The Seventh-Day Adventist Church In Lebanon 1897

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The Seventh-Day Adventist Church In Lebanon 1897
A hardcover copy of this book can be obtained at [email protected]
THE
SEV H-DAY
ADVEN CHURCH
ON
97
MANOUG H. NAZIRIAN
THE
SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
IN LEBANON
1897 - 1997
By
MANOUG H. NAZIRIAN
Published
by
The East Mediterranean Field
of
Seventh-day Adventists
1999
Beirut, Lebanon
DEDICATION
This book is dedicated to all the national
and expatriate employees and laity, who
compelled by the love of Christ, devoted
themselves to the proclamation of the
Advent Message in the ancient Biblical
rand of Lebanon in order ' to make
ready a people for the Lord'.
T rTI T"
T
Page
Foreword
6
Preface
7
Lebanon in the Bible
9
Early Developments
11
Abraham La Rue's Initial Contact with Lebanon
11
H. P. Holser's Visit
11
L. R. Conradi's Survey of the Middle East Including Lebanon
11
Elias Zarub: Pioneer Preacher and Colporteur Won by a Lay Member 12
Early Sabbath Keepers
12
1908 - A Memorable Date
12
George Keough - Pioneer Missionary to Egypt
12
Walter Ising - Pioneer Missionary to Lebanon
13
Baptism of Ibrahim El Khalil, Shukry Nowfel and Bashir Hasso
13
The First Seventh-day Adventist Church in Lebanon
13
Henry Erzberger's Arrival
14
Far-reaching Effects of World War I
14
Resumption of Work in Mission Fields
14
Walter Ising Revisits Lebanon
14
Later Developments
15
Nils Zerne Reorganizes the Church
15
Persecution - A Blessing in Disguise
15
The Seventh-day Adventist Church in Lebanon After World War I
16
Change of Leadership
16
Seventh-day Adventist Pioneers
16
Pastor Shukry Nowfel: The First Lebanese Ordained Minister
16
Pastor Ibrahim El-Khalil
18
Hamad Elias Obeid
18
Lebanon's Place in the Organizational Structures of the Seventh-day
Adventist Church
19
Seventh-day Adventist Churches and Institutions in Lebanon
Aramoun Adventist School
Aramoun Seventh-day Adventist Church
20
21
22
25
26
30
33
35
36
39
40
42
45
47
48
51
Armenian Adventist School
Armenian Seventh-day Adventist Church
Ashrafieh Seventh-day Adventist Church
Beirut Adventist Church School
Bishmezzine Adventist School
Bishmezzine Seventh-day Adventist Church
Boucherieh Adventist Secondary School
Boucherieh Seventh-day Adventist Church
College Park Church
Middle East College
Mouseitbeh Adventist Secondary School
Mouseitbeh Seventh-day Adventist Church
Middle East Press
Voice of Prophecy (Bible Coresspondance School)
Physiotherapy Clinic
53
54
Additional Developments Aimed At Expanding the Mission
Outreach of the Church
55
Seventh-day Adventist Youth in Lebanon
57
The Sixteen Year Long Lebanese War (1975 - 1991)
58
Centennial Celebration of the SDA Church in Lebanon
59
Our Divine Mission and Commission
68
Presidents of the East Mediterranean Field in Chronological
Order (1909-1997)
69
Secretary - Treasurers of the East Mediterranean Field
in Chronological order (1909-1997)
73
Memories
74
Key to Abbreviations
79
Directory of Employees
80
References
96
F OREWORD
Elder Manoug Nazirian, an active Seventh-day Adventist retiree, and former church
administrator and college president, in the Middle East, has rendered a commendable
service to the SDA Church in Lebanon in the preparation of a valuable resource material
that deals with the historical development of the SDA Church over the past century
(1897-1997) in the Republic of Lebanon. Much of this data was unknown and
unpublished, to this day.
It is fitting that the only Lebanese with such a wide and vast experience should have
undertaken this valuable task. The love of people and the positive contribution they
made to the building up of the SDA Church and its institutions is clearly evidenced in
this book.
Elder Nazirian's work will hopefully inspire other nationals to take over where he
left off and build on the foundation that has been diligently laid. Many more questions
will have to be addressed in order to further enrich our understanding of the history of
the SDA Church in Lebanon.
A vital point needs here to occupy our attention, which is the drastic depletion of
church membership in Lebanon. This disturbing phenomenon is attributed to a
number of factors, one of which is the protracted Lebanese war (1975-1991) that has
caused mass emigration, mostly to the USA. As a result, the overall outreach program
of the church has been hampered and it has contributed to a lack of sustained growth.
In the light of this fact, it is incumbent upon us to face this very real problem with the
determination to find a solution to it.
We can take courage from the phenomenal growth of the SDA church in other
countries where God's people have been faced with insuperable difficulties, but the
Holy Spirit through the ministry of dedicated workers and laity has accomplished
amazing things by bringing thousands of lost sheep into the safe fold of Christ. Surely
what the Spirit of God has done elsewhere, He can also do for His church in Lebanon,
provided we surrender all to Him, fully cooperate with Him, and equipped with His
transforming power we rise to the challenge of fulfilling our divine mission and
commission.
It is the solemn responsibility of other national historians to dig deeper and to help
the SDA Church in Lebanon to fully understand its past so that its future can be what
God intends it to be.
Claude Lombart, D.Min.
East Mediterranean Field President
Beirut, November 10, 1998
The story of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Lebanon (1897-1997) cannot be
fully related in this concise book. Hence, I opted to present in the ensuing pages a
concise summary of the origin and growth of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in this
ancient Biblical land. I would also like to point out that in this book I have tried to
record the essential facts of the history of the SDA church in Lebanon without duly
dwelling upon the philosophy of mission adopted and followed by our church leaders
and administrators who with God's help established the church and operated it.
Besides, I have not identified the various factors that have impeded the progress of the
work. I intend to objectively deal with this timely issue in a separate article.
In the research process I am indebted to the following sources for substantial help:
Dr. Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer's valuable book entitled The European Seventh-day Adventist
Mission in the Middle East 1879-1939, Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, Seventh-day
Adventist Yearbooks, East Mediterranean Field Service Records, Middle East Union and East
Mediterranean Field Committee Minutes, Middle East College Pine Echoes, Mildred Olson's
Middle East Program presented at Middle East Fellowship in the USA (April 4-7, 1997),
The Middle East Messenger (official organ of the Middle East Union Mission of Seventh-day
Adventists, 1945-1970 issues), Impact (official organ of the Afro-Mideast Division of
Seventh-day Adventists, 1971-1977 issues), and personal interviews with SDA
employees and sustentees residing in Lebanon, as well as my own service in the church
for over forty three years, that have provided information that is not available
elsewhere.
I am also thankful to Claude Lombart, President of the East Mediterranean Field,
Raja Farah, Head of the Religion Department at Middle East College, Nabil Mansour,
Editor of the Middle East Press, for reading the manuscript and offering constructive
comments, and Jimmy Choufani, Director of Youth Ministries Department of the
Middle East Union and the East Mediterranean Field, for the clerical work.
It is hoped that these pages will achieve a twofold objective:
To refresh our minds on God's marvelous leadership in the history of the
Seventh-day Adventist Church in Lebanon encouraging us to face the future
with absolute confidence in the ultimate triumph of His truth.
To lead us into an experience of wholehearted dedication and commitment
to God that will compel us to do our honest part in fulfilling Christ's commission
(Mathew 28:18-20) in this generation.
Manoug H. Nazirian
Cedar of Lebanon: symbol of spiritual growth,
strength, and fortitude (Psalm 92:12)
LEBANON
IN
THE BIBLE
Lebanon, a republic in the Middle East, is situated on
the Eastern Shore of the Mediterranean Sea. Its area is
10,452 sq. km . It is bounded by Syria on the north and east
and by Israel on the south. Its population, composed of
Christians and Muslims, is estimated at 4.5 million
including the non-Lebanese residents. It is a member of the
United Nations and the Arab League.
Lebanon is mentioned sixty-eight times in the Old
Testament, and the name Phoenicia (ancient name of
Lebanon) occurs three times only in the New Testament.
The inspired writers of the Old Testament books refer to
Lebanon for its natural beauty (Isaiah 35:1,2), for its snow
and streams (Jeremiah 18:14), for its wild beasts, such as
lions and leopards (2 Kings 14:9; Songs of Solomon 4:8),
and for its majestic cedars and other trees - the fir, the pine,
and the box (Songs of Solomon 5:15; Amos 2:9; Psalms
104:16; 2 Kings 19:23; Isaiah 60:13). We learn from 1 Kings
5:5-10 that King Solomon used timber of cedar from
Lebanon to beautify the Lord's Temple in Jerusalem.
Lebanon is noted for its important historic sites, such as
the rock inscriptions at the Dog River (Naher El-Kalb),
Byblos (Biblical Gebel), Baalbeck, Tyre, Sidon, and
Zarephath, etc.
Two inspired gospel writers, St. Matthew and St. Mark
mention that during His Galilean ministry (A.D. 29-30),
Christ visited the region of Tyre and Sidon, where He
rewarded the faith of a Syro-phoenician woman by healing
her devil-possessed daughter (Matthew 15:21-28; Mark
7:24-30).
Furthermore, St. Luke tells us in Acts 21:3-6 that there
was a Christian church in Tyre in the apostolic period. On
his way to Jerusalem, the apostle Paul visited this church
during his third missionary journey (A.D. 53-58).
There is ample evidence in the New Testament that the
Christian churches that were established by Christ's
apostles believed in and preached the truth of the second
coming of Jesus and kept the seventh-day Sabbath as God's.
holy day of rest (John 14:1-3; Acts 1:11; Hebrews 9:28;
Revelation 22:20; Luke 23:54-56; Acts 13:42-44, 16:13, 17:2,
18:1-4). We do not know exactly how long the Seventh-day
Adventist Church in Tyre continued to shed its God-given
light in Lebanon. But one who is acquainted with the
colorful history of Lebanon knows that there has always
been a strong Christian presence in this fair land from the
apostolic period to the present time.
Today, we believe that in divine providence when the
right time arrived God motivated His dedicated servants to
bring the Advent Message to the Middle East. Thus, it was
a century ago that the light of present truths specifically for
these last days began shining brightly in Lebanon.
11
The seventh-Day Adventist Church In Lebanon
EARLY DEVELOPMENTS
Abraham La Rue's Initial Contact
with Lebanon
R
esponding to Christ's global commission
to carry the Good News of salvation "to
every nation, and kindred, and tongue
and people" (Revelation 14:6), Abraham La Rue,
an American self-supporting pioneer laymissionary to China, paid a short visit to Beirut
in 1897 and left some truth-filled literature here
with the purpose of acquainting the Lebanese
with the "present truth" (2 Peter 1:12) 1. Only in
eternity will we know the ultimate result of this
act of sowing seeds of truth through the
powerful agency of the printed page.
Abraham La Rue, self-supporting lay missionary to China
Advent Message. In harmony with this plan,
L. R. Conradi, a German-American, then
president of the European Seventh-day
Adventist Mission, made a tour of the Middle
East in 1901 to see how the mission outreach of
the church can be best served in this important
geographical area. During his tour he passed
through Beirut where he met with Dr. Daniel
Bliss, President of the Protestant College of Syria,
precursor of the American University of Beirut
(AUB). Elder Conradi was shown the institution
where he had the opportunity to obtain firsthand
information on the American Mission from the
American Missionaries who were serving at the
faculty. He also visited the press of the American
Tract Association where literature and Bibles
were being printed in Arabic. His survey of the
Middle Eastern countries in general and of
Lebanon in particular led him to the conclusion
that Seventh-day Adventists should also
establish their headquarters for the Middle East
in Beirut3 . His farsightedness was vindicated
after 1939 when American expatriate workers
took over the leadership of the Seventh-day
Adventist Church in the Middle East. For some
thirty years the headquarters for the Middle East
Division and the Afro-Mideast Division and the
Middle East Union were located in Beirut, capital
city of the Republic of Lebanon.
H. P. Holser's Visit
Following this germinal development, H. P.
Holser of the Central European Conference
visited Lebanon in 1898 with a view to making
plans for publishing books and tracts in the
Arabic language. 2
L. R. Conradi's Survey of the Middle
East Including Lebanon
Then the European Seventh-day Adventist
Mission with its headquarters in Darmstadt,
Germany, felt the sacred urge to enter the
Middle East including Lebanon with the
L.R. Conradi,
Director of the
European Seventhday Adventist
Mission
12
Elias Zarub: Pioneer Preacher and
Colporteur Won by a Lay Member
In recounting the origin and progress of
the Seventh-day Adventist Church in
Lebanon, special recognition is to be given to
those committed lay persons who were
effectively used by the Holy Spirit in
bringing God's last warning and saving
message to Lebanon - land of the world
famous cedar trees. One of those faithful lay
persons was a Lebanese (name not available)
who while residing in the United States of
America had accepted the advent message.
In 1902, he visited his parents in Lebanon
bringing a copy of the book Bible Readings.
With the help of this good book, he
succeeded in convincing the Protestant
minister named Zarub in his town in
southern Lebanon of the Sabbath truth. Not
knowing that there were Seventh-day
Adventists in the Middle East, Zarub visited
Berrien Springs (Michigan, U.S.A.) where he
spent six months with our church leaders
who taught him the message more fully. 4
With a burden for the Master's service
heavily resting upon his heart he returned to
Lebanon in 1903 as a worker to share his Godgiven faith with his fellow nationals. Upon
his arrival he made contact with John Harry
Krum, the German-American colporteur itinerant - preacher - missionary who served
in Palestine at that times. Krum came to
Lebanon and teamed up with Zarub and
together they toured the villages in southern
Lebanon as literature evangelists placing
Adventist publications in the homes of
people. Soon it became apparent that Zarub
was determined to follow an independent
course. He printed his own literature on the
Seventh-day Adventist church and its
message and baptized a few followers with
the aim of establishing an indigenous Middle
Eastern church according to local culture and
customs. His independence was interrupted
by the arrival of Walter K. Ising from
Germany, whose idea of church organization
and unity was incompatible with Zarub's
concept of developing the work. As a result
Zarub bid farewell to his town Alma El-Shaab
and immigrated with his family to Brazil
where he continued to be a loyal active
church member. 6
Early Sabbath Keepers
During the years 1903-1908, before we
had any organized work in Lebanon,
Sabbath keepers were reported in Malaka
near Beirut, and in Deir Demas near mount
Hermon, possibly converts of Elias Zarub;
also in Beirut a German masseur named
Haussman and his wife, a nurse from Basel
sanitarium, who were engaged in private
health work. Haussman was a convert of
John Harry Krum in Jaffa, Palestine. When
in 1905 W. H. Wakeman, superintendent of
the Egyptian Mission (son-in-law of
Conradi), visited Lebanon, he baptized a
woman named Anistas Khoury, a teacher
from Schwayfat, who had vacationed in
New York five years earlier and had learned
of the Sabbath truth. He also baptized a
former Catholic priest in the village of
Magdouchy near Sidon. 7
1908 A Memorable Date
-
The year 1908 is a very significant date in
the colorful history of the Seventh-day
Adventist church in the Middle East. In this
year two spirit-filled missionaries, George
Keough from Ireland and Walter R. Ising from
Germany arrived in Egypt and Lebanon
respectively.
George Keough - Pioneer Missionary
to Egypt
As a result of living and working among
the fallahin (farmers) of the Nile in Upper
Egypt in 1912 Keough's self-sacrificing
ministry, blessed by Heaven, was richly
rewarded when 24 fellahin - 17 men and 7
women from Ben Adi were baptized thus
forming the first Arabic speaking Seventhday Adventist church in Egypt. These upper
Egyptian Christian farmers had with the
help of the Holy Spirit discovered the Bible
truth of the Sabbath and had faithfully been
keeping it for some years prior to the arrival
of Keough. This Phenomenal success in
evangelism paved the way for the rapid
growth of the Seventh-day Adventism
throughout Egypt.
13
Walter Ising - Pioneer Missionary
to Lebanon
As regards Ising, he was of German-American
background who while living in the United
States as an emigrant had joined the Seventh-day
Adventist church there. Upon his return to his
native land Germany, Conradi chose him as his
personal secretary and associate. After he
worked with Conradi for a while and became
acquainted with the denomination and its mode
of operations in Europe, he was sent by Conradi
to Lebanon in order to stress the indispensability
of evangelism in building up the Lord's cause.
Thus, a mission center under Ising's direction
was established in Beirut. 8
Walter Ising,
pioneer
missionary to
Lebanon
In 1909 Ising was appointed as head of the
Syrian-Egyptian Mission that consisted of Syria,
Lebanon, Palestine, Egypt, Mesopotamia (Iraq),
Arabia and Egyptian Sudan with its
headquarters in Beirut. There were 7 or 8 church
members in Lebanon at that time but they were
not yet united in an organized church. 9
While Ising was directing the work in
Lebanon early in 1910, Tigran Zachary, the first
Armenian dedicated colporteur, a convert of
Theodore Anthony-Tzadour Baharian of Turkey,
proclaimed the truth of the second advent and of
the Sabbath in Lebanon through the printed
page.10 Then he was joined by Michael Ghafary
and together they sold Seventh-day Adventist
publications in the major mountain villages and
towns. It is worth mentioning that Ising was one
of the very few Seventh-day Adventist
missionaries to the Middle East who not only
believed that mastering the Arabic language was
imperative for doing effective evangelism but he
applied himself to learning Arabic at the
Protestant Center in the mountains.
After one year of intensive study he rented
a home near the Syrian Protestant College
(now AUB) in Ras Beirut and began his public
ministry among the indigenous population. 11
Baptism of Ibrahim El-Khalil, Shukry
Nowfel and Bashir Hasso
Through aggressive personal work and with
God's blessing Ising succeeded in establishing a
good rapport with a group of students from the
Syrian Protestant College some of whom began
taking regular Bible studies in his home. For two
years he prayed earnestly and labored untiringly
until 1911, when he was able to baptize five
persons including Ibrahim El-Khalil, Shukry
Nowfel and Bashir Hasso. 12 It is interesting to
note that Ibrahim El-Khalil was baptized in the
brook Cherith where Elijah was fed by ravens.
He was a Kurdish Moslem from Turkey who
became a pioneer minister in Palestine, Lebanon,
and Syria. Shukry Nowfel was a Lebanese who
also became a pioneer gospel minister and
effectively served in Lebanon and Syria. As for
Bashir Hasso, he became the pioneer layman who
took the advent message to his homeland Iraq.
The First Seventh-day Adventist
Church in Lebanon
It is most gratifying to know that the first
Seventh-day Adventist Church in Beirut was
organized under Ising's leadership in 19081911. Its membership consisted of 13
members, 7 Arabs, 5 Germans, and 1
Armenian. These earliest converts joined the
church out of love for the truth and not for
securing denominational employment because
the church had no institutions then. 13
While Ising passionately endeavored to
expand his mission outreach in Beirut, greater
responsibilities were assigned to him. The
central European Mission under Conradi
appointed him as President of the Middle East
Mission that was composed of Egypt, Palestine,
Mesopotamia (Iraq), Syria, and Lebanon. Thus
heavy administrative work prevented Ising from
strengthening the newly established church in
Beirut and deepening its outreach there.14
14
Henry Erzberger's Arrival
In 1913 Ising spent 9 months in Iraq trying to
gain a foothold there like he had done in
Lebanon. During his absence from Lebanon
three nationals - Ibrahim El-Khalil, Shukry
Nawfel and Dikran Zachary worked in Lebanon.
In 1914 they were joined by Henry Erzberger
from Switzerland who directed the affairs of the
church in Lebanon and remained in the Middle
East throughout World War I. At this time
church members held Sabbath services in
Bhamdoun in the mountains and at Erzberger's
home in Ras Beirut. 15
Far-Reaching Effects
of World War I
World War I had far reaching effects on the
overall outreach mission of the church in the
Middle East. Most missionaries who were
serving in different countries of the Middle
East, together with their German church
members returned to Europe for safety
reasons. In 1915, the second year of the war,
the Beirut Seventh-day Adventist church had
10 members. Like the Seventh-day Adventist
expatriates who returned to Europe, the Arab
members likewise went back to their homes in
Syria and Iraq where each member kept his
faith and shared it with his fellow-natives
without church fellowship and pastoral care.
While Ising was in Egypt (he had the
headquarters transferred to Egypt) he was
interned by the British forces and taken to a
prison-of-war camp in Malta where he stayed
f9r the next five years. The remaining few
church members in Lebanon were taken care
of by Ibrahim El-Khalil who retained
communication with the Armenian Seventhday Adventist Mission in Istanbul that was
under the leadership of Elder Tzadour
Baharian.
As for Henry Erzberger, the Swiss
missionary, who tried to stay behind and carry
on the work in Lebanon, he first moved from
Beirut to the Lebanon mountains from where
he went to Palestine in 1917 and finally ended
up in Istanbul as the British forces approached.
With Erzberger's departure, the Syrian Mission
(composed of Syria, Lebanon and Cyprus) had
no director from 1918-1923. Thus, the war
brought the progress of the work in Lebanon to
an abrupt halt. 16
Resumption of Work
in Mission Fields
Despite the fatal setback our mission
outreach suffered in Lebanon as a direct result
of World War I, Seventh-day Adventist
leaders maintained their faith in God and in
the vision of the divine commission they were
called to fulfill in the world. Therefore, in
1920 an outstanding conference was held near
Magdelburg, Germany, where European
Seventh-day Adventist leaders met with
delegates from the General Conference and
objectively reevaluated the situation in the
mission fields and approved plans to squarely
face the needs and challenges they presented.
In this particular conference it was decided to
give full moral and financial support to the
Central European Seventh-day Adventist
Mission to resume its work in the mission
fields. 17
Walter Ising Revisits Lebanon
In 1920 Walter Ising was released from his
61 month confinement in Malta and returned
to Germany where he was appointed
secretary of the Central European Seventhday Adventist Mission. At his first
opportunity he set out to survey the
situation in the Middle East but it was after
obtaining visas from the British and French
mandates in 1923 that he was able to travel
to the region. 18
When he revisited Lebanon, he happily
discovered that some of the church members
he had baptized and who had been left
without pastoral care for several years, had
remained loyal throughout the tragic war.
This brought great encouragement to his
heart. Two of his earliest converts Ibrahim
El-Khalil and Shukry Nowfel who became
leading national gospel ministers, had
courageously held aloft the torch of truth in
Lebanon during his long absence, and Bashir
Hasso who had returned to Iraq was serving
as an active elder of the Seventh-day
Adventist church in Mosul.19
-
15
LATER DEVELOPMENTS
Nils Zerne Reorganizes the Church
After Ising returned to Europe
missionaries were again recruited from the
continent and sent over to fill a number of
vacant posts in the Middle East. One of
these dedicated missionaries was Nils Zerne
from Switzerland. When he arrived in Beirut
in 1923, he vigorously set out to reconstruct
the work and to reorganize the church using
the remaining few faithful members as the
nucleus. 20
Persecution: A Blessing in Disguise
Down through the ages the history of the
church has shown that persecution and
adverse circumstances encountered by
God's trusting and truth-loving people have
been a blessing in disguise for His cause.
They have substantially contributed to the
progress of the gospel work and have
purified the church. This proved to be true
in the case of the Seventh-day Adventist
church in Lebanon as well.
In 1921 Nazareth Ohanian, an Armenian
Seventh-day Adventist from the city of
Adana, Turkey, (Mrs. Sella Nazirian's
grandfather) settled in Beirut. Then in 1923
ten additional Armenian Seventh-day
Adventists refugees from Turkey arrived in
Beirut21 . They were the converts of Tzadour
Baharian, Diran Cherakian and Theodore
Anthony. Among the Armenian refugees
were Sarkis Yerganian (Ara Yerganian's
father) and Minas Hamalian (the Hamalians'
grandfather). The arrival of these Armenian
Seventh-day Adventist members, who had
survived the Turkish persecutions and
massacres, not only bolstered the dwindled
and scattered membership of our church in
Lebanon, but also formed the beginning of
the Armenian Seventh-day Adventist church
in Beirut.
Theodore Anthony (left): The
Greek lay member who
introduced the Advent message
into Turkey in 1889. Tzadour
Baharian (right): Theodore
Anthony's first convert in
Turkey, the first ordained SDA
minister in the Middle East,
President of the Armenian
Mission in Turkey, martyred in
Turkey. Their Armenian converts
became the nucleus of the
Armenian SDA church in
Lebanon.
16
The Seventh day Adventist Church
in Lebanon after World War I
-
After World War I, when the Mandate Forces
allowed Germans to travel in the Middle East,
the Central European Division organized the
Egypt-Syria Mission in 1923, which in 1927 was
renamed as Arabic Union Mission with its
headquarters in Cairo, Egypt. George Keough
was appointed as its president. He directed the
work in the Middle East from Cairo until 1929
when Walter Ising joined the mission in the
Middle East again. From 1929 to 1942 Walter
Ising and George Keough took shifts in the
leadership in the Middle East.
During the 1920s, especially after 1923, Nils
Zerne, Shukry Nowfel, Ibrahim El-Khalil,
Stanley Bull, Wilhelm Lesovski and his wife
Charlotte and Walter Ising carried on the work
in Lebanon. It is intresting to note that the
Ghazal Brothers - Chamoun, Melki, Ibrahim,
and Najib - were baptized by Nils Zerne in the
Beirut river (Nahr Beirut) in 1926 and after two
years their wives followed suit. The Lesovskis
served as teachers at Mouseithbeh School in
1929. Then, they were transferred to Syria
where they founded the first Seventh-day
Adventist Church with 12 members in
Damascus. One of Lesovski's converts was
Faris Dow, a Lebanese, who as a layman
served on the Syrian Mission Committee. 22
Change of Leadership
It should be borne in mind that from 18791939 the European missionaries directed and
supported the mission of the Seventh-day
Adventist Church in the Arab lands. But when
World War II broke out in 1939, they returned
to their respective homelands in Europe and
the leadership of the Seventh-day Adventist
mission in the Middle East was taken over by
American expatriate workers. 23
During the period extending from 18791939 our dedicated European missionaries
(especially after Walter Ising's arrival in
Lebanon in 1908) with a handful national
pastors and lay members served with
unstilted faith and energy and succeeded in
setting the mission of the church on a
permanent footing in the Syrian Mission that
comprised Syria, Lebanon and Cyprus.
It is interesting to note that when the
European missionaries left the Middle East
there were 16 churches and 420 members in
the Arabic Union Mission. The Syrian Mission
had two churches and 85 members. 24
Seventh day Adventist Pioneers
-
The lives and ministry of Seventh-day
Adventist pioneers national and expatriate
were characterized by total commitment
without reservations. Their love for Christ and
His church compelled them to serve
unconditionally. Their supreme goal in life
was to glorify God and advance His cause on
earth. Winning souls for the kingdom of
heaven dictated all their plans and actions.
They were on the King's business in season
and out of season. They proclaimed their
unique message with a sense of urgency. For
them the Church, God's family, was the most
precious object in the world. They patiently
and joyfully bore sufferings for the sake of the
church (Col. 1:24). They refrained from doing
anything that tended to erode the unity of the
church and mar its fair reputation. Only one
thing mattered to them - success of the church
in revealing God's love to the world and
fulfilling its global mission with the purpose of
hastening the coming of Jesus.
-
-
Honesty demands that we admit the fact
that the Seventh-day Adventist Church in
Lebanon owes its existence to God's
transforming grace that flowed to the world
through the Christ-centered lives and ministry
of our pioneers.
As we consider our pioneers today, let us
ask ourselves the question - Do we have the
kind of devotion to God's cause that they had?
Pastor Shukry Nowfel: The First
Lebanese Ordained Minister
Pastor Shukry Nowfel was one of our
pioneer ministers who rendered more than 50
years of outstanding service for the Seventhday Adventist Church in the Middle East. As a
young man after attending the National
School in Souk-El Gharb near his home, he
entered the American University of Beirut.
There he came in contact with the German
17
language were such that the sermons he
preached proved an inspiration to young
people and old.
Pastor
Shukry
Nowfel, the
first
Lebanese
ordained
minister
missionary Walter R. Ising who taught him the
"present truth". Desiring to walk in the new
light God had revealed to him, he was
baptized with four others. Among them were
Ibrahim El-Khalil who became a successful
minister and Bashir Hasso, distinguished lay
person and pioneer of the Seventh-day
Adventist Church in Iraq.
When God's cause in Lebanon was left
without leadership during World War I, Pastor
Shukry Nowfel and Pastor Ibrahim El-Khalil
continued the work. Responding to the call of
the Holy Spirit, he dedicated his life to the
gospel ministry. When he proved his call to the
ministry both by his spiritual experience and
by his soul-saving services, the church set him
apart for the gospel work. Thus he became the
first Arabic speaking ordained minister in the
Middle East.
He married Hneineh Madi and eight
children - five daughters and three sons - were
born into their family. One of their sons
Camille Nowfel, who settled in the U.S.A.,
ably served as translator for five American
presidents.
Pastor Nowfel believed that a Christian
pastor is primarily called to the ministry of
God's Word. Thus, he applied himself to the
study of the Scriptures. His wide knowledge
of Scripture and his command of the Arabic
The Lord used him to build up the advent
cause in Syria as well. He teamed up with
Ibrahim El-Khalil and W. Lesovski and worked
in Damascus from 1936-1939. Then he and
Hamad Obeid went to Tartous, where they
baptized Hanni Srour, mother of Pastor Chafic
Srour. Pastor Towfic Issa learned the Sabbath
truth from the Srours and carried it to his village
Bezag where the first SDA church in Western
Syria was built. In addition, he began the work in
Aramoun (Aley district) by baptizing his sister
Nabeeha Khoury who resided there.
When the Adventist College of Beirut was
established in Mouseithbeh in 1939, Pastor
Shukri Nowfel was selected to lead out in
teaching religion courses.
As the first Arab ordained minister in the
Middle East he had the privilege of serving as
pastor of the first Arabic speaking church in
Lebanon, the Mouseithbeh Seventh-day
Adventist Church known as the mother
church. He devotedly spent nearly 20 years
there, and with the help of the Holy Spirit led
many souls to the foot of the cross. By
constantly looking to Jesus he became a loving
and lovable minister whose positive influence
was felt not only among our church members
but in the evangelical circles as well.
He realized that there was no release from the
ministry while his life lasted. After his retirement
on February 1, 1949, he fervently continued to
preach and teach the Word with the purpose of
advancing the progress of God's work.
This faithful soldier of the cross, wearied by a
long illness, full of years and with his eyes fixed
on the "Blessed Hope", died in West Beirut on
October 20, 1976. The church leaders were not
able to go to West Beirut to conduct his funeral
service due to the Lebanese civil war that was
raging its most destructive stage at that time.
Therefore, a pastor of the Evangelical Church,
Fuad Behnam, and an Orthodox priest whose
name is not recorded, performed his obsequies 25.
With the cessation of hostilities and the
restoration of communications in Lebanon, a
memorial service in honor of this venerable
worker was convened in the Boucherieh
Seventh-day Adventist Church.
18
Pastor Ibrahim El-Khalil
Ibrahim El-Khalil was one of our national
pioneer ordained ministers who made an
invaluable contribution to the Seventh-day
Adventist church in Lebanon, Syria and
Palestine during its formative years. He was a
non-Christian who resided in Turkey where
after his conversion to Christianity moved to
Lebanon. He was one of those who attended
the weekly Bible studies in the home of Walter
Ising.
Being an honest seeker of truth, together
with Shukri Nowfel and Bashir Hasso he
joyfully accepted the Sabbath truth. The fact
that he was baptized in 1911 by Walter Ising in
the brook Cherith where Elijah was fed by
ravens indicates that he wanted to be a witness
for the Lord filled with the spirit and power of
the prophet.
Pastor
Ibrahim
El-Khalil,
pioneer
ordained
minister
During World War I (1914-1918), when the
SDA church in Lebanon was left without
leadership, he and Shukry Nowfel continued
to share their God-given faith with their
fellow-citizens. In 1913 he entered
denominational work as a gospel minister and
rendered over twenty years of faithful service
in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. His
loving and hospitable wife Mary, a pious
German church member, faithfully stood by
his side in his varied labors. When Wilhelm
Lesovski was sent to direct the mission in
Syria, he and Shukry Nowfel joined Ibrahim
El-Khalil in pioneering the work in Damascus
from 1936-1939.
After his retirement in 1939 he served as an
Arabic teacher at the Adventist College of
Beirut (later known as Middle East College)
and did translation work serving fervently to
the last. He passed away on Thursday
morning, November 15, 1945 at the American
University Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon, after a
lingering illness. 26 Elder Ibrahim El-Khalil was
a prince in Israel, a true-hearted servant of
God, who served long and well and faithfully
and he peacefully passed to his rest awaiting
the coming of the Life giver.
Hamad Elias Obeid
Hamad Elias Obeid was a dedicated
Christian who labored unceasingly to build up
God's cause in the Middle East. He was born
in Beit Obeid, Zgharta, North Lebanon.
Having been a pupil at the American School in
Tripoli for two years, he entered the University
of Hikmy (Sagesse) in Beirut, where he studied
for seven years with the purpose of becoming
a lawyer. Then responding to the invitation of
his relative, who was running a lucrative
business in Cuba, he immigrated to Cuba in
1912 where he lived for twenty years. He
married Marian and two children, a son and a
daughter, were born into their home.
During his stay in Cuba, the Holy Spirit led
him into the Advent truth. And because he
was a linguist (he spoke Arabic, French,
Spanish and Assyrian) and possessed the
ability to speak persuasively, the church
leadership appealed to him to be a full-time
salaried minister, but he declined their offer
and decided to be a self-supporting itinerant
preacher - literature evangelist.
After his wife died in 1932, he returned to his
homeland Lebanon in order to share his faith
with his compatriots. He then proceeded to
Jerusalem, Palestine. There he did the first home
to home colporteur work in the Middle East. He
covered the city in ten weeks and placed 700
books in different languages in the homes of
people.27 His main concern in selling books was
not to earn money but to win people to Christ.
He used the canvassing work as an avenue to
find openings for teaching the truth. He believed
19
that the advent message must be carried to
everybody. So, he preached the Word in the
homes, in the stores and in the markets. Among
the people he called on were not only common
folks but also high government officials and
heads of states namely King Abdullah,
grandfather of King Husein of Jordan, King
Faisal and King Saud of Saudi Arabia.
With a sense of urgency he worked in
Palestine, Jordan, Egypt, Hejaz (Saudi Arabia),
Iraq and Syria. In 1936 he accompanied Pastor
Shukry Nowfel to Tartous where they
baptized Hanni Srour, mother of Pastor Chafic
and Philip Srour through whom Adventism
penetrated Western Syria. In 1939 he settled in
Lebanon permanently. He married Hanneh
and seven children - six sons and one daughter
- (the Obeids) were born into their home. He
traveled all over Lebanon and placed
publications in the homes of people and
discussed the Bible with Christian and
Moslem clerics. Two prominent Lebanese
politicians - the late Soleyman Franjie,
President of the Republic of Lebanon, and
Riad Solh (a Moslem), Prime Minister of
Lebanon, were his friends. They knew that he
was a Sabbath-keeping Christian.
The June 21, 1978 issue of the popular
French newspaper "Le Reveil" contains a
lengthy article in which Hamad Elias Obeid
tells how he became a Seventh-day Adventist
and explains the meaning of the term Seventhday Adventist. In the article he is referred to as
the missionary in the Arab countries 28.
Hamad Elias Obeid, pioneer
literature evangelist, itinerant
preacher
This faithful servant of the Lord died on
April 21, 1987 at the age of 97 with his hope
anchored in the Second Coming of Jesus. His
funeral service was conducted by the church
leadership in Bousherieh Seventh-day
Adventist Church. He was buried in the
Obeid Cemetery, Beit Obeid, Zgharta, North
Lebanon.
Lebanon's Place in the
Organizational Structures of the
Seventh-day Adventist Church
From 1897-1930 the term Syria was used
to denote the present countries of Syria and
Lebanon.
From 1899-1908 the Syria Mission
(comprising Syria, Palestine, Mesopotamia
(Iraq), and Arabia), was under the
jurisdiction of the Levant Union Mission
with its headquarters in Darmstadt,
Germany.
In 1909 the Syrian mission was renamed
as the Syrian-Egyptian mission that
consisted of Syria, Palestine, Mesopotamia
(Iraq), Arabia, Egypt and Egyptian Sudan.
In 1912 the Syrian-Egyptian mission was
reorganized. Its territory consisted of Syria
and Mesopotamia (Iraq).
In 1913 Arabia was added to the Syrian
Mission which was under the administration
of the European Division Missions.
In 1915 the Syrian Mission was renamed
as the Arabic-Syrian Mission.
In 1923 the Egypt-Syrian Union Mission
was organized and enlarged by the
annexation of Iraq in 1927.
In 1927 the Central European Division
organized the Arabic Union Mission with its
headquarters in Jerusalem, Palestine. The
Syrian Mission was part of it.
In 1930 the Syrian Mission consisted of
Syria, Grand Lebanon, and Cyprus.
In 1944 the Arabic Union Mission was
renamed as the Middle East Union Mission
under the Central European Division,
Section Two, with its headquarters in
Takoma Park, Washington D.C., U.S.A.
20
From 1944-1947 the Syrian Mission was
part of the Middle East Union Mission.
Seventh-day Adventist Churches
and Institutions in Lebanon
Lebanon was in the territory of the
Lebanon-Syria Mission under the Middle
East Union Mission from 1948-1950.
The following is a list of the Seventh-day
Adventist churches and institutions that were
established in Lebanon during the last one
hundred years:
Aramoun Adventist School
Aramoun Seventh-day Adventist Church
Armenian Adventist School
Armenian Seventh-day Adventist Church
Ashrafieh Seventh-day Adventist Church
Beirut Adventist Church School
Bishmezzine Adventist School
Bishmezzine Seventh-day Adventist Church
Boucherieh Adventist Secondary School
Boucherieh Seventh-day Adventist Church
College Park Church
Middle East College
Middle East Press
Mouseitbeh Adventist Secondary School
Mouseitbeh Seventh-day Adventist Church
Physiotherapy Clinic
Voice of Prophecy (Bible Correspondence
School)
In 1951 the Middle East Union was
organized into the Middle East Division with
its headquarters in Beirut.
In 1958 the Lebanon-Syria Mission was
renamed as Lebanon-Syria Section.
In 1959 Lebanon became a Section under
the Middle East Division and maintained
this status until 1970.
In 1970 the Afro-Mideast Division was
organized with its headquarters in Beirut.
The Middle East Union, as a part of the
newly organized division, was made up of a
number of local fields, one of which was the
East Mediterranean Field that comprised
Lebanon, Syria, Cyprus, Turkey and
Jordan. 29
In 1982 the Middle East Union became a
detached union under the direct supervision
of the General Conference.
When in the 1990s Cyprus and Turkey
were placed under the jurisdiction of the
Middle East Union, the East Mediterranean
Field's territory was limited to three
countries Lebanon, Syria and Jordan.
-
In 1995 the Middle East Union joined the
Trans-European Division.
Note: Although Middle East College and
Middle East Press are Middle East Union
institutions, but because they are established
in the territory of the East Mediterranean
Field, they have made invaluable contribution
to the advancement of God's work in Lebanon.
The information on the SDA educational
institutions and the press in Lebanon provided
in the following pages was prepared in 1997.
21
ARAMOUN ADVENTIST SCHOOL
Date of establishment of school 1944-45
Aramoun, District of Aley
Location or address of school:
Levels of school:
1944-45
The Primary level began in (year):
1944-45
The Elementary level began in (year):
Student enrolment:
Lowest number of students enrolled:
Highest number of students enrolled :
Highest number of teachers employed:
4
200
7
Financial status of school:
Was the school subsidized by the East Mediterranean Field? Yes
No
Was the school self-supporting?
No
Is the school still functioning?
Yes
Was the school closed permanently?
1983
Date of its closure:
Reason why it was discontinued: Due to Lebanese civil war.
Names of school principals in chronological order:
Moussa Kerkenny
Elias Hanna
Alfred Akar
Henri Jeha
Elias Jeha
Joseph Mansour
Adel Aboujaoudeh
Georgi Abd-ElKarim
Milad Abd-ElKarim
Laurice Yacoub
Salwa Daher Abd-ElKarim
Fawzi Deeb
The following are some of the worthy contributions the school has made to the cause of the SDA
church in Lebanon:
It provided Christian education for Adventist children in Aramoun.
It exposed Druze children to Adventist teachings, principles and ideals.
Many SDA workers received their elementary training at Aramoun Adventist School.
Note: The names of teachers who taught at Aramoun Adventist School are recorded in the directory
of employees.
22
ARAMOUN SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
There are two scenic villages in Lebanon
that are called Aramoun. One of them is
located in Keserwan, north of Beirut, a
mountainous region inhabited by Christians.
The other is nestled in the Aley district,
Southeast of Beirut, also a mountainous area
inhabited by Druzes and Christians.
Once again the Holy Spirit used a faithful
lay witness to bring the three Angels'
Messages to the village of Aramoun. This lay
person was Nabeeha Nowfel Khoury, sister
of Shukry Nowfel, pioneer pastor of
Mousaithbeh Seventh-day Adventist Church.
After her marriage with a Mr. Khoury, a
resident of Aramoun, she earnestly studied
the beliefs of the Seventh-day Adventist
Church with her brother Pastor Shukry
Nowfel, who had the joy and privilege of
baptizing her into the Great Advent Family.
Thus, she became the first Seventh-day
Adventist in Aramoun.
Complying with Christ's exhortation that
His followers must let their light shine
before men (Matt. 5:14,15), she began sharing
her God-given faith in the Christian
community of Aramoun. Her earnest
prayers and efforts coupled with Pastor
Nowfel's support through periodic pastoral
visits created a genuine interest in the hearts
of Aramounites, some of whom gladly
accepted the advent message and sealed
their loyalty to it by baptism. They were the
first fruits of a larger harvest of baptisms that
followed in later years.
As church membership grew in Aramoun,
and there were a good number of Adventist
children there, the Lebanon-Syria Mission,
under R. H. Hartwell's administration,
Aramoun Seventh-day Adventist school and church built in 1958.
23
decided to establish an elementary school for
them. The school began functioning in a
rented building in the mid 1940s. Our
church members held their weekly religious
services in the school building until 1958
when a new school building was built that in
addition to classrooms had a spacious hall
which was used as a church. The contractor
of the new school building in Aramoun was
Yenovk Dardaghanian, the dedicated elder
of the Armenian Seventh-day Adventist
Church.
Therefore, all the Aramounite Christians,
including our workers and church members,
left their homes and took refuge in
comparatively safer places in Lebanon. The
homes of Christians in Aramoun were
destroyed, a real calamity that prevented
them from returning there. Thus, some of
our church members immigrated to foreign
countries, and the remaining church
members joined the Seventh-day Adventist
Churches in the Beirut area.
Although it was a small church with over
40 members, it served as an effective agency
in spreading the light of the gospel among
Christians and Druzes in the Aley district.
The school and church in Aramoun gave
many talented workers to the SDA
denomination.
In 1994 the East Mediterranean Field
Committee took action to sell the Aramoun
School and church property. The proceeds
from the sale of the property were used to
purchase a permanent campsite (16000 sq.
m) at Baskinta, a picturesque summer resort
in the Math district in Lebanon.
In 1983 the school and church activities in
Aramoun were brought to a halt as a result
of the 16-year long Lebanese war. This tragic
war created an atmosphere of fear, danger
and insecurity throughout the country.
The following people provided pastoral
care for the Aramoun Seventh-day Adventist
Church: Shukry Nowfel, George Raffoul,
Gaby Bejjani, Salam Aboujawda, Jalal Doss,
and Fawzi Deeb.
The new Baskinta campsite purchased in 1994.
24
Armenian Adventist school built in 1963.
ARMENIAN ADVENTIST SCHOOL
Date of establishment of school: 1938
Location or address of school: Khalil Badawy, (later) Bourj-Hammoud,
Beirut, Lebanon
Levels of school:
1938
The Primary level began in (year):
The Elementary level began in (year) : 1938
The Intermediate level began in (year): 1963
Student enrolment:
16
Lowest number of students enrolled:
350
Highest number of students enrolled :
125
Student enrolment when the school was closed:
14
Highest number of teachers employed:
Financial status of school:
Was the school subsidized by the East Mediterranean Field? Yes
Was the school self-supporting? No
Is the school still functioning? No
Was the school closed permanently? Yes
1984
Date of its closure:
Reason why it was discontinued: Financial loss
Names of school principals in chronological order:
Yepraxi Gomig
Hosanna Ayoub
Sella Nazirian
Haigouhy Delice
Hagop Keushguerian
Sella Nazirian
Nourhan Ouzounian
Mary Bitar
Sella Nazirian
Aram Aghassian
Jirair Kourouyan
L. H. Cowles
Minas Megerditchian
Sella Nazirian
The following are some of the worthy contributions the school has made to the SDA church in Lebanon:
It provided Christian education for the children of the church.
Hundreds of non-Adventist children passed through its gates where they learned the principles
of true education and the real values of life.
It was an effective agency for winning people to Christ.
It educated more than forty Armenian youth to become denominational workers.
Note: The names of teachers who taught in Armenian Adventist School are recorded in the
directory of employees.
26
ARMENIAN SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
The Armenian Seventh-day Adventist
Church in Lebanon originated with the help
of eleven Armenian refugees who fled from
Turkey and settled in this hospitable country
in 1920 and 1923. They lived in the large
Armenian refugee camp near the Beirut
seaport. Here they held religious meetings in
a very modest wooden room and let their
light shine in the community. Pastor
Parounag, a new convert, served as their
pastor for a while. They also received
pastoral care from Elders Nils Zezne and
Walter Ising . The small community made up
of Armenian and Arabic speaking members
constantly communicated with each other.
The pastoral visit of Elder Willian A.
Spicer (General Conference president) to
Lebanon was a turning point in Beirut.
When he visited the Armenian believers in
the refugee camp he was so touched by the
sight of the wooden church that he assured
them that upon his return to America he
would do his best to provide sufficient funds
for the construction of a new church building
for them. This kind gesture on the part of the
GC president greatly encouraged and
strengthened the Armenian Church
members. As a trustworthy leader Elder
Spicer kept his promise by sending from the
General Conference the needed money with
which a piece of land was purchased in the
district of Khalil Badawy in Beirut and a
beautiful church building was erected on it.
In 1938 the Ghazal brothers, Najeeb and
Ibrahim, themselves refugees from Turkey,
who became the official builders of our
church in Lebanon, built the church building
and brother Mansour Aboujawdeh, an
expert carpenter (father of Elder Salam
Aboujawdeh) did the wood work in it. The
Armenian believers were deeply grateful
that they now had a presentable church
building in which to worship God and to use
it as a consecrated channel to spread the
saving light of truth in the city.
Following the construction of the new
church building from 1939 to 1997, a period
of 58 years, the following individuals served
as pastors of the Armenian Seventh-day
Adventist Church: Neshan Hovanessian
(licensed minister), Dikran Der Housiguian
(church elder), Abraham Mazloumian
(licensed minister), R.L.Mole (licensed
minister), M,C Grin (ordained minister,
Swiss), Manoug Nazirian (ordained
minister), Aram Aghassian (ordained
minister), A. Zuriguian (layman), Raymond
Khatchadourian (licensed minister), Levon
The Armenian SDA church members
(refugees from Turkey) held their church
services in a wooden church in Beirut
(1920s).
27
1. The Armenian SDA church and school built in 1938, Khalil Badawy, Beirut.
2. The Armenian SDA church built in 1955, Khalil Badawy, Beirut.
During Elder Manoug Nazirian's
ministry (1952-1967) in 1955 a new church
building was built adjacent to the first
church building in order to accommodate
the outgrowing membership. Elder R.H.
Harllwell, President of the East
Mediterranean Union and the Lebanon-Syria
Mission led out in the dedicatory service of
the church. Several evangelistic efforts were
conducted in the new church as a result of
which the advent message was preached to
hundreds of Armenians in Beirut.
property and to transfer the church to a safe
area in the city. Hence, through a
magnanimous special appropriation of
$150,000.00 from the General Conference it
was possible to purchase a lot of 1600 square
meters in Bourj Hammoud where a new
church and a new school were erected. Its
construction was initiated and completed
while Elder Salim Noujeim and George
Khoury successively served as presidents of
the Lebanon-Syria Mission. This new
building was named Bourj-Hammoud
Evangelistic Center. It is the largest Seventhday Adventist auditorium in the Middle East
with a seating capacity of 800.
The year 1958 was marked by a nation
wide civil conflict in Lebanon. The situation
in the district where our church was located
became so unsafe that the Lebanon-Syrian
Mission in collaboration with the Middle
East Division decided to sell our church
It is appropriate to give grateful
recognition to Elder R.A. Wilcox, Middle
East Division President (1959-1966), who
was primarily responsible for the
implementation of this outstanding project.
The church was dedicated on January 9,
Maksoudian (licensed minister), Raffic
Keshishzadeh (licensed minister).
28
1965. Seven hundred members and visitors
attended this special event. Among those
who took part in the program was Pastor
Farid Audi, President of the Supreme
Council of Evangelical Churches in Syria
and Lebanon. Elder R.R. Figuhr, President of
the General Conference preached the
dedication sermon in response of which this
edifice was dedicated to God for worship in
prayer and song and for the preaching of the
living Word.
The Armenian Seventh-day Adventist
Church consisting of some 90 members was
one of the most active churches in Lebanon.
The Lord used it effectively to evangelize the
Armenian population in Lebanon and
through its ministry many Armenians
accepted the advent message. Besides, by
God's help it gave more than fifty national
workers to the cause of the church. The
names of these workers appear in the
directory of workers.
Just the next day Manoug Nazirian,
pastor of the church, launched a major
evangelistic effort which was attended by
several hundred people. Among those who
assisted him in the evangelistic campaign
were Krikor Yessayan, Minas
Megueditchian, George Manoukian, Vartkes
Azadian, Raymond Kiraz, and Sella
Nazirian. This was the second largest
evangelistic effort held for Armenians in
Lebanon. The largest evangelistic effort held
in the history of the Middle East was in a
rented cinema hall in Bourj-Hammoud in
1948-1949. Twelve hundred persons
attended it. Elder E. L.Branson, President of
the Middle East Union Mission and Elder F.
J. Harder, President of Middle East College,
led out in this major public campaign.
The 16-year long Lebanese war (19751991) greatly affected the Armenian Church
and its outreach program. Heavy
bombardment badly damaged the church
building and made it inoperative. It also
accelerated the immigration of many
Armenian Seventh-day Adventist families to
the United States as a result of which the
church membership was drastically reduced.
At present the remaining 15-20 members
are by God's help committed to reviving
their beloved church. It is imperative that
the East Mediterranean Field administration
find a way to generate the necessary funds to
restore this beautiful auditorium to its
original state so that it will continue to be a
powerful instrumentality in bringing many
souls to Christ.
The new Armenian SDA Church
(Evangelistic Center) at Bourj-Hammoud
in Beirut
29
Dedication Service
at Bourj Hammoud
Below: Leaders gather in the
reception room before beginning the
service.
Above: Elder R.R. Figuhr, the General
Conference President, gives the sermon
as Elder Manoug Nazirian, the church
pastor, translates.
Below: Elder R. A. Wilcox, the Division
President, is joined at the pulpit by
Elder A. A. Haddad, MV and
Temperance Secretary of the Division.
Left corner: The congregation stands for the act of dedication.
Below: A view of the large audience filling auditorium for the
dedication service.
30
ASHRAFIEH SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
In 1959 a three-floor building was built
near the national museum in the Ashrafieh
area in Beirut. The ground floor was a
beautiful 250 seat evangelistic center. The
second floor was occupied by the
Physiotherapy Clinic. The third floor
accommodated the Lebanon Section
headquarters and the Voice of Prophecy
office. This was a multi-purpose building
(named Adventist Center) established for
the purpose of proclaiming the Three
Angels' Messages (Revelation 14:6-12) and
winning converts in a new area in the city.
When this evangelistic center was ready
for use, the Lebanon Section under Elder
Chafic Srour's leadership thought of
starting a new church there. In harmony
with this plan, some members from
Mouseitbeh Church volunteered to transfer
their membership to the new church. This
was a kind of church implantation.
The members were mobilized to take an
active part in the outreach programs of the
church. Elder Harry E. Robinson, an
American expatriate minister presented the
first series of public meetings there. He was
one of the very few missionaries in the
Middle East who put forth special efforts to
preach in Arabic. Aida Farah and Ruby
Williams (credentialed Bible workers)
worked with great fervor to build up the
new church. Ashrafieh church was
organized with a charter membership of 40
on October 7, 1961.
Interior view of the Achrafieh Seventh-day Adventist Church built in 1959, Hotel Dieu street, Beirut.
31
A series of major evangelistic efforts were
held there that resulted in the baptism of
new members. Elder Robert Taylor,
Ministerial Association Secretary of the
Afro-Mideast Division, led out in one of
these evangelistic series. He was assisted by
a group of ministers - R. D. Pifer, Angeli
Gayed, Aram Aghassian, George Raffoul,
Edward Skoretz, Gaby Bejjani, Salam
Aboujawdeh, Salem Majeed, Nathan
Malaka, Milad Modad, Manoug Nazirian,
and VOP workers Philip Srour and Michael
Katreeb. Elder Harley Bresee, Director of
the Adventist Cultural Center, also
conducted an evangelistic campaign which
was directed especially to the non-Christian
community in the city. Then, Roland
Vertallier, pastor-evangelist of Bordeaux
SDA Church, France, held the first public
meetings in French (1969) with the purpose
Facade of the Ashrafieh
Seventh-day Adventist
church
of reaching the French speaking
community.
Ashrafieh Church effectively functioned
for 17 years (1961-1978) and then its
religious services and activities were
disrupted as a result of the Lebanese civil
war (1975-1991) during which heavy
bombing badly damaged the Adventist
Cultural Center. The church members met
for worship in the Afro-Mideast Division
administration bulding in Sabtiye for a
while and then they joined the Bousherieh
Church.
During its existence of seventeen years,
Ashrafieh Church was under the pastoral
care of the following ministers: Chafic
Srour, Salam Aboujawde, Angeli Gayed
and Borge Schantz.
32
Beirut Adventist Church school
33
BEIRUT ADVENTIST CHURCH SCHOOL
Date of establishment of school : September, 1984
Sabtiyeh, Beirut, Lebanon
Location or address of school:
Levels of school:
The Primary Level began in (year): 1984
The Elementary level began in (year): 1984
The Intermediate level began in (year): 1984
The Secondary level began in (year): 1985 (only for 1 year) (Gr. 11)
Student enrolment:
Lowest number of students enrolled:
Highest number of students enrolled :
Student enrolment when the school was closed:
approx. 30 students
approx. 50 students
23 students
Highest number of teachers: 4 teachers when it was closed.
Financial status of school:
Was the school subsidized by the East Mediterranean Field? Yes
Was the school self-supporting? No
Is the school still functioning? No
Was the school closed permanently? Yes
Date of its closure: September, 1997
Reason why it was discontinued: Financial loss
Sale of the Division property
Names of school principals in chronological order:
Raja Farah
Raffy Manassian
Wadad Karam
The following are some of the worthy contributions the school has made to the SDA church in
Lebanon:
It created an Adventist atmosphere for the church's children.
It taught Adventist children the centrality of the Bible in Christian education.
It provided our children with extra-curricular activities aimed at developing in them the
spirit of Christian service.
Note: The names of teachers who taught in Beirut Adventist Church School are recorded in the
directory of employees.
34
Bishmezzine Adventist School built in 1952, Bishmezzine, El-Koura, North, Lebanon.
35
BISHMEZZINE ADVENTIST SCHOOL
Date of establishment of school: 1952
Location or address of school: Bishmezzine, El-Koura, North Lebanon
Levels of school:
1952
The Primary level began in (year):
1952
The Elementary level began in (year):
1960
The Intermediate level began in (year):
Student enrolment:
85
Lowest number of students enrolled:
250
Highest number of students enrolled:
85
Current student enrolment:
14
Highest number of teachers employed:
Financial status of school:
Is the school subsidized by the East Mediterranean Field? Yes
No
Is the school self - supporting?
Yes
Is the school still functioning?
Names of school principals in chronological order:
Alfred Akkar
Fouad Nowfel
Naim Mashni
George Issa
Issa Kharma
Haifa Aboujawde
Joseph Mansour
Adel Aboujawde
Elias Ieha
Fawzi Deeb
Johnny Issa
Johnny Manassian
The school has provided Christian education for our children and produced many workers for the
chruch.
Note: The names of teachers who taught in Bishmezzine Adventist School are recorded in the
directory of employees.
36
BISHMEZZINE SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
The Seventh-day Adventist Church in
Bishmezzine, El-Koura, North Lebanon,
came into being as a result of a group of
devoted expatriate and national workers
who had passion for evangelism and who
through full dependence upon God were
willing to encounter hardship for the sake of
the Advent message.
In the fall of 1947, Pastor Wayne Olson
and his wife Mildred, a dedicated American
missionary couple, accepted the challenge to
carry the good news of salvation to North
Lebanon. They chose Shekka, a coastal town
on the road to Tripoli as the base for their
mission. This particular town is noted for its
cement factory that produces top quality
cement. There they spent four very exciting
and fruitful years during which they faced
unbelievable
persecution
and
life
threatening situations until God overcame
the opposition and the way was opened for
the message to penetrate the El-Koura
district. Fifty-four people were baptized.
This phenomenal success in soul-winning is
due to four factors: 1) Total dependence
upon the Holy Spirit; 2) Team work missionaries and national workers working
together harmoniously; 3) Fellowship and
associating (mingling) with people; 4) Preeminence of personal evangelism with
emphasis on giving systematic Bible studies.
The Olsons teamed up with a group of
energetic and zealous young national
ministers in building up the work in this
region. These national ministers were
Mousa Ghazal, Michael Kebbas, Faris Bishai,
George Raffoul and Maurice Katreeb. Their
Bishmezzine Seventh-day Adventist Church built in 1954-1955.
37
united prayers and selfless efforts were
richly rewarded when a new church for
God's glory was organized in Bishmezzine.
Elder Wayne Olson chose a site for a
church and school before he and his family
left on furlough. Elder George Appel
(President of the Middle East Division),
Elder R. H. Hartwell (President of the East
Mediterranean Union and the Lebanon-Syria
Mission), A. W. Fund (Secretary - Treasurer
of the Lebanon-Syria Mission), and D. V.
Kubrock, newly appointed pastor of
Bishmezzine Church, oversaw the building
of the church in 1954-1955.
Did you know that a relative of Ellen G.
White made a valuable contribution to the
cause of the Seventh-day Adventist Church
in Lebanon? That person was Mrs. Gladys
Kubrock. The self-sacrificing ministry of the
Kubrocks characterized by genuine
hospitality and sympathy made them
lovable Christians in their community and
greatly enriched and strengthened the work
in their field of labor.
Exterior view of the Bishmezzine Seventh-day Adventist
Church, Bishmezzine, El-Koura, North Lebanon
From 1947 to 1997 the following workers
served as pastors of Bishmezzine Seventhday Adventist Church: Wayne Olson
(ordained), D.V. Kubrock (ordained), George
Raffoul (ordained), Shehadi Halabi
(licensed), Towfic Issa (ordained), Gabriel
Katreeb (ordained) Salam Aboujawda
(ordained), Milad Madad (licensed), Fawzi
Deeb (church elder), Awaida Wahbe
(licensed), Fady Ghafary (licensed), Aram
Matti (licensed).
Bishmezzine Seventh-day Adventist
Church like its sister churches has given
many valuable workers to God's cause in
Lebanon. The names of these workers are
found in the directory of employees.
It is a well-known fact that uninterrupted
immigration has drastically reduced the
membership of Seventh-day Adventist
churches in Lebanon including the
Bishmezzine Church. Many active families
from North Lebanon have settled in the
United States and Australia. We still have
some fifteen members in North Lebanon
who under the current active leadership of
Pastor Aram Matti are praying and working
to revive the church.
Interior view of the Bishmezzine Seventh-day Adventist Church
38
Boucherieh Adventist Secondary School
The new kindergarten of Boucherieh Adventist Secondary School
39
BOUCHERIEH
ADVENTIST SECONDARY SCHOOL
Date of establishment of school: February 15, 1949
Sid El-Bousherieh, Beirut, Lebanon
Location or address of school:
Levels of school:
The Primary level began in (year)
The Elementary level began in (year):
The Intermediate level began in (year):
The Secondary level began in (year):
1949
1949
1949
1949
Student enrolment:
Lowest number of students enrolled:
Highest number of students enrolled:
Current student enrolment:
120
460 (1996-1997)
400
Highest number of teachers employed:
40
Financial status of school:
Was the school subsidized by the East Mediterranean Field? No
Yes
Was the school self - supporting?
Names of school principals in chronological order:
Jad Katrib
Issa Kharma
Issa Obeid
The following are some of the worthy contributions the school has made to the SDA church in
Lebanon:
Spreading Christian education to future generations.
Supporting the church in its various evangelistic efforts through programs prepared at the school.
Giving the Bible message to non-SDA teachers at the school.
Supporting the church financially in all possible ways.
Note: The names of teachers who taught in Boucherieh Adventist Secondary School are recorded in
the directory of employees.
40
BOUCHERIEH SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
The year 1954 marks the beginning of
Boucherieh Seventh-day Adventist Church.
That year a dedicated teacher at Middle East
College, Miss Edith Davis together with a
group of students from Middle East College
began a Pathfinder Club for the children in
the Assyrian Quarter at the bottom of
Sabtiyeh hill. The children who joined the
Pathfinder Club greatly enjoyed their varied
activities and soon the interest in the club
grew and more help was
needed. Some Master Guides
from the College Missionary
Volunteer Society joined them.
into a regular Sabbath School and weekly
church services were held on Sabbath
afternoons. Miss Davis was in charge of the
Sabbath School, and the Ministerial Seminar
was responsible for church services. This
evangelistic function provided a twofold
blessing - the participants were enriched
spiritually, and the students received
training in effective service.
The Bible stories told by our
young people in Pathfinder
meetings created a definite
interest in studying the Bible.
The parents joined their
children in studying the Word
as a result of which a Branch
Sabbath School was organized.
Additional space was needed
so the group rented a room in
that area and the Lebanon
Section under Elder Chafic
Srour's presidency paid the
rent while the College
Ministerial Seminar cared for
the various meetings,
programs, and miscellaneous
expenses.
In October 1956, the Branch
Sabbath School was transferred
to the newly built Middle East
College Elementary School
building (presently occupied
by the EMF) and continued to
be held in the afternoon. The
Religion Department of the
college also showed a keen
interest in this Branch Sabbath
School and bought a portable
organ for the group.
In October 1957, the Branch
Sabbath School was organized
Boucherieh Seventh-day Adventist Church
41
In 1958, both the Sabbath School and the
Church Service were changed to meet in the
mornings, thus it became more convenient
for the community members to attend.
In 1961, the group began to meet in the
college chapel. Two services were held
weekly. The early morning service was in
English, followed by the Sabbath School in
Arabic and English. Then at 11:00 A.M. the
Arabic service met.
The Arabic services were moved to the
worship room of the Men's Dormitory in
January 1965 and became a section of the main
College Park Church with Pastor Samir
Shahine as the associate pastor in charge of the
Arabic speaking group. It remained there
until January 17, 1970.
Due recognition is to be given to Pastor
Salim Japas from Argentina (Middle East
Division Evangelist) who devotedly labored
along side Pastor Shahine to build up this
small group of believers into a church body.
It was primarily through his initiative and
promotion that the new Boucherieh Church
building was completed and organized in
January 17, 1970. Then the Arabic Section of
the College Park Church moved to the newly
built edifice. The construction of the church
was financed by the Middle East Division.
The new Boucherieh Church was
dedicated on February 7, 1970. The
dedication sermon was given by Pastor C. C.
Facade of Boucherieh Seventh-day Adventist Church
Guenther, Lay Activities Secretary of the
General Conference. Among others who
took part in the program was Pastor Ibrahim
Dagher, President of the Supreme Council of
Evangelical Churches in Syria and Lebanon.
Mrs. Madlene Gilleroth, music teacher at
the College, served as the pianist at the
dedication service. She proudly played the
Baby-grand piano for which she had
solicited the funds with great enthusiasm.
Elder. Salim Japas was appointed as the
pastor of the new church with a charter
membership of 82.31
In 1980 the members of Ashrafieh Church
began worshipping in Boucherieh Church.
This was not a formal union of the two
churches. The reason for this was the
Lebanese civil war during which the
museum area where the Ashrafieh Church
was located was heavily bombed, thus our
church members were not able to attend
their weekly church services. As a result
Bousherieh Church became the largest
Arabic speaking Church in Lebanon, and
many of its young men and young women
dedicated their lives and talents to God's
cause in Lebanon. The following persons
have served as pastors of Bousherieh
Church: Samir Shahine, Salim Japas, Shehadi
Halabi, Angeli Gayed, George Raffoul, Raja
Farah, Nathan Malaka, and Levon
Maksoudian.
New Boucherieh Seventh-day Adventist Church dedication,
January 17,1970.
42
COLLEGE PARK CHURCH
The beginning of the College Park
Church dates back to the establishment of
Middle East College in 1939. It was
organized for providing services of worship
for the students and the faculty and staff of
the college.
In the early years of the college, before
the present administration building was
built, religious services, prayer meetings,
Friday evening vespers, Sabbath School and
church services were held in the following
places: Mouseitbeh Church (1939-1941),
Amman (1941), Mouseitbeh Church (19411943), Grand Hotel, Beit Mery (1945-1946),
Hotel Ghassoub, Beit Mery (1946-1947),
Middle East College womenis dormitory,
college cafeteria (1948-1953), Middle East
College chapel (1954 to the present time).
The two floors of the administration
building including the college chapel were
built in 1954.
The master plan of the college included a
separate church edifice, which was
supposed to be built between the men's
dormitory and the bakery building. This
plan never materialized because of lack of
funds.
College Park Church became the largest
church in Lebanon with a total membership
of 200. Some of the members were new
converts. But the bulk of membership was
made up of expatriate workers at the
college, Division workers, Adventist
students from the four Unions (three of
which were on the continent of Africa), and
native Seventh-day Adventists from
churches in the Beirut area. College Park
Church was truly a cosmopolitan church. It
was a church rich in talents. Its musical
band (under the direction of E. D. McGhee)
consisting of a company of performers of
various types of instruments greatly
enriched the religious services and social
activities of the college. The weekend
religious services were deeply inspiring and
uplifting.
College Park Church served as a training
center where students - prospective workers
- were offered opportunities to take part in
its religious programs and to learn how to
organize and conduct dignified and
edifying church services.
From 1965 to 1978, when Middle East
College functioned under the jurisdiction of
two successive Divisions namely Middle
East Division and Afro-Mideast Division,
Although no evangelistic efforts were
held in the College Park Church (due to its
proximity to Bousherieh Church), its pastors
and members gave full support to the
evangelistic activities of all the Seventh-day
Adventist Churches throughout Lebanon.
College Park Church in Grand Hotel, Beit Mery (1946)
College Park Church in the college cafeteria (1948)
43
They took part in the work of distributing
handbills, visiting and providing rich music
in the evangelistic efforts. Besides, two of its
pastors namely Frederick Harder (College
President), Kenneth Vine (College
President) and Richard Muller (Head of the
Religion Department of the College)
conducted public meetings in BourjHammoud, Aramoun and Bishmezzine
respectively.
The Lebanese civil war (1975-1991) had a
detrimental effect on the operation of the
college. The college area - Sabtiye - was
intensely bombed. Classes were
discontinued. Expatriate workers residing
at the college and in other organizations in
Lebanon were asked to leave Lebanon for
safety reasons. So, there was a mass
evacuation in 1978 and 1982 as a result of
which all expatriate workers and most of
the non-Lebanese students departed from
Lebanon. Thus both the college enrollment
and membership of the College Park
Church were sharply reduced.
East College, with a membership of about
65 continues to provide lofty worship for its
constituency and to present the gospel to
the community through its various
outreach programs. It is worth noting that
a host of outstanding Adventist ministers
from around the world including three
General Conference Presidents - Elder R. R.
Fighur, Elder Robert Pearson and Elder
Neal Wilson have preached from the pulpit
of the College Park Church bringing
messages of hope and encouragement from
heaven to God's Remnant people in
Lebanon.
Despite this setback beyond control, a
company of dedicated and courageous
indigenous workers with their faith
anchored in God, kept the college and the
College Park Church running in the face of
seemingly insurmountable difficulties.
When the sixteen - year long Lebanese war
ended in 1991, both the college and the
College Park Church began to function
freely and normally again. Today College
Park Church, the throbbing heart of Middle
The following people have served as
pastors of College Park Church from its
beginning to the present time:
College administration-1939-1945, J. S.
Russell - 1947-1951, 1957-1952, 1965-1969,
1981-1982, G. A. Keough-1951-1952, 19541956, 1962-1963, G. M. Krick - 1952-1953, A.
W. Fiedler- 1953-1954, Fred Veltman - 19561957, K. L. Vine - 1958-1960, E. L. Gammon 1960, K. S. Oster - 1960-1961, H. S. Johnson 1961, W. E. Olson - 1963-196430, Richard
Fenn (associate pastor) - 1966-1969, Bertil
Gilleroth - 1970, Edward Skoretz 19711975, Arthur Moyer - 1976-1977, Jon Green 1978, Johnny Manassian -1979-1980, 1985,
Ray Roth - 1983-1984, Hamzik
Keshishzadeh - 1990-1992, Raja Farah -19921993, Levon Maksoudian - 1993-1994,
Claude Lombart 1995 to present time.
Exterior view of the College Park Church
Interior view of the College Park Church
-
-
44
Middle East College
administration building, library
and classrooms
Middle East College Boys
Dormitory
Middle East College Girls
Dormitory
MIDDLE EAST COLLEGE
Date of establishment of college:
Location or address of college:
1939
Originally Mouseitbeh,
Now Sabtieh, Bouchrieh, Beirut, Lebanon
Student enrolment:
Lowest number of students enrolled: 12 students
Highest number of students enrolled: 260 students
Current student enrolment: 149 students
Current number of teachers:
12 regular, 14 part-time
Financial status of college:
Is the college subsidized by the Middle East Union?
Is the college self-supporting?
No
Yes
Names of college presidents in chronological order:
G. Arthur Keough, 1939-1949, 1962-1965
Gilbert M. Krick, 1944-1946, 1950-1951
Frederick E. J. Harder, 1946-1950
Thomas S. Geraty, 1951-1955, 1957-1959
Cecil L. Gemmell (Interim President) 1955-1957
George Y. Got (Interim President) - 1957
Reymond H. Hartwell (Interim President) - 1959
Robert C. Darnell (Interim President) 1959-1960
Ed. D. Gammon, 1960-1961
Keneth L. Vine, 1965-1971
Ole C. Bjerkan, 1971-1974
Victor Christianson (Interim President) 1974
Ralph L. Koorenny, 1974-1978
Joseph Estephan, 1978-1980
Donald 0. Eichner, 1980-1984
Edmond A. Haddad (Interim President) - 1983
Manoug Nazirian (Interim President) 1984
Edmond Haddad, 1984-1990
Manoug Nazirian, 1990-1993
Juanito Villagomez, 1993-1997
Svein Myklebust, 1997 to present time
-
The following are some of the worthy contributions the college has made to the SDA church in
Lebanon:
Almost all the national workers who are serving the SDA Church in various capacities in
the Middle East region have been trained at Middle East College.
It has also educated many young people from different religious backgrounds, who are
now holding important positions and are making worthy contributions to their countries.
It has given full support to the outreach programs of the SDA Church in Lebanon.
It is known as the educational flagship of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Middle
East.
46
Mouseitbeh Adventist Secondary School administration
building and classrooms
ADVENTIST SECONDARY0 SCHOOL
F011\01-A1 192
• ao
to
-AB
im
Facade of Mouseitbeh Adventist Secondary School
47
MOUSEITBEH
ADVENTIST SECONDARY SCHOOL
Date of establishment of school:
Location or address of school:
1929
Mouseithbeh, Mar Elias Str., Beirut, Lebanon
Levels of school:
The Primary level began in (year):
The Elementary level began in (year):
The Intermediate level began in (year):
The Secondary level began in (year):
1929
1929
1931
1973
Student enrolment:
Lowest number of students enrolled:
Highest number of students enrolled:
Current student enrolment:
150
1060
1026
Highest number of teachers employed:
73
Financial status of school:
Was the school subsidized by the East Mediterranean Field? No
Yes
Was the school self-supporting?
Nathes of school principals in chronological order:
Hanna Gibran
Salim Njeim
Adeeb Fargo
Jad Katrib
Issa Kharma
Alfred Akar
L. H. Cowles
Jad Katrib
Samir Shahine
Issa Kharma
Johnny Manassian
The following are some of the worthy contributions the school has made to the SDA church in
Lebanon:
Supports the EMF financially.
Produced many workers.
It is an effective agency for spreading God's message of love and salvation in West Beirut.
Note: The names of teachers who taught in Mouseitbeh Adventist Secondary School are recorded
in the directory of employees.
4$
MOUSEITBEH SEVENTH-DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
The Seventh-day Adventist Church in
Zeydaniye Mouseitbeh, West Beirut, is
known as "the mother church", because not
only was it the first Arabic speaking church
in Lebanon but also played a direct role in
the establishment of other Arabic churches in
Lebanon.
day Adventist Church. It was Walter K.
Ising, the self-sacrificing pioneer missionary
from Germany who was used by the Holy
Spirit to erect a new memorial for God's
glory and for the proclamation of His last
warning and saving message in Beirut, the
heart of Lebanon.
The date 1908-1911 as referred to earlier,
marks the beginning of Mouseitbeh Seventh-
Before
Mouseitbeh
Seventh-day
Adventist Church was built on its present
site in Zeydaniye, Mouseitbeh,
the original church members
together with their Pastor
Walter Ising held their religious
services in in the pastor's home
in the district of Howz Saatiye,
near American University of
Beirut. In 1915 there were only
10 Seventh-day Adventists in
Beirut. As the war continued,
the original membership
dwindled or was scattered.
Following World War I, Nils
Zerne from Switzerland
arrived in Beirut in 1923 and
assumed the leadership of the
church in Lebanon and Syria.
At the first opportunity he set
out to regroup the scattered
members and began nurturing
them spiritually. As our church
members ardently shared their
God-given faith with their
fellow-citizens, the Lord added
new converts to the fold of
Christ. Membership grew to
the point where expansion was
needed. So during Nils Zerne's
and Walter Ising's leadership a
piece of land was purchased in
Zeydaniye, Mouseitbeh, on
which a beautiful church
building was built in 1929. The
three Ghazal brothers (who had
come from Turkey)
Melki
(Aida Farah's father) and her
two uncles Ibrahim and Najeeb
built the Mouseitbeh Church.
-
Facade of the Mouseitbeh Seventh-day Adventist Church built in 1929.
49
Mansour Aboujawdeh (Faiza Asmar's
father) made the wooden doors and
windows in the church, and Nazaret
Ohanian did the painting. In addition to the
Aboujawdehs and Ghazals, among the
original members of Mouseitbeh were
Michael Ghafary (father of Manasseh
Ghafary), Shukry Nowfel, (first national
ordained minister in Lebanon), Ibrahim
Touma (father of Rose Kharma), and Ibrahim
El-Khalil.
In the 1950s, Mouseitbeh Adventist
Secondary School badly needed additional
space due to its rapidly growing enrollment.
So, the Mouseitbeh Church building with its
facilities were handed over to the school to
help it meet its physical needs. This
necessitated the construction of a new
church building on the school property in
1959.
The new Seventh-day Adventist church built in 1959,
Mouseitbeh, Beirut.
From its beginning up to the present time
Mouseitbeh Seventh-day Adventist Church
has received pastoral and evangelistic care
and leadership from the following workers:
Walter Ising, Nils Zerne, Shukry Nowfel,
Ibrahim El-Khalil, C. C. Crider, Anees
Haddad, George Raffoul, Maurice Katreeb,
Salim Noujeim, W. A. Potter, George Khoury,
Samir Shahine, and Elie Wehbe (present
pastor).
The Mouseitbeh Seventh-day Adventist
Church has been a lighthouse for "present
truth" for sixty years. The Lord has used it
as an avenue to bring many Lebanese into
the fold of the Great Shepherd. This church
has under God's blessing produced more
than 40 national workers who have made
and are still making a worthy contribution to
the SDA church in Lebanon. The names of
these workers appear in the directory of
employees.
Facade of the new Mouseithbeh Seventh-day Adventist Church
50
Middle East Pess situated on the
Sabtiye Hill, Beirut.
MIDDLE EAST PRESS
PRINT ERS.,0PUBLISHERS
Offset printing machine
Much of the literature produced at
Middle East Press was distributed by
student colporteurs in Lebanon.
51
MIDDLE EAST PRESS
Date of establishment:
Location or address of press:
1947
P.O.Box 90484, Jdeidt EL Matn,
Ferdaws St., Sabtieh Hill, Beirut, Lebanon
Type of literature produced: Religious, Health and Social.
Languages in which literature is produced: Arabic, English, Armenian, Persian (Farisi).
Geographical area the press is serving: Countries of the Middle East Union.
Is the press a self-supporting institution?
No
Is the press subsidized by the Middle East Union? Yes
Highest number of workers employed in the past:
26
Current number of workers:
4
Names of press managers in chronological order:
C. Dinning (1951-1952)
J. McCulloch ( 1952-1958)
E. Anderson (1969-1976)
A. Akman (1969-1976)
Deitter Gramkow (1976-1982)
Roger Stocks (1982-1984)
Moses Elmadgian (1985-1990)
Roland Fidelia (1992-1996)
Elias Asmar, Acting Manager (1996 to present time)
Some of the worthy contributions the press has made to the SDA church in Lebanon:
Supplied the literature evangelists with the books needed which in turn made the
Adventists known all over Lebanon.
Helped students gain scholarships, who in turn graduated and some of whom are currently
serving the church in the Middle East and elsewhere.
Supplies the church in Lebanon with Bible Lessons for the use of pastors and Bible workers.
Gave the church an Arabic Church Manual for its workers and nationals in Lebanon who
do not read the English Language.
Is currently in touch with other presses and publishing houses and acquaints them with our
literature through printing some of it there.
52
The office of the "Voice of Prophecy" Bible Correspondence School on the
third floor of the Adventist Center, Hotel Dieu street, Beirut
Arabic Voice of Prophecy graduation in Beirut Adventist Center
Armenian Voice of Prophecy graduation in Beirut Adventist Center
53
"VOICE OF PROPHECY"
Bible Correspondence School
A Bible Correspondence School called Voice
of Prophecy was established in 1948 in order to
augment the proclamation of the advent
message in Lebanon. Its office was located on
the first floor of the Mouseitbeh Seventh-day
Adventist Church building in West Beirut. The
VOP was under the supervision of the East
Mediterranean Union.
Elder George Keough served as its first
director. Five other workers assisted him in
running it. Elder Keough, who spoke Arabic
fluently, Najla Aboujawdeh, Esther Ghazal
and Naheela Kerkanny took care of the Arabic
lessons, Aram Ashod and Sella Nazirian were
responsible for the Armenian lessons.
The Seventh-day Adventist churches in
Lebanon enthusiastically supported this
unique school by enrolling thousands of
students. who were desiring to read the word
of God. A considerable number of enrollees
were non -Christians.
Bible
Prophecy
of
Voice
The
Correspondence course consisted of 36 lessons
that covered the fundamental teachings of the
Bible. These lessons were daily sent into the
homes of hundreds of people throughout
Lebanon. Through this effective agency the
seeds of truth were sown in many places in
Lebanon that were not accessible to our
preachers.
Many thrilling testimonies were received
from the enrollees. One of these testimonies
reads: "Since I began to read your lessons, I
felt as if the Holy Spirit was working in me.
But on the other hand the devil is tempting my
soul. Please pray for me that I may be firm in
the truth of the Bible." 31
From 1948-1958 the Voice of Prophecy
Correspondence School effectively carried out
its mission from Mouseitbeh. Then in 1959 it
was transferred to its new office on the third
floor of the Adventist Cultural Center in Hotel
Dieu Street, Ashrafiye, Beirut. The new
spacious Voice of Prophecy office was placed
under the direction of a new staff consisting of
Philip Srour, Director, Michael Katreeb and
Nawal Estephan in charge of the Arabic
lessons, and Haigouhy Keushguerian Delice
responsible for the Armenian lessons. When
Philip Srour was transferred to the Middle
East Union Michael Katreeb became the
director of the Voice of Prophecy.
In order to widen the outreach of the Voice
of Prophecy, health courses in Arabic and
Armenian were added. It is worth noting that
the Voice of Prophecy in Lebanon had a good
number of enrollees from various Arab
countries in the Middle East. One of the
highlights of Voice of Prophecy were the
graduation ceremonies in which enrollees who
had completed the courses received their
certificates. These were thrilling occasions.
During its 28 years of existence (1948-1976)
the VOP served as an efficient agency through
which the saving seeds of God's word were
sown in the hearts of thousands of people.
Only eternity will reveal the blessings that
resulted from this agency. The school closed
down in 1976 due to lack of proper promotion
and funding. It is hoped that the East
Mediterranean Field leadership will give due
consideration to reviving this unique means of
proclaiming God's glorious message.
54
The physiotherapy clinic on the second floor of the Beirut
Adventist Center, Hotel Dieu street, Beirut
uix1cor
PliPSWINERAPV
NA SSA fif
The physiotherapy clinic staff right to left: Leif Jensen, Mrs.
Jensen, sister Abdel Malek, Ayoub Azar
57
)
ADDITIONAL DEVELOPMENTS
Aimed at Expanding the Mission Outreach of the Church
The period from 1947 to 1981 was marked
by several additional developments aimed at
expanding the mission outreach of the church
in Lebanon. These developments were:
In 1947, when Middle East College was
functioning in Beit Mery, a six-grade school
was begun there under the care of Elias Yousef
and Mary Nassimian (Bitar). The school
proved to be a blessing to many non-Adventist
children who learned the Bible truths and
participated in the Missionary Volunteer
Progressive classes.
In 1948, Pastor W. E. Olson opened a
school with 60 students at Chekka, North
Lebanon, but it was short lived.
In the early years of 1950's attempts were
made to carry the Advent Message to South
Lebanon. In harmony with this plan Pastor
Moussa Ghazal, a Lebanese graduate of
Middle East College, was sent to Marjayoun.
Similarly, Pastor Daniel V. Kubrock (from
USA) was commissioned to evangelize the
Sidon area. After sowing the seeds of truth in
the region for a short while, both of these
ministers were transferred to North Lebanon
to develop the work there.
A physiotherapy clinic, located on the
second floor of the Adventist Cultural Center
in Hotel Dieu Street, Ashrafieh, Beirut,
functioned during the decade from 1958 to
1968. The purpose of the physiotherapy clinic
was to augment the evangelistic program of
the church through the health work which is
known as "the Right Arm of the Message."
The staff of the physiotherapy clinic consisted
of Leif Jensen (Dane, Director), Mrs. Leif
Jensen, Ayoub Azar, sister Abdel-Malak, and
Serpouhy Maksoudian.
In 1969, the East Mediterranean Field
launched another evangelistic project with the
purpose of taking the Three Angels' Messages
to Bekfaya, a famous town in the mountainous
district of Math. Pastor Jerald Whitehouse
(from USA) accepted the challenge to carry out
this project. A place of worship was rented
there where he and his team held weekly
meetings. Their faithful efforts, blessed by
Heaven, produced a couple of baptisms. In his
work Pastor Whitehouse was assisted by his
dedicated wife, Adel Kamal (a resident of
Bekfaya), national ministers, and students and
expatriate workers from Middle East College.
After Pastor Whitehouse departed from
Lebanon in June 1973, the Bekfaya project
continued until 1975 as a result of which the
light of truth was spread in the Math district of
Lebanon.
Zahle, the capital city of the famous
Bekaa Valley, was also targeted for
evangelism. In 1975, Pastor Nathan Daoud
(Egyptian) was given the responsibility to
preach the message in that new region. He
carried on his evangelistic activities in a rented
apartment which was used as a church.
Several national and expatriate workers
assisted him in his work. Among them was
Elder Borge Schantz, the President of the East
Mediterranean Field, who conducted an
evangelistic effort in the church. Our youth
also supported the church's program through
Their efforts were
canvassing work.
productive, and a company of believers were
organized there. But the evangelistic thrust of
the church in Zahle was interrupted in 1981
when the church pastor left the area, and
another qualified minister was not available to
take his place.
It is God's plan that His church should take
aggressive steps to carry the message into unentered territories in Lebanon. Relying on our
past experiences, we believe that the
successful implementation of this worthy plan
demands teamwork - expatriate and national
ministers working together.
56
Elder Anees Haddad,
Director of the former
East Mediterranean
Union M.V. Department,
introduced into the
Middle East the plan of
holding summer camps
for Adventist young
people.
The first Master Guide Leaders' Training Camp (MGLTC I)
held in Maaser, Shouf, 1953.
57
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST
YOUTH IN LEBANON
From its very beginning the Seventh-day
Adventist church in Lebanon, like its sister
churches around the world, has had a special
care for its youth. It has given due attention to
its young people by providing various
facilities aimed at meeting their physical,
mental and spiritual needs.
One of these facilities was the organization
of the Young People's Society called
Missionary Volunteer's Society (M. V. Society)
whose objective was to train the youth to
strengthen the church and to work for the
salvation other youth.
Each organized local church had an M. V.
Society. The main activities of the M. V. Society
were holding regular meetings for youth,
following the Morning Watch, the Bible Year, and
the M. V. Reading Course, participating in
witnessing programs, wholesome activities and
taking part in Progressive Class work. Every year
the M. V. Societies in our churches and schools
conducted Investiture Services in which
hundreds of Adventist and other children and
students received beautiful emblems and pins for
completing the Progressive Class requirements.
In 1948-1949 the College Park Church had a
very active M. V. Society with a Master Guide
Club consisting of a large group of Adventist
Workers and young people who had been
invested as Master Guides.
The youth work was enriched when Elder
Anees A. Haddad, Director of the Youth
Department of the East Mediterranean Union
(under the presidency of Eder R. H. Hartwell),
introduced into the Field the plan of holding
summer camps for Adventist young people. In
1953, under his leadership a Master Guide
Leaders' Training Camp was held in Maaser,
Shouf. All Master Guides in Lebanon expatriate and indigenous - were invited to
attend this historic training camp in which
they were trained how to run summer camps
for the youth of the church. Following this
important event, Elder Haddad with a group
of trained Master Guides conducted the first
junior camp in Eshbeniyeh, Hammana,
Lebanon. Since then many junior and senior
camps have been held in Lebanon and in other
Middle Eastern countries where we have
established work. These summer training
camps, conducted under dedicated and
experienced youth leaders, have proved to be
a source of blessings to our youth in building
them up spiritually and leading them to
Christ.
It is instructive to remember that the first
Youth Department in the Lebanon-Syria
Mission was organized in 1956.
We are deeply grateful to the Lord for the
role our youth have played in building up His
cause in Lebanon to date. In these last days
God is calling them to lay their all on the
divine altar of sacrifice that He may empower
them to do a greater work for Him and share
in the triumph of His message.
58
THE SIXTEEN YEAR LONG
LEBANESE WAR (1975-1991)
Jesus said to His church: "...In this world
you will have trouble. But take heart I have
overcome the world" (John 16:33).
The Seventh-day Adventist Church in
Lebanon passed through a time of awesome
trouble. The trouble began on 1975 with the
start of the civil war and went on for sixteen
long years until 1991. The greatest damage
caused by this outrageous war was neither
the widespread physical destruction of
property throughout the country nor the
severe economic crisis that hit Lebanon, but
the loss of thousands of human lives. The
Seventh-day Adventist church also lost
three of its workers: Krikor Yessayan, elder
of the Armenian SDA church and bookbinder of Middle East Press, Wajih Faddoul,
translator of Middle East Press, and Khalil
Abbas, the gateman of Middle East College.
with the normalization of the situation
throughout the country, God's remnant
people were granted a new opportunity to
renew their consecration to Jesus by fully
surrendering themselves to Him that He
may be the Master of their lives and enable
them to fulfill their unique mission and
commission.
Besides, this senseless war greatly
hampered the progress of the church in
Lebanon. Our school and church in
Aramoun and the Ashrafieh Church were
closed permanently. The Adventist Cultural
Center in Ashrafieh, which was built in the
"Green Line" sector in Beirut, the dividing
line between the feuding parties, was
terribly damaged. Weekly religious services
at the Mouseitbeh and the Armenian
Churches were discontinued. Many
Adventist families immigrated to the
U.S.A., and all expatriate workers serving at
Middle East College, and the Middle East
Union and the Afro-Mideast Division were
evacuated for safety reasons. During this
period the evangelistic outreach of the
church was reduced to a minimum.
But in spite of all obstacles a group of
dedicated national workers who had
remained at their posts of duty, trusting in
the Lord and claiming His heartening
promises continued the work.
Thanks be to God that the sixteen year
long war, the worse calamity in the history
of Lebanon, came to an end in 1991. And
The Beirut Adventist Center in Hotel Dieu street, Ashrafieh,
was one of the several SDA buildings that was badly
damaged during the Lebanese war.
CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION
of the SDA Church in Lebanon (1897-1997)
The Seventh-day Adventist Church in
Lebanon joyfully celebrated its 100th
anniversary on June 5 and 6, 1998. A centennial
committee consisting of Manoug Nazirian
(chairman), Jimmy Choufani (secretary),
Levon Maksoudian, and Issa Obeid planned
and organized this unique event. The College
Park Church (Middle East College) was the
venue for this historical occasion. The entire
SDA constituency in Lebanon as well as others
from the Middle East Union, Europe, and the
USA were invited to attend it.
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61
The centennial celebrations were marked by
five highly edifying meetings. The opening
meeting held on Friday, June 5, 1998 (7:00 P.M.),
was devoted to a joint Communion Service in
which all the SDA Churches in Lebanon and
visitors from Cyprus, Europe, and the USA
participated. Elder Sven Jensen presented the
message for the hour, which was, entitled
"Worthy is the Lamb." Other participants were:
at the ordinance of foot washing: Danielle
Phillips, Johnny Manassian, Svein Myklebust,
Claude Lombart, Manuk Benzatyan (from USA),
Venice Khoury; at the Lord's Supper: Claude
Lombart, George Khoury, Elie Abourjiely, Kai
Arasola; deacons and deaconesses: Jack
Havatian, Fouad Khoury, Raffik Keshishzadeh,
Martin Modi, Faiza Asmar, Wadad Karam,
Elizabeth Atamian, Ida Arasola, and Raja Farah
(pianist). This sacred service, properly planned
and conducted, brought encouragement and
spiritual renewal to God's people in Lebanon.
On Sabbath, June 6, 1998 four meetings
were held as follows:
1. Sabbath School (9:30 P.M.): Halim
Chehadi served as Sabbath School
superintendent. The various features of the
Sabbath School program were presented by
Raffy Manassian, Fawzi Deeb, Maria Lombart,
Suhad Kharma, Elie Gibran, and Sylvia Kiraz
(pianist). The Sabbath School teachers were:
William Olson, Elie Abourjiely, Elie Wehbe,
Aram Matta, Raffik Keshishzadeh, Rein
Muhlberg, Jimmy Choufani, Valerie Fidelia,
Ida Arasola, and Ibtissam Abdalla. This was a
special Sabbath School in that the entire SDA
Church in Lebanon was at study.
Following the Sabbath School the
Mousietbeh Church conducted an inspiring
baptismal service at the baptismal pool on the
college campus. Tony and Samira Hallak were
baptized into the Advent family in Lebanon.
The officiating ministers were Rein Muhlberg
and Elie Wehbe.
Divine Service (11:30 A.M.): Dr. Baldur
Pfeiffer, who represented the European SDA
Church at the centennial celebrations,
preached the Sabbath morning sermon
entitled "Responsibility to Build". Other
workers who took part in this divine service
were Housni Kolta, Claude Lombart, Levon
Maksoudian, Roland Fidelia,
Steven
Manougian, Mana Manougian (pianist, lay
member), Raja Farah (pianist), and Nabil
Mansour (translator). A special offering of LL.
30,000 per family was collected in order to
finance the printing of an Arabic hymnbook.
This church service provided a unique hour of
inspiration and Christian fellowship for the
SDA community in Lebanon.
After the divine service, all those present
were invited to a special centennial meal in the
college cafeteria. The East Mediterranean Field
and the SDA churches in Lebanon shared in
the expense of the food. This was a kind of
love feast reminiscent of the fellowship meals
Christ's followers used to have in the apostolic
times.
Special Centennial Celebration (5:00
P.M.): This particular meeting was held on the
college lawn and was attended by 300
Adventists and non-Adventists. Those who
took part and made appropriate speeches
62
were George Khoury, Svein Myklebust,
Claude Lombart, Manoug Nazirian, Salim
Sahiouny (President of Evangelical
Community in Syria & Lebanon), Baldur
Pfeiffer, Sven Jensen, Nabil Mansour, Mana
Manougian (pianist). The SDA choir "ALIVE",
under Michael Sidawi's conductorship,
enriched the meeting with two uplifting songs.
In this centennial celebration decided
emphasis was placed upon the worthy
contributions the SDA Church has made to
Lebanon in the fields of education, literature,
health and temperance, and welfare.
This centennial celebration was followed by
a reception on the college lawn.
4. Youth Meeting with Torches (7:30 P.M.):
This was a unique youth meeting conducted
under Jimmy Choufani's leadership. It was
designed to challenge our youth to accept the
responsibility of finishing the proclamation of
the gospel message in Lebanon. Claude
Lombart gave the address entitled, "The
Challenge of an Unfinished Task". Other
contributors were Manuk Benzatyan (song
service), Raja Farah (vibra-harp solo), and
Lydia Lombart (pianist). Five senior workers,
Faiza Asmar, Aida Farah, George Khoury,
Baldur Pfeiffer, and Manoug Nazirian
representing the pioneers, carried the lighted
torches (symbols of truth) and passed them on
to five young people, Suzan Dallal, Mirna
Karam, Pascal Chahine, Steven Manougian,
and Bell Yessayan. George Khoury appealed to
them to accept and continue carrying these
torches until the gospel work is finished. Then
a solemn ceremony of candle lighting took
place indicating the willingness of our young
people to share the light of truth with others.
This inspiring youth meeting ended with a
deepfelt consecration prayer offered by Elder
William Olson.
This historical centennial celebration, under
God's blessing, was an occasion of inspiration,
fellowship, spiritual renewal, and
commitment to taking the Great Commission
to the ancient Biblical land of Lebanon.
63
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OUR DIVINE MISSION AND COMMISSION
Our divine mission and commission is TO
PREACH THE GOSPEL to all the world with
the purpose of preparing humankind for the
second coming of Jesus Christ. This is the
most awesome responsibility ever
committed to the church.
The pioneers of the Seventh-day
Adventist Church addressed themselves to
this responsibility with their God given
resources and accomplished enduring
achievements by building the church upon a
solid foundation.
In comparison, we as their successors,
have many advantages over them. Just
consider the facilities the Seventh-day
Adventist Church has today. In the light of
this, God's people and especially the
Adventist Youth must readily accept the
challenge to continue the good work our
pioneers began and to bring it to completion.
In harmony with Christ's declaration
recorded in Matthew 24:14 the messenger of the
Lord bequeathed to His Church this reassuring
message: "During the loud cry, the church, aided
by the providential interpositions of her exalted
Lord, will diffuse the knowledge of salvation so
abundantly that light will be communicated to
every city and town. The earth will be filled with
the knowledge of salvation. So abundantly will
the renewing Spirit of God have crowned with
success the intensely active agencies, that the
light of present truth will be flushing
everywhere" (Review and Herald, Oct. 13, 1904).
May God help us to hasten this glorious
day.
Second coming of Jesus
69
PRESIDENTS OF THE EAST
MEDITERRANEAN FIELD
In Chronological Order (1909-1997)
Walter K. Ising
1909-1914, 1930-1937
Henry Erzberger
1915-1917
Nils Zerne
1923-1929
George Keough
1938-1942
E. L. Branson
1943-1946, 1949-1950
B. J. Mondics
1947-1948
R. H. Hartwell
1952-1955
Salim Noujaim
1959-1961
Harry Robinson
1962-1963
George Khoury
1963-1967
Chafic Srour
1967-1971
R. D. Pifer
1971-1974
Borge Schantz
1974-1976
Manoug Nazirian
1977-1983
Basim Aziz
1985-1988
Samir Chahine
1988-1990
Roland Fidelia
1992-1996
Claude Lombart
1996 to present time
Note: In addition to the above-mentioned leaders the following. eople directed the affairs of the
East Mediterranean Field:
W. E. Olson (Acting President)
1956-1958
T. S. Staples (Chairman, EMF Committee)
1983
Gerry Karst (Chairman, EMF Committee)
1983-1984
R. Thompson (Acting President)
1991-1992
Svein Johansen (Chairman, EMF Committee)
1993
70
- 11111111111MOMMIMMOM
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not
available
Walter K. Ising
1909-1914, 1930-1937
•■
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■
■
■
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lissusso m
Nils Zerne
1923-1929
■
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Henry Erzberger
1915-1917
George Keough
1938-1942
B.J. Mondics
1947-1948
E.L. Branson
1943-1946,1949-1950
essassaimunme
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Harry Robinson
1962-1963
R.H. Hartwell
1952-1955
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Salim Noujaim
1959-1961
mussessussule
R.D. Pifer
1971-1974
George Khoury
1963-1967
Chafic Srour
1967-1971
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71
72
NOSIONOISOOOSSO
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OBSOOSOMMOOSSOS
Borge Schantz
1974-1976
Basim Aziz
1985-1988
Manoug Nazirian
1977-1983
NOOSOSOMOSONSOS
ill II VW
Samir Chahine
1988-1990
Claude Lombart
1996- to present time
Roland Fidelia
1992-1996
73
SECRETARY-TREASURERS OF THE
EAST MEDITERRANEAN FIELD
In Chronological Order (1909 - 1997)32
No secretary-treasurer (Formative years)
1909-1912
L. Krug (Secretary)
1913-1917
No secretary-treasurer (Period after World War I)
1918-1931
E. Maier
1932-1940
No secretary-treasurer
1941
A. G. Rogers
1942-1943
C. H. Mackett
1944-1945
Khalil Yared (Secretary)
1945-1947
C. H. Mackett (Treasurer)
1945-1947
A. B. King
1948-1949
E. S. Cubley
1950
A. B. King
1951
George B. Yared
1952-1961
T. S. Hasbani
1962-1963
George B. Yared
1963-1968
Minas Meguerditchian
1969-1971
George B. Yared
1972-1974
Leon Thomasian
1975-1977
Husni Kolta (Assistant secretary-treasurer)
1978-1983
Husni Kolta
1983-1992
Samaan Ghali
1992-1996
Husni Kolta
1996 to present time
74
M E M O R IE s
Central European Division (Section Two) Council held in Cairo, Egypt, February, 1939.
From left: Row I (seated), Wilhelm Lesovski(1), George Keough (5), E.L. Branson (9).
Row II (standing), Shukry Nowfel (6), Maurice Grin (8), Ibrahim El-Khalil (9), Mrs. El-Khalil (11), Arthur Kneough (14), Mrs.
Branson (21).
75
Wilhelm and Charlotte Lesovski, pioneer missionaries to
Lebanon and Syria
Walter K. Ising and Ibrahim El-Khalil
Pole jumper at Middle East College became a gospel
minister in Lebanon (1948).
First graduates of Middle East College High School, 1946,
Beit Mery.
From right, Row I: Mousa Ghazal (1), Manoug Nazirian (3),
Sara Ghazal (6), Fares Bishai (11).
Row II: Sella Maksoudian Nazirian (3), Angel Der Housiguian
Manassian (11).
These graduates became workers in Lebanon.
Arabic elementary church school operated by Middle East
College. The branch Sabbath School that was organized in the
Assyrian Camp at the bottom of the Sabtiye Hill was
transferred to this building in 1956. Later this school
building was enlarged by new additions to accomodate the
headquarters of the Middle East Union and the East
Mediterranean Field.
76
Andrews University Extension School, July 9 to August 20, 1961, Beirut, Lebanon.
Thirty-six of these expatriate and nationl workers served in Lebanon.
Can you identify them?
Lebanon - Iraq
youth camp at
Baskinta, August
23 to September 7,
1963
77
Quadrennial Council representatives
The Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Middle East Division, Broumana, Lebanon, November 10-13, 1967
Delegates including
workers from
Lebanon represented
the Middle East
Division at the
1966 General
Conference Session
held in Detroit,
Michigan, U.S.A.
78
Members of the various Seventh-day Adventist Churches
in the Beirut area constituted this large work force of the
Middle East Press (1963).
East Mediterranean Field headquarters, Sabtiye,
Boucherieh, Beirut
RC lDQUARTERH'
OF TM
SEVENTH DAYADVENTIST CHURCH
WIAHONa dORDAN
The children's choir of the College Park Church visits a patient
as a part of the lay activities band work in the hospital (1970).
Adventist youth retreat, Bekfaya, 1994
79
Key to Abbreviations of Names of Seventh-day Adventist Churches,
Organizations, and Institutions Referred to in the Directory of Employees.
AAS
Aramoun Adventist School
AMD
Afro-Mideast Division
ASAC
Aramoun Seventh-day Adventist Church
Arm AS
Armenian Adventist School
Arm SAC
Armenian Seventh-day Adventist Church
Ash SAC
Ashrafieh Seventh-day Adventist Church
AUM
Arabic Union Mission
BACS
Beirut Adventist Church School
BASS
Boucherieh Adventist Secondary School
Bish SAC
Bishmezzine Seventh-day Adventist Church
Bish AS
Bishmezzine Adventist School
BSAC
Boucherieh Seventh-day Adventist Church
CPC
College Park Church
EMF
East Mediterranean Field
EMU
East Mediterranean Union
ESAM
European Seventh-day Adventist Mission
LS
Lebanon Section
LSM
Lebanon-Syria Mission
LSS
Lebanon-Syria Section
MASS
Mouseitbeh Adventist Secondary School
MSAC
Mouseitbeh Seventh-day Adventist Church
MEC
Middle East College
MED
Middle East Division
MEFTT
Muslim Evangelism Forward Thrust Team
MEP
Middle East Press
MEU
Middle East Union
PC
Physiotherapy Clinic
SEM
Syrian-Egyptian Mission
SM
Syrian Mission
VOP
Voice of Prophecy
80
DIRECTORY OF EMPLOYEES
The following is a directory of indigenous and expatriate employees who have served in various
capacities in the Seventh-day Adventist Church and its institutions in Lebanon from 1897-1997.
Heartfelt appreciation is due to each of them for the contribution he/she has made to God's
cause in Lebanon.
The dates recorded in this directory of employees indicate the time employees began to serve in
the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Lebanon in any capacity and not the time they entered
denominational work.
Names of Employees
Date of Initial
Service
A. B. King
A. E. Lind
A. G. Rodgers
A. H. Brandt
A. J. Jones
A. R. Mazat
A. W. Fund
Abdallah Jeha
Abdallah Makhoul
Abdel-Massih Khamsmieh
Abed Doweis
Abraham La Rue
Abraham Mazloumian
Acaby Bedelian
Adeeb Fargo
Adeeb Kamal
Adel Aboujawda
1948
1970
1942
1970
1952
1951
1953
1983
1979
1955
1997
1897
1945
1932
1949
1978
1965
Adel Kamal
Adrene Azadian
Afif Jeha
Ahad Samaan
Aida Farah
1977
1974
1961
1966
1941
Alfred Akar
Alice Elmadjian
Alice Iwaz
Alice Majeed
Allan Philips
Amir Ghali
Anahid Barsoumian
Anahid Benzatyan
Anahid Murdesemjian
1954
1964
1982
1970
1996
1990
1961
1970
1957
Type of Work Performed
Secretary-treasurer, LSM
President, AMD
Treasurer, SM
Lay Activities, Youth Director, AMD
Treasurer, MEC
VOP Director, MED
Treasurer, EMU
Teacher, MEC
Credentialed Literature Evangelist
Teacher, AAS and MASS, Bible Instructor
Publishing Director, EMF
Self-supporting pioneer colporteur to China
Licensed Minister, Arm SAC
Missionary Liscentiate, SM
Licensed minister, Principal, MASS
Licensed Literature Evangelist
Teacher and Principal, AAS, Acting Principal,
Bish AS
Credentialed Literature Evangelist
Secretary, MEC
Teacher, MASS, AAS, Bish AS
Teacher, MEC
Credentialed teacher, MASS, BASS,
Credentialed Bible Worker, Lebanon
Principal, Bish AS, AAS
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, MASS
Credentialed teacher, BASS
Elder, CPC, Head of English Dept., MEC
Teacher, BACS
Teacher, Arm AS
Office Secretary, MEU
Teacher, Arm AS
81
Anahid Ohannessian
Andrew Barr
Anees A. Haddad
1979
1926
1956
Aneesi Nakhle
Angel Manassian
Angel Yessayan
Angely Gayed
Annette Leatherman
Annig Maksoudian
Antoine Jabbour
Antranig Avakian
Anwar Ayoubi
Ara Yerganian
Aram Aghassian
Aram Ashod
Araxy Tcherkezian
Armond Manassian
Arthur Keough
Arthur Keough (Mrs.)
Arthur Moyer
Awada Abd-Elshadid
Ayoub Azar
1974
1951
1987
1972
1983
1965
1960
1956
1966
1972
1946
1951
1973
1985
1939
1939
1976
1909
1963
B. Baldwin
Baldur Pfeiffer
Basim Aziz
Bassam Asmar
Bassam Karam
Bedros Kolian
Bekele Heye
Benjamil Rahail
Benjamin J. Mondics
Bert Gilleroth
Bertram Chan
Beverly Roth
Bonavee Eichner
Borge Shantz
1978
1966
1985
1996
1968
1970
1970
1974
1947
1966
1972
1983
1983
1977
Boutros Ghazal
1977
Bruce O'neil
B.J. Mondics (Mrs.)
1974
1947
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS, BASS
Missionary Licentiate, SM
Youth and Sabbath School Director, EMU, LSM,
Pastor, MSAC, Youth, Sabbath School,
Temperance Director, MED
Teacher, MEC
Credentialed teacher, MASS, Arm AS, MEC
Bible Worker, Arm SAC
Pastor, BSAC, EMF Committee member
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, MASS
Maintenance Worker, gateman, MEC
Lay Activities Director, LSS, Pastor, Arm SAC
Licensed Minister, MEP Translator
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, Head of Business Department, MEC
President, MEC, CPC Pastor
Wife of Arthur Keough
Pastor, CPC
SEM, Committee Member
PC worker
Secretary of Instructional Services, MEC
Teacher, MEC, Head of History Department, MEC
President, EMF
Assistant Accountant, MEU
Credentialed teacher, Assistant Principal, BASS
Teacher, Arm AS
Sabbath School Director, AMD
Teacher, Arm AS
President, SM
Pastor, CPC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
President, EMF, Youth and Lay Activities
Director, AMD
Lebanon Legal Association Committee member,
MEP treasurer
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
82
C. C. Norris
C. D. Watson
C. D. Watson (Mrs.)
C. E. Schmidt
C. H. Mackett
C. V. Brauer
Carmelita Troy
Carol Issa
Caroline Russell
Cecil David
Cecil L. Gemmell
Chafic Srour
Chafic Srour (Mrs.)
Charlotte Conway
Charlotte Lesovsky
Christina Nazirian
Claude Lombart
1956
1976
1976
1967
1944
1963
1983
1996
1967
1991
1955
1936
1967
1974
1929
1971
1996
Costy Sawada
Craig Newborn
1963
1980
D. K. Bazara
1970
D. L. Chappell
Dale Hepker
Dalal Aziz
Dalton Baldwin
Danielle Philips
Daniel V. Kubrock
David Zavas
Dean 0. McDaniel
Diana Atamian
Dikran Der Housikian
Dirouhy Garabedian
Doly D. Jeha
Don Leatherman
Donald 0. Eichner
Dorothy Oster
Dorothy Winslow
Dorris Moris
Dean McDaniel (Mrs.)
Dwight Rose
Dwight Rose (Mrs.)
1964
1966
1985
1978
1996
1954
1983
1973
1991
1932
1961
1980
1983
1980
1972
1949
1966
1973
1978
1978
Secretary-treasurer, MED
President, AMD
Wife of C. D. Watson
Treasurer, AMD
Secretary-treasurer, SM
Radio and Sabbath Director, MED
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Bish AS, MASS
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Church Elder, MEC
Interim President, MEC
Teacher, MASS, President, LS
Wife of Chafic Srour
Music Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MASS
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS
EMF President, CPC Pastor,
EMF Stewardship & Global Mission Director
Teacher, Bish AS
Youth Director, EMF, Youth, S School, Lay
Activities Director, MEU
Field Secretary Stewardship and Development
Secretary, AMD
Publishing Director, MED
Teacher, Dean of Men, MEC
Bible Teacher, Amman Adventist School
Teacher, MEC
Deaconess, CPC, Secretary to President, MEC
Pastor, Bish SAC
Teacher, MEC
Evangelist, Lebanon
Teacher, MEC
Missionary Licentiate, SM, Pastor, ARM SAC
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, Bish AS
Teacher, MEC
President, MEC, EMF Committee member
Music Teacher, MEC
Librarian, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Wife of Dean McDaniel
Principal, Beirut Overseas School
Teacher, Beirut Overseas School
83
E. D. Mc Ghee
E. G. Gregg
E. L. Branson
E. L. Branson (Mrs.)
E. L. Gammon (Mrs.)
E. S. Cubley
E. W. Pedersen
Earnest Runge
Earnest W. Waring
Ed D. Gammon
Edith Davis
Edmond Haddad
1958
1978
1943
1943
1960
1950
1975
1974
1959
1960
1948
1966
Edward Boghbadian
Edward Skoretz
Eileen Manassian Ghali
Elias Asmar
1963
1972
1988
1962
Elias Choufani
1985
Elias Estephan
Elias Hanna Youssif
1960
1947
Elias Jeha
1956
Elias Zarub
Elias Zein
Elie Abourejaili
1903
1957
1984
Elie Jibran
Elie Wehbe
1991
1979
Ella Haddad
Ellen Ghazal Khoury
Ellen Raffoul
Ellen Sarkis
Emile Tabanji
Erna Kruger
Esther Ghazal Katrib
Euphemia M. Bryne
Eva Villagomez
Evelyn Dikran
Evelyn Hamer
Evelyn Ibrahim
1966
1963
1970
1966
1964
1949
1951
1957
1993
1939
1969
1976
Teacher, MEC
Secretary-treasurer, AMD
President, SM, MEU
Wife of E.L. Branson, Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Secretary-treasurer, SM, MEU
President, AMD
Superintendent, Land and Development, MEC
Teacher, Dean of Men, MEC
President, MEC, Pastor, CPC
Education Secretary, LSS, Teacher MEC
Teacher, Academic Dean, President, MEC,
MEC,Executive Committee Member, EMF
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, MEC, Pastor, CPC
Teacher, BASS
Press Worker, Lebanon Legal Association
Committee member, Acting Manager, MEP
Credentialed Teacher, Associate Principal,
MASS
Licensed minister, Beirut Publishing Director, LS
Teacher, Beit-Mery Elementary School, MASS,
Principal, AAS
Credentialed teacher, MASS, Arm AS, Principal,
Bish AS and AAS
Licensed minister, SM
Teacher, MASS
Lebanon Legal Association Committee member
Church Elder, BSAC
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MASS, Pastor, MSAC, Lebanon Legal
Association Secretary
Teacher, MEC
Licensed Bible Worker, LS
Credentialed teacher, MASS, BASS, Bish AS
Teacher, Bish AS
VOP Worker, Teacher, MASS
Acting Dean of Women, MEC
VOP Worker, Credentialed teacher, BASS
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Head Deaconess, MEC
Credentialed teacher, MASS, Arm AS
Teacher, MEC
Secretary, BASS
84
F. C. Webster
F. C. Webster (Mrs.)
Frederick G. Harder
Frederick G. Harder (Mrs.)
F. Gregorius
Fadia Farag
Fady Ghafary
Faiza Asmar
Farid Khoury
Faris B. Bishai
Faris Daw
Fawzia Ghali
Fawzi Deeb
1967
1967
1946
1946
1908
1983
1994
1956
1990
1951
1945
1983
1960
Fida Jeha
Ferial Choufani
Fida Abdel-Karim
Francis Saliba
Fred Veltman
Fouad Ashkar
Fuad Nowfel
F. Gregorius (Mrs.)
1991
1994
1961
1992
1956
1977
1961
1908
G. Fargo
G. Fargo (Mrs.)
G. J. Appel
G. J. Appel (Mrs.)
G. M. Krick
1952
1952
1951
1951
1941
G. M. Krick (Mrs.)
Gabriel Bejjani
Gabriel Katrib
Gaby Melki
Gaby Shamoun
Garbis Bedelian
Garo Baghchejian
Gary Fresk
Gary Gene Johnson
George A. Khoury
1952
1978
1971
1979
1983
1955
1948
1971
1969
1966
George Asmar
George Esber
1996
1949
George Ghazal
1965
President, MED
Wife of F.C. Webster
President, MEC
Wife of Frederick G. Harder, teacher, MEC
Missionary Licentiate, SM
Colporteur Trainer, Lebanon
Pastor, Bish SAC, Assistant Pastor, BSAC
Credentialed Teacher, MASS, BASS
Teacher, BASS, Teacher, MEC
Licensed minister, Bish SAC
Executive Committee member, SM
Dorcas Leader, CPC, English Teacher, MEC
Teacher, AAS, MASS, Arm AS, Principal, AAS,
Bish AS
Teacher, MASS, Bish AS
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, AAS
Health & Temperance Director, EMF
Pastor, CPC
Bible teacher, MASS, Editor, MEP
Principal, Bish AS
Missionary Licentiate, SM
Dean of Men„ MEC
Teacher, MEC
President, MED
Wife of G. J. Appel
Executive Committee member, SM, President,
MEC, Pastor, CPC
Nursing Service, MEC
Licensed minister, Bikfaya, Aramoun
Pastor, Bish SAC
Teacher, BASS, Arm AS, MEC
Literature Evangelist, Lebanon
Arm SAC Elder, mailman, janitor, MED, AMD
Executive Committee member, SM
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Principal, AAS, Treasurer, Business Manager,
MEC
Teacher, BASS, MASS
Credentialed teacher, MASS, Bish AS Principal,
AAS
Business Manager, MEC, Cashier, MEU
85
George Issa
1954
George Keough
George Keough (Mrs.)
George Khoury
1941
1941
1960
George Manougian
1974
George Marinakis
George Moujabbar
George Raffoul
1982
1955
1951
George Shahine
George T. Gott
George Terzibashian
'George Yared
Georgette Estephan
Gerry Karst
Gladys Kubrock (Mrs.)
1954
1957
1974
1948
1963
1983
1954
H. D. Bresee
H. D. Bresee (Mrs.)
H. E. Robinson
H. N. Sheffield
H. S. Holser
H. S. Johnson
Habib Rai
Hagop Keushguerian
Hagop Manougian
1968
1968
1961
1971
1898
1961
1968
1953
1996
Haifa Abou Jawdeh
1957
Haifa Srour
Haigouhy Keushguerian
1947
1945
Halim Salloum
Halim Shehadi
1982
1996
Hamad Obeid
Hamzik Keshishzadeh
Hana Abboud
Hana Nasr Jubran
Hanan Obeid
Hanna Kebbas
1932
1991
1973
1930
1983
1971
Principal, Bish AS, Teacher, MASS Bible
Instructor, Registrar, MEC
President, SM, AUM, VOP Director
Wife of George Keough
Pastor, MSAC, President, LS, Lebanon Legal
Association President, MEU Evangelist,
Ministerial Association and Personal Ministries
Director, EMF
Superintendent, Maintenance and College Wood
Products
Teacher, MASS, Arm AS
Teacher, MASS
Pastor, Bish SAC, ASAC, MSAC, Ash SAC,
Lebanon Legal Association Committee member
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, Business Manager, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Secretary-treasurer, LSM
Teacher, Bish AS, MASS
President, MEU
Wife of Daniel Kubrock
Adventist Center Director
Wife of H. D. Bresee
Evangelist, Beirut, President, LS
Medical and Temperance Secretary, AMD
Director, Central European Conference
CPC Pastor
Teacher, Assistant Principal, MASS
Teacher, MASS, Principal, Arm AS
Assistant Treasurer, CPC, Maintenance worker,
MEC
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS, Principal, Bish
AS, Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MASS, Principal, Arm AS, VOP
Worker
Teacher, MASS
Assistant Sabbath School Director, EMF Lebanon
Legal Association Treasurer
Pioneer Literature Evangelist, itinerant preacher
Pastor, CPC, Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Assistant Registrar
Principal, MASS
Teacher, Arm AS, BAGS, Accountant, EMF
Licensed minister, Lebanon
86
Hanneh Katrib
Harold Zinner
Hasmig Azadian
Hasmig Varjabedian
Hayat Bejjani
Heba Malaka
Henry Erzberger
Henry Jeha
Henry Melki
Herbert H. Faiman
Hilal Doss
Hosanna Ayoub
Hovhanness Maksoudian
Hovig Sarrafian
Hugh Cowles
Husni Kolta
Robinson (Mrs.)
1974
1978
1977
1956
1967
1997
1915
1956
1957
1966
1952
1963
1963
1979
1973
1971
1961
Teacher, Bish AS
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, MASS
Cashier, BASS
Director, SM
Teacher, MEC, Principal, AAS
Teacher, MEC, Publishing Director, EMU
Teacher, Bakery Manager, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Arm AS, PC Worker
Janitor, Arm AS, gateman, AMD
Teacher, MEC
Principal, MASS, ARM AAS, Teacher, MEC
Accountant, LS, Secretary-treasurer, EMF
Wife of H. E. Robinson
I. Paul
I. Touchard
Ibrahim El-Khalil
Ibrahim Ghazal
Ibrahim Hanna
Ibrahim Kasem
Ibrahim Maamary
1978
1978
1918
1947
1959
1971
1962
Ibrahim Swaidan
Ibtisam Jbara
Ida Arasola
1952
1991
1996
Ignatius Yacoub
1972
Iman Gergis
Indra Ashod
Ingeborn Bjerkan
Issa H. Obeid
1977
1957
1971
1969
Issa Jbara
Issa Kharma
1971
1957
Issa Sawma
1957
Secretary to the President
Dean of Women
Pioneer Ordained minister
Executive Committee member, SM
Teacher, MEC
Janitor, MASS
Credentialed Teacher, AAS, MASS, Arm AS,
Teacher, gateman, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, BASS
Teacher, Children's Sabbath School, CPC,
Matron, MEC
Executive Committee Member, Education
Director, EMF, Academic Dean, MEC, Public
Relations and Religious Liberty Director, AMD
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, BASS. Public Relations Director, LS,
Lebanon Legal Association Secretary, Principal,
BASS
Janitor, BASS
Teacher, MASS, Education Director, EMF,
Principal, Bish AS, BASS & MASS, Lebanon
Legal Association Secretary, Public Relations &
Religious Liberty Director, EMF
Janitor, MASS, Ash SAC, VOP
87
Jerald W. Whitehouse
J. H. Krum
J. S. Russell
Jabbour Semaan
1971
1903
1947
1953
Jack Barakat
Jack Bohannon
Jack Mahon
1957
1970
1975
Jacob Havatian
Jad Katrib
1991
1961
Jalal Doss
James Kilmer
James Segar
James Stephen
Jamila Sarkis
Jamily Nicola
Jean Atamian
Jeanette Balta
Jeanette Issa
Jerry Lewis
1974
1978
1969
1967
1974
1991
1997
1962
1953
1991
Jimmy Choufani
1984
Jirair Kourouyan
Joanne Elmadgian
Johan B. Storfjell
John Bedelian
Johnny Issa
Johnny Manassian
1966
1991
1971
1952
1991
1979
Jon Green
Joseph Estephan
1978
1974
Joseph Khoury
1967
Joseph Mansour
1962
Josephine Abou-Haidar
Josephine Khoury
Juanito Villagomez
1958
1964
1993
Judith Storfjell
1979
Pastor, Bikfaya Company
Literature evangelist, Preacher
Pastor, CPC, Dean of Men and Teacher, MEC
Associate Secretary of Medical Department,
MED, Licensed minister, Lebanon, Editor, MEP
Teacher, MASS
MEFTT member, Teacher, MEC
Health and Temperance Director, MEU,
Communication and Temperance Director, AMD
Supervisor, MASS
Principal, MASS, BASS, Education Director, LS,
Teacher, MEC
Ministerial intern, Lebanon, Pastor, ASAC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Superintendent, College Laundry
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MASS
Credentialed teacher, MASS
Global Mission, ADRA-Middle East Director,
MEU
Teacher MASS, ADRA Director, Communication
Director, Youth Director, EMF, MEU
Teacher, MASS, Principal, Arm AS
Administrative Secretary, MEU
Teacher, MEC
Licensed minister, Beirut
Principal Bish AS, Assistant Principal, BASS
Teacher, Dean of Men, Academic Dean, MEC,
CPC Pastor, Principal, MASS, Bish AS,
Education Director, EMF, MEU
Chaplain, MEC Pastor, CPC
President, Teacher, MEC, Lebanon Legal
Association Committee Member, Education
Director, AMD
Education Director, LS, Head of Education
Department MEC
Credentialed teacher, MASS, Arm AS, Principal,
AAS, Bish AS
Teacher, BACS
Credentialed teacher, AAS, BASS
President, MEC, Executive Committee member;
EMF
Teacher, MEC
88
Juliette Saliba
June Soper
Justin Hamer
J. W. Whitehouse (Mrs.)
1963
1957
1969
1971
Teacher, MASS
Music Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Wife of J. W. Whitehouse
Kai Arasola
Kameel Haddad
1996
1996
Kamel Adeeb
Kamly Meguerditchian
Karen Blinci
Karen Staples
Kenneth L. Vine
Kenneth L. Vine (Mrs.)
Kenneth Oster
Khachatourian (Mrs.)
Khalil Yared
Khatoum D. Wehbe
Knarig Maksoudian
Kozet Meguerditchian
1978
1964
1973
1976
1955
1955
1961
1915
1945
1983
1958
1976
Elder, CPC, Academic Dean, MEC
EMF Committee Member, Pastor Amman SDA
Church
Licensed Literature Evangelist, Lebanon
Office Secretary, LS, MED
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Beirut Overseas School
President, Teacher, MEC, CPC Pastor
Wife of Kenneth L. Vine, teacher, MEC
Pastor, CPC, MEFTT Member
Credentialed Missionary, SM
Treasurer, SM
Teacher, MASS
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, Arm AS
L. C. Miller
1968
L. Krug
L. R. Conradi
L. S. Tabingo
Laila Aboujawda
Laila Tabanji
Larry Siemens
Laura Abdel-Karim
Laurence Sidawi
Laurice Abboud
Laurice Bishai
Laurice H. Bishara
Laurice Yacoub
Lawrence E. Hanson
Leif Jensen
Leon D. Thomassian
Leslie Norris
Levon Maksoudian
1913
1901
1983
1969
1966
1978
1977
1976
1955
1964
1974
1953
1974
1961
1970
1946
1982
Leif Jensen (Mrs.)
Lloyd Nolin
1967
1966
Ministerial Radio - TV and Sabbath School
Secretary, MED
SM Secretary
President, ESAM
Secretary to Registrar, Cashier, MEC
Teacher, MASS
Credentialed teacher, MASS, AAS
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, BASS, MASS
Credentialed teacher, MASS, BACS
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, Bish AS, MASS
Director of Food Services, MEC
Principal, AAS, Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MEC
PC Director
Accountant, Secretary-treasurer, LS
Licensed minister, Beirut
Pastor, Arm SAC, Health and Temperance
Director, Lebanon Legal Association Committee
member, EMF secretary
Teacher, MEC, PC Worker
Maintenance Director, Teacher, MEC
89
Londa Schmidt
Luisa Taer
Lyda England
Lydia Lombart
1972
1996
1979
1996
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Wife of Claude Lombart
M. E. Adams
M. E. Lind
M. E. Lind (Mrs.)
M. T. Battle
Malak Rai
Manoug H. Nazirian
1958
1970
1970
1977
1990
1952
Manoushag Anserlian
Manuk Benzatyan
1968
1972
Marie Chan
Mark Kharma
Marlene Gilleroth
Maroun Khoury
Martha Manassian
Mary Azadian
Mary Bitar
Mary David
Mary Farah
Mary Ghazal
Mary Haddad
Mary Halabi
Mary Havatian
Mary Mansour
Mary Nashed
Mary Segar
Mary Wehbe
Maurice C. Grin
Maurice Katrib
1973
1997
1966
1968
1995
1963
1948
1991
1997
1960
1957
1965
1955
1963
1961
1969
1964
1952
1953
Michael Ghafary
Michael Katrib
Michael Kebbas
Michael Nabti
Michael Obeid
Michael Oweijan
Michael Sidawi
Milad Abdel-Karim
Milad Modad
Mildred Olson (Mrs.)
1910
1959
1949
1957
1961
1953
1991
1965
1974
1947
Teacher, MEC
President, AMD
Wife of M. E. Lind
AMD Secretary, GC Associate Secretary
Teacher, MASS
Pastor, Arm SAC, Youth Director, LS Lebanon
Legal Association President, President, EMF,
MEU, MEC
Teacher, Arm AS
Executive Committee member, EMF, MEFTT
member
Teacher, MEC
Supervisor, MASS
Music Teacher, MEC
Bible Worker, Lebanon
Teacher, MASS
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS
Credentialed teacher, Principal, Arm AS
Teacher, MEC, CPC pianist
Teacher, MEC
Office Sedcretary, LSM
Teacher, Registrar MEC
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS, BASS
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS, MASS
Teacher, AAS, MASS
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
VOP Worker, Credentialed Teacher, Bish AS
Pastor, Arm SAC, MEP Treasurer
Evangelist, Pastor, MSAC, Ash SAC, Publishing
Director, MED, Editor, MEP President, AMD
Pioneer Literature Evangelist
VOP Worker, VOP Director, Bible Worker
Licensed minister, North Lebanon
Teacher, Dean of Men, MEC
Farm Supervisor, MEC
Teacher, AAS
Teacher, MASS, BASS
Publishing Director, EMF
Pastor, Bish SAC
Wife of Wayne Olson
90
Minas Megerditchian
1957
Minerva Mousa
Minerva Nassif
Minerva Nowfel
Mirna Karam
Mona Kerbage
Mona Najjar
Mona Nowfel
Mona Nowfel Melki
Moses Elmadjian
1971
1969
1945
1991
1983
1975
1973
1956
1972
Mousa Azar
Mousa Ghazal
Mousa Kerkenny
Munir Deeb
1961
1949
1949
1959
N. Hargreaves
Nabil Mansour
Nabil Razzouk
Naheel Kerkanny
Naila Touma
Naim Awais
Naim Jabriel
Naim Mashni
Najah Muallim
Najeeb Azar
Najeeb Ghazal
Najib W. Nakhle
Najla Aboujawda
Najm Khoury
1941
1997
1972
1958
1986
1948
1945
1963
1969
1947
1944
1974
1959
1965
Najwa Nabti
Najwa Obeid
Nakhle Jammal
Narguis Watson
Nassim Khoury
Nassima Berbawy
Nathan Dawoud
Nathan Hanna
Nathan Malaka
Nathan Ratib
Nawal Akar
Nawal Ashkar
1957
1981
1985
1949
1967
1968
1969
1973
1992
1973
1955
1968
Teacher, Arm AS, Accountant, LS
LS Sabbath School Director, LS Secretarytreasurer, Arm AS Principal, Lebanon Legal
Association Committee member
Office Secretary, LSS
Teacher, MASS
Credentialed teacher, MASS
Teacher, BASS
Teacher, BASS
Credentialed teacher, Bish AS
Teacher, MASS
VOP Worker, Credentialed teacher, BASS
Executive Committee member, EMF, Manager,
MEP
Executive Committee member, EMF
Licensed minister, El-Koura„ Marjouyoun
Teacher and Principal, AAS
VOP Worker
Licensed minister, Lebanon
Visiting ordained minister, MEP Translator, Editor
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, AAS
Teacher, BACS
Credentialed Teacher, MASS, Editor, MEP
Licensed minister, Lebanon
Licensed minister, Lebanon principal, Bish AS
Credentialed teacher, MASS
Licensed minister, Lebanon
Executive Committee member, SM
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Dean of Women, MEC
Teacher, AAS, Colporteur, Lebanon, Press
Worker
Teacher, MEC
Credentialed Teacher, BASS
Teacher, MASS
Director of Cafeteria, MEC
Teacher, MASS, Arm AS
Teacher, AAS, Arm AS, MASS
Licensed minister, Zahle company
Licensed minister, Lebanon
Pastor (ordained), BSAC
Credentialed Literature Evangelist, Lebanon
Teacher, AAS, Bish AS, MASS
Bible Worker, Lebanon
91
Nawal Estephan
Nazely Yacoubian
Nellie Nehme
Nelson Tabingo
Neshan Hovhannessian
Nicola Esber
Nils Zerne
Nisreen Shahine
Nona Obeid
1969
1971
1953
1983
1938
1958
1923
1969
1973
Norma Laflouf
1992
Noura Abdel-Karim
Nourhan Ouzounian
Nuha Abdel-Karim
1976
1952
1976
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, Arm AS
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MEC, Secretary-treasurer, MEU
Licensed minister, Arm SAC
Teacher, AAS
Director, SM
Credentialed teacher, MASS
Teacher, Arm AS, Accountant and Cashier, EMF,
Cashier, BASS
Teacher, MEC, Sabbath School Department
Director, EMF
Teacher, AAS
Teacher, commissary, MEC, Principal, Arm AS
Teacher, AAS
Odette Johnson
Oweda Wehbe
Ole C. Bjerkan
Ole C. Bjerkan (Mrs.)
1958
1993
1971
1971
Teacher, MASS, AAS
Pastor(licensed), Bish SAC
President, MEC
Wife of Ole C. Bjerkan
Pamela Manassian
Patricia Beaman
Paul Huston
Pauline Koorenny
Per Naesheim
Percy Paul
Philip Srour
1993
1972
1971
1974
1978
1978
1963
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
VOP Director, EMU, Lebanon Legal Association
Committee member, MEU cashier
R. A. Wilcox
R. A. Wilcox (Mrs.)
R. C. Darnell
R. C. Darnell (Mrs.)
R. C. Mills
R. C. Thomas
R. D. Pifer
R. D. Pifer (Mrs.)
R. Fenn
1959
1959
1970
1970
1967
1975
1971
1971
1966
R. H. Hartwell
R. H. Hartwell (Mrs.)
R. H. Henning
1952
1952
1970
President, MED
Wife of R. A. Wilcox
President, MEU, Interim President, MEC
Wife of R. C. Darnell
Treasurer, MED
Publishing Department Director, AMD
President, EMF
Wife of R. D. Pifer
Teacher, MEC, Evangelist (ordained), Associate
Pastor, CPC
President, LSS & EMU
Music Teacher, MEC
Publishing Department Director, AMD
92
R. K. Hasso
R. K. Hasso (Mrs.)
R. L. Jacobs
R. L. Jacobs (Mrs.)
1952
1952
1967
1967
R. L. Mole
R. 0. Osborn
R. S. Greaves
R. Thomson
R. W. Coon
1948
1958
1933
1991
1967
R. W. Taylor
R. W. Willmot
R. W. Willmot (Mrs)
Raafat Kolta
Raffic Keshihzadeh
Raffy Manassain
1970
1962
1962
1994
1994
1987
Raimund Muller
Raja Farah
1996
1983
Ralph L. Koorenny
Randy Myklebust
1974
1996
Rania Tabanji
Ray Doyle
Ray Roth
Raymond Khatchatourian
Ragelio Taer
Refaat Abdallah
Rein Muhlberg
1995
1971
1983
1984
1996
1991
1996
Rein Muhlberg (Mrs.)
Rene Katrib
Reymond Constantine
Reymond Jeha
Reymond Kiraz
1996
1953
1982
1976
1962
Richard Muller
Robert Blinci
Robert Conway
Robert Yousif
Roland Fidelia
1995
1978
1973
1971
1993
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Secretary, MED, AMD
Wife of R. L. Jacobs, office secretary, MED,
AMD
Pastor (ordained), Arm SAC, Treasurer, MEC
Secretary Treasurer, MED
Minister, SM
Acting President, EMF
Education Ministerial and Radio TV Secretary,
MED
Ministerial Secretary, AMD
Assistant Accountant, Cashier, MED
Office Secretary, MED
Accountant, MASS
Pastor (licensed), Arm SAC
Teacher, BASS, Principal, BACS,
Communication, Pathfinder, ADRA Lebanon
Director, EMF
Head Deacon, CPC, Carpenter, MEC
Principal, BACS, Pastor (ordained), BSAC, &
CPC, Lebanon Legal Association Committee
member, Education Director, EMF, Head of
Religion Department, MEC
President, MEC
Head Deaconess, CPC, Librarian, MEC, Teacher,
MEC
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MEC
Pastor, CPC, Teacher, MEC
Pastor (licensed), Arm SAC
Teacher, MEC
Elder, CPC, Teacher, Dean of Men, MEC
Ministerial Association, Sabbath School &
Personal Ministry Director, MEU
Wife of Rein Muhlberg
Teacher, MASS, BASS
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, Bish AS, Accountant, EMF
Press Worker, Lebanon Legal Association
Committee member, EMF, Teacher, Treasurer,
Business Manager, Public Relations Director, MEC
Head of Religion Department, MEC
Teacher, MEC, Accountant, AMD
Teacher, Cashier, MEC
Teacher, MASS
EMF President, MEU Communication,
Stewardship Director, Manager, MEP
93
Rose Katrib
Rose Kharma
Rose Moussally
Ruby Williams
1941
1966
1964
1950
Ruth Ingram
1974
Saadiya Malaka
Salam Aboujawda
1992
1964
Salim Farah
1985
Salim Japas
Salim Majeed
Salim Noujaim
Salim T. Hasbani
Salwa Abdel-Karim
Salwa Jbara
Salwa Saad
Sami Bishai
Samir Berbawi
Samir Shahine
1970
1970
1947
1959
1976
1981
1984
1971
1979
1961
Samira Shahine
1957
Samaan Ghali
Samuel C. Jackson
Samuel Shehata
Sam Issa
Sara Ghazal Srour
1979
1978
1996
1968
1947
Sara Zamer
Sarkis Zurigian
Seigfried Schwantes
Sella Nazirian
Serjie Ferrer
Serpouhy Maksoudian
Shahin Ouzounian
Shamma Youssif
Shehada Halabi
1969
1979
1966
1942
1991
1964
1947
1975
1960
Shukry Nowfel
1913
S. W. Johnson
1948
Credentialed Teacher, MASS
Credentialed Teacher, BASS
Teacher, Arm AS
Credentialed Bible Worker, Lebanon, Dean of
Women, MEC
Librarian, MEC
Teacher, MASS, BACS, BASS, Deaconess, CPC
Pastor, ASAC, Bish SAC, MEU and EMF Youth
Director
Teacher, BACS, Cashier, EMF, Treasurer,
CPC
Pastor (ordained), BSAC, MEU Evangelist
MEFTT member
President, LS, VOP Director, Principal BASS
Treasurer, LS
Principal, AAS, Teacher, Bish AS, MASS, Arm AS
Teacher, MASS
Credentialed Teacher, BACS
Evangelist, Bikfaya, Teacher, MASS
Teacher, MEC
President, EMF, Lebanon Legal Association
President, Teacher, MEC, Principal, MASS,
Education Director, MEU
Credentialed teacher, AAS, MASS, BACS, VOP
Worker
Treasurer, MEC, EMF, Church Elder, CPC
Music Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, BASS, Teacher, Registrar MEC
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS, BASS, VOP
Worker
Teacher, Bish AS
Pastor (licensed), Arm SAC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Principal, Arm AS
Secretary-treasurer, MEU
PC Worker
Teacher Evangelist, Beirut, Registrar, MEC
Stenographer, EMF
Pastor (licensed), Bish SAC & BSAC,
Temperance Department Director, LS, Principal,
Bish AS
Committee Member, SM, Pioneer pastor
(ordained), MSAC
Vocational - Industrial Director, MEC
94
Sirvart Murdesemjian
Solomon Wolde-Endreas
Sonia Sidawi
Sossi Adjemian
Souha Amin Khoury
Stanley Bull
Steve Manougian
Suad Koko
Suhad Kharma
1963
1976
1994
1971
1962
1928
1997
1972
1996
Sossi Nazirian Kevorkian
Svein B. Johansen
Svein B. Johansen (Mrs.)
Svein Myklebust
1985
1988
1988
1997
Sven Jensen
Sven Jensen (Mrs.)
Sylvia Kiraz
1995
1995
1997
Towfic Issa (Mrs.)
T. Zachary
Taghrid T. Shartouni
Tanios Issa
Thomas S. Geraty
Thomas S. Geraty (Mrs.)
Thomas Staples
Towfic Issa
Towfic Madanat
1962
1910
1983
1973
1951
1951
1976
1962
1996
Towfic Sayegh
1969
Vartouhi Terzibashian
Violet Wentland
Verta Johnson
V. A. Fenn
Virginia Siemens
Valerie Fidelia
1973
1958
1969
1961
1978
1996
Venice Khoury
1956
Veronica Muller
1995
Teacher, Arm AS
Sabbath School Secretary, AMD
Teacher, MASS
Teacher, Arm As
Office secretary, LS
Committee Member, SM, Teacher, MEC
Licensed minister, CPC
Credentialed teacher, Arm AS, BASS
Sabbath School Superintendent and Pianist,
BSAC, Cashier, MEC
Secretary to President, MEC
President, MEU
Wife of Svein B. Johansen
President, MEC, Executive Committee member,
EMF
President, MEU
Wife of Sven Jensen
Credentialed Teacher, Arm AS, Teacher &
Secretary, MEC, BACS
Wife of Towfic Issa
Pioneer colporteur, Lebanon
Secretary to the President, MEC
Farmer, Gardener, BASS
President, MEC
Wife of Thomas S. Geraty
Secretary-Treasurer, MEU
Pastor (ordained), Bish SAC
Sabbath School Department Director, EMF,
Principal, Amman School
Teacher, BASS, MASS
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, MEC
Treasurer, MED
Teacher, MEC, Secretary to the President, MEC
Health & Temperance & Women's Ministries
Director, MEU
VOP Worker, Credentialed teacher, MASS,
Bible Worker, Women's Ministries and
Children's Ministry Director, EMF
Teacher, BASS, Pianist, CPC
95
W. A. Potter
W. A. Potter (Mrs.)
W. H. Wakeham
W. Khoury
W. R. Lesher
W. Steffen
Wadad Ayoub
Wadad Issa
Wadad Karam
1968
1968
1905
1976
1963
1926
1973
1954
1969
Wadie Farag
Wafa G. Raffoul
Walter K. Ising
Warde Kharma
W. S. Edsell
Wayne Olson
1949
1983
1908
1966
1976
1947
Widad Faimann
Wilhelm Lesovski
Wilhelmine Muller
William Olson
William Olson (Mrs.)
William Wagner
Wilma Hepker
Wolfhard Touchard
1967
1929
1908
1997
1997
1954
1966
1978
Yacoub Greige
Yacoub Nashed
Yepraxy Gomig
Yohan Lusingu
Yolla Abdelkarim
Youssif Farag
1958
1961
1938
1973
1976
1975
Yung Sikkim
1997
Zaky Narouz
Zaher Berbawy
1961
1973
Zakariah Youssif
Zeina Heleu
Zevart Yerganian
1965
1984
1968
Pastor (ordained), MSAC
Wife of W. A. Potter
President, Egyptian Mission
Accountant, MEC
Secretary, Educational Secretary, MED
SM, Missionary Licentiate
Credentialed Literature Evangelist, Lebanon
Bible Worker, North Lebanon
Credentialed teacher, MASS, BASS, Principal,
BACS
Teacher, MEC, Radio Dept. Secretary, MED
Secretary to the Academic Dean, MEC
First Director, SM
Credentialed teacher, Bish AS, BASS
Youth and Temperance Director, AMD
Pastor (ordained), Bish SAC, Acting President,
LS, Pastor, CPC
Teacher, MEC
Missionary to Lebanon and Syria
Missionary Licentiate, SM
Secretary- Treasurer, MEU
Wife of William Olson
Medical Secretary, MED
Teacher, MEC
Teacher, Librarian, MEC
Credentialed Teacher, MASS, BASS, AAS
Teacher, MEC
Principal, Arm AS
Stewardship and Development Secretary, AMD
Teacher, AAS, BASS
Publishing Director, EMF, MEU Publishing
Director
Student Missionary, CPC
Teacher, MEC
Licensed Minister, Bikfaya, Bible Teacher,
Aramoun, MASS
Teacher MASS, VOP worker
Teacher, Bish AS
Teacher, Arm AS
96
REFERENCES
1 Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, 1996 edition, p. 914.
2 Ibid., p. 614.
3 Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer, The European Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Middle East 1879-1939,
(Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main. Bern, 1981), p. 65.
4 Mildred Olson, Middle East Program, April 4-6, 1997, U. S. A., p. 9.
5 Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer, The European Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Middle East 1879-1939,
(Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main. Bern, 1981), pp. 67, 70.
6 Ibid., p. 70
7 Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, 1996 edition, p. 915.
8 Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer, The European Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Middle East 1879-1939,
(Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main. Bern, 1981), p. 68.
9 Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, ? edition, p. 695.
10 Mildred Olson, Middle East Program, April 4-6, 1997, U. S. A., p. 9.
11 Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer, The European Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Middle East 1879-1939,
(Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main. Bern, 1981), pp. 68, 69.
12 Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, 1996 edition, p. 915.
13 Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer, The European Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Middle East 1879-1939,
(Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main. Bern, 1981), p. 70.
14 Ibid., p. 71.
15 Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, 1996 edition, p. 915.
16 Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer, The European Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Middle East 1879-1939,
(Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main. Bern, 1981), p. 72.
17 Ibid., p. 76.
18 Ibid., p. 79
19 Ibid., p. 79
20 Seventh-day Adventist Encyclopedia, 1996 edition, p. 915.
21 Ibid., p. 695.
22 Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer's, letter, May 13, 1198.
23 Baldur Ed. Pfeiffer, The European Seventh-day Adventist Mission in the Middle East 1879-1939
(Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main, Bazn, 1981). p. 11.
24 Seventh-day Adventist Yearbook - 1939
25 Impact (official organ of the Afro-MidEast Division), Vol. VI, November - December 1945, p. 30.
26 The Middle East Messenger (official organ of the Middle East Union Mission of Seventh-day
Adventists), Vol. I, No 5, December 1945, p. 7.
27 Mildred Olson, Middle East Program, April 4-6, 1997, U. S. A, p. 6.
28 Daniel Obeid, Hamad Elias Obeid's Biography, 1998.
29 Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks, 1909-1971.
30 Middle East College Pine Echoes, 1964.
31 The Middle East Messenger (official organ of the Middle East Division), January, February 1970,
P. 3.
32 Seventh-day Adventist Yearbooks, 1909-1997.

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