in Art Central.
The feature artist, Emmelia Taylor, from Consul, is
a third-year fibre art student attending the Alberta
College of Art and Design in Calgary.
White Rabbit, which was on until the end of
October, featured three lines of wearable art,
designed and created from a variety of materials and
ideas. Taylor’s artist statement for the show provides
the viewer with an understanding about how she is
inspired by stories from the deep dark woods.
“Each piece comes from an inspiration of
cautionary tales, and how such stories have shaped
generations of lives. In a sense, they are heirlooms
and memories, reflecting purity and memories, both
of an individual and of a world,” says Taylor.
Taylor’s interest in cautionary tales, commonly
called fairy tales, began as a little girl herding sheep
in the evergreen and poplar forests in the foothills of
the Canadian Rockies. Wolves and cougars lurked in
the dark shadows; fairies and elves danced in the
sunlight.
It wasn’t until she moved to the open expanses of
southwest Saskatchewan prairies in 2002, where she
was able to witness the curious fox and watch stags
running across the native grass, that her imagination
took flight. The prairie gave her bleached bones,
discarded pioneer treasures, an appreciation of
natural and man-made textures and many
inspirations.
Taylor is best known for her animal hoods.
Black, grey and white faux fur rams, rabbit and
wolves tempt viewers to touch and try on these cozy
hoods. New creations for the show are white,
repurposed lace, embroidered and beaded fingerless
gloves in wooden boxes lined with red satin.
Taylor’s jewelry line features hand-cut brass
necklaces: one of a fox’s silhouette; the other a proud
stag’s head. Another piece, named for the fairy tale by
Hans Christian Andersen, and inspired by winter is
the Snow Queen Collar made of fox fur, vintage lace,
glass beads, chain and ribbon.
Taylor’s favourite piece is the Fox Jaw Fascinator, a
hair piece, created with fox fur, red fox jaw, and
vintage rhinestone splendidly displayed in a glass
case.
At first glance, Taylor’s wearable art pieces seemed
out of place amongst Studio Intent’s sleek, stylish
clothes made by Canadian fashion designers.
When asked about how she came to choose Taylor’s
art, Studio Intent’s owner, Chantal Barchard said she
looks for uniqueness, and Taylor’s art is unique.
Barchard’s website (http://www.studio intent.ca)
expands on the theme of uniqueness.
“The studio showcases designs and art made by
largely independent Canadian artists that cannot be
found at large stores. Independent designers put a lot
of work and heart into what they create. Some of the
lines are not only designed, but also manufactured by
the designers themselves. When you buy from an
independent designer or artist, you are adding
quality, personality, and community to your life. It is
meaningful and lasting.”
If you didn’t make it to Calgary to see Emmelia
Taylor’s White Rabbit show, you can see her wearable
art at: http://www.etsy.com/shop/grimmfabrications.
CASH PURCHASE PRICE
INCLUDES FREIGHT & PDI
STANDARD FEATURES ON LX
ü $,5&21',7,21,1*
ü &58,6(&21752/
ü +$1'6)5((/,1.™ -BILINGUAL BLUETOOTH® WIRELESS
MOBILE PHONE INTERFACE USB DEVICE CONNECTOR
ü Żƛ:+((/$17,ƛ/2&.%5$.,1*6<67(0ƙ$%6ƚ:,7+
(/(&7521,&%5$.(',675,%87,21ƙ(%'ƚ$1'%5$.($66,67
41129203•11/16/12
RegierHonda.com
‡MSRP is $19,235.00/$19,735.00 for a 2012 CIVIC LX, model FB2E4CEX/2012 CIVIC COUPE LX, model
FG3A4CE and includes $1,495.00/$1,495.00 freight and PDI. Taxes, license, insurance, environmental
fees and registration are extra. Retailer may sell for less. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers
valid from November 1, 2012 through November 30, 2012 at participating Honda retailers. Offers valid
only for Saskatchewan residents at Honda Dealers of Saskatchewan locations. Offers subject to change
or cancellation without notice. Visit HondaSask.com or see your Honda retailer for full details.
REGIER HONDA
1520 South Service Road E
Swift Current
306 773 3535
[email protected]
Photo contributed
Emmelia Taylor's Snow Queen Collar and Fox Jaw Fascinator
were on display at the White Rabbit show at Art Central In
Calgary.
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 27
www.prairiepost.com
To place an ad: Sask: 306-773-8260 / Alta: 403-526-SOLD / Email: [email protected]
PRAIRIE POST CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 1 WEEK/$7.50
Buy 4 weeks and the 5th week is FREE
Based on 20 words or less. Extra words 50¢ each. Prices exclusive of GST. Payment required at time of booking.
Classified Display Ads 87¢ per agate line • Local Run Career Ads 89¢ per agate line
Hours of operation: Mon-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
REAL ESTATE
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Manager of Operations
Gun, Hobby & Antiques
Collectibles Show
[email protected]
Rural & urban
customers welcome!
CAREERS
PRAIRIE
SPRINTER
Daily shuttle service
from Medicine Hat
to Calgary & back.
For reservations or
info call
403-487-1312 or
visit
prairiesprinterinc.ca
THE TEA BAG
over 100 varieties
of loose tea
Penny Ledarney
(403)526-2631
www.theteabag.biz
CONATTENTION! NEED CORAM
EXTRA
income? STRUCTION IS hirTurn 15 hrs/wk into ing Carpenters and
$1500/month, work concrete finishers to
at home. Please work PCL sites in
Saskatchewan.
visit
$32.55, Good benewww.123haveitall.com
fits, 3-5 years experience. Join, fit and
UNIVERSITY/COLinstall
formwork.
LEGE STUDENTS E-mail: [email protected] for sum- ram.ca
Fax:
mer
management 306-525-0990 Mail:
positions w/ Student 205-845
Broad
Works. Full busi- Street Regina, SK
ness training pro- S4R-8G9
vided. Challenging
learning experience,
huge
resume
builder.
Average FOREMAN OF PUBearnings in the sum- LIC Work & Utilities
mer of 2012 was Water and Waste$20,500. Info 1-800- water. Level 1 certirequired.
665-4992 www.stu- fication
dentworks.ca under Operating and main“business opportu- taining large equipment, organizational
nity” Deadline Dec 1
and
management
skills required. Send
resumes by December 15, 2012 with
references to: Town
of Lashburn, Box
328, Lashburn, SK
S0M
1H0.
306.285.3533
to
[email protected]
tel.net.
ADVERTISE HERE! 403-526-7653
ARTICLES FOR SALE
REAL ESTATE
DISCONNECTED
ADVERTISEMENTS
PHONE? CHOICE- FOR SALE. WARAND
STATEMAN 55 PLUS ACTEL Home Phone
MENTS
contained
TIVE ADULT LIFEService. No One
herein are the sole
STYLE
Large
Refused!
Low
responsibility of the
Monthly Rate! CallGround Level Townpersons or entities
ing Features and
homes 306 241
that post the adverUnlimited Long Dis0123
www
tisement, and the
tance Available. Call
Saskatchewan
.diamondplace.ca
ChoiceTel
Today!
Weekly Newspaper
PRIVATE TREED 2
1-888-333-1405.
Association
and
www.choice-tel.ca.
BDRM
bungalow,
membership do not
garage, central air,
make any warranty
FREE 120 PAGE appliances,
Hilda,
as to the accuracy,
CATALOGUE from AB, 40 min north of
completeness, truthHalfords.
Butcher
Med Hat, must see, MUST BE MOVED!
fulness or reliability
supplies, leather & $27,500
of such advertiseobo, Immediate delivery
craft supplies and (403)866-7130
ments. For greater
for 20’ X 76’ Moduanimal control prodinformation on adline
Homes.
ucts.
vertising conditions,
NEW VANCOUVER $105,900 (includes
please consult the
1-800-353-7864 or ISLAND
within
Town- delivery
Association’ s BlanEmail: [email protected] homes available in 200km Lethbridge).
ket Advertising Confordhide.com or visit Beautiful Qualicum Our prices are worth
ditions on our webour
Web
Store: Beach. Ocean view. shopping
for!
site at www.swna.
1-855-380-2266;
www.halfordsmailorOne
block
from
the
com
www.craigshomeder.com
beach. Starting at
sales.com.
STEEL BUILDINGS/ $429,000. More inREMODELED
METAL
BUILD- formation at. HY2 bdrm mobile trailer,
INGS UP TO 60% PERLINK
new carpet/lino &
OFF! 30x40, 40x60, "http://www.taylorcounter, 2 additions
50x80,
60x100, ridge.ca/"www.tay(8x16 ea), wood
80x100 sell for bal- lorridge.ca
burning fireplace,
ance owed! Call:
f/s, newer w/d
$4900 DOWN
1-877-728-4807
$19,000
NO QUALIFIYING!
403-502-2785
www.crownbuildFort Macleod
(403)529-6399
ings.ca
03
41031247•11/16/12
BIG
BUILDING PROVINCE-WIDE
SALE... “THIS IS A CLASSIFIEDS.
over
CLEARANCE YOU REACH
readers
DON’T WANT TO 550,000
MISS!”
20x20 weekly. Call this
$3,985.
25x24 newspaper NOW or
for
$4,595.
30x36 306-649.1405
$6,8593
35x48 details.
$11,200.
40x52 CKC REGISTERED
$13,100.
47x76. ENGLISH MASTIFF
$18,265. One End puppies for sale. All
wall included. Pio- colours, boys and
neer
Steel girls. Price $2500.
View puppies at
1-800-668-5422.
www.doublepjsengHYPERLINK
lishmastiffs.net
in
"http://www.pioneerthe gallery sections.
steel.ca/"www.pioEnjoy the view. Serineersteel.ca.
ous inquiries only
contact Pauline at
STEEL BUILDINGS/ 403-652-3429.
METAL
BUILD- WANTED: WE PAY
INGS
30x40, Cash for your un45x90,
50x150, wanted farm mascrap
60x150, 80x100 sell chinery,
for balance owed! metal, old vehicles,
buses
etc.
Call:1-800-457-2206
403-330-7357
or
www.crownsteelbuild403-553-3069
ings.ca
Clean two bedroom
mobile home on
LOT THAT YOU
OWN!
$89,900
$599/mo
Vacant.
Randy
1-403-880-5582
"SKI-IN
SKI-OUT"
CHALET at Castle
Mountain Ski Resort. Also - 3 furnished 1/2 duplexes
$439,900.00 each.
Bill Sturgeon @ Sutton
Group
Lethbridge
403-393-2456
CANCEL
YOUR
TIMESHARE.
NO
RISK
program.
STOP Mortgage &
Maintenance Payments Today. 100%
Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us Now.
We
can
Help!
1-888-356-5248
$1500
WEEKLY!!!
MAILING Our Company Brochures FREE SUPPLIES!! /
/ $250+ Per Day
Easy Data Entry
Work - $40 per
Transaction. 100%
Legit - PT/FT. No
Experience Needed!
www.CanadianMailers.com
TRANSPORTATION
41129194•11/16/12
HOT TUB (SPA)
COVERS.
Best
Price, Best Quality.
All Shapes & Colors
Available.
Call
1-866-652-6837
www.thecoverguy.c
om/newspaper
SEASONAL
HELP
WANTED:
busy
Lethbridge distributor seeks 12 to 15
hard working individuals to assist during the Christmas
rush and 2013 expansion. If you are
hardworking,
reliable, motivated, we
offer
competitive
wages, overtime, on
the job training up to
$18.36/hr.
Call
Monday or Tuesday
only 10 AM - 7 PM,
403-381-8101.
GUARANTEED APPROVAL
DRIVE
away today! We
lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest
rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for
immediate delivery
OAC.
1-877-796-0514.
www.yourapprovedonline.com.
Under the direction of the Leslie Beach Recreational Co-operative,
the Manager of Operations is responsible for all aspects of the
Leslie Beach administration, financial management and human
resource management.
Position requires post secondary education in administration or
formal training in business management or related field; three years
relevant experience or an equivalent combination of education and
experience. Ability to work in an automated environment. Ability to
work flexible hours including some evenings and weekends.
The candidate must have strong communication skills, be team
oriented with strong people skills, excellent organizational skills and
strong leadership.
Apply by: November 30, 2012
41129243•11/16/12
Kathleen Longpre
403-580-3369
SHUTTLE
TEA
41129246•11/16/12
AVON
This full-time position operates from
mid March to mid November of each year.
How to Apply:
please email cover letter and resume
to [email protected]
LLEESSLLIIEE
B
BEEAACCHH K
PAARRK
NAALL P
ON
R
REEGGIIO
Employment Opportunity
Is presently accepting applications for
Tubing Inspector
Salary will commensurate experience. Applicants will
be requested to provide a copy of their driving abstract
as well as a criminal record check from their local police
service or RCMP Detachment. Applicants must possess
nothing less than a Grade 12 education. Consideration wil
be given to those who have oilfield experience, as well as
current H2S, WHMIS, and First Aid Certification.
Applicants are requested to forward resumes to:
41110066•11/16/12
•Piapot Lions Club 16th Annual
•Maple Creek Armouries
•Sat Nov 24 10-5 & Sun Nov 25 10 - 3
•Contact: 306-558-4802
Prepayment required
CJ-CSM Inspection
114-172 Clearview Drive
Red Deer County, AB, T4E 0A1
They may also be faxed to 1-403-347-1774
or emailed to [email protected]
*No Phone Inquiries Please
CAREERS WITH A FUTURE - PIONEER CO-OP ASSOCIATION
Senior Clerk (FT), Stewart Valley –Farm chemical Branch Clerk, Tompkins (Student/Casual)
knowledge preferred; drivers license and good
Cashier (Casual) & Stock Clerk (24 hrs/wk),
public relations skills required.
Maple Creek Grocery
Meat Clerk, Mall Br., Average 32 Hours per week.
41129230•11/16/12
Apply to: Pioneer Co-op Human Resources, 1150 Central Ave. N, Swift Current, Sask. S9H 0G1
• Phone: (306) 778-8806 Fax: (306) 778-3424 • Email: [email protected]
411086898•11/16/12
DEADLINE: Thursday at 4 p.m.
28- PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
www.prairiepost.com
PERSONALS
SERVICES
YOUR SWM
FROM REMOVE
HELP
WANTED!!! PUBLIC WORKS & HAVE YOU BEEN LEARN
SENIOR
RE- SEEKS responsible
EARN CRIMINAL
Position. DENIED
MAKE $1000 a Utilities
Canada HOME.
100,000+ female for outings.
HOME. CORD
week mailing bro- Class 1 water & Pension Plan Dis- FROM
chures from home! wastewater certifica- ability Benefits? The Medical Transcrip- have used our serv- Send reply to Box
FREE
Supplies! tion preferred but Disability
Claims tionists are in de- ices since 1989. 566 c/o 3257 DunHelping
Home- will train. Experi- Advocacy Clinic can mand. Lots of jobs! BBB A+ rating. US more Rd SE, MediWorkers since 2001! ence in operating & help. Contact Allison Enrol today for less Waiver allows you cine Hat, AB, T1B
than $95 a month. to travel to the US, 3R2.
large Schmidt
Genuine
Opportu- maintaining
or apply for a Re1-800-466-1535
Valid at:1-877-793-3222
nity! No experience equipment.
cord
Suspension
www.canscribe.com
required. Start Im- drivers license re- www.dcac.ca
TRUE ADVICE!
(Pardon) ñ profesHYPERLINK
quired. Resumes by
mediately!
TRUE Clarity!
sional
&
affordable
"mailto:admisDec 15, 2012 with
www.TheMailTRUE PSYCHICS!
Call 1-8-NOW PARreferences to Town HERBAL MAGIC - [email protected]
ingHub.com
1-877-342-3032 or
DON
of Lashburn, Box With Herbal Magic m"[email protected]
1-900-528-6256
(1-866-972-7366)
328 Lashburn, SK lose up to 20 scribe.com
or mobile # 4486
www.RemoveYour1H0 pounds by New
LOOKING
FOR S0M
(18+) $3.19/min.
SPARE school bus 306.285.3533 HY- Year’s
Eve
and START OR CON- Record.com
www.truepsychics.ca
drivers for Irvine PERLINK
keep it off. Results TINUE your busiREarea. If interested "mailto:townoflasGuaranteed!
Start ness education at CRIMINAL
CANAplease
contact [email protected]"to
today
Call Lakeland College’ s CORD?
(403)664-2265
or [email protected] cam- DIAN Record Sus1-800-854-5176.
(Criminal
403-664-0671 and tel.net
pus. Major in ap- pension
ask for Eric.
praisal and assess- pardon) seals re**CLASS 1 DRIVAmerican
ment, general busi- cord.
NEED
A
HOME ERS, Join an indusness,
accounting, waiver allows legal
try leader - Now hirPHONE? Cable TV
marketing, or small entry. Why risk eming
10
drivers!
or High Speed Interbusiness and entre- ployment, business,
$1500 Sign On,
Moose Jaw, SK
net? We Can Help.
preneurship. Trans- travel, licensing, deLong Haul, and U.S.
Everyone Approved. Runs. Call us at
fer
your
current portation, peace of
Give the Gift of
mind? Free consulCall
Today. 1-800-973-9161 or
post-secondary
WARMTH with
courses towards a tation:
1-877-852-1122
Temple Gardens
apply
at
business diploma or 1-800-347-2540
Gift Cards this
Protel Reconnect
www.heyl.net Heyl
a degree. Apply toHoliday Season!
Truck Lines, Inc.
day, start in January
Calgary, AB
**INPHASE
ELECTo Purchase:
or
September.
TRIC IS looking for
Onlinewww.lakelandcola
Journeyman MARLOWE SMITH
templegardens.sk.ca
CURRENTLY
lege.ca 1 800 661
HEATED CANOLA
Electrician
and TRUCKING ltd. Are
Toll Free PURCHASING
6490, ext. 5429
WANTED!!
Apprentice. Oilfield looking for Lease
1-800-718-7727
LAMBS, Slaughter
- GREEN CANOLA
Visit our Kiosk at
Experience is an Operators revenue
ewes & Breeding
- SPRING THRASHED
base and experi- the Northgate Mall HAWAII ON THE
asset.
Email
ewes. **Top Prices
- DAMAGED CANOLA
MAINLAND, healthy
enced long haul
in Regina from
Paid! Call Blaine
resume
to
FEED OATS
low-cost living can
class 1 drivers to
(Nov 26 - Dec 24)
(403)312-1279
WANTED!!
inph[email protected]
be yours. Modern
Or directly at the
haul through out
- BARLEY, OATS, WHT
Arenal Maleku ConHotel
Canada and the US.
- LIGHT OR TOUGH
dominiums, 24/7 seMust be able to
- SPRING THRASHED
Available in dollar
cured Community,
cross border. MiniHEATED FLAX
amounts
Costa Rica “friendlimum of 2 years veriWANTED!!
of $25 - $500
est
country
on
fiable experience reHEATED PEAS
earth”!
quired. Must be able
Escape to
HEATED LENTILS
1-780-952-0709;
to handle oversized,
Saskatchewan’s
"ON FARM PICKUP"
www.CanTico.ca.
step decks and multi
Favourite
Westcan Feed
d
axle. Approximately
Destination!!
& Grain
$56,000 to $70,000
1-877-250-5252
a year based upon
mileage,
benefits
and bonuses available. Please submit
resume
to
[email protected]
smithtrucking.com
or
fax
to
We currently have opportunities in our Richardson Pioneer Ag Business
403-345-6627
Phone
Centres located in Herbert, SK (Reed Lake) and Swift Current, SK.
403-345-6672
For
Classified
Ads
SUCCESS
STARTS
HERE
“SINCE 1971”
CAREERS
AIRTH
FARMS LTD.
A
CSG
Ph: (403) 362-4372
Fax: (403) 362-8110
Email: [email protected]
Brooks, ALTA
ALWAYS HAVING A GOOD SELECTION OF SEED.
Newell Regional Services Corporation (NRSC) (Brooks)
has an exciting employment opportunity in the following position:
AREA MARKETING REPRESENTATIVE
Water and Wastewater System Operator (Entry)
This position is responsible for developing a market growth strategy;
identifying grain merchandising and crop input opportunities to maximize
profitability coupled with establishing and maintaining strong customer
relationships. Specific responsibilities include providing contract services
to customers; purchasing and grading grain; coordinating the logistics for
grain movement; and credit management.
For more information on these positions and other career opportunities visit www.richardson.ca
41087837•11/02/12
REMEMBER
READ
THEN
RECYCLE!!
The ideal candidate will have a degree related to Agriculture, several
years of agronomy/crop inputs sales experience and hold a Professional
Agrologist designation or be eligible to obtain one. They will have excellent
customer service, communication, interpersonal and organizational skills
as well as strong computer competencies. A Certified Crop Advisor
designation would be considered an asset.
Discover
Valuable
Treasure
This is a new ground floor opportunity for anyone interested in pursuing a career in
water treatment, water distribution, wastewater treatment and collection.
Reporting to the Maintenance Foremen, this position is primarily responsible for
the installation, maintenance and repair of water booster and sewage lift stations,
transmission mains, distribution and collection mains in communities within the County
of Newell.
Newell Regional Services Corporation is responsible for all water treatment and water
transmission and wastewater treatment and collection within the
County of Newell, including the City of Brooks.
If you are interested in becoming part of our professional team, have a Class 5 driver’s
license, and a clean drivers abstract, we would be interested in talking to you. Candidates
may be subject to passing a general knowledge test and mechanical comprehension
test and must meet the physical requirements of the position. Company policy includes
random drug testing.
Stay
tay Posted with
Prairie Post
Classifieds
for items for sale
Current (AE) Certification, defensive driving and First Aid certificates would be an asset.
NRSC has an attractive and comprehensive benefit package.
For more information see our website under the careers section. www.nrsc.ca
41086871•11/09/12
Richardson International is a worldwide handler and
merchandiser of major Canadian-grown grains and
oilseeds. We sell crop inputs and related services
through our western network of Ag Business Centres
and actively participate in canola processing as one
of North America’s largest suppliers
of canola oil and meal.
In all areas of our business,
Richardson continues to
provide high-quality products
and superior customer service.
www.selectintroductions.com
PEDIGREED SEED
Sales Agronomists are a key part of the operations at Richardson Pioneer Ag
Business Centres. This position is responsible for delivering agronomic support
to Richardson Pioneer customers by providing accurate and current crop
production information to improve overall farm profitability.
Interested candidates should apply online by visiting
www.richardson.ca to upload their cover letter
and résumé before November 30, 2012.
Matchmakers Select
1888-916-2824
Guaranteed service
Face to face matchmaking, customized
memberships thorough
screening process.
Rural, remote, small
towns, isolated
communities & villages
12 years established
Canada/US
AGRICULTURE
SALES AGRONOMIST
The ideal candidate will have a Diploma/Degree in Agriculture/Business;
related agriculture experience, above average communication, leadership
and organizational skills, knowledge of environment, health and safety
standards and Microsoft applications.
30. 5'6”, 132lbs, loves
dogs and has a
Rottweiler called Ben.
A teacher, home owner,
non smoker, and social
drinker. Loves to cook
while sipping a good
glass of wine. Enjoys
all types of music,
bbqs, a day at that
beach, quadding,
skiing in the winter,
watching hockey,
baseball and football.
Loves to laugh and is
open and genuine with
people. Family is
important and would
like someone with the
same values. Age is
irrelevant and men with
children are ok.
41031249•11/16/12
AGRICULTURE
Classified has it all!
Cars, Trucks,
SUV’s you’ll find
them here!
41105860•11/16/12
41129242•11/16/12
41129247•11/16/12
(403)526SOLD
AVAILABLE
BACHELORETTE
41129245•11/16/12
CAREERS
Please send your resume by noon November 23, 2012 to:
Mr. Ralph Havinga
General Manager
Newell Regional Services Corporation
Box 638, Brooks, AB. T1R 1B6
or fax: 403-794-4051
NRSC appreciates interest from all applicants, however will only contact those being
considered for an interview.
Prairie Post
Classifieds
403-526-SOLD
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 29
Letters to the Editor
Bill 2 poses major concerns for landowners
Editor:
Recently, Alberta’s PC Government introduced the
Responsible Energy Development Act (Bill 2). Bill 2
would create a new one-stop-shop regulator to help
streamline the process of receiving project approval.
This is a laudable goal, and is something industry has
been asking to be accomplished.
However, as written, the bill would limit landowner
rights and centralize powers.
That’s why the Wildrose Official Opposition
introduced 12 amendments to avoid the kind of
sweeping powers landowners fought so passionately
against with former Bills 19, 36 and 50. These
amendments were put forward with the goal of
encouraging development, protecting landowner
rights and respecting the environment.
We saw how the PC government amended Bills 19,
36, and now 50, but only after the uprising of
landowners demanding property rights. With Bill 2,
the PCs have the opportunity to get it right the first
time.
Under current legislation, appeals are made to the
Environmental Appeals Board, but landowners won’t
have that option under Bill 2. Bill 2 removes the rights
of landowners to appeal decisions under the
Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act, the
Water Act, and the Public Lands Act.
Wildrose amendments would restore an independent
appeal process to give Alberta landowners confidence
their appeal rights are not being taken away.
Bill 2 also makes no reference to “the public
interest.” Wildrose proposes to enshrine those
essential words in the new law. Given the expanded
role of the regulator, it is even more important to
consider the public interest when reviewing energy
applications. Furthermore, Bill 2 needs to explicitly
mention respect for landowner rights in the
regulator’s mandate.
Another proposed Wildrose amendment would
include an explicit requirement for the regulator to
follow legislated timelines for the total regulatory
process. This would give certainty to project owners
their applications won’t get bogged down indefinitely
and help make sure Bill 2 accomplishes what it sets
out to do.
The new regulator’s board of directors needs to have
the appropriate expertise. That’s why we are pushing
for the board to be composed of at least two energy
sector experts, a landowner rights expert and an
environmental expert. As written, Bill 2 allows the
minister to appoint anyone, effectively making
members of the board what no one wants to see:
patronage appointees.
As written, Bill 2 cancels Section 26 of the Energy
Resource Conservation Act, which ensures those
affected by extraction are involved from the beginning
of the regulatory process and are fully informed.
The Wildrose proposes reinstating the provisions of
Section 26 that protect landowners.
Bill 2 would also give the Minister of Energy the
right to access personal information about applicants
from the regulator. It is not at all clear why the
Minister would need to be so hands on as to require
this access during the application process, and it could
give the impression of political interference in
decisions. Wildrose proposes the Minister be excluded
from accessing personal information.
Bill 2 presents opportunities for industry to receive
faster approval of projects with the streamlining of
the process. However, as written, it poses dangers for
both landowners and industry.
The government should amend the mechanics of
this bill to ensure landowner rights are protected
to avoid the same uproar that followed the Land
Stewardship Act, the Land Assembly Project Area Act
and the Electric Statutes Amendment Act (former
Bills 19, 36 and 50.)
We can avoid another landowner fiasco. We just have
to get it right the first time.
As the Wildrose Official Opposition Energy Critic,
I look forward to hearing feedback. Please contact
my office at [email protected]
Jason Hale, MLA for Strathmore – Brooks ,Energy
Critic, Wildrose Official Opposition
Widow finally gets compensation but is of little comfort
Editor:
Lorna Chandler, the widow of farmworker Kevan
Chandler who was killed in a grain elevator in 2006,
has finally received compensation.
But let’s be clear. About six years that had passed,
and this family, with two children, endured immense
emotional pain, financial uncertainty and a lengthy
lawsuit to finally get justice. That’s right — since
WCB is not required for agricultural operations in
Alberta she had to fight for it in court — for six long
years!
In spite of widely required WCB and Occupational
Health and Safety laws in virtually every other
workplace, these same requirements are noticeably
absent in the agriculture sector, despite the fact that
an average of 18 deaths per year are due to
agricultural injuries like the one that took Kevan
Chandler’s life.
The settlement for Lorna passed unnoticed in the
media along with the 6 years of unmitigated
suffering. Also unnoticed by most Albertans, was
the passing of Tongue Creek Feeders; the
corporation has gone out of operation, displacing
some 40 employees along with it.
All of this is because the government is afraid
to offend rural voters by doing its duty to bring
agriculture regulations into the 21st century.
Some of us believe that with proper laws and
enforcement in place we would still have Kevan,
an intact family, a productive workplace, and
contributing member to our society and provincial
economy.
Over the past decade, we’ve witnessed strong
judicial recommendations to legislate farmworker
protection, evidence supporting legislation from the
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, and
real reductions in injuries and deaths in BC
following the introduction of this type of legislation.
Nonetheless, this government refuses to introduce
similar legislation that would provide even the most
basic protections for paid farmworkers, their
families and for the legal protection of owners. And,
not even the knowledge that the millions of dollars
in healthcare for injuries and deaths paid by the
taxpayer instead of the industry, through WCB,
hasn’t moved this government.
One has to ask of our political leaders who whose
interests they value more, unfounded financial
concerns of industry, or the safety and well-being of
hardworking Albertans and their families.
Dr. David Swann – MLA Calgary Mountain View
Oilfield Services
To Advertise in this listing
DIRECTORY
Contact
41022305•05/06/011
Jamie Fode Ph: 403-528-5761
Fax: 403-528-2276
email: [email protected]
CATCH THE SAFETY BUZZ,
To Advertise in
YOUR SOURCE FOR SAFETY TRAINING!
• St. John’s First Aid
• Global Training Ground Disturbance I & II
• Confined Space, Fall Protection
1-888-573-0311
• Hours of Service & Fatigue Managment
www.safetybuzz.ca
• Gas Testing, and Defensive Driving/PDIC
[email protected] • TDG, WHMIS & Fire Extinguisher Training
Bay 5, 1015 30th St SW
• Enform H2S Alive & GODI
We supply Petro
Canada Fuel & Lubes
• Antifreeze
• Glycol
• Methyl Hydrate
• Solvent
• Kerosene
• Fuel Tanks
• Diesel Exhaust
Fluid, Fuel and
Lube Dispensing
Systems
With 9 Locations To Serve You
• Swift Current • Assiniboia • Gravelbourg • Mankota • LaFleche • Pontiex • Eastend • Maple Creek • Fox Valley
41086189
or
PIPELINE NEWS
Saskatchewan’s Petroleum Monthly
Stacey
Powell
Contact
Building for the Future
Pipeline Construction
Facilities Construction
Pile Driving
45 Ton picker with 135 ft of reach
Pumpjack Assembly & Maintenance
B Pressure Welding
General Oilfield Maintenance
Heavy Equipment Hauling
Other Oilfield Services
www.eos1990.com
Shaunavon, SK
PH: 297-3367 FAX: 297-3369
306-773-8260
52078700
YOUR BULK FUEL AND FEED DEALER
41022402•02/03/12
(403) 526-8400
or email:
[email protected]
Want your non-profit event listed for free
in our community calendar? Email:
[email protected]
41086771•11/02/12
OILFIELD SERVICES
30 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
CROSSWORD CLUES
CROSSWORDS GRID
ACROSS
1. Charity gifts
5. Carpet type
9. Remnant
12. Kind of belt
13. Pious
14. Prior to, in poetry
15. Liver spread
16. Century segment
17. Family feline
18. Ball
20. New York district
22. Bo or John
24. Saudi, e.g.
27. Timeworn
30. Eminent
conductor
32. Absent
33. Not the back
35. Heathrow abbr.
36. Rapid ____
38. Mustang
40. In good mental
health
41. Jeopardy
43. Remove from
print
45. Frozen formation
49. Lillie or Arthur
51. Pen fillers
53. Face-covering
material
54. Opposite of
neath
55. Docile
56. Types
57. Law ____ order
58. Tense
59. Downwind, to
Popeye
ANSWERS FROM NOVEMBER 9
STANDARD MOTORS WANTS TO GIVE YOU:
Send your community
calendar
info to:
1 in 100 Odds to Win!!!
CASH!
[email protected]
Just make your best deal on a new or quality pre-owned vehicle….
Only the first 100 retail customers are entered in the draw!
44 2nd Ave NW Swift Current, SK 773-3131 www.standardmotors.ca
Tundra
41129197•11/16/12
$10,000
DOWN
1. Dangerous snakes
2. Dancer's jump
3. School subject
4. Male equines
5. More bashful
6. Dig in the garden
7. Nome native
8. Greek sandwich
9. Newspaper worker
10. "__ Husbands
Necessary?"
11. Understand
19. Coral structures
21. Possesses
23. Show feeling
25. Linkletter and
Garfunkel
26. Presage
27. ____ and pans
28. Emanation
29. Customary
31. Rule of conduct
34. Fully developed
37. Social-register
word
39. Ms. de Havilland
42. Dangerous
44. Rickey ingredient
46. Jail chamber
47. Have affection for
48.You're something
____!
49. Feathery wrap
50. Poetic contraction
52. Small barrel
PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012 - 31
Add an event to the calendar at www.prairiepost.com
or e-mail details to [email protected]
November 16-24-Medicine Hat
Medicine Hat Musical Theatre Presents
Grease. Enjoy an evening with Rydell
High’s senior class of 1959: duck-tailed,
hot-rodding “Thunderbirds” and their gumsnapping, “Pink Ladies” in bobby socks
and pedal pushers, evoking the look and
sound of the 1950’s. Saturday, Nov. 17 and
Wednesday, Nov. 21, to Saturday, Nov. 24, at
8 p.m. nightly; with a Matinee performance
on Sunday, Nov. 18, at 2 p.m. Performances
will run at The Esplanade Friday, Special
Dinner Theatre Performance on Friday, Nov.
16. Cost to see this musical is $30 + S/C,
GST. Dinner Theatre tickets cost $75.00+
S/C, GST. Contact: Rae Wahl 403 581- 6465
or [email protected]
November 17 — Vanguard
Vanguard Ladies Night Out with the theme:
“You know you’re a Redneck When…”
needs some help. If you would like to help
on a committee contact chairperson Susan
Mouland at 306-582-2299.
November 17-Swift Current
Swift Current Farmers Market Thursday &
Saturday at the Swift Current Mall from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
November 17-Swift Current
The Women of Worth brings you an evening
of laughter at the East Side Church of
God. Tickets are $25 each or $160 for a
table of 8. Performing will be Leslie Norris
Townsend, comedienne who has been on
HBO, The Tonight Show and A&E.
November 17-Swift Current
What Women Want - Trade Show will take
place at Walker Place (2150 Walker Street)
in Swift Current. It goes 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Everything a woman loves... Chocolates,
jewelery, candles, clothing and so much
more. Booth themes are centered around
Woman, so if you would like to have a booth
please call Kathy at 306-774-9636. Limited
space available.
November 17-Swift Current
Kids and Parents! We are having a Snow
Day at the Swift Current Library on
Saturday at 10 a.m. Come and make 3-D
snowflakes without getting cold! For more
information call the Library at 778-2752.
This program is free.
November 17-Swift Current
Join us on Saturday at 2 p.m. for the Swift
Current Library’s Family Movie; Madagascar
3. Drinks and snacks provided! For more
information call the Library at 778-2752.
This program is free.
November 17-Swift Current
The Good Tyme Dance Club will hold a
dance on Nov. 17, in the Elks lower hall from
8-11 p.m. It’s a Hawaiian theme. Pot luck
lunch. Live Music. Everyone is welcome.
November 17-Maple Creek
Cypress Cyclones Steak Night at the
Rockin’ Horse. Tickets are $20 each and are
available from Shawn at 306-662-3473 or
Gisele at Menko’s (306-662-4582).
November 17-Eastend
Eastend Rink Fundraiser — Puck n Funny
stand up comedian will take place at the
Eastend Memorial Hall. Cocktails are at 6
p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. and comedian is at
8 p.m. Music to follow. Tickets are $50 and
there’s also a silent auction. No minors
allowed. Call 306-297-3510 for tickets.
Sponsored by the Eastend Kinsmen Club.
November 17-Rosemary
Rosemary Business & Christmas Craft
Trade Show from 10 a.m. -3 p.m. at the
Rosemary Recreation Plex. For more info,
contact [email protected] or call Barb
at 403-378-3513.
November 17-Rolling Hills
Christmas Daze goes from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Location: Rolling Hills Community Hall,
Rolling Hills’ Christmas Daze at Rolling Hills
Community Hall on November 17th from 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Tables are $20.00 each. To book
call wayne at 403-793-4245.
November 17— Buffalo
The Annual Turkey Supper will also have
entertainment (TBA) starting at 5 p.m. at
the Buffalo Community Centre. It’s put on by
the Buffalo and District Agricultural Society.
Contact Marg Schonhofer at 403-379-2272;
fax: 403-379-2272.
November 17-Patricia
Country Christmas at Dinosaur Provincial
Park goes from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. A great
Christmas celebration in the heart of dinosaur
country! Come and visit friends, family, and
enjoy the friendliness of the UNESCO World
Heritage Site. More details to come!
November 19-Swift Current
Need to brush up on your keyboard and
mouse skills? The Swift Current Library
will be having a COMPUTER BASICSKEYBOARDING AND MOUSE SKILLS on
Monday at 10 a.m. Space is limited so
please register by calling the Library at
778-2752. This program is free.
November 19-Swift Current
The MS Society’s monthly support group
will be at the Swift Current Library on
Monday, November 19 at 6:30 pm. For more
information call the Library at 778-2752.
November 22-Swift Current
Join us at the Swift Current Library on
Thursday, at 7 p.m. to make a Hemp
Bracelet. You will learn basic knots and how
to incorporate beads into your knotting.
Space may be limited, please register
by calling the Library at 778-2752. This
program is free.
November 19-Swift Current
The Green Braes Pipe & Drum Band meets
Mondays at 7 p.m. — upper floor of Legion
Hall. New members always welcome. Call
306-773-1368 for more information.
November 22-Swift Current
Swift Current Farmers Market Thursday &
Saturday at the Swift Current Mall from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
November 20-Swift Current
Get a jump on your Christmas
correspondence! Join us at the Swift
Current Library for a Christmas Card
Making class on Tuesday, November 20 at
7 p.m. Please register by calling the Library
at 778-2752. Cost is $2.
November 22-Brooks
Santa Claus Parade is on Nov 22. Parade,
Shopping, and the event in the downtown
parks. Fireworks will be displayed in the
downtown core and will start between 7:30
p.m. and 8 p.m.
November 20-Swift Current
Parents! Bring your children to the Swift
Current Library for Story Time every
Tuesday at 2 p.m. Join Tekeyla for a fun
afternoon of stories, puppet plays and
crafts. For more information call the Library
at 778-2752. This program is free.
November 22-Medicine Hat
Squire Gastropub will host a steak night at
$20/person for steak with all the trimmings
starting at 6 p.m. It will be at (formerly
Dublin’s) 4 Strachan Crt SE. It’s in support
of the Canadian Red Cross’ Bullying
Prevention Program. Tickets are available at
Canadian Red Cross, Squire’s Gastropub &
Gold Dust Jewelry.
November 20-Swift Current
On Nov. 20, WorkSafe Saskatchewan and
the Workers’ Compensation Board will
host a Regional Workshop at the Days
Inn in Swift Current. The day will include
information on: the ins and outs of the WCB;
injury prevention; WorkSafe’s young worker
strategy; developing and maintaining
effective occupational health and safety
committees; providing safety services in the
oil field and developing a fully functional
health and safety management system.
Registration is free and a continental
breakfast and lunch are provided free of
charge. For more information or to register
call: 1-800-667-7590 ext. 9271 or go to the
WorkSafe Saskatchewan website www.
worksafesask.ca/events.
November 22-25-Brooks
18th Annual Festival of Trees will take
place at the Heritage Inn & Convention
Centre: “Believe...in a cure for diabetes.”
A Christmas wonderland of beautifully
decorated trees & wreaths, silent auction,
gift and craft shop, Santa’s Canteen,
Festival Stage Entertainment and much
more. You are invited to become part of
the “Festival Family of Volunteers”. Every
person involved is an important part of
celebrating our community spirit. For more
information and to Volunteer please call the
Diabetes Association at 403-362-5914.
November 23-Swift Current
Parents! If you have preschool age children
RHYME TIME is the program for you. Join us
at the Swift Current Library, Fridays at 10
a.m. for rhymes, actions, songs and stories.
For more information call the Library at
778-2752. This program is free.
November 21-Swift Current
Kids. Parents. Join us at the Swift Current
Library every Wednesday evening at 6:30 to
shake your sillies out with a new program
calledleaps & wiggles. Get active and have
fun with music, movement, songs and
stories! This program is free and is for kids
and parents. For more information call the
Library at 778-2752.
November 23-Swift Current
At the Lyric Theatre, Blenders presents
Genticorums is a popular traditional
Québécois musical trio based in Montreal,
Canada. Genticorum fuses modern
composition with classic folk elements.
Their musical scores are original, largely
based on Pascal’s repertoire of fiddle tunes,
while their lyrics are often traditional.
Contact Shann Gowan for more information
at 306-778-2686.
November 21-Waldeck
Waldeck Golden Age Pot Luck supper at
Waldeck Hall 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome.
Cards and games to follow.
November 22-Swift Current
At the Lyric Theatre: Improv Night. Doors open
at 7:30 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. $5
at the door. Brian Dueck, Stefan Rumpel and
their team of improvisers put on a hilarious
show that gets everyone involved. A form
of theatrical comedy that will have you bent
over laughing by the end of the night.
November 23-Cessford
The Ella Jane W I will be holding their
annual Christmas Craft and Trade Show
on Nov. 23 at the community hall. If you
Artistic Expressions Custom Framing
Scene Saskatchewan 130 Central Ave. N.
Swift Current Sk.
on display featuring
306-773-1033
local photographers [email protected]
for Details
Ph: 403-528-5761
Fax: 403-528-2276
[email protected]
DECOR
DECO
Looking for music for your next event or party? Getting
married? Planning your Christmas party and looking
for something different? All For You Music is what you
need. We have been proudly serving Swift Current and
southern Saskatchewan for over 15 years. We pride
ourselves on delivering quality service and helping our
customers get exactly what they want from each and
every event. And now we offer Karaoke!
Professional, Personalized DJ & Karaoke service.
Rates to make you Dance!
Check our new web site at
www.allforyoumusic.ca and like us on Facebook
• Carpet and Lino
• Laminate Flooring
• Hardwood Flooring
• Cork Flooring
• Ceramic Tile
• Window Treatments
MOBILE DJS & KARAOKE
Call (306) 778-6147
COMPLETE
L
I
M
I
T
E
November 24-Swift Current
Swift Current Farmers Market Thursday &
Saturday at the Swift Current Mall from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
November 24-Swift Current
Girl Guide Tea, Bake & Craft Sale at Oman
School. There will be games for the kids
as well. Takes place from 1:30-3:30 p.m.
It’s a fundraiser for local Sparks, Brownies,
Guides, Pathfinders, Trex and Rangers.
Please come for a fun filled time while you
enjoy a cup of tea or coffee and strawberry
shortcake.
November 24-25-Maple Creek
Gun Hobby & Antiques Collectible Show
for the Piapot Lions Club (16th Annual) on
Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday 10
a.m.- 3 p.m. It will take place at the Maple
Creek Armouries. Contact 306-558-4802 for
more info.
November 24-25-Swift Current
Jake’s Gift is a powerful and surprisingly
funny drama about a Canadian World
War II veteran who reluctantly returns to
Normandy, France, for the 60th Anniversary
of the D-Day invasion. When he encounters
a young child with many questions, he
is forced to revisit memories of his late
brother’s war time death. You don’t want
to miss this unbelievable play! Takes place
at the Lyric Theatre. For more information
contact the Lyric Theatre at 306-773-6292.
Patti Hildebrandt “Party on Purpose” Director
Box 11, Blumenhof, SK S0N 0E0 | Phone: 306-627-3579
r Jamie Fode
u
o
Y d
A !!!
e
r
e
H
All For You Music
November 24-Bassano
Christmas in Bassano- Craft Sale & Tea,
Saturday at Bassano Community Hall.
Sponsored by Willing Workers of the Knox
Presbyterian Church. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
To book a table: call Doreen at 641-3873
or Edna at 641-3054, $25.00 per table,
Admission $5 per adult; 5-12 years $2; five
years and younger are free. Bake table and
door prizes (drawn at 2 p.m.).
Friend me on Facebook and never miss a promo again!
Junction Square
BINGO & NEVADA’S
Odds Are You Might Get Lucky!
Daily Programs @ 7PM
321 North Railway St E
Swift Current
Ph: 306-773-4388
“Your Complete
Home & Farm
Building
Supply Centre”
D
803 N. Railway St. West, Swift Current, SK S9H 0A6
Phone: 773-1529
Fax: 773-6213
(306) 773-5307
Hwy #1, 2015 N. Service
Road. W. Swift Current, SK
www.decorcomplete.com
E-mail: [email protected]
We focus on our clients journey
City Plaza, Unit 6, 330 Central Ave.
Swift Current SK S9H 0L4
aryn Woods
Tel: (306) 778-0826
Clinical Audiolog
Caryn Woods
Caryn
& Woods
Toll Free: 1 (877) 202-0122
Clinical Audiologist
Caryn
Woods
Caryn
Woods
Clinical
Audiologist
rad
Woods
www.thehearingplace.ca
Clinical Audiologist
Business Manage
Clinical Audiologist
52129000•01/21/11
www.nodgemfg.com [email protected]
nodgemfg.com
Ph: (306) 773-5288
Toll Free 1-800-667-7421
125 - 10th Ave, N.W.
Swift Current, SK.
81645200•11/06/09
Specializing in Combine,
Swather and Tractor Parts
November 24-Redcliff
Fall Trade Show on November 24th at I.F. Cox
School in Redcliff (3rd Street) 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
there will be lots of everything for everyone!
There will also be lots of raffle prizes and
a 50/50 draw! As well as a bake sale/
concession stand. All proceeds for this go
toward the school for childrens playground
euipment and activiites for the kids.
YES! I Sell Tupperware!
YES! We Still do Parties!
YES! We Are Hiring!
Contact
AGRICULTURAL
PARTS STORE
November 24-Elkwater
Looking for the perfect gift for a friend or
yourself, go to the 2nd Annual Elkwater
Craft and Trade Show at the Elkwater
Community Hall. It goes from 10 a.m.-4
p.m. If you make crafts or have baking
for sale, contact Elaine Ziegenhagel at
403-529-6373 to reserve a table. Free
admission and concession available.
It’s not just bowls anymore!
6 Months of
constant presence here
for as little as
$11.53 weekly
81645300•101/21/11
Needle Work, Diplomas, Canvas,
Watercolor, Posters, Photos, Shadow Box
are interested in having a table please
contact Lila Bird at 403-566-2428 for more
information.
41086899•11/16/12
November 17-Swift Current
ANGEL APPRECIATION TEA: Enjoy
our famous “Angel Cake Walk” plus
refreshments, raffles, door prizes &
homestyle baking on Saturday, 1:30 - 4 p.m.
at Christ the Redeemer Hall, 600 Memorial
Drive. Adults $5, students $3.
ST
AFTER HARVJEECTS?
O
R
BUILDINGLSPIN STOCK FOR
MATERIA
ALS,
FENCING, CORR
D
AN
RN
BA
LE
PO
NGS
DI
IL
BU
STUDWALL
• Building Materials
&
• Drywall
Dry
Insulation
Insu
& Doors
• Windows
Win
• Steel
Ste Roofing &
Siding
S
• Farm
Far & Ranch
Supplies
Sup
41022119
November 16-Swift Current
Parents! If you have preschool age children
RHYME TIME is the program for you. Join us
at the Swift Current Library, Fridays at 10
a.m. for rhymes, actions, songs and stories.
For more information call the Library at
778-2752. This program is free.
41086764•09/28/12
COMMUNITYCALENDAR
32 - PRAIRIE POST - Friday, November 16, 2012
King of Trucks
MASSIVE MODEL YEAR END EVENT
2012 CHEV SILVERADO
2500HD 4WD CREW CAB LTZ
SALE PRICE
76,800
$
MSRP
$
2012 GMC SIERRA 1500
4WD
4W CREW CAB SL
NEVEDA
EDITION
CASH PRICE
26,900
$
93,855
MSRP
2012 CHEV SILVERADO 1500
4WD EXT CAB LS
4W
E
CHEYENN
EDITION
CASH PRICE
26,900
$
MSRP
41,850
$
$
40,190
$469 BI-WEEKLY
$12,000 Cash/Trade down
$193 BI-WEEKLY
for 84 months
$193 BI-WEEKLY
$0 Cash/Trade down
for 84 months
6.6L V8 DURAMAX DIESEL, WHITE
AT REAR BUMPER, NEW HOOD,
BUSH WACKER FLARES, NEW
GRILLE, 20” RIMS & TIRES, STEPS,
4” RANCHO LIFT, 4 FLAPS
4.8L V8, 4 SPD AUTO, FRONT
SPLIT BENCH, AM/FM, CD/MP3, XM
SATELLITE RADIO, BLUETOOTH,
TRAILERING EQUIP, OFF-ROAD,
ENGINE BLOCK HEATER
4.8L V8, 4 SPD AUTO,FRONT SPLIT
BENCH, AM/FM, CD/MP3, XM
SATELLITE RADIO, BLUETOOTH,
TRAILERING EQUIP, BSW TIRES,
ENGINE BLOCK HEATER
2012 BUICK ENCLAVE
AWD 4DR CXL 1
2012 GMC TERRAIN
AWD 4 DR SLE-1
FINANCED PRICE
42,900
$
MSRP
$
2012 GMC SIERRA 2500 HD
4WD CREW CAB SLE
SALE PRICE
54,435
MSRP
$
CASH PRICE
41,328
$
26,400
$
MSRP
31,640
54,810
$
$306 BI-WEEKLY
$0 Cash/Trade down payment
84 months @ 4.49%
$179 BI-WEEKLY
$0 Cash/Trade down
for 84 months
$294 BI-WEEKLY
$0 Cash/Trade down
for 84 months @ 4.49%
3.6L V6, 6 SPD, LEATHER
BUCKET SEATS, AM/FM, CD/MP3,
TRAILER EQUIPMENT, ENGINE
BLOCK HEATER
2.4L, 6 SPD AUTO, AM/FM,
CD, FRONT BUCKET SEATS,
CLOTH
6.0L SFI V8 FLEX-FUEL, 6 SPD,
18” ALUMN, AM/FM, CD/MP3,
ALL SEASON BSW, OFF-ROAD,
TAILGATE PKG, BLUETOOTH,
REMOTE START, CLIMATE
CONTROL, 6-WAY SEAT ADJUSTER
2012 CHEV SILVERADO 1500
4WD CREW CAB LT
2012 CHEV CAMARO 2DR
CONVERTIBLE 2SS
BLOW OUT PRICE
30,000
$
MSRP
$
SALE PRICE
47,700
$
45,220
$215 BI-WEEKLY
$0 Cash/Trade down
for 84 months @ 4.49%
4.8L SFI FLEX FUEL V8, 4 SPD
AUTO, AM/FM, CD/MP3, CHFROME
ACCES. PKG, TRAILER BRAKE,
BLUETOOTH, OFF-ROAD,
SATELLITE RADIO
2012 CHEV ORLANDO
4 DR WAGON 1LT
MSRP
53,815
$
6.2L V8, 6 SPD AUTO,
FRONT SPORT BUCKET,
AM/FM, CD/MP3, REMOTE START,
RALLY SPORT PACKAGE,
SALE PRICE
23,000
$
MSRP
$
29,255
STARTING AT
$157 BI-WEEKLY
$0 down payment for 84 months
2.4L 6 SPD AUTO,
16” ALLOY WHEELS,
FRONT BUCKET,
AM/FM, CD/MP3, SUNROOF
3 IN-STOCK!T!
DON’T MISS OU
OPTIMUM PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
CARS
SUVS / VANS
2007 CHEV EQUINOX AWD LS – SALE $15,995
3.4L V6 auto loaded pwr seat alumn whls dark grey cloth
98,563 kms
2007 CHEV EQUINOX AWD LT – SALE $13,995
3.4L V6 auto loaded heated buckets sunroof alumn whls GFX
pkg 132,855 kms
2008 CHEV UPLANDER LT EXT VAN – SALE
$14,995
3.9L V6 auto loaded 7 pass remote start rear air & heat
alumn whls DVD silver grey cloth 54,700 kms
2008 BUICK ENCLAVE AWD CXL – SALE $27,995
3.6L V6 auto loaded heated buckets alumn whls DVD sunroof
goldmist ebony leather 104,124 kms
2008 BUICK ENCLAVE FWD CX – SALE $23,995
3.6L V6 auto loaded heated buckets alumn whls 8 pass
cocoa tan leather 105,540 kms
2008 PONTIAC TORRENT AWD LT
– SALE $15,995
3.4L V6 auto loaded heated buckets pwr seat alumn whls
sunroof blue ebony cloth 93,923 kms
2010 CADILLAC SRX AWD – SALE $31,995
3.0L V6 auto loaded heated front buckets pwr seats nav
sunroof alumn whls dark grey leather 95,194 kms
2011 GMC YUKON 4X4 SLT – SALE $36,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded buckets pwr seats remote start rear air &
heat sunroof alumn whls autotrac silver ebony 42,956 kms
2012 GMC YUKON XL 4X4 SLT – SALE $43,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded heated front buckets sunroof remote
start boards alumn whls autotrac white ebony leather 36,297
kms
2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN STOW N GO –
SALE $21,995
3.6L V6 auto loaded 7 pass front buckets silver black cloth
43,723 kms
2012 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 XLT – SALE $35,995
3.5L V6 auto loaded heated buckets pwr seat alumn whls
sync system silver ebony cloth 47,721 kms
2012 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 XLT – SALE $35,995
3.5L V6 auto loaded heated buckets pwr seat alumn whls
sync system maroon ebony cloth 45,332 kms
2012 FORD ESCAPE 4X4 LTD – SALE $29,995
3.0L V6 auto loaded heated buckets pwr seats sunroof alumn
whls sync system grey ebony leather 34,085 kms
2012 FORD ESCAPE 4X4 LTD – SALE $29,995
3.0L V6 auto loaded heated buckets pwr seats sunroof alumn
whls sync system black tan leather 33,315 kms
2012 FORD EDGE LTD – SALE $38,995
3.5L V6 auto loaded heated buckets pwr seats sunroof sync
alumn whls maroon ebony leather 51,797 kms
2012 CHEV 1 TON EXPRESS VAN – SALE $36,995
6.0L V8 auto loaded front buckets pwr seats rear air & heat
15 pass white grey cloth 22,337 kms
2003 CHEV MONTE CARLO SS – SALE $6,995
3.8L V6 auto loaded sunroof alumn whls black ebony leather
190,734 kms
SUVS
2009 CHEV EQUINOX FWD LS – SALE $12,995
3.4L V6 auto loaded remote start alumn wheels white tan cloth
151,161 kms
TRUCKS
2005 CHEV 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 LS
– SALE $15,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded split front bench pwr seat autotrac alumn
whls 20” whls coloured key bumpers black ebony cloth 152,340
kms
2008 GMC 3/4 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLE
– SALE $25,995
Duramax auto loaded alumn whls silver ebony cloth 237,689
kms
2008 GMC 1/2 TON EXT CAB 4X4 W/T
– SALE $15,995
4.8L V8 auto A/C/T CD blue grey ebony cloth 161,205 kms
2009 CHEV 1/2 TON REG CAB 4X4 W/T
– SALE $14,995
4.8L auto A/C/T CD red grey cloth 206,098 kms
2009 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLE
– SALE $17,995
5.3L V8 auto A/C/T CD pwr windows/locks split front bench pwr
seat alumn whls autotrac white ebony cloth 166,472 kms
MASSIVE
MODEL
YEAR END
EVENT
TRUCKS
2007 DODGE RAM 2500 MEGA CAB 2WD SLT
S/BOX – SALE $27,995
Cummins diesel 6 spd manual loaded 5th wheel topper
silver grey cloth 120,471 kms
2.9L 4 cyl 5 spd loaded alumn whls black grey cloth
2008 GMC CANYON EXT CAB 2WD SLE
– SALE $12,995
2.9L 4 cyl auto A/C/T CD box cover pewter grey cloth
59,218 kms
2009 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLE
– SALE $22,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded split bench pwr seat alumn whls
autotrac stealth grey 119,973 kms
2009 CHEV 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 LT
– SALE $23,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded leather split front bench alumn whls
silver ebony leather 72,815 kms
2009 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLT
– SALE $26,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded heated buckets remote start 20” whls
steps flaps black ebony leather 106,322 kms
2009 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLT
– SALE $22,995
“GAT PACKAGE” Auto loaded heated buckets alumn
whls autotrac white ebony leather 132,525 kms
2009 CHEV 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 LT
– SALE $22,995
4.8L V8 A/C/T CD pwr W/L split front bench pwr seat
alum whls blue grey ebony cloth 101,982 kms
2009 CHEV AVALANCHE LTZ
– SALE $33,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded heated buckets remote start sunroof
20” whls white ebony leather 58,890 kms
2009 CHEV 1/2 TON EXT CAB 4X4 LT
– SALE $24,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded split bench pwr seat remote start
autotrac alumn whls dk gray ebony cloth 44,050 kms
2010 CHEV AVALANCHE 4X4 LT
– SALE $36,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded heated buckets pwr seats remote
start boards 20” whls black grey leather 60,281 kms
2010 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLE
– SALE $29,995
5.3L V8 loaded split bench pwr seat autotrac 4x4 alumn
whls steps flaps, dk gray ebony cloth 36,249 kms
2010 DODGE RAM 2500 CREW CAB 4X4
LARAMIE
– SALE $44,995
6.7L diesel auto loaded heated & cooled leather 6” lift big
rubber black ebony leather 47,863 kms
2010 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB DENALI AWD
– SALE $37,995
6.2L V8 auto loaded heated & cooled buckets sunroof 20”
whls black ebony leather 66,707 kms
2010 CHEV 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 LT
– SALE $24,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded split bench pwr seat alumn whls
autotrac 2” lift black ebony cloth 87,650 kms
2010 CHEV 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 LT
– SALE $26,995
5.3L V8 auto A/C/T CD pwr windows/locks split front
bench pwr seat alumn whls autotrac red ebony cloth
69,303 kms
2011 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLE
– SALE $29,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded split bench pwr seat remote start
alumn whls autotrac Z-71 greengrey met ebony cloth
36,605 kms
2011 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLE
– SALE $28,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded split bench pwr seat remote start
alumn whls autotrac black ebony cloth 62,344 kms
2011 CHEV 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 LT
– SALE $25,995
5.3L V8 auto loaded split bench pwr seat remote start
alumn whls autotrac Z-71 off road black ebony cloth
96,978 kms
2011 GMC 1/2 TON CREW CAB 4X4 SLE
– SALE $28,213
5.3L V8 auto A/C/T CD pwr windows/locks front bench
pwr seat alumn whls autotrac steps flaps dark grey ebony
cloth 22,970 kms
2012 FORD F-150 CREW CAB 4X4 XLT XTR
– SALE $35,995
5.0L V8 auto loaded front buckets pwr seat alumn whls
sandstone tan cloth 16,618 kms
(3"%3&#"5&t"3.&%'03$&43&#"5&
TOLL FREE 1-800-661-8228
PHONE 306-463-2653
OFFICE HOURS.0/56&8&%'3*mr5)634mr4"5m
HIGHWAY 7 –– 504–12TH AVE EAST, KINDERSLEY, SK
WWW.KINDERSLEYMAINLINE.NET
41110081•11/16/12
PRE-OWNED
VEHICLES
IN-STOCK
CARS
2007 CHEV MONTE CARLO LS – SALE $9,995
3.5L V6 auto loaded buckets pwr seat alumn whls silver
grey cloth 128,593 kms
2008 PONTIAC G6 SE SEDAN – SALE $10,995
2.4L 4 cyl auto loaded front buckets maroon ebony cloth
96,260 kms
2008 CHEV MALIBU LT – SALE $11,995
2.4L 4L 4 cyl loaded buckets pwr seat alumn whls white
ebony coth/suede sake 106880 kms
2010 PONTIAC VIBE – SALE $13,995
1.8L 4 cyl auto loaded white ebony cloth 49,807 kms
2011 CHEV CRUZE LS SEDAN – SALE $15,995
1.8L 4 cyl auto loaded white grey cloth 52,798 kms
2012 CHEV MALIBU LS – SALE $15,995
2.4L 4 CYL loaded buckets black granite gray cloth
32,887 kms
2012 CHEV MALIBU LS – SALE $15,995
2.4L 4 CYL loaded buckets gold mist tan cloth 36,313
kms