Instructional Videos - LMS

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Instructional Videos - LMS
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
M
School
Resources
www.ket.org/learn
1-800-432-0951
This book is designed to be used by teachers, librarians, media
specialists, and school administrators in selecting, viewing, and
recording KET’s programs. It is published annually and distributed to Kentucky teachers in K-12 classrooms.
This book contains:
• instructional television series for students on KET3 and
• professional development television seminars for
teachers and administrators
• distance learning classes for secondary students
• order form for teacher’s guides and videotapes
• support services for KET resources, video production
and technical needs
Photo credits: Steve Shaffer and Jeff Gray, KET
Special thanks to Rick McComb, Kentucky Department of
Education, for providing many photographs for this book.
Front and Back Cover Photos Credit: Rick McComb
© Copyright 2006
KET, The Kentucky Network
All rights reserved
Printed with state funds.
This book may be reproduced by Kentucky teachers.
For downloadable pdf files of the KET Resource book,
go to www.ket.org/itvvideos
Printed on recycled paper.
2006/2007 M�
•1
SOCIAL STUDIES
2006/2007
Introduction
Y
ou may be among the
thousands of Kentucky
teachers who have used KET
EncycloMedia in the classroom.
Or perhaps youʼve incorporated
KET3 educational programming
into your teaching or participated
in professional development opportunities offered via KET4. You
may have attended a workshop
on media literacy conducted by
one of our education consultants,
helped students enroll in our
outstanding distance learning
courses, or used an Arts Toolkit
to teach your class about dance,
drama, or visual arts.
Or you may be new to KET,
just beginning to discover what
we offer Kentucky teachers and
students. In any case, this book is
your passport to our rich array of
resources and services.
As educational technologies
advance, youʼll find that KET
evolves with them. This year,
KET EncycloMedia, the comprehensive online multimedia learning service launched in 2005, has
been updated and expanded. Not
only does it have a new
look, it also offers new instructional features including audio clips, tutorials on
educational software, and a
writing prompt generator.
And this wonderful service
is still available free of
charge to Kentucky public
schools.
When you tune in to KET3,
youʼll notice more changes.
Weʼve extended our broadcast schedule of quality educational programming to 21 hours
a day, seven days a week.
Weʼve also reorganized the
schedule by core content area
and established consistent daily
air times for popular programs
like Cyberchase, Reading
Rainbow, and News Quiz:
This school year, I hope you and
your students take advantage
of KETʼs many resources—all
designed with your needs and priorities in mind. Whether youʼre
looking for exciting professional
development tools like Literacy
Strategies in Action, a new CD-
ROM for primary teachers
produced in partnership with the
Kentucky Department of Education, or relying on continuing
services like Distance Learning,
youʼve come to the right place.
Please browse through the
Resource book, visit us at
www.ket.org/education/, and
check out KET3 and KET4. I
know youʼll like what you see.
Malcolm Wall
Executive Director
For information about KET resources, call the Education Division at (800) 432-0951 or visit our Web site at www.ket.org/education.
2 • 2006/2007 M INTRODUCTION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
introduction
Series and Programs Deleted for 2006/2007 ......................... 7
Kentucky’s Learning Goals & Academic Expectations ....... 8
KET Support Services ............................................................. 10
KET Regional Education Consultants .................................. 11
How To Contact Us at KET .................................................... 11
KET3 Schedule of Instructional Programs
Eastern Time/Central Time .............................................. 12
SEE CROSS-REFERENCED LIST OF OTHER INTER-DISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS ........... 27
KET ELECTRONIC FIELD TRIPS
instructional videos
F
ARTS AND HUMANITIES
F
F
ARTS TOOLKIT PROMO: DRAMA
(Revised and Expanded) ..................................................... 14
ARTS TOOLKIT PROMO: VISUAL ARTS .......... 15
ARTS TOOLKIT PROMO: DANCE........................... 15
DANCE
Dancing Threads: Community Dances from Africa to Zuni
(Primary-8) K
................................................................ 15
DanceSense (5-10) K C........................................................... 16
MULTI-ARTS
Arts Express (Primary-6) K ..................................................... 16
Winter: Season of Darkness/Season of Light (4-12) K C . 17
Arts Alive (6-9) ........................................................................... 17
Humanities Connections (7-12) K
................................... 17
MULTI-ARTS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
F Art to Heart (PD for Pre-Primary) K C ............................... 18
MUSIC
Mrs. Cabobble's Caboose (Primary) ....................................... 19
Old Music for New Ears (Primary-8) K C .......................... 20
F 2007 World's Largest Concert (Primary-6) C ........................ 21
Hymnody of Earth (5-12) K .................................................... 21
Richard Davis on Jazz Teleconference (PD) K ..................... 21
Sing Out for Freedom (7-12) K C ......................................... 21
2003 Great Kentucky Gospel Shout Out (7-12) K C.......... 22
Exploring the World of Music (9-12) C ................................. 22
THEATER
Wind in the Willows (Primary-8) K C................................. 22
Appleseed John (3-7) K C ..................................................... 23
Liz's Circus Story (6-12) K C ................................................ 23
Words Like Freedom/Sturdy Black Bridges (9-12) K C ... 23
VISUAL ARTS
The Big A (Primary) C ............................................................. 23
Posie Paints (Primary-3) C ...................................................... 24
Doodle (Primary-12) C............................................................. 24
Art On Air (4-6) K C .............................................................. 24
From the Shadows of the River (4-12) K C
................. 25
Crafting Tradition (5-12) K C
........................................ 25
Art History I: A Century of Modern Art (6-12) ..................... 25
Art History II: A Survey of the Western World (6-12) ......... 26
F
Electronic Field Trip Through Geologic Time (4-12) K C . 28
Electronic Field Trip to a Beef Cattle Farm (4-12) K C
. 28
Electronic Field Trip to a Coal Mine (4-8) K C .................. 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Horse Farm (4-12) K C
....... 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Newspaper (4-12) K C .............. 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Pig Farm (4-8) K C
.............. 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Veterinary Clinic (4-12) K C . 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Watershed (K-8) K C ................. 30
Electronic Field Trip to an Orchard (4-12) K C
........... 30
Electronic Field Trip to Fort Harrod and
Fort Boonesborough (4-8) K C ........................................ 30
Electronic Field Trip to Horse Cave Theatre (5-12) K C .. 31
Electronic Field Trip to KET (4-12) K C .............................. 31
Electronic Field Trip to Mammoth Cave (4-12) K C
... 31
Electronic Field Trip to Perryville (4-12) K C
............. 31
Electronic Field Trip to the Aviation
Museum of Kentucky (3-12) K C
............................ 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Falls of the Ohio (4-12) K C
. 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Forest (4-8) K C
............... 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Kentucky Center
for the Arts (6-12) K C ...................................................... 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Kentucky Opera (6-9) K C
.. 33
Electronic Field Trip to the Louisville Zoo (4-12) K C ...... 33
Electronic Field Trip to the Mountain
Homeplace (4-12) K C
................................................ 33
Electronic Field Trip to the National
Weather Service (5-12) K C
...................................... 34
Electronic Field Trip to the Post Office (Primary) K C
.. 34
Electronic Field Trip to the Speed Museum (6-12) K C
...35
Electronic Field Trip to Toyota (4-12) K C .......................... 35
Electronic Field Trip to White Hall Historic Site,
Home of Cassius M. Clay (4-12) K C ............................. 35
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Looking At Picasso (8-12) ......................................................... 26
World of Our Own: Kentucky Folkways (8-12) K C ........ 26
Ellis Wilson—So Much to Paint (9-12) K C ........................ 27
Looking at Painting (9-12) K C ............................................ 27
SEE CROSS-REFERENCED LIST OF OTHER INTER-DISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS ........... 35
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Lyric Language (Primary-6) ..................................................... 36
GERMAN
Deutsch macht Spass! (German Can Be Fun!) (4-6) K ....... 36
JAPANESE
Teach Me Japanese (Primary-5) ............................................... 37
SIGN LANGUAGE
F Signing Time! (Preschool-3) C ................................................ 38
SPANISH
Arte y más! (Primary) K
.................................................... 38
Saludos (Primary-5) ................................................................... 39
The Spanish Media Collection (Primary-12) ......................... 40
F INDICATES NEW/REVISED FOR 2006/2007
INTRODUCTION
2006/2007 M�
•3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Los Constructores de Cerritos del Uruguay:
Uniendo el Pasado y el Futuro K .................................... 41
Destinos (9-12) ............................................................................ 41
MATHEMATICS
Tumbletown Tales (K-3) ............................................................ 42
Mathica's Mathshop I (Primary) C
................................ 42
Mathica's Mathshop II (Primary) C
............................... 43
Math Can Take You Places (3-6) C ............................................. 43
The Eddie Files (3-6) C............................................................. 43
Cyberchase (3-7) C................................................................... 44
It Figures (4)................................................................................ 44
Math Works (5) ........................................................................... 44
Solve It (6) ................................................................................... 45
Math Vantage (7-9) C ............................................................... 45
Math Basics (9-12) K C .......................................................... 46
Statistics: Decisions Through Data (10-12) C ...................... 46
SEE CROSS-REFERENCED LIST OF OTHER INTER-DISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS ........... 46
PRACTICAL LIVING/VOCATIONAL STUDIES
F
F
Signing Time! (Preschool-3) C ................................................ 47
I'm Safe on Wheels (K-2) .......................................................... 48
Different and the Same (Primary) C ..................................... 48
Head To Toe (Primary) C ....................................................... 48
Just For Me (Primary) C ......................................................... 49
Well, Well, Well with Slim Goodbody (Primary) C ............ 49
The Character Education Series (Primary-4) ......................... 49
Econ and Me (Primary-5) C ................................................... 50
Looking from the Inside/Out (Primary-5) C ...................... 51
Drug Avengers (Primary-6) C................................................ 51
Red Light, Green Light, Have You Heard? (Primary-6) C . 51
Fat Albert & the Cosby Kids (Primary-7) .............................. 52
When I Grow Up (1-4) C
.................................................. 53
Inside Story with Slim Goodbody (2-6) C
..................... 53
Bullying/Character Education (3-5) ....................................... 53
Healthy Body Healthy Mind (4-8) C ..................................... 54
Life Skills/Character Education Series (5-9) ......................... 54
Violence: Reversing the Trend (5-10)
................................ 55
TV411 (5-12) C ........................................................................... 55
Middle School Kids Speak Out (6-9) ...................................... 56
Flirting or Hurting: Sexual Harassment In
Schools (11-12) C ............................................................... 56
Women's Work (6-12) ................................................................ 56
Careers in Printing (7-12) K C .............................................. 57
Teen Issues (7-12) ....................................................................... 57
College and You—Why Not? Tackling College with
a Disability (9-12) K C ...................................................... 58
Street Skills (9-12) K C ........................................................... 58
Career Encounters (10-12) C .................................................. 59
Workplace Essential Skills (9-12) K C ................................. 59
Truth and Consequences: Federal Crimes
and Teenagers (11-12) K .................................................... 60
SEE CROSS-REFERENCED LIST OF:
CONSUMER DECISIONS
CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION
OTHER INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS ................................................. 60
4 • 2006/2007 M INTRODUCTION
READING/WRITING
BASIC SKILLS/VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT
Cursive Handwriting Series A (Primary) C ........................ 61
Know It All (3-6) ........................................................................ 61
Creating Stories and Music (4-5) K C ................................. 62
Write Ideas (4-6) K .................................................................. 62
Student Lessons with Barry Lane (4-8) K
...................... 63
English Composition: Writing for an Audience (9-12) ........ 63
Latin Roots for English Word Power (9-12) K .................... 64
Everyday Voices (10-adult) K C ............................................ 64
READING MOTIVATION/LITERATURE
Between the Lions (Primary) C ............................................. 65
Reading Rainbow (Primary) C .............................................. 65
Teletales (Primary) ..................................................................... 67
Cover to Cover (P-4) C ........................................................... 69
Telling Tales (Primary-8) K C
......................................... 69
Beyond the Page (3-5) C ......................................................... 70
Read On: Cover to Cover (4-5) C .......................................... 70
From the Brothers Grimm (4-8) ............................................... 71
More Books from Cover to Cover (5-6) C ............................ 72
An Electronic Conversation with
George Ella Lyon (5-12) K C ........................................... 73
The Short Story (7-12) ............................................................... 73
James Still's River of Earth (7-12) K C................................. 73
[email protected]: James Still’s Legacy
“River of Earth (9-12)” K C ............................................. 73
Living By Words (9-12) K C ................................................... 74
Shakespeare Shorts (9-12) C ................................................... 74
Signature (9-12) K C ............................................................... 74
SignatureLIVE (10-12) K C.................................................... 75
Voices & Visions (10-12) ............................................................ 75
SEE CROSS-REFERENCED LIST OF OTHER INTER-DISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS ........... 75
SCIENCE
Backyard Safari (Preschool-Primary) C................................. 76
Up Close and Natural (Primary) ............................................. 76
Zoo Zoo Zoo (Primary) ............................................................. 77
Take a Look I (Primary-4) C................................................... 77
Forest Family Forever (Primary-5)
................................... 78
Concepts in Nature (Primary-6)
........................................ 78
The World of Nature II (Primary-6)
.................................. 79
NASA SCIence Files (3-5) C ................................................... 79
Natureworks (3-6) C ............................................................... 80
Gee Whiz in Agriculture (4-5) C
..................................... 81
Real World Science (4-6)
..................................................... 81
Kentucky Afield for Kids (4-7) ................................................ 82
North American Biomes (4-8) C ............................................ 82
Kentucky's Natural Heritage (6-12) K.................................. 83
Work, Energy, and the Simple Machine (5-8) C ............ 83
Real Science! II (5-10) C .......................................................... 83
Real Science! III (5-10) C ......................................................... 84
Classic Animal Tracks (5-12) C .............................................. 84
The Complete Cosmos (5-12) C ............................................. 85
Explore More (6-8) C ................................................................ 85
NASA Connect (6-8) C ............................................................ 86
Inside the Living Cell (6-9) C................................................. 86
Passport to Weather & Climate (6-9) C ................................ 86
Life in Marine and Freshwater Environments (6-12) C ..... 87
Planet Neighborhood (6-12) C ............................................... 87
Inventing Flight (7-9) C .......................................................... 87
Lab Safety: The Accident at Jefferson High (7-9) .................. 88
The Biology Of... (7-12) C ....................................................... 88
F INDICATES NEW/REVISED FOR 2006/2007
SEE CROSS-REFERENCED LIST OF OTHER INTER-DISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS ........... 90
SOCIAL STUDIES
CULTURE AND SOCIETY
I Love Music (Primary-6) ......................................................... 91
My Beautiful House (Primary-6) C ........................................ 91
Hand in Hand (2-3) C ............................................................. 92
Native Americans Series (2-5) .................................................. 92
Great Native American Leaders (3-8) ..................................... 92
Great Native American Nations (3-8) ..................................... 93
Native American Exhibit (4-8) K........................................... 93
Passport to Japan - Konnichiwa (4-8) C ................................ 93
A Native Presence (4-12) K C
......................................... 94
Living the Story: The Civil Rights Movement
in Kentucky (6-12) C .......................................................... 94
Living the Story: The Rest of the Story (6-12) C ................. 94
Kentucky Archaeology (7-12) .................................................. 95
ECONOMICS
Entrepreneurs in Kentucky (1-12) K C................................ 95
Economics: The Production, Distribution, and
Consumption of Goods and Services (4-6) ................. 96
Electric Money (8-12) C .......................................................... 96
GEOGRAPHY
Kentucky GeoQuest (4) K C
........................................... 96
Rivers of North America "The Ohio River" (4-8) C ............ 97
U.S. Geography: From Sea To Shining Sea (4-8)
............. 97
Maps and Globes (4-12) C
................................................ 97
Rivers of the World (4-12) ....................................................... 98
GOVERNMENT AND CIVICS
America's Special Days (Primary) C...................................... 98
My America (1-6) ...................................................................... 99
America's Veterans (2-9) C ................................................... 100
News Quiz (4-8) K ................................................................... 100
The Kentucky Legislature: Behind the Scenes (4-12) C ... 100
The Almost Painless Guide to American Civics (5-12)
101
Under 18: Under the Law (6-8) .............................................. 101
U. S. Constitution (6-12).......................................................... 102
Human Rights: Youth Perspectives (9-12) C .................... 102
A Bill of Rights: What No Just Government
Should Refuse (10-12) ........................................................ 102
HISTORY
Sacagawea (3-8) ........................................................................ 103
Kentucky's Story (4-5) K C ................................................. 103
Tracks: Impressions of America (4-8) C .............................. 103
F Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trips (4-12) .......... 104
Kentucky in Africa (4-12) K C
..................................... 104
Kentucky's Underground Railroad Passage to Freedom (4-12) K C ............................... 105
Liberty Hall (4-12) C ............................................................. 105
The Prehistoric Mounds of Uruguay:
Linking the Past and the Future (4-12) K C ................ 105
Women of Kentucky: Our Legacy, Our Future(4-12) K .... 106
Pyramid (5-9) C ....................................................................... 106
Our Presidents in American History (5-12) ......................... 106
The Remarkable Clarks (5-12) K C .................................... 107
Roman City Modules (5-12) C .............................................. 107
Ancient Civilizations (6-12) C ......................................... 108
Great Campaigns of the Civil War (6-12) ............................. 108
American Voices (7-12) C ...................................................... 108
Events of the 20th Century (7-12) ......................................... 109
Kentucky Chautauqua (7-12) K............................................ 109
The Middle Ages (7-12)........................................................... 109
America Past (8-12) C ............................................................110
Twentieth Century History (11-12) ........................................110
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Inside Our Human Body (7-12) C ......................................... 89
Our Earth (7-12) C ................................................................... 89
NASA's Destination Tomorrow (9-12) C.............................. 89
Visualizing Cell Processes (9-12) C ....................................... 90
Viruses on the Rise (10-12) ....................................................... 90
SEE CROSS-REFERENCED LIST OF OTHER INTER-DISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS ..........110
Photo: Rick McComb
Photo: Rick McComb
INTRODUCTION
2006/2007 M�
•5
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TECHNOLOGY/MEDIA
F
F
KET School Video Project 2006: My Kentucky
Home (K-12) K C .............................................................111
KET School Video Project 2007: My Kentucky
Home (K-12) K C .............................................................111
Media Mania (Primary-4) ........................................................111
Making News Quiz (4-12) K C ............................................112
Hollywood Homeroom: Producing Classroom Videos
with Hollywood Magic (K-12) ..........................................112
Making Grimm Movies (6-12) ................................................113
Mountain Media (9-12) ............................................................113
Science
Essential Science for Teachers: Physical Science (K-6) C ..119
Rediscovering Biology: Molecular to
Global Perspectives C .......................................................119
Social Studies
Bridging World History (9-12) C ..........................................119
Social Studies In Action: A Methodology
Workshop, K-5 C ................................................................119
CEREBELLUM CORPORATION SERIES
Principals: Leaders & Learners ...............................................119
DISTANCE LEARNING HIGH SCHOOL COURSES
Physics Program K .................................................................114
AP Physics B and Honors Physics Program K .................114
German Program K ...............................................................114
Humanities Program K .........................................................115
Latin Program K .....................................................................115
SECONDARY GED...........................................................116
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
ANNENBERG/CPB SERIES
Arts and Humanities
The Art of Teaching the Arts: A Workshop for
High School Teachers (9-12) C ........................................117
The Arts in Every Classroom: A Workshop for
Elementary School Teachers (K-5) C ..............................117
Connecting with the Arts:
A Teaching Practices Library (6-8) C .................................117
Connecting with the Arts: A Workshop for
Middle Grades Teachers (6-8) C .....................................117
Foreign Languages
Teaching Foreign Languages K-12: A Library of
Classroom Practices C ......................................................118
Language Arts/Reading
Developing Writers: A Workshop for High School Teachers C 118
F Inside Writing Communities, Grades 3-5 (3-5) K C ..........118
Teaching Multicultural Literature: A Workshop for
the Middle Grades (6-8) .....................................................118
Teaching Reading K-2: A Library of
Classroom Practices (K-2) C................................................118
F Teaching Reading 3-5 Workshop (3-5) C.............................118
Write In the Middle: A Workshop for Middle
School Teachers (5-8) C K .................................... 118/121
Education Theory and Issues
Principles for Principals (K-12) C ........................................118
The Learning Classroom: Theory Into Practice (K-12) C119
Mathematics
Insights Into Algebra 1: Teaching for Learners (6-12) C..119
Learning Math: Number and Operations C .......................119
F
INDICATES NEW/REVISED FOR 2006/2007
6 • 2006/2007 M INTRODUCTION
KET SEMINARS
Arts and Humanities
F Art to Heart K C ................................................................... 120
The Arts: A Content Course for Teachers K C ................. 120
The Arts II: West African Dance K C ................................ 120
The Arts III: Afro-Cuban Dance K ...................................... 120
Reading and Writing
Authentic Publishing K C ................................................... 120
How To Improve the Quality of
Writing Conferences K C .............................................. 121
F Inside Writing Communities, Grades 3-5 K C ................. 122
Write in the Middle: A Workshop for
Middle School Teachers K C ......................................... 121
Social Studies
Kentucky's Underground Railroad K C ........................... 121
Special Education
About Autism K C ................................................................... 121
Your Child With Special Needs K C ................................... 121
Special Programming
Childhood Obesity Prevention K C..................................... 122
Just Ask: A Call-In on Teen Depression K C ..................... 122
Promise Not to Tell? A Teacher’s Guide to Recognizing and
Responding to Child Sexual Abuse C........................... 122
F
Inside Writing Communities, Grades 3-5 K C ................. 122
Literacy Strategies in Action K ............................................. 123
More Reading Strategies in Action K .................................. 123
Teacher's Guide Order Form .......................................................... 124
Videotape Price List ......................................................................... 125
Videotape Service Order Form ...................................................... 126
Alphabetical Index ........................................................................... 127
F
New or Revised for 2006/2007
C Closed Captioned
K KET Production
On KET EncycloMedia
Series and Programs Deleted for 2006/2007
The following programs and series have been deleted from our
schedule for 2006/2007. Any copies of these programs, whether
recorded from KET broadcast or acquired through KET’s tape duplication service, must be erased by the start of the 2006/2007 year
unless arrangements are made with the copyright owner to keep
videotape copies for an extended period.
A complete list of program deletions is on our web site at www.
ket.org/education/updates/deletions2006-07.htm. Call the KET
Education office at 1-800-432-0951 with any questions.
How to Become an Alcoholic (Or How to Avoid It)
Schools may keep their copy on tape for the life of the tape. You may
not duplicate or broadcast the program, but you can circulate the copy
you have.
Many Voices
The rights to this series have been withdrawn by the distributor. They
do not offer retention rights. You need to erase all copies.
MediaWorks
This KET-produced series is dated. Therefore, we are pulling it from our
schedule. However, you may keep your copy on tape for the life of the
tape.
Mountain Born: The Jean Ritchie Story
Broadcast rights to this series have expired. KET is in the process of
renegotiating rights. If rights become available, it will be added back to
KET’s schedule. In the meantime, you may keep your copy on tape for
the life of the tape.
Multicultural Arts Series
The rights to this series have been withdrawn by the distributor. They
do not offer retention rights. You need to erase all copies.
NASA Connect
KET is dropping all programs from past seasons that are not part of this
season’s lineup. However, you may keep your copies on tape for the life
of the tape. If you missed any episodes, you can contact your local ERC
(http://spacelink.nasa.gov/ercn/) for a video copy or view them free
on the Internet via http://quest.nasa.gov/events/connect/index.html
NASA SCIence Files (formerly NASA Why? Files)
KET is dropping all programs from past seasons that are not part of this
season’s lineup. However, you may keep your copies on tape for the life
of the tape. If you missed any episodes, you can contact your local ERC
(http://spacelink.nasa.gov/ercn/) for a video copy or view them free
on the Internet via http://quest.nasa.gov/events/connect/index.html
The Self-Management Skills Series
Photo: Rick McComb
This series is expensive and the usage is very low. To retain your copy
at a cost of $10.00 per program or $200 for the whole series, contact;
Maria Caprara
Sunburst Visual Media/Teacher’s Media Company/Bureau for At-Risk
Youth/Great Events Publishing/Wellness Reproductions/ChildsworkChildsplay
2 Kyline Drive, Suite 101, Department GC14
Hawthorne, NY 10532
Phone: 1-888-367-6368, ext. 6001
Fax: 1-914-347-1531
[email protected]
INTRODUCTION
2006/2007 M�
•7
KENTUCKY’S LEARNING GOALS &
ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS
GOAL 1: Students are able to use basic communication and
mathematics skills for purposes and situations they will encounter
throughout their lives.
KY’S LEARNING GOALS & ACAD. EXPECTATIONS
1.1–Students use reference tools such as dictionaries, alma-
nacs, encyclopedias, and computer reference programs and
research tools such as interviews and surveys to find the information they need to meet specific demands, explore interests,
or solve specific problems.
2.6–Students understand how living and nonliving things
change over time and the factors that influence the changes.
MATHEMATICS
2.7–Students understand number concepts and use numbers
appropriately and accurately.
2.8–Students understand various mathematical procedures
and use them appropriately and accurately.
1.2–Students make sense of the variety of materials they read.
1.3–Students make sense of the various things they observe.
1.4–Students make sense of the various messages to which
2.9–Students understand space and dimensionality concepts
1.5-1.9–Students use mathematical ideas and procedures to
2.11–Students understand mathematical change concepts
1.10–Students organize information through development
2.12–Students understand mathematical structure concepts
they listen.
communicate, reason, and solve problems.
and use of classification rules and systems.
1.11–Students write using appropriate forms, conventions,
and styles to communicate ideas and information to different
audiences for different purposes.
1.12–Students speak using appropriate forms, conventions,
and styles to communicate ideas and information to different
audiences for different purposes.
1.13–Students make sense of ideas and communicate ideas
with the visual arts.
1.14–Students make sense of ideas and communicate ideas
with music.
1.15–Students make sense of and communicate ideas with
movement.
1.16–Students use computers and other kinds of technology
to collect, organize, and communicate information and ideas.
GOAL 2: Students shall develop their abilities to apply core con-
cepts and principles from mathematics, the sciences, the arts, the
humanities, social studies, practical living studies, and vocational
studies to what they will encounter throughout their lives.
SCIENCE
2.1–Students understand scientific ways of thinking and
working and use those methods to solve real-life problems.
2.2–Students identify, analyze, and use patterns such as
cycles and trends to understand past and present events and
predict possible future events.
2.3–Students identify and analyze systems and the ways their
components work together or affect each other.
2.4–Students use the concept of scale and scientific models to
and use them appropriately and accurately.
2.10–Students understand measurement concepts and use
measurements appropriately and accurately.
and use them appropriately and accurately.
including the properties and logic of various mathematical
systems.
2.13–Students understand and appropriately use statistics
and probability
SOCIAL STUDIES
2.14–Students understand the democratic principles of jus-
tice, equality, responsibility, and freedom and apply them to
real-life situations.
2.15–Students can accurately describe various forms of
government and analyze issues that relate to the rights and
responsibilities of citizens in a democracy.
2.16–Students observe, analyze, and interpret human behaviors, social groupings, and institutions to better understand
people and the relationships among individuals and among
groups.
2.17–Students interact effectively and work cooperatively
with the many ethnic and cultural groups of our nation and
world.
2.18–Students understand economic principles and are able
to make economic decisions that have consequences in daily
living.
2.19–Students recognize and understand the relationship
between people and geography and apply their knowledge in
real-life situations.
2.20–Students understand, analyze, and interpret historical
events, conditions, trends, and issues to develop historical
perspective.
2.21–(Incorporated into 2.16)
ARTS AND HUMANITIES
2.22–Students create works of art and make presentations to
explain the organization and functioning of living and nonliving things and predict other characteristics that might be
observed.
convey a point of view.
2.5–Students understand that under certain conditions nature
2.24–Students have knowledge of major works of art, music,
tends to remain the same or move toward a balance.
8 • 2006/2007 M INTRODUCTION
2.23–Students analyze their own and others’ artistic products and performances using accepted standards.
and literature and appreciate creativity and the contributions
of the arts and humanities.
KENTUCKY’S LEARNING GOALS &
ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS
2.25–In the products they make and the performances they
present, students show that they understand how time,
place, and society influence the arts and humanities such as
languages, literature, and history.
that although people are different, they share some common
experiences and attitudes.
2.27–Students recognize and understand the similarities and
differences among languages.
2.28–Students understand and communicate in a second
language.
PRACTICAL LIVING
2.29–Students demonstrate skills that promote individual
well-being and healthy family relationships.
based on ethical values.
3.7–Students demonstrate the ability to learn on one’s
own.
GOAL 4: Students shall develop their abilities to become
responsible members of a family, work group, or community,
including demonstrating effectiveness in community service.
4.1–Students effectively use interpersonal skills.
4.2–Students use productive team membership skills.
4.3–Students individually demonstrate consistent,
responsive, and caring behavior.
4.4–Students demonstrate the ability to accept the rights
2.30–Students evaluate consumer products and services and
and responsibilities for self and others.
2.31–Students demonstrate the knowledge and skills they
tion for, and sensitivity to a multi-cultural and world view.
make effective consumer decisions.
need to remain physically healthy and to accept responsibility for their own physical well-being.
4.5–Students demonstrate an understanding of, apprecia4.6–Students demonstrate an open mind to alternative
perspectives.
2.32–Students demonstrate strategies for becoming and
remaining mentally and emotionally healthy.
2.33–Students demonstrate the skills to evaluate and use
services and resources available in their community.
2.34–Students perform physical movement skills effectively
in a variety of settings.
2.35–Students demonstrate knowledge and skills that promote physical activity and involvement in physical activity
throughout lives.
VOCATIONAL STUDIES
2.36–Students use strategies for choosing and preparing for
a career.
2.37–Students demonstrate skills and work habits that lead
to success in future schooling and work.
2.38–Students demonstrate skills such as interviewing, writ-
ing resumes, and completing applications that are needed to
be accepted into college or other postsecondary training or to
get a job.
GOAL 3: Students shall develop their abilities to become self-sufficient individuals.
GOAL 5: Students shall develop their abilities to think and
solve problems in school situations and in a variety of situations they will encounter in life.
5.1–Students use critical thinking skills such as analyz-
ing, prioritizing, categorizing, evaluating, and comparing
to solve a variety of problems in real-life situations.
5.2–Students use creative thinking skills to develop or
invent novel, constructive ideas or products.
5.3–Students organize information to develop or change
their understanding of a concept.
5.4–Students use a decision-making process to make
informed decisions among options.
5.5–Students use problem-solving processes to develop
solutions to relatively complex problems.
GOAL 6: Students shall develop their abilities to connect and
integrate experiences and new knowledge from all subject
matter fields with what they have previously learned and
build on past learning experiences to acquire new information
through various media sources.
3.1–Students demonstrate positive growth in self-concept
6.1–Students connect knowledge and experiences from
3.2–Students demonstrate the ability to maintain a healthy
6.2–Students use what they already know to acquire new
through appropriate tasks or projects
lifestyle.
3.3–Students demonstrate the ability to be adaptable and
flexible through appropriate tasks or projects.
3.4–Students demonstrate the ability to be resourceful and
creative.
different subject areas.
knowledge, develop new skills, or interpret new experiences.
6.3–Students expand their understanding of existing
knowledge by making connections with new knowledge,
skills, and experiences.
3.5–Students demonstrate self-control and self-discipline.
INTRODUCTION
2006/2007 M�
•9
KY’S LEARNING GOALS & ACAD. EXPECTATIONS
2.26–Through the arts and humanities, student recognize
3.6–Students demonstrate the ability to make decisions
CONSULTANTS/CONTACT
Classroom Video Production
This hands-on workshop
introduces teachers and students to video production and
includes information on how
to:
• Compose shots effectively
• Use video equipment
• Capture quality audio
• Plan and evaluate productions
• Write scripts for news, interviews, and
original productions
• Connect the writing process and the
process of creating film and video
KATHY QUINN • Explore careers in media
Director of
Education
KET Workshops
Whether you would like a brief
update on new programs or a
longer workshop on using our
instructional resources effectively,
a KET consultant can assist you
at no charge. All our workshops
support Kentucky and national
academic standards. Workshops
tying KET resources to your specific needs can be arranged.
Here are some of the workshops we provide:
KET Awareness
Looking for effective teaching
tools for your classroom? This
workshop addresses available
cross-curricular KET resources:
• Instructional Television (ITV)
• KET and Annenberg Professional
Development
• Distance Learning
• Online Resources
Effective Use of KET
Instructional Resources
Discover how ITV caters to
multiple intelligences and supports Kentucky academic and
technology standards.
Participants will:
• View clips from KET educational
resources
• Select content-appropriate ITV resources and support materials
• Design activities/lesson plans to demonstrate how these resources can be
used to meet academic standards
KET EncycloMedia
Learn how to incorporate
KET EncycloMedia multimedia
services and features successfully into classroom instruction. KET EncycloMedia Basic
offers an overview of services,
instructional tips, and hands-on
experience with the website and
its features. KET EncycloMedia
Advanced is designed for users
who are familiar with KET
EncycloMedia but want to learn
about more sophisticated ways
to integrate it with various software programs, research techniques, and Internet resources.
Telemedia Literacy
This workshop demonstrates
to teachers and students how to:
• Think critically about video and film
production
• Identify cultural stereotypes, bias in
the media, and techniques used to
“sell” products and ideas
• Appreciate the aesthetics of video and
film production
• Analyze techniques to enhance
instruction across the curriculum
Professional Development
KET Professional Development
sessions provide research-based
opportunities to improve teaching and learning.
More Reading Strategies in Action
Develop your best practice
reading strategies.
Annenberg/CPB
10 • 2006/2007 M INTRODUCTION
Join national experts and
master teachers in the classroom for innovative learning in
a wide variety of offerings for
K-12 teachers. Online support
materials are available.
Arts Toolkits
Bring the arts to life in the
classroom as you implement
lessons tied to Kentucky Arts
and Humanities Core Content.
JEFF GRAY
Special Projects
and Online
Resources
KET Produced PD Seminars
KET produced PD seminars
can be found on page 120 of
this book.
To schedule a KET Workshop or
Professional Development, contact the KET Education Division,
600 Cooper Drive, Lexington
KY 40502-2296 (800) 432-0951
or contact the KET Education
Consultant for your region (see
page 11 for contact information).
Ready to Learn
This training using KET
programming as a learning
catalyst is targeted for teachers
and caregivers of children from
birth to 8. To schedule, contact
Carrie Grate (800) 432-0951, ext.
7451 or email [email protected]
Technical Support
KET has transitioned the
delivery of school programming from satellite to its
land-based digital television
transmitters. If your school
has not ordered or installed
the proper DTV receivers and
antennas, we urge you to do so
as soon as possible. Without
this equipment in place, you
will not be able to access our
instructional programming. If
your school does not receive
a digital signal, and you have
not replaced your analog satellite receivers with a digital
video player, please contact
us for more information about
alternative conversion options.
For questions concerning
digital receivers and antennas,
existing reception equipment,
and school A/V distribution
systems, call the KET School
Technical Services Coordinator,
Mark Holt at 1-800-432-0951
X 7173 or visit our DTV web
pages, www.ket.org/dtv/
schooldtv.htm. State price contract information can be found
at www.ket.org/education/
tvcontract.htm.
Look Us Up on the Web
The KET website at, http://
www.ket.org/learn, offers
Kentucky educators the ability to:
• View and receive updated satellite
and open broadcast schedules
• Search the database of ITV programs
• Locate available print materials to
accompany programs
• Download teacher’s guides with
correlations to Kentucky Academic
Expectations
• Utilize additional content for KET
Electronic Field Trips
• Link to other supporting websites
South Central
Kathy Davis
(606) 679-9424
KET Regional Office
526 Lake Forest Drive
Somerset, KY 42503
[email protected]
Voicemail:
1-800-432-0951, ext. 7903
North Central
Larry Moore
(502) 875-9002
KET Regional Office
220 Pinewood Avenue
Frankfort, KY 40601
[email protected]
Voicemail:
1-800-432-0951, ext. 7264
Central
Northeast
Jessica Lynch Andrews
Manager
(800) 432-0951, ext. 7274
KET, The Kentucky Network
600 Cooper Drive
Lexington, KY 40502-2296
[email protected]
Voicemail:
1-800-432-0951, ext. 7274
Missi Baker
(606) 836-0474
KET Regional Office
145 Crestview Road
Russell, KY 41169
[email protected]
Voicemail:
1-800-432-0951, ext. 7265
Southeast
Cynthia Warner
(859) 624-2789
KET Regional Office
1729 Barnes Mill Road
Richmond, KY 40475
[email protected]
Voicemail:
1-800-432-0951, ext. 7902
CONSULTANTS/CONTACT
West
Carol Chapman
(270) 683-7829
KET Regional Office
4512 Doe Run
Owensboro, KY 42303
[email protected]
Voicemail:
1-800-432-0951, ext. 7905
Carol Chapman/West Region
Kathy Davis/South Central Region
Larry Moore/North Central Region
Missi Baker/Northeast Region
Jessica Lynch Andrews/Central Region
Cynthia Warner/Southeast Region
HOW TO CONTACT KET
EDUCATION DIVISION
(800) 432-0951
General Information
Rhonda Moberly–ext. 7261
email: [email protected]
Kathy Quinn–ext. 7260
email: [email protected]
Child Development
Programming
Susan Hines-Bricker–ext. 7278
email: [email protected]
Distance Learning
Schedules & Information
Jane Ireland–ext. 7136
email: [email protected]
KET Web Services
(K-12 education)
KET e-news service
Jeff Gray–ext. 7263
[email protected]
KTLN Information
Mike Clark–ext. 7254
email: [email protected]
www.ket.org/KTLN
Professional Development
Seminars & Tape Orders
Darlene Carl–ext. 7271
email: [email protected]
Suzanne Prichard–ext. 7298
email: [email protected]
Satellite Reception
Information
Mark Holt, ext. 7173
[email protected]
Scheduling and
Programming (ITV)
Rhonda Moberly–ext. 7261
email: [email protected]
Teacher’s Guide &
Videotape Orders
(800) 945-9167
email: [email protected]
COLLEGE CREDIT
TELECOURSES
Laura Orsetti
(800) 432-0970
email: [email protected]
Scheduling and
Programming (Evening/
Weekend)
GED ON TV
KET3 Calendar–
Mailing Changes
SECONDARY GED
Janie Williams–ext. 7253
email: [email protected]
Rhonda Moberly–ext. 7261
email: [email protected]
Sharon Jackson
(800) 538-4433
email: [email protected]
morehead-st.edu
INTERACTIVE
LEARNING
DIVISION
(800) 333-9764
Call this number for
help with equipment
problems or to reach distance learning teachers
or tutors.
VIEWER
REACTION LINE
(800) 926-7765
Automated line for
viewers’ comments
about KET programs.
Tonya Crum-ext. 7009
email: [email protected]
INTRODUCTION
2006/2007 M�
• 11
KET3 BROADCAST SCHEDULE
2006/2007 KET3
Digital Schedule
of Instructional
Television
Programs
Eastern Time/Central Time
KETBroadcastSCHEDULE
KET3 DIGITAL
Check out the changes to KET3!
KET3 has a completely new look this year.
As part of KET’s continuing efforts to provide
the most effective, diverse, and complete
educational resources to Kentucky schools,
KET3’s broadcast schedule has expanded
to 21 hours a day, 7 days a week, of quality
instructional television linked to Kentucky
academic standards. In addition, KET3’s
broadcast schedule has been reorganized by
core content area, with each day of the week
linked to particular academic disciplines.
The popular programs Cyberchase, Reading
Rainbow, Between the Lions, and KET’s
News Quiz now have consistent daily air
times that will be even easier for teachers to
access. Weekend professional development
programming blocks, PBS and PBS Kids programming, Inside Kentucky Schools, the
U. S. Department of Education’s
Education Parents Can Use, and teacher
request blocks make KET3 an even more
versatile instructional resource for Kentucky
schools.
Please continue to send us your suggestions
and ideas for KET3. Stay tuned, keep in
touch, and teach!
Monday: Arts & Foreign Language
Tuesday: Reading/Writing &
Technology/Media
Wednesday: Practical Living &
Secondary GED Programs
Thursday: Social Studies and
Electronic Field Trip Programs
Friday: Math & Science
Saturday: National PBS programs, PBS Kids,
and Teacher Requests
Sunday: National PBS programs, PBS Kids,
and Teacher Requests
12 • 2006/2007 M INTRODUCTION
Sundays Weekly
Mondays Weekly
Tuesdays Weekly
National PBS programs,
PBS Kids, and Teacher
Requests
Arts & Foreign Language
Reading/Writing &
Tech/Media
12 midnight/11:00 pm CT
– 4:00/3:00 am CT
National PBS programs
like Nova, Frontline,
Nature, American
Experience, and
Masterpiece Theatre.
12 midnight/11:00 pm CT
– 2:00/1:00 am CT
Higher Education
12 midnight/11:00 pm CT
– 2:00/1:00 am CT
Higher Education
2:00/1:00 am CT–
6:00/5:00 am CT
Teacher Requests & Special
Programming
2:00/1:00 am CT–
6:00/5:00 am CT
Teacher Requests &
Special Programming
6:00 – 10:00 am ET/
5:00 – 9:00 am CT
Arts & Foreign Language
Programs
6:00 – 10:00 am ET/
5:00 – 9:00 am CT
Reading/Writing &
Tech/Media Programs
10:00/9:00 am CT
Cyberchase
10:00/9:00 am CT
Cyberchase
10:30/9:30 CT
News Quiz (R)
10:30/9:30 CT
News Quiz (R)
10:45/9:45 am CT
a selected 15-minute ITV
series
10:45/9:45 am CT
a selected 15-minute ITV
series
11:00/10:00 am CT
Reading Rainbow
11:00/10:00 am CT
Reading Rainbow
11:30/10:30 am CT
Between the Lions
11:30/10:30 am CT
Between the Lions
12 noon – 4:00 pm ET/
11:00 am – 3:00 pm CT
Arts & Foreign Language
Programs
12 noon – 4:00 pm ET/
11:00 am – 3:00 pm CT
Reading/Writing &
Tech/Media Programs
4:00/3:00 pm –
8:00/7:00 pm CT
Professional Development
Programs
4:00/3:00 pm –
8:00/7:00 pm CT
Professional Development
Programs
8:00/7:00 pm –
12:00 am /11:00 pm CT
High-Definition TV
8:00/7:00 pm –
12:00 am /11:00 pm CT
High-Definition TV
4:00 am –12:00 noon ET/
3:00 am – 11:00 pm CT
Discovery programs
(4 hr block), Teacher
Requests,
& Special Programming
(4 hr block)
12 noon – 1:30 pm ET/
11:00 am – 12:30 pm CT
USDOE Education Parents
Can Use & Inside Kentucky
Schools
1:30 – 4:00 pm
PBS Kids programs like
Zoom, Maya & Miguel,
Dragonfly, Arthur,
Postcards from Buster, etc.
4:00/3:00 pm –
8:00/7:00 pm CT
Discovery programs
& Teacher Requests
8:00/7:00 pm –
12:00 am /11:00 pm CT
High-Definition TV
Wednesdays Weekly Thursdays Weekly
Fridays Weekly
Saturdays Weekly
Social Studies &
Electronic Field Trips
Math & Science
National PBS programs,
PBS Kids, and Teacher
Requests
12 midnight/11:00 pm CT
– 2:00/1:00 am CT
Higher Education
12 midnight/11:00 pm CT
– 2:00/1:00 am CT
Higher Education
12 midnight/11:00 pm CT
– 2:00/1:00 am CT
Higher Education
2:00/1:00 am –
6:00/5:00 am CT
Teacher Requests & Special
Programming
2:00/1:00 am –
6:00/5:00 am CT
Teacher Requests & Special
Programming
2:00/1:00 am –
6:00/5:00 am CT
Teacher Requests & Special
Programming
Midnight/11:00 pm CT
– 4:00/3:00 am CT
National PBS programs
like Nova, Frontline,
Nature, American
Experience, and
Masterpiece Theatre.
6:00/5:00 am –
10:00/9:00 am CT
Practical Living/Vocational
Studies & Secondary GED
Programs
6:00/5:00 am –
10:00/9:00 am CT
Social Studies &
Electronic Field Trip
Programs
6:00/5:00 am –
10:00/9:00 am CT
Math & Science Programs
10:00/9:00 am CT
Cyberchase
10:00/9:00 am CT – LIVE
then repeats of Colonial
Williamsburg EFT
10:30/9:30 CT
News Quiz (R)
10:45/9:45 am CT
a selected 15-minute ITV
series
11:00/10:00 am CT
Reading Rainbow
11:30/10:30 am CT
Between the Lions
12 noon/11:00 am
– 4:00/3:00 pm CT
Practical Living &
Secondary GED Programs
4:00/3:00 pm –
8:00/7:00 pm CT
Professional Development
Programs
8:00/7:00 pm –
12:00 am/11:00 pm CT
High-Definition TV
11:00/10:00 am CT
Reading Rainbow
11:30/10:30 am CT
Between the Lions
12 noon/11:00 am
– 4:00/3:00 pm CT
Social Studies &
Electronic Field Trip
Programs
1:45/12:45 pm CT
NewsQuiz LIVE
2:00 – 4:00 pm
Social Studies &
Electronic Field Trip
Programs
4:00/3:00 pm –
8:00/7:00 pm CT
Professional Development
Programs
10:00/9:00 am CT
Cyberchase
10:30/9:30 CT
News Quiz (R)
10:45/9:45 am CT
a selected
15-minute ITV series
11:00/10:00 am CT
Reading Rainbow
11:30/10:30 am CT
Between the Lions
12 noon/11:00 am
– 4:00/3:00 pm CT
Math & Science Programs
4:00/3:00 pm –
8:00/7:00 pm CT
Professional Development
Programs
8:00/7:00 pm –
12:00 am/
11:00 pm CT
High-Definition TV
4:00 am – 12 noon
Discovery programs
(4 hr block),
Teacher Requests, &
Special Programming
(4 hr block)
12 noon/11:00 am
– 1:30/12:30 pm CT
USDOE Education Parents
Can Use & Inside Kentucky
Schools
KETBroadcastSCHEDULE
Practical Living/Vocational
Studies & Secondary GED
1:30/12:30 pm –
4:00/3:00 pm CT
PBS Kids programs like
Zoom, Maya & Miguel,
Dragonfly, Arthur,
Postcards from Buster,
etc.
4:00/3:00 pm –
8:00/7:00 pm CT
Discovery programs
& Teacher Requests
8:00/7:00 pm –
12:00 am/11:00 pm CT
High-Definition TV
8:00/7:00 pm –
12:00 am/11:00 pm CT
High-Definition TV
2006/2007 M�
• 13
ARTS&HUMANITIES
ARTS & HUMANITIES
program titles
dance
Dancing Threads: Community Dances from
Africa to Zuni (Primary-8) K
DanceSense (5-10) K C
multi-arts
Arts Express (Primary-6) K
Winter: Season of Darkness/Season of
Light (4-12) K C
Arts Alive (6-9)
Humanities Connections (7-12) K
multi-arts professional development
F Art to Heart (PD for Pre-Primary) K C
music
Mrs. Cabobble’s Caboose (Primary)
Old Music for New Ears (Primary-8) K C
F 2007 World’s Largest Concert (Primary-6) C
Hymnody of Earth (5-12) K
Richard Davis on Jazz Teleconference (PD) K
Sing Out for Freedom (7-12) K C
2003 Great Kentucky Gospel Shout Out (8-12)K
Exploring the World of Music (9-12) C
theater
Wind in the Willows (Primary-8) K C
Appleseed John (3-7) K C
Liz's Circus Story (6-12) K C
Words Like Freedom/Sturdy Black
Bridges (9-12) K C
visual arts
The Big A (Primary) C
Posie Paints (Primary-3)
Doodle (Primary-12) C
Art On Air (4-6) K C
From the Shadows of the River (4-12) K C
Crafting Tradition (5-12) K C
Art History I: A Century of Modern Art (6-12)
Art History II: A Survey of the
Western World (6-12)
Looking At Picasso (8-12)
World of Our Own: Kentucky Folkways (8-12) K C
Ellis Wilson–So Much to Paint (9-12) K C
Looking at Painting (9-12) K C
Multimedia materials for teaching with the arts
Grade Levels:
Toolkit Pricing
and Order Information:
Web Site:
14 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
See Web site or call
1-800-945-9167, or see pages 125-126
www.ket.org/artstoolkit
KY Academic Expectations: 2.22, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
The KET Arts Toolkits offer a wealth of teacher-tested materials for
teaching the arts and for incorporating the arts across the curriculum.
These multimedia kits contain video pieces, including segments from
KET instructional programs as well as specially produced new material; CD-ROMs; lesson plans, glossaries, and classroom handouts; and
many other resources — all tied to Kentucky's Core Content in the
arts.
Dance (2004); Visual Arts (2005); and Drama (revised and expanded
2nd edition released in 2006) toolkits are available now for purchase
by Kentucky teachers. A Music toolkit is scheduled to be released in
2007.
All toolkits allow access to the Arts Toolkit web site. Offers additional lesson plans and resources, online video previews, links to the
Kentucky Arts Council Directory of Artists, and other useful resources.
Separate MARC records have been created for the VHS and DVD
versions of each Arts Toolkit. Go to www.ket.org/cgi-bin/itv/marc_
menu.pl#toolkit
DRAMA Toolkit
NETA BEST OF THE BEST AWARD WINNER
Revised and Expanded!
www.ket.org/artstoolkit/drama
CONTENTS INCLUDE:
*
*
F
New or Revised for 2006/2007
C Closed Captioned
K KET Production
On KET EncycloMedia
Preschool-12
*
*
*
Choice of 4 VHS tapes with 1 DVD, or 3 DVDs. These include performance excerpts from professional and student performances, a
video "History of Theater" and other informational video segments,
storytelling by top Kentucky storytellers, and an in-depth look at
the Japanese art of Kabuki. The toolkit also includes the complete
Electronic Field Trip to Horse Cave Theatre.
A 3-ring binder containing lessons plans for primary, intermediate,
middle school, and high school, plus glossaries and informational
materials including a "Responding to Drama" guide, activities and
ideas Especially for Primary, guides to producting student theater,
a storytelling guide, an updated list of Kentucky Drama Resources,
and an index and correlation to Core Content Version 4.0.
Reader's theatre of drama from a variety of periods and styles.
Color poster "The World's Stage"
Stage One's "From Page to Stage" interactive CD-ROM, a comprehensive look at the collaborative process of theater.
Photo: Rick McComb
DANCE Toolkit
www.ket.org/artstoolkit/dance
*
*
*
*
*
Access to new features on the Arts Toolkit Web site, such as additional lesson plans and resources (including a photographic "Tour of
the Theater" and a guide to theater careers), online video previews,
and links to the Kentucky Arts Council Directory of Artists and other
useful online resources.
30 Drama Idea Cards, "mini-lessons" and at-a-glance ideas for content-oriented classroom activities.
VISUAL ARTS Toolkit
— aligned to both 3.0 and 4.0 versions of the Kentucky Core
Content.
www.ket.org/artstoolkit/visual
CONTENTS INCLUDE:
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Visual Arts Video. Classroom-suitable video segments show artists at
work, explore cultural connections, model the process of responding
to art, and take students on a tour of an art museum. Choose VHS or
DVD format. The toolkit also includes a Spectrum of Art DVD that
contains additional cultural and artist segments. You'll receive nearly
eight hours of video in all!
The Kentucky Virtual Art Museum CD-ROM brings together images
of art collections from across the state. From works by the "old
Masters" to quilts and Kentucky folk art, a world of art is just a click
away.
Color Transparencies. A set of 6 color transpariences covers a range
of periods and styles found in Kentucky's Core Content.
A 3-Ring Binder of Lesson Plans and Information. Along with lesson
plans (including assessment components) for primary, intermediate, middle school, and high school, the toolkit provides glossaries,
a guide to responding to art, information about cultural art and
periods and styles, an extensive guide to Kentucky resources, and a
cross-reference to Core Content.
Full-Color "Purposes of Art" Poster. A beautiful 24"X36" color poster
shows examples of art created for a variety of purposes and is ideal
for classroom display.
Visual Arts Idea Cards. A set of 4"X6" cards offer "mini-lessons" and
at-a-glance ideas.
Access to Arts Toolkit Web site. Online resources will include additional lesson plans, a Kentuckians in Visual Arts career feature, a
Masterworks slide show, video previews, and arts education news.
*
*
*
Dance performances, cultural dances, and creative movement lessons on video, in your choice of VHS or DVD format. Many of the
video segments are exclusive to the Dance Toolkit. Combined with
the DanceSense Enhanced DVD, the toolkit offers nearly 8 hours of
video!
DanceSense Enhanced DVD. KET's acclaimed 10-program DanceSense
series, built around Kentucky Core Content, is included in its entirety
on DVD, along with a variety of additional dance video, including a
video "History of Dance." The Dance Arts Toolkit is the only source
for this material in easy-to-use DVD format.
A 3-Ring Binder of informational material. Includes lesson plans for
primary, intermediate, middle school, and high school; glossaries;
a "Responding to Dance" guide; and guides to dance styles and
Kentucky dance resources, plus a cross-referencing of toolkit materials to Kentucky Core Content.
A full-color Dance Timeline poster. Put dance on display in your
classroom with this beautifully illustrated history of dance.
Kentucky Department of Education CD-ROM. Includes an electronic
version of the Kentucky Implementation Manual, guides to books
and Web sites, and music samples and art works from the Speed Art
Museum.
Dance Idea Cards. A packet of "mini-lessons" and at-a-glance ideas
for content-oriented classroom activities.
The Arts Toolkit project is funded in part by awards from the W. Paul and
Lucille Caudill Little Arts Endowment for KET, the National Endowment
for the Arts, the Charles M. and Mary D. Grant Foundation, and the Federal
Title VI Innovative Educational Strategies Program.
dance
Dancing Threads: Community
Dances from Africa to Zuni K
Traditional folk dances from various cultures
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary-8
30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.15, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
Outstanding performers teach traditional Appalachian, AfricanAmerican, and Native American dances and “play party games,”
involving patterns of singing, dancing, poetry, mimicry, and play-acting. Each program features step-by-step instructions as well as a complete student performance of the game or dance. An interview with
the performer gives the historical and cultural contexts of the dance.
Dancing Threads gives young people a multicultural and historical
perspective, encouraging them to value their own and other cultural
traditions. Additional background information is provided in the
extensive teacher’s guide.
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 15
ARTS&HUMANITIES
CONTENTS INCLUDE:
ARTS&HUMANITIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Goin’ to Boston — Appalachian storyteller Anndrena Belcher discuss-
es changing attitudes toward dance and immigration from the British
Isles to North America.
2. Little Johnny Brown
— African-American musician and storyteller Paula Larke discusses types of games, oral tradition, African
settlement in America, and slave life.
3. Weevily Wheat
— Anndrena Belcher discusses Britain’s Bonnie
Prince Charlie, genealogy, family traditions, and heroes.
4. Zuni Harvest Dances — Zuni storyteller Arden Kucate discusses history of the Southwestern American Indians, daily life of the Pueblo
peoples, and similarities and differences among cultures.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, September 11 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, October 17 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, March 20 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed IV:
Monday, April 16 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
DanceSense K C
Understanding dance elements, styles, and history
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
5-10
15 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/dancesense
KY Academic Expectations: 1.15, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
This series explores why people dance, the elements of dance, dance
styles, dance in a multicultural and historical context, and dance as an
art form. It uses performances, archival photographs and footage, and
interviews to capture dance’s emotion and energy and to stimulate
students’ interest, understanding, and appreciation.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/AIR DATES
1. Understanding Dance — explores why people dance. (Apr 25)
2. The Dance of Culture — looks into the origins and functions of dance
in various cultures. (Apr 27)
3. Dance in America — looks at how dance has developed in America,
focusing on the influences of Native American, African-American,
and European dances. (Apr 30)
4. The Elements of Dance — examines the "language" of dance: space,
time, and force. (May 1)
5. The Moving Body — explores how bodies move as well as how dancers train and maintain their bodies. (May 2)
6. Making Dance — shows how dances are created and what choreographers are trying to communicate through their dances. Explores the
role of improvisation in dance. (May 4)
7. Ballet — explores dance as a means of creative expression, focusing
on ballet—its history, vocabulary, and style—as well as the viewer's
role in responding to and appreciating a dance performance. (May 7)
8. Modern Dance — explores modern dance's origins and ever-changing approach to expression. (May 8)
9. Jazz Dance — explores jazz dance and the elements of improvisation
and syncopation and looks at how dances are constantly evolving.
(May 9)
10. Tap and Percussive Dance — explores the classic tap form, its roots
in jazz and blues, and looks at other percussive dance forms such as
flamenco and clogging. (May 11)
16 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULES
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays April 25-May 11 at
10:45/9:45 am CT
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, August 14 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, January 15 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
multi-arts
Arts Express K
Visual arts, music, and dance as
means of communication
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary-6
15 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 1.14, 1.15, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25
Arts Express introduces children to the visual arts, music, and dance.
Real-life footage, animated characters, and dramatic sequences make
the series fun and informative and help teach the elements and principles of the art forms.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
Observing the World Around Us
1. What Is Communication? — shows how the world communicates to
us through sound, appearance, and motion
2. Living Creatures — encourages observing the appearances, sounds,
and motions of living creatures
3. The World We Live In — encourages observing the appearances,
sounds, and motions of the physical world
4. Arts Look at the World — develops observational skills and an
awareness of the arts as forms of communication
5. Appearances, Portraits, and Lifestyles — stresses observing and
using personal characteristics to make portraits
6. Cultures and Customs — shows how music, dance, and the visual
arts communicate to us about many cultures
7. The Past — explores the arts as documentation
8. Fantasies, Dreams, and Wishes — encourages divergent thinking
and creativity
9. Feelings — develops observation and expression skills
Elements of the Arts
10. Line — how line determines direction, shape, form, and sometimes
mood
11. Shape and Form — shows how shape and form are used to depict
geometric and natural objects in the visual arts
12. Space — explores the use of space in the visual arts
13. Texture — the elements and principles of the visual arts
14. Light — shows how visual artists use light to portray appearance and
express moods
15. Visual Arts — how artists consciously manipulate their media in
order to communicate
16. Rhythm — shows how beat and tempo combine to create rhythm
17. Melody and Timbre — variety in pitch; the different timbres of various instruments
18. Music — observes an orchestra in rehearsal; reviews the elements of
music
19. Dance — shows how dancers use space, tempo, motion, and direction to communicate
20. Synthesis — explores animation as an art form which combines
appearances, sounds, and motions
Monday, July 31 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-15; 4 hours) and at 12
noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 16-20; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, January 1 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-15; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 16-20; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Winter: Season of
Darkness and Light K C
Holiday traditions from various cultures
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
This 1997 KET production is a multicultural exploration of the way
winter is celebrated in this country and how these celebrations have
been changed, merged, assimilated, or forgotten over generations.
Artists from across the country explain the traditions associated with
their cultures through music and stories.
The holidays traditions featured are Hanukkah (Jewish), Kwanzaa
(African-American), Posadas (Chicano), and European Christmas.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, December 4 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Monday, May 7 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Elements and processes of the arts
6-9
15 minutes
Unlimited
Call 1-800-457-4509, ext. 4 or www.ait.net/catalog
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations:
2.23, 2.24
Arts Alive is an introduction to the arts for young viewers. The art
forms are treated as unique disciplines which can help children attain
self-understanding and a better grasp of their world through experiencing the arts in their daily lives.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Alive with the Arts — the power and appeal of the arts
2. Elements of Visual Arts — line, shape, color, and texture
3. Creating Visual Arts — expressing an idea
4. Elements of Dance — space, time, and energy
5. Creating Dance — the choreographer and the dancer
6. Elements of Music — rhythm, melody, and harmony
7. Creating Music — developing an idea
8. Elements of Drama — voice and body movement
9. Creating Theater — how theater is more than actors using the elements of drama
Monday, September 4 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-13; 3 hours, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, February 5 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-13; 3 hours, 15 minutes)
Humanities Connections K
The elements of the arts
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
7-12
2-2 1/2 hours
Unlimited, teachers must register each year
Register for free materials online or
call at 1-800-333-9764
Arts & Humanities Core Content Posters: Five color-your-own POSTERS
highlight Core Content in Dance, Theater, Visual Arts, Music and Literature.
Scaled for 11 x 17 paper, you can print and enlarge your own posters from the
humanities web pages-- www.dl.ket.org/humanities (click on “resources”) -or call 1-800-333-9764 to purchase a color set on card stock ($20.00).
Videocassette:
Web Site:
Call 1-800-333-9764
www.dl.ket.org/humanities
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 1.15, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
Humanities Connections covers the basic elements of visual arts, dance, music,
and theater. Each production begins with a teacher video — a collection of
ideas for educators who may not be art specialists. Each teacher video is followed by a student video designed for broadcast in the classroom.
The Connections series features a companion Web site with detailed episode
summaries, vocabulary, works consulted, and a teacher response form.
Arts Alive
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Humanities Connections and Class Connections are written to align with
The National Standards in the Arts and Humanities and Kentucky's
Academic Expectations.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
(Note: All Connections broadcasts are segmented with divider slates to enable
teachers to select sections most appropriate to their students.)
CONNECTIONS
THEATER BASICS
101. Teacher audience: What makes theater magical? Discussion of set,
lighting, sound, costumes, actors and acting. (39:42)
102. History of Theater: Traces development of theater from Greece to
the beginning of the 20th century. Includes discussion of commedia del' arte and Shakespearean stage. Teacher tape ends with
"Who's Who in American Theater." (1:00:32)
103. Student audience: See an A+ performance and look for movement,
gesture, diction, improvisation. (54:27)
104. The making of The Crucible: Students discuss their roles in creating
staging, scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup.
Edited version of Acts 1 ,2, 3, and 4 of The Crucible, intercut with
comments from students on their roles in the production. (14:53)
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 17
ARTS&HUMANITIES
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
10. Arts and Self-Expression — expressing who you are
11. Arts and Social Messages — how the arts can influence human
thought and behavior
12. Arts and Technology — computer graphics
13. Arts and Work — dance therapy for disabled adults
ARTS&HUMANITIES
DANCE BASICS
105. Teacher audience: How to talk to students about dance, a classroom
project idea, a brief history of ballet, and background for The Nutcracker.
(29:45)
106. Student audience: New ways to watch dance: elements of dance:
space-time-force, clips from Act 1 The Nutcracker, discussion of
divertissements, full performance, Act 2, The Nutcracker.
Comparison: How two choreographers handle identical sections of
The Nutcracker, last half of Act 2. (1:11:49)
MUSIC BASICS
107. Teacher audience: Music can be approached in a huge variety of
ways—intellectually, emotionally, or even viewed comparatively
with a work of art. This segment examines the musical "ism's."
(39:57)
108. Student audience: Basic elements of music. More tools of the musician and a review of all elements. (43:02)
VISUAL ARTS BASICS
109. Teacher audience: The art of questioning, an interview with
Lexington artist Carolyn Hisel, and how do the visual arts intersect
with other arts. (35:22)
110. Student audience: Elements of art, the tools of the artist. A discussion of ten paintings—focusing on how they fit into the culture of
their times. (41:10)
CLASS CONNECTIONS
The following broadcasts are excerpts from Humanities through the Arts.
To order tapes, call 1-800-333-9764. This series will not be broadcasted.
THE AFRICAN CULTURAL ROOT
201. Broadcast 1: Intro to Africa, African Drummer, African dance
(52:50)
202. Broadcast 2: African visual art, the modern primitives (48:06)
ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS
203. Broadcast 1: Intro to Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh, Daily life in ancient
Egypt, Giza pyramids, I.M. Pei: The Modern Pyramid (46:14)
204. Broadcast 2: American Indian Culture (43:00)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, October 9 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 101-105;
3 hours, 53 minutes); Monday, October 16 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 106-110; 3 hours, 53 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 201-204; 3 hours, 11 minutes); and Monday, October 23 at
6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 205-209; 3 hours, 40 minutes) and at 12
noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 210-214; 3 hours, 20 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, November 23 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 101-105;
3 hours, 53 minutes); Thursday, November 30 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 106-110; 3 hours, 53 minutes); Thursday, December 7 at
6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 201-204; 3 hours, 11 minutes); Thursday,
December 14 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 205-209; 3 hours,
40 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 210-214;
3 hours, 20 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Monday, March 12 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 101-105;
3 hours, 53 minutes); Monday, March 19 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs
106-110; 3 hours, 53 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs
201-204; 3 hours, 11 minutes); and Monday, March 26 at 6:00/5:00 am
CT (Programs 205-209; 3 hours, 40 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am
CT (Programs 210-214; 3 hours, 20 minutes)
multi-arts professional
development
Art to Heart K C
Exploring creativity and arts activities for young
children
Grade Level:
Taping Rights:
Length:
Print Materials:
Professional Development for teachers of
infants through primary
Unlimited
30 minutes
Downloadable at www.ket.org/
education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/arttoheart
GREECE AND ROME
205. Broadcast 1: Classical Architecture, Greek Sculpture, Later
Videocassette/DVD:
Web Site:
Greek Masterpieces, (35:06)
206. Broadcast 2: Roman Portraiture, Roman Architecture (39:28)
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 1.14, 1.15, 2.26, 3.4,
5.2, 5.5
WORLD RELIGIONS
207. Broadcast 1: Rabbi Jon Adland, Genesis, The Three Daves. (55:30)
208. Broadcast 2: The Church of Hagia Sophia, Dome of the Rock,
Children love to move, sing, draw, sculpt, and play–act, and this
national series of eight engaging half-hour programs offers parents
and teachers of young children insight into the importance of these
kinds of activities to early development and learning. The series
explores how developmentally appropriate activities in visual arts,
dance, drama, and music contribute to learning and physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development in children from birth to age
8. Programs visit schools, child care centers, museums, and community centers to see a wide array of arts activities. Researchers, teachers,
artists, and parents offer information and ideas about enjoyable and
beneficial arts activities for home and school settings. A viewing guide
and Web site include discussion questions and expanded information.
Islamic Architecture, The Silk Road. (20:21)
MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE
209. Broadcast 1: Origins of Gothic Architecture, Hildegarde of Bingin,
Chartres Cathedral, Dante and the Inferno, Intro to the Renaissance.
(59:39)
210. Broadcast 2: Giotto, Michelangelo (27:24)
BAROQUE-NEOCLASSIC-ROMANTIC
211. Broadcast 1: Intro to the Baroque Era, Caravaggio, Shakespeare's
Greatest Hits, Rubens and Rembrandt, Back to Bach. (1:01:54)
212. Broadcast 2: Dance at the Court of Louis XIV, The Palace of
Versailles, Monticello, Goya. (30:38)
THE FINALE- REALISM THROUGH 20TH CENTURY
213. Broadcast 1: Monet and Debussy, Frank Lloyd Wright, Kabuki
Intro, Kabuki Performance, Van Gogh (1:01:54)
214. Broadcast 2: The Ballet Russe, Dorothea Lange, Woody Guthrie,
Georgia O'Keeffe (30:38)
18 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Children’s First Language — introduces the series and offers an over-
view of arts activities and play as a foundation for growth and development
2. Visual Arts — shows an array of visual arts activities (from parentchild steppingstones to art inspired by stories and art) as doorways
to bonding, self-esteem, and literacy
3. Music — teaching artists guide youngsters in activities ranging from
finding their singing voices to learning to play an instrument, demonstrating how music inspires self-expression and self-confidence
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, October 30 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Monday, November 13 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed III:
Monday, January 15 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed IV:
Monday, February 12 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed V:
Monday, April 16 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
music
Mrs. Cabobble’s Caboose
Sing-alongs; musical elements
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary
15 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 1.14, 2.23, 2.24
Mrs. Cabobble’s Caboose encourages active participation in a variety
of musical experiences designed to teach basic music concepts such
as melody, rhythm, harmony, families of instruments, and more. The
programs, hosted by Mrs. Cabobble (Fran Powell) and her cast of characters, invite primary students to sing individually and in groups, to
move rhythmically, and to play classroom rhythm instruments.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Songs: “Mrs. Cabobble’s Caboose,” “How Do You Do?,” “Mister
Banjo”
Rhythm and Rhymes — gives students a chance to participate in singing rhymes and chants, clapping and hand-jive activities, and totalbody movement
Up, Down, and All Around — presents the steps of the music scale
and how the upward and downward movements of a melody form
the melodic contour of the song. Songs: “Skat!,” “Bought Me a Cat”
Let’s Go for a Hike — presents a melodic phrase and asks students to
accurately repeat it during the performance of the song, thus creating
a “harmony echo” effect. Songs: “Color Me Happy,” “Traffic Signs”
Apple Cider Time — presents “dialogue”-style songs and melodic
movement by skips rather than by steps of the scale. Songs: “Apple
Cider,” “Charlie Chipmunk”
Make a Wish — presents the sound of harmony created by movement with the melodic contour in intervals of a third; also allows
students to participate in creative dramatization of the songs. Songs:
“Make a Wish,” “Ki-Yi-Yippee-Yippee-Yea”
(Monday, January 1 at 10:30/9:30 am CT)
Photo: Rick McComb
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/SOME AIR DATES
1. Making New Friends — a musical way to meet and greet new friends.
7. Strike Up the Band — shows how to play various classroom rhythm
instruments. Songs: “Strike Up the Band,” “The Rhythm Song”
8. Spook in the Pumpkin Patch — presents two Halloween songs that
demonstrate the difference between major and minor modes. Songs:
“Pumpkin Patch,” “Spook”
(Tuesday, October 31 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
9. A Lot of Brass — presents the trumpet and trombone as members of
the brass instrument family
10. Arrows and Tomahawks — presents songs from Native American
culture; rhythm instruments are played to accompany the songs.
Songs: “Pow-Wow,” “We Are the Red Men”
(Monday, November 20 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
11. Doin’ the Turkey Trot — presents Thanksgiving songs. Songs: “The
Turkey Trot,” “Grandma’s Oven”
(Tuesday, November 21 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
12. Coats and Mittens — presents seasonal songs, the notation of rests,
and the rhythmic feel of syncopation. Songs: “Coats and Mittens,”
“Popcorn Poppin’”
13. Keep It Movin’ — presents movement activities to enhance motor
skills and rhythmic response. Songs: “Keep It Movin’,” “Brother
Come and Dance”
14. Decorate and Celebrate — presents information about how different cultures celebrate the Christmas season and how their customs
of celebration are reflected in their music. Songs: “Ring-a-Ling-a!,”
“The Pi–ata” (Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, December 18-20 at
10:30/9:30 am CT)
15. Caboose Caroling — gives examples of choral singing and demonstrates the use of the voice as vocal instrument. Songs: “Santa
Claus Is Coming to Town,” “Away in a Manger” (Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, December 18-20 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
16. Fiddle-Dee-Dee — shows different sizes of violins and the sounds
they make; demonstrates different playing methods and styles. Song:
“I Am a Fine Musician”
17. Round and Round — demonstrates independent singing skills and the
combination of multiple sounds. Songs: “Are You Sleeping?,” “Little
Tommy Tinker,” “Three Blind Mice”
18. The Music Man — shows three different sizes of saxophone and
the different sound each one makes. Song: “When the Saints Go
Marching In”
19. Happy Hearts — presents songs to be played and sung in celebration of Valentine’s Day. Songs: “A Valentine,” “Love Somebody”
(Wednesday, February 14 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
20. Blast Off! — presents the scale-wise movement of the melody and
demonstrates the elements of melodic contour. Songs: “I Want To Go
Up in a Rocketship,” “Riding on a Rainbow”
21. February Holidays — demonstrates the difference between the rhythmic style of a march and the story-telling style of the ballad. Songs:
“I’m Proud To Live in America,” “February Birthdays,” “George and
Abraham” (Thursday, February 15 at 9:15/8:15 am CT)
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 19
ARTS&HUMANITIES
4. Movement & Dance — explores activities such as movement awareness, cultural and folk dances, and ballet lessons as ways for children
to learn about themselves, their community, and their own and other
cultures
5. Drama & the Literary Arts — shows storytelling, play-acting, puppetry, and creative dramatics as ways to stimulate the imagination and
forge important connections to language development and reading
6. The Artful Environment — explores how to create a stimulating, interesting, and encouraging environment at home and school
7. Arts for Learning — a look at how arts activities connect to learning
in other subject areas and the importance of teacher professional
development
8. Arts Everyday — explores how the arts are part of everyday life and
offers ideas for activities at home and at school
ARTS&HUMANITIES
22. Windy Days — presents songs that demonstrate an understanding
of melodic contour and how harmony can be produced by combining musical sounds. Songs: “Who Is the Wind?,” “I Wish I Could Fly
Like a Kite!”
23. Hoppin’ Down the Bunny Trail — presents songs that call for rhythmic
response, creative expression, and dramatization. Songs: “Hoppin’
Down the Bunny Trail,” “(But) That Pesky Rabbit Got Away!”
24. April Showers — presents songs that develop an awareness of the
expressive qualities of music. Songs: “Yellow Umbrella,” “Spring Is
Filled with Color” (Friday, April 6 at 10:30/9:30 am CT)
25. Remember When — All the characters at the caboose choose their
favorite experiences from the year’s activities
26. Raindrops and Froghops — presents songs that encourage aesthetic
awareness and musical expression. Songs: “Raindrops,” “Mr. Frog
Went A-Courtin’”
27. Butterflies and Fishin’ Poles — introduces music notation by the
use of objects to represent the melodic contour of the song. Songs:
“Butterfly,” “Who’s Got a Fishin’ Pole?”
28. Summer Fun — demonstrates the expressive qualities of music and
how music relates and contributes to the quality of our lives. Songs:
“Summer Fun,” “Sunny Day!”
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULE
(See above for specific holiday program dates and times.)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, September 11 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16;
4 hours) and Monday, September 18 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
(Programs 17-28; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Monday, February 12 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16;
4 hours) and Monday, February 19 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
(Programs 17-28; 3 hours)
Old Music for New Ears K C
Exposing elementary students to
traditional music
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary-8
15 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.14, 1.15, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.27
This KET-produced instructional series introduces children to a broad
range of music — folk, blues, Cajun, traditional — and cultures
— Native American, African-American, and Appalachian, among others. All lyrics are in the teacher’s guide. The series also introduces a
variety of traditional instruments, such as the hammer dulcimer, the
lap dulcimer, and the jaw harp.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/AIR DATES
1. Malcolm Dalglish — “Cooper’s Caper,” “Bushy Tail,” “One Day, One
Foot,” “Wide Mouth Frog,” “Woody Knows Nothin’” (A) Sep 8,
(B) Feb 6
2. Jean Ritchie — “Shady Grove,” “Bandyrowe,” “Lazy John,” “Goin’
to Boston” (A) Sep 11, (B) Feb 7
3. John McCutcheon — “The Hours After,” “The Rainstorm,” “No More
Pie,” “May There Always Be Sunshine” (A) Sep 12, (B) Feb 9
4. Sparky and Rhonda Rucker — “The Gospel Train,” “Oh Susannah,”
“Freight Train” (A) Sep 13, (B) Feb 12
20 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
5. Mike Seeger — “Cluck Old Hen,” “I Had a Rooster,” “Foo Boo Woo
Boo John,” “Molly Hare,” “Derby Ram” (A) Sep 15, (B) Feb 13
6. Odetta — “Give Me Your Hand,” “Keep On Movin’ On,” “I’m a
Child of God” (A) Sep 18, (B) Feb 16
7. Gray Eagle Band — “The Hound Dog Song,” “Rabbit in a Log,”
“Breathitt County Hill Farm,” “Oh Groundhog,” “Christmas Calico/
Sally Goodin” (A) Sep 19, (B) Feb 20
8. Jean Ritchie — “Love Somebody, Yes I Do,” “The Blue Bird Song,”
“Skin and Bones,” “What’ll I Do with the Baby-O?” (A) Sep 20,
(B) Feb 21
9. Tom Bledsoe, Joy D’Elia, and Rich Kirby — “Twinkle Twinkle Little
Star,” “Skip to My Lou,” “The Cuckoo,” “The Devil and the Farmer’s
Wife,” “Five Little Ducks Out on a Limb” (A) Sep 22, (B) Feb 23
10. Bob and Susie Hutchison — “She’ll Be Comin’ Around the
Mountain,” “Did You Feed My Cow?”, “Taddle-Diddle-Dink-Dink,”
“The Old Woman and the Little Pig,” “Sandy River Belle/Whiskey
Before Breakfast” (A) Sep 25, (B) Feb 26
11. Odetta — “I’m a Rambler, I’m a Gambler,” “Home on the Range,”
“Chilly Winds/Shenandoah” (A) Sep 26, (B) Feb 27
12. The Metro Blues Trio — “Chicken’ la Blues,” “Mother the Queen of
My Heart,” “She Caught the Katy” (A) Sep 27, (B) Feb 28
13. The Reel World String Band — “Last Old Train,” “Go Rabbit,” “Stay
All Night” (A) Sep 29, (B) Mar 2
14. Mike Seeger — “Quill Ditty,” “All Around the Kitchen,” “When First
to This Country,” “Skip to My Lou,” “Susan Girl” (A) Oct 2,
(B) Mar 6
15. John McCutcheon — “John Henry,” “Hambone,” “The Awful Hilly
Daddy-Willie Trip” (A) Oct 3, (B) Mar 7
16. Malcolm Dalglish — “Danville Klude,” “Spoons Story,” “Bones
Lesson/Fine Lady and the Saxophone Pig,” “I Had a Bird,” “Throw
the Window Open” (A) Oct 4, (B) Mar 9
17. Taj Mahal — “Fishin’ Blues,” “Shake Sugaree,” “Light Rain”
(A) Oct 6, (B) Mar 12
18. The Doucet Family — “Poor Johnnie (Johnny Peux Pas Danser),”
“The Fifty Cent Song (La Chanson de Cinquante Sous),” “P’tit Galop
pour Mamou” (A) Oct 9, (B) Mar 13
19. Dennis Banks — “The Flip Side,” “A Forty Niner Song,” “An Honor
Song” (A) Oct 10, (B) Mar 14
20. Paula Larke — “Rosebud,” “Chicken and the Rooster,” “Zudio”
(A) Oct 11, (B) Mar 16
21. The Doucet Family — “La Cravate a’ Zig et Zag,” “Le Hoogie
Boogie,” “L’Arc en Ciel,” “Deux Cocodries” (A) Oct 13, (B) Mar 19
22. Taj Mahal — “Funky Bluesy ABC,” “African Blues,” “Stagger Lee,”
“You Don’t Have To Go” (A) Oct 16, (B) Mar 20
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Weekly broadcast (A):
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays,
September 8-October 16 at 10:45/9:45 am CT
Weekly broadcast (B):
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, February 6-March 20
at 10:45/9:45 am CT
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, November 20 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-22; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, April 23 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-22; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
www.ket.org/education/newsletters
Richard Davis on Jazz K
A national sing-along
History, elements, and social context of jazz
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
Primary-6
30 minutes
Unlimited for one year after broadcast
Call 1-800-336-3768 or see www.menc.org/guides/
wlc/WLCFront.html
www.menc.org
KY Academic Expectations: 2.24
Produced by the Music Educators National Conference to launch
Music in Our Schools Month, the World’s Largest Concert is a national
celebration of music in our schools. K-6 students and their teachers
practice selected numbers throughout the year. The broadcast connects
these students from across the country in one simultaneous sing-along
performance of those musical numbers.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
LIVE on Thursday, March 8 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Monday, March 12 at 9:30/8:30 am CT
TEACHER’S GUIDE
A guide with reproducible music, piano accompaniments, and
performance instructions is available for $3.00 shipping and handling. Download free from website at www.menc.org/guides/wlc/
WLCFront.html or order from: MENC • 1806 Robert Fulton Drive •
Reston, VA 20191 • (703) 860-4000 or 1-800-336-3768
Hymnody of Earth K
The poetry of Wendell Berry set to music
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
5-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.24
This production sets the poetry of Kentucky writer and farmer Wendell
Berry to music by Malcolm Dalglish. A chorus of young people sing
about a deep love for the Earth and the people and creatures who
inhabit it. Both the poetry and the combination of words and music
offer a wealth of opportunities for classroom discussion about the creation and function of art. The performance features the Bloomington
Youth Chorus, the Lexington Children’s Chorus, The Anglicantors,
Dalglish (on hammer dulcimer), and Glen Velez (percussion).
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, September 11 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Tuesday, October 31 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Tuesday, April 3 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Monday, April 16 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
5-adult
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.14, 2.24, 2.25
This series introduces students and teachers to the elements of jazz,
its history and pioneers, its instruments, and its contribution to
American life and culture. The host is Richard Davis, a mainstay of the
New York jazz scene and a professor at the University of WisconsinMadison. Davis intersperses lecture segments with questions from the
KET viewing audience, samples of work by jazz masters, and demonstrations of key jazz elements on his string bass. In addition to music,
each program in the series addresses topics in social studies, humanities, and African-American studies.
The first four programs in this series aired as live teleconferences during the 1997/98 school year.
ARTS&HUMANITIES
2007 World’s Largest Concert C
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Elements of Jazz and Jazz History
2. Jazz Pioneers
3. Jazz Instruments: Saxophone and Trumpet
4. Jazz and Social Protest Movements
5. Jazz and the Spiritual Experience
6. Jazz Instruments: Bass and Piano
Note: This series is offered on videotape only. See tape order information on
pages 125-126.
Sing Out for Freedom K C
Music of the civil rights movement
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
7-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.25
The Freedom Singers are one of the best known of the singing groups
that traveled the U.S. in the 1950s and ’60s spreading the civil rights
message. With full-bodied harmonic voices, they sang the songs of
the civil rights movement, often stopping to tell about their personal
experiences. This KET production includes highlights of the Freedom
Singers’ 1993 concert in Louisville — inspirational gospel, call-toaction songs, and ballads, all sung a cappella. In interviews, group
members talk about their experiences with the civil rights movement
and nonviolent protest.
Note: This program is offered on videotape only. See tape order information
on pages 125-126.
Photo: Rick McComb
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 21
ARTS&HUMANITIES
Roles of gospel music in African American culture
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
8-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
Photo: Rick McComb
The 2003 Great Kentucky
Gospel Shout Out K C
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.25
Gospel music has played a vital role in the life and culture of AfricanAmericans from slavery through the civil rights movement. In the
summer of 2003, 25 choirs from across the state competed for recognition as the finest gospel choir in Kentucky and proved how vibrant the
music still is today. This program showcases the finalists, including
gospel groups from Lexington, Owensboro, Bowling Green, Paducah,
and Louisville. The program is hosted by Rev. Bobby Jones from Black
Entertainment Television and Dawne Gee, a WAVE-TV anchor. The
program also includes special performances, including one by nationally-known singer Kim Burrell.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, December 4 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Exploring the World of Music C
Basic elements of music, introduction to music
with a global perspective
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
9-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
$15.00
Annenberg Media, PO Box 2345
South Burlington, VT 05407-2345
phone: 1-800-LEARNER (532-7637),
fax: (802) 846-1850
www.learner.org/resources/series105.html
KY Academic Expectations: 1.14, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
Through rare archival footage and contemporary performances, this
series presents themes such as music and the environment, music as
cultural memory, and the effect of technology on music. It also demonstrates how musical elements can express culture and create an infinite
variety of sounds.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Sound, Music and the Environment — Explores the definition of
music and the impact of culture on music. Examples include Bosnian
ganga and becarac singing; Tuvan throat singing; Irish, West African,
Trinidadian, and Japanese music; and Western chamber music, jazz,
and rock
2. The Transformative Power of Music — The musical healing ceremonies
of the Kung people in Namibia and Botswana; Epirote music in traditional Greek weddings; and modern rock, gospel, and folk music
3. Music and Memory — West African griots, the Walbiri people of
Australia, folksingers of Ireland and Appalachia, and modern practitioners of early music
4. Transmission: Learning Music — Indian classical music, African village drumming, and modern jazz and gospel
5. Rhythm — American marching band, North Indian tala, the Japanese
shakuhachi tradition, West African drumming, and Afro-Cuban
dance music
22 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
6. Melody — Western classical music, the Arabic maqam tradition, Irish
dance music and sean-nós singing, and Indian raga
7. Timbre: The Color of Music — Jazz, Indian, West African, Irish,
Bosnian, Indonesian gamelan, and Japanese music
8. Texture — Japanese shakuhachi, Trinidadian steel band, Bosnian
ganga, West African percussion, and modern Australian choral music
9. Harmony — Jazz, chamber music, Bosnian ganga singing, early music
plainchants, and barbershop quartets
10. Form: The Shape of Music — Improvisational jazz, traditional
Japanese music, call-and-response forms in West African music and
American gospel, and Irish fiddle tunes
11. Composers and Improvisers — American rock, Indian raga, classical
and contemporary Western music, jazz, and Arabic classical music
12. Music and Technology — A case study of the flute and an examination of developing recording and composing technologies where the
roles of composer, musician, arranger, and conductor begin to fuse
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, August 7 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-12; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Monday, January 8 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-12; 2 hours
theater
Wind in the Willows K C
KET's production of the Stage One play
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary-8
90 minutes
7 years, education use only (August 2009)
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.22, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25
Stage One, Louisville's professional theater for young people, has
adapted the Kenneth Grahame children's classic, Wind in the Willows,
for the stage. In this version, the irrepressible Toad is taught again and
again that "animals who go rushing around too fast get into lots of
trouble." But that doesn't stop him from pursuing his latest fancy, the
glorious automobile! Despite the efforts of practical Rat, fickle Otter,
ingenuous Mole, and sage Badger, modernization begins to intrude
upon their tranquil country life.
The KET production includes a short introductory segment that
explores how the stage version is transformed into a television program.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, September 25 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
Monday, February 26 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
Appleseed John K C
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
3-7
One 90-minute program (easily divided into
shorter segments for classroom use)
7 years, educational use only (Aug 2010)
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.25
This play, performed by StageOne: Louisville Children’s Theatre, is set
during America’s westward expansion. It centers on a girl’s desire to
escape farm life and become an actress. She meets an American hero,
John Chapman, better known as Appleseed John. The teacher’s guide
provides information on how to use this play to address Drama Core
Content and enrich viewing of a professional play.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, September 25 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Thursday, October 26 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Monday, February 26 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Thursday, March 29 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Liz's Circus Story K C
NETA AWARD WINNER
An autobiographical one-woman play
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
6-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, page 125
www.ket.org/circusstory/
KY Academic Expectations: 2.22, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25
Kentuckian Liz Bussey Fentress’s one-woman play spans 23 years,
beginning when Liz is 21 and just graduated from the University of
Wisconsin. With job prospects dim in her chosen field of theater, she
takes a job as ringmistress, organist, and puppet show performer with
Wayne Franzen’s Franzen Bros. Circus, a brand-new one-ring circus.
Through Liz’s portrayal of herself, Wayne, and an array of other circus
characters and animals, she shares the trials and triumphs of the fledgling circus and her own efforts to pursue her dream of working in theater. As a 44-year-old at the play’s end, Liz realizes that her circus experience has taught her humorous, tragic, and life-changing lessons about
what individuals can achieve if they believe in their dreams. Originally
produced at Horse Cave Theatre, the play was adapted for television by
Fentress and directed by Vince Spoelker. A KET production.
This program has been flagged for content and/or language. KET
strongly encourages teachers to preview this program. Call KET's
Education office at (800) 432-0951 for more information.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, November 20 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Monday, April 23 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
African-American poetry and music
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
9-12
60 minutes
Unlimited until 2010
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.14, 2.23, 2.25
Words Like Freedom/Sturdy Black Bridges is a “poetic concert” featuring
African-American writing and music. Words Like Freedom focuses on
the role of African-American women in the struggle for racial justice
and opens with Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman” speech.
Sturdy Black Bridges explores the trials and triumphs of black womanhood through the words of African-American women writers, Nikki
Giovanni, Yusef Iman, Carolyn Rogers, and Priscilla Cooper.
A 1997 KET production.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, October 31 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Monday, November 27 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Tuesday, April 3 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Monday, April 30 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
visual arts
The Big A C
Looking at, talking about, and creating
visual arts
Grade Level:
Taping Rights:
Length:
Print Materials:
Primary
School year
15 minutes
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.22, 2.23, 2.24, 2.36
The Big A is a 10-program series designed to teach children the processes
of looking at art, talking about art, and creating art. The program host,
cartoonist Don Arioli, explores concepts related to art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and art production. Each program features a different
art education theme and includes animated and dramatic segments,
documentary footage of children, guest artists, and famous works of art.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Telling a Story in Art — Host Don Arioli introduces his cartoon side-
kick, “Norman the Storyteller,” to show students how artists use
their own experiences to tell stories. The program highlights the storytelling aspects of Northwest Coast Indian art.
2. Getting Ideas — The Big A kids use zoo animals as a source for their
art ideas. Visits to a sculptor’s and a painter’s studios reveal the
steps artists take to turn their ideas into art creations.
3. Exploring Ideas — Students learn how to make use of an “idea book”
as a source for creating their own art work. Don explains that before
ideas can be turned into art, artists need to explore, experiment,
refine, and clarify them. The kids visit a Javanese puppet master and
a sculptor to see how artists transform their ideas into art.
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 23
ARTS&HUMANITIES
A theatrical production about a young farm girl
who meets American hero, John Chapman
Words Like Freedom/
Sturdy Black Bridges K C
ARTS&HUMANITIES
4. Tools and Materials — Don shows how to get many artistic effects
with just one tool. Visits to a Native American artist, a glass artist,
and a painter introduce students to the different tools and materials
used in creating art and how artists use them to achieve the expressive quality they desire.
5. Teamwork — Don and the children work together to put on a puppet show. Students go through the process of brainstorming, finding
and testing solutions, dividing tasks, and completing their show. The
program also highlights professional teamwork by showing how
filmmakers use special effects to make a film about dinosaurs.
6. Lines, Shapes, Colors, and Textures — Don introduces the elements
of design: line, shape, color, and texture. With the help of a billboard
artist, he and the kids transform a graffiti-covered tank into a mural
full of animated lines and shapes.
7. Putting It Together — Don introduces the concept of composition. A
trip to a farmer’s market provides lots of sketches for the kids’ idea
books. A visit with a painter teaches the children how to organize a
painting through repetition and variety.
8. What Does it Mean? — Don and the children visit an art museum,
where they talk with a photographer, an art curator, and a West
African artist about how to interpret works of art in terms of their
design elements and compositions.
9. I Like It Because — The children visit an art gallery. The gallery
owner discusses the works of art on display and encourages them to
critique the works in terms of their likes and dislikes.
10. Different Ways of Seeing — For a surprise birthday party for Don,
the kids create works of art that show his image in different ways.
They also explore using the computer to create art, making a story
quilt, and sculpting with clay.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, October 9 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30
minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, March 12 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-10; 2 hours,
30 minutes)
Posie Paints C
Fun, animated series that teaches basic
art techniques
Grade Level:
Taping Rights:
Length:
Print Materials:
Primary-3
School year
15 minutes
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.23, 2.24
This animated series teaches children the basics of visual art and how
successful artists have used various techniques. It challenges students
to use the same skills to create their own artistic products.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Line
2. Shape and Form
3. Color
4. Value
5. Texture
6. Space
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, August 14 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, January 15 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
24 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Doodle C
FUNdamental art techniques for everyone
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
Primary-12
15 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
www.mystudiostore.com/doodlemain.htm
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.22, 2.23, 2.24
Doodle is the world’s first 3D animated art teacher who, with the help
of his animated friends, sparks the creative process with a fresh, new
approach. The series teaches fundamental art concepts, vocabulary,
techniques and incorporates the Internet in art history lessons.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Drawing Faces
2. Cartooning & Caricatures
3. Color
4. Painting
5. Drawing the Human Figure
6. Comic Book Art
7. Light & Shadow
8. Perspective
9. Drawing Animals
10. Careers in Art
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, November 6 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
(Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, April 9 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
(Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Art On-Air K C
Creative art projects in a variety of media
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-6
18-30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/artonair
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.22, 2.23
Kentucky Arts Council artists-in-residence show students how to
express themselves in a variety of art projects. Each program provides
step-by-step instructions and features students working on the same
projects and reflecting on their own work. The series also features
related works by famous artists and video field trips to local artists’
studios and other interesting places.
Art On-Air helps students recognize elements and principles of art and
design, use a variety of media and tools, see themselves as artists, and
learn to value themselves through their creativity.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Walking the Dot (with Rebecca Gallion) — contour line drawing
2. Moving Lines (with Alice Noel) — gestural line drawing
3. Color (with Catherine Rubin) — cut paper collage, using color to
evoke a mood and communicate ideas
4. Geo-Vistas (with Ruben Moreno) — cardboard sculptures created
with geometric shapes
5. Tessellations (with Thomas Freese) — making a tessellating stamp
6. cARTography (with Cynthia Cooke) — using map-making skills to
draw an imaginary island
Monday, September 25 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-10; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 11-12; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Monday, February 26 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-10; 4 hours) and
at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 11-12; 1 hour)
From the Shadows
of the River K C
Portrait of a Native American artist
4-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.20, 2.25, 2.26
The Wickliffe Mounds near Barlow inspired contemporary Native
American artist Truman Lowe, who created four works of art in
response to what he saw and felt upon visiting this ancient Indian settlement on the bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River. He returned
to create another work on-site with the help of schoolchildren from
several Western Kentucky counties.
Through interviews with Lowe and others involved in the project, as
well as documentary footage shot at the mounds and at Murray State
University’s Eagle Gallery, From the Shadows of the River offers insights
into the creative process, the mounds and their significance, and other
issues surrounding multicultural art. A KET production.
Note: This program is offered on videotape only. See tape order information
on pages 125-126.
Crafting Tradition K C
Honoring Kentucky’s hand-made past
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
Monday, December 18 at 12:30 pm/11:30 am CT
Monday, April 23 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
Art History I:
A Century of Modern Art
An introduction to the works of influential modern painters
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
5-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
KET’s Crafting Tradition visits members of five Western Kentucky families to discover how they are preserving the pioneer tradition of handcrafting baskets, fishing nets, quilts, brooms, and furniture. It also
explores the importance of maintaining this link to the past.
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
6-12
15 minutes
School year
Call 800-457-4509, ext. 4 or visit
www.ait.net/catalog
See order form, page 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
These programs highlight the evolution of European and American art
during the last century. Host Denise Hicks discusses selected works,
commenting on the artists’ personal histories and pointing out distinctive elements in their work.
The series aims to give students the skill and information they need to
recognize the works of 60 modern artists by style and subject matter.
At the end of each program, the host asks students to identify several
paintings by artist.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
European Artists
1. Impressionism — Edouard Manet, Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir,
Edgar Degas, and Mary Cassatt; Post-Impressionists Georges Seurat
and Henri Toulouse-Lautrec
2. The Fauves — Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin; Fauves Henri
Matisse, Andre Derain, Maurice Vlaminck, and Raoul Dufy
3. Expressionism — Edvard Munch, Ernst Kirchner, Wassily Kandinsky,
Franz Marc, Alexei Jawlensky, and Max Beckmann
4. Cubism — Paul Cezanne; Cubists Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque,
Juan Gris, Robert Dulaunay, Fernand Leger, Marcel Duchamp, and
Piet Mondrian
5. Surrealism — Salvador Dali, Joan Miro, Henri Rousseau, Rene
Magritte, Giorgio De Chirico, and Marc Chagall
6. Modern Mavericks — Gustav Klimt, Paul Klee, George Rouault,
Amedeo Modigliani, Giacomo Balla, and Oskar Kokoschka
American Artists
7. American Landscapes — Joseph Stella, Charles Demuth, Charles
Scheeler, Georgia O’Keeffe, Arthur Dove, and John Marin
8. Realism — Edward Hopper, Ben Shahn, Jack Levine, Horace Pippin,
Milton Avery, Andrew Wyeth, Grant Wood, and Thomas Hart Benton
9. Abstract Expressionism — Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, Willem
de Kooning, Adolph Gottlieb, Mark Rothko, Helen Frankenthaler,
Morris Louis, and Frank Stella
10. Pop — Roy Lichenstein, Andy Warhol, James Rosenquist, Wayne
Thiebaud, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Indiana
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, August 21 at 8:30/7:30 am CT (Programs 1-6; 1 hour,
30 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 7-10; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Monday, January 22 at 8:30/7:30 am CT (Programs 1-10; 2 hours,
30 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 7-10; 1 hour)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 25
ARTS&HUMANITIES
7. Drawing Animals (with Rex Robinson) — a three-step process
enabling students to draw anything they want
8. Turning Everyday Objects Into Art (with Alice Noel) — art of assemblage to make portrait boxes
9. Exploring the Third Dimension with Captain Cooke (with Cynthia
Cooke) — three-dimensional map making
10. Celebrating Ancestors (with Maude Alexander) — African mask making
11. Combining Words with Art (with Thomas Freese) — creating accordion-fold books
12. Animating Art (with Ruben Moreno) — creating zoetropes
ARTS&HUMANITIES
Photo: Rick McComb
Looking at Picasso
The master painter’s early life and works
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Web site:
8-12
20 minutes
School year
http://picasso.thinkport.org
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24
Art History II:
A Survey of the Western World
American and European painting and
architecture
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
6-12
15 minutes
School year
Call 800-457-4509, ext 4 or visit
www.ait.net/catalog
See order form, page 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
This series hooks students with modern paintings before moving back
in time to make the old masters just as interesting. Host Denise Hicks
connects the artists’ styles to the literature and history of their times.
She also traces religious influences on art, from the Spanish Inquisition
and El Greco’s mysticism to the Protestant Reformation, with Dürer’s
line drawings and woodcuts, Cranach’s portrait of Luther, and the pictures Hans Holbein painted to help Henry VIII choose another wife.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Ash Can Plus — Bellows, Luks, Sloan, Stieglitz, and Marsh
2. Cosmopolitans: Looking Toward Europe — Sargent, Whistler, Homer,
This 20-minute program on the early life and works of Pablo Picasso
features visits to the conservation lab at the National Gallery of Art,
an up-close look at pieces in the gallery’s Picasso exhibition, and commentary by art historians and museum educators.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, September 4 at 9:10/8:10 am CT
Monday, February 5 at 9:10/8:10 am CT
World of Our Own:
Kentucky Folkways K C
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
8-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/programs/ket/folkways
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
Eight 30-minute programs highlight the rich cultural heritage of rural
and urban Kentucky in this 1998 KET production. Each program features
Kentuckians from different communities and walks of life who represent
aspects of traditional culture in their work, play, art, and religious lives.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Culture of Work, Part 1 — occupational folklife of Kentucky, featuring river workers, tobacco farmers, whiskey tasters, farriers, small
businesses, and the lore of truck drivers
Eakins, Henri, and Prendergast
3. Colonials: Realistic and Romantic — Copley, West, Catlin, Bingham,
Bierstadt, Church, and Ryder
4. English Painting — Hogarth, Gainsborough, Reynolds, Constable,
Turner, and Rossetti
5. Spain — El Greco, Velasquez, Goya, and Gaudi
6. German Painting — Grünewald, Dürer, Cranach, and Holbein
7. 17th-Century Dutch Masters — Rembrandt, Hals, Vermeer, de Hooch,
and Ruisdael
8. Flemish Painting — Jan Van Eyck, Rogier Van Der Weyden, Bruegel,
Memling, and Rubens
9. Italian Renaissance Painting — Leonardo, Michelangelo,Raphael
10. Mannerism: Italy — Parmigianino, Pontormo, Bronzino, Tintoretto,
Michelangelo
11. Italian Architecture — Alberti, Brunelleschi, Bramante, Michel-angelo, Giulio Romano, Palladio, Bernini, and Longhena
12. Chateaux of the Loire — Amboise, Azay-Le-Rideau, Blois,
Chambord, Chenonceau, and Cheverny
2. Culture of Work, Part 2
3. Culture of Play, Part 1 — traditional ways of passing time, including
the Rolley Hole marble game; children’s hand-jive games; thumbpicked, flat-picked, and fiddle music; folk dancing; and 4th of July,
Emancipation Day, Dirt Bowl Homecoming, and Halloween celebrations
4. Culture of Play, Part 2
5. Art of the Everyday, Part 1 — the aesthetic of everyday activities:
quilting, weaving, chair making, riving shingles, stone masonry, gardening, food preservation, and dog breeding
6. Art of the Everyday, Part 2
7. Customs and Beliefs, Part 1 — rites and traditions marking important events in life, including roadside memorials, funeral traditions,
Indian wedding traditions, folk medicine, spiritual yard art, and
Cherokee lore
8. Customs and Beliefs, Part 2
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, August 21 at 1:00 pm/12 noon am CT
(Programs 1-12; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Monday, January 22 at 1:00 pm/12 noon am CT
(Programs 1-12; 3 hours)
26 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Thursday, November 23 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Monday, November 27 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed III:
Monday, April 30 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Ellis Wilson – So Much to Paint K C Looking at Painting K C
How to read a painting
Grade Levels:
Length:
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Web Site:
9-12
60 minutes (easily divided into shorter
segments for classroom use)
Unlimited
www.ket.org/elliswilson
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
9-12
60 minutes (easily divided into shorter
segments for classroom use)
Unlimited
Downloadable at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/painting
Ellis Wilson (1899-1977) was an artist whose passion for painting took
him from his native Mayfield, KY, to Manhattan, where he worked for
50 years. Using bold color, shape, and form, Wilson captured the beauty and dignity of ordinary black people in more than 300 paintings.
In the process, he helped integrate the art world, paving the way for
younger African American artists. The program’s Web site provides
additional information about Wilson and other African American artists as well as two lesson plans.
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.23, 2.24
This documentary has been flagged for content due to adult subject matter,
such as race-based violence and works depicting nudity. The complete program is not recommended for elementary students and should be previewed
for middle school. As an alternative to watching the program, students may
explore the Gallery and Biography sections of the Web site.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Realism — featuring painters Dal Macon, Gaela Erwin, Sheldon
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, December 4 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
Monday, May 7 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
Artist-host Robert Tharsing introduces the art of painting through
interviews with Kentucky artists, visits to their studios, and discussion
of techniques, elements, and principles in selected paintings. Using
works from Kentucky art museums by Kentucky artists and artists
from other places and times, the series demonstrates how to “read” a
painting.
Tapley, and Laurin Notheison
2. Expressionism — featuring painters Mark Priest, Karen Spears, Ann
Tower, Guiniver Smith, and Patrick Adams
3. Abstraction — featuring painters Gerald Ferstman, Sam Gilliam, Ivan
Schifferdecker, Nancy Cassell, and Henry Chodkowski
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, November 27 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Block Feed II:
Monday, April 30 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
See Also...
Arte y Más! (Primary) –– page 38
James Still’s River of Earth (7-12) — page 73
Creating Stories and Music (4-5) –– page 62
Kentucky Chautauqua (7-12) — page 109
Electronic Field Trip to Horse Cave Theatre (5-12) — page 31
Making Grimm Movies (6-12) — page 113
Electronic Field Trip to the Kentucky Center for the Arts (6-12)
Signature (9-12) — page 74
— page 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Kentucky Opera (6-9) — page 33
SignatureLIVE! (10-12) — page 753
Telling Tales (K-8) — page 69
Electronic Field Trip to the Speed Museum (6-12) — page 35
Humanities Through the Arts (KET Distance Learning) — page 115
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 27
ARTS&HUMANITIES
The life and art of a Kentucky-born painter
KET ELECTRONIC FIELD TRIPS
ELECTRONIC
FIELDFIELD
TRIPSTRIPS
KET ELECTRONIC
program titles
Electronic Field Trip Through
Geologic Time (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to a Beef Cattle Farm (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to a Coal Mine (4-8) K C
Electronic Field Trip to a Horse Farm (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to a Newspaper (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to a Pig Farm (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to a
Veterinary Clinic (4-12) K C
F Electronic Field Trip to a Watershed (K-8) K C
Electronic Field Trip to an Orchard (4-12) K C
F Electronic Field Trip to Fort Harrod and Fort
Boonesborough (4-8) K C
Electronic Field Trip to
Horse Cave Theatre (5-12)K C
Electronic Field Trip to KET (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to Mammoth Cave (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to Perryville (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to the Aviation Museum
of Kentucky (3-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to
the Falls of the Ohio (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to the Forest (4-8) K C
Electronic Field Trip to the Kentucky Center for
the Arts (6-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to
the Kentucky Opera (6-9) K C
Electronic Field Trip to the Louisville Zoo (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to the Mountain
Homeplace (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to the National Weather
Service (5-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to the Post Office (Primary) K C
Electronic Field Trip to
the Speed Museum (6-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to Toyota (4-12) K C
Electronic Field Trip to White Hall Historic Site,
Home of Cassius M. Clay (4-12) K C
F
New or Revised for 2006/2007
C Closed Captioned
K KET Production
On KET EncycloMedia
Electronic Field Trip
Through Geologic Time K C
Exploring layers of rock at Jenkins Pound Gap
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/geotime
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.6, 2.19
A geologist and a science teacher show students how to identify and
date rocks as they explore Jenkins Pound Gap in Letcher County. This
is the first site in Kentucky designated as geologically significant.
Geologist Frank Ettensohn and teacher Kim Alexander discuss how
early settlers used the Pound Gap as an easy crossing through the
Pine Mountain Ridge. As students see how layers of rocks formed and
moved over time, they’ll see examples from the Devonian through the
Mississippian to the Pennsylvanian periods, with lots of explanations
and visible examples of aging. Produced 2000, updated 2002
Students will explore:
• how weathering and erosion caused the formation of a gap;
• what cultural and economic effects the gap had on the region;
• how environments move “in and out” through time;
• differences between shale, sandstone, coal, limestone and dolomite; &
• how to identify properties of rock in terms of color, texture, and
hardness.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 17 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Thursday, January 18 at 2:00 pm CT
Electronic Field Trip to a Beef
Cattle Farm K C
Where’s the beef in Kentucky?
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.3, 2.18, 2.19, 2.36
Photo: Rick McComb
The Goggin family has owned and operated a beef cattle farm in Boyle
County for three generations. Family members show us around the
farm and answer questions like these:
• Why do they raise beef cattle?
• What role does the veterinarian play in the operation?
• How is artificial insemination used?
• How do cows digest grass?
• What’s a day on the farm like for kids?
Co-produced by KET and University of Kentucky College of
Agriculture. Produced 1997. Note: This program shows real-life video of the
intestines and digestive system of a cow.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
28 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Thursday, September 21 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
Wednesday, November 22 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Thursday, February 22 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
Electronic Field Trip to a Coal Mine KC
Exploring the coal industry in Kentucky
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-8
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/coal
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.6, 2.19
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 31 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Thursday, January 18 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Electronic Field Trip
to a Horse Farm K C
Daily life with thoroughbreds
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/farm
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.19, 2.36
During a field trip to Margaux Farm in Woodford County, students
will learn:
• what makes the Bluegrass region so good for raising horses and
other livestock;
• what a farrier does;
• what a typical day on a horse farm is like;
• how a veterinarian knows that a mare is in foal; and
• how thoroughbred horses are bred (limited information)
Co-produced by KET and University of Kentucky College of
Agriculture. Produced 1996.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 7 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Wednesday, April 25 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Thursday, May 3 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 21 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Thursday, November 7 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Thursday, February 22 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Tuesday, April 10 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Electronic Field Trip
to a Pig Farm K C
Daily life with pigs
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.6, 2.19, 2.36
Learn about the swine industry without leaving your classroom.
Students whose experience with pigs might consist of watching the
move “Babe” might be very curious to learn what life is like on a pig
farm. At BLT Farm in Hardin County, students will learn what makes
Kentucky so good for raising pigs and other livestock, what a typical
day on a pig farm is like, how a veterinarian clips needle teeth, and a
little about the life cycle of swine. Collaboratively developed by KET,
University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, and the Kentucky
Farm Bureau. Produced 1997.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 21 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Wednesday, November 22 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Thursday, February 22 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Electronic Field Trip to a
Veterinary Clinic K C
A visit to the animal doctor
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/vet
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.3, 2.6, 2.36
Electronic Field Trip to a Newspaper K C
Producing a daily newspaper
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/news
KY Academic Expectations: 1.11, 1.13, 2.36
Learn about the daily workings of a vet clinic without leaving your
classroom. During the field trip to Jessamine Veterinary Clinic,
William McCaw, Dan Bowling, and Stacey Burdick answer questions
and give visitors a glimpse of their daily activities. Students will:
• see how difficult it is to be a veterinarian;
• learn how a veterinarian cleans animal’s teeth;
• find out how veterinarians use computers and other technology;
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 29
KET ELECTRONICFIELDTRIPS
KET takes you and your students on a field trip to a coal mine, and
you won’t even need a hard hat—in fact, you never have to leave your
classroom. Through the magic of satellite and video technology, you will
• go underground to a deep mine;
• visit a surface mine and see huge earth-moving equipment;
• see reclamation projects;
• learn how coal was formed;
• watch as coal is transported by truck, barge, and train; and
• hear questions answered by people involved in Kentucky’s mining
industry.
Produced 1995
On this field trip, KET introduces you to the staff of the Lexington
Herald-Leader. A reporter, a sports writer, a photographer, and an editor
share techniques used in creating a newspaper. Get a close-up look at
the business of running a newspaper as we explore advertising and
sales and see the technology involved. A variety of newspaper professionals also offer advise on developing career skills. Produced 1996.
•
•
•
•
observe problem-solving skills used to diagnose non-verbal patients;
discover careers available to people who want to work with animals;
follow several cases from start to finish; and
meet a variety of animals: cats, dogs, horses, cows, and even some
exotic pets. Produced 1998.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
ELECTRONIC
FIELDFIELD
TRIPSTRIPS
KET ELECTRONIC
Thursday, September 21 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Wednesday, November 22 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Friday, December 8 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Thursday, February 22 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Friday, May 11 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Electronic Field Trip
to a Watershed K C
We all live in a watershed
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
K-4, 5-8
2 programs, 15 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/watershed
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.5, 2.6, 2.31
Take a virtual field trip to a Kentucky watershed—including rural,
urban, karst, and mountain environments—to learn how our individual actions affect water quality. A watershed is an area that catches
rain and snow and drains into a common waterway, such as streams,
rivers, lake or groundwater. Large watersheds are made up of many
smaller watersheds.
There will be two 15-minute field trips, both with computer animation, showing how watersheds work. The first will be targeted to
grades K-4 and the second targeted to grades 5-8. The field trips will
show ways water gets polluted, ways water systems can clean themselves until pollution overwhelms the cures, and some of the practices
schools and families can do to help keep waterways clean in Kentucky.
Produced 2006.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Friday, December 1 at 9:00/8:00 am CT (Programs 1-2; 30 minutes)
Thursday, December 7 at 9:30/8:30 am CT (Programs 1-2; 30 minutes)
Thursday, December 14 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 30 minutes)
Friday, January 5 at 10:30/9:30 am CT (Programs 1-2; 30 minutes)
Thursday, February 1 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-2; 30 minutes)
Thursday, February 23 at 9:30/8:30 am CT (Programs 1-2; 30 minutes)
Electronic Field Trip to
an Orchard K C
From planting to pruning to marketing
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
40 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/orchard
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.6, 2.36
KET and the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture spent a
year documenting the work of orchard owners Mark and Don Haney,
who live near Somerset, Kentucky. You’ll learn about:
• the crucial role played by honeybees in fruit production,
• the importance of pruning trees in winter,
• how many apples are produced on one tree,
• the economics of operating a successful orchard,
• the fun of visiting an orchard to pick your own apples Produced
1999.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 24 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Thursday, January 25 at 9:15/8:15 am CT
Electronic Field Trip to Fort Harrod
and Fort Boonesborough K C
Westward expansion into Kentucky and daily
life in a settlement fort
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-8
20 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/forts
Academic Expectations: 1.16, 2.16, 2.19, 2.20
Photo: Rick McComb
30 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Harrodstown (now Harrodsburg) and Boonesborough, two of
Kentucky's 18th century settlements, provide an intriguing glimpse
into Kentucky's pioneer past. Students will learn why early settlers
moved to Kentucky as well as the routes they traveled. Early settlers
encountered many barriers to exploration and settlement, experienced conflict and compromise in their interactions with Kentucky's
native peoples, and endured many hardships as they used the natural
resources to survive and establish communities on the frontier. Along
the way, these early pioneers created a unique culture and forever
changed the physical environment of the land they settled.
Through the video and Web site, students will visit these reconstructed
forts and get to experience what daily life was like for pioneers as they
watch re-enactors and craftspeople demonstrate the responsibilities
and areas of specialization of the members of a settlement community.
Produced 2006.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, October 17 at 9:00 am ET
Wednesday, October 18 at 3:20 pm ET
Friday, October 20 at 3:00 pm ET
Monday, October 23 at 9:40 am ET
Thursday, February 22 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Thursday, March 1 at 9:30/8:30 am CT
Thursday, March 15 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
First hand look at stage production
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
5-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/horsecave
Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.36
Tucked away in Kentucky’s cave country is a remarkable regional
theater company: Horse Cave Theatre, which has been bringing both
stage classics and original dramas to audiences from throughout the
region since 1977. Go behind the scenes to explore what it takes to
mount a theatrical production and meet the people whose professionalism and dedication to both theater and education make Horse Cave
a vibrant part of its community. Produced 2002.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, October 12 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Monday, December 18 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Monday, February 5 at 9:30/8:30 am CT
Tuesday, April 10 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Electronic Field Trip to KET K C
A behind-the-scenes look at TV production
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.3, 1.13, 2.22, 2.36
The program includes a behind-the-scenes tour through KET’s studios
and control rooms, post-production audio and video editing suites,
master control center, video graphics and animation facilities, and
more, letting students see nearly every step in the production process.
Host and tour guide Mary Henson interviews Missy Johnston, host of
News Quiz; Tim Farmer, host of Kentucky Afield; and KET production
crew members about how they put a program together. Produced 1996.
Let’s go spelunking!
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/cave
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.6, 2.19, 2.36
Tour the world’s largest cave system with National Park Service
rangers. They provide fascinating information at each stop. See the
beautiful Frozen Niagara, the blind fish, Native American artifacts,
the “bottomless” pit, and unique passageways underground. Squeeze
through some tight places while exploring Fat Man’s Misery and the
Wild Caving tour, and learn about careers in park service and science.
Produced 1997.
Teachers may choose to watch the trip in the following four segments:
1. Beauty and Diversity of the Cave
2. History and Geology of the Cave
3. Animal Species of the Cave
4. The Role of Water in Caves and Cave Formation
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 21 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Friday, December 8 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
Thursday, February 22 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Wednesday, May 9 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Friday, May 11 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
Electronic Field Trip
to Perryville K C
Echoes of the Civil War in Kentucky
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/perryville
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.20
The Battle of Perryville marks the last major attempt of the
Confederate States of America to claim Kentucky. Learn how this
battle changed this town forever by exploring what happened on that
tragic day, October 8, 1862. The field trip includes descriptions of what
life was like for soldiers in 1862, reenactments of war, and an archeological dig with high school students. Produced 1999.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 3 at 10:30 am CT
Thursday, September 14 at 9:30/8:30 am CT
Thursday, September 21 at 9:30 am CT
Thursday, February 22 at 9:30 am CT
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, November 7 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
Wednesday, December 6 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Thursday, March 1 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Tuesday, April 10 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 31
ELECTRONICFIELD
FIELDTRIPS
TRIPS
KET ELECTRONIC
Electronic Field Trip to
Horse Cave Theatre K C
Electronic Field Trip to
Mammoth Cave K C
•
•
•
•
find out how glacial action exposed the fossil beds and formed the
Ohio River Valley;
learn the importance of the Falls to early Native Americans and
eventually to the development of the Louisville area;
see some of the animals that now call the Falls area home; and
tour the Interpretive Center and get a behind-the-scenes look at how
realistic displays were created. Produced 1999.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
ELECTRONIC
FIELDFIELD
TRIPSTRIPS
KET ELECTRONIC
Photo: Rick McComb
Electronic Field Trip to the
Aviation Museum of Kentucky K C
Celebrating 100 years of flight
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
3-12
15 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/aviation
Streaming video available at Web site
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.6, 2.20, 2.36
This fun and educational video celebrating 100 years of powered flight
spotlights several exhibits at the museum, located at Blue Grass Airport
in Lexington, including the first aircraft built and flown in Kentucky
and the Kentucky Aviation Hall of Fame. It also features segments
on women in aviation and Kentucky aviation pioneers. A look at the
Aviation Museum’s annual Summer Camp for students ages 10-15
demonstrates how the study of aviation fits into many curriculum
areas, including science, math, and social studies. Produced 2003.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 21 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Thursday, November 2 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Thursday, February 22 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Thursday, March 8 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Electronic Field Trip to
the Falls of the Ohio K C
Visit a fossil bed and a nature preserve
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/falls
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.6, 2.19, 2.36
Just beyond the Louisville skyline lies a geological and environmental
treasure called the Falls of the Ohio. This area is one of the world’s
largest exposed Devonian age fossil beds. Here, 265 species of bird
and 125 species of fish now live in this nature preserve. On this field
trip, students will:
• visit the outer beds and see the fossils of many Devonian age
creatures;
• learn how fossils are formed;
32 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Thursday, September 21 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Wednesday, November 29 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Friday, February 2 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT
Wednesday, May 2 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
Electronic Field Trip
to the Forest K C
Give your students a "behind the trees"
look at a forest!
Grade level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-8
3, 20-minute programs
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/forest
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.5, 2.6, 2.18,
2.20, 2.33, 2.36
A simple hike through the woods turns into a learning experience
when three teenagers meet up with a forester from the Kentucky
Division of Forestry. Through their discussions with the forester, interviews with other experts, and a video exploration of the forest, our
hikers and your students will learn about the history of Kentucky forests, the natural and human influences which have shaped them, and
their future. Content areas covered include: environmental science,
life science, history, geography, and economics. Produced by KET, the
USDA Forest Service, Kentucky Division of Forestry, and other partners. This series is correlated to a comprehensive forestry curriculum
guide located at the Web site. Produced 2002.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 21 at 7:00/6:00 am CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Friday, December 1 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Thursday, February 22 at 7:00/6:00 am CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Friday, May 4 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Electronic Field Trip to the
Kentucky Center for the Arts K C
Backstage access
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teacher's Guide:
Videocassette:
6-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/trips/materials.htm
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.36
This field trip explores the Kentucky Center for the Arts in Louisville,
Kentucky’s largest performing arts space, including the Center’s different theaters. Meet actors and musicians and follow a performance from
the initial planning to the excitement of opening night. Produced 1999.
Electronic Field Trip to the
Louisville Zoo K C
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Habitats and animal care
Thursday, August 10 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Monday, December 18 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
Wednesday, May 16 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Perspectives/Careers in Opera
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
6-9
30 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/opera
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.36
A cultural adventure to Louisville for a production of the American
opera Susannah. A brief history of opera and descriptions of artistic
styles help students develop an appreciation for this unique performance event. A backstage, behind-the-scenes tour shows the sets, costumes, lighting and make-up while providing insight into the many
skills necessary to produce live musical and theatrical productions.
Produced 2000.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, October 12 at 10:30/9:30 am CT
Monday, December 18 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Monday, February 5 at 3:15/2:15 pm CT
Wednesday, May 16 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/zoo
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.6, 2.36
The animals and staff of the Louisville Zoo host a very special behindthe-scenes tour for Kentucky teachers and students. See how training
of animals makes caring for them easier for zoo staff. Learn about the
successful captive breeding program for the black-footed ferret; watch
a zoo veterinarian at work; and learn about an innovative rotation system which allows animals to move between different habitats.
Produced 1999.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, October 12 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Wednesday, November 22 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
Friday, December 8 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Thursday, March 1 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
Friday, May 11 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Electronic Field Trip to the
Mountain Homeplace K C
Mountain life in the 1850s
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/homeplace
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.19, 2.20
Take a trip through time to the nineteenth century in Eastern
Kentucky. The Mountain Homeplace is an interpretive working farm
in Paintsville, Kentucky. Local author, John David Preston, provides
historical perspective on the development of the region. Re-enactors
demonstrate what rural life was like from 1850-1875. Produced 1999.
On this trip, students will:
• learn how wilderness can be turned into a mountain homestead;
• visit a one-room school house;
• meet the preacher and learn about customs of the rural church;
• find out how the blacksmith bends iron and makes a cooking fork;
• follow children as they dance folk dances and play dulcimers; and
• observe plowing, cooking, spinning and carving the 1850’s way.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 3 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Thursday, September 21 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Thursday, February 1 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
Thursday, February 22 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Photo: Rick McComb
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 33
ELECTRONICFIELD
FIELDTRIPS
TRIPS
KET ELECTRONIC
Electronic Field Trip to the
Kentucky Opera K C
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
Electronic Field Trip to the
Post Office K C
Real world applications in science and technology
A look at the postal service in action for primary
students!
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
5-12
20 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
Web Site:
www.ket.org/trips/weather
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Primary
7 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.16, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.10,
2.31, 2.33
Web Site:
www.ket.org/trips/postoffice
KET takes students on an electronic visit to the Louisville office of the
National Weather Service, one of three regional offices that provide
services to Kentucky. Students will learn about:
• the history and mission of the National Weather Service;
• professionals who work there;
• different types of forecasting, equipment and technology;
• Doppler radar, and satellites;
• safety precautions students should follow;
• and much more! Produced 2004.
This electronic field trip allows primary students to see what an integral part, the U.S. Postal Service plays in their daily lives. Primary
students follow the mail as it moves from mailbox to post office to
mailbox.
Streaming video available at Web site
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 24 at 10:40/9:40 am CT
Friday, December 1 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Friday, May 4 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Streaming video available at Web site
KY Academic Expectations: 1.11, 2.33, 5.3, 6.3
With its emphasis on communication, this program reinforces the
need for strong reading and writing skills and underscores the idea
that individual actions can play a significant role in the community
at large. The field trip is correlated to Kentucky's Program of Studies,
Core Content, and KELP Indicators.
The accompanying web page includes ideas for:
• classroom activities and performance assessments
• ideas for cross curricular units
• links to additional support materials
• lesson plans and instructional suggestions
• Web bibliography detailing content of support sites
• Vocabulary list Produced 2005.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Photo: Rick McComb
ELECTRONIC
FIELDFIELD
TRIPSTRIPS
KET ELECTRONIC
Electronic Field Trip to the
National Weather Service K C
Thursday, August 31 at 3:15/2:15 pm CT
Thursday, November 16 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Thursday, January 25 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Thursday, March 1 at 1:40/12:40 pm CT
Thursday, March 29 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
TV411
Learning Kits
Financial Literacy
and
Read All About It
Life skills in a
lively format.
Call 1-800-228-3382
for more information
34 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Electronic Field Trip to the
Speed Museum K C
Careers in visual art
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
6-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/trips/speed
Hot Ticket!
The 2006-2007
KET Resource Book
Get your FREE PDF copy today!
www.ket.org/itvvideos
KY Academic Expectations: 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, 2.36
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 28 at 10:00/9:00 am CT
Monday, December 18 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT
Wednesday, May 16 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Electronic Field Trip to Toyota K C
Advanced technology and teams at work
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
See order form, pg.125
www.ket.org/trips/toyota
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.36, 2.37
KET’s visit to Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky Inc., in
Georgetown takes students to places that are off limits to most tour
groups. Your class will see the whole process of building a vehicle,
from steel to the test track. As your students watch Toyota employees
at work, they’ll also see and hear what’s expected on the job in the
world of automotive manufacturing. On the tour learn more about:
• die casting—how a 17-ton steel coil becomes car parts;
• automation/technology and robotics;
• inspection processes;
• power train assembly/engines;
• recycling of materials;
• business terms like kaizen, kanban, and jidoka; and
• 85 m.p.h. test-track runs! Produced 1997.
Electronic Field Trip to White
Hall Historic Site, Home of
Cassius M. Clay K C
Visit the home of an emancipationist
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Resources:
Videocassette:
4-12
40 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/trips
See order form, pg. 125
Web Site:
www.ket.org/trips/whitehall
Streaming video clips available at Web site
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.16, 2.20
Located in Madison County near Richmond, White Hall was home
to emancipationist Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810-1903), a naturalist,
newspaper publisher, and well-known orator who served as U.S. minister to Russia from 1861-1869. Clay is credited with urging President
Lincoln to sign the Emancipation Proclamation freeing American
slaves. As students move through White Hall’s stately rooms, they
learn about Clay’s long and varied career and his involvement in the
Mexican-American and Civil Wars. They’ll also learn about his daughter, Laura Clay, who was active in the women’s rights movement of
the 19th and early 20th century. Produced 2000.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, October 31 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Thursday, February 1 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 14 at 12:25/1:25 pm CT
Wednesday, November 29 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Wednesday, May 9 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
See Also...
Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trips (4-12) – page 104
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 35
ELECTRONICFIELD
FIELDTRIPS
TRIPS
KET ELECTRONIC
This field trip gives a behind-the-scenes look at the operation of the
J.B. Speed Art Museum, in Louisville, Kentucky’s oldest and largest
art museum. Hosted by KET’s former Humanities instructor Liz Jewell
Coogle, the program begins on the loading dock as crates arrive for a
traveling exhibition of Rodin sculpture. From there we’ll look at the
many and varied professions that are required to mount an exhibit,
care for the art, and make the museum an interesting and inviting
place to visit. Produced 1999.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
program titles
Lyric Language (Primary-6)
german
Deutsch macht Spass! (German Can
Be Fun!) (4-6) K
japanese
Teach Me Japanese (Primary-5)
sign language
F
Signing Time! (Preschool-3) C
spanish
¡Arte y más! (Primary)
Saludos (Primary-5)
The Spanish Media Collection (Primary-12)
Los Constructores de Cerritos del Uruguay:
Uniendo el Pasado y el Futuro (4-12) K
Destinos (9-12)
F
New or Revised for 2006/2007
C Closed Captioned
K KET Production
On KET EncycloMedia
Lyric Language
FOREIGNLANGUAGE
Introduction to the Spanish, French, German, and
Japanese languages
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary-6
20 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.27, 2.28
This series combines original music and bilingual lyrics with the fun
of live-action video adventure to introduce children to foreign language vocabulary. The song lyrics, printed on the television screen and
simultaneously sounded out, alternate between English and the other
language to provide instant word comprehension. Children can sing
along to practice pronunciation. Subtitles are provided in both English
and the featured language.
The accompanying teacher’s guide, designed for both monolingual
and bilingual teachers, provides reproducible student activity pages.
The games and activities may be used to motivate students to pursue
a foreign language or to teach English as a Second Language (ESL)
while developing multicultural awareness.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Spanish I, Program 1
2. Spanish I, Program 2
3. Spanish II, Program 1
4. Spanish II, Program 2
5. French I, Program 1
6. French I, Program 2
7. French II, Program 1
8. French II, Program 2
9. Japanese I, Program 1
36 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Japanese I, Program 2
German I, Program 1
German I, Program 2
German II, Program 1
German II, Program 2
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, July 31 at 1:20/12:20 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours,
40 minutes) and Monday, August 7 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 9-14; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Monday, January 1 at 1:20/12:20 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours,
40 minutes) and Monday, January 8 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 9-14; 2 hours)
german
Deutsch macht Spass!
(German Can Be Fun!) K
Introduction to the German language
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
4-6
30 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.27, 2.28
This fun and interactive series begins with an introduction to the
very basic expressions and an overview of the Federal Republic of
Germany, one of the major German-speaking countries. As the series
progresses, students will add to their understanding of simple expressions and vocabulary. Print materials include exercises and activities
for reinforcement and extended practice. Audio cassettes with recordings accompany the exercises.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Course introduction; greetings; asking for and giving names; boy/
girl/prouncing vowel: a,e,i,o,u; Story Corner: medieval map and
legends
2. Review introductions and greetings; pronouns for “you” and “I”;
alphabet; names of places “Where do you live?” Story Corner: life
in a medieval fortress
3. Review alphabet; colors; introduce “Familie Rosenmeyer” who
live in the Rhine region; Story Corner: medieval family life
4. Names for member of the family; numbers 0-20; the verb “to be”;
“How old are you?”; Story Corner: medieval titles
5. The calendar; an invitation to the North Sea; verbs; to live, to
come; the song “Laurentia”; Story Corner: the life of the knight
6. The seasons and weather; verbs: to swim, to play, to have; a vacation on the sea; Story Corner: the hero Siegfried
7. A comparison of the capital cities: Berlin/Washington, D.C.; zoo
animals; Story Corner: medieval treasure
8. A shopping trip in town; currency; expressing likes and dislikes;
ordering in a café; Story Corner: medieval treasure
9. What is a saga or epic? Who are the characters of the epic The
Song of the Nibelungs? What are the forces of good and evil?
Where does this saga take place?
10. The telling and retelling of the tale!
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, December 4 at 9:00/8:00 am CT (Programs 1-2; 1 hour) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 3-10; 4 hours)
Block Feed I:
Monday, May 7 at 9:00/8:00 am CT (Programs 1-2; 1 hour) and at 12
noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 3-10; 4 hours)
japanese
Teach Me Japanese
Beginning Japanese
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
Primary-5
15 minutes
School Year
Downloadable at web site
See address below
www.hardin.k12.ky.us/isd/japan/default.htm
KY Academic Expectations: 2.27, 2.28
This series exposes viewers to basic Japanese vocabulary, culture, and
customs. Students learn and participate with Yuki and Keiko, puppets
on the show, as Ms. Shiffler teaches them Japanese.
Music, origami, dance, and storytelling are included in the series. A
vocabulary of approximately 150 Japanese words is taught. This series
is developed and produced by Hardin County educators and has been
used successfully there for several years.
8. “Cherry Blossoms” Sakura are the national flowers of Japan.When
they bloom, parties are held all over the country. Shifflersan has a
party of her own.
9. “Children’s Day” May 5th is set aside to honor all Japanese children.
Yuki is honored and flies a carp streamer.
10. “Happy Birthday, Yuki” Keiko and Shifflersan give Yuki a special
birthday party.
11. “Down on the Farm” Yuki puts on his overalls and heads for the
farm. Even the animals can speak Japanese.
12. “Monkey See, Monkey Do” Yuki and friends go on a field trip to the
zoo.
13. “Lava, Lava Everywhere” Yuki is assigned a science project about
volcanoes. He makes a model of an erupting Mt. Fuji.
14. “I Love My Sports” Yuki teaches Shifflersan about his favorite
sports, while Shifflersan teaches Yuki how to say it Japanese.
15. “Keiko’s New Clothes” A frantic Keiko discovers she has nothing
to wear to her friend’s party, and learns that it is easier to say
“clothes” in Japanese than it is finding that special outfit. Keiko
is thankful she has unifoms to wear to school and doesn’t have to
decide what to wear to everyday.
16. “I Get Around” After her best friend Yuki has gone to Japan, Keiko
makes a visit to the travel agency to investigate the price of a ticket
to Japan. Keiko also learns about other modes of transportation in
Japan.
17. “Through the Woods” While taking a hike, Shifflersan tries to teach
Keiko the importance of being healthy and that the Japanese have
one of the highest life expectancies in the world because of their
healthful lifestyle.
18. “Sayonara Keiko” Keiko’s friends gather to send her off in style to
Japan with a goodbye party. Luckily, her passport arrives just in
the nick of time.
continued on next page
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. “Help Me Please” Yuki is a Japanese/American boy who wants to
FOREIGNLANGUAGE
Photo: Rick McComb
learn about his home country. Yuki meets Shifflersan at the movies
and they begin their friendship and their study of Japanese.
2. “I Am Not Wearing A Dress” While at a fashion show, Yuki and his
friends discover the traditional clothing of Japan.
3. “A Taste of Japan” Shifflersan and Yuki visit a Japanese restaurant
and learn how to make sushi.
4. “Do I Ever Get a Break?” Yuki discovers that children in Japan have a
much longer school year than American students.
5. “Happy New Year Oshogatsu” Yuki and his friends ring in the New
Year Japanese style by celebrating the biggest holiday of the year.
6. “I Do Not Play With Dolls” Keiko teaches Yuki about the traditional
Doll Festival.
7. “What Day is It?” Yuki learns how to say the days of the week in
Japanese.
KET4—The Annenberg/CPB Channel
Just for teachers!
Flexible, convenient PD workshops
Challenge yourself at:
www.ket.org/education/ket4.htm
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 37
With an unparalleled multi-sensory approach (encouraging learning
through three senses: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic), Signing Time!
reaches children with diverse learning styles and abilities by encouraging interaction through signing, singing, speaking, and dancing.
Featuring the remarkable Rachel Coleman, her daughter Leah (who is
deaf), Alex (Leah's cousin, who can hear) and their animated pet frog
"Hopkins", the Signing Time! series teaches hundreds of ASL vocabulary-building signs that are useful in daily life. Charming animation,
children who sign, and delightful songs make any time Signing Time!
Dale Mings
Hardin County Educational and Community Television
110 South Main Street
Elizabethtown, KY 42701
270-769-8948
email: [email protected]
Photo: Rick McComb
Tapes may be purchased from:
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Leah's Farm
My Great Backyard
The Zoo Train
My Day
My Neighborhood
Welcome to School
Time to Eat
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, August 14 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and Monday, August 21 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 9-13; 2 hours,
30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, December 18 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-18; 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, April 5 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-18; 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, May 14 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-18; 30 minutes)
sign language
FOREIGNLANGUAGE
PROGRAM TITLES
1. My First Signs
2. Playtime Signs
3. Everyday Signs
4. Family, Feelings & Fun
5. ABC's
6. My Favorite Things
Signing Time!
C
Wednesday, November 15 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Wednesday, December 13 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed IV:
Monday, January 15 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and Monday, January 22 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 9-13; 2 hours,
30 minutes)
spanish
¡Arte y más!
Learning American Sign Language
A KET primary-level Spanish language course
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
Grade Levels:
K-Primary
Length:
10 minutes
Taping Rights:
Unlimited
Print Materials:
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
Videocassette/DVD: See order form, pg. 125
Preschool-3
30 minutes
School Year
See Web site
www.signingtimekids.org
KY Academic Expectations: 1.3, 1.12, 2.34, 4.1, 5.3,
6.1, 6.2, 6.3
Play, sing, and sign along with Singing Time! while learning American
Sign Language. This multi-sensory program introduces children to a
"hands on" second language. It is natural and fun for them to use their
bodies to communicate. Research shows that, when empowered with
even a few simple ASL signs:
•
•
•
babies and toddlers can express their needs through sign long
before they can speak (resulting in fewer tantrums!)
school-aged children can develop larger vocabularies and better
reading skills while learning a second language
children with special needs or developmental delays can find their
own "voice"
38 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
KY Academic Expectations:
Aligned with the National Standards for Foreign Language
Learning, the Kentucky Content for World Language Proficiency
and addresses the KY Core Content for Arts and Humanities
!Arte y más! is aligned with national standards in foreign language
instruction, which support an immersion approach to teaching children a second language. Immersion philosophy centers on contentbased instruction completely in the target language. The lessons are
based on Kentucky’s Arts and Humanities core content.
!Arte y más! consists of two levels of introductory instruction--Level
1 which is 26 programs dealing with introductory language and
movement concepts, and Level 2 which is an additional 34 programs
dealing with music, visual arts, and drama. In addition, there is a professional development component that focuses on understanding the
theory of how children acquire a second language and practical implementation tips for classroom usage.
Level 1 also contains Program 0 which is conducted entirely in English
and introduces students and teachers to !Arte y más! The lessons are
guided by four underlying principles:
1) the lessons reflect direct instruction in Kentucky Arts and
Humanities Core Content;
2) all instruction is in Spanish;
3) children are actively engaged with the content, not passive
viewers; and
4) teachers participate with the children.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, August 28 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (PD program, Programs 0-19;
3 hours, 35 minutes) and at 12 noon (Programs 20-42; 4 hours); and
Monday, September 4 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 43-60; 3 hours, 10
minutes)
Block Feed II: (Programs through 26 only!)
Monday, January 29 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (PD program, Programs 0-19;
3 hours, 35 minutes) and at 12 noon (Programs 20-42; 4 hours); and
Monday, February 5 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 43-60; 3 hours, 10
minutes)
Saludos
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
Vamos a comer (Let’s eat)
Vamos a repasar II (Let’s review II)
La biblioteca (The library)
Las partes del cuerpoóPart I (The parts of the body: Part I)
Las partes del cuerpoóPart II
La clase (The classroom)
¿Cómo está el tiempo? (How’s the weather?)
Entra a mi casa (Enter my house)
Vamos a repasar III (Let’s review III)
Vamos a dibujar (Let’s draw)
Vamos al campo (Let’s go to the country)
Vendo gorras (I sell caps)
Vendo frutas (I sell fruits)
Vamos de compras (Let's go shopping)
Vamos a repasar IV (Let's review IV)
¿Qué hora es? (What time is it?)
Los meses del año (The months of the year)
Las cuatro estaciones (The four seasons)
Una visita (A visit)
¿Qué haces en casa? (What do you do at home?)
Vamos a repasar V (Let's review V)
Memorias (Memories)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, October 2 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon (Programs 17-32; 4 hours); and Monday, October 9 at
8:30/7:30 am CT (Programs 33-36; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Monday, March 5 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon (Programs 17-32; 4 hours); and Monday, March 12 at 8:30/7:30
am CT (Programs 33-36; 1 hour)
continued on next page
Beginning Spanish
Primary-5
15 minutes
Unlimited
See below
See order form, pg. 125
FOREIGNLANGUAGE
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
KY Academic Expectations: 1.12, 2.27, 2.28
Saludos introduces Spanish to the English-speaking student. The
emphasis is on oral communication, with each program introducing a limited number of new words and grammatical structures. The
objectives are to create a positive attitude toward learning a foreign
language, to teach correct Spanish pronunciation, to teach a practical set of Spanish phrases, to present the history and culture of some
Hispanic countries, and to develop cross-cultural understanding.
Photo: Rick McComb
PROGRAM TITLES
1. ¡Hola! ¿Cómo estás? (Hello! How are you?)
2. ¿Cómo te llamas? (What is your name?)
3. Mi familia (My family)
4. La visita de abuelita (Grandmother’s visit)
5. ¿Cuántos años tienes? (How old are you?)
6. La ropa de niñas (Clothing for girls)
7. Los regalos (The presents)
8. Vamos a repasar (Let’s review)
9. Más números (More numbers)
10. El supermercado (The supermarket)
11. La carta (The letter)
12. La fiesta mejicana (The Mexican party)
13. Los d’as de la semana (The days of the week)
14. Los animales (The animals)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 39
TEACHING MATERIALS
A master set of guide materials is available for Saludos. It contains
teacher’s information for each program, plus student activity sheets,
words and music to all songs, copies of all recipes, reproducible student activity sheets, and audiocassettes for each lesson. The set is
available for $25. Order from:
Great Plains National Instructional Television Library • P.O. Box 80669
• Lincoln, NE 6850l • (800) 228-4630 or Order at Web site:
www.gpn.unl.edu (Type "Saludos" in keyword search, click on first
entry (Saludos), scroll to bottom of page to teacher's guide, and click on
"Saludos Teacher's Guide" to order.
The Spanish Media Collection
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
Primary-12
4-28 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.27, 2.28
The Spanish Media Collection features Spanish-language adaptations
of 31 outstanding children’s books which are familiar to any elementary or public library. From students learning English as a Second
Language to students learning Spanish, this series has multiple uses
for the creative teacher who wants to introduce Spanish or English
vocabulary, emphasize translation skills, and provide rich language
experience to students.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, September 18 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-27; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon CT (Programs 28-31; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Monday, February 19 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-27; 4 hours) and
at 12 noon CT (Programs 28-31; 1 hour)
FOREIGNLANGUAGE
PROGRAM TITLES/LENGTHS
1. La Maravillosa Grace (Amazing Grace) (9:00)
2. La Oruga Y El Renacuajo (The Caterpillar and the Polliwog) (8:00)
3. “Charlie Necesita Una Capa” (“Charlie Needs a Cloak”) (8:00)
4. Jorge El Monito Ciclista (Curious George Rides a Bike) (11:00)
5. Danielito Y El Dinosauro (Danny and the Dinosaur) (10:00)
6. El Dia En Que La Boa De Jimmy Se Comio’ La Lavada (The Day
Jimmy’s Boa Ate the Wash) (6:00)
7. Doctor De Soto (Doctor De Soto) (11:00)
8. Owen (Owen) (15:00)
9. El Sombrero (The Hat) (7:00)
10. Aqui Viene El Gato! (Here Comes the Cat! ) (12:00)
11. El Hipopotamo Tiene Calor (Hot Hippo) (6:00)
12. La Cocina De Noche (In The Night Kitchen) (8:00)
13. Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum) (10:00)
14. Joey Se Escapa (Joey Runs Away) (8:00)
15. La Gallinita Roja (The Little Red Hen) (8:00)
16. Los Patitos Encuentran Un Hogar (Make Way For Ducklings Hen)
(12:00)
17. La Navidad De Max (Max’s Christmas Hen) (5:00)
18. Miguel Muligan Y Su Pala De Vapor (Mike Mulligan and His Steam
Shovel Hen) (11:00)
19. Millones De Gatos (Millions of Cats) (11:00)
20. Monty (Monty) (8:00)
21. El Hombre De La Luna (Moon Man) (9:00)
22. Chato’s Kitchen (Chato’s Kitchen) (12:00)
23. El Huevo Mas Bonito Del Mundo (The Most Wonderful Egg in the
World) (6:00)
24. Silvestre Y La Piedrecita Magica (Sylvester and the Magic Pebble)
(12:00)
25. Max El Prodigio Musical (Musical Max) (10:00)
26. Nora, La Bulliciosa (Noisy Nora) (7:00)
27. La Historia Del Patito Ping (The Story About Ping) (11:00)
28. El Muneco De Nieve (The Snowman) (28:00)
29. La Sopa De Piedras (Stone Soup) (12:00)
30. Los Tres Bandidos (The Three Robbers) (6:00)
31. El Paseo De Rosita (Rosie’s Walk) (5:00)
Photo: Rick McComb
40 • 2006/2007
2004/2005 M�Instructional Videos
Los Constructores de Cerritos
del Uruguay: Uniendo el Pasado
y el Futuro
K
Exploring archaeology in South America
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
Web site:
4-12
27 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
www.dinacyt.gub.uy/proykent/novedades.htm
KY Academic Expectations: 2.21, 2.19, 2.20. 2.28
Produced in Spanish and English, this program explores the rich 11,000year history of Uruguay in South America, and learn about the preHispanic mound-building societies that once flourished there. Viewers
accompany Uruguayan public school students as they collect scientific
data at a mound, and then visit the school to see how the students used
their archaeological field experience to explore topics in social studies
and language learning. The video and its bilingual website are designed
as teaching tools; both resources are useful for raising students’ awareness of the importance of preserving our cultural heritage.
Note: The schedule for the English version The Prehistoric Mounds of
Uruguay: Linking the Past and the Future is located on page 105.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, August 28 at 9:35/8:35 am CT
Monday, January 29 at 9:35/8:35 am CT
UNIT III: Progams 7-11
Un viaje a Madrid, España
Vocabulario: clothing; numbers (21-99); interrogatives; months; seasons; colors; descriptive adjectives
Gramática: saber; conocer; present tense (irregular verbs, stem-changing verbs, reflexive pronouns); more on possession; demonstratives;
more on using adjectives; ser and estar
UNIT IV: Programs 12-18
Un viaje a Argentina
Vocabulario: numbers (100-1000); food groups (meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, others); writing and written works
Gramática: preterite tense; direct and indirect object pronouns; prepositions; pronoun objects of prepositions; using adjectives; verbs used
reflexively and nonreflexively; gustar and verbs like it; two object pronouns together
UNIT V: Programs 19-26
Un viaje a Puerto Rico
Vocabulario: directions; more family members; weather; changes in
state or condition; parts of a house; domestic appliances; more descriptive adjectives
Gramática: present and past progressive; imperfect; imperfect and
preterite together; por and para; affirmatives and negatives; idioms
with tener; comparisons; estar and sentirse with adjectives; acabar de;
hace, hace É que; al + infinitive
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Destinos
An introduction to Spanish
9-12
30 minutes
School year
See below
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.12, 2.27, 2.28
In Destinos, students learn Spanish in the diversified cultural context in
which it is spoken throughout the world. Destinos uses the natural conversations and intriguing situations of a continuing story as the vehicle
for language learning. The course is designed to help develop proficiency
in all the communication skills—listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Monday, October 30 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours); and Monday,
November 6 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours) and at 12
noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 25-26; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Monday, April 2 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at 12
noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours); and Monday, April 9 at
6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours) and at 12 noon/11:00 am
CT (Programs 25-26; 1 hour)
SUPPORT MATERIALS
To order teacher and student support materials that accompany this
series, call (800) 462-6595.- The following information is necessary
to include when ordering any of the support materials:- Destinos
Copyright Year 1992, Programs 1-26.
While all characters speak only in Spanish, early episodes use both
Spanish and English narration. By episode 13, students hear only
Spanish. At the end of each episode, Raquel reviews the highlights of
the story, using flashbacks and on-screen questions and answers to
help students remember what has happened.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
UNIT I: Programs 1-2
Vocabulario: cognates; family members
Gramática: ser; articles and gender; possession
2004/2005 M�Instructional Videos�
• 41
FOREIGNLANGUAGE
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
UNIT II: Programs 3-6
Un viaje a Sevilla, España
Vocabulario: numbers (0-20); academic subjects; animals; days of the
week; telling time
Gramática: hay; estar; ir; present tense (regular verbs); subject pronouns; personal a; interrogatives; adjectives
MATHEMATICS
program titles
MATHEMATICS
Tumbletown Tales (K-3)
Mathica’s Mathshop I (Primary) C
Mathica’s Mathshop II (Primary) C
Math Can Take You Places (3-6)
The Eddie Files (3-6)
Cyberchase (3-7) C
It Figures (4)
Math Works (5)
Solve It (6)
Math Vantage (7-9) C
Math Basics (9-12) C
Statistics: Decisions Through Data (10-12) C
F
C
K
New or Revised for 2006/2007
Closed Captioned
KET Production
On EncycloMedia
Tumbletown Tales
Entertaining Primary Series
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
K-3
2-4 minutes
School Year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.8, 2.10, 2.11
Tumbletown Tales is an entertaining series in which Tumbleweed, a
fun-loving hamster, uses mathematics to solve real-life problems in
the world of fuzzy rodents. Tumbleweed models a variety of strategies in the problem-solving process and practices skills related to the
big ideas in the math curriculum. Short, entertaining programs offer
opportunities for students to discuss concepts such as capacity, perimeter, quanitity, division, data analysis and patterning. Students will be
delighted at the tiny world of Tumbleweed and the many inhabitants of
Tumbletown.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. The Not-So-Fantastic Voyage — Estimation (2:41)
2. Play Rodent Ball!!! — Patterns (3:37)
3. Wagons, Boats and Automobiles — Fractions (3:05)
4. A Room with a Choo — Division (3:00)
5. Birthday Crate — Maps-directions (2:56)
6. Green Thumb Conundrum — Color arrangements-math creativity (3:07)
7. Silo Road — Volume and capacity (2:53)
8. Mix Master — Cereal ingredients and proportions (2:26)
9. De'Fence — Calculations for building (3:00)
10. Traffic Co-Op — Charting traffic control for solutions (4:00)
11. Field of Seeds — Counting by rows (3:30)
12. The Even Littler Hobo — Directions in paces, etc. rabbit paces, hamster
13.
14.
15.
16.
paces, etc. (3:52)
Trading Cages — Using math in decorating (3:50)
A Seed by Any Other Weight — Weights and measurements (3:46)
Keeping Up with Zeus — Shapes (3:57)
Chomp-etition — Substraction (3:50)
42 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
17. Tumbleweed: Domestic Animal — Shapes and measurements (3:25)
18. Current Sea-Worthy — Money -coins (3:38)
19. Pile Driver — Organization skills (3:32)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 13 at 1:00 pm/12:00 noon CT
(Programs 1-19; 1 hour, 25 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, November 24 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-19; 1 hour, 25 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Friday, March 16 at 1:00 pm/12:00 noon CT
(Programs 1-19; 1 hour, 25 minutes)
Mathica’s Mathshop I C
Recognizing and solving math problems
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10
Fairy-tale-style programs put math into a meaningful context and engage
viewers in story-related problems involving number, measurement, and
geometry.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Help Wanted — Number: counting by 2s, 5s, and 10s to 25; number
facts of 7. Geometry: solids and their properties—cube, cone.
The King Comes Calling — Number: counting by 10s; sorting.
Geometry: plane figures —rectangle and triangle.
3. Food for Thought — Measurement: mass. Geometry: solids and their
properties—sphere, cylinder, rectangular prism, cube.
4. All-Star Elf — Number: ordinals. Measurement: linear and volume.
Data management: interpretation of graphs.
5. Sweet Dreams — Number: patterns, subtraction. Fractions: wholes,
halves, and quarters.
6. Winter Wonders — Number: doubling numbers, patterns. Geometry:
plane figures. Measurement: area. Math in the environment.
7. Best Wishes — Number: subtraction of numbers to 50, place value,
counting by 3s and 4s. Measurement: linear. Geometry: plane figures—
triangle, square, trapezoid, rhombus, hexagon. Data management:
interpreting graphs.
8. Mary, Mary Extraordinary — Number: sorting; division; equal shares;
probability. Data management: interpreting graphs.
9. A Sure Cure — Number: patterns, sequence, more than, less than.
Measurement: estimating capacity.
10. A Rich Reward — Number: addition of equal groups, counting by 2s.
Measurement: time, days of the week, hours. Geometry: plane figures.
2.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 13 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 16 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Photo: Rick McComb
Mathica’s Mathshop II C
Recognizing and solving math problems
Primary
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10
Ten more programs continue the story of Mathica, an elf in the Land of
Tales, and introduce new math skills in stories involving characters from
traditional tales of many cultures.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Captain Blunder’s Treasure — Number: seriation, patterns, attributes
of the number 9. Measurement: volume. Problem solving: permutations
and combinations.
2. A Merry Band — Number: two- and three-digit numbers, adding twodigit numbers, sorting, mental math. Data management: interpreting
information from a chart or graph.
3. Wicked Weather — Geometry: 3-D solids and their properties. Problem
solving: number strategy game involving unequal groups.
4. Big Business — Number: counting by 50s, the 99 game. Measurement:
mass—gram, kilogram; volume/capacity—liter; linear measures—centimeter, meter.
5. Courting Trouble — Number: multiplication-arrays, equal groups, mental math. Problem solving: making a diagram or chart.
6. Away with Wishes — Number: subtracting two-digit numbers, sorting
and classifying, number patterns.
7. Tea Times Trouble — Number: multiplication, division—fair shares.
Measurement: area—comparison. Geometry: 2-D shapes—square and
triangle.
8. Super Gnome — Number: multiplication. Measurement: mass—comparison of kilogram measures; linear measures—centimeter, meter.
Data management: interpreting a bar graph.
9. Winter Warm-Up — Number: fractions of a whole, division. Geometry:
2-D shapes—tangrams.
10. A Bundle of Joy — Number: probability. Measurement: time—minutes,
hours. Geometry: 2-D shapes—pentominoes.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 13 at 8:30/7:30 am CT (Programs 1-6 (1 hour, 30 minutes)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 7-10; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 16 at 8:30/7:30 am CT (Programs 1-6 (1 hour, 30 minutes)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 7-10; 1 hour)
The Math Can Take You Places curriculum uses travel as a backdrop and
five professionals in travel-related positions to show how algebraic
thinking is used during everyday situations in the workplace. Studies
have found that math concepts presented in real-world situations are
critical to students' understanding and long-term retention. The mathematical applications in the program are patterning, equivalency, reasonableness, measurement and problem solving.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. What's Cooking (Patterns)
2. All Aboard (Problem Solving)
3. Amazing Amusement (Domain/Range/Reasonableness)
4. The Tall and Long of It (Measurement/Area and Perimeter)
5. Time Flies (Equivalency)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, August 25 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-5; 52 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, October 27 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT (Programs 1-5; 52 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Friday, January 26 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-5; 52 minutes)
Block Feed IV:
Friday, March 23 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-5; 52 minutes)
The Eddie Files C
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
3-6
20-22 minutes
School year
Call Jady Wade at NETA, 1-803-799-5517
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.9, 2.10, 2.36
Math Can Take You Places C
Through the eyes of “Eddie,” a 5th grade student in East Harlem math
teacher Kay Toliver’s class, viewers discover how people use key math
concepts and skills in the workplace. Four “Fileboxes,” each with 4
episodes and accompanying teacher guide.
Using Math Skills in Careers
PROGRAM TITLES
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
3-6
10 minutes
School Year
email [email protected]
www.mathcantakeyouplaces.org
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.8, 2.10, 2.11, 2.12, 2.13,
2.36
File Box #1
101. Welcome to Math
102. Estimation
103. Geometry
104. Fractions
File Box #2
201. Distance, Time and Speed
202. Statistics
203. Circles
204. Decimals
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 43
MATHEMATICS
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
MATHEMATICS
File Box #3
301. Length and Area
302. Patterns
303. Volume
304. The Counting Principle
File Box #4
401. Ratios
402. Variables
403. Charts and Graphs
404. Percents
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, August 11 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 101-303; 3 hours,
50 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 304-404; 1 hour,
51 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, January 12 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 101-303; 3 hours,
50 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 304-404; 1 hour,
51 minutes)
Cyberchase C
Adventures in mathematics
Grade Levels:
3-7
Length:
30 minutes
Taping Rights:
School year
Web Site: www.pbs.org/cyberchase
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10
Three kids take a wild ride through cyberspace in this animated series.
Summoned out of the library by a computer named Motherboard, they use
the power of math and logic to defeat the schemes of a villain who is on a
quest to take over the cyberworld. Each episode focuses on one “big idea.”
For the 2006-2007 school year, KET will air Cyberchase Mondays,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 10:00/9:00 am CT on KET3.
Program numbers will be announced on each KET3 Monthly Calendar
Update. Program titles and descriptions are located http://www.ket.
org/itvvideos/offering/math/cyberchase.htm Please note that the distributor does not allow block feeds of this series.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Deciding When To Use Subtraction
2. Deciding How Close To Measure
3. Problem Solving: Acting It Out
4. Using Estimation
5. Understanding Place Value
6. Deciding When To Use Multiplication
7. Using Fractions
8. Problem Solving: Drawing a Picture
9. Looking at Objects—Different Positions
10. Using Mental Computation
11. Deciding When To Use Division
12. Problem Solving: Making a Table
13. Using Multiplication and Division
14. Relating Fractions and Decimals
15. Predicting Your Change
16. Using Bar Graphs
17. Understanding Remainders
18. Problem Solving: Recognizing Relevant Information
19. Finding Equivalent Fractions
20. Finding Area by Covering
21. Making Sense of a Big Number
22. Estimating When Dividing
23. Comparing Decimals
24. Using Probability
25. Changing Scale on a Graph
26. Problem Solving: Keep On Trying
27. Problem Solving: Many Ways To Go
28. Problem Solving: Using a Guide
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, September 8 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-28; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, February 9 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at 12
noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-28; 3 hours)
Math Works
Real-life problems involving mathematics
Mondays, Tuesday, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 10:00/9:00 am CT
(July 31, 2006 - May 18, 2007)
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
It Figures
Math Works extends to 5th graders the mathematics instruction begun in
the 4th-grade series It Figures. Dramatic vignettes in each program show
students how to solve problems involving mathematics.
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Basic mathematical skills
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
4
15 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.9, 2.10, 2.12, 2.13
It Figures helps students develop mathematical skills, understand mathematical ideas, learn problem-solving strategies, and communicate
about mathematics. In each program, children confront a problem that
mathematics can help solve. At mid-point, the story pauses for a review
of the topic presented in an animated “fractured fairy tale.”
44 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
5
15 minutes
Unlimited
1-800-457-4509, ext. 4 or www.ait.net/catalog
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.9, 2.10, 2.12, 2.13
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Measurement: Finding Areas of Rectangles
2. Problem Solving: Identifying the Problem
3. Mental Computation: Using Mental Computation for Addition
4. Decimals: Place Value in Decimals
5. Geometry: Exploring Geometric Shapes
6. Estimating: Estimating by Rounding
7. Problem Solving: Simplifying the Problem
8. Decimals: Relating Fractions and Decimals
9. Measurement: The Difference Between Perimeter and Area
10. Problem Solving: Using Tables
11. Fractions: Adding and Subtracting Fractions
12. Statistics: Sampling
13. Geometry: Exploring the Movement of Objects in Space
14. Problem Solving: Looking for a Pattern
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, August 25 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-28; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, January 26 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-28; 3 hours)
Solve It
Fractions: Subtracting Mixed Numbers
Estimation: Estimation Strategies for Division
Problem Solving: Guess-Check-Revise
Geometry and Measurement: Measuring Angles
Problem Solving: Using Logical Reasoning
Ratio/Proportion/Percent: Scale Drawing and Models
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 10 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 13-18; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 13 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 13-18; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Math Vantage C
Preparing for the transition to algebra
and geometry
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
7-9
10-15 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.9, 2.11, 2.12, 2.13
Mathematics for grade 6
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
6
15 minutes
Unlimited
1-800-457-4509, ext. 4 or www.ait.net/catalog
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.9, 2.10, 2.11, 2.13
Both adults and children use specific strategies to solve math problems—
making a drawing, constructing a table, looking for a pattern. Special
video techniques and young hosts emphasize that knowing how to find
an answer is as important as the answer itself.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Estimation: Reasonableness of Answer
2. Mental Computation: Using Mental Computation for Multiplication
3. Ratio/Proportion/Percent: The Meaning of Percent
4. Problem Solving: Drawing and Interpreting Tables
5. Measurement: Precision and Estimation
6. Statistics: Understanding Mean, Median, and Mode
7. Fractions: Multiplication with Fractions and Mixed Numbers
8. Decimals: Ordering Decimals
9. Geometry and Measurement: Measuring Volume
10. Estimation: Estimation Strategies for Multiplication
11. Problem Solving: Solving a Simpler Problem
12. Statistics: Sampling
To prepare 7th, 8th, and 9th grade students for algebra and geometry, the
series promotes active involvement; practical applications and enrichment
activities; multidisciplinary and multicultural curriculum; problem-solving and reasoning skills; distributing integrated practice of mathematical
concepts and skills; and encouraging students to read and communicate
mathematics, thereby taking responsibility for their own learning.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
PATTERNS UNIT: This unit emphasizes the problem-solving technique
of finding patterns while instructing students in basic math concepts.
1. Discovering Patterns — the use of patterns to explain, create, and predict
2. Patterns with Ten — the use of patterns in base ten place value, exponents, scientific notation, and the metric system
3. Sequences and Ratios — the patterns of the Fibonacci Sequence and
Golden Ratio in the world around us. These topics introduce sequences
and ratios and reinforce measuring skills
4. Tessellations/Transformations — tessellations in quilt patterns, architecture, and nature
5. Networks, Paths, and Knots — mathematics as an evolving subject that
develops through experimentation and discovery of patterns
Photo: Rick McComb
SPATIAL SENSE UNIT: This unit develops the ability to visualize and
identify properties of two- and three-dimensional shapes.
6. 2D Visions in a 3D World — the necessary spatial skills for visualizing,
representing, and interpreting object drawings and objects
7. What’s Your Angle? — various types of angles and their prevalence,
importance, and use in the world around us
8. Trusting Triangles — triangles as a common shape used for structural
support, as a means to indirectly measure distance, and as a basic shape
with which the area of any polygon can be found
9. A World of Quadrilaterals — categorizing quadrilaterals in various
descriptive categories. Perimeter, area, and properties of quadrilaterals
are illustrated with examples in the world around us
10. Going Around in Circles (circles, curves, and spheres) — the properties of circles and curves and the area and circumference of circles
through the action and motion of car races and amusement parks
11. Containers: Surface Area and Volume — surface area, volume, and the
relationship between the two
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 45
MATHEMATICS
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
Decimals: Comparing Decimals
Problem Solving: Using Diagrams
Mental Computation: Using Mental Computation for Subtraction
Place Value: Large Numbers
Estimating: Other Estimation Strategies
Fractions: Adding and Subtracting Fractions and Mixed Numbers with
Unlike Denominators
Statistics: Collecting Data
Problem Solving: Using Graphs
Probability: Possible Outcomes
Decimals: Understanding the Placement of the Decimal Point
Measurement: Dividing Regions Into Subregions for Finding Area
Statistics: Analyzing Data
Ratio: Forming Ratios
Problem Solving: Using Maps
MATHEMATICS
DATA ANALYSIS UNIT: This unit illustrates methods of collecting, interpreting, and presenting data in meaningful ways. Theories of probability are also demonstrated.
12. Data: How Do You Get It? — examples of common ways to collect data,
including surveys, observation, examination of past records, experiments, and simulations
13. Data: How Do You Show It? — a variety of possible data displays and
the arenas in which they may be most appropriate
14. Data: What Does It Mean? — the challenges and techniques in accurately interpreting a variety of data displays
15. Chances Are — using data to make decisions and predictions based on
the theories of probability
LANGUAGE OF MATHEMATICS UNIT: This unit helps develop an
understanding of integers and the elements of algebraic statements.
16. Integers — representing and using integers in various problem situations: adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing with integers; the
number line; absolute value
17. Digitizing with Binary Power — various number systems, with special
emphasis on using base two to communicate with computers; using
place value to translate quantities between different base systems
18. Algebraic Expressions — translating word problems into numeric or algebraic equations; evaluating algebraic expressions; combining like terms
19. Algebraic Sentences — creating algebraic sentences to describe patterns
from tables, graphs, and situations; solving one- and two-step singlevariable equations; finding and plotting ordered pairs; graphing onevariable inequalities on a number line
PROPORTIONAL REASONING UNIT: This unit develops an understanding of comparisons, scale representations, and percentages as relationships of elements.
20. Rates and Ratios: Comparisons — using rates and ratios in numerous
outdoor arenas
21. Proportions: Expressing Relationships — the process for finding missing values in proportions explained
22. Proportions: The Stretching and Shrinking Machine — proportional reasoning in various types of art
23. Percents: Say It with Hundredths — visualization for understanding
percentages as comparisons to 100
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, September 29 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-19; 3 hours,
50 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 20-23; 56 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 2 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-19; 3 hours, 50 minutes)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 20-23; 56 minutes)
Math Basics K C
Understanding the “big ideas” of math
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
9-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.7, 2.8, 2.10, 2.12, 2.13
Using a bold new approach based on the National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics standards, the series helps adult students develop number
sense and the confidence they need to succeed at mathematics and to
prepare for GED study. It is also appropriate for general and remedial
math classes at the middle and high school levels.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Many Ways To Measure
Solving Problems
Estimation
Many Kinds of Numbers
Names for the Same Number
How Much?
Dimensions
Patterns and Statistics
Putting It All Together
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 24 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/1:00 am CT (Programs 9-11; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 27 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/1:00 am CT (Programs 9-11; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Statistics: Decisions
Through Data C
Introducing statistical strategies
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
10-12
15 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.12, 2.13
This introduction to statistics is a series of modules built around video
units, offering students a variety of settings for problem solving. The
material may be used to supplement a full course on statistics. Although
the programs should be used in sequence, the series is designed for
modular use, with individual units introduced whenever the curriculum
calls for a particular statistical concept.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. What Is Statistics? — A puzzle graphic introduces the ideas that sta-
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
tistics is a way of solving puzzles using data, and that statistics can be
divided into three main areas: describing data, producing data, and
drawing conclusions from data.
Stemplots — The distribution of a variable is a pattern of values. The
stemplot is described as a graphical method of looking at the overall
patterns of data.
Histograms — The video uses graphics to briefly show how to make a
histogram, with emphasis on how to choose the classes. More information is given on patterns of distribution as skewness is considered.
Measures of Center — As histograms display male and female earnings, the median and the mean are introduced as alternative methods
of comparing data. On-screen graphics present the recipe for calculating the median.
Boxplots — A measure of spread or variability is presented with the
use of boxplots.
Standard Deviation — The concept of the standard deviation is
explained as a function of variance.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 13 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT (Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 16 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT (Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Beginning
2. Getting Up to Speed
See Also...
46 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
NASA Connect - page 86
NASA SCIence Files - 79
Workplace Essential Skills - page 59
PRACTICAL LIVING &
VOCATIONAL STUDIES
program titles
F
F New or Revised for 2006/2007
C Closed Captioned
K KET Production
On KET EncycloMedia
SEE CROSSREFERENCE LIST OF:
•CONSUMER DECISIONS
•CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
other interdisplinary programs-page 60
Learning American Sign Language
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Preschool-3
30 minutes
School Year
Web Site:
www.signingtimekids.org
Print Materials:
See Web site
KY Academic Expectations: 1.3, 1.12, 2.34, 4.1, 5.3,
6.1, 6.2, 6.3
Play, sing, and sign along with Signing Time! while learning American
Sign Language! This multi-sensory program introduces children to a
"hands on" second language. It is natural and fun for them to use their
bodies to communicate. Research shows that, when empowered with
even a few simple ASL signs:
•
•
•
babies and toddlers can express their needs through sign long before
they can speak (resulting in fewer tantrums!)
school-aged children can develop larger vocabularies and better
reading skills while learning a second language
children with special needs or developmental delays can find their
own "voice"
With an unparalleled multi-sensory approach (encouraging learning
through three senses: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic), Signing Time!
reaches children with diverse learning styles and abilities by encouraging interaction through signing, singing, speaking, and dancing.
Featuring the remarkable Rachel Coleman, her daughter Leah (who is
deaf), Alex (Leah's cousin, who can hear) and their animated pet frog
"Hopkins", the Signing Time! series teaches hundreds of ASL vocabulary-building signs that are useful in daily life. Charming animation,
children who sign, and delightful songs make any time Signing Time!
PROGRAM TITLES
1. My First Signs
2. Playtime Signs
3. Everyday Signs
4. Family, Feelings & Fun
5. ABC's
6. My Favorite Things
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Leah's Farm
My Great Backyard
The Zoo Train
My Day
My Neighborhood
Welcome to School
Time to Eat
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Monday, August 14 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and Monday, August 21 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Progrmas 9-13; 2 hours,
30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, November 15 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Wednesday, December 13 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed IV:
Monday, January 15 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and Monday, January 22 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 9-13; 2 hours,
30 minutes)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 47
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
F
Signing Time! (Preschool-3) C
I’m Safe on Wheels (K-2)
Different and the Same (Primary) C
Head To Toe (Primary) C
Just For Me (Primary) C
Well, Well, Well with Slim Goodbody
(Primary) C
The Character Education Series (Primary-4)
Econ and Me (Primary-5) C
Looking from the Inside/Out (Primary-5) C
Drug Avengers (Primary-6) C
Red Light, Green Light, Have You Heard?
(Primary-6)
Fat Albert & the Cosby Kids (Primary-7)
When I Grow Up (1-4) C
Inside Story with Slim Goodbody (2-6) C
Bullying/Character Education (3-5)
Healthy Body Healthy Mind (4-8)
Life Skills/Character Education Series (5-9)
Violence: Reversing the Trend (5-10)
TV411 (5-12) C
Middle School Kids Speak Out (6-9)
Flirting or Hurting Sexual Harassment
in Schools (6-12) C
Women’s Work (6-12)
Careers in Printing (7-12) K C
Teen Issues (7-12)
College and You—Why Not? Tackling College
with a Disability (9-12) K C
Street Skills (9-12) K C
Career Encounters (10-12) C
Workplace Essential Skills (10-12) K C
Truth and Consequences: Federal Crimes
and Teenagers (11-12) K
Signing Time! C
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
I’m Safe on Wheels
Head to Toe C
Riding equipment safety
Health, life sciences
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
K-2
10 minutes
School Year
1-800-962-7546
Primary
15 minutes
School year
Call 1-800-457-4509 or www.ait.net
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.31
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.29, 2.31, 4.4
I’m Safe on Wheels is a fully animated video teaching the five key areas
to safe riding:
• Correct helmet fit and use
• Safe clothing
• Safe places to ride
• Maintaining safe equipment
• Safe riding skills
In addition this video addresses skateboard, inline skates, scooters,
tricycles, Big Wheels and other riding equipment.
Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices
needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance
of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits.
This series builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks,
works, breaks down, heals, and grows and emphasizes children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
younger children safe
2. Cells: Your Starting Place — parts and functions of the cell; genetic
traits; the importance of good health habits
3. In a Heartbeat — how the circulatory system works; protecting the
heart by avoiding tobacco; the importance of exercise
4. Muscles: Holding You Together — how muscles help bodies move
and do many different things; teaches why muscles need exercise
5. Standing Tall — examines how the skeleton bones and joints support
and protect a body and give it shape; investigates activities that keep
bones strong, healthy, and safe
6. Fueling Up — how the body breaks down and uses food; eating well
for good nutrition
7. From Fuel to Waste — how the organs of the excretory system work
(digestive, urinary, skin); ways to keep these organs healthy
8. Fresh Air — how the body breathes; asthma and other respiratory
problems; protecting the respiratory system by avoiding pollutants,
including cigarette smoke
9. Control Center — how the nervous system works; protecting the brain
by avoiding drugs; the importance of sleep
10. Fighting Germs and Diseases — how germs cause diseases; health
care workers, institutions, and procedures that deal with disease;
immunization; disease prevention
11. Sounds — the structure and function of the ear; health care workers
and tests involving the ear; cleaning and protecting the ear
12. Sights — structure and function of the eye; eye care professionals;
eye examinations; wearing glasses; eye protection
13. A Healthy Smile — structure and function of teeth; dental care
workers; dental health procedures; the importance of dental care
14. Staying Healthy — childhood development; the importance of eating
well, exercise, sleep, and rest
15. Safety First — a review and celebration of the human body; ways to
guard against intentional and unintentional injury
Wednesday, August 23 at 1:50/12:50 pm CT
Wednesday, January 24 at 1:50/12:50 pm CT
Different and the Same C
Helping children identify and prevent prejudice
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary
12-15 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.17, 2.29, 3.6, 4.1, 4.5
This series of stories uses puppets and actors from various ethnic
backgrounds to tackle difficult issues of racism. The characters work
together to solve the problem presented in each story; basing their
solutions on awareness, fairness, inclusion, and respect.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Sticks and Stones — name calling/racial slurs; hurting others as a
reaction to being hurt
Cinderella and Me — exclusion from popular culture
Long Distance — speaking a different language
Play Ball — stereotyping
The Club — standing up against prejudice directed at someone else
Tug of War — choosing a friend across racial/ethnic lines
Proud To Be Me — the tug-of-war between assimilation and maintaining a strong cultural identity
8. I’m American, Too — exclusion based on definitions of nationality
9. Words on the Wall — hate crimes
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, October 25 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-9; 2 hours, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, March 28 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-9; 2 hours, 15 minutes)
48 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. In the Beginning — the development of a human baby; how to keep
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, September 6 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-15; 3 hours, 45 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, February 7 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-15; 3 hours, 45 minutes)
Just for Me C
Making wise decisions
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary-4
15 minutes
Unlimited
Call 1-800-457-4509, ext. 4 or www.ait.net/catalog
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.30, 2.32, 3.1, 5.4
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Who Are You? — shows how thoughts, feelings, and experiences can
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
affect a child’s self-concept negatively or positively and how
self-concept, in turn, affects the decisions children make
My Choice — demonstrates that a decision-making process, well
learned and wisely implemented, can be an important tool for
resolving personal health issues
The Real Me — shows how family values and support combined
with refusal skills can help children cope with negative peer pressure
I Do Care — dramatizes the importance of adhering to the rules;
respecting the needs, feelings, ideas, and environment of others; and
taking responsibility for behavior
My Family, My Self — presents dramatic evidence of the influence of
family members on one another and strategies for strengthening
family bonds
I Don’t Buy It! — humorously demonstrates how commercials and
ads can influence children’s ideas, values, and behavior; helps
viewers “break through to the truth”
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, October 4 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-15; 3 hours, 45 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, March 7 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-15; 3 hours, 45 minutes)
The Character Education Series
Guidance character development
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary-4
12-20 minutes
School Year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.32, 3.1, 3.6, 4.4
This series deals with respect, honesty, consideration, accepting
differences, and sportsmanship.
continued on next page
Photo: Rick McComb
Wednesday, October 4 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, March 7 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Well, Well, Well with
Slim Goodbody C
Motivation of healthy attitudes and behaviors
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
Just for Me uses six video programs and print lessons to present
themes common to many health education texts and widely used drug
prevention curricula: handling relationships with family members,
peer pressure and support, self-esteem, responsibility for self and others, making decisions, and the influence of the media.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Wellness — total good health
2. Go, Grow, Glow — use of food for energy and growth
3. Food Power — variety of foods for a healthy body
4. Clean Power — cleanliness and dental hygiene
5. Exercise To Energize — importance of exercise
6. Relax — sleep and relaxation
7. Feeling Good — mental health
8. Senses — using senses to learn
9. You Are Special — unique characteristics of individuals
10. Safety Counts — indoor safety rules
11. Play It Safe — outdoor safety rules
12. Emergencies — coping with emergencies
13. Healing Helpers — first aid and medicine
14. The Wellness Team — student and doctor as a team
15. Sharing Your World — community health and cleanliness
Primary
15 minutes
School year
Call 1-800-457-4509 or www.ait.net
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.31, 2.32, 2.33, 3.2
Help young students understand the concept of “wellness,” learn
ways of caring for the mind and body, and develop self-respect. Slim
Goodbody, along with his friends, encourages children to take an
active part in protecting, maintaining, and improving their own good
health. By emphasizing wellness, safety, nutrition, exercise, and handling feelings in a healthy way, Slim helps students realize that choices
made now will affect them the rest of their lives.
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 49
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
GRADES K-2
1. I Had It First! – learning to share makes everyone feel good and takes
many forms. (13:00)
2. I’m Telling! – demonstrates the difference between "telling" in situations where someone could be hurt or "tattling" when it would be
better to try to solve a problem yourself. (16:00)
3. I’m So Frustrated! – offers strategies for solving problems without
resorting to inappropriate or destructive behavior. (20:00)
4. It’s OK to Say NO – teaches techniques for saying "no" when others
pressure you to do something you don't want to do or you think is
wrong. (14:00)
5. Learning About Honesty – addresses the forms dishonesty can take,
the ways in which it harms others, and whether it’s ever okay to lie.
(18:00)
6. Learning to Care – promotes empathy by encouraging students to
imagine themselves in someone else’s place. (15:00)
7. Respecting Differences – shows children how to accept and respect
differences in ability, likes and dislikes, and culture. (16:00)
8. Say Please – dramatizes the importance of being polite. (14:00)
9. What’s Respect – teaches how to spot disrespectful behavior and
how to be respectful to people, property, rules, differences, abilities,
and the environment. (13:00)
GRADES 2-4
10. Feeling Good About ME – helps viewers learn to value their own
uniqueness and take positive steps toward self-esteem. (16:00)
11. Feelings: Glad, Mad, Sad – distinguishes between feeling and acting
and explores the range of feelings between a simple “good and bad.”
(18:00)
12. How to Say NO –teaches children to become more comfortable saying
“no” to destructive behavior. (19:00)
13. Stressbusters –helps children understand stress and what they can
do about it. (14:00)
14. What If You Lose When You Play to Win – shows how negative attitudes toward losing affect relationships and how good sportsmanship and honest behavior win respect. (14:00)
15. What Is Honesty? –defines honesty, creates guidelines for staying
honest, and develops tools for distinguishing between fantasy and
truth, stealing and borrowing, cheating and competing, and politeness and lying to protect others. (14:00)
16. What It’s Like to Be Different – helps develop sensitivity to others by
showing how it feels to be different and encouraging the celebration
of differences. (14:00)
17. When It’s Hard to Be a Friend – dramatizes problems with friends
and uses thought-provoking questions to give students a chance to
discuss their own experiences with friendship. (12:00)
18. When Should You Tell? Dealing with Abuse – shows abused children
that they are not alone and that telling an adult they trust can help.
It also provides information about steps to take and resources to rely
on. (14:00)
19. You Can Count On Me: Building Character – explores responsible
behavior, the problems caused by irresponsibility, and the best way
to handle obstacles. (15:00)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, September 27 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-15; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 16-19; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, February 28 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-15; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 16-19; 1 hour)
Econ and Me C
Basic economic concepts
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
Primary-5
15 minutes
Unlimited
Call 1-800-436-3266
See below
www.econ.org
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.18, 2.30, 2.33, 5.1, 5.4
With Econ and Me, teachers can teach economic concepts to 7- to 10year-olds; help students gain insight into today’s world; help students
make reasoned decisions; and reinforce language arts, mathematics,
and problem-solving skills.
The Kentucky Council on Economic Education provides training for teachers
in the use of these video programs. Call 1-800-436-3266 for information.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/AIR DATES
1. Scarcity — Scarcity occurs when people can’t have everything they
2.
3.
4.
5.
want and must make choices. Econ tells Sean and his friends that they
have an economic problem — a scarcity of space. (Dec 6)
Opportunity Cost — Opportunity cost is the most valuable alternative
people give up when making a choice. Jennifer sees that the swing
set was her opportunity cost for choosing the clubhouse. (Dec 8)
Consumption — It’s important to consider the benefits of each opportunity in relation to its cost. Econ tells the children that they can use
their $4.00 to buy goods, save their money, or pay someone to perform a service. (Dec 11)
Production — Producers combine resources to make goods and services, considering costs and benefits. (Dec 12)
Interdependence — We all depend on each other. When we specialize
to increase our well-being, we give up some of our independence.
(Dec 13)
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, December 6-13 at
10:45/9:45 am CT
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, October 18 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, November 9 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 15 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Wednesday, March 21 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 15 minutes)
Block Feed IV:
Thursday, April 12 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 15 minutes)
new at ket.org...
KET Shool Resources
Coordinator page
www.ket.org/education/schoolcoordinator.htm
50 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Looking from the Inside/Out C
Health and guidance about emotional skills
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary-5
15 minutes
unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, page 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.32, 3.5, 4.1, 4.3, 5.4
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. I Don’t Get It — confusion. The characters decide whether to partici-
pate in a gang-related activity.
2. That’s Me! — pride. Competition arises between siblings.
3. I’ll Decide — independence. The kids decide about products advertised on TV.
4. Sticks and Stones — embarrassment. Students cope with ridicule at
school.
5. Oh, Yeah? — anger. Even friends disagree sometimes!
6. Now What Do I Do? — frustration. The characters try to resolve misunderstandings with parents.
7. Alone in a Crowd — loneliness. Moving to a new town or school
makes the “new kid” feel isolated.
8. A Helping Hand — caring. The students learn about the satisfaction of
helping others.
9. In Harm’s Way — fear. Bullying and name-calling inspire fear.
10. Learning To Say “No” — stress. The kids learn what it feels like to be
pressured and how to say “no” in spite of it.
11. Saying Goodbye — love. Characters cope with deaths of pets and
loved ones.
12. Will He or Won’t He? — distrust. Characters must deal with family
violence.
13. Changes — sadness. Parents’ divorces lead to feelings of sadness.
14. Worrywart — worry. The students must make a difficult decision
about a health-related behavior.
15. I Know I Can — determination. Perseverance helps the students identify and accomplish a big task.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
FOR GRADES 1-3:
1. From the Future … the Drug Avengers! — advises children to take
medicine only from a parent or other trusted adult
2. Body Talk — cautions students about eating unknown substances
3. Up and Down — demonstrates that bad days come and go and that
lows are a normal part of growing up
4. Street Talk — advises children not to feel responsible for curing family members who abuse alcohol or drugs
5. Uh Oh Video — listening to the “uh oh” feeling tells children when
something is wrong.
FOR GRADES 4-6:
(Program 1 should be shown first as an introduction.)
6. Fast Friends — taking drugs doesn't make you "one of the crowd"
7. Picture Perfect — Advertising can present misleading images about
products.
8. Trick or Treat — helps students develop refusal skills
9. Double Scare — stresses the unpredictable effects of substances
10. Rock Solid — advises that students don’t need drugs to have fun
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, September 6 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-10; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, February 7 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-10; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Red Light, Green Light,
Have you Heard? C
Personal safety
Grade levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Primary-6
16 minutes
School Year
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.31, 5.4
Wednesday, November 8 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-15; 3 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, April 11 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-15; 3 hours, 30 minutes)
Drug Avengers C
Viewers learn that a red light person is a stranger who can be dangerous while a green light person is someone they can trust to help keep
them safe.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, November 8 at 9:30/8:30 am CT
Wednesday, April 11 at 9:30/8:30 am CT
Drug abuse prevention
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary-6
5-8 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.30, 2.31, 2.32, 3.5, 4.4
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 51
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
This primary health series is designed to help students discover their
emotions and feelings. A cast of continuing characters provides positive reinforcement by serving as role models in contemporary situations. Four categories of skills — decision making, communication,
stress management, and goal setting — are developed throughout the
programs. Each program also emphasizes basic knowledge of human
emotions and their universality.
This animated series introduces drug education to the youngest students, teaching them easy, sensible ways to refuse drugs. The year is
2050, and the planet Earth has a terrible drug problem. Earth’s leaders
organize a group of young Drug Avengers to go back in time and
teach today’s children about the dangers of drug abuse. Program 1 is
an introductory episode. Programs 2-5 are intended for primary students; programs 6-10 are designed for grades 4-6.
Fat Albert & the Cosby Kids
©
Dealing with everyday problems
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary-7
15 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
KY Academic Expectations: 2.31, 2.32, 3.6, 4.4, 5.4, 5.5
This series has Fat Albert and his friends dealing with the day-to-day
problems confronted by children everywhere. Featuring Bill
Cosby, the shows emphasize values
and how to work through
problem situations. In addition to speaking through the
animated Fat Albert gang,
Bill Cosby directly addresses
viewers, guiding them in
understanding the dilemmas
and solutions dealt with by Fat
Albert and his friends.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
CONFLICT
1. Nobody Likes a Bully — The Cosby Kids realize that the neighborhood bully just wants attention and friendship.
2. Talk — Don’t Fight — A fight between gangs results in a death, making all of them realize the price they have paid.
3. The Hero — Cool or Fool? — A man the kids look up to gets them
into trouble before they finally wise up.
PREJUDICE
4. I Can Do It Myself! — The gang tries to make friends with a distant,
independent boy who is confined to a wheelchair but refuses their
help.
5. Everybody’s Different and That’s OK! — The kids finally accept a girl
from the South, even though she is very different in many ways.
6. Old Folks Are A-Okay! — After being treated to soda and cookies on
Halloween, Fat Albert and the gang learn that they have the wrong
impression of old people.
7. Who Is an American? — The kids learn that being a good American
has little to do with where you were born or what accent you have.
FAMILY
8. Mom Deserves Some Thanks — After struggling to get his chores
done, Fat Albert learns to appreciate all the things his mother does.
9. Mom and Pop Split Up — The gang helps Flora through her parents’
divorce.
10. Baby on the Way — After initially resisting the idea of having a new
baby brother or sister, Dumb Donald decides that he loves having his
new baby sister around.
11. Dad’s Job Is Cool — The gang’s teacher has them spend a day on the
job with their dads.
52 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
SCHOOL
20. Study Makes the Grade — Donald is tempted to cheat on an upcoming test.
21. Give School a Chance — Rudy drops out of school, but is convinced
by a local bum that success in life begins with a good education.
22. You Can Make It If You Try — Thurman, a real klutz at sports, shares
tips with the gang on how to study; they, in turn, teach him some
athletic skills.
23. Reading Is the Way To Grow — A gifted football athlete hides the fact
that he can’t read, but finally admits that he must learn how.
OTHER ISSUES
24. Only Fools Break the Rules — The gang follows a boy into all kinds
of dangerous mischief at an abandoned amusement park.
25. Going Into Business — The boys are duped by a fraudulent ad for a
free bicycle. (A) Mar 8, (B) Mar 16
26. Kids and Alcohol Don’t Mix — Fat Albert helps a friend, who is also
an outstanding soccer player, deal with a severe alcohol problem.
27. Clean Is Keen — Russell and Fat Albert have to tell their friend Suede
Simpson that he needs to take a bath.
28. Four Eyes — Heywood finally admits that he can’t see well and
needs glasses. When he becomes a baseball hero, the gang realizes
he has changed from a clumsy Humpty-Dumpty to the coolest kid in
school.
29. Folk Tales — After the gang’s TV breaks, they discover that the
library contains many stories they can read and tell to each other.
30. Write a Poem — Share Your Feelings — Fat Albert helps Richard
overcome his fear of letting people know that he writes poetry, then
reads one of Richard’s poems at a school assembly.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, August 30 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours);
and 12 noon (Programs 17-30; 3 hours, 32 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, January 31 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours);
and 12 noon (Programs 17-30; 3 hours, 32 minutes)
Photo: Rick McComb
SAFETY
12. Signs Are for Safety — Fat Albert convinces Cool Roy that moving
and changing signs is dangerous.
13. Bicycle Rules — Safety First — After a serious bike accident, the
boys finally learn that a cyclist who ignores the rules is a danger to
himself and a threat to others.
14. Beware of Strangers — Hank sleeps through class and misses some
important tips about how to avoid becoming a victim of dangerous
strangers, then finds himself in a bad situation.
15. Help Police Your Neighborhood — The gang learns all about how to
form a neighborhood watch and how the police work to keep people
safe.
RESPONSIBILITY
16. Do Your Job Right — The gang pressures Weird Harold to give them
some free ice cream at the ice cream parlor where he has a summer
job. But Harold learns that his job responsibilities come first.
17. Heart Attack — Save a Life! — Rudy chooses not to learn CPR and
then runs into a situation where he doesn’t know how to treat a
man having a heart attack. Film approved by the American Heart
Association.
18. Responsibility — The Only Way — Weird Harold spends all his
money on his video game obsession and then can't help pay for the
gang's annual picnic.
19. TV or Not TV? — Monroe learns the hard way that he can’t spend all
of his time watching TV.
When I Grow Up C
Career exploration
1-4
15 minutes
School Year
www.unitedlearning.com
(type title of series in search box)
KY Academic Expectations: 2.33, 2.36, 2.37
This series takes students on location to a variety workplaces to learn
what several careers entail.
2.
3.
4.
5.
police work: concern for community safety; respect for law; and
reading, writing, communication, and investigative skills.
I Want To Be a Firefighter – takes students to a fire station where
firefighters talk about the science, math, and reading skills they use
every day.
I Want To Be a Teacher – makes connections between school work
and an eventual teaching career and demonstrates the teamwork,
organization, and diplomacy teachers need to be successful.
I Want To Be a Veterinarian – gives viewers a behind-the-scenes look
at a dog’s wellness exam and shows the role of teamwork and good
science and math skills in veterinary science.
I Want To Be a Librarian – focuses on the skills needed by librarians:
reading, researching, and reviewing, along with organization, communication, and math skills.
Wednesday, October 4
at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-10; 2
hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, March 7
at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-10; 2
hours, 30 minutes)
Bullying/Character Education Series
Essential building blocks of good character
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, October 11 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 10 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, March 14 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 10 minutes)
Inside Story with
Slim Goodbody C
Understanding the human body
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
2-6
15 minutes
School year
Call 1-800-457-4509 or www.ait.net
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.4, 2.31
Students will get a delightful and instructive tour of the “human factory” in Slim Goodbody. Each program provides information about a
specific physical system. Series host Slim Goodbody sings and dances
his way through sets that feature huge soft-sculpture models of the
human heart, lungs, brain, and digestive system. KET strongly advises
that teachers preview Program 9 before using it with students.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Lubba Dubba: The Story of Your Heart and Blood
2. Breath of Life: The Story of Respiration
3. Down, Down, Down: The Story of Digestion
4. The Team That Hustles: The Story of Bones and Muscles
5. Smart Parts: The Story of the Brain and Nervous System
6. Sensational Five: The Story of Your Senses
7. The Little Giants: The Story of Your Glands
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print materials:
3-5
13-24 minutes
School Year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 3.5, 3.6, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5
This series deals with the essential building blocks of good character:
respect, responsibility, tolerance, empathy, courage and integrity. It
helps students deal with bullying and harassment by making them
aware of positive techniques they can use.
PROGRAM TITLES/LENGTHS
1. I Was Just Kidding! (14:56)
2. What It’s Like to Be Different (13:51)
3. You Can Try, So Can I (11:13)
4. Put Yourself in Someone Else’s Shoes (13:43)
5. Problems at School (23:08)
6. Respect: It Starts With You (20:13)
7. Should I Speak Up? Character Education (12:47)
8. Stress: I Can Handle It (18:14)
9. What is Courage? Building Character (14:14)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, September 6 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-9; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, February 7 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-9; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 53
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. I Want To Be a Police Officer – illustrates the qualities needed for
Symphony: The
Story of Your
Whole Body
9. Protection Against
Infection: The
Inside Story of the
Immune System
and AIDS
10. Attention to
Prevention: The
Inside Story of
Substance Abuse
Photo: Rick McComb
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Web Site:
8. The Body
Healthy Body Healthy Mind C
Building a healthy you
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print materials:
Web Site:
4-8
14-26 minutes each
School Year
Web site or 1-800-431-2050
www.hrmvideo.com
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.31, 2.32, 5.1
Healthy Body, Healthy Mind is an 18-part series emphasizing the importance of building not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mind.
Some of the many topics included are: good character traits, avoiding
the use of alcohol and other drugs, good nutrition and the long lasting
value of exercise.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. Don't Drain Your Brain — This video shows the damaging effects of
alcohol on the brain. (15:00)
2. Brick By Brick: Respecting Yourself — Helps students understand the
importance of their own self worth and value systems. (23:00)
3. Brick By Brick: Respecting Other — Respecting Others explores the
simple rule of respecting others (25:00)
4. Brick By Brick: Respecting Your World — Respecting Your Worl and
Caring for the environment is this video's theme. (25:00)
5. Danger Zone: Dangers in Your House — This video focuses on the
dangers of common household items which students can use to make
their own drugs. Note: Please preview before showing to students.
(17:00)
6. Danger Zone: Alcohol, Tobacco & Marijuana — Shows the damaging
effects these substances can have on the growing body and mind.
(20 :00)
7. Danger Zone: The Power of No — This video focuses on 4 short dramas in which elementary children are confronted with a decision on
whether to try a substance or choose to talk to an adult about the
substance. The scenarios involve alcohol, tobacco, cough syrup and
air freshener. The message is clear: learning important refusal skills
can save your health as well as your life. (20:00)
8. To The Max: Understanding the New Diet and Exercise Guidelines
— This fast paced and entertaining video shows young, elementary
students how they can begin to improve their health by eating smarter, eating smaller portions, exercising more and understanding basic
information about nutrition and food labeling. (14:00)
9. Ten Reasons to Get and Stay in Shape — This video combines upto-date information with an upbeat, engaging, kid-friendly format to
teach young students the reasons why physical fitness is essential to
a healthy lifestyle. (16:00)
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Videos 10, 11, 12, and 13 are a part of The Gateway Drugs Action
Pack. The Gateway Drugs Action Pack is a comprehensive drug curriculum aimed at elementary students to educate and inform them
of the extreme dangers of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana and inhalants.
The age-specific series centers around four videos which will rivet
your students’ attention with songs, quizzes, computer animated
graphics and a question-and-answer series with the amazing Dr.
Brainiac. Each video works to bring home the message to your students to stay away from drugs.
Gateway Drugs: What’s Wrong with Alcohol? (20:00)
Gateway Drugs: What’s Wrong with Tobacco? (21:00)
Gateway Drugs: What’s Wrong with Inhalants? (14:00)
Gateway Drugs: What’s Wrong with Marijuana? (17:00)
Leader of the Pack – This video helps young viewers recognize the
dangers of tobacco use through the power of storytelling and compelling cartoon characters. (16:00)
Portion Distortion: Seeing the Healthy Way to Eat — This program
teaches children how to choose the right food portions for their body
type and metabolism. (18:00)
54 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
16. Good Conduct: Courtesy is Contagious — Young hosts and school age
children deliver the message that good manners, thoughtfulness and
helpfulness make for a winning personality. (16:00)
17. Good Conduct: Cool Kids in Control — Dramatizations show the
consequences of losing one’s cool and also demonstrates positive
approaches that students can take when dealing with anger, frustration and excitement. (19:00)
18. Good Conduct: Honesty Counts — Thought-provoking scenarios
engage students in discussion about the benefits of honesty and the
consequences of deceit. (21:00)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, August 23 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-12; 3 hours, 53 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 13-18; 1 hour, 50 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, October 18 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-12; 3 hours, 53 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 13-18; 1 hour, 50 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Wednesday, January 24 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-12; 3 hours, 53 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 13-18; 1 hour, 50 minutes)
Block Feed IV:
Wednesday, March 21 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-12; 3 hours, 53 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 13-18; 1 hour, 50 minutes)
Life Skills/Character
Education Series
Building healthy, successful relationships
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print materials:
5-9
18-25 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.36, 3.5, 3.6, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5
This series focuses on the number one problem for middle schoolers: bullying and harassment. It helps students develop the traits of
good character that enable them to stand up for themselves and build
healthy, successful relationships.
PROGRAM TITLES/LENGTHS
1. Gossiping, Taunting, Bullying: It’s All Harassment (24:00)
2. Building Character (25:00)
3. Respect for Differences (24:00)
4. Suppose It Was Me (18:00)
5. Talking About Responsibility (23:00)
6. Stress: You Can Handle It (22:00)
7. Choosing Your Friends (19:00)
8. Talking About Sexual Harassment (21:00)
9. Own Your Anger (22:00)
10. Alcohol: Truth and Consequences (22:00)
11. What Would I Be Good At? Exploring Careers (22:00)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, October 11 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-11; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, March 14 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-11; 4 hours)
Violence: Reversing the Trend
4. Explaining ambiguous newspaper headlines, Keeping a Journal, Using
5.
6.
7.
8.
A look at violence and its ramifications
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
5-10
15-20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
9.
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 3.1, 5.4
This compelling series takes a hard look at violence and its ramifications. Aimed at both urban and non-urban audiences, Violence:
Reversing the Trend “tells it like it is” from many perspectives. Young
people recount how violence has deeply affected their lives, and
experts confirm the devastating impact of violence.
10.
11.
12.
13.
17.
18.
19.
20.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
Wednesday, November 22 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 40 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, April 25 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 40 minutes)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Photo: Rick McComb
TV411 C
Wednesday, September 13 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8;
4 hours) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours); and
Wednesday, September 20 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 17-24;
4 hours) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 25-30; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, February 14 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8;
4 hours) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours); and
Wednesday, February 21 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 25-30; 3 hours)
Essential reading, writing, math skills
TV411 Financial Literacy Kit
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Web Site:
grades 5-12
Cost 45.00, Kit includes six video clips on DVD and 1 vhs tape with
20 Minding Your Money workbooks.
To order, call-1-800-228-3382
5-12
30 minutes
School Year
www.tv411.org
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.30, 2.31, 2.33, 2.37, 2.38
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.30, 2.31, 2.33, 2.37, 2.38
TV411 focuses on parenting, money matters, and health. Subjects
include reading comprehension, research techniques, writing to others,
filling out forms, calculating percentages, using fractions, test taking,
and more.
By teaching students to track and control spending, save money, shop
sensibly and use credit responsibly, this kit will help learners achieve
their financial goals.
Unit 1: What's on the Stub?: Understanding Your Paycheck
Unit 2: Reading the Fine Print: Don't Be Fooled
Unit 3: Rent-to-Own: Is It Really a Deal?
Unit 4: Wise Decisions: Selecting and Using Credit Cards
Unit 5: Getting on Track: Making a Budget
Unit 6: A Home of Your Own: From Dream to Reality
PROGRAM TITLES
1. The Thesaurus, Synonyms and Antonyms, Personal Portfolio & The
Paycheck
2. Apostrophes, The Library Card, Percentages, Decimals, and
Probability
3. Prefixes, Compound words and phrases, Creating a Medical Bible,
Strategy for learning to read difficult words
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 55
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
14.
15.
16.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Violence: The Ripple Effect
2. Crossing the Line: The Truth About Gangs
3. Violence: Myth vs. Reality
4. Weapons and You
5. Getting Along
Transitions, Reading Books
Suffixes, Ask the Librarian, Baby on the way, Math Skills
How to take a phone message, The Resume, Using Percentages
Reading a Map, Using the Dictionary, Math- how to find an average
How to navigate around the Yellow Pages, Diabetes, The Cover Letter,
Deciphering the food label
Preparing for a public speech, Reading to your children, Relationships
between addition and multiplication
Subject-Verb Agreement, Understanding the Fine Print
Test Taking Tips, Using an Atlas, Understanding a Lease, The writing
process
Choosing a Dictionary, Word Meaning, Choosing a School for Your
Child, Draft and revise a personal greeting card
The Library, Metaphors and Similes, Credit Card Application,
Percentages and Fractions
Writing a Letter, Foreign Words, Using a Highlighter, Reading a Map
Picking a book, Using a glossary, Making a schedule, Journaling
Renting versus owning an appliance, Time Management,
Estimating a Job
Buying a House, Using a Thesaurus, Reading A Utility Bill
Strategies for understanding a difficult newspaper article, Percentiles
and Rankings, Summarizing a poem
Learning Styles, Reading and using the unit price labels
Understanding the concept of probability, Words with Multiple
Meanings, A look at Dyslexia
Body Works
Personal Finances
The Learning Journey
On the Job
Navigating the System
Family Matters
Writing
Express Yourself
Math for Life
Media
TV411 Read All About Kit
grades 5-12
Cost 45.00, Kit includes eight video clips on VHS only and reproducible masters for each unit.
To order, call-1-800-228-3382
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.30, 2.31, 2.33, 2.37, 2.38
Learners can strengthen their reading skills and increase their awareness and enjoyment of the daily newspaper with this engaging practical kit.
Unit 1: Navigating the Newspaper: Finding Articles of Interest
Unit 2: Getting the Big Picture: How to Skim the Newspaper
Unit 3: What's Happening?: Looking for the Main Points of a News
Story
Unit 4: Extra! Extra!: Making Sense of Ambiguous Headlines
Unit 5: To Read or Not to Read: Book Reviews Can Help You Decide
Unit 6: Life Stories: Reading Newspaper Obituaries
Unit 7: Help Wanted: Making Sense of the Classifieds
Unit 8: What's the Catch: Reading the Fine Print in Newspaper Ads
Middle School Kids Speak Out
Adolescent issues
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web site/Prog 1:
Web site/Prog 2:
6-9
60 minutes
School Year
See below
http://www.uwgb.edu/newist/guys/index.htm
http://www.wpt.org/butterfly/
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.31, 2.32, 3.5, 5.4
These documentaries tell what middle school girls and boys are
thinking, doing, and feeling. The documentaries will help them and
others gain a full understanding of the forces at work on their minds
and bodies during their adolescent years, and how they can react to
emerge stronger, wiser and more confident.
Flirting or Hurting? Sexual
Harassment in Schools C
Definition, effects, and how to respond
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
6-12, staff development
60 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.32, 3.6, 4.4
This award-winning program on sexual harassment in schools
contains three video modules. The first two, “What Is Sexual
Harassment?” and “Stopping Sexual Harassment,” use reenactments
and dramatized interviews to define sexual harassment; show the
various effects it can have on students; and show students how to
respond to offensive behavior, whether they are targets or bystanders.
The third module, designed for teachers, is hosted by Nan Stein of the
Wellesley College Center for Research on Women.
This program has been flagged for content and/or language. KET strongly
encourages teachers to preview the program before showing it to students.
Call KET's Education office at (800) 432-0951 for more information.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, October 25 at 8:15/7:15 am CT
Wednesday, March 28 at 8:15/7:15 am CT
Women’s Work
Inspiration and exploration of non-traditional
careers for women
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
6-12
10 minutes
School Year
KY Academic Expectations: 2.36, 2.37, 4.6
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Middle School Boys Speak Out
2. Beyond the Butterfly: Middle School Girls Speak Out
This series profiles six young women working in male-dominated
fields--science, math, and technology--and introduces viewers to interesting careers they may not have considered.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Kathy Doughty: Emergency Task Force In 1999 – a large metropolitan
Wednesday, August 23 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, January 24 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Teacher Materials: A teacher's guide is available for $10 from:
NEWIST/CESA7
2420 Nicolet Drive, IS 1040, Green Bay, WI 54311
Phone: 920-465-2599, Toll-free: 800-633-7445, Fax: 920-465-2723
E-mail: [email protected]
56 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
city's Emergency Task Force responded to 441 high risk calls. Kathy
Doughty, the only female member of her team, explains the types
of calls the ETF handle and the equipment and training used by the
team.
2. Jen Miller: Firefighter – The first known female firefighter was Molly
Williams in New York City in the year 1818. Jen Miller is training
to become a professional firefighter in the hope of following in her
footsteps. One of six females in a class of 41, Jen enjoys the teamwork
and satisfaction that firefighting offers.
3. Bonnie Black: Hercules Pilot – Bonnie flies missions all over the
world, dropping food and supplies to troops. She thrives on the daily
challenges and immediate gratification flying brings to her life.
4. Julie Lewis: Contractor – Julie, a self-employed home renovtion
contractor, talks about a typical day on the job and how she came to
work in this field. For Julie, the benefits outweigh the difficulties. As
she states: "I've learned that I can really do whatever I want."
5. Kim Parker: Biomedical Engineer -- Kim researches rehabilitative
theories and methods for children with disabilities in order to build
effective prosthetic equipment. We see her at work, assessing, designing, and refining equipment and working directly with the children
who benefit from her dedication and expertise.
6. Ellen Besen: Animator Since 1995 – the proportion of female computer animators in North America has increased from 10 to 25 percent.
Ellen Besen, an independent animation filmmaker, discusses one of
her films, and we hear from several animation students.
Wednesday, November 8 at 3:20/1:20 pm CT
(Programs 1-6; 40 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, April 11 at 3:20/1:20 pm CT (Programs 1-6; 40 minutes)
Jobs in graphic design and production
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
7-12
15 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.36, 2.37
This KET production presents an overview of the Graphic Arts/
Printing Trade and highlights the various job categories from graphic
design to print production. It also looks at professionals in the printing industry as they describe their jobs and what they like most about
what they do. Students take a field trip to a graphic design studio,
printing plant and trade school.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, August 16 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Wednesday, January 17 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Teen Issues
Health/social issues
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
7-12
16 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.29, 2.31, 2.32, 4.4, 5.5
This 13-part series imparts a wealth of information on a variety of
issues facing teenagers today. Interviews are conducted with young
people who are being faced with many of these challenges. A variety
of experts offer advice to help viewers understand each topic in depth
and also provide a clear message that dealing with these teen issues is
in reality often a matter of life or death.
These programs have been flagged for content and/or language. KET strongly
encourages teachers to preview the programs before showing them to students.
Call KET’s Education office at (800) 432-0951 for more information.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. HIV and Teens: Remembering Krista Blake — Krista Blake contracted
2.
Photo: Rick McComb
3.
4.
5.
6.
HIV when she was 16 from a hemophiliac boyfriend. At 19, she
developed AIDS. The program follows Krista over a three-year
period as she speaks out about AIDS, and as her disease progresses.
Steroids — In this program, interviews with former users and health
professionals present concrete information about steroids, including
the physical and psychological effects.
Marijuana — Viewers learn about the physical effects of marijuana and
how effective educational programs can prevent the spread of its use.
Eating Disorders — Young men and women with eating disorders
such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia are interviewed. Viewers are
shown warning signs to look for in friends and family members.
Cults — Interviews with experts in the field and detailed testimony
about one family’s involvement in a cult give teens the tools necessary to distinguish the difference between a group and a cult.
Teen Dads — Four teenage fathers who have chosen to play an active
role in their children’s lives are profiled in this video about responsibility, hard decisions, and planning ahead.
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 57
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Careers in Printing K C
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
7. Sexual Harassment – This program focuses on helping teen viewers
identify sexual harassment and how it can be stopped.
8. Living with HIV — A teenage boy born with the HIV virus explains
what it is, how it is and is not transmitted, and what life is like for him.
9. Teens with Cancer — Casey Moore was diagnosed with childhood
leukemia when she was 8 years old. Viewers receive a firsthand
account of her family’s struggle to learn more about the disease.
10. Drinking and Driving — This program presents the story of a teenager
who died in an alcohol-related accident. Visits to a sobriety checkpoint and a county morgue, along with graphic footage of alcoholrelated car crashes, show the dramatic results of drinking and driving.
11. Dropouts — Viewers get an in-depth look at the process of dropping
out and learn the alternatives available to teens who want to get an
education, including night school and alternative school. Two young
people who quit school discuss regrets and plans for their futures.
12. Inhalants — This program describes the dangers of inhalant abuse.
Viewers meet the parents of a boy who lost his life to inhalants
before his 13th birthday. A doctor discusses the deadly risks.
13. Heroin — A toxicologist explains the physical effects of heroin use,
how easy it is to become addicted, and the not-so-glamorous symptoms of withdrawal. Stories of overdose and addiction illustrate the
drug’s devastating effects.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, November 8 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-13; 3 hours, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, April 11 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-13; 3 hours, 15 minutes)
College and You — Why Not?
Tackling College with a Disability K C
Street Skills K C
Driver safety education
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
9-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/streetskills
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.31, 4.4, 5.1
Street Skills, a 1997 KET production, is a four-part drivers education
series designed to help teenagers become safer, more responsible drivers.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Art of Driving — breaks down the act of driving into its compo-
nent parts, covering basic driving skills and the rules of the road
2. Nature’s Laws — focuses on the physical and biological forces that
affect driving ability, including speed, gravity, traction, fatigue, alcohol, and drugs
3. The Car — surveys different kinds of mechanical problems that can
develop and gives advice on maintenance and repair
4. The Road — examines the special challenges offered by different
kinds of roads and driving problems related to weather conditions
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, October 11 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, March 14 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Overcoming barriers to higher education
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
9-12
25 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.36, 2.38
Addresses barriers that sometimes discourage students with disabilities from pursuing a college education. Students with learning or
physical disabilities talk about their experiences at a wide range of
colleges and universities.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, August 16 at 9:30/8:30 am CT
Wednesday, January 17 at 9:30/8:30 am CT
Photo: Rick McComb
58 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Challenging and rewarding careers
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
10-12
30 minutes
School year
KY Academic Expectations:
2.36, 2.37, 5.3, 5.4, 6.3
Photo: Rick McComb
Career Encounters C
Career Encounters is a cumulative series of documentary-style programs which explore some of today’s most challenging and rewarding
career fields. Under the guidance of qualified advisors, the producers
travel to the workplaces of America to find professionals and technicians who can explain what they do, how they got where they are and
why they find their work so rewarding.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, August 16 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, January 17 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 3 hours)
Workplace Essential Skills K C
NETA AWARD WINNER
Skills and advice for finding, getting, and
keeping a job
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
10-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
See below
See below
www.ket.org/enterprise/work/workplace.htm
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.11, 2.7, 2.8, 2.10, 2.36,
2.37, 2.38
Workplace Essential Skills shows students what to expect from the job
application process, what skills and attributes employers look for, and
how those skills are put to work in real on-the-job situations. The first
eight programs in particular are designed to help the learner develop
career goals and realistic plans for attaining those goals.
Produced by KET as part of the PBS LiteracyLink project, the series
also includes instructional programs in writing, reading, and mathematics at a 6th to 7th grade reading level. Designed for adults who are
looking for a job or want to improve their skills in order to get or keep
a better job, these programs may be used as remedial help to students
who need to improve basic skills in these areas.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
FINDING A JOB
1. Planning To Work — career planning; role of work in people’s lives
2. Matching Skills and Jobs — skills assessment; job search skills and
tools
3. Applying for Jobs — understanding and using application forms and
processes
4. Resumes, Tests, and Choices — effective resumes; factors to consider
in choosing a job
5. Interviewing — successful interview preparation and presentation
NEW TO THE JOB
6. Ready to Work — understanding and demonstrating work-readiness
skills
7. Workplace Safety — developing safety-conscious attitudes and skills
8. Learning to Work — strategies for the orientation and training phase
COMMUNICATION SKILLS
9. The Language of Work — effective workplace speaking and listening
strategies and skills
10. Communicating With Co-Workers and Supervisors — conflict-resolution strategies
11. Working Together — definition and qualities of the successful team;
key personal skillls and strategies
12. Communicating with Customers — developing excellent customer
service skills
WRITING SKILLS
13. A Process for Writing — the importance of writing in the workplace,
using the writing process
14. Supplying Information: Directions, Forms, and Charts — developing
accuracy and completeness
15. Writing Memos and Letters — audience and purpose; appropriate
formats
READING
16. Reading for a Purpose — purposes, structures, and strategies for
workplace reading
17. Finding What You Need: Forms and Charts — the role and importance
of accuracy; locating specifics
18. Following Directions — the variety of directions in the workplace and
their roles and importance
19. Reading Reports and Manuals — usage; organization; comprehension
skills
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 59
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Automotive Technician
2. Women in Computing
3. Pharmacy
4. Political Science
5. Radiological Technologists
6. Information Technology
MATH
20. Number Sense — developing number sense, uses of mathematics in
the workplace
21. Solving Problems — addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
22. Fractions, Decimals, and Percents — workplace uses, ration, rate,
and proportion
23. Measurements and Formulas — different units of measurement;
appropriate applications
24. Trends and Predictions: Graphs and Data — presentation of data; the
role and importance of evaluation
PRACTICALLIVING/VOC.STUDIES
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, October 25 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-8;
4 hours); and Wednesday, November 1 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs
9-16; 4 hours) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, March 28 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours);
and Wednesday, April 4 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours)
TEACHING MATERIALS
7DVDs or 25 VHS tapes including the 24 student programs and the
30-minute orientation program ($125), student workbooks (18), and a
teacher’s guide (24) are all available from KET. Kentucky schools may
call KET Tape Duplication (800) 228-3382, for information.
Truth and Consequences: Federal
Crimes and Teenagers K
Laws, court processes, and penalties
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
11-12
50 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.29, 4.4, 5.4
In this program, high school students will learn about the serious
penalties for crimes involving drugs and firearms with the help of
United States Probation Officers Mike Kearns and Jeanne Arnold.
Using real-life examples involving teens, their presentation also covers
federal conspiracy laws and the court process, from the arrest through
sentencing. A young offender convicted of a drug-trafficking offense
offers personal testimony on the consequences of a bad decision. This
program first aired on February 27, 1998.
Note: This program is offered on videotape only. See tape order information
on pages 125-126.
See Also...
Consumer Decisions
Economics: The Production, Distribution, and Consumption of
Goods and Services (4-6) — page 96
Electronic Field Trip to the Falls of the Ohio (4-12) — page 32
Electronic Field Trip to Mammoth Cave (4-12) — page 31
Gee Whiz in Agriculture (4-5) — page 81
Kentucky Afield for Kids (4-7) — page 82
Natureworks (3-6) — page 80
Real World Science (4-6) — page 81
The World of Nature II (Primary-6) — page 79
Career and Technical Education
The Eddie Files (4-6) — page 43
An Electronic Conversation with
George Ella Lyon (6-9) — page 73
Electronic Field Trip to a Beef Cattle Farm (4-12) — page 28
Electronic Field Trip to a Coal Mine (4-12) — page 29
Electronic Field Trip to the Kentucky Center
for the Arts (6-12) — page 32
Electronic Field Trip to KET (4-12) — page 31
60 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Electronic Field Trip to the Kentucky Opera (6-9) — page 33
Electronic Field Trip to the Louisville Zoo (4-12) — page 33
Electronic Field Trip to a Newspaper (4-12) — page 29
Electronic Field Trip to an Orchard (4-12) — page 30
Electronic Field Trip to a Pig Farm (4-12) — page 29
Electronic Field Trip to the Speed Museum (6-12) — page 35
Electronic Field Trip to Toyota (4-12) — page 35
Electronic Field Trip to a Veterinary Clinic (4-12) — page 29
Entrepreneurs in Kentucky (1-12) — page 95
Gee Whiz in Agriculture (4-5) — page 81
Kentucky Afield for Kids (4-7) — page 82
Making Grimm Movies (6-12) — page 113
Real Science II (5-10) — page 83
Real Science III (5-10) — page 84
World of Our Own: Kentucky Folkways (8-12) — page 26
Other
Inside Our Human Body (7-12) — page 89
Under 18 Under the Law (6-8) — page 101
READING & WRITING
basic skills/
vocabulary development
Cursive Handwriting Series A (Primary) C
Know It All (3-6)
Creating Stories and Music (4-5) K C
Write Ideas (4-6) K
Student Lessons with Barry Lane (4-8) K
English Composition: Writing for
an Audience (9-12) C
Latin Roots for English Word Power
(9-12) K
Everyday Voices (10-adult) K C
reading motivation/literature
Between the Lions (Primary) C
Reading Rainbow (Primary) C
Teletales (Primary)
Cover to Cover (Primary-4) C
Telling Tales (Primary-8) K C
Beyond the Page (3-5) C
Read On: Cover to Cover (4-5) C
From the Brothers Grimm (4-8)
More Books from Cover to Cover (5-6) C
An Electronic Conversation with
George Ella Lyon (5-12) K C
The Short Story (7-12)
James Still's River of Earth (7-12) K C
[email protected]: James Still’s Legacy
“River of Earth” (9-12) K C
Living By Words (9-12) K C
Shakespeare Shorts (9-12) C
Signature (9-12) K C
SignatureLIVE! (10-12) K C
Voices & Visions (10-12)
C
K
New or Revised for 2006/2007
Closed Captioned
KET Production
On KET EncycloMedia
basic skills/
vocabulary development
Cursive Handwriting Series A C
Handwriting instruction—Zaner-Bloser
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary
15 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.11
The emphasis in Cursive Handwriting is on demonstration and practice
of cursive letters and words. Direct instruction, letter animation, and
graphics introduce letters and words that can easily be practiced by
the students during and after the television lesson. Specific instruction
is given for both right- and left-handed students on correct cursive
writing, paper and pencil position, and posture. The letter formations
shown in this series are basically similar to the Zaner-Bloser method of
handwriting. The programs should be used in sequence.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
H, X, W
K, M, N, U
V, Y, Z, Q
F, T, I
G, S
B, P, R
C, O
A, D, E
J, L
Numbers
Days of the Week, Months
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 8 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-22; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, January 9 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 17-22; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Know It All C
An introduction to the process of gathering,
presenting, and evaluating information
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
3-6
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 1.1, 1.10, 5.3, 5.4
Student programs introduce a four-step learning process to help
students gather, present, and evaluate information in science, social
studies, humanities, and language arts. Professional development
programs focus on introducing learning skills, collaborative teaching, and information literacy standards developed by the American
Association of School Librarians and the Association for Educational
Communications Technology.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Asking the Right Questions — Discovering how to narrow a topic,
refine and reframe questions, and clarify what information is needed.
2. Knowing What to Do — Developing a rubric to guide an information
search.
3. Choosing the Right Information — Learning how to evaluate information sources for validity, accuracy, and relevance.
4. Thinking Up Ideas — Using brainstorming techniques to find a variety of information sources.
5. Saying It Another Way — Learning how to paraphrase.
6. Getting It All Together — Understanding how to put together and use
organizational schemes.
7. Sharing Your Results — Learning about the various ways to present
information, and how the format can affect the search and results.
8. Thinking About What You Did — Asking questions to assess a product—why might it fail, what might be wrong with the information,
and what is needed to help a project succeed.
9. Thinking About How You Did — Evaluating a final product by reviewing the four-step process and revising as necessary.
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 61
READING&WRITING
F
PROGRAM TITLES
1.
Introduction
2.
i, u, t
3.
w, r, s
4.
p, j
5.
e, l, f
6.
h, b, k
7.
a, o
8.
d, q, c, g
9.
v, m, n
10. x, y, z
11. Review
TEACHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS:
1. Primary Learners — Strategies for introducing learning skills in the
early grades.
2. Intermediate Learners — Engaging students in two step-by-step
information-processing strategies: (1) thinking up ideas and (2) writing authentically correct historical fiction.
3. Collaborative Teaching — Creating a “learning community” in your
school.
4. Information Literacy — Standard for Student Learning — Observing
the process of the information literacy standards for student learning
developed by the American Association of School Librarians and the
Association for Educational Communications Technology.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Character—The Center of Attention — Host Robert Franz, writer
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 22 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-9 &
PD Programs 1-4; 3 hours, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, January 23 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-9 &
PD Programs 1-4; 3 hours, 15 minutes)
Creating Stories and Music K C
Exploring the connections between
writing and composing
Grade Levels:
Length:
Tuesday, August 29 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
(Programs 1-3; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, October 24 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-3; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Monday, November 20 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-3; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, January 30 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
(Programs 1-3; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, March 27 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-3; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Write Ideas K
KY Academic Expectations: 1.11, 1.13, 2.23, 2.24, 2.25
Creative ideas for writing poetry
A writer, a composer, a conductor, and an audience of young people
discuss character, setting, and conflict/resolution (common elements
of both stories and compositions), and illustrate the creation of these
elements through words and music. Featured are Kentucky writer
George Ella Lyon reading from her books, the premiere of a work
by composer Lawrence Dillon, and musical performances by young
Kentucky musicians.
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
4-8
3 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.11
Photo: Rick McComb
Photo: Rick McComb
READING&WRITING
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
4-5
20-30 minutes
(in approx. two 15-minute segments)
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
George Ella Lyon and composer Lawrence Dillon discuss how characters can be created through words and music.
2. Setting the Scene — George Ella Lyon reads an excerpt from Here
and Then illustrating setting, and the Central Kentucky Youth
Orchestra shows how music describes setting by performing
“Sunrise” from Peer Gynt.
3. Conflict and Resolution — George Ella Lyon reads her book One
Lucky Girl, which describes a real-life conflict, and the Louisville
Youth Orchestra plays a storm scene from Beethoven’s 6th
Symphony.
62 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Write Ideas is a series of 10 short video exercises designed to spark children’s imagination and help them find clever, enticing ideas to write
about. Program host Aleda Shirley is a poet who spent more than
five years teaching creative writing to young people in the Jefferson
County Public School System. This KET-produced series is a compact,
video version of the successful techniques she used.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Colors — Aleda asks students to think of the most vibrant colors they
have seen.
2. The Third Eye — Aleda tells students that the third eye is simply an
eye that can see things their regular eyes can’t.
3. Wishes — Aleda asks students to write several long, detailed sentences about their wishes—their unusual, crazy, even weird wishes.
4. Animals — Aleda lets students choose any animal they want and
imagine what it’s like being that animal—and then write lots of long,
detailed sentences about their ideas.
5. Letter to the Moon — Aleda tells students they suddenly have the
power to talk to the moon and suggests things they might tell it.
6. Seeing Music — A musician joins Aleda to play some instrumental
music. She asks students to write down what they see when they listen to music or imagine what the music would be if it were not music.
7. Simultaneous Events — Aleda asks students to imagine things that
might be going on in other places at the very minute they are watching the show and writing their sentences.
8. Quiet Times — Aleda tells students to think about the times in their
lives or the times they can imagine that seem most quiet to them and
asks that they explain why these times seemed so quiet.
9. Being Things — Aleda asks students to choose an object they would
like to be and then to write about what it is like to be that object.
10. Negative Imagery — Aleda asks students to select any object and
describe what it isn’t, rather than what it is; to tell what it can’t do,
rather than what it can do.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Student Lessons in Revision
with Barry Lane K
Creative writing exercises
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
4-8
30-40 minutes
Unlimited
See below
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.11, 5.2
These programs are designed for teachers to use in the classroom or
to watch themselves for professional development. Using humor and
engaging examples, nationally known author and educator Barry Lane
leads viewers through exercises to help them develop more creative
writing pieces.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. Growing Leads and Digging Potatoes: The Art of Beginning — With a
little help from the wolf and the three pigs of lore, Lane demonstrates
exercises that help writers develop creative and engaging leads.
(22:21)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 15 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 2 hours, 40 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, January 16 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 2 hours, 40 minutes)
TEACHING MATERIALS
Purchase book After the End, by Barry Lane Heinemann ISBN
0435087142
English Composition:
Writing for an Audience
Target Audience: Grades 9-12
Length:
30 minutes
Taping Rights:
Unlimited
Print Materials:
Textbook $59.95; Study Guide for Textbook $53.95;
Faculty Guide for Textbook $29.95; Study Guide for Programs $43.95; Faculty
Guide for Programs $29.95 (Video programs and guides can also be purchased
individually.) Call 1-800-LEARNER (532-7637) for more information.
Videocassette:
Video streaming or purchase information at
www.learner.org/resources/series128.html
KY Academic Expectations: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.11, 5.1, 5.3,
5.4,
Special Note: Odd-numbered programs cover “Thinking and Writing
Strategies.” and even-numbered programs cover the “Writing Process.”
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. School Writing/Real World introduces the series’ key concepts.
2. Finding Something To Say introduces invention, drafting, and revi-
sion.
3. Description offers tips to help students develop their descriptive
skills.
4. Reading as a Writer explores the role of reading in the writing process.
5. Narrative Writing shows the relationships among narrative writing,
personal writing, and academic writing with tips for telling a good
story.
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 63
READING&WRITING
Tuesday, August 22 at 9:30/8:30 am CT (Programs 1-10; 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, October 24 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT (Programs 1-10; 30 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, January 23 at 9:30/8:30 am CT (Programs 1-10; 30 minutes)
2. The Myth of the Boring Subject: Revising Research Writing — Lane
shares strategies such as “Question CPR” and the “Revisor’s
Checklist” to help students write more interesting research papers.
(31:01)
3. Digging for Details — In writing, as in other things, it’s all in the
details. In this program, Lane introduces the “binocular” strategy
and questioning exercises to help writers find the interesting details
in a story. (27:28)
4. Snapshots and Thoughtshots — Lane discusses why writers use images
and thoughts in stories to connect with their readers and demonstrates
ways students can add them to their own work. (19:45)
5. Exploding Moments & Shrinking Centuries — This program provides
writing exercises to help students expand small moments in time by
using vivid detail, thoughtshots, and snapshots. Alternatively, there
are exercises for compressing a long period of time into a single sentence or scene. (25:23)
6. Don’t Make a Scene, Build One: Revising Dialogue — Mark Twain
wrote, “Don’t say the old lady screamed. Bring her on and make her
scream.” Barry Lane shares activities to help students write more
realistic and engaging dialogue. (25:26)
READING&WRITING
6. Voice addresses how writers choose their language and tone based
on their audience.
7. Process Analysis provides examples of “process analysis/how-to”
writing in action.
8. Revision offers a variety of strategies to help the student writer
revise.
9. Writing Under Pressure teaches students how to adapt the skills
learned in English composition to timed writing in other classes and
to writing under deadlines at work.
10. Freewriting and Generating looks at ways to generate ideas and overcome writer’s block.
11. Computers in Composition explores how computers are changing our
approach to written documents.
12. Organizing Devices addresses organization strategies for prewriting
and drafting.
13. Comparison and Contrast demonstrates how this strategy applies to
invention and drafting.
14. Peer Feedback examines how students and professionals rely on
peers during revision.
15. Definition explores the role that definition plays in a variety of writing contexts.
16. Collaborative Writing shows how professionals can write as a team.
17. Persuasion compares the art of persuasion to formal academic argument, with input from political activists, journalists, and ad execs.
18. Reading as a Thinker teaches students how to read and understand
challenging college textbooks.
19. Argument explores the process of writing a simple statement and
supporting it with evidence.
20. Quotes and Citations shows how to paraphrase, quote, and use MLA
or APA citations in academic and other writing.
21. Research demonstrates how to use research during each stage of the
writing process.
22. Editing: Sentences helps students correct their own writing weaknesses, particularly sentence structure problems that can make otherwise coherent writing confusing.
23. Critical Thinking examines how the concept of “critical thinking”
affects the relationship among students, their textbooks, and their
teachers as well as its importance in good reading and writing.
24. Editing: Word Usage addresses errors in word choice.
25. Writing Across the Disciplines demonstrates how to apply the writing processes and rhetorical strategies learned in English composition across the curriculum.
26. Editing: Mechanics helps students proofread for problems that could
ruin the credibility of their writing.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, September 19 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours); and Tuesday,
September 26 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours) and at
12 noon (Programs 25-26; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, February 20 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours); and Tuesday,
February 27 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours) and at
12 noon (Programs 25-26; 1 hour)
Latin Roots for English
Word Power K
Latin and Greek roots of English words
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
9-12*
30 minutes
Unlimited
See Web site
See order form, pg. 125
Web Site:
www.ket.org/education/latin
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.4, 2.27, 6.1, 6.3
More than 50% of the words we use today are derived from Latin.
Students who want to increase their “word power” in English can do
so either by studying Latin in a traditional way or by learning some
basic root words, prefixes, and suffixes. Joan Jahnige, KET’s satellite
Latin II teacher, designed this six-part series to help high school students improve vocabulary decoding skills by learning some of those
basic Latin roots.
*Though designed for high school students looking toward college entrance tests,
this series will also be valuable enrichment for advanced middle school students.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Overview — explores how languages evolve; introduces a variety
of English words taken from Latin; shows how new words can be
coined using roots, prefixes, and suffixes
2. Growing Words from More Latin Roots — more combinations of word
parts
3. Latin in Medicine and Science — looks at medicine in ancient Rome
and Greece
4. Legal Latin/Latin in Government — compares ancient Rome’s legal
and political systems to ours
5. Latin in Daily Use: Sports, Food, Art, and Music
6. Wrap-Up — decoding unfamiliar words
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, September 26 at 1:00 pm/12:00 noon CT
(Programs 1-6; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, February 27 at 1:00 pm/12:00 noon CT
(Programs 1-6; 3 hours)
Everyday Voices K C
The how-to's of creative writing
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
10-adult
30 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.11, 2.22, 2.36, 3.4, 5.2
In this 2001 KET production, Kentucky author George Ella Lyon leads
a group of adult workshop participants through exercises designed to
spark creativity and provide ideas for writing. Each program focuses
on a specific form of writing, from poetry to the personal narrative.
64 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Lyon is the author of the novel With a Hammer for My Heart as well as
Come a Tide and other children's books. For additional background
on the writer, pair Everyday Voices with An Electronic Conversation with
George Ella Lyon, in which she talks about the inspirations for her own
work and her writing process.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Journaling — creative and easy ways to begin keeping a journal and
2.
3.
4.
5.
how it can lead to other forms of writing.
Writing Fiction — a series of exercises designed to help the aspiring
writer create a convincing fictional character.
Children's Books — details and ideas on how to get started
writing for children.
Poetry — fun and stimulating exercises that demonstrate the howto's of writing poems.
Personal Narrative — an exploration of memories that can serve as
inspiration for writing a personal narrative.
EMMY AWARD WINNER
Motivational reading of children’s literature
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
Primary
30 minutes
See below
Call GPN at 1-800-228-4630
gpn.unl.edu/rainbow
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
(additional academic expectations will vary with topics covered in each program)
Tuesday, August 1 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, January 2 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
reading motivation/
literature
Between the Lions
C
EMMY AWARD WINNER
Reading motivation and library skills
for beginning readers
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
Reading Rainbow C
Primary
30 minutes
School year
Available at Web site
www.pbskids.org/lions
Between the Lions opens up a world of literature and learning for children
aged four to seven. Each episode centers on a book or other written
material that Theo and Cleo and their cubs, Lionel and Leona, and their
friends discover in the library. Some of their friends are Click the Mouse,
the library’s cyborg communications expert; Cliff Hanger, a swashbuckling comic book hero who escapes from sticky situations through quick
thinking and literacy skills; Tiger Words , a multi-talented sports figure
who plays with vowels and consonants instead of golf balls and tees;
Martha Reads and the Vowelles, a rhythm and blues group that sings
only vowel sounds; and the stalwart knights of “Gawain’s World” whose
jousting matches create words instead of wounds.
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Mondays-Fridays, July 31- May 18 at 11:30/10:30 pm CT
READING RAINBOW Taping Rights:
A public school (K-12) may record Reading Rainbow off the air for
audiovisual use only; tapes may not be used on ITFS, cable, or other
multi-site distribution systems. The programs recorded off the air may
be used only at the recording site; programs may not be circulated to
other schools. Programs recorded off the air may not be duplicated
without acquiring duplication rights from GPN. Public schools have
off-air recording rights as long as their public television station is airing the Reading Rainbow programs. If the station ceases to air Reading
Rainbow, the school must contact GPN (see address below) concerning
the date the tapes must be erased or rights acquired. GPN does not
grant off-air duplication and circulation rights to any regional, county,
or district media center, unless such rights are purchased from GPN.
GPN, Box 80669,
Lincoln, NE 68501
(800) 228-4630 / (402) 472-2007
Reading Rainbow schedule on next page
Photo: Rick McComb
For the 2006-2007 school year, KET will air Between the Lions MondaysFridays at 11:30/10:30 pm CT on KET3. Program numbers will be
announced on each KET3 Monthly Calendar Update. Program titles and
descriptions are located at www.ket.org/itvvideos/offering/reading/
lions.htm. Please note that the distributor does not allow block feeds of
this series.
For the 2006-2007 school year, KET will air Reading Rainbow MondaysFridays at 11:00/10:00 am CT on KET3. Program descriptions are
located at http://www.ket.org/itvvideos/offering/reading/rainbow.
htm Please note that the distributor does not allow block feeds of
this series.
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 65
READING&WRITING
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
The content of this series is based on careful selection of the best available books for children. The rationale is straightforward: Children become
involved in good literature by reading books with intrinsic value and interest. The programs are great motivators for children to obtain the books.
READING RAINBOW SCHEDULE
FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2006-2007
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULES
READING&WRITING
Mondays-Fridays, July 31 - May 18 at 11:30/10:30 am CT
7/31/06
8/1/06
8/2/06
8/3/06
8/4/06
8/7/06
8/8/06
8/9/06
8/10/06
8/11/06
8/14/06
8/15/06
8/16/06
8/17/06
8/18/06
8/21/06
8/22/06
8/23/06
8/24/06
8/25/06
8/28/06
8/29/06
8/30/06
8/31/06
9/1/06
9/4/06
9/5/06
9/6/06
9/7/06
9/8/06
9/11/06
9/12/06
9/13/06
9/14/06
9/15/06
9/18/06
9/19/06
9/20/06
9/21/06
9/22/06
9/25/06
9/26/06
9/27/06
9/28/06
9/29/06
10/2/06
10/3/06
10/4/06
10/5/06
10/6/06
10/9/06
10/10/06
10/11/06
10/12/06
10/13/06
10/16/06
10/17/06
10/18/06
10/19/06
10/20/06
10/23/06
409
The Paper Crane
609
Bored — Nothing to Do!
610
Sports Pages
705
Sunken Treasure
703
The Bicycle Man
1008
Summer
405
Abiyoyo
1208
Hip Cat
905
Berlioz the Bear
310
Mama Don't Allow
810
Sophie and Lou
510
Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters
1001
Follow the Drinking Gourd
1112
Uncle Jed's Barbershop
1503
Mr. George Baker
1106
The Wonderful Towers of Watts
709
Galimoto
1010
Appelemando's Dreams
807
The Wall
1114
Owen
1406
Badger's Parting Gift
102
Miss Nelson is Back
103
Bea and Mr. Jones
104
Bringing the Rain to Kapiti Plain
105
Louis the Fish
106
Digging Up Dinosaurs
107
Liang and the Magic Paintbrush
109
Three Days on a River in a Red Canoe
110
The Gift of the Sacred Dog
609
Bored — Nothing to Do!
1408
Max
1409
Enemy Pie
1410
Our Big Home: An Earth Poem
1501
Visiting Day
1502
Unique Monique
1005
June 29, 1999
1503
Mr. George Baker
1405
My America: A Poetry Atlas of the United States
1209
Regina's Big Mistake
1114
Owen
1104
My Shadow
902
The Piggy in the Puddle
807
The Wall
610
Sports Pages
708
The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush
111
Gregory the Terrible Eater
203
Ox-Cart Man
404
Germs Make Me Sick!
(No Broadcast due to special programming)
402
The Milk Makers
309
Watch the Stars Come Out
1504
Beegu
1505
Two Old Potatoes and Me
1407
The Tin Forest
1301
Math Cure
1109
The Sign Painter's Dream
1110
Archibald Frisby
1007
Borreguita and the Coyote
1303
Saturday Sancocho
1402
Pet Stories: You Don't Have to Walk
1004
And Still the Turtle Watched
66 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
10/24/06
10/25/06
10/26/06
10/27/06
10/30/06
10/31/06
11/1/06
11/2/06
11/3/06
1003
1002
808
702
604
608
507
1403
1210
11/6/06
11/7/06
11/8/06
11/9/06
11/10/06
11/13/06
11/14/06
11/15/06
11/16/07
11/17/06
11/20/06
11/21/06
11/22/06
11/23/06
11/24/06
11/27/06
11/28/06
11/29/06
11/30/06
12/1/06
12/4/06
12/5/06
12/6/06
12/7/06
12/8/06
12/11/06
12/12/06
12/13/06
12/14/06
12/15/06
1108
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
1504
1505
1501
1502
1503
1204
905
904
903
809
602
607
510
415
1208
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
1408
1409
1410
1401
12/18/06
12/19/06
12/20/06
12/21/06
12/22/06
12/25/06
12/26/06
12/27/06
12/28/06
12/29/06
1/1/07
1/2/07
1/3/07
1/4/07
1/5/07
1/8/07
1/9/07
1/10/07
1/11/07
1/12/07
1/15/07
1/16/07
1/17/07
1/18/07
1/19/07
1/22/07
1/23/07
1/24/07
1/25/07
1201
1104
1006
902
810
601
805
606
509
414
412
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
1504
1505
1501
1502
1503
1407
1211
1109
1206
1001
1009
1003
807
Is This a House for Hermit Crab?
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie
Sam the Sea Cow
Jack, the Seal and the Sea
Ludlow Laughs
Tooth-Gnasher Superflash
Duncan and Dolores
Lemonade For Sale
Giving Thanks: A Native American Good
Morning Message
Alejandro's Gift
The Biggest Test
I Lost My Tooth in Africa
Boxes For Katje
Game Day
Show Way
Beegu
Two Old Potatoes and Me
Visiting Day
Unique Monique
Mr. George Baker
Hotel Animal
Berlioz the Bear
Through Moon and Stars and Night Skies
Seashore Surprises
Rechenka's Eggs
Stay Away From the Junkyard!
Desert Giant: The World of the Saguaro Cactus
Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters
My Little Island
Hip Cat
The Biggest Test
I Lost My Tooth in Africa
Boxes for Katje
Game Day
Show Way
Max
Enemy Pie
Our Big Home: An Earth Poem
The Shaman's Apprentice: A Tale of the
Amazon Rain Forest
How Much is a Million?
My Shadow
Nosey Mrs. Rat
The Piggy in the Puddle
Sophie and Lou
Humphrey the Lost Whale: A True Story
Snowy Day: Stories and Poems
Dive to the Coral Reef
Mummies Made in Egypt
Meanwhile Back to the Ranch
Rumpelstiltskin
The Biggest Test
I Lost My Tooth in Africa
Boxes for Katje
Game Day
Show Way
Beegu
Two Old Potatoes and Me
Visiting Day
Unique Monique
Mr. George Baker
The Tin Forest
The Carousel
The Sign Painter's Dream
Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin
Follow the Drinking Gourd
Once There Was a Tree
Is This a House for Hermit Crab?
The Wall
READING RAINBOW SCHEDULE FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2006-2007 (continued)
805
708
605
1/31/07
2/1/07
2/2/07
2/5/07
2/6/07
2/7/07
2/8/07
2/9/07
2/12/07
2/13/07
2/14/07
2/15/07
2/16/07
411
410
801
808
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
1504
1505
1403
1210
2/19/07
2/20/07
2/21/07
2/22/07
2/23/07
2/26/07
2/27/07
2/28/07
3/1/07
3/2/07
3/5/07
3/6/07
3/7/07
3/8/07
3/9/07
3/12/07
3/13/07
3/14/07
3/15/07
3/16/07
3/19/07
3/20/07
3/21/07
1203
1107
405
1101
907
106
704
604
603
609
409
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
1408
1409
1410
1501
1502
1503
1401
3/22/07
3/23/07
3/26/07
3/27/07
1209
1114
1102
1005
Snowy Day: Stories and Poems
The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush
Dinosaur Bob and His Adventures
With the Family Lazardo
A Three Hat Day
The Runaway Duck
Opt: An Illusionary Tale
Sam the Sea Cow
The Biggest Test
I Lost My Tooth in Africa
Boxes for Katje
Game Day
Show Way
Beegu
Two Old Potatoes and Me
Lemonade For Sale
Giving Thanks: A Native American Good
Morning Message
Bread Is for Eating
Martha Speaks
Abiyoyo
The Lotus Seed
The Furry News: How to Make a Newspaper
Digging Up Dinosaurs
Florence and Eric Take the Cake
Ludlow Laughs
Little Nino's Pizzeria
Bored — Nothing to Do!
The Paper Crane
The Biggest Test
I Lost My Tooth in Africa
Boxes for Katje
Game Day
Show Way
Max
Enemy Pie
Our Big Home: An Earth Poem
Visiting Day
Unique Monique
Mr. George Baker
The Shaman's Apprentice: A Tale of the
Amazon Rain Forest
Regina's Big Mistake
Owen
Hail to Mail
June 29, 1999
710
809
705
602
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
1504
1505
1407
1211
1202
1110
1007
1305
1004
1010
810
610
601
608
510
408
702
708
607
407
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
TBA
1504
1505
1501
1502
Fox on the Job
Rechenka's Eggs
Sunken Treasure
Stay Away From the Junkyard!
The Biggest Test
I Lost My Tooth in Africa
Boxes for Katje
Game Day
Show Way
Beegu
Two Old Potatoes and Me
The Tin Forest
The Carousel
Always My Dad
Archibald Frisby
Borreguita and the Coyote
Worksong
And Still the Turtle Watched
Applemando's Dreams
Sophie and Lou
Sports Pages
Humphrey the Lost Whale: A True Story
Tooth-Gnasher Superflash
Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters
Chickens Aren't the Only Ones
Jack, The Seal and the Sea
The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush
Desert Giant: The World of the Saguaro Cactus
Keep the Lights Burning, Abbie
The Biggest Test
I Lost My Tooth in Africa
Boxes for Katje
Game Day
Show Way
Beegu
Two Old Potatoes and Me
Visiting Day
Unique Monique
Teletales
Motivational reading of folk and fairy tales
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary
15 minutes
School year
1-800-457-4509 or www.ait.net
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
Complementing the primary-level language arts curriculum, this
series shows how folk and fairy tales promote active listening, sharpen
comprehension skills, and extend vocabulary. Their simple, direct
plots provide superb examples of structure, organization, and chronological sequencing and can be used to help students develop logic
skills. The stories can be a springboard for teaching the analysis skills
such as thinking critically, interpreting information, and predicting
results. Teletales also will enhance the various social studies, as distant
lands and distant times are brought near.
continued on next page
Photo: Rick McComb
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 67
READING&WRITING
1/26/07
1/29/07
1/30/07
3/28/07
3/29/07
3/30/07
4/2/07
4/3/07
4/4/07
4/5/07
4/6/07
4/9/07
4/10/07
4/11/07
4/12/07
4/13/07
4/16/07
4/17/07
4/18/07
4/19/07
4/20/07
4/23/07
4/24/07
4/25/07
4/26/07
4/27/07
4/30/07
5/1/07
5/2/07
5/3/07
5/4/07
5/7/07
5/8/07
5/9/07
5/10/07
5/11/07
5/14/07
5/15/07
5/16/07
5/17/07
5/18/07
READING&WRITING
Photo: Rick McComb
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Charmed Ring (India) — Kind-hearted Sindhu is repaid in the
end for the friendship he bestows on a cat, a dog, and a snake.
2. The Willow Tree (England/China) — Li-Ho defies her greedy father
and elopes with the gardener’s son rather than submit to a prearranged marriage with the wealthy prince.
3. Stan Bolovan (Romania) — To make enough money to feed his hundred children, Stan takes a job as a dragonslayer—but finds it more
profitable to outsmart the dragon.
4. Hansel and Gretel (Germany) — Two hungry, helpless children use
their wits to defeat a nearsighted witch.
5. Soongoora and Simba (Africa) — A clever rabbit’s craving for honey
repeatedly gets him into trouble with a lion.
6. The Bargain (Ireland) — When a crafty old farmer tricks Myles into
working for nothing, a “little green man” helps Myles’ brother Donal
turn the tables.
7. The Chenoo (Native American) — Team warns his wife Mimku never
to touch a leather pouch in their wigwam. When their little son Wasis
shoots an arrow into the pouch, a terrible creature is released—a
Chenoo.
8. Molly O’Mally (Wales/England) — Spunky, daring Molly takes on the
task of retrieving several precious items a cruel giant has stolen from
her king.
9. Long Nose (Germany) — Jem endures laughter and derision until he
discovers how to undo the witch’s spell that made his nose grow and
his neck disappear.
10. Bianchinetta (Italy) — Bianchinetta is pushed into the sea by the evil
Shamina, who then masquerades as Bianchinetta to gain entrance to
the prince’s palace.
68 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
11. The Sorcerer’s Boy (Russia) — A sorcerer who misrepresents himself
as a teacher turns Peter into a toad, a dove, and a horse.
12. Half Chick/The Squire’s Bride (Spain/Norway) — In one tale, selfishness and impatience bring a strange chicken to an ignominious end
atop the tallest tower in Madrid. In the other, a proud and stubborn
Norwegian squire gets a surprise on his wedding day when his
bride-to-be turns out to be a horse.
13. Caliph Stork (Iraq) — The caliph of Baghdad finds himself trapped
in the body of a stork, and only the evil magician with designs on
his throne knows the magic word that will restore him to his human
form.
14. Fiddy Wow Wow (Denmark) — Ordinary people, including a schoolteacher, are reduced to speaking nonsense after touching a magic
stone.
15. Paka’a (Hawaii) — Paka’a invents the sailing canoe and wins power
over the winds of the ocean. How he uses his power affects everyone, especially the king.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, October 3 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Progams 1-15; 3 hours, 45 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, March 6 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Progams 1-15; 3 hours, 45 minutes)
Cover-to-Cover C
Reading/language arts
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary-4
15 minutes
School year
Call ITS at 703-476-4468
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
Cover-to-Cover is a reading motivation series designed for today’s
3rd- and 4th-grade students. Each program gives a “taste” of a book
through two readings in which scenes and characters are colorfully
illustrated by artists. A cliffhanger ending piques students’ interest
and promotes reading.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Ralph S. Mouse, by Beverly Cleary
2. Junie B. Jones and Some Sneaky Peeky Spying/Junie B. Jones and A
Little Monkey Business, by Barbara Park
3. The Year of the Panda, by Miriam Schlein/Dolphin Adventure: A True
Story, by Wayne Grover
4. A Lion To Guard Us, by Clyde Robert Bulla
5. The Big Wave, by Pearl Buck
6. Pretty Polly, by Dick King-Smith
7. Which Way Freedom? by Joyce Hansen
8. The Boys Start the War, The Girls Get Even,
by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
9. Yang the Youngest and His Terrible Ear, by Lensey Namioka
10. The Animal, the Vegetable, and John D. Jones, by Betsy Byars
11. Shape-Changer, by Bill Brittain
12. A Brown Bird Singing, by Frances Wosmek
13. Goblins in the Castle, by Bruce Coville
14. The War with Grandpa, by Robert Kimmel Smith/All About Sam,
by Lois Lowry
15. Mayfield Crossing, by Vaunda Michequx Nelson
16. Guests, by Michael Dorris
told by Anndrena Belcher (A) Oct 24, (B) Mar 21
2. The Two Gals — a story about a good sister and a bad sister, told by
Anndrena Belcher (A) Oct 25, (B) Mar 23
3. The Buzzard and the Monkey — an African-American tale, told by
John O’Neal, in which the buzzard learns a lesson (A) Oct 27,
(B) Mar 26
4. The Possum and the Snake — a story about character and deception,
told by John O’Neal (A) Oct 30, (B) Mar 27
5. Jack and the Giants
— a “Jack tale” which pits Jack against four
giants, told by Rich Kirby and Tom Bledsoe (A) Nov 1, (B) Mar 28
6. Soap/Cat and Rat — A forgetful little boy and how forgetfulness gets
him into trouble, and how the rat lost his tail and got it back again,
told by Tom Bledsoe and Rich Kirby (A) Nov 3, (B) Mar 30
7. Little Deer and Mother Earth — a Cherokee tale with an environmental message, told by Marilou Awiakta (A) Nov 6, (B) Apr 2
8. Rising Fawn and the Fire Mystery
— a tale from Cherokee history
told by Marilou Awiakta (A) Nov 7, (B) Apr 3
9. The Parable of the Eagle — Mama Yaa’s version of the African fable
about how the eagle learned to fly (A) Nov 8, (B) Apr 4
10. Anansi’s Rescue from the River
— a story about Anansi, the trickster hero of Ashanti Land on the west coast of Africa, told by Mama
Yaa (A) Nov 13, (B) Apr 13
11. Wicked John — the story of a really mean man, told by Tom Bledsoe,
Rich Kirby, and Joy D’Elia (A) Nov 14, (B) Apr 16
12. Jack and the Magic Mill — a cautionary tale about greed, told by
Tom Bledsoe, Rich Kirby, and Joy D’Elia (A) Nov 15, (B) Apr 17
13. Ashpet — a mountain version of the Cinderella story, told by
Anndrena Belcher (A) Nov 17, (B) Apr 18
14. Mutsmag — the story of a humble gift and a brave little girl, told by
Anndrena Belcher (A) Dec 1, (B) Apr 20
15. Balaam Foster’s Fiddle/The Banjo and the Loom — a tale about a pact
with the devil, plus a poem, told by Anndrena Belcher
(A) Dec 4, (B) Apr 23
16. Passing It On — documentary with Anndrena Belcher
(A) Dec 5, (B) Apr 24
Tuesday, August 15 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, November 28 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, January 16 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, May 1 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Telling Tales K C
Appalachian, African, and Native American
stories told by master storytellers
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Fridays, October 24-December 5
at 10:45/9:45 am CT (Some interruptions for special programs.)
Weekly broadcast (B):
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, March 21-April 24 at
10:45/9:45 am CT (Some interruptions for special programs.)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, October 3 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, December 5 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, March 6 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed IV:
Tuesday, May 8 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Primary-8
15 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.24
This KET-produced series features Appalachian, African-American,
and Native American stories told by master storytellers.
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 69
READING&WRITING
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULES
Weekly broadcast (A):
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/AIR DATES
1. Hardy Hard Head
— a “Jack tale” in which Jack bets with a witch,
Beyond the Page C
4.
Capture students' imagination with live author
and illustrator chats from award-winning books
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teacher Materials:
3-5
18 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
Beyond the Page explores award-winning children’s literature in a multimedia environment to spark children’s imaginations. This series lets
students explore books from the inside out by including chats with the
authors and illustrators!
When you go Beyond the Page, you’ll find it easy to:
• Make reading enjoyable by bringing the books to life.
• Boost comprehension and reading confidence
• Spark interest in currciulum-related topics, as well as
multicultural lessons
Heo--A Chinese-American family is about to celebrate baby Henry's
First Moon, his one-month birthday. Big sister Jenny helps her
grandmother with the preparations--and helps us appreciate a joyous cultural tradition. Join both the author and the illustrator of this
award-winning book for a revealing chat, then take a field trip to
Chinatown.
2. I Love Saturdays y domingos — by Alma Flor Ada, illustrated by
Elivia Savadier--Her paternal grandaprents are of European descent;
her maternal abuelito y abuelita (grandfather and grandmother) are
Mexican-American. One very lucky little girl enjoys the love of both
sets of grandparents, each of whom provides a deep connection to
their rich cultural heritage. Sit in on an interview with renowned
educator and author Alma Flor Ada, Director of the Center for
Multicultural Literature, and enjoy a field trip featuring dynamic
grandparents.
3 Under the Lemon Moon — by Edith Hope Fine, illustrated by Rene'
King Moreno --Who is the night man? Why has he taken Rosalinda's
beautiful lemons and left her beloved tree to suffer? A young girl in
the rural Mexican countryside finds a way to save her ailing arbolita
(little tree)--and offers hope and redemption to someone in need.
Meet the author of this compassionate, award-winning book, then
learn about the rewards of helping others with a field trip about volunteering.
It's a special day when a little girl and her father go to visit the house
where the great poet Langston Hughes lived--especially when the little
girl is a poet herself! Take a field trip to Harlem and enjoy a chat with
the author and illustrator of this rhythmic tale, which serves as a wonderful introduction to the work and world of an American cultural hero
and central figure of the Harlem Renaissance.
5 Float Like a Butterfly — by Ntozake Shange, illustrated by Edel
Rodriguez--Trace the remarkable life journey of world-famous icon
and boxing champion Muhammad Ali. Integrate Ali's story into language arts lessons with an interview with Obie award-winning author
Ntozake Shange and an inspiring field trip.
6. Honk! — by Pamela Duncan Edwards, illustrated by Henry Cole--A
ballet-smitten swan named Mimi drives everyone crazy practicing
plies and grand jetes---until she finallly gets to perform on stage.
Appreciate the discipline of dance with a visit to a ballet studio and
explore the nature of collaboration through a chat with the author
and illustrator.
7. Freedom River — by Doreen Rappaport, illustrated by Bryan Collier-This ALA Notable Children's Book and Coretta Scott King illustrator
Honor Book tells the true story of ex-slave John Parker, who risked
his freedom and life to help others escape slavery. Integrate the
book into social studies lessons with a segment on the Underground
Railroad and enjoy a chat with the author and illustrator.
8. The Web Files — by Margie Palatini, illustrated by Richard Egielski--In
this deliciously tongue-in-cheek parody of TV's classic detective shows,
Ducktective Web, a feathered flatfoot, must quack the case of the purple
almost-pickled peppers. An interview with the author and a field trip
to meet a real detective extend the lesson.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 29 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 2 hours, 20 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, November 21 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 2 hours, 20 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, January 30 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 2 hours, 20 minutes)
Block Feed IV:
Tuesday, April 24 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 2 hours, 20 minutes)
Read On: Cover-to-Cover C
Motivational reading
Photo: Rick McComb
READING&WRITING
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Henry's First-Moon Birthday- by Lenore Look, illustrated by Yumi
Visiting Langston — by Willie Perdomo, illustrated by Bryan Collier--
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4-5
15 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
Read On: Cover-to-Cover is relevant to today’s 4th and 5th graders while
building on the style and charm of the past Cover-to-Cover series. Like
those series, Read On uses “cliffhangers,” music, and narration to bring
stories to life. However, there is a new emphasis on multicultural stories,
computer graphics, and other contemporary production techniques.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. McMummy, by Betsy Byars — Mozie promises to take care of Dr.
Orloff’s greenhouse for the summer, but one of the plants terrifies
Mozie.
2. Number the Stars, by Lois Lowry — A Danish Christian family saves
a Danish Jewish family from the Nazis in 1943.
70 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 29 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, November 28 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, January 30 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed IV:
Tuesday, May 1 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
From the Brothers Grimm
Motivational reading
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-8
20 minutes
(Programs 17-20 are 25 minutes each)
School year
1-800-804-7466 or go to Web site
See order form, page 125
www.davenportfilms.com
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.24, 5.1
American versions of classic folktales are featured in the live-action
film adaptations of From the Brothers Grimm. Each program has a
different historic American setting chosen from authentic locations
around the Virginia countryside. The series stimulates interest and
understanding of folk literature and presents the classic folktale in an
accessible format.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Frog King or Faithful Henry — a story about the importance
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
of valuing others, as well as the awkwardness of growing up.
Suggested curriculum theme: using point of view.
Bearskin (or The Man Who Didn’t Wash for 7 Years) — a story about
endurance, force of character in adversity, and spiritual transformation through suffering. Suggested curriculum theme: the use of
visual symbols in literature.
Hansel and Gretel: Appalachian Version — focuses on how children’s
inner resources and mutual loyalty can help them deal with their
fears. Suggested curriculum theme: the use of plot to bring about
character development.
Rapunzel, Rapunzel — a story, set around the turn of the century,
about a young girl’s struggle with independence. Suggested curriculum theme: the use of fantasy in literature.
Bristlelip — an adaptation of the Grimm’s tale called “King
Thrushbeard,” this is a comical tale focusing on the importance of
empathy and kindness. Suggested curriculum theme: how characters
in a story affect one another.
The Goose Girl — a story, set in the late 17th century, about the
endurance and the ultimate triumph of virtue through honorable
means. Suggested curriculum theme: how characters use events to
make important choices.
Jack and the Dentist’s Daughter, Part I — an American folktale adapted
from a tale in an Appalachian story cycle; a clever hero wins his true love
by using his head. Suggested curriculum theme: using identification with
a story’s main character to address life issues.
8. Jack and the Dentist’s Daughter, Part II
9. Soldier Jack, Part I — an adaptation of an American “Jack tale” set
in rural America after World War II. Jack receives two magical gifts:
a sack that can catch anything and a jar that can show whether a sick
person will die or get well. Suggested curriculum theme: character
traits; the courage to live or die. (Note: “Soldier Jack” has some scary
scenes. Teacher discretion is advised with students under 8 years old.)
10. Soldier Jack, Part II
11. Ashpet, Part I — an American version of the Cinderella story, set in
the South shortly after World War II. Suggested curriculum theme:
magic and fantasy in the folktale.
12. Ashpet, Part II
13. Ashpet, Part III
14. Mutzmag, Part I — an Appalachian variant of “Molly Whuppy,”
brought to the U.S. by Scottish immigrants. Mutzmag and her sisters
escape from a witch and a dumb but brutal giant. Suggested curriculum themes: heroes and heroines; past and present. (Note: “Mutzmag”
is recommended only for middle and secondary students.)
15. Mutzmag, Part II
16. Mutzmag, Part III
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 71
READING&WRITING
3. Strider, by Beverly Cleary — Leigh and Barry find an abandoned
dog, Strider, and agree to joint custody, but Leigh wants Strider all to
himself.
4. Sing Down the Moon, by Scott O’Dell — A Navajo girl survives slavery and a forced march from her home in Arizona to New Mexico in
1863.
5. Me, Mop, and the Moondance Kid, by Walter Dean Myers —The
Dominican Academy Orphanage in urban New Jersey turns out good
kids who play terrible ball—until Sister Carmelita gets involved.
6. A Jar of Dreams, by Yoshiko Uchida — Rinko Tsujimura learns firsthand the sting of prejudice when her family’s new home laundry
business threatens the owner of the biggest established laundry in
Berkeley, CA.
7. The Knights of the Kitchen Table/The Not-So-Jolly Roger, by Jon
Scieszka — The Knights of the Kitchen Table introduces three adventurous boys who travel back in time to encounter wizards, giants,
and dragons in King Arthur’s court. In The Not-So-Jolly Roger, the
boys meet the most evil of all pirates—Blackbeard.
8. Teacher’s Pet/Attaboy, Sam — In Johanna Hurwitz’s Teacher’s Pet,
Cricket can’t understand why her teacher hasn’t discovered her brilliance, outstanding leadership qualities, and natural gift for practically
everything. Attaboy, Sam by Lois Lowry tells how 4-year-old Sam
sets out to make perfume for his mother with all her favorite smells:
chicken soup and one of his father’s pipes, for starters.
9. El Guero, by Elizabeth Borton de Trevi — In 1875, Porfirio, called El
Guero or the Blond One, must travel the length of Baja California to
tell the authorities that corrupt Mexican soldiers have imprisoned his
father.
10. On the Banks of Plum Creek, by Laura Ingalls Wilder — The Ingalls
family moves into an underground sod house on the banks of Plum
Creek on the Minnesota prairie.
11. Chevrolet Saturdays, by Candy Dawson Boyd — Joey, an African
American, refuses to accept his stepfather and to let go of his natural
father, even though his parents are divorced. This contemporary
story is set in California.
12. The Haymeadow/Hatchet, by Gary Paulsen — In The Haymeadow,
John is sent alone to be shepherd to 6,000 sheep for the summer.
He and the sheep share the haymeadow with rattlesnakes, coyotes,
bears, and spectacular storms. In Hatchet, Brian is flying up to
Canada to visit his father when the pilot of the small plane dies at
the controls.
13. Daphne’s Book, by Mary Downing Hahn — Daphne is missing a lot
of school because she is afraid to leave her baby sister at home alone
with their guardian/grandmother, who is deteriorating mentally.
14. Dragonwings, by Laurence Yep — In 1909, six years after the Wright
brothers’ triumphant first flight, the feat was repeated by a Chinese
American with his airplane, Dragonwings, in Oakland, CA.
15. Shades of Gray, by Carolyn Reeder — Will loses his whole family
in the Civil War and hates the thought of having to go live with an
uncle who refused to fight in the war.
17. Willa: An American Snow White, Part I — a version of the ancient
“Snow White” story set in 1915 America. The jealous queen is Regina
Worthington, an aging beauty whose stage career has soured. Snow
White is her beautiful and talented stepchild, Willa. The cottage of
the seven dwarves has been changed into a traveling medicine show
run by a failed Shakespearean actor and his two oddball companions.
They sell “Chief Tonka’s Elixir of Life,” a highly alcoholic concoction
that is supposed to reverse aging—among other reputed cures. (Note:
“Willa” is recommended for the middle school grades.)
18. Willa: An American Snow White, Part II
19. Willa: An American Snow White, Part III
20. Willa: An American Snow White, Part IV
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, September 12 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours, 53
minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 13-20;
3 hours, 5 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, February 13 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours,
53 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 13-20;
3 hours, 5 minutes)
More Books from Cover-to-Cover C
Blending dramatic narration, artwork, sound
effects, and music to bring books to life
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
5-6
15 minutes
School year
1-703-476-4468
READING&WRITING
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4
Host John Robbins introduces each book (one or two per program),
and the narration takes viewers up to a crucial point in the story.
Students must read the book to learn the ending. The goals are to
introduce 5th and 6th graders to a variety of exciting and well-written
books, stimulate the desire to read, broaden each student’s reading
experience, expand reading abilities, and instill the simple enjoyment
of leisure reading.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Wish Giver, by Bill Brittain — genre: fantasy; reading level: inter2.
3.
4.
5.
mediate. Three characters are profoundly affected by their wishing
experiences when their wishes are granted.
Summer Birds, by Penelope Farmer — genre: fantasy; reading level:
difficult. A strange new boy in town teaches the other children how
to fly; one boy returns to an island with him at the end of the summer to live the life of a bird.
Won’t Know Till I Get There, by Walter Dean Myers — genre: contemporary realism; reading level: intermediate/difficult. When his
parents announce that they are going to adopt a child, 14-year-old
Stephen Perry is calm about it until he learns that the child is 13year-old Earl Goins, who has a record that includes armed robbery.
The Agony of Alice, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor — genre: contemporary realism; reading level: easy/intermediate. While packing
her things for her family’s move to a new house, 11-year-old Alice
McKinley thinks of all the embarrassing incidents in her past.
Stone Fox, by John Reynolds Gardiner — genre: modern legend;
reading level: easy. Ten-year-old Willy enters a dogsled race against
Stone Fox, an Indian. The money he hopes to win will help save his
grandfather’s farm.
72 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
6. Mama’s Going To Buy You a Mockingbird, by Jean Little — genre:
contemporary realism; reading level: intermediate. Jeremy deals
with the death of his father and befriends Tess, an unpopular girl at
school.
7. The Ghost Squad Breaks Through/Who Kidnapped the Sheriff? —
E.W. Hildick’s The Ghost Squad Breaks Through is a detective story
for intermediate reading levels in which ghosts develop a new communication device and plan to use it to foil crimes and solve mysteries. Who Kidnapped the Sheriff? by Larry Callen is a seriocomic collection of self-contained but connected pieces about Patrick O’Leary
and Violet Deever and their encounters one summer with the citizens
of Tickfaw. Reading level: easy/intermediate.
8. The Castle in the Attic, by Elizabeth Winthrop — genre: fantasy; reading level: intermediate. In this tale of castles, knights, tokens, evil
spells, and dragons, the characters are all made very small by the
power of a magic token.
9. Baby-Sitting Is a Dangerous Job, by Willo Davis Roberts — genre:
suspense; reading level: intermediate. Sitter Darcy Stevens and the
three children she is taking care of are kidnapped and held in a rundown old house.
10. Come Sing Jimmy Jo, by Katherine Paterson — genre: contemporary
regionalism; reading level: intermediate. Shy 11-year-old James sings
every Friday night on a country music television show, but nearly
quits singing when his parents record a song written to be sung by
James.
11. The Not-Just-Anybody Family, by Betsy Byars — genre: eccentricism,
contemporary and regional; reading level: easy/intermediate. The
Blossom children break into jail to see Pap, their grandfather. The
children’s mother learns of her family’s antics while in Texas, where
she has a job in a rodeo, and returns home to take care of things.
12. Tom’s Midnight Garden, by Philippa Pearce — genre: fantasy; reading
level: intermediate. At his Uncle Alan and Aunt Gwen’s old house,
Tom discovers a secret garden, which he visits every night. No matter how much time he spends in the garden visiting his playmate
Hatty, ordinary clocks measure none of it.
13. Midnight Is a Place, by Joan Aiken — genre: Dickensian adventure;
reading level: difficult. After a fire kills his guardian and destroys
Midnight Court, the run-down old mansion where 13-year-old Lucas
is living, he and his friend Anna Marie must fend for themselves in
the streets of the dreary city of Blastburn.
14. The Root Cellar, by Janet Lunn — genre: time travel; reading level:
intermediate. Having been sent to live on a farm belonging to her
aunt and uncle, Rose Larkin experiences time travel when she enters
a root cellar and, upon coming back out, finds herself living in 1862
amid the Civil War.
15. The Whipping Boy, by Sid Fleishman — genre: humor; reading level:
intermediate. Prince Brat, also known as Prince Horace, is a royal
mischief maker who ties the lords’ and ladies’ wigs to their chairs
and hog-greases the knights’ saddles. He also refuses to learn to
read and write. For his pranks and failures he is punished — via his
whippy boy, Jemmy.
16. The Dark Is Rising, by Susan Cooper — genre: fantasy; reading level:
difficult. Eleven-year-old Will Stanton is transported to a strange
time and place where he is told that because he was born one of the
Old Ones, he must devote himself to the conflict between the forces
of Light and Dark. His quest is to find and guard the six great Signs
of the Light, which will awaken one of the forces to be used against
the Dark.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 22 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, December 5 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, January 23 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed IV:
Tuesday, May 8 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
An Electronic Conversation
with George Ella Lyon K C
James Still’s River of Earth K C
Questions and answers about writing
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
5-12
51 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.4, 2.24
Kentuckian George Ella Lyon, author of more than 20 books for
children and adults, answers questions from students in this KET
production, which originally aired live. Topics include where story
ideas come from, how being a Kentuckian influences her writing, writing strategies, techniques for crafting dialogue, and the relationship
between words and pictures in children’s picture books.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, August 15 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Tuesday, January 16 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
The Short Story
Literary appreciation of varied writers
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
7-12
15 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.24
PROGRAM TITLES
1. “The Yellow Wallpaper,” by Charlotte Gilman
2. “The Lull,” by Saki
3. “Dave’s Necklace,” by Charles W. Chesnutt
4. “The Village Singer,” by Mary Wilkins Freeman
5 “The Birthmark,” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
6. “The Tell-Tale Heart,” by Edgar Allan Poe
7. “Mrs. Ripley’s Trip,” by Hamlin Garland
8. “The Real Thing,” by Henry James
9. “The Boarded Window,” by Ambrose Bierce
10. “The Dilettante,” by Edith Wharton
11. “Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen,” by O. Henry
12. “The Bet,” by Anton Chekhov
13. “The Two Little Soldiers,” by Guy de Maupassant
14. “Diary of Adam and Eve,” by Mark Twain
15. “Tennessee’s Partner,” by Bret Harte
16. “The Queen of Spades,” by Alexander Pushkin
7-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.24
James Still’s River of Earth is a portrait of one of Kentucky’s most distinguished and honored writers as well as an introduction to his
work; it also gives students insight into the history and culture of the
Appalachian region from which that work springs. Still’s publishing
career spans 70 years and includes novels such as River of Earth, story
collections such as Pattern of a Man, children’s books, collections of
mountain lore and sayings, poetry collections such as The Wolfpen Poems,
and, most recently, The Wolfpen Notebooks: A Record of Appalachian Life.
Through interviews with Still and people who knew him—including
scholars, friends, and relatives —this KET production highlights the
uniqueness of the man and the importance of his vision. The program
also includes archival photographs; reminiscences; and readings from
Still’s poetry, stories, and novels.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, September 5 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Tuesday, February 6 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
[email protected]: James Still’s
Legacy “River of Earth” K C
A panel discusssion of the life and works of
James Still
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
9-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Download James Still's River of Earth
teacher's guide at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.11
Students, teachers, and writers come together to discuss the life and
works of a great Kentucky writer, James Still. They discuss the powerful influence Still and his book, River of Earth, has had on other writers.
The program also includes a documentary of Still’s life. This broadcast
will lend itself to reading and writing instruction. In the area of reading, it will encourage students to respond critically to and analyze
River of Earth In writing, it will provide students with models and
ideas for writing fictional narratives and poetry.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, September 5 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
Tuesday, February 6 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 1 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, January 2 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 73
READING&WRITING
Dramatized by professional actors and supported by striking costumes
and vivid sets, The Short Story introduces junior/senior high school
students to the best American writers and compares their works
with those of the best writers from other countries. Various themes
of humor, suspense, allegory, romance, reality, and morality portray
points of view born of the periods in which the stories were written.
Portrait of a Kentucky poet
Living by Words K C
Shakespeare Shorts C
A Celebration of 50 Years of Creative Writing at
the University of Kentucky
Excerpts of plays for classroom analysis
of characterization
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
9-12
90 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at website
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
www.ket.org/livingbywords
Videocassette:
See order form, pg. 125
9-12
20 minutes
School Year
1-800-228-4630
KY Academic Expectations: 1.3, 1.4, 2.24
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.4, 1.11, 2.24, 2.25, 2.26
Join five of Kentucky’s best-loved authors—Bobbie Ann Mason,
Wendell Berry, Gurney Norman, Ed McClanahan and James Baker
Hall—for a celebration of creative writing. This 90-minute special features readings the five writers gave in the fall of 2001 as part of the 50th
anniversary of the University of Kentucky’s Creative Writing Program.
Educational Use: Teachers will want to preview the program in
advance. It is divided into “chapters” which allows for easier use in
the classroom. Visit the Living by Words website at <www.ket.org/livingbywords> for additional information about all five writers, essays
on Kentucky’s literary tradition, and advice from the writers.
This program has been flagged because one poem has the word “s...”
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, August 1 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
Supported by clips from past television and film versions, leading
television actors discuss the motivation of major characters in chosen
scenes from five plays. A full performance of each scene introduces
viewers to character motivation, key lines, and themes such as the
supernatural, persuasion, kingship, guilt, and insanity.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Romeo and Juliet
2. Julius Caesar
3. A Midsummer Night’s Dream
4. Twelfth Night
5. Macbeth (the character of Lady Macbeth, projected 50 years into the future)
6. Macbeth
7. To Kill the King — Playing Macbeth
8. The Supernatural — Playing Macbeth
9. Sanity and Insanity — Playing L.A.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, January 2 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
Tuesday, October 17 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-9; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, March 20 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-9; 3 hours)
Signature K C
READING&WRITING
Profiles of contemporary Southern writers
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
9-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.24, 2.36
This series humanizes and demystifies the creative process through
interviews with six mid-career writers and their colleagues, friends,
relatives, and critics; visits to places related to their work; and readings from that work. The teacher’s guide includes biographical information, brief bibliographies, and writing activities for students.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Bobbie Ann Mason — Mason visits her hometown of Mayfield and
Photo: Rick McComb
74 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
talks about its influence on her work. The program includes readings from the novels In Country and Feather Crowns as well as several
short stories, plus an excerpt from the Hollywood film of In Country.
2. Ed McClanahan — The author reads from his novel, The Natural Man,
and the autobiographical work, Famous People I Have Known, and
talks about influences from Charles Dickens to Ken Kesey. Visits to
boyhood haunts in Northern Kentucky prompt stories of the origins
of McClanahan’s ideas and characters.
3. Marsha Norman — Backstage scenes of the production of a Broadway
version of The Red Shoes frame the story of this Louisville playwright.
Norman and others read from ‘night, Mother, which won the Pulitzer,
and the Tony Award-winning musical The Secret Garden, for which
Norman wrote the script.
4. Lee Smith — Growing up in Grundy, Virginia, near the Kentucky
border, 9-year-old Lee Smith wrote—and sold, for a nickel apiece—
stories about her neighbors. Since 1968, she has published nine novels, including Fair and Tender Ladies and Oral History and two short
story collections. The sense of place infusing her novels reveals her
insight into and empathy for Appalachian people and culture.
5. George C. Wolfe — The New York theatre scene is literally and figuratively miles away from the segregated but nurturing African-American
community of 1960s Frankfort and the childhood of this Tony Awardwinning playwright/director. This program explores the juxtaposition
of past and present in the life and work of the man who wrote The
Colored Museum, wrote and directed Jelly’s Last Jam and Bring In ’Da
Noise, Bring In ’Da Funk, directed Angels in America, and led the New
York Shakespeare Festival/Joseph Papp Public Theater.
6. Barbara Kingsolver — Like the lead character in her first novel,
The Bean Trees, Kingsolver left her Kentucky hometown to settle in
Arizona, where she has written critically acclaimed novels, poetry,
short stories, and nonfiction. This portrait examines how Kingsolver’s
“wallflower” youth in Carlisle led to her “fierce wish to look inside
people” as well as an “aptitude for listening.”
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, October 10 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 5-6; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, March 13 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 5-6; 2 hours)
SignatureLIVE! K C
Conversations with writers
10-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/signaturelive
KY Academic Expectations: 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.24, 2.36
Young writers talk about writing with Ed McClanahan and Bobbie
Ann Mason in these two programs taped live before a KET studio
audience of high school and college students.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Elizabeth Bishop — From her childhood in Nova Scotia to her travels in
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Brazil, this program illustrates the geographic spirit of Bishop’s life and
works with scenes from her poems. Mark Strand, James Merrill, Octavio
Paz, and Mary McCarthy offer personal memories and commentary.
Emily Dickinson — Dramatic scenarios and New England landscapes
illuminate the passionate genius of Dickinson, whose poems represent a broad range of imaginative experience. Adrienne Rich, Joyce
Carol Oates, and Dickinson biographer Richard Sewall comment.
T.S. Eliot — Eliot’s life, influence, and poetry—from the bold
originality of “Prufrock” to the probing, meditative style of “Four
Quartets”—are explored with photos; archival footage; and discussion with friends, critics, and scholars.
Robert Frost — Frost’s image as elder statesman is contrasted with
his vigorous, poetic exploration of the darker forces of nature and the
human condition. Readings and interviews yield compelling insights
into his work.
Langston Hughes* — Hughes wrote of the beauty, dignity, and heritage of blacks in America. Interviews, music, and dance performances convey his work and influence, discussed by James Baldwin and
biographer Arnold Rampersad.
Walt Whitman* — Brilliant readings of Whitman’s poems demonstrate his American vision and style and vividly convey their poignancy and sheer power. Whitman’s sources, including Emerson, the
King James Bible, opera, and political oratory, are revealed.
* These programs have been flagged for content and/or language. KET strongly encourages teachers to preview these programs. Call KET’s Education
office at (800) 432-0951 for more information.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, October 24 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 5-6; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, March 27 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 5-6; 2 hours)
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Ed McClanahan
2. Bobbie Ann Mason
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, October 10 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Tuesday, March 13 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Voices & Visions
Modern American poetry
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
10-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
See below
See Also...
Making News Quiz — page 112
KY Academic Expectations: 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 2.24
2004/2005 M�Instructional Videos�
• 75
READING&WRITING
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
Six of America’s most memorable poets are portrayed in these programs, originally produced for a college-level telecourse. Nobel Prize
winner Joseph Brodsky, writer Mary McCarthy, the late author James
Baldwin, and poet Adrienne Rich join other notable writers, scholars,
and performers in exploring the work, lives, and times of individual
poets. Drama, dance, performances, interviews, archival footage, onlocation cinematography, and recordings of poets reading their own
works heighten appreciation and understanding of the literary texts.
SCIENCE
program titles
SCIENCE
Backyard Safari (Preschool-Primary) C
Up Close and Natural (Primary)
Zoo Zoo Zoo (Primary)
Take a Look I (Primary-4) C
Forest Family Forever (Primary-5)
Concepts in Nature (Primary-6)
The World of Nature II (Primary-6)
NASA SCIence Files (3-5) C
Natureworks (3-6) C
Gee Whiz in Agriculture (4-5) C
Real World Science (4-6)
Kentucky Afield for Kids (4-7)
North American Biomes (4-8) C
Kentucky’s Natural Heritage (4-12) K
Work, Energy and
the Simple Machine (5-8) C
Real Science! II (5-10) C
Real Science! III (5-10) C
Classic Animal Tracks (5-12) C
The Complete Cosmos (5-12) C
Explore More (6-8)
NASA Connect (6-8) C
Inside the Living Cell (6-9) C
Passport to Weather and Climate (6-9) C
Life in Marine and Freshwater
Environments (6-12) C
Planet Neighborhood (6-12) C
Inventing Flight (7-9) C
Lab Safety: The Accident at Jefferson
High (7-9)
The Biology Of... (7-12) C
Inside Our Human Body (7-12) C
Our Earth (7-12) C
NASA's Destination Tomorrow (9-12) C
Visualizing Cell Processes (9-12) C
Viruses on the Rise (10-12)
F
C
K
New or Revised for 2006/2007
Closed Captioned
KET Production
On KET EncycloMedia
Backyard Safari C
Biology in the world around us
Grade Levels:
Preschool-Primary
Length:
30 minutes
Taping Rights:
School year
Print Materials:
Go to http://gpn.unl.edu, then type "Backyard
Safari" in the Search box, Click on the top Backyard Safari link and
scroll toward the bottom of the page. The teacher's guide is available
for $10.00.
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.6
76 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
The primary goal of this science and natural history series is to excite
children about investigating the natural world by exposing them to
scientific practices in a positive way. The programs help children see
themselves as scientists who can go outside and learn directly from
the world around them.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. That's My Baby — Everyone begins as a baby, but not all babies need
the same care to become self-sufficient.
2. Birds — If you learn what to look and listen for, you begin to identify
the world's amazingly varied birds.
3. Butterflies — These colorful insects go through a process called
metamorphosis, from egg to caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly.
4. Clouds — By observing clouds, we can begin to understand the
weather.
5. Color — Like us, animals often use colors to send messages.
6. Dinner Tools — Each animal has the right kind of tools to gather and
eat its favorite foods.
7. Dinosaurs — We can learn what dinosaurs looked like and how they
lived by piecing together dinosaur fossils and by observing some
animals alive today.
8. Home-Sweet-Home — Animals make or find the materials to create
homes that are right for them.
9. Paper — Paper has a multitude of properties, forms, and uses.
Although most often made from wood, it can also be made from a
variety of other materials.
10. Rocks and Minerals* — Rocks and minerals come in a wide array of
colors, textures, sizes, and shapes.
11. Trees — A tree is a busy place. It’s a living, growing plant and a
home and habitat for many different animals.
12. Water — Water in its three different states is present everywhere on
Earth. All living things need water to survive.
13. Working Together — Some animals, such as bees, ants, and termites,
work together to maintain a viable, adaptable society.
*This program has been flagged for visual content. KET strongly encourages
teachers to preview this program. Call KET's Education office at (800)-432-0951
for more information.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, August 18 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, January 19 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Up Close and Natural
Natural science and ecology
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary
15 minutes
Unlimited
Call 1-800-457-4509, ext. 4 or visit
www.ait.net/catalog
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.2, 2.3, 2.6
Filmed at the Squam Lake Science Center in New Hampshire, this
series is designed to develop awareness and appreciation of the wonders of the natural world around. The series explores the center’s
lakes, fields, and forests; introduces the animals that live there; and
encourages students to sharpen their observation, description, and
clarification skills.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Introduction — seasonal changes; habitats; life cycle changes; differ-
BLOCK FEED
Block Feed I:
Friday, September 22 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-15; 3 hours, 25 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, February 23 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-15; 3 hours, 25 minutes)
Zoo Zoo Zoo
Animals in the zoo
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary
15 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.36
PROGRAM TITLES
1. All About Eyes
2. All About Feet
3. All About Ears
4. All About Tails
5. Animal Costumes
6. Animal Defenses
7. The Importance of Predators
8. Do Animals Talk?
9. How and What Animals Eat
10. How Animals Move
11. How Animals Help Each Other
12. Zoo Babies
13. Animal Houses
14. Animal Groups
15. Who Works at the Zoo?
16. Where Animals Live
SCIENCE
ences between living and non-living things
2. Animals Without Backbones — invertebrates such as earthworms,
crayfish, and spiders
3. Insects — insect body parts, life cycles
4. Fish — types of fish; scales, fins, and gills; how different fish behave
5. Toads, Frogs, and Salamanders — metamorphosis; the double life of
amphibians; how to tell a frog from a toad
6. Turtles — specialized bodies and behavior adapt turtles to diverse
habitats
7. Snakes — A garter snake and a seven-foot eastern indigo snake with
scutes, scales, a hinged jaw, and a one-piece skin
8. What Is a Bird? — what birds have in common and some special
adaptations
9. Mammals — a baby raccoon and two fawns introduce the distinctive
characteristics of mammals — even dolphins
10. Winter at Squam Lake — how animals such as the snowy owl, black
bear, and white-tailed deer adapt to winter’s cold
11. Life in the Winter Forest — winter homes in the many-layered forest
habitat
12. The Pond — new Spring life in the pond, including animals too small
to see with the naked eye
13. Marsh and Swamp — the food chain; the importance of the wetlands
as breeding places
14. In the Field — how a fox kit, a woodchuck, an opossum, a skunk, and
a kestrel survive
15. Outside Your Door — studying creatures close to home: millipedes,
centipedes, spiders, bees, sowbugs, spittle bugs
Zoo animals are presented to young viewers in programs built around
themes such as predators, ears, eyes, tails, feet, etc. Special features of
the animals, their behavior, and their relationships to one another are
emphasized. The photography helps young viewers see the close-up
details of each animal.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 17 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 20 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-16; 4 hours)
Take a Look I C
Plant and animal life, astronomy, geology, and
meteorology
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary-4
10 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.6
Take a Look I introduces students to Jeffrey, a city kid spending his
summer on a farm. Jeffrey’s guide in his science exploration is Kate, a
writer of science books for children. She takes viewers on visits to see
science in the real world and demonstrates a variety of experiments
teachers can perform with students in the classroom. The series’ use
extends beyond basic science into the areas of art, music, writing, and
research.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Plants — Kate shows Jeffrey the parts of a plant — the root, stem,
leaf, and flower — and their functions. We see what a plant needs to
live by visiting a greenhouse and by experimenting at home.
2. Flowers and Seeds — Jeffrey discovers why flowers have more to do
than just look pretty. We identify the different parts of flowers, then
watch as they bloom in spring.
3. Growing Things — We learn how some plants grow from rhizomes,
runners, and bulbs instead of seeds. We also see some unusual ways
seeds travel to new places and how to grow an avocado plant from a
seed.
4. Insects — At a beekeeping farm, Kate and Jeffrey see how honey is
made and identify the three kinds of bees in the hive. Children demonstrate how to catch and study insects.
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 77
SCIENCE
5. Eggs — Jeffrey learns about the parts of an egg by looking inside one,
and Kate’s egg chart shows what each part does. Experiments with
eggs show how strong they are, and how weak they can be!
6. Birds — Kate and Jeffrey examine the special shapes of birds’ beaks
and find out how they are suited to diet. We see how to make two
simple bird feeders.
7. Flight — Jeffrey learns more about birds’ bones, feathers, and wings
and how they are designed for flight. Also, we learn how to build a
high-flying kite.
8. Seasons — Visits to a marsh on a summer morning and a winter day
show Jeffrey and Kate the changes that the seasons bring.
9. Playground Science — Kate and Jeffrey mix fun and science while
learning about gravity and balance points at the playground. We see
how to make a mobile from string and straws.
10. Boats — Simple backyard experiments show why some objects float
and some sink. We look at many different types of boats and see how
to make a sailboat.
11. Mixtures — Kate shows Jeffrey the difference between suspension
and solution mixtures and ways to experiment with them at home. A
visit to a soda pop factory reveals how a popular solution is made.
12. Sun and Other Stars — Jeffrey learns about the sun and its relationship to other stars, as well as the sun’s effects on Earth. Kate explains
how a sundial works and how to build your own.
13. The Moon — Kate and Jeffrey study the four phases of the moon and
make a calendar to chart the moon’s progress. We watch astronauts
exploring the moon to learn more about its surface.
14. Rocks — Jeffrey identifies three types of rocks — sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous — and learns about their origins. We see how
pottery is made by visiting a china factory.
15. Crystals — Kate and Jeffrey examine the shapes of some common
crystals, then make their own sugar crystals. We trace the progress
of diamond crystals from the mine to their final forms in jewelry and
machines
16. Fossils — Jeffrey and Kate study fossils, some millions of years old,
to discover how they were made. We learn how the study of fossils
provides clues to Earth’s history
17. Wind — Kate makes a weather vane and shows Jeffrey how the wind
creates weather. She conducts some experiments to simulate the
movement of air currents, explaining how storms can start
18. Rain — Although rain dampens Jeffrey’s day, he finds out why the
water cycle is important for all living things
19. Waste — Jeffrey sees how garbage is part of the life cycle and plants
a “reverse garden” to watch how things decay. Kate stresses the
value of recycling
20. Energy — Kate uses moving toys to show Jeffrey the basic principles
of energy, the different forms it can take, and how it is found everywhere.
Forest Family Forever
Rainforests and how to save them
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.5, 2.6
Forest Family Forever tells the story of a thousand-year-old grandfather
tree who teaches his sapling grandson about the wonders of a rainforests and what kids can do to save them, in a blend of live footage and
animation.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Friday, December 1 at 8:25/7:25 am CT
Friday, May 4 at 8:25/7:25 am CT
Concepts in Nature
Wild animal behavior
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Friday, September 22 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-20; 3 hours, 20 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, February 23 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-20; 3 hours, 20 minutes)
This series looks at the behavior of wild animals as they interact with
their environments and one another. Viewers will learn that animals
have specific and unique living situations, diets, and actions.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Animal Predators and the Balance of Nature — types of predators;
2.
4.
Photo: Rick McComb
5.
6.
7.
8.
relationships among predator, prey, and environment; omnivores,
carnivores, and herbivores; factors that help maintain nature’s balance; and the role people play
Instincts in Animals — what instincts are; how instincts direct animals through their lives, from finding food to finding mates; and the
difference between instincts and learned behavior
Why Do Animals Love Geography? — why animals live where they
do and how they adapt to their environments; the difference between
physical and human geography; how humans affect animals including where and how to live.
Adapting to Changes in Nature — how animals cope with routine
and unpredictable changes, from the seasons to climate changes to
habitat destruction. Footage of deer, a great horned owl, rabbits, and
bears demonstrates why some animals seem to adapt better than
others.
Why Do Animals Look the Way They Do? — footage of elephants,
hummingbirds, barn owls, porcupines, and walking sticks showing
that even the most unusual features can have survival advantages
Animal Communication — animals' use of vocalization, body language, and even odors to exchange information about vital matters
such as food, danger, and reproduction
Animal Families — importance of families to success and survival of
animal species
Where Animals Live — animal shelters ranging from burrows and
caves to lodges and nests; ecosystems, habitats, and niches; footage of
animals at home
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
78 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Primary-6
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.6, 2.19
3.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Primary-5
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at:
www.rainforestheroes.com/kidscorner/
rainforests/fff_video.html
(The website offers a free video of this program
along with other supplemental materials.)
Friday, October 20 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 23 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours)
The World of Nature II
Animal habits and habitats;
environmental messages
Primary-6
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.5, 2.6
This series explores animal habits and habitats from around the world.
Shot on location, the programs feature close-up views of animals in
the wild as they go about their daily lives. Each program studies an
animal or group of animals; all convey a strong environmental
message.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Operation Burrowing Owl — When European settlers moved into the
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Canadian wilderness, they threatened many species, including the
burrowing owl. Operation Owl is trying to protect this creature by
re-creating its natural habitat.
Coral Reef: Rain Forest of the Sea — The Christmas tree worm, the
parrot fish, and the hermit crab are three of many sea creatures that
find refuge and food in a coral reef.
Overrun with Rabbits – British settlers introduced rabbits to Australia
for sport, altering its wildlife forever. With few predators, the rabbits
overwhelmed large areas, and efforts to eradicate them have often
caused more harm than good.
Nature’s Foresters — To prepare for winter, squirrels, mice, and
chipmunks bury more nuts and seeds than they’ll be able to recover,
ensuring new seedlings in the spring.
Gray Jays: Nesting in the Snow — The gray jay’s ability to eat a
variety of foods and store provisions for winter allows it to thrive in
Algonquin Park all year round. Nest building and caring for young
are also observed.
Hippos: Killing the Land, Feeding the Lakes — In Uganda, hippos
enrich river and lake beds with their dung, but destroy important
grasses. Hippo social structure, care for the young, physical traits,
enemies, and territorial battles are examined.
Australia’s Plants: Surviving Down Under — Designed to survive,
Australia’s plants employ some unusual methods to ensure pollination. The trigger plant, the kangaroo’s paw, and the giant banksia are
among the plants featured.
The Plight of the Asian Elephant — As Thailand's forests diminish
and floods become more frequent, the Asian elephant is losing its
home.
Saving the Ferruginous Hawks — In Alberta, a research scientist
catches and bands ferruginous hawks to keep track of their growth
and change. Wrongly believing their livestock was being attacked,
ranchers used to shoot the hawks.
Cicadas: The 17-Year Invasion — In a Chicago suburb, residents
prepare for the invasion of millions of cicadas that emerge from the
ground every 17 years. The nymphs crawl out at night to the nearest
tree, where they transform themselves into adult cicadas.
The Success of the Sea Gull — The gull’s ability to eat almost anything and live almost anywhere has led to an overpopulation of this
tough scavenger, while other birds, not as adaptable, become
endangered.
Komodo Dragon: The Largest Lizard — Characterized by a large
mouth, dry skin, and sharp claws, the Komodo dragon's most drastic
feature is size. Identified only in 1912, the dragon has carried on its
hunting and breeding rituals on Komodo Island for centuries.
Raccoons: Wild in the City — With ravines, big trees, and old homes,
Toronto, Canada is an ideal environment for raccoons. While some
people lovingly feed the raccoons, others hire experts to remove
them from attics and chimneys.
Spreading the Pollen — Close-up footage shows how flowers are
designed to ensure that insects and birds are dusted with pollen as
they extract nectar.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 20 at 8:00/7:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours) and at
12 noon (Programs 9-20; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 23 at 8:00/7:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours) and at
12 noon (Programs 9-20; 3 hours)
NASA SCIence Files C
Problem-solving in math, science, and technology.
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
3-5
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at Web site
http://scifiles.larc.nasa.gov/treehouse.html
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
This national standards-based series integrates and enhances the teaching of math, science, and technology. It includes a resource-rich teacher
guide and a user-friendly Web site linking students, teachers, and
parents to NASA programs, projects, and researchers. The programs
feature a group of “tree house detectives” who use problem-solving
skills and scientific inquiry to find answers to real-life mysteries. (Note:
NASA is repeating shows from previous seasons this coming year. The following are the programs listed in their schedule. NASA may air new programs
towards the end of the broadcast season. Watch the KET3 Monthly Calendar
Update for details.)
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
(Note: The Program numbers over the years have been wrong. Below in parenthesis is NASA's program number for your convenience.)
1. (301) The Case of the Great Space Exploration — New discoveries
by NASA and a new vision for space exploration create excitement
as the detectives set off to learn what it will take to become a space
explorer.
2. (401) The Case of the Physical Fitness Challenge — The detectives
are eager to win the Presidential Physical Fitness Award and decide
to learn more about being fit. They visit NASA to learn more about
muscles, bones, and physical activity and why fitness is the key to
space exploration.
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 79
SCIENCE
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
15. Pikas: Ice Age Survivors — In cold, mountainous regions, the pika
spends most of its summer gathering grass to prepare for winter.
Physical characteristics, habitat, territorial defense, and enemies are
also described.
16. Kuroshio: The Ocean River — The Kuroshio is a giant current that
sweeps through the Pacific from Japan to North America and back
again, sustaining thousands of sea creatures and a complete food
chain.
17. Insect Disguises — Rainforest insects use color, shape, and movement to ward off predators and attract "dinner."
18. Giant Rhinoceros Hornbill: Nesting — High in the trees of tropical
Thailand, a pair of hornbills court, mate, build a nest, and nurture
their chick until it is ready to fly.
19. Salmon: The Upstream Battle — Rapids, predators, pollutants, and
dams are obstacles salmon face when they journey from the Pacific
up the Fraser River to their spawning grounds. The process of
spawning is shown.
20. Tokyo Bay: Fight for Survival — Pollution and the destruction of
most of the natural coastline have made Tokyo Bay an inhospitable
environment for sea life. While many creatures have perished, spider
crabs, mantis shrimp, and marble sole have adapted..
SCIENCE
3. (203 of NASA Why Files?). The Case of the Inhabitable Habitat — The
detectives enter a contest to design a habitat that can keep humans
alive on Mars.
4. (104) The Case of the Galactic Vacation — The detectives go galactic
with their latest project, creating travel brochures for our solar
system.
5. (203) The Case of the Prize-Winning Plants — The detectives attempt
to grow plants for the upcoming fair, experimenting with soil, plant
and animal life cycles, and genetics.
6. (303) The Case of Zany Animal Antics — Curious why the animals are
behaving so differently, the detectives join forces with NASA and
animal experts to discover the cause. Learn about the classification
and life cycles of animals, migratory patterns, habitats, and much
more.
7. (404) The Case of the Deafening Sound — The tree house detectives
find that NASA is an expert in the sound business. They learn how
sound travels, how human beings hear, and what NASA is doing to
quiet the skies.
8. (103) The Case of the Biological Biosphere — One of the detectives
is taking a trip abroad. Come help the detectives learn about the
human body as they discover that no man, not even a kid, is an
island.
9. (202) The Case of the Disappearing Dirt — Thee tree house detectives
discover that their favorite beach is shrinking. They dig in and learn
about erosion, rocks, and natural preservation.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, September 15 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours); and Friday,
September 22 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT (Program 9; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Friday, February 9 at 2:00/1:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours); Friday,
February 16 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours); and Friday,
February 23 at 5:00/4:00 am CT (Program 9; 1 hour)
Natureworks C
Science biomes
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Website:
3-6
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at website
www.nhptv.org/natureworks
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.5, 2.6
Each episode of this series consists of five segments:
1. An introduction on basic concepts including habitat, adaptations, and
biomes.
2. A focus featuring a particular animal or plant.
3. Field work featuring student researchers, scientists, and naturalists.
4. A review which sums up material presented in each program.
5. Natural footage with no narration to allow students to see and enjoy
nature at work.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Adaptation — how plants and animals — in particular, opossums
and beavers — are adapted to their environment and how the New
England Aquarium’s critical care ward cares for beached Kemp’s
Ridley sea turtles.
2. Coloration — how the structural adaptation of coloration contributes
to plant and animal survival. A visit with a wildlife photographer
highlights the role of color in photography.
80 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
3. Natural Communication — how animals communicating through
visual, auditory, chemical, and tactile signals with specific looks at
the red fox and songbirds. A visit to a pond with a herpetologist
shows how frogs communicate.
4. Migration — the many reasons for migration, banding to track bird
migration, the migration of three raptors (broad-winged hawks, redtailed hawks, and snowy owls), and an annual hawk count.
5. Habitat — the artificial habitat at the Squam Lakes Natural Science
Center aviary. Featured is the common loon: we see its habitat and
join a biologist as she builds and floats a loon raft.
6. Marine Communities — how life in the ocean is organized in layers
and a visit to the Wells Reserve estuary to monitor soft shell clams
and green crab experiments.
7. Fresh Water Communities — life in lakes, streams, and wetlands, with
a special look at the snapping turtle.
8. Terrestrial Communities — tundra, rainforest, grassland, taiga, temperate deciduous forest, and desert biomes. We learn how the redtailed hawk is adapted to a different habitat and examine the plant
diversity along the Appalachian Trail.
9. The Wildlife Web I (producers and herbivores) — how plants make
food and how plants and herbivores depend on each other with an
up-close look at the moose and its habitat and methods for improving melons.
10. The Wildlife Web II (herbivores and carnivores) — how herbivores
and carnivores depend on each other for survival and up-close looks
at the insect-eating brown bat, the gray wolf, and a bat cave.
11. Decomposers and Scavengers — the role of decomposers and scavengers. The Appalachian Mountain Club demonstrates recycling in
the wilderness.
12. Population Dynamics — the concept of population and its limiting
factors that impact porcupine and white-tailed deer populations. A
University of New Hampshire professor shows how he helps control
deer numbers.
13. Species Diversity — how species diversity helps maintain a healthy
environment. The naturalists see how many different insects they can
locate. We look at life on the forest floor, and a Keeping Track member shows how to determine animal diversity.
14. Niche — animals’ roles in their environment, in particular the niches
of pileated woodpeckers and of coral reefs. A conservation officer
demonstrates how he tries to control beavers’ impact in urban areas.
15. Invasive Species — how invasive species can change an environment, with a special consideration of milfoil in aquatic communities
and the mute swan. Shoals Marine Lab researchers show the impact
of invasive seaweed in the waters off their island.
16. Life at Risk — factors that could endanger plant and animal species,
particularly the wood turtle and the peregrine falcon. A US Fish and
Wildlife Service employee shows how she monitors the health of
dwarf wedge mussels.
17. How to Use Natureworks in the Classroom
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 17 at 5:50/4:50 am CT
(Programs 1-17; 4 hours, 8 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 20 at 5:50/4:50 am CT
(Programs 1-17; 4 hours, 8 minutes)
Photo: Rick McComb
10. Water Heroes! — young people who help protect their watersheds
from hidden pollution. A visit to Kentucky’s Hidden River Cave
illustrates the dangers of non-point-source pollution.
11. From Moo to You? — an exploration a dairy food plant and a comparison of the nutrient values of milk and soft drinks.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Gee Whiz in Agriculture C
Science with a twist
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-5
30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/guides
See Web site
www.ca.uky.edu/CALE/
products_geewhizctlg.php
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6. 2.36
Gee Whiz in Agriculture demonstrates practical applications in basic
math, the metric system, nutrition, scientific method, and introduces
agronomy, anatomy, animal science, aquaculture, chemistry, ecology, and other sciences. The series fits the 4th- and 5th-grade science
curriculum and meets specific education objectives in science and
math. Gee Whiz presents numerous career opportunities and shows
that agriculture today is much more than milking cows and planting
corn.
Gee Whiz in Agriculture is presented by the University of Kentucky College
of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service, Kentucky State University, the
USDA, AG-SAT, and KET.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Why Can a Cow Eat Grass? — an in-depth look at the digestive tracts
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
of cattle from birth to maturity, focusing on differences between
bovine and human digestive systems.
Wood You Take Care of Me? — the forestry industry and its impact
upon our environment. Students get a firsthand look at a logging
operation and take a trip through a furniture factory.
Yams in Space! — how today’s research will help us grow food in
space tomorrow.
What’s Bugging You? — the role of insects in our environment, with
close-up and personal accounts of several unique insects.
How Do Horses Run So Fast? — the differences and similarities
between human and equine athletes using skeletons, X-rays, heart
monitors, real-time and slow-motion video comparisons, and computerized imaging.
Wool Ewe Keep Me Warm? — sheep, the wool industry, the chemistry of wool and fiber production, and the unique properties of this
versatile fiber.
How Do You Grow a Fish Sandwich? — a fish-eye view of fish and lettuce production in an ecologically closed system shows how land and
water life systems depend on each other for nourishment.
Chickens and Piglets and Lambs, Oh My! — the growth and development of farm animals, from fertilization to birth to adolescence.
Now Ear This! — an exploration of products that contain corn, plant
genetics and breeding, and new techniques for growing corn with
fewer chemicals.
Real World Science
Earth, life, and physical science
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4-6
15-20 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.etvconsortium.com/catalog
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
This series uses colorful graphics, animation, and diagrams to make
science relevant to a child’s everyday life. Peer hosts introduce liveaction, concrete situations to demonstrate scientific principles.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Dinosaurs
— Animatronic dinosaurs help recreate life 60 million
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
years ago. Students learn the names and features of common dinosaurs and discover how fossils are formed and how they teach us
how dinosaurs lived and died.
— Viewers see the diversity of the plant kingSeeds and Plants
dom and learn to identify seed plants. Diagrams show the different
parts of a plant, while animation demonstrates how nutrients and
water move through the plant.
— Students discover why habitats are important.
Habitats
Viewers explore the tundra, desert, grasslands, forests and waterways
of the world, and learn about the plants and animals that live there.
— Students learn to define and recognize the
Simple Machines
six simple machines: the inclined plane, the wedge, the screw, the
lever, the wheel and axle, and the pulley.
Rocks and Minerals — Footage of various rock formations and a
“field trip” to a quarry, mine and cave give students the ability to
recognize specific rocks and minerals. Graphics and animation show
Earth's layers and how rocks are formed.
The Solar System — Viewers learn about ancient astronomers, telescopes, observatories and space exploration; planets, orbits, gravity,
revolution, and rotation; and the sun, comets, asteroids and meteors.
Weather and Climate — Learn how water, air and heat interact to
make weather happen. Atmosphere, condensation, evaporation, and
precipitation are explained through animated diagrams.
— By visiting a recycling center,
Trash and the Environment
landfill and town dump, kids learn what happens to trash. The program focuses on environmental problems created by solid waste and
ways to alleviate them.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, September 29 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
(Programs 1-8; 2 hours, 40 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 2 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
(Programs 1-8; 2 hours, 40 minutes)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 81
SCIENCE
Friday, September 1 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-11; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, February 2 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-11; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Kentucky Afield for Kids
SCIENCE
Life science, safety, and environmental issues
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-7
30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
kentuckyawake.org
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.5, 2.6, 2.19, 2.20
Co-produced by KET and the Kentucky Division of Fish and Wildlife
Resources, Kentucky Afield for Kids covers a variety of topics relating to
the outdoors, such as wildlife careers, safety, endangered species, and
many more. This series takes a look back at 12 programs produced
during previous seasons.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. (146) Water World (September, 1999) — Splash into the aquatic arena
where water quality determines the number and types of animals
and the food web starts with algae, bass, and caddis flies.
2. (188) Red Fish, Blue Fish, Two Hundred Forty-two Fish (March, 2005)
— Join fisheries biologists as they study how fish interact in a pond,
how to raise fish in a hatchery, where fish go during different times
of the year, and how new exotic fish are affecting Kentucky's waters.
3. (182) Slime, Mud, and Feathers: Swamp Things! (February, 2004)—
Get down and dirty to discover the many animals that live in
swamps; from slimy salamanders to long-legged herons.
4. (153) Wanted: Predators (April, 2000) — Take a look at the predator's
role in nature and learn why "the best snake is NOT a dead snake".
5. (149) Hear'Em Honking (December, 1999) — Geese fly by here every
year. Where are they going? Where have they been? And what do
they mean to people who live along their path?
6. (150) New Year's Resolution: Do Something for the Birds (January
2000) — Feeders, baths, nesting boxes and bushes help you enjoy
Kentucky birds the next time you look out the window.
7. (177) Symbols of Wildlife (March, 2003) — Learn about the history
and cultural importance of some of our wild symbols, such as the
bald eagle, monarch butterfly, and the gray squirrel.
8. (184) The Forest Ecosystem (October, 2004) — Forests provide habitats for plants and animals, add oxygen to the atmosphere, and play
a role in the water cycle. Listen to how various people — from birdwatchers to scientists — see the woods.
9. (185) Kentucky's Furry Critters (December, 2004) — Join a research
team to learn about mammal adaptations and population changes
and how biologists and others work together to protect our furry
friends.
10. (186) Kentucky's Feathered Rainbow (January, 2005) — More than
350 types of birds live at least part of the year in Kentucky. Learn
about the adaptations that have made these animals so successful.
11. (187) Are you an Outdoor Survivor? (February, 2005) — Learn safety
tips and survival techniques so you can enjoy all the great outdoors
has to offer.
12. (145) Step by Step: Plans for Building a Safe Haven for Wildlife (May,
1999) — Learn how to inventory your home and school to create better habitats for wildlife and a healthier environment.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, August 4 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at 12
noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-12; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, January 5 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at 12
noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-12; 2 hours)
82 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Kentucky Afield for Kids
North American Biomes
C
Life Science, ecology
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4-8
10 minutes
School year
Downloadable at
www.envmedia.com
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
This series provides a comparative study of North American biomes,
examining each biome's diverse plant and animal communities and
their interrelationships. The series begins with an overview of the
criteria that distinguish one biome from another, and helps students
understand plant and animal adaptations.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Introduction to North American Biomes — an exploration of the term
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
biome and an overview of North America’s major biomes, (forests,
grasslands, deserts, seashores, rivers and streams, and wetlands.)
Forests — the flora and fauna and the ecology of North America's
forest types: coniferous, deciduous, and mixed forest.
Grasslands — an exploration of the natural diversity of major grasslands (tallgrass, mixed grass, and shortgrass) and of processes that
maintain them.
Deserts — the common traits and special characteristics of North
America's four major deserts: the Great Basin, Chihuahuan, Mojave,
and Sonoran.
Seashore — the characteristics of North America’s Atlantic, Gulf, and
Pacific coasts.
Rivers and Streams — tracing a North American river from its headwaters to the sea and describing the natural processes and plants and
animals seen along the way.
Wetlands — the many different types of wetlands in North America,
from lakes to floodplains.
Conserving North American Biomes — how various biomes have
been treated and mistreated and how to get involved in their protection and restoration.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 6 at 12:25 pm/11:25 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 9 at 12:25 pm/11:25 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Kentucky’s Natural Heritage K
Real Science! II C
Biological and geological characteristics of
unique environments
Careers in science
4–12
15 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.5, 2.6, 2.19, 2.20
Kentucky’s Natural Heritage examines unique environments with a wide
range of biological and geological characteristics, including virgin
forest, naturally carved sandstone arches, cascading waterfalls, and
cypress swamplands.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Lilley Cornett Woods
2. The Red River Gorge
3. Cumberland Falls
4. Murphy’s Pond
5. Swan Lake
6. Mammoth Cave
7. Panther Glade — prairie remnants
8. The Bluegrass
NOTE: This series is offered on videotape only. See tape order information on
pages 125-126.
Work, Energy, and the
Simple Machine C
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.36
This series lets students spend a day in the field with actual scientists
and highlights some of the fascinating aspects of their jobs. Each program includes information on required coursework and degrees for
various scientific professions, as well as ways students might explore
the career immediately.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. On the Water — A herpetologist and an oceanographer investigate ani-
2.
3.
4.
Six simple machines and their many uses
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
5-8
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at unitedlearning.com
5.
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.3, 2.4
This series will acquaint students with information about the six
simple machines and their many uses. Students will see examples of
simple machines being used in everyday situations.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Work and Energy — This program introduces students to concepts
associated with work and energy and introduces the six simple
machines and compound machines.
2. Lever, Wheel and Axle, Pulley — The lever, wheel and axle, and
pulley are compared and contrasted.
3. Incline Plane, Wedge, Screw — This program identifies and defines
these closely related simple machines and discusses their
relationships.
4. Compound Machines — This program is about compound machines
— machines made up of two or more simple machines.
5-10
20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
www.realscience.org
6.
mal life in two diverse bodies of water — the Florida Everglades and
the Atlantic Ocean. (Note: This segment shows the process of determining
the sex of an animal and should be previewed by the teacher before viewing by
students.)
Weathering the Storm — Learn how meteorologists use technology to
predict the weather and visit Lassen Volcanic National Park outside
Redding, CA to learn about hydrothermal vents and the historic 1917
eruption.
Eyes on the Skies — Tour NASA’s Goddard Space Center in
Maryland and study tropical storms using satellite data. Then search
for evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence at the SETI Institute in
Northern California.
On the Brink — See the director of the University of Washington
School of Fisheries explain how salmon eggs are fertilized in a
“return pond.” Next, witness the release of California condors into
the wild at Los Padres National Forest. (Note: This segment graphically
shows salmon being killed to harvest eggs and milt.)
Bugs and Babies — Feed tarantulas with an entomologist at the
Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in
Washington, DC. Then, spend a day with an obstetrician-gynecologist to see how modern technology is helping in the delivery of
babies. (Note: This segment shows a seven-month-pregnant woman’s bare
stomach during an ultrasound exam.)
Quest for Cures — Learn about chromosomes with a cytogeneticist at
Kaiser Permanente in San Jose, CA. Then see how a biochemist at the
University of California, Irvine uses leeches to study blood clotting.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, September 1 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT (Programs 1-6; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, November 29 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-6; 2 hours)
Block Feed III:
Friday, February 2 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT (Programs 1-6; 2 hours)
Block Feed IV:
Wednesday, May 9 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-6; 2 hours)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 10 at 1:55/12:55 pm CT
(Programs 1-4; 1 hour, 2 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 13 at 1:55/12:55 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour, 2 minutes)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 83
SCIENCE
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
Real Science! III C
SCIENCE
Science careers
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
5-10
30 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
www.realscience.org
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.36
More programs take students into the work world of real scientists,
to learn what they do for a living and how to pursue a similar career.
Each program includes action tips and curriculum advice.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Deep Subs — Dive to the bottom of the sea in a Navy rescue sub-
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13
marine, meet animals that live in submarine canyons, and see how
engineers at Grand Coulee Dam use a remote-operated sub to check
the dam’s structure.
Blast Off — Tour the Johnson Space Center in Houston and see the
life-sized space station model; go deep into space to explore the
accomplishments of the Hubble Space Telescope.
Flying Doctors — Follow a dentist and a team of doctors to an island
off the Mexican coast, where they set up a four-day clinic and treat
more than 100 patients. Meet a surgeon from Interplast, an organization that provides plastic surgery to children in poor countries.
Fire and Water — Travel with a naturalist from the New Orleans
Aquarium to check on Louisiana's endangered sea turtles. Then join
a forestry professor to watch a controlled fire burn in a Montana
forest.
Disease and Discovery — Look for ticks on Nantucket Island with
a Harvard epidemiologist studying Lyme disease. Then see how a
cardiologist at Stanford University Hospital uses an echo machine to
examine hearts.
Trailblazers — Hit the trails in Glacier National Park with a Montana
geologist to learn about glaciers. Then visit the National Geographic
Society to see how cartographers use computers to make maps.
Computer Dreams — Lean how a neurologist analyzes brain waves
at the Stanford Sleep Center. Next spend a day at Apple Computer to
learn how programmers design school software.
Rad CAD — Meet three engineers who use computer-assisted design
systems in their work. Then discover the latest innovations in engineering at the San Francisco Bay Bridge, the MIT artificial intelligence laboratory, and a NASA wind tunnel.
Fueling the Future — Find out how Toyota trucks are designed and
manufactured at the NUMMI car factory in Fremont, CA. Next, a
chemist from Catalytica shows the fuels of the future.
High Flyers — Take off on an adventure with hurricane hunters at
Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, MS. Then visit an engineer from
McDonnell Douglas who is helping to design the space station.
Swamp Story — Head into a Louisiana marsh on an airboat with an
ecologist from the National Biological Service, check in at the San
Jose Water Company to find out how scientists test our drinking
water, and learn how computer engineers at PIXAR made the animated film Toy Story.
Getting Physical — See how a trainer from the San Francisco 49ers
football team helps players recover from injuries. Then learn about
the monitor lizard breeding program from a physiologist at the San
Diego Zoo.
Blast from the Past — Dig for artifacts at the site of a Jamestown
plantation with a University of Virginia archaeologist. Ride
Disneyland's Indiana Jones ride with one of the engineers who
designed it.
84 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 27 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, November 29 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and Wednesday, December 6 at 6:00/5:00 am
CT
(Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Friday, March 30 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed IV:
Wednesday, May 9 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and Wednesday, May 16 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Classic Animal Tracks C
‘Music videos’ in life science, geography, and
ecology
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
5-12
3 minutes
School year
Downloadable at
www.envmedia.com/guides/guides.htm
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.4
Exquisite animal footage filmed around the globe, classic pop tunes,
and on-screen descriptions combine to create a series of short educational and entertaining programs lead students toward an understanding of animals, their behavior, and their habitats.
(Note: This series offers good writing prompts.)
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Emperor Penguin
2. Blue Wildebeest
3. Mute Swan
4. Alligator
5. Meerkat
6. Tiger
7. Hummingbird
8. Wandering
Albatross
9. Army Ant
10. Chimpanzee
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Red Kangaroos
African Elephant
Grey Squirrel
Hippo
Frog and Toad
Common Vampire
Bat
Elephant Seal
Giraffe
Barn Owl
Hare
Tuesday, September 5 at
8:00/7:00 am CT
(Programs 1-29; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, December 1 at
12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-29; 1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, April 10 at
12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-29;
1 hour, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 30 at
2:30/1:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-29;
1 hour, 30 minutes)
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
Macaw
Flamingo
Killer Whale
Polar Bear
The Lion
Sea Otter
Coral
The Vulture
The Red Deer
Photo: Rick McComb
The Complete Cosmos C
Science, Astronomy
5-12
11 minutes
School year
Downloadable at
www.etvconsortium.com/catalog/
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4
Using up-to-date content and high quality graphics, this series
explores the unique characteristics of the planets and visits the sun
and the moon.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
SUN AND THE INNER PLANETS
1. Our Star is Born — birth, life, and death of the sun plus information
on interior dynamics and exterior fireworks, sunspots, corona, solar
wind, and recent discoveries
2. Mercury — the most comprehensive portrait ever of this scorched
little planet, depicting double sunrises, craters, cracks, and (perhaps)
polar ice
3. Venus — an exploration of Venus’ poisonous, crushing atmosphere;
searing heat; volcanoes; and runaway Greenhouse Effect
4. Blue Planet — the evolution of the Earth and of life with a look at
internal structure, continental drift, day length, seasons, oceans, climate, weather, and El Niño
5. Moon — the story of earth’s natural satellite — its origin, influence
on earth, the Apollo landings, and the recent discovery of water
MARS AND THE OUTER PLANETS
6. Red Planet — cold, arid Mars, the next destination for the space program, with its polar caps, volcanoes, enormous canyon, and evidence
of former oceans
7. Jupiter — a journey to the turbulent gas giant, bigger than all the
other planets combined, and its mini solar system of 16 moons
8. Saturn — the many rings and moons of this gas giant, with a preview
of a landing on Titan, a moon resembling primitive earth
9. Uranus and Neptune — the outer giants, particularly Uranus’ crazy
tilt and chaotic moon
10. Realm of the Comets — the origin of comets in the Oort Cloud and the
Kuiper Belt and a discussion of whether tiny Pluto is really a planet
BLAST OFF!
11. Earth Patrol — satellites that monitor the planet’s health, ozone layer,
melting ice caps, weather, deforestation, and navigation
12. Space Frontier — human space exploration from Yuri Gagarin’s first
orbit of Earth, to the race for the moon and the Apollo Landings
13. High Life — triumphs, tragedies, and everyday practicalities aboard
the Russian space station Mir and America’s space shuttles
14. Robots — robotic scouts exploring the solar system, including Mars,
Jupiter, and Saturn’s moon, Titan
15. Where Next — a spaceport in earth orbit, the colonization of the
moon and Mars, and the taming of Venus plus an elevator into space
SPACE WATCH
16. Pioneers — the story of astronomy from ancient Babylonian sky
watchers through Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Hubble, and
space-age cosmology
17. Eclipse and Aurorae — how solar winds conjure an aurora, an explanation of lunar and solar eclipses, and the 1998 eclipse of the sun
18. Impact! — comets and asteroids — what would happen if the space
rock that killed off the dinosaurs hit New York today?
19. Light Fantastic — how wavelengths other than visible light—from
gamma rays to radio—fill the universe
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 6 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-23; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 24-25; 21 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 9 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-23; 4 hours) and at
12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 24-25; 21 minutes)
Explore More C
Scientific issues that impact our future
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
6-8
30 minutes
School Year
www.iptv.org/exploremore
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.5, 2.6
This video series is a part of a balanced multimedia resource encouraging students to unravel timely issues and make informed decisions.
Each fast-paced program incorporates expert interviews, meaningful
3D modeling and animation, and an engaging young host.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Explore More: Genetic Engineering — Genetic engineering could
change the way we live. This program outlines several issues, surveys stakeholders and experts in the field, and presents questions for
viewers.
2. Explore More: The Future of Energy — This program explores current
and future methods of generating energy and factors influencing
energy consumption and distribution.
3. Explore More: Loess Hills — By exploring the unique plants and animals of Iowa's Loess Hills, deposits of silt left by receding glaciers,
viewers are encouraged to examine how they value the natural environments in their own communities.
4. Explore More: Water Quality — Viewers learn about current and future
threats to water quality and are encouraged to develop their own solutions to this critical challenge.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, August 4 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, January 5 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 85
SCIENCE
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
20. Life Quest — searching for life elsewhere in the universe: on Jupiter’s
moon, Europa, and in the future, on Saturn’s moon, Titan, and in
deep space
21. Milky Way — our galaxy, light years, the life and death of stars,
supernovae, and the clouds where stars are born
22. Hubble’s Eye — peering back through time to the depths of the cosmos with the Hubble Space Telescope
23. Infinity — the structure of the universe (galaxies, clusters, strands) and
measuring the distance to nearby galaxies and the farthest quasar
24. Big Bang, Big Crunch — theory of the Big Bang, the cataclysmic
explosion from which the universe continues to expand
25. Black Holes, Dark Matter — detecting invisible black holes and dark
matter, the missing 90% of the universe
SCIENCE
NASA Connect C
Inside the Living Cell C
Careers in math and science at NASA.
Cell Biology, Cell Processes, Life Science
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
Grade Levels:
Length:
Print Materials:
Taping Rights:
Web Site:
6-8
30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at Web site
http://connect.larc.nasa.gov
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.8, 2.10, 2.13
Endorsed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics,
NASA Connect supports the national math, science, and technology standards. The concept of proportional reasoning is an ongoing
mathematical thread throughout the series. Each program includes a
lesson, focus questions, hands-on activity, and Web-based component
designed to help students make connections between NASA research
and the math, science, and technology they learn in the classroom.
(Note: NASA is repeating shows from previous seasons this coming year.
The following are the programs listed in their schedule. NASA may air new
programs towards the end of the broadcast season. Watch the KET3 Monthly
Calendar Update for details.)
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
(Note: The Program numbers over the years have been wrong. Below in parenthesis is NASA's program number for your convenience.)
1. (502) Better Health from Space to Earth — Students investigate what
we can learn in space about how our bodies function here on Earth.
2. (601) Good Stress: Building Better Muscles and Bones — NASA
researchers and scientists collect and analyze physiological data to
understand how muscle and bones are constantly changing, especially in a microgravity environment.
3. (701) The Right Ratio of Rest: Proportional Reasoning — focuses on circadian rhythms, their impact on daily life, and why NASA is studying them. Lessons and Web activities develop students’ proportional
reasoning skills and their understanding of how fractions, decimals,
and percents are related.
4. (602) Rocket to the Stars — NASA engineers and scientists use
algebra to study the transfer of energy on Earth and in space.
5. (402) Measurement, Ratios, and Graphing: Who Added the ‘Micro’
to Gravity? — NASA researchers and scientists use measurement,
ratios, and graphing to demonstrate the principles of microgravity.
6. (504) The Venus Transit — Students learn the importance of using
scale models to represent the size and distance of objects in the solar
system and beyond and about the Venus Transit, an event which
helped astronomers determine the scale of the solar system.
7. (604) Hidden Treasures: Landscape Archeology — NASA archeologists
and scientists use remote sensing and problem solving to determine
how ancient civilizations adapted to their environment and what
factors may have led to their disappearance.
8. (703) The Path of Totality: Measuring Angular Size and Distance
— examines the history, mythology, and science of total eclipses.
Students learn how to use simple tools to measure and approximate
the size and distance of objects in the sky.
9. (404) Data Analysis & Measurement: Dancing in the Night Sky — NASA
engineers and researchers use data analysis and measurement to study
the regions of the Earth’s geospace or space environment.
BLOCK FEED
Block Feed I:
Friday, September 22 at 2:00/1:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and
at 9:30/8:30 am CT (Program 9; 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, February 16 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
and Friday, February 23 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT (Program 9; 30 minutes)
86 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
6-9
15 minutes
Downloadable at website
School year
www.ebiomedia.com/teach/
guides.html#LivingCell
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
This highly visual tour of the processes that keep life operating is
designed to interest students and provide them with a new understanding fundamental units of life. Correlated to the National Science
Standards, each program also includes free, downloadable teaching
guides. The series can be used as an introduction to the in-depth cell
biology program Visualizing Cell Processes in grades 10 and up.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Cell—Unit of Life — the structure of the cell and its organelles
2. The Outer Envelope — the cell membrane, membrane behavior and
cell walls, osmosis, transport proteins, endocytosis
3. How Cells Obtain Energy — ATP; the cell's energy carrier; mitochondria, the cell's powerhouses; photosynthesis; light reactions of photosynthesis; light-independent reactions
4. How Cells Are Controlled — how enzymes and other proteins are
made
5. How Cells Reproduce — DNA structure, DNA replication, mitosis,
mutation and DNA repair
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 3 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 6 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 15 minutes)
Passport to Weather and Climate C
Science, social studies, geography, mathematics,
language arts
Grade Levels:
Length:
Print Materials:
Taping Rights:
Web Site:
6-9
15 minutes
See order form, page 124
School year
passporttoknowledge.com/ptweather/ptwc.html
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.6
This series uses students’ natural fascination with thunder and
lightning, tornadoes, and winter storms to bring science concepts to
life. Using dramatic footage from the U.S. and the world, the series
explores the forces that shape Earth’s weather and climate.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. What Makes Earth’s Weather and Climate? — Learn how the sun and
seasons, land and ocean, and pressure and altitude shape clouds,
storms, hurricanes, and tornadoes.
2. In and Out of a Hurricane! — Fly through a hurricane with NOAA
researchers, and track Texas-size storms with NASA’s satellite eyes.
See how hurricanes transform latent energy into ferocious winds.
3. Tornado Detectives — Go on location with NOAA’s “VORTEX” project as they use Doppler radar and mobile mesonets to learn how and
why tornadoes spin out of supercell thunderstorms.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, December 1 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, May 4 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours)
Life In Marine and
Freshwater Environments C
Biology
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
6-12
30 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ebiomedia.com/prod/
WatBiomes.html
KY Academic Expectations: 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Biology of Lakes, Ponds and Wetlands — This program explores
life in weedy shallows, open water, vernal pools, and bottom environments of ponds and wetlands. Featured organisms include
hydras, planarians, micro-annelids, micro-crustaceans, bryozoans,
aquatic insects, rotifers, and protists.
2. The Biology of Seashores — Focused on foundational biology concepts, this program is divided into modules organized into three
main parts:
1) Conditions on the Shore: Tides, Seashore Conditions: Abiotic
Factors, and Seashore Conditions: Biotic Factors
2) Adaptations for Intertidal Life: Adaptations for Wave Shock, for
Defense, for Feeding, Adaptations: Predation and the Role of
Chemicals, and Reproductive Strategies
3) Seashore Habitats and Inhabitants: Rocky Shore Habitats, Sandy
Beach Habitats, Mudflat and Estuary, and Docks and Piling Habitats
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, December 1 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Friday, May 4 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 1 hour)
Planet Neighborhood
C
Solving environmental problems using science
and technology
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
6-12
10 minutes
School Year
Call 1-703-476-4468
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.6, 2.18, 2.30
Planet Neighborhood provides a multidisciplinary blend of science,
technology, social studies, civics and economics curricula. The series
increases student consciousness of current environmental challenges
and opportunities for change. Each program illustrates new technology applications and demonstrates everyday conservation techniques.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Home - how to reduce garbage by "smart shopping," recycling
and composting.
2. The Car - new methods that use old car materials to produce today's
models and cheaper materials that encourage auto makers to "design
for disassembly" and facilitate recycling.
3. Wetlands Technology - how to clean polluted water more economically and efficiently through two new approaches: contained ecosystems and constructed wetlands.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 3 at 3:15/2:15 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 6 at 3:15/2:15 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 30 minutes)
Inventing Flight
C
Science and history of the Wright brothers'
invention of powered flight
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Website:
5-12
10 minutes
School Year
Available at Web site
www. ait.net
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.20
Inventing Flight is a multimedia series on the science and history of the
Wright brothers' invention of powered flight. The series enables teachers across the globe to use this historic event to showcase inquirybased science.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Visions of Flight — the influences of flight on art, history and thought
through time
2. Wright Time, Wright Place — the life and times of the Wright
Brothers
3. Total Control—Pitch, Yaw, and Roll — how the Wright Brothers discovered the secret of control in flight
4. Wings That Work — camber, shape, and velocity: how a wing creates
lift
5. Power Plus-Thrust and Drag — how streamlined design and efficient
propellers help airplanes take off
6. After the Flyer — how the Wright brothers' discoveries have changed
the world
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 87
SCIENCE
4. Winter Storms–White Hurricanes — Explore how temperature and
humidity determine whether snow, sleet, or freezing rain will fall
and how snowstorms affect daily life and the economy.
5. Thunder and Lightning — Learn about the generation and discharge
of static electricity in cumulus clouds, why we see lightning before
we hear thunder, and storm safety tips for students.
6. El Niño and La Niña: The “Boy” and the Buoys — El Niño and La
Niña are the second most powerful influence on global weather
and climate. Learn how a network of buoys in the Pacific led to the
world’s first climate forecast.
7. Earth’s Variable Climate — Answer questions about climate change
and variation and the Greenhouse Effect by tracking ancient temperature and humidity records found in tree rings and fossils.
8. Tracking and Recording Weather and Climate — Find out how to
decode weather maps using math skills, where to access information, how to build simple weather instruments, and how NOAA and
NASA use super-computers and satellites to study weather and climate.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
SCIENCE
Friday, September 8 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-6; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Friday, February 9 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-6; 1 hour)
Lab Safety:
The Accident at Jefferson High
Chemistry laboratory safety
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
7-9
20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
The Biology Of …
C
Behaviors and relationships in the microscopic
world
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
7-12
28 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ebiomedia.com
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6
This series is a collection of short segments that illustrate the behavior
and ecological interactions of microorganisms.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. The Biology of Ciliates — “Ciliated super cells” like Paramecium,
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.31
This program introduces students to proper lab safety techniques and
attitudes, demonstrates how to use tools and apparatus in a typical
high school science lab, shows how to prepare for lab work, and demonstrates how to handle emergencies.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Friday, November 10 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Friday, April 13 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
Photo: Rick McComb
88 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Vorticella, and Stentor, play vital roles in aquatic ecosystems.
Observations include one minute in the life of a Paramecium, an
aggregation of Paramecia, cilia responding to contact with bacteria
and with a salt crystal, and Trichocysts. (29:09)
2. The Biology of Flagellates and Amoebas — This program presents
in-depth observations of the flagellated and amoeboid protists most
often seen in school labs, along with many of the more exotic species
found in nature. (22:50)
3. The Biology of Nematodes, Rotifers, Bryozoans, and ‘Some Minor Phyla’
— A wealth of organisms occupy the fringes of animal evolution,
including some interesting human parasites. Most creatures are easily
found in ecosystems ranging from birdbaths to ponds. (18:48)
4. The Biology of Cnidarians — These delicate creatures, the two-celllayer branch of animal evolution, include three classes (hydrozoans,
scyphozoans, and anthozoans). The program emphasizes their life
cycles, morphology, adaptations, and ecological interactions and
shows Hydra investigations students can do in school labs. (15:55)
5. The Biology of Plants — From photosynthesis to ecology, this video
presents a mini-course in plant biology. Topics include the emergence
of plants from water onto land as seen in the evolution of non-vascular plants (mosses and liverworts), transport systems (ferns and
horsetails), seeds (gymnosperms) and flowers (angiosperms). (18:00)
6. Viruses — These strange parasitic entities, little more than packages
of genetic information, subvert cells into producing more viruses.
This program explores the discovery of viruses, their structures, how
they are studied, their modes of infection, and their uses as gene vectors in genetic engineering. (17:45)
7. Bacteria — This video examines the range of behavior seen in
bacteria; how they obtain nutrients; how to use sterile techniques
for culturing them; the roles they play in maintinaing the biosphere
including oxygen production (by cyanobacteria), decompostition,
nitrogen fixation; and how pathogenic bacteria trick human hosts
into passing on their infection. (16:40)
8. The Biology of Flatworms — This program provides detailed observations on structure, behavior, and life cycles of planarians and other
free-living flatworms, flukes and tapeworms (14:54)
9. The Biology of Molluscs — This program looks at the four major
phyla of Mollusca Polyplacophora; Gastropoda (snails, limpets,
nudibranchs, and slugs), Pelecypoda (clams and mussels), and
Cephalopoda (squid and octopus). (14:54)
10. Biology of Annelids — Phylum Annelida is made up of segmented
worms divided into three classes: Oligochaetes (earth worms and
aquatic worms), Polychaetes (Nereis and thousands of other mostly
marine species, and Leeches. (15:14)
11. The Biology of Arthropods — This program highlights the structure
and behavior of Crustaceans, Arachnids, and Uniramians (including
centipedes, millipedes, and insects). (25:15)
12. The Biology of Echinoderms — Animals observed are: seastars (Class
Asteroidea), brittle stars and basket stars (Class Ophiuroidea),
urchins and sand dollars (Class Echinoidea) and sea cucumbers
(Class Holothuoidea) (15:05)
13. The Biology of Chordates — The unique features of Phylum Chordata
are investigated in modern animals including tunicates, lancelets
(Branchiostoma or Amphioxus), hagfish, and cartilagenous fish.
(18:10)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 3 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours,
47 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 13-18; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 6 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours,
47 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 13-18; 2 hours)
Our Earth C
Earth Science, Rock Cycle, Fossils,Tectonics
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.36
Presented by young scientists, Our Earth looks at the science of geology - fossils, Earth core, tectonic forces, and the impact of sun, wind
and water. It also discusses why we need to understand geology.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. How Old is It? — During England's industrial revolution, early geolo2.
3.
4.
Inside Our Human Body
C
Exploring the human machine
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
7-12
15 minutes
School year
Call 1-800-457-4509, ext. 4 or
visit www.ait.net/catalog
KY Academic Expectations: 1.10, 2.3, 2.4
This series takes students on a fascinating field trip through the
human body. Dynamic computer graphics and footage of advanced
medical procedures uncover the secrets of the world’s most amazing
and efficient machine.
7-12
15 minutes
School year
email [email protected] or call 703-476-4468
5.
6.
7.
gists studied and compared rock strata and drew an amazing conclusion: our Earth is incredibly old.
Fossils — Fossils offer a three-part challenge: to reconstruct the
organism, to reconstruct its world; and to understand its place in
time and evolution.
The Fires Below — The interior of the Earth is very hot, with a metallic core surrounded by a rocky mantle. Huge slow convection currents rise up, often resulting in earthquakes and volcanoes.
Pushing and Shoving — Tectonic forces and their end products are
discussed.
Wear and Tear — The forces of the sun, wind, and water changes the
face of the earth.
Rock Recipes — Igneous, Sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks are
discussed.
Who Needs Geology? — The program discusses the importance of
geology and why we need to understand many of its basic findings.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, October 6 at 1:45/12:45 pm CT
(Programs 1-7; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 9 at 1:45/12:45 pm CT
(Programs 1-7; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Engineering Human Life — DNA, RNA, chromosomes, and the excit-
NASA's Destination Tomorrow C
2.
Inside look at NASA research and new technologies relating to our lives
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
ing and hopeful possibilities of genetic engineering
From Ear to Ear — the properties of sound, the structure of the ear,
and the consequences of noise pollution
Have a Heart — the heart and its structure; causes of heart disease
The Kidneys — the kidneys' importance as the body’s filtration
system
Muscles — differences among involuntary, voluntary, and reflex muscles
The Skeleton — how this powerful structure supports weight, allows
movement, acts as a storeroom, and repairs itself
Skin — the epidermis, the dermis, and the hypodermis — the frontier
which separates organisms from their outside worlds
Smell and Taste — the different types of papillae on a tongue, the
four types of taste, and the importance of the olfactory membrane
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, August 11 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Friday, January 12 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours)
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Website:
9-12
30 minutes
School year
http://destination.larc.nasa.gov/
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4
Designed for life-long learners, this Emmy (R) award-winning series
uses a five-segment magazine format to provide inside looks at NASA
and how research and technology relate to our everyday lives. An
associated website provides summaries of stories and links to related
program material. (Note: NASA is repeating shows from previous seasons
this coming year. The following are the programs listed in their schedule. NASA
may air new programs towards the end of the broadcast season. Watch the KET3
Monthly Calendar Update for details.)
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 89
SCIENCE
14. The Light Microscope: Window on the Microcosm — This program
demonstrates techniques for using a student microscope including
correct lighting procedures and techniques for viewing living cells.
(15:26)
15. The Biology of Protists — New genetic analysis research shows that
the various lines of protists might easily represent different kingdoms,
revising the old five kingdoms classification scheme still found in
many textbooks. (29:45)
16. The Biology of Sponges — This program looks at this phylum in
developmental, ecological, and evolutionary terms and clarifies its
structure, function, classification, and ecological roles. (14:45)
17. The Biology of Algae — These photosynthetic organisms play vital
roles in aquatic and marine ecosystems, providing oxygen, food, and
shelter for vast communities of living things. (18:30)
18. The Biology of Fungi — These organisms help provide oxygen, food
and shelter in aquatic and marine ecosystems (18:00)
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
SCIENCE
(Note: The Program numbers over the years have been wrong. Below in parenthesis is NASA's program number for your convenience.)
1. (Program 18 (403)) — takes a look at NASA's new plan for space
exploration; robotic missions that lead the way for astronauts;
and talk about some of the challenges of getting to and staying on
other worlds.
2. (Program 16 (401)) — Part 1 of this two-part episode explores the
food astronauts eat during space flights.
3. (Program 17 (402)) — Part 2 looks at the future of food technology
in space.
4. (Program 23 (503)) — looks back at the successful CasinniHuygens
mission to Saturn and Titan. This show revisits robotic exploration
that will enable future human missions to the Moon and Mars,
GPS technology, and the development of the space shuttle program.
5. (Program 24 (504)) — focuses on the Mars Phoenix mission; The Crew
Exploration and Crew Launch Vehicles; Viking Mission to Mars 30
years later, and how space suits work.
6. (Program 25 (505)) — highlights radiation protection efforts done by
NASA and focuses on how NASA plans to tackle radiation questions
for travel to the Moon and Mars.
7. (Program 20 (405)) — consists of four exciting segments. "Behind
the Scenes" segment, which viewers learn about the Mars
Reconnaissance Orbiter; the "Tech Watch" segment, where viewers
learn about a new type medical device that will give doctors a form
of x-ray vision; the "Retrospective" segment, which viewers find out
how the space shuttle program was started; and viewers find out
about sonic booms in the "How it Works" segment.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, August 18 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, January 19 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 15 minutes)
Viruses on the Rise
Science, Biology, Viruses, Infectious Disease
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
10-12
30 minutes
School Year
Call 919-821-3644 or
email [email protected]
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.6, 2.31
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, September 29 at 2:00/1:00 am CT
(Programs 1-7; 3 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Friday, March 2 at 2:00/1:00 am CT
(Programs 1-7; 3 hours, 30 minutes)
Visualizing Cell Processes C
Short teaching modules of cell biology
Grade level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4. DNA Replication, Mitosis and Cell Reproduction — Mitosis:
Chromosome Condensation, Mitosis Stages, Cytokinesis, Meisis,
Nucliotide Structure and Bonding, Replicaiton Enzymes, Replicating
the Strands, Topoisomerase and the Twisting Problem, Proof Reading
and Repair, Replication Review
5. The Genetic Code and Its Translation — The Protein Nature of Life,
Protein Structure, Transcription, Translation and Protein Synthesis,
Gene Regulation in Prokaryotes, Exons and Introns, Mutations,
Renegade DNA—the Viruses
9-12
15 minutes
School Year
Downloadable at www.ebiomedia.com
Companion CD-ROM and DVDs also available
at Web site for extra fee
KY Academic Expectations: 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.6
Each program presents a series of short, narrated, full-motion, liveaction or animated modules 1-2 minutes long to convey an essential
process of cellular biology.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Cells and Molecules — A Variety of Cells, Cell Organization,
Overview of Organic Molecules, Prokaryotic Cells, The Evolution of
Eukaryotic Cells
2. Cell Movement and Transport — Structure and Behavior of the
Plasma Membrane,Osmosis, Transport Proteins, Phagocytosis,
Pinocytosis, Receptor Mediated Endocytosis, Golgi Function,
Lysosomes and Hydrolytic Digestion, Microtubules, Cilia, Actin and
Myosin Motor Proteins
3. Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration Photosynthesis — Chlorplast
Structure, the Light Dependent Reactions of Photosynthesis, Cellular
Respiration Modules: Glycolysis and Fermentation, Mitochondrion
Structure, Aerobic Respiration, Krebs Cycle, Electron Transport Chain
and ATP Synthesis
90 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Consider the difference in size between some of the very tiniest and
the very largest creatures on earth. A small bacterium weighs as little
as 0.00000000001 gram, while a blue whale weighs about 100,000,000
grams. Yet a bacterium can kill a whale. “Microbes, not macrobes rule
the world.”—Bernard Dixon
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Viruses: The Deadly Enemy — This program investigates medical
science's discovery of viruses; the efforts to combat them; and how
studying viruses has helped us understand more about disease, the
immune system, and the relationships between humans and the
global ecosystem.
2. The Rising Threat of Infectious Diseases — This program focuses
on the interaction of disease-causing microbes with human beings.
It explores the discovery of bacteria and viruses, advances in sanitation and medical science, ways in which microbes have adapted, and
newly emerging diseases.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Friday, November 10 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Friday, April 13 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 1 hour)
See Also...
Electronic Field Trip to the Falls of the Ohio (4-12) — page 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Forest (4-8) –- page 32
Electronic Field Trip to Louisville Zoo (4-12) — page 33
Electronic Field Trip to Mammoth Cave (4-12) — page 31
Electronic Field Trip to the National Weather Service (5-12)
— page 34
Electronic Field Trip to a Veterinary Clinic (4-12) — page 29
KET Distance Learning AP Physics course (9-adult) — page 114
KET Distance Learning Physics course (9-adult) — page 114
program titles
F
culture and society
I Love Music!
The culture of a country experienced through
its musical
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary-6
8 minutes
School Year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 1.14, 2.16, 2.17, 2.23, 2.26
Each program, narrated by a child musician, shares the festivals, ceremonies, costumes, rhythms, and dances of his or her heritage. Viewers will be
encouraged to discover similarities and differences among cultures.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. England: Katie and Her Orchestra — Katie has ambitions to become a
musician, a conductor, or a composer
2. Japan: Yutaro and His Drum — Yutaro practices the wadaiko, a traditional Japanese drum, in preparation for a big community concert.
3. USA: Duquan Sings Gospel — A Harlem church celebrates through
gospel music
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, November 2 at 9:00/8:00 am CT (Programs 1-3; 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 8 at 9:00/8:00 am CT (Programs 1-3; 30 minutes)
My Beautiful House
C
Ways diverse cultures meet their basic needs
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary-6
8 minutes
School Year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.17, 2.19
My Beautiful House shows the structure, organization, food preparation,
sleeping arrangements, clothing, and family relationships within the
homes of three cultures.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Canada: My Indian House — Catherine Wapachee, a Cree, shows her
modern home and her teepee.
2. Ivory Coast: My House in the Ivory Coast — Soro takes us through
her daily chores at her home in the Ivory Coast in Africa.
3. USA: My loft in New York — Lino shares his top floor apartment in
NYC.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, November 2 at 9:30/8:30 am CT (Programs 1-3; 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 8 at 9:30/8:30 am CT (Programs 1-3; 30 minutes)
New or Revised for 2006/2007
C Closed Captioned
K KET Production
On KET EncycloMedia
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos • 91
SOCIALSTUDIES
culture and society
I Love Music (Primary-6)
My Beautiful House (Primary-6) C
Hand in Hand (2-3) C
Native Americans Series (2-5) C
Great Native American Leaders (3-8)
Great Native American Nations (3-8)
Native American Exhibit (4-8) K
Passport to Japan–Konnichiwa (4-8)
A Native Presence (4-12) K C
Living the Story: The Civil Rights Movement in
Kentucky (6-12) C
Living the Story: The Rest of the Story (6-12) C
Kentucky Archaeology (7-12)
economics
Entrepreneurs in Kentucky (1-12) K C
Economics: The Production, Distribution… (4-6)
Electric Money (8-12) C
geography
Kentucky GeoQuest (4) K C
Rivers of North America "The Ohio River" (4-8)
U.S. Geography: From Sea To Shining Sea (4-8)
Maps and Globes (4-12) C
Rivers of the World (4-12)
government and civics
America’s Special Days (Primary) C
My America (1-6)
America’s Veterans (2-9) C
News Quiz (4-8)
The Kentucky Legislature: Behind the Scenes (4-12) C
The Almost Painless Guide to American Civics (5-12)
Under 18: Under the Law (6-9)
U. S. Constitution (6-12)
Human Rights: Youth Perspectives (9-12) C
A Bill of Rights…(10-12)
history
Sacagawea (3-8)
Kentucky’s Story (4-5) K
Tracks: Impressions of America (4-6)
F Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trips (4-12)
Kentucky in Africa (4-12) K C
Kentucky’s Underground Railroad… (4-12) K C
Liberty Hall (4-12) C
The Prehistoric Mounds of Uruguay… (4-12) K C
Women of Kentucky: Our Legacy, Our Future (4-12) K
Pyramid (5-9)
Our Presidents in American History (5-12)
The Remarkable Clarks (5-12) K C
Roman City Modules (5-12)
Ancient Civilizations (6-12)
Great Campaigns of the Civil War (6-12)
American Voices (7-12)
Events of the 20th Century (7-12)
Kentucky Chautauqua (7-12) K
The Middle Ages (7-12)
America Past (8-12) C
Twentieth Century History (11-12)
SOCIAL STUDIES
SOCIALSTUDIES
Hand in Hand C
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
How communities function locally, regionally,
and globally
Thursday, August 17 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, January 18 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 4 hours)
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Native Americans Series C
2-3
20 minutes
School Year
$6.50 plus shipping, Call Pam McElroy at
1-888-225-4029, ext. 210
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.16, 2.18, 2.19
Introduction to North American Indian cultures
Hand in Hand provides students with the knowledge and skills needed
to understand and analyze the functioning of communities locally,
regionally, and globally.
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Back Then — What was daily life like in communities long ago?
2. Comparing Communities
3. Choices, Choices, Choices — Following directions. How do people
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.19, 2.20, 2.25, 4.5
in communities meet their wants?
4. This for That — Interpreting and Creating Flow Charts. How and
why do people in communities exchange goods, services, and products?
5. Moving On — Using timelines. How do communities change?
6. It’s the Law! — Social participation skills. How do communities
make, carry out, enforce, and manage conflicts over rules and laws.
7. Count On Me — Group interaction skills (negotiation). Communities
have rules and laws to guide behavior and establish order.
8. Where We Live — Using map symbols. How do people living in
communities adapt to and change the environment?
9. This Is the Place — Asking and answering geographical questions.
Why are communities located where they are?
10. Just Like Me and Different Too — Using bar and line graphs. Who
lives in communities?
11. Fix It — Decision-making. How do communities face and resolve
problems?
12. What's New? — Brainstorming. Will communities continue to
change?
2–5
approx. 20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
Five hundred years ago, a wide variety of Native American peoples
occupied all of the lands of North America. This series introduces
students to some of those cultures by region. Through stunning liveaction cinematography, each program shows the continuity of customs, culture, and history among the Native Americans of each region,
helping students develop appreciation and understanding of this
shared heritage.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Indians of California
2. Indians of the Northwest
3. Indians of the Plains
4. Indians of the Southeast
5. Indians of the Southwest
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, October 19 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 40 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, November 9 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 40 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, March 22 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 40 minutes)
Photo: Rick McComb
Great Native American Leaders
Native American leaders and cultures
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
3-8
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.20
Four of America's great Indian leaders, from some of the most famous
Native American tribes, are portrayed here by historic photographs
& graphics, dramatic reenactments, haunting music, and their own
words. This revision of America's Great Indian Leaders focuses the series
at the lower primary - middle school level.
92 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Chief Joseph & The Nez Perce Indians — The eloquent "Guardian
of the Nez Perce" led his people on a 1,700-mile flight from the U.S.
Army.
2. Crazy Horse & The Lakota Sioux Indians — Known as the "Sacred
Warrior of the Lakota," he refused to bring his people into submission.
3. Geronimo & The Apache Indians — The "Brilliant Medicine Man of
the Apaches" seemed to be able to use his powers to vanish and reappear, confounding pursuers.
4. Quannah Parker & The Commanche Indians — "Last Chief of the
Comanche" and the son of a white woman, he guided his people
between two worlds, white and Indian.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, October 19 at 7:40/6:40 am CT (Programs 1-4; 54 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, November 9 at 7:40/6:40 am CT (Programs 1-4; 54 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, March 22 at 7:40/6:40 am CT (Programs 1-4; 54 minutes)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, October 19 at 8:35/7:35 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 1 minute)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, November 9 at 8:35/7:35 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 1 minute)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, March 22 at 8:35/7:35 am CT
(Programs 1-6; 1 hour, 1 minute)
Native American Exhibit K
Native American crafts and storytelling
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
4–8
21 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.16, 2.20
The history and cultures of Native Americans
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
3-8
9-11 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.18, 2.19, 2.20
Six of America's representative Indian nations from five major geographic areas of common Native American cultures are portrayed here
by historic photographs & graphics, dramatic reenactments, music,
and the people's own words. This revision of America's Great Indian
Nations focuses the series at the primary-middle school levels.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. Cheyenne — A look at the North American Plains Indian people who
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
live near the Platte River and the Black Hills of South Dakota. (8:39)
Iroquois — Indians of the Northeast (A) Five warring Native
American tribes, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca,
negotiated the Great law of Peace or Iroquois league, which influenced American political thinkers. Nonetheless, the American
Revolution split the confederation, pitting old friends against each
other and signaling the decline of their culture. (10:13)
Lakota Sioux — The North American Plains Indian people living in
North and South Dakota. (11:24)
The Navajo — Overview of the country's most populous Indian
groups who live in northwestern New Mexico, Arizona, and southeastern Utah. (9:47)
Seminoles — The history and culture of the Flordia Seminoles, comprised of migrant tribes from Georgia and runaway African slaves,
who now live in Oklahoma and Florida. (9:24)
Shawnee — The history and culture of the Algonkian-speaking
Shawnee who inhabited the Ohio Valley. Tecumseh became a great
leader during their resistance unifying many native peoples until he
was tragically killed until the war of 1812. (10:56)
This program, produced by KET from footage shot at the 1994
Kentucky State Fair exhibit, features Native American crafts and
storytelling with demonstrations, photographs, and interviews with
participants.
Note: This program is offered on videotape only. See tape order information on
pages 125-126.
Passport to Japan–Konnichiwa C
A modern day trip to Japan
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4-8
20-22 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.17, 2.19, 2.20
This series is an integrated, cross-curricular approach to teaching western children in grades 4-8 about the children of contemporary Japan.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. School — Go to school for a day and see Japanese children waking
up, walking to school, and participating in the classroom.
2. Family — Spend a day with two Japanese families.
3. Community — Tour various Japanese communities for an introduction to the geography, history, and industry of Japan.
4. Traditions — Visit Kyoto, the cultural capital of Japan, to learn about
its rich and long cultural heritage.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 14 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-4; 1 hour, 24 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, February 15 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-4; 1 hour, 24 minutes)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 93
SOCIALSTUDIES
Great Native American Nations
A Native Presence K C
Kentucky’s Native American heritage and
contemporary issues
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
4–12
60 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.17, 2.19, 2.20
This KET production documents the efforts of Native Americans in
Kentucky to reconstruct their ancestors’ history in the state through
archaeological evidence as well as oral history and tradition. In particular, the program addresses myths held about Kentucky’s early history.
SOCIALSTUDIES
NOTE: This program is offered on videotape only. See tape order information
on pages 125-126.
Living the Story: The Civil Rights
Movement in Kentucky C
Personal stories of the fight for racial equality
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
6-adult
60 minutes
Unlimited
Available at Web site
$12.00, contact Carrie Dowdy
at 1-877-444-7867
Web Site:
www.ket.org/civilrights
During the 1950s and '60s, profound legal and social changes took
place in Kentucky and across America as a result of the civil
rights movement.
This documentary is designed to give a feel for the
times, to explain some of the issues that were particularly important in Kentucky, and to inspire young
people by showing how people their age have
made a difference in society.
Photo: Rick McComb
94 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
To facilitate classroom use, the hour-long video is divided into segments that may be viewed separately. Related biographies, a historical
timeline, and lesson plans written by Kentucky teachers for various
grade levels, including connections to Kentucky Core Content in social
studies, can be found at the Web site developed by KET.
Living the Story is a 2001 production of Video Editing Services,
Lexington, and the Kentucky Oral History Commission of the
Kentucky Historical Society.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 3 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
Tuesday, November 14 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT
Thursday, February 15 at 8:15/7:15 am CT
Living the Story: The Rest
of the Story C
Interviews with civil rights pioneers
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
6-12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at Web site.
$12.00 each, contact Carrie Dowdy at
1-877-444-7867
Web Site:
www.ket.org/civilrights/restofstory.htm
Streaming video available at Web site
Ky Academic Expectations: 2:20, 2:22
These 14 one-hour programs contain extended interviews with
Kentuckians featured in the documentary Living the Story: The Civil
Rights Movement in Kentucky. In unedited one-on-one conversations
taped for a Kentucky Oral History Commission project, these eyewitnesses to history tell their own moving stories of life under segregation and of the struggle for racial equality in Kentucky and in
America.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Julian Bond
2. Gov. Edward Breathitt
3. Sen. Georgia Davis Powers
4. John Jay Johnson
5. Mervin Aubespin
6. P. G. Peeples
7. Abby Marlatt
8. Blaine Hudson
9. James Howard (35:00)
10. Jennie & Alice Wilson
11. Raoul Cunningham
12. Audrey Grevious
13. Ann Braden
14. Grace Lewis (30:00)
BLOCK FEED
Thursday, August 3 at 7:00/6:00 am CT (Programs 1-3; 3 hours)
and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 4-7; 4 hours); and
Thursday, August 10 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 8-11; 3 hours,
30 minutes) and at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 12-14;
2 hours, 30 minutes)
Science and American Indian culture
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
7-12
25 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.state.ky.us/
agencies/khc/video.htm
KY Academic Expectations: 2.1, 2.2, 2.6, 2.16, 2.19, 2.20,
2.24
These short documentaries, produced by the Kentucky Heritage
Council, explore new research about the state’s rich cultural heritage.
Each episode examines a unique aspect of archaeology through interviews, artifacts, rare archival images, and video of ancient American
Indian sites.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. Ancient Fires at Cliff Palace Pond — examines landmark research on
Kentucky’s first forest managers. (10:30)
2. The Adena People: Mound-Builders of Kentucky — (6:00)
3. Saving a Kentucky Time Capsule — Archaeologists Valerie Haskins
and Dan Davis lead viewers on an unforgettable journey to see rare
legacies discovered inside a Kentucky cavern from Kentucky’s early
occupants. (9:00)
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Entrepreneurs in Kentucky K C
Kentucky businessmen and women
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
1-12
5-10 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, page 125
See below
www.econ.org
KY Academic Expectations: 2.18, 2.36, 3.4
Segments taken from KET's Kentucky Life series provide opportunities for students to learn about the lives of unique businessmen and
women living in Kentucky.
PROGRAM SEGMENTS/LENGTHS
Music
Tom T. Hall (9:21)
Arts & Crafts
James Archambeault (9:02)
Rebekka Seigel (4:37)
Ed Hamilton (5:40)
Stan Schu (4:56)
Rose Mary King (5:37)
Farming
Sunflower Farm (4:55)
Paddlefish (7:15)
Double Stink Hog Farm (4:00)
Tourism
Fort Boonesborough (4:28)
Kentucky Derby Museum (4:50)
Equine
Horse Logging (4:50)
Jockey Silks (6:05)
Fast Food
Sanders Museum and Cafe
(4:50)
Environmental
Quiet Trails Nature Preserve
(7:40)
Bernheim Forest (3:25)
Retail and Service
Valco's Barge Delivery Service
(7:00)
Abbey of Gethsemani (5:15)
Olde Tyme Toys (4:02)
Unity Wear (4:40)
Moonlight Barbecue (6:06)
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, September 27 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT (2 hours, 4 minutes)
Thursday, November 16 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (2 hours, 4 minutes)
Thursday, February 1 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (2 hours, 4 minutes)
Wednesday, April 25 at 7:45/6:45 am CT (2 hours, 4 minutes)
TEACHING MATERIALS
A curriculum package including lesson plans, activity sheets and community and curriculum connections for each school level is available
for $35 plus shipping from:
Kentucky Council on Economic Education, 4010 Dupont Circle, Suite 360,
Louisville, KY 40207, Attention: Jan Mester. Phone: (800) 436-3266, Fax:
502-893-4229, Email: [email protected]
Thursday, October 19 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (25 minutes)
Thursday, March 22 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (25 minutes)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 95
SOCIALSTUDIES
Kentucky Archaeology
economics
Economics: The Production,
Distribution and Consumption of
Goods and Services
Economic Concepts
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4-6
20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.18, 2.30, 5.1, 5.4
This five-program series introduces the basic concepts of economics
and lays a strong foundation for making wise choices in our increasingly economics-driven future.
SOCIALSTUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Resources — This program defines and illustrates the three basic
kinds of resources: natural resources, labor, and capital.
2. Producing — In this program, students learn the differences between
consumer and industrial goods and services.
3. Needs and Wants — This program defines the three basic needs
— food and water, shelter, and clothing — and shows that satisfying
those needs is a difficult problem and is not the same for all people at
all times.
4. Consuming — This program defines the three categories of consumption: durable goods, non-durable goods, and services. The student
learns the role of “opportunity cost”as people choose which goods
to consume. The program also traces the growth of consumerism
throughout the U.S. in the last part of this century.
5. Money — This program defines the five properties of money and
traces the evolution of money through history and presents the concepts of savings, checking accounts, and credit cards.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, August 24 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 25 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, January 25 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 25 minutes)
Electric Money C
Money's transformation by electric technology
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
8-12
15 - 25 minutes
School year
Downloadable at Web site
www.pbs.org/opb/electricmoney
KY Academic Expectations: 2.18, 2.30
Host Bob Cringely tells the story of the invention of the credit card
and how it has evolved into the trillion-dollar-a-year business it
is today. Electric Money examines how information technology has
expanded futures, options, and stock trading.
96 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. Evolution of Money - The progression of money from gold and silver to
paper currency and checks to electronic transfer of bank deposits. (26:00)
2. How Credit Cards Work - How companies make money from credit
cards. Should we be worried about a few companies having a
monopoly? (20:00)
3. Banks in the 20th and 21st Centuries - How modern technology has
changed the banking system. (15:00)
4. Trading Risk: Markets for Futures and Options - Which commodities
are traded on the futures market and why. (18:00)
5. The Electronic Revolution in Financial Markets - How does the stock
market work? Who gains and looses from technological innovation? (26:00)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, October 26 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 2 hours, 5 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 29 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 2 hours, 5 minutes)
geography
Kentucky GeoQuest
KC
Kentucky geography
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
4
30 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.19, 2.20, 2.24
This series shows students the incredible diversity of the state’s geographic features and gives them an understanding of how those features have influenced human life — and the ways in which humans,
in turn, have affected the land around them.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. A Statewide Ride — Molly the mapmaker meets Ricky Redbird and
together they tour Kentucky, documenting the geographic diversity
of the state and its main regions: the Jackson Purchase, the Western
Coal Field, the Pennyroyal, the Knobs, the Bluegrass, and the Eastern
Mountains and Coal Field.
2. Natural Gifts — Molly and Ricky investigate the origins of the
Kentucky landscape, visiting remnants of a virgin forest (Lilley
Cornett Woods), the Red River Gorge, Mammoth Cave, and the
Ballard Wildlife Management Area.
3. The Human Factor — Early inhabitants of Kentucky are examined
through visits to Cumberland Gap, the Wilderness Road, and Fort
Boonesboro. The program reviews Kentucky history up through the
Civil War.
4. My New Kentucky Home — Molly and Ricky explore the effects of
humans and their machines on the state’s environment, as well as the
shift from a rural to an urban society. The program also looks at some
Kentucky artists, writers, and musicians.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 14 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, November 30 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, January 11 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, May 3 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Rivers of North America
"The Ohio River" C
Natural and human geography of the Ohio River
4-8
22 minutes
School year
Available at www.filmideas.com/titlepages/
pthrus/riversna.html
KY Academic Expectations: 2.19, 2.20
"The Ohio River," from the series, Rivers of North America, looks to both
the past and the future as it explores how the Ohio River has shaped
and continues to shape the vast North American landscape. Some of
the key topics include: dams, watersheds, steamboats, fossil fuels,
tributaries, river confluences, Kansas-Nebraska Act, the Underground
Railroad, the Ice Age, the French and Indian War, and the Ohio and
Erie canals.
Photo: Rick McComb
Grade Level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, November 2 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Thursday, March 8 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Relationships among geography, history,
government, and business
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4–8
20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.18, 2.19, 2.20
This beautifully photographed series shows how geography helped
shape the history, government, and business of the United States.
Documentary segments and historic reenactments introduce prominent industries, agriculture, mining activities, and historical events
by region, and map skills are reinforced to help students place these
regions within the United States as a whole.
6. Mountain West Region — The extensive rivers, canyons, basins and
mountain ranges make this region a popular tourist destination,
which is also rich in agricultural and natural resources.
7. Pacific West Region — The Pacific region’s landscape of rain forests,
deserts, and volcanoes provide a backdrop for a prospering regional
economy based on technology and natural resource industries.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 28 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-7; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 1 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-7; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Maps and Globes C
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. South Central Region — The program explores the states of Texas,
Identification and use of different types of
maps and globes
2.
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
3.
4.
5.
Oklahoma, and New Mexico, which comprise the fastest growing
economic region in the country and the influence of Native
American and Mexican cultures.
New England Region — The states of Maine, Massachusetts,
Connecticut, Vermont, Rhode Island and New Hampshire are
featured, showing how the Atlantic Ocean and its bays contributed
to the development of the early U.S. economy.
Mid Atlantic Region — New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland,
Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia comprise this region,
whose waterways, protected bays and moderate climate combined to
make a prosperous transportation center.
Southeast Region — The region’s rich history, economy and
geography are explored.
Midwest and Great Plains Region — The rich topsoil and adequate
rainfall makes this region a flourishing agricultural zone, as well as a
region rich in natural resources.
4-12
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable Teacher's guide and blackline
masters at www.unitedlearning.com
(Search by Individual program titles.)
KY Academic Expectations: 2.19, 2.9
This program describes and illustrates the many and varied uses
and forms of maps, including software programs and Internet sites.
Information is included about the Global Positioning System. Maps
include weather maps, marine maps, tourist maps, and maps for pilots
with flight plans.
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 97
SOCIALSTUDIES
U.S. Geography:
From Sea to Shining Sea
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/AIR DATES
1. Globes and Their Use - Students will learn about key terms associ-
ated with globes such as Equator, Prime Meridian, axis, hemispheres,
latitude, longitude, compass rose, time zones, and scale model.
Demonstrations are provided for calculating the distances between
locations on the globe. (14:00) (A) Oct 17, (B) May 14
2. Maps and Their Use - This program describes and illustrates the
many and varied uses of maps. It also presents information about
GPS (Global Positioning System) (13:00) (A) Oct 18, (B) May 15
3. Using Graphs - The four main types of graphs - the line graph, the
bar graph, the circle or pie graph, and the pictograph - are discussed
and illustrated in this video. (16:00) (A) Oct 20, (B) May 16
4. Using Tables, Charts, and Diagrams - This program is about using
visual tools to organize data, represent information, organize thinking, and illustrate the workings of processes or internal workings of
machinery. (14:00) (A) Oct 23, (B) May 18
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULES
Weekly broadcast (A):
SOCIALSTUDIES
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, October 17-23
at 10:45/9:45 am CT
Weekly broadcast (B):
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, May 14-18
at 10:45/9:45 am CT
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
5. The Mississippi: Taming the River — The longest river in the United
States, the Mississippi flows south from Minnesota to the Gulf of
Mexico. This river tends to overflow its banks and silt up vital shippinig routes, so taming the river has been a long fought battle.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 28 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 40 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 1 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 40 minutes)
government and civics
America’s Special Days C
A study of the holidays in the United States
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Primary
15 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.16, 2.20
Thursday, September 7 at 9:00/8:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, January 18 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour)
Rivers of the World
America’s Special Days is a 10-program series that helps students
understand and appreciate why we celebrate certain days commonly
referred to as “holidays.” The series uses an interdisciplinary approach
that combines language arts, reading, science, math, and the fine arts
around a social studies framework. The interdisciplinary content is
included at appropriate, naturally occurring points in the programs;
not all disciplines are included in every program.
Natural and human geography of the world’s
greatest rivers
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/ SOME AIRDATES
1. New Year’s Day(s) — The celebration of the new year is investigated
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
2.
4-12
20 minutes
School year
KY Academic Expectations: 2.19, 2.20
This series explores the relationship between humans and the river
environments where they live. The programs present the universal
geographic features of river systems and the types of human settlements established along them.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Orinoco: The Natural River — This South American River begins
in the mountains of Venezuela and passes through tropical forests
inhabited by the indigenous Piaroa people before reaching the
Atlantic Ocean.
2. The Angara: Power from the River — The Angara River begins in
Lake Baikal in Central Asia and flows north to the Arctic Ocean.
Huge hydroelectric dams harness the river’s power to supply electricity for the region’s heavy industry.
3. The Danube: Transport on the River — The second longest river
in Europe, the Danube runs from Germany to the Black Sea. The
Danube is a “managed” river, with many locks and dams, but also is
home to indigenous people and unique wildlife.
4. The Nile: River of Life — The Nile is the longest river in the world,
beginning in the mountains of Central Africa and flowing north to
the Mediterranean Sea. The Nile has provided precious water for
civilizations that have inhabited this desert region.
98 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
3.
4.
5.
6.
as we follow Earth around the sun, explain the calendar, and experience several New Year activities, including the making of New Year’s
resolutions. (Monday, Jan 1 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
Martin Luther King Jr. Day/Black History Month — Fairness and
equal rights and the goals of Dr. King are depicted as we visit
important historical sites in Memphis, Atlanta, and Washington, DC.
(Friday, Jan 12 and Monday, Jan 15 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
Presidents’ Day — We honor George Washington and Abraham
Lincoln as we tour historical monuments in Washington, DC;
Mount Vernon; and Springfield New Salem, IL. (Thursday, Feb 15 at
9:45/8:45 am CT and Monday, Feb 19 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
Women’s History Month — We celebrate the contributions of women
in our society through reenactments of events in the lives of famous
women. Florence Nightingale and Amelia Earhart visit classrooms
and talk with children. (Monday, Mar 5 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
Arbor Day/Earth Day — Environmental conservation and the roles
of trees in the survival of ecosystems are discovered as we visit the
birth of Arbor Day and the rainforest of Australia. (Friday, Apr 6 at
10:45/9:45 am CT)
Memorial Day/Veterans Day — Honoring America’s veterans takes
us to several memorials, including Arlington National Cemetery,
the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and others. Students will experience the ceremonies and discover how we show respect for the men
and women who serve or have served our nation. (Thursday, Oct
26 at 8:30/7:30 am CT and Friday, Nov 10 at 9:30/8:30 am CT and
10:45/9:45 am CT)
7. Flag Day/ Citizenship Day — Respect for the flag and flag etiquette
are demonstrated as we visit the birthplace of Flag Day (Wisconsin),
a flag factory, and America’s largest Flag Day celebration.
8. Independence Day(s) — This holiday commemorates the signing of
the Declaration of Independence in 1776.
9. Native American Day — We celebrate the contributions of Native
Americans to our country’s development, including their influence
on the food we eat and the workings of our government. Successful
Native Americans share their feelings about living in two cultures.
(Thursday, Oct 26 at 8:45/7:45 am CT)
10. Thanksgiving Day — The true meaning of Thanksgiving is emphasized as we observe past and present celebrations in a wide variety
of cultural and ethnic settings. (Thursday, Oct 26 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
and Wednesday, Nov 22 at 10:45/9:45 am CT)
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULE
10. Rights and Responsibilities — The principles of the Declaration of
Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights are illustrated
11. Parents, Teachers, and Community: Working Together — This program address the involvement of parents, teachers, and community
members in a site-base managed school
12. Teaching in a Multicultural Society — This program conveys the principles of multiculturalism – the ability to hold multiple perspectives,
to see and understand different points of view, and to understand
and accept that each of these is valid
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, August 17 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, January 4 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 4 hours)
(See above for specific holiday program dates and times.)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, August 24 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, February 1 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-10; 2 hours, 30 minutes)
SOCIALSTUDIES
My America
A multicultural view of America
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
1-6
20 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.15, 2.16, 2.17, 2.20, 4.5
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. What Is a Flag? — The story of the American flag, including the
McComb
meaning behind the stars, stripes and colors
2. A Pledge Is a Promise — The meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance
and the commitment a promise
3. Neighborhood and Community — How people living together in
neighborhoods and communities work together towards common
goals
4. Liberty and Justice — Students learn the American ideals of freedom
and fairness
5. What Is an American? — The multiethnic cultural history of America
6. The Story of the National Anthem — The story of how and why the
national anthem was written
7. What Is a Democracy? — Students learn that democracy is based on
participation
8. Becoming an Active Citizen — Students learn that an active citizen is
one who participates in the world around them
9. How Our Laws Are Made — Senator Barbara Boxer and Justice Ruth
Bader Ginsburg answer children’s questions about how laws are
made
Photo: Rick
The My America series explores the basics of American government in
a way that encourages students to participate actively in their schools
and communities and to become a part of the democratic process. Two
programs in the series provide parents and teachers with instruction
on how to use the programs in a multicultural classroom.
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 99
America’s Veterans C
Veteran’s Day to Honor the Men and Women
who Protected our Country
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
2-9
24 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations:
2.14, 2.15, 2.16, 2.20
Twelve-year-old Lizzie discovers who veterans are, what they have
done, and why they should be honored. Four veterans tell their stories
and the program concludes with a Veteran’s Day parade.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
SOCIALSTUDIES
Thursday, October 26 at 8:05/7:05 am CT
Thursday, November 9 at 1:20/12:20 pm CT
Friday, November 10 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Thursday, March 29 at 8:05/7:05 am CT
News Quiz K
REGIONAL EMMY NOMINEE
Current events
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
4–8
15 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
www.ket.org/newsquiz
KY Academic Expectations: 2.17
Note: Academic Expectations addressed will vary with new topics covered each
week.
This weekly KET production features highlights from the past week’s
top news stories and includes a multiple-choice quiz concerning
aspects of each story.
The Kentucky Legislature:
Behind the Scenes C
Dramatically captures how a bill becomes a law
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
4-12
18 minutes each
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.15
Students experience the exciting twists and turns when a “fly on the
wall” camera visits the legislature, observes the governor, lobbyists,
and legislators as they maneuver for and against the passage of three
bills. With graphics to clarify the process, the programs lead viewers to
ask: Does this work? Should I be more involved?
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Overview – How A Bill Becomes Law and Bill # 1 — Mental Health
Insurance Parity. One citizen lobbyist manages to get this bill passed
despite the odds. The Issue: Mental Health is not covered as broadly
by insurance companies as physical health. The Bill: Would increase
mental health coverage.
2. Early Childhood Development — The balance of powers between executive and legislative branches is seen in debate of this bill proposed
by the Governor. The Issue: Research shows children learn from day
one. Should the state help educate parents and children before the
age of 5? The Bill: Would regulate day care centers, provide money
for more day care, create educational programs for parents and
health professionals, and provide free health exams.
3. Factory Farming — Professional lobbyists maneuver on opposing
sides. The Issue: Mass production poultry and meat is profitable for
farmers but animal waste produces environmental hazards for the
community where they are situated. The Bill: Debates regulation of
factory farms.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, October 12 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
Thursday, March 15 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULES
Live Weekly broadcast (A):
Thursdays, September 7-May 17 at 1:45/12:45 pm CT (Note: No broadcast on November 23; December 14, 21, 28; Jan 4, and April 5)
Weekly broadcast (B):
Repeats Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, September 8May 18 at 10:45/9:45 am CT (Note: No broadcast on November 24-29;
December 15-January 10; and April 6-11)
Newsquiz also airs Fridays at 2:00/1:00 pm CT on KET 1
100 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
When state legislature is in session, you
can access live coverage of chamber sessions and selected committee meetings of
the Kentucky House of Representatives and
Kentucky Senate on Digital KET5 and KET6.
The Almost Painless Guide to
American Civics
Under 18: Under the Law
Civics made fun!
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Material:
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
5-12
20-22 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.15, 2.20
Delivered in an entertaining style, this series uses contemporary and
archival footage, and computer graphics to provide a fresh approach
to the study of civics.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Executive Branch — Focuses on the origins of the executive
2.
4.
5.
6–9
45-60 minutes
Unlimited
Call 1-502-573-2350
KY Academic Expectations: 2.15, 5.1
Students will learn about the juvenile justice system, the role of the
court-designated worker, the diversion process, and the formal court
system in this two-part special.
Registration packets will be mailed to middle school teachers in early
October. For free resource materials or classroom resource speakers,
contact:
Deborah Williamson
Law-Related Education Program
Administrative Office of the Courts
100 Millcreek Park
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 573-2350
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, October 26 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-2; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, December 7 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-2; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, March 29 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-2; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, August 31 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, November 30 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, January 11 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
Block Feed IV:
Thursday, April 19 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
Photo: Rick McComb
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 101
SOCIALSTUDIES
3.
branch, the executive offices, the Cabinet, the power of Presidential
veto, and executive checks and balances. Also, it examines the
requirements and functions of the Presidency, along with the distribution of federal power between the branches
The Judicial Branch — Looks at judicial checks and balances, the
functions of the Supreme Court, and the appointment of Justices. It
also delves into judicial overview of lower courts and the power of
the Supreme Court to influence history
The Legislative Branch — Explores the functions of the legislative
branch of the U.S. government; legislative checks and balances, the
power to impeach, and the lawmaking process. It also explains the
origins of the two-house system and the structure of the Senate and
House of Representatives
The Constitution — The ideas of American Constitutional government, the theory of “We the People,” and the concepts laid out by the
Preamble
The Election Process — The process of electing a political candidate
The juvenile justice system
U.S. Constitution
The Constitution as a living document
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
6–12
30 minutes
Unlimited
Call 1-800-457-4509, ext. 4 or visit www.ait.net/
catalog
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.15, 2.20, 4.4
This series, hosted by Bill Moyers, increases students’ understanding
and awareness of the U.S. Constitution as a vital part of the American
heritage and of their own lives. Each program features a dramatic
episode in which constitutional law directly affects teenagers. The programs show the dynamism that enables the Constitution to adapt as
our country changes, the structure that balances constitutional powers
and rights, and the critical thinking skills demanded of young people
as citizens and learners.
SOCIALSTUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Limited Government and the Rule of Law — A young woman is
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
unjustly accused of vandalism.
Federalism — A young man confined to a wheelchair finds that his
school board does not want to install facilities for the handicapped.
Separation of Powers with Checks and Balances — A teenager learns
about the interactions of the three branches of government when she
discovers that an important nesting place for sea birds may become a
government-assigned nuclear waste dump.
Freedom of Expression — A young man who wants to broadcast a
prevention tape on teen suicide may be stopped by parents who fear
the program will glamorize suicide.
Equal Protection of the Laws — An older woman who is an expert
pilot may be rejected for a flying job because of her age.
The Constitution and the Economy — An artistic teenager hired to
custom-paint cars may lose his job when anti-pollution regulations
make it difficult for the shop to do business.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, November 2 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-6; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 8 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-6; 3 hours)
Human Rights: Youth Perspectives C
See young people learning about and acting on
human rights issues
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
9-12
15 minutes
School year
Call 1-800-457-4509, ext. 4 or visit
www.ait.net/catalog
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.16, 2.17, 2.20, 4.5
Linking the human rights violations of the past with current events,
this series features Presidential Classroom Scholars studying human
rights issues in Washington D.C. for two weeks. Students hold debates
on the roles of citizens in a democracy and the value of personal action
in promoting human dignity in their communities.
102 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Japanese-American Internment Camps: Human Rights Violations
Presidential Scholars from around the world tour the National
Museum of American History exhibit, “A More Perfect Union?”
to learn about the internment of Japanese Americans during
World War II. Later, the students interview survivors of these
internment camps.
2. Learning from the Holocaust — The Presidential Scholars visit the
National Holocaust Museum and meet Holocaust survivors, officials from the German and American governments and members of
Human Rights Watch, a not-for-profit group promoting civil rights
for all global citizens.
3. The Price of Silence: Students Speak Out at the Front Lines
— Students at a Coeur D’Alene high school, recent site of a militarystyle parade by members of the Aryan Nation, form a Human Rights
Club. The program features members of the high school club and the
Coeur D’Alene community work to counter the aggressive activities
of hate groups.
4. Creating a Human Rights Agenda — The Presidential Scholars debate
global human rights issues. In the program, views are encouraged to
explore the role of citizens in upholding human rights in the United
States and abroad.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 28 at 8:30/7:30 am CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 1 at 8:30/7:30 am CT (Progrms 1-4; 1 hour)
A Bill of Rights: What No Just
Government Should Refuse
Civics and government
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
10–12
30 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations:
2.14, 2.15, 2.20
This film recounts the demand for a bill of rights, voiced by
Jefferson and Madison, and Madison’s struggle against an unwilling Congress to attach such amendments to the new Constitution.
Through the eyes of these founders, engaged in the fight to secure
our rights, the film looks at the Bill of Rights issues that confront
the nation today — religion in the classroom, the death penalty,
civil rights.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, October 12 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT
Thursday, March 15 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT
history
Sacagawea C
A reenactment of the Lewis & Clark expedition
through a young person's eyes
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Materials:
3-8
15-17 minutes
School year
Email [email protected]
(free for classroom teachers)
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.19, 2.20
Sacajawea's storytelling of the epic journey of Lewis and Clark
becomes an historic adventure. This reenactment of America's most
important exploration through the eyes of a teenager is shown with
the Native American point of view giving their contribution to the
success of this exploration. Episodes are rich with wildlife, tribal lore,
and clear, concise maps of the undiscovered wilderness.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. St. Louis to Ft. Mandan — Sacajawea shares what the two captains had
Thursday, August 31 at 7:45/6:45 am CT
(Programs 1-9; 2 hours, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, November 21 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-9; 2 hours, 15 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, February 15 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-9; 2 hours, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, April 24 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-9; 2 hours, 15 minutes)
Tracks: Impressions of America C
Tracing this country’s greatest historical events
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Material:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, October 12 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 15 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Kentucky’s Story K
Historical perspective on early Kentucky
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
4–5
15 minutes
Unlimited
Download at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.19, 2.20
Kentucky’s Story presents a re-creation of what life in Kentucky was
like at different times in history, beginning with the American Indians
who were here when the first white settlers arrived. The focus in each
program is on what a typical 10-year-old might have experienced during the various periods. Viewers see how early Kentuckians dressed,
cooked, played, spoke, and worked. The series is not meant to convey
a great many facts or detailed information, but rather to give a feel for
the issues and emotions of the times.
4–6
15 minutes
Unlimited
Lesson plans and worksheets downloadable at
Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.ecb.org/tracks
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.20
This series reflects the experiences of two young adults who investigate U.S. history as they travel by rail across the country. While learning about historical events, they also discover the relevance of those
events to the present day.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/AIR DATES
1. Trekking Across Our Land — Describes the early migration of people
from Asia to North America (Jan 16)
2. Spain Comes to America — Introduces some of the first European
explorers in the Americas and describes their influence on colonization (Jan 17)
3. Early European Settlements — Describes the motivation and goals of
early English settlers at Jamestown and their interaction with Native
Americans (Jan 19)
4. Seeds of Revolution — In Boston, Issy and Duncan learn about the
diverse beliefs and independent thinking that laid the groundwork
for the American Revolution (Jan 22)
5. Independence — Issy discusses the state of the colonies with the
character Ben Franklin in Philadelphia (Jan 23)
6. The New Nation — Focuses on the creation of the Constitution and
sketches the three branches of the federal government. (Jan 24)
7. Westward Ho! — The territorial expansion of European settlers and
their effect on Native Americans; a visit to the Cumberland Gap is
included (Jan 26)
continued on next page
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 103
SOCIALSTUDIES
learned of the wilderness and of the Indian nations in their journey.
(15:53)
2. Over the Rockies to the Pacific — A moving reenactment of
Sacajawea's invaluable contributions to the journey and her survival.
(15:22)
3. Ft. Clatsop & the Journey Home — As the expedition makes the
trip back across the west, an important decision about where to
build the fort is brought to a vote, possibly the first instance in
North America's history that a woman (Sacajawea) and an African
American (York) are given the right to vote on an important issue.
(16:54)
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Early Kentucky
2. The Lure of the Middle Grounds
3. Survival of a People
4. The Need for Statehood
5. Slavery in Kentucky
6. Civil War
7. Schoolmarm
8. Riverboats and Railroads
9. The Birthday Party
8. Divided and United — The causes of the Civil War and its effects
on the American people; program connects the events of the Civil
War with the Civil Rights movement during a visit to Montgomery,
Alabama (Jan 29)
9. The Urbanization of America — Milwaukee, Wisconsin is the site to
describe the waves of immigration that changed social patterns and
labor relations in the late 19th century (Jan 30)
10. The Road to Mount Rushmore — Explores the development of mining, ranching, agriculture and the railroads, and the strained relations between settlers and Native Americans (Jan 31)
11. America at War — Discusses America’s reluctance to enter World
War I and World War II (Feb 2)
12. Changing Times and Modern Industries — Examines the Cold War
and the dangers and promise of the Atomic Age (Feb 5)
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, January 16-February 5
at 10:45/9:45 am CT
5. The Slave Trade — Beginning with the American Revolution, this
program explores the U.S. law of 1807 that abolished the transAtlantic slave trade. Meet the people who were involved in or influenced by this pivotal legislation: the slaves, plantation owners, slaveship captains, common seamen, government officials, Navy officers,
and anti-slavery activists. (Live at 10:00/9:00 am CT on Feb 15)
6. Made in America — Throughout America's history, advances in technology have revolutionized the nature of work several times over.
This trip through three centuries examines technology's effects on
labor, the family, and how people perceive their jobs.
(Live at 10:00/9:00 am CT on Mar 22)
7. Jamestown Unearthed — Take a look at how history is written and
reevaluated as new methods of study are introduced. Using the
example of Jamestown in 1607, explore the myths and misconceptions of that era: revisit the documents, artifacts, and other evidence
through archaeology. Learn how every generation sees the evidence
in new ways, and how this affects our understanding of the past.
(Live at 10:00/9:00 am CT on Apr 26)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
*Purchasing teacher materials through the Web Site secures extended taping
rights.
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULE
SOCIALSTUDIES
Thursday, September 7 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, February 8 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours)
Colonial Williamsburg
Field Trips Season 2006-2007
Exploring colonial life in America
Grade level:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Web Site:
4-12
60 minutes
10 days*
Order at Web site or call 1-800-761-8331
www.history.org/trips
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.15, 2.20
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/AIR DATES
1. Yorktown — The story of the people of the small town of York during
the Revolutionary War siege in October, 1781, the ripples it caused
internationally, and how it defined future events. How the military
men planned, how the soldiers fought, and how civilizns fared.
(Live at 10:00/9:00 am CT on Oct 19)
2. Degrees of Latitude — Charting the New World was the task of
American surveyors and European mapmakers. This is a 21st-century look at the craftsmanship and importance of 18th-century mapmaking —revealing to student historians the geography of a rapidly
changing world.(Live at 10:00/9:00 am CT on Nov 16)
3. Buying Respectability — By 1700, the demand for goods and services
led to a "consumer revolution." Explore the 18th century's changing
economy, including the status symbols of this class society, social
mobility, taxation, the monetary system, and the impact of British
mercantilism on America. (Live at 10:00/9:00 am CT on Dec 14)
4. Influenced by None — "Freedom of the press" is a principle that
Americans take for granted. Eighteenth-century printers, though,
were not free to express independent points of view. Explore the
world of Clementina Rind, printer of the Virginia Gazette in preRevolutionary War America. (Live at 10:00/9:00 am CT on Jan 18)
104 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
WEEKLY BROADCAST SCHEDULES
Live Broadcast (A):
Thursdays at 10:00/9:00 am CT (See above for dates.)
Weekly Broadcast (B):
Repeats the following Thursdays at 10:00/9:00 am CT before the next
live program.
Kentucky in Africa K C
Exploring Social Studies in Africa and Kentucky
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Teaching Materials:
Videocassette:
4–12
24 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at
www.ket/org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.19, 2.20
A Kentucky Life special which focuses on the emigration of
Kentuckians to the nation of Liberia, West Africa. In the 1800's, before
and after the Civil War, around 15,000 freed American slaves went to
live in Africa. This video traces the ex-slaves journey from Kentucky in
America to Kentucky in Africa. As they arrived in Africa they formed
their own independent country, "Little America" as some called it.
They named their towns after American names such as "Kentucky in
Africa" and "Clay-Ashland". These towns are still there today and in
many ways they live like Americans. This program allows students to
experience first-hand this historical relationship by hearing the stories
of the actual people involved speak in their own words. People like
Abraham Lincoln, Henry Clay, Alfred Russell (a president of Liberia
from Kentucky) and many more.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, October 19 at 12:30 pm/11:30 am CT
Thursday, March 22 at 12:30 pm/11:30 am CT
Kentucky’s Underground Railroad:
Passage to Freedom K C
PBS Eddie Award Winner
Trace Kentucky’s tracks on the Underground
Railroad
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4–12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
See order form, pg. 125
www.ket.org/underground
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.19, 2.20, 2.26, 4.5
Kentucky’s location on the border of slave and nonslave states and
its unique geography as the only state surrounded on three sides by
rivers, created opportunities for people who were willing to risk their
lives to live in freedom, and those willing to risk everything to help
them. KET’s documentary, Kentucky’s Underground Railroad – Passage to
Freedom, tells the stories of fugitive slaves and anti-slavery advocates
in Kentucky.
Thursday, September 14 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Tuesday, November 21 at 2:15/1:15 pm CT
Thursday, January 11 at 9:00/8:00 am CT
Tuesday, April 24 at 2:15/1:15 pm CT
KENTUCKY’S UNDERGROUND RAILROAD WEB SITE
Includes a brief history of slavery in Kentucky; teacher resources;
audio and video segments from the documentary, including additional footage not seen in the broadcast; and a discussion forum. The
Web site promotes historical preservation and community research to
document more stories of the fugitive slave movement in Kentucky.
In addition, it includes arts and humanities resources and discussion
questions. Kentucky’s Underground Railroad Professional Development
Series–see page 121
Liberty Hall
Thursday, October 19 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Thursday, March 22 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
The Prehistoric Mounds of
Uruguay: Linking the Past
and the Future K C
Exploring archaeology in South America
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
4-6
24 minutes
Unlimited
Videocassette:
Web Site:
See order form, pg. 125
www.dinacyt.gub.uy/proykent/index_i.htm
Print Materials:
Teacher and Student materials available at
Web site
KY Academic Expectations: 2.19, 2.20, 2.21, 2.28
Product of a cultural and educational exchange project between the
governments of Uruguay and Kentucky, this video introduces the
principles of archaeological field research and raises awareness of the
importance of preserving our cultural heritage. South American students help archaeologists collect data at a prehistoric site in Uruguay
that was occupied by a mound-building society, then return to the
classroom to use what they have learned to explore topics in social
studies and language learning. The program will air in both English
and Spanish versions. The Web site, which includes background information on the project and links to related resources, is also bilingual.
Note: The schedule for the Spanish version Los Constructores de Cerritos
del Uruguay: Uniendo el Pasado y el Futuro is located on page 36.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 31 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT
Thursday, January 4 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
C
Explore the home of a founding Kentucky family
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
4-12
20 Minutes
School year
For 4th-6th grade materials visit
www.libertyhall.org
$18.00 To order, email [email protected]
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.15, Z2.16, 2.20
Take a trip to Frankfort and back through time to see the lives of the
Browns at Liberty Hall. This video will show students the beautiful
historic home built in 1796 while describing what life was like for
one family as they moved to and settled in the muddy backwater of
Frankfort.
During this video, students will learn what life was like in Kentucky's
early statehood; learn about governmental changes that took place in
the U.S. around 1800; hear the story of Liberty Hall's ghost, the Gray
Lady; and see maps, engravings, and paintings from the 18th and 19th
centuries.
www.ket.org/education/newsletters
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 105
SOCIALSTUDIES
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Women of Kentucky:
Our Legacy, Our Future K
Kentucky Women Leaders – Past and Present
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4–12
60 minutes
Unlimited
Downloadable at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.womeninkentucky.com
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.15, 2.16, 2.20
SOCIALSTUDIES
Through interviews with women leaders, primary documents, and
brief biographical sketches, this film encourages young people to
become more committed to Kentucky’s political process by becoming
grassroots advocates and future office holders. The program inspires
interest in Kentucky history, focusing on the fine heritage of its
women, and promotes the values of citizenship and public service by
documenting the progress of women in positions of community leadership and elected office.
NOTE: This program is offered on videotape only. See tape order information
on pages 125-126.
Pyramid C
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. What Was Ancient Egypt Like? — geography of Egypt; importance
of the Nile; unification of Upper and Lower Egypt; dynasties; social
structure; religious beliefs; creation myth; mummification techniques
2. Why Were the Pyramids Built? — myth of Osiris; development of
pyramid complexes; importance of pyramid shape; social, cultural,
religious, and political significance of pyramids
3. How Were the Pyramids Built? — ancient tools and construction
techniques; theories of construction; statistics about the size of the
pyramid; pyramid builders; Tutankhamen’s tomb; hieroglyphics; the
Rosetta Stone; archaeology; dynasty review
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, August 24 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, February 15 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Our Presidents In America’s History
Personal and historical profiles
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
5-12
9-13 Minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.16, 2.20
Ancient Egypt and the pyramids
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
5–9
20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.19, 2.20
Based on the book by David Macaulay, Pyramid takes us on a voyage
of discovery to see and feel the mystery, romance, and overwhelming splendor of ancient Egypt and the pyramids during the Fourth
Dynasty of the Old Kingdom (c. 2500 BC).
Photo: Rick McComb
106 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
This revision of Portraits of American Presidents focuses on individual
Presidents' influence on the historical events of their eras, shortens
each program to correlate better with classroom units of study, provides better graphic details in maps, omits on-camera commentators,
and adds two programs: #1. "The Making of America's Presidency,"
and #17, "G.H.W. Bush, Clinton & G.W. Bush.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS/LENGTHS
1. Making of America's Presidency — Shows how our early history
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Thursday, August 31 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-17, 3 hours, 15 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, January 25 at 6:00/5:00 am CT
(Programs 1-17, 3 hours, 15 minutes)
The Remarkable Clarks
KC
A docudrama on one of Kentucky's most famous
families
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
Upper elementary-12
30 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
www.locustgrove.org/
KY Academic Expectations: 2.20, 2.22
Captain William Clark of Lewis and Clark was the younger brother
of Louisville founder and Revolutionary War hero General George
Rogers Clark. As part of the bicentennial celebration of the Lewis and
Clark expedition, KET's production of The Remarkable Clarks looks back
over the lives of the two brothers and their sister, Lucy Clark Croghan.
This docu-drama was staged at the Croghan home-Locust Grove in
Louisville — which in the early 19th century was a gathering place for
the prominent political and social figures of the day.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, October 12 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Thursday, March 15 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Roman City Modules C
Ancient Roman engineering and technology
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
5–12
20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.15, 2.19, 2.20
Author/illustrator David Macauley visits sites throughout the ancient
Roman Empire to point out examples of the remarkable achievements of
Roman engineers and show how their architectural principles and technical innovations are still reflected in our civic construction projects.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. People and Society — comparisons between Roman cities and modern cities.
2. The Built Environment — Roman innovations in materials and construction techniques.
3. Daily Life
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, August 10 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, February 15 at 3:00/2:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 107
SOCIALSTUDIES
7.
fortuitously led to George Washington, and prepares us for the later
growth of Presidential power. (12:10)
George Washington — Features Washington's establishment of
Presidential dignity with democratic forbearance during the
Revolutionary War and the creation of the Constitution. (9:11)
John Adams & Thomas Jefferson — The rise of political parties, the
XYZ Affair, Marbury v. Madison, and the Louisiana Purchase were
among the great events during these presidents tenure (12:43)
Madison & Monroe — Both deal with foreign threats in the War of
1812 and the Monroe Doctrine. (12:53)
J.Q. Adams, Jackson & Van Buren — Features injustices to African
and Native Americans while white Americans are moving west.
(12:45)
Harrison, Tyler, Polk, & Taylor — As the Westward Movement and
Manifest Destiny gained momentum, controversies about slavery,
border disputes, and territorial rights were reflected in President conflicts and short, unmemorable terms of office. (12:29)
Fillmore, Pierce, & Buchanan — Features the Kansas-Nebraska Act,
the Dred Scott decision, founding of the Republican Party, and John
Brown's raid. (9:19)
Abraham Lincoln — Remembered for his great writing and tragic
character, Lincoln was dedicated to keeping the Union intact, delaying emancipation of the slaves and suspending some legal rights
during the Civil War. (10:20)
Johnson, Grant, & Hayes — The Reconstruction period seriously
damaged the Presidency with Johnson's impeachment, Grant's corruption scandal, and Hayes election fraud. Also the Gilded Age of
economic expansion, western outlaws, Edison's inventions, and massive immigration. (11:02)
Garfield, Arthur, Cleveland, & Harrison — Features Garfield's assassination, industrialization, Urbanization, and immigrations. As
America's frontier closes world affairs expand. (12:52)
Cleveland, McKinley, & Theodore Roosevelt — Features Cleveland's
economic problems, McKinley's economic upturn, and growing
American wealth and power during Roosevelt's Term of office. (9:54)
Taft, Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, & Hoover — Features World War I,
League of Nations, business boom of the 20's, and growing military
shadows. (12:39)
Franklin D. Roosevelt — Contrasts his own handicap and his famous
speeches against fear with the crises of the Great Depression and
World War II. Moving documentary footage creates an experience of
history both sweeping and personal. (10:10)
Truman, Eisenhower, & Kennedy — Features WWII ending with the
Atomic Bomb, the Marshall Plan, and the Truman Doctrine. The
popular Eisenhower continues the Cold War. The stylish Kennedy
succeeds with the Cuban Missile Crisis, but assassination cuts his
promise short. (12:05)
Johnson, Nixon, & Ford — Features the Great Society, the Voting
Rights Acts, Civil Rights victories, and the Vietnam War. Martin
Luther King's and Robert Kennedy's assassination shock the world.
The Watergate affair forces Nixon to resign. (12:18)
Carter, Reagan, & G.H.W. Bush — Features Middle East problems, the
Iran Contra scandal, recession, and the end of the communist threat.
Reagan restores some Presidential prestige. (11:07)
Clinton & G.W. Bush — Clinton's presidency was undermined by an
increasingly apathetic public, a Republican legislature, and personal
scandals. G.W. Bush took office with an Electoral College victory
despite losing the popular vote, soon finding his attention focused
mainly on Terrorism. (8:56)
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Ancient Civilizations C
World history
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
6–12
30 minutes
School year
Downloadable at www.ket.org/education/guides
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.19, 2.20, 2.25
This six-part series studies the ancient civilizations of China, India,
Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Meso-America from the
invention of writing 5,000 years ago to the fall of Rome in 450 A.D.
SOCIALSTUDIES
The programs are skills-based, stimulating comparison, analysis, synthesis, and conclusion, and are organized thematically. By examining
the basic human search for food, security, and creativity, the series
traces the development of ancient economies, governments, and cultures. The daily life of the inhabitants of the various civilizations is
explored using models, reconstructions, and actual artifacts. Particular
attention is paid to the role of women in each society. Maps and animation are used to present lateral time comparisons.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Beginning Is in the End
2. Balancing the Budget — The invention of agriculture and the subse-
3.
4.
5.
6.
quent domestication of animals gradually led to economies based on
trade. This evolution is studied in detail in Egypt. The program also
looks at the Minoans and Phoenicians.
Safekeeping — This study of ancient systems of security reveals how
these systems evolved into sophisticated governments and codes of
law. Athens and Sparta are contrasted, and the Etruscans and republican Rome are examined.
On the Town — The cultural high points of ancient civilizations are
examined, with a focus on the Golden Age of Greece.
Legacies — The debt we owe to past civilizations — in particular,
Rome — is explored.
The End Is in the Beginning — The reasons for the decline and fall of
the civilizations explored in this series are examined.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, August 24 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-6; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, January 11 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-6; 3 hours)
Great Campaigns of the Civil War
2. The Killing Grounds — Covers the major battles of 1862 beginning
with Shiloh and ending with Antietam
3. The Confederate Resurgence — Traces the period from late 1862 to
1863 including the battle of Gettysburg
4. The Turning Tide and the Final Peace — Chronicles the confrontation between Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee at the Battles of
Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburg, including
Sherman’s capture of Atlanta and subsequent “March to the Sea”
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, November 2 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 8 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
American Voices C
Using interviews from the Federal Writers'
Project -- A look at America between the wars
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Program Notes:
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.16, 2.17, 2.20
In the late 1930's, the U.S. Government commissioned an oral history
project in which thousands of ordinary Americans took part. They
described their lives and experiences: immigrants who came in search
of the American dream; Americans who flourished in the boom times,
then lost it all in the crash; poor farmers in the South; meatpackers in
the North; and New Deal relief workers. The powerful human narratives, archival film, and historic photographs combine to provide a
unique and interesting look at American's lives.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Immigrant America — Between 1900-1917, eight million Immigrants
2.
3.
4.
Realistic reenactments of pivotal battles
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
6–12
30 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.20, 2.24
This award-winning series brings the Civil War to life through portraits and readings from letters, speeches, and diaries.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. First Blood — Chronicles the battles at Fort Sumter, Manassas, and
Fort Donelson, and the prevailing issues of the Civil War’s first years
108 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
7-12
24 minutes
School year
http://pmi.itmonline.com/netnotes/
(click on American Voices)
5.
crossed the Atlantic to start a new life. Could America fulfill all of
their expectations for success and prosperity?
Boom and Bust — The Roaring Twenties and the Jazz Age after the
horrors of World War I was a boom time of prosperity and pleasure.
How real was the prosperity for most Americans, and why did the
good times crash in 1929?
Hard Times — In the early 1930's, the U.S. experienced the worst
depression in her history. Fifteen million Americans lost their jobs.
Whas was it like to live through the Great Depression?
New Deal — In 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt toured the country and
promised a New Deal for the American people. How successful
would his New Deal prove in tackling the challenges ahead?
Black America — In the early decades of the 20th century, Black
Americans experienceed a harsh side to America's promise as land of
the free. How real for them was the American Dream?
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 28 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 2 hours, 1 minute)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, November 7 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 2 hours, 1 minute)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, January 4 at 12:30 pm/11:30 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 2 hours, 1 minute)
Block Feed IV:
Tuesday, April 10 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-5; 2 hours, 1 minute)
Events of the 20th Century
From the horror of the Holocaust to the triumph
of the moon landing
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Material:
7–12
15 minutes
School year
Downloadable at
www.ket.org/education/guides
The Kentucky Humanities Council celebrates the state’s bicentennial,
sponsoring a series of traveling stage shows in which actors portrayed
characters from Kentucky history. This KET production offers five of
the performances:
•
•
•
Nancy Sherburne as Belle Brezing, the notorious Lexington madam.
Laura Lee Duncan O’Connell as Cora Wilson Stewart, the adult education pioneer who opened the “Moonlight Schools.”
George T. Vaughn as the Rev. Elisha Green, a former slave who
became a Baptist minister and fought for civil rights.
Jimmy Lowe as author Jesse Stuart.
Vic Hellard Jr. as Edwin Porch Morrow, Kentucky's Republican governor from 1919 to 1923, who championed women's rights, fair tax
assessments, governmental accountability, and, above all, education
reform.
KY Academic Expectations: 2.14, 2.15, 2.16, 2.20
•
•
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Apollo XI — Through a captivating musical montage of graphics and
NOTE: This program is offered on videotape only. See tape order information
on pages 125-126.
2.
The Middle Ages
This series provides insight into the major historical events of the 20th
century. Each program blends archival footage and interviews to give
students a unique look at the momentous occurrences of the period.
3.
5.
6.
7.
8.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 7 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, February 8 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 2 hours)
Kentucky Chautauqua K
Characters from Kentucky history
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
7–12
60 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
English history in the 14th and 15th centuries
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
7–12
20 minutes
School year
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.20
Each program focuses on a different aspect of life, showing the everyday
lives of peasants, traders, church officials, and townspeople and how
their lives influenced changes in political and social movements, architecture, religion, government, and commerce. All programs incorporate
source materials or evidence from the period, even when dramatized.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. The Peasants’ Revolt — the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381 from the per-
spectives of both the peasants and King Richard II
2. The Castle — evolution of castle design and the changing
role of the castle
3. The Church — a variety of perspectives on the role of religion
4. The Town — why towns developed and what life was like in them
5. The Traders — the importance and complexity of the medieval wool
industry; modes of travel during the Middle Ages
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 7 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, November 14 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
Block Feed III:
Thursday, February 8 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, April 17 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
(Programs 1-5; 1 hour, 45 minutes)
KY Academic Expectations: 2.20, 2.26
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 109
SOCIALSTUDIES
4.
archival film footage, viewers gain an overview of the mission from
blast off to splash down. Extensive insight is provided by Apollo XI
astronaut Buzz Aldrin
Chernobyl: Lessons Learned — A brief history of the nuclear
disaster at Chernobyl; the program also explains how people continue to be affected to this day
JFK Assassination: Transfer of Power — The role the death of John
F. Kennedy played in modifying the United States Constitution, the
transition of presidential power, and the safety of future presidents
Lessons of the Holocaust — This program examines the persecution
of Jews in Nazi Germany and demonstrates that the ideas and opinions of that time are still prevalent in our society today
Martin Luther King: Civil Rights Movement — The Civil Rights
Movement through the words of Dr. Martin Luther King; excerpts
from some of his most stirring speeches are put into context through
the recollections of people who knew him best
Return to Vietnam — A history of the conflict in Vietnam: what led
up to it, how the United States became involved, and what happened
prior to the North Vietnamese invasion of Saigon
Conversation with Rosa Parks — Students will learn the importance of
knowing their own heritage and standing up for what they believe in
Return to Auschwitz — This program will take the viewer on a tour of
Auschwitz, the most notorious Nazi “death camp” of World War II.
Several survivors who have returned to Auschwitz after a half-century
tell their forced inarceration and the hardships they had to endure
America Past C
Development of America from the
Colonial period to the eve of the Civil War
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
8–12
15 minutes
Unlimited
Call 1-800-457-4509, ext. 206 or visit www.ait.net
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.19, 2.20, 2.25
America Past provides teachers with opportunities to enhance their
American history courses by emphasizing social history while providing direct and clear connections to the curriculum, extending and
enriching typical textbook content, and highlighting personal experiences and dramatic events.
SOCIALSTUDIES
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. New Spain — how the Spanish affected ways of life and culture in
the New World
2. New France — how the French influenced ways of life and culture in
North America
3. Southern Colonies — the influence of the plantation system on other
aspects of Southern life
4. New England Colonies — the role of religion; the hardships faced by
early settlers at Plymouth; how geography affected ways of life
5. Canals and Steamboats — how the Mississippi and Ohio rivers
affected east-west trade; life on the early canals and steamboats
6. Roads and Railroads — how changes in land transportation affected
regional and national developments
7. The Abolitionists — goals of the abolitionists; Garrison and Douglas;
Northern and Southern reaction to the abolitionists
8. The Role of Women — the beginnings and the development of the
women's rights movement
9. Social Life — 19th-century family life; population changes; reform
movements; medicine
10. Moving West — factors that motivated Americans to move westward; Manifest Destiny
11. The Industrial North — Industrial Revolution; industry in the North;
effects of industrialization
12. The Antebellum South — social classes in the pre-Civil War era
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, September 14 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, April 5 at 12:30 pm/11:30 am CT (Programs 1-12; 3 hours)
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Make Germany Pay — Chronicles the aftermath of World War I in
Germany
2. Boom and Bust — The story of the development of the modern consumer society in America and its sudden crash in 1929
3. Hitler’s Germany — The rise of Adolph Hitler and the Nazi party
4. Roosevelt and the New Deal — The Federal programs designed to
provide Americans relief from the Great Depression
5. Stalin and the Modernization of Russia — Chronicles the industrial
and agricultural reforms initiated by the Communist Party and the
persecution of their opponents
6. Why Appeasement? — British Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain’s
historic visit to Munich in 1938 in which Czechoslovakia was effectively ceded to Germany to avoid involving Britain and France in a
world war.
7. Britain Alone — Covers the Battle of Britain and the Battle of the
Atlantic during World War II, ending with the involvement of Russia
and the United States
8. Pearl Harbor to Hiroshima — The war between Japan and the United
States
9. The Road to Berlin — World War II from 1942 to 1945, including the
Soviet victory over Germany, the bombing of London, German surrender and opening of the concentration camps
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Thursday, October 12 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-9; 3 hours)
Block Feed II:
Thursday, March 15 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-9; 3 hours)
See Also...
Twentieth Century History
Appleseed John (3-7) — page 23
Major events in modern world history
Electronic Field Trip to Perryville (4-12) — page 31
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Electronic Field Trip to the Mountain Home Place (4-12) - page 33
11–12
20 minutes
School year
Call 1-217-359-6130
KY Academic Expectations: 2.16, 2.18, 2.20, 4.5
Designed and produced for classroom use, this series illuminates the
events and issues that have been critical in shaping modern world history. Drawing on archival footage, animated maps, and contemporary
illustrations, the programs document actions that have reverberated
around the world.
110 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Econ and Me (primary-5) — page 50
Electronic Field Trip to White Hall Historic Site,
Home of Cassius M. Clay (4-12) — page 35
Humanities Connections (7-12) — page 17
Teach Me Japanese (Primary-5) — page 37
A World of Our Own: Kentucky Folkways (8-12) — page 26
TECHNOLOGY & MEDIA
program titles
F
F
KET School Video Project 2006:
My Kentucky Home (K-12) K C
KET School Video Project 2007:
My Kentucky Home (K-12) K C
Media Mania (Primary-4)
Making News Quiz (4-12) K C
Hollywood Homeroom: Producing Classroom
Videos with Hollywood Magic (K-12)
Making Grimm Movies (6-12)
Mountain Media (9-12)
F
New or Revised for 2006/2007
C Closed Captioned
K KET Production
KET School Video Project 2006:
My Kentucky Home
K-12 student-produced documentaries
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
K-12
2 hours
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
This KET production shows examples of K-12 student videos from
around Kentucky. See the work of these talented young producers.
This year’s theme of My Kentucky Home emphasizes Kentucky history as a social studies project.
K-12 student-produced documentaries
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
K-12
TBA
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
Streaming video will be available at Web site
after May 15
Web Site:
www.ket.org/education/video_project.htm
KY Academic Expectations: 1.16, 2.20, 2.22, 2.36, 2.37, 2.38,
5.2
This KET production will show examples of K-12 student videos from
around Kentucky. See the work of these talented young producers.
This year’s theme of My Kentucky Home emphasizes Kentucky history as a social studies project.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, May 15 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
Tuesday, May 15 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT
Thursday, May 17 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Thursday, May 17 at 2:00/1:00 pm CT
Media Mania
Information literacy for elementary students
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Primary–4
20 minutes
School year
See order form, pg. 124
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.1, 1.10, 5.3
Works submitted from Anderson Co High, Appalachian Media
Institute; Appalshop, Bardstown High, Bourbon Co Middle, Cartmell
Elementary, Central Hardin High, Corbin High, Fairvew High, Gray
Middle, Henderson Co High, Jackson Co High, Kentucky School for
the Deaf, Lakeside Elementary, LaRue Co Intermediate, Lebanon
Middle, Lewis Co High, McDowell Elementary, Meadow View
Elementary, Munfordville Elementary, Newburg Middle, Newport
Middle, Oldham Co High, Providence Elementary, Shearer Elementary,
Simon Kenton High, Sorgho Elementary, South Elementary, Warren
Central High, and Whitley Co High
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Photo: Rick McComb
Tuesday, September 5 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
Tuesday, December 12 at 7:00/6:00 am CT
Tuesday, February 6 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 111
TECHNOLOGY&MEDIA
Streaming video available at Web site
Web Site:
www.ket.org/education/video_project.htm
KY Academic Expectations: 1.16, 2.20, 2.22, 2.36, 2.37, 2.38,
5.2
KET School Video Project 2007:
My Kentucky Home
Media Mania helps 2nd, 3rd, and 4th graders learn to use the
library media center. Mortimer, a lovable media monster, helps
kids have fun learning about card catalogs, the Dewey decimal
system, fiction and nonfiction books, and doing research.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Fiction/Nonfiction
2. Card Catalog
3. Research
4. Reference
How to use the video camera effectively
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 8 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, January 9 at 2:30/1:30 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour, 20 minutes)
Making News Quiz K C
See how a professional news program is produced
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
4-12
20 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
Streaming video available at Web site
www.ket.org/newsquiz
KY Academic Expectations: 2.20, 2.22, 2.36, 2.37, 2.38
Making News Quiz looks behind the scenes at KET’s weekly live current
events program for 4-8th graders. The students will see video of the
News Quiz team planning, writing, producing, and broadcasting the
program.
TECHNOLOGY&MEDIA
Hollywood Homeroom:
Producing Classroom Videos
With Hollywood Magic
Interviews with the News Quiz crew demonstrate how the program is
based on the writing process. The program also models good production values for school video producers. See how it’s done by watching
Making News Quiz on KET3 or online in the streamed Web version at
the News Quiz website. A KET production.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 14 at 1:25/12:25 pm CT
Thursday, October 19 at 1:25/12:25 pm CT
Tuesday, November 7 at 8:00/7:00 am CT
Tuesday, April 10 at 8:30/7:30 am CT
Photo: Rick McComb
112 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
K-12
15 minutes
School year
Contact Ann Tsao at 213-241-4007 or
email [email protected]
KY Academic Expectations: 2.22, 3.4, 5.2
Hollywood Homeroom: Producing Classroom Videos With Hollywood Magic
is a series of four programs that address how to use the video camera more effectively. From pre-production planning, to framing shots
properly, to editing the finished product, Hollywood Homeroom offers
practical tips to make classroom videos outstanding. Students can use
the video medium to demonstrate their knowledge in all of the curricular areas. The series features classroom teachers who are in various
stages of video production. Teachers and students share their experiences and discuss issues that beginners should consider.
PROGRAM TITLES
1. Getting Started: Choosing a Subject
2. Pre-Production
3. Getting into Production
4. Post-Production
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, September 5 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, December 12 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, February 6 at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour)
Block Feed IV:
Tuesday, May 15 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-4; 1 hour)
Mountain Media
Storytelling through film-making
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Videocassette:
9–12
30 minutes
Unlimited
See order form, pg. 125
KY Academic Expectations: 1.11, 1.13, 2.16, 2.22, 2.25, 4.2, 5.2
Making Grimm Movies
How to make creative and inexpensive
movies/media literacy
Grade Levels:
Length:
Taping Rights:
Print Materials:
Videocassette:
Web Site:
6–12
20 minutes
School year
Order at Web site
See order form, pg. 125
www.davenportfilms.com
KY Academic Expectations: 1.13, 2.22, 3.4, 5.2
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. Making Grimm Movies, part 1—scripting and editing
2. Making Grimm Movies, part 2—design: location, sets, makeup, and
props
3. Making Grimm Movies, part 3—production: producing, editing, and
directing
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, August 8 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, December 6 at 1:00 pm/12 noon CT
(Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Block Feed III:
Tuesday, January 9 at 1:30/12:30 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Block Feed IV:
Wednesday, May 16 at 8:30/7:30 am CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
and traditions associated with death
2. As Long as It Takes/Simon — a documentary about striking coal
miners and a folk tale brought to life through claymation
3. Sacred Vows/Fat Man — a documentary about marriage in
Appalachia and an animated folk tale
4. McRoberts: An Eastern Kentucky Coal Camp — a documentary
about a coal town
5. To Hell and Back — a documentary about Vietnam veterans in
Eastern Kentucky
NOTE: This series is offered on videotape only. See tape order information on
pages 125-126.
Try KET’s MediaWorks
listerv to recieve and
discuss information on
video & multi-media
production equipment,
methods, and news.
To join, email Jeff Gray
at [email protected]
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 113
TECHNOLOGY&MEDIA
Making Grimm Movies shows young people how to use resources and
locations in their own communities to produce inexpensive films.
Examples from the Brothers Grimm folktale films and interviews with
key production staff members guide students through the rigors of
translating tales into scripts and storyboards, working with teams of
actors and crew members, selecting locations, establishing continuity
during filming, and editing fragments into a coherent narrative. The
series does not simply tell students how to “read” media; it shows
them how to “write” it.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
1. A Dying Tradition — a documentary exploring the mountain rituals
MediaWorks
Photo: Rick McComb
High school interns participating in Appalshop’s Appalachian Media
Institute show and talk about their own videos in Mountain Media.
Each program showcases one or more of the students’ films and the
young filmmakers answering one another’s questions on how they
chose and researched their topics, interview and production techniques, problems they encountered and how they solved them, and
collaboration and teamwork in making and editing a film.
DISTANCELEARNING
DISTANCE LEARNING
KET Distance Learning combines multimedia and
personal interation with teachers to bring courses
in humanities, physics, German, and Latin directly
to students in classrooms across Kentucky. These
courses challenge students with rigorous
academic work that strengthens their educational
credentials and prepares them for advanced
placement and college entrance exams.
Students watch lessons on videotapes, CD-ROMs,
or DVDs produced by KET Distance Learning. These
lessons include demonstrations,
performances, lectures, animation, and film clips
which present the material in a lively format that
complements most learning styles. Students participate in interactive learning activities through the
companion Web site or by using a CD-ROM,
putting these instructional practices to their best
uses.
Master teachers, who have a combined 82 years of
instructional experience, including 40 years of expertise in distance learning, lead the instruction. Unlike
many online courses, KET Distance Learning offers
personal interaction with experienced
educators who work closely with students throughout the course.
With proper supervision, the course materials may also be used with
small groups or full classes. All three courses use the same college
textbook. There is no lab component.
physics
Physics I
Physics principles at work in
everyday phenomena
Physics I provides students with an
appreciation and understanding of the
physical world while preparing them
for college courses and careers that
require an understanding of physics.
The guided workshop utilizes a CDROM with movies and animations,
labs, and videotaped lessons to give
students direct experience with the
phenomena and provides a self-paced
learning environment. Students discover physics principles themselves by
analyzing data taken from the movies
on the CD-ROM or from labs they conduct. The Internet is also used extensively in the course. This course may
be taken on a full-year schedule, or in a
block schedule, one-semester format.
AP Physics B, and Honors Physics
Preparation for college physics
AP Physics B, and Honors Physics all utilize a set of 27 CD-ROMs (or
4 DVDs) produced for the AP course. Multimedia-based instruction
includes lectures, demonstrations, and problem solving. Students
work independently with minimal need for supervision at their
school. The teacher is available via e-mail and phone when help is
needed. The teacher grades tests—homework is graded by computer.
114 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
AP Physics B is a rigorous preparation for the AP Physics B test, and
the Medical College Aptitude Test. It uses college-level syllabi, homework, and tests. (Full year.)
Honors Physics is for students who want to learn physics at a high
level, but who are not interested in the full AP Physics B program.
(Full year.)
Visit the Web site at www.dl.ket.org or contact the instructor Chuck
Duncan at 1-800-333-9764 or [email protected]
German Program
Language and cultures of
the German-speaking
people
German I is an interactive multimedia course designed to engage students in mastering the basic skills
of speaking, listening, writing, and
reading. The German video series
Fokus Deutsch and its accompanying
materials are used to give students
an authentic picture of the Germanspeaking culture. Conversation
practice is provided via telephone
interaction with tutors. The course
is structured for high school 9th12th graders, but is available to
highly-motivated middle school 8th
graders. This course may be taken
on a full-year schedule, or in a block
schedule, one-semester format.
German III continues the multimedia approach to help students extend
the language skills learned in German I and II. In this accelerated
course, students will explore the topics relevant to today's Germanspeaking countries while expanding their vocabulary, and reviewing
and extending their language skills. The video series Fokus Deutsch
provides the core of the content. Conversation practice is provided via
telephones. Assignments and exercises integrate an interactive, multimedia approach to language learning. This course may be taken on a
full-year schedule, or in block schedule, one-semester format.
Visit the Web site at www.dl.ket.org, or contact the instructor Harold
Hayes at 1-800-333-9764 or [email protected]
Humanities Program
History and appreciation of visual and
performing arts
Humanities through the Arts is a
survey of the development of
humankind as reflected in dance,
theater, visual arts, and music.
This high school class promotes an
understanding of the connections
between creative works and their
historical and cultural contexts, and
fosters an appreciation of all the
arts.
This is a one-credit, one-semester
course designed to be compatible
with block scheduling and to be
used in partnership with a certified classroom teacher. It makes
available a wide range of arts and
humanities resources that teachers
can use, not only as part of this class,
but in a variety of ways in the future.
Teachers registering for Humanities through the Arts will be able to use
their password to access Themes, a web-based resource that includes
projects suitable for students with a wide range of ability levels. This
resource organizes visual arts, theater, dance, music, and literary topics in three thematic strands:
The Natural World
Relationships
Search for Self
Humanities Connections is an innovative set of resources for students
in grades 7-12. These four productions consists of programs for both
teacher and student audiences and cover the basic elements of theater,
dance, music and visual arts. They are written in direct compliance
with the Kentucky Core Content for Arts and Humanities and National
Standards in the Arts. The accompanying Connections Web site provides an episode summary, vocabulary, ideas for projects, works consulted, and a teacher response form for each of the productions.
Visit the Web site at www.dl.ket.org or contact the instructor C. Geraci
at 1-800-333-9764 or [email protected]
Latin Program
Language and Roman culture
Latin I students read Latin stories through which they also study the
vocabulary and structures of Latin. Learning Latin also improves
students’ ability to decode English words, their understanding of the
English language, and prepares them to study other world languages.
Mythology and an overview of Roman contributions to Western civilization are stressed. The study of Latin often improves one’s performance on achievement tests. The instruction follows the Ecce Romani
I text. The course is structured for high school 9th-12th graders, but is
available to highly-motivated middle school 7th or 8th graders. This
course may be taken on a full-year schedule, or in a block schedule,
one-semester format. Middle school students may also split this course
over the 7th and 8th grades.
Latin II is designed to increase student proficiency in reading and
speaking Latin. Additional vocabulary and grammatical structures,
cultural and historic materials, and excerpts from original Roman
authors all serve to enhance students’ understanding of the language and culture of the ancient Romans.
Students apply what they learn of the
ancients to better understand our world
as they see the many influences of Latin
in our lives—from our language to our
government. The course follows the
program set forth in the Ecce Romani II
text series. This course may be taken
on a full-year schedule, or in a block
schedule, one-semester format.
Latin III is a student directed class
taught via Internet. This class is
designed to increase vocabulary and
assist students in completion of the corpus of grammar required to read many
authentic Latin writings. Students
read selections from Caesar, Cicero,
Augustus, Pliny, Trajan and Eutropius.
Through the words of these Roman
authors, students increase their knowledge of the intricacies of the late Roman
Republic and early Roman Empire. Grammatical concepts and Latin
vocabulary are reinforced in the context of these selections. Agenda,
assignments, graded and non-graded activities, quizzes and tests are all
posted on the Internet. The text is Ecce Romani III with several ancillary
readings from Internet sites.
Internet access is required for the course.
Literature of the late Republic and early
Empire—AP Syllabus
Latin Literature is a student-directed class taught via Internet. Students
read authentic works from Latin authors, concentrating in particular
on the poems of Horace and Catullus, in preparation for the Advanced
Placement Latin Literature exam. Students interact with the teacher via
e-mail and telephone. Agenda, assignments, graded and non-graded
activities, quizzes and tests are all posted on the Internet.
Internet access is required for the course.
Visit the Web site at www.dl.ket.org or contact the instructor Ann
Denny at 1-800-333-9764 or [email protected]
All Latin courses have 160 lessons. Students can expect to spend a minimum
of 200 hours spread evenly over the academic cycle.
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 115
DISTANCELEARNING
German II continues the interactive multimedia approach to further
develop the basic skills of speaking, listening, writing, and reading
acquired in German I. The German video series Fokus Deutsch and
accompanying materials expose students to a variety of situations in
authentic cultural contexts. Conversation practice is provided via telephone interaction with tutors. This course may be taken on a full-year
schedule, or in a block schedule, one-semester format.
SECONDARY GED
Secondary GED Programming
Pre-GED
Grades 9-12
and
Recently, legislation was passed and a waiver was granted by the
American Council on Education that allows Secondary GED programs
to be established in Kentucky’s schools. The purpose of the program
is to provide a potential dropout student—who has the academic
capability to complete high school graduation requirements but who is
behind the cohort group in the credits needed to graduate—the opportunity to stay in school, prepare for, and obtain the GED certificate.
GED Connection
As schools begin to prepare to implement these programs, they are
searching for curriculum resources. KET has two such resources: GED
Connection and Pre-GED Connection. Below is a block feed of the series
GED Connection (which also includes Pre-GED Connection programs).
1. GED Connection Orientation
Language Arts: Reading
11. Passing the GED Reading Test
12. Nonfiction
13. Fiction
14. Poetry
15. Drama
Social Studies
16. Passing the GED Social
Studies Test!
17. Themes in U.S. History
to help ensure
student achievement.
Mathematics
27. Passing the GED Math Test
28. Number Sense
29. Problem Solving
30. Decimals
31. Fractions
32. Ratio, Proportion, and Percent
33. Measurement
34. Formulas
35. Geometry
36. Data Analysis
37. Statistics and Probability
38. Introduction to Algebra
39. Special Topics in Algebra and
Geometry
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, August 2 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and
at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours); Wednesday, August
9 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours) and at 12 noon/11:00
am CT (Programs 25-32; 4 hours); and Wednesday, August 16 at
6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 33-39; 3 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, January 3 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours) and
at 12 noon/11:00 am CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours); Wednesday, January
10 at 6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours) and at 12 noon/11:00
am CT (Programs 25-32; 4 hours); and Wednesday, January 17 at
6:00/5:00 am CT (Programs 33-39; 3 hours, 30 minutes)
TEACHING MATERIALS
The full series is now available on ten DVDs with menus so it’s easier
to use ($200). 39 VHS tapes ($200), student workbooks ($20), and a
teacher’s guide ($24) are all avilable from KET. Kentucky schools may
call KET (800) 228-3382, for information.
116 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Contact Tonya Crum at
[email protected] or call
1-800-432-0951 ext. 7009.
Photo: Rick McComb
SECONDARY GED
Language Arts: Writing
2. Passing the GED Writing Test
3. Getting Ideas on Paper
4. The Writing Process
5. Organized Writing
6. Writing Style and Word Choice
7. Effective Sentences
8. Grammar and Usage
9. Spelling, Punctuation, and
Capitalization
10. The GED Essay
Alternative solutions
18. Themes in World History
19. Economics
20. Civics and Government
21. Geography Science
22. Passing the GED Science Test
23. Life Science
24. Earth and Space Science
25. Chemistry
26. Physics
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Annenberg Media Series
arts and humanities
The Art of Teaching the Arts: A Workshop for High School Teachers (9-12) C
The Arts in Every Classroom: A Workshop for Elementary
School Teachers (K-5) C
Connecting with the Arts: A Teaching Practices Library (6-8) C
Connecting with the Arts: A Workshop for High School Teachers (6-8) C
foreign languages
Teaching Foreign Languages K-12: A Library of Classroom Practices (K-12) C
language arts/reading
F
F
Developing Writers: A Workshop for High School Teachers (9-12) C
Inside Writing Communities, Grades 3-5 (3-5) K C
Teaching Multicultural Literature: A Workshop for the Middle Grades (6-8) C
Teaching Reading K-2: A Library of Classroom Practices (K-2) C
Teaching Reading 3-5 Workshop (3-5) C
Write in the Middle: A Workshop for Middle School Teachers (5-8) K C
education theory and issues
Principles for Principals (K-12) C
The Learning Classroom: Theory Into Practice (K-12) C
mathematics
Insights Into Algebra 1: Teaching for Learners (6-12) C
Learning Math: Number and Operations (K-8) C
science
Essential Science for Teachers: Physical Science (K-6) C
Rediscovering Biology: Molecular to Global Perspectives (9-12) C
social studies
Bridging World History (9-12) C
Social Studies in Action: A Methodology Workshop (K-5) C
New or Revised for 2006-2007
F
K KET Production
C Closed Captioned
arts & humanities
The Art of Teaching the Arts:
A Workshop for High School Teachers C
For high school teachers; eight 60-minute programs. This workshop
introduces and explores seven principles of effective teaching in dance,
music, theatre, and visual art classes.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, July 31 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Monday, August 7 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
The Arts in Every Classroom: A Workshop for
Elementary School Teachers C
For K-5 classroom teachers and arts specialists; eight one-hour video
programs. Southeast Center for Education in the Arts workshop leaders help teachers, principals, and arts specialists from three elementary
schools develop and implement arts-based units.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, August 14 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Monday, August 21 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-14; 3 hours)
Connecting with the Arts:
A Teaching Practices Library, 6-8 C
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
introduction
The professional development series listed below are funded
by Annenberg Media, a part of The Annenberg Foundation.
For program titles and descriptions, as well as related online
resources, visit www.learner.org, the Annenberg Media Web
site.
Please note: In addition to the blockfeeds of Annenberg Media
professional development on KET3 listed below, KET is broadcasting the full schedule of Annenberg Media programming
on KET4 from 8:00/7:00 am CT to 8:00/7:00 pm CT Sunday
through Saturday. This schedule includes professional development, instructional programming for students, and college telecourses. For program schedule on KET4, visit KET’s Website,
www.ket.org/watch.
Monday, August 28 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Monday, September 4 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-12; 4 hours)
Connecting with the Arts: A Workshop for
Middle Grades Teachers C
For 6-8 teachers; eight 60-minute programs. Connecting with the Arts
uses extensive classroom examples and round table discussions among
art educators to demonstrate why and how middle school teachers
integrate dance, music, theatre, and visual arts into other content
areas.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, October 9 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Monday, October 16 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
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PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT
For 6-8 teachers; twelve 30-minute programs. This video library visits
classrooms around the country where teachers have incorporated arts
integration strategies. Each program includes ideas and projects arts
specialists and subject-area teachers can use in their own classrooms,
as well as insights into planning and implementing an integrated curriculum.
Photo: Rick McComb
Annenberg Media Seminars
Teaching Multicultural Literature:
A Workshop for the Middle Grades C
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, August 1 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Tuesday, August 8 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
Teaching Reading K-2: A Library of
Classroom Practices C
For K-2 teachers, twelve 30-minute programs. This series features the
teaching practices of a diverse cross-section of teachers from across
the country.
foreign language
Teaching Foreign Languages K-12:
A Library of Classroom Practices C
For K-12 foreign language teachers; 30-minute introduction, two 60minute overviews, twenty-seven 30-minute classroom videos. This
subtitled video library illustrates effective instruction and assessment
strategies for teaching foreign language in grades K-12. Classrooms
shown includes Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin,
Russian, and Spanish.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, September 11 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-6; 4 hours)
Monday, September 18 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 7-14; 4 hours)
Monday, September 25 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 15-22; 4 hours
Monday, October 2 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 23-30; 4 hours)
PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT
For 6-8 teachers; eight 60-minute programs. This workshop examines
instructional strategies and resources that make ethnically diverse
writing meaningful to students.
language arts/reading
Developing Writers: A Workshop for
High School Teachers C
For high school teachers, eight 60-minute programs. This workshop
presents practical and philosophical advice for teaching writing and
examines issues such as high-stakes assessment and teaching students
with differing abilities.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, September 19 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Tuesday, September 26 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
Inside Writing Communities, Grades 3-5 C
For 3-5 teachers, sixteen 30-minute programs. This series guides
teachers in enhancing their writing instruction through researchbased strategies, interactive online exercises, and classroom video
examples.
NOTE: For more information and block feed schedule, see page 122.
118 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, August 15 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Tuesday, August 22 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-12; 2 hours)
Teaching Reading 3-5 Workshop C
For 3-5 teachers, sixteen 30-minute programs. This workshop shows
intermediate elementary teachers how to help their students'
transition from "learning to read" to "reading to learn."
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, September 5 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Tuesday, September 12 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, November 14 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Tuesday, November 21 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours)
Write In the Middle: A Workshop for
Middle School Teachers C K
For 5-8 teachers, eight 60-minute programs. This workshop explores
effective practices and strategies that help middle-level students
become more confident and proficient writers.
NOTE: For more information, see page 122.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, October 3 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Tuesday, October 10 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, December 5 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Tuesday, December 12 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
education theory & issues
Principles for Principals C
For K-12 principals, eight 60-minute programs. Designed by and for
principals working to improve student achievement in mathematics and science, this workshop addresses the specific issues faced by
administrators.
Tuesday, August 9 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Tuesday, August 16 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, October 11 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Tuesday, October 18 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
Rediscovering Biology: Molecular
to Global Perspectives C
For high school teachers, thirteen 30-minute programs. This course
updates teachers’ knowledge and understanding of major new
developments in the field of biology.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
The Learning Classroom:
Theory Into Practice C
For K-12 teachers, thirteen 30-minute programs. Hosted by Stanford
University professor Linda Darling-Hammond, each program explores
a specific learning theory and its use in the classroom.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, October 17 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Tuesday, October 24 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-13; 2 hours,
30 minutes)
mathematics
Insights Into Algebra 1: Teaching for Learning C
For middle and high school teachers, eight 60-minute programs. This
workshop explores strategies that improve the teaching of 16 key
topics in Algebra 1.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Friday, August 11 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Friday, August 18 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
Learning Math: Number and Operations C
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Friday, September 15 at 4:00/3:00 pm pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Friday, September 22 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-12; 2 hours)
science
Essential Science for Teachers: Physical Science C
For K-6 teachers; eight 60-minute programs. By exploring topics that
range from the essential properties of aluminum foil to the plasma
that makes up the sun, this series provides participants with enhanced
understanding of content and how it connects to the elementary
school classroom.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Friday, September 1 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Friday, September 8 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
social studies
Bridging World History C
For 9-12 teachers, twenty-six 30-minute programs. This multimedia
course looks at global patterns through time –seeing history as an integrated whole.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, August 10 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Thursday, August 17 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-16; 4 hours)
Thursday, August 24 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 17-24; 4 hours)
Thursday, August 31 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 25-26; 1 hour)
Social Studies in Action:
A Methodology Workshop, K-5 C
For K-5 teachers, eight 60-minute programs. This workshop provides a
methodology for teaching social studies, with a focus on engaging students.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, October 12 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Thursday, October 19 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
Professional Development for Principals
from Cerebellum Corporation
Principals: Leaders & Learners
For K-8 administrators and teachers, seven 30-minute programs.
Each program illustrates one standard from Leading Learning
Communities: Standards for What Principals Should Know and Be Able
To Do, a publication of The National Association of Elementary
School Principals. The series features K-8 principals, teachers,
and students in 12 different schools demonstrating what the standards look like in practice. To purchase a companion guide, call
Cerebellum at 1-800-238-9669. For program titles and descriptions
go to http://www.cerebellum.com/principals/.
BLOCK FEEDS
Block Feed I:
Wednesday, September 13 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-7; 3 hours, 30 minutes)
Block Feed II:
Wednesday, November 15 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-7; 3 hours, 30 minutes)
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PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT
For K-8 teachers, twelve 30-minute programs. This video- and
Web-based course examines the Number and Operations strand of
Principles and Standards of School Mathematics (NCTM) and its
classroom applications.
Friday, October 6 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-8; 4 hours)
Friday, October 13 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 9-13; 2 hours, 30
minutes)
Annenberg Media Seminars
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Block Feed I:
arts & humanities
KET seminars
Art to Heart C K
arts and humanities
Art to Heart K C
The Arts: A Content Course for Teachers K C
The Arts II: West African Dance K C
The Arts III: Afro-Cuban Dance K
F
Length: 8 programs; 30 minutes each Audience: teachers of
infants through primary Cost: $50 for the series
This series explores how developmentally appropriate activities
in visual arts, dance, drama, and music contribute to learning and
physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development in children
from birth to age 8.
reading and writing
Authentic Publishing K C
How To Improve the Quality of Writing Conferences K C
Inside Writing Communities, Grades 3-5 K C
Write in the Middle: A Workshop for Middle School Teachers K C
F
NOTE: For more information and the block feed schedule, see page 20.
social studies
Kentucky’s Underground Railroad K C
The Arts: A Content Course for Teachers C K
special education
About Autism K C
Your Child With Special Needs K C
Length: 3 programs; 90 minutes each Audience: teachers, all levels Cost: $25 per program; $75 for the series
special programming
Childhood Obesity Prevention K C
Just Ask: A Call-In on Teen Depression K C
Promise Not to Tell? A Teacher’s Guide to Recognizing and
Responding to Child Sexual Abuse K C
A series for adult learners on the elements and principles of art
forms assessed in Kentucky schools: dance, drama, and music
(produced in collaboration with the Institute for Arts in Education
sponsored by the Kentucky Center for the Arts).
1. Drama 2. Dance 3. Music
New or Revised for 2006/2007
F
C Closed Captioned
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
K KET Production
Monday, November 6 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-3; 3 hours, 37 minutes)
The Arts II: West African Dance C K
The following professional development programs are
available on videotape. Accompanying participant’s
guides are posted at our Web site (www.ket.org/
profdev). When you purchase videotapes, a copy of the
print materials will be mailed with your order.
All KET seminars are approved by the Kentucky
Department of Education for professional development
credit if schools or districts include them in their PD
plans. Teachers who wish to use KET seminars for PD
credit should check with their school or district PD
coordinator. Unless otherwise indicated, the stage of
professional development is practice/application.
KET seminars also can be used to satisfy requirements for the fifth year program. Contact your local
university or the Division of Teacher Education and
Certification at (502) 564-4606 for more information.
Length: 60 minutes Audience: teachers, all levels Cost: $20
Step-by-step dance instruction from professional artists designed
to deepen teachers’ general knowledge of Kentucky’s dance Core
Content and of West African dance.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, November 13 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (1 hour)
The Arts III: Afro-Cuban Dance K
Length: 40 minutes Audience: teachers, all levels Cost: $20
An exploration of the interrelated music and dance traditions of
Cuba, including the claves, simple percussion sticks.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Monday, November 13 at 5:00/4:00 pm CT (40 minutes)
reading & writing
Photo: Rick McComb
PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT
introduction
120 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
Authentic Publishing C K
Length: 9 programs; 30 minutes each Audience: primary-6 classroom and language arts teachers Cost: $10 per program; $90 for
the series
Maintaining authentic audience and purpose while tying student writing to the Core Content and allowing student choice.
1. Personal Narrative 2. Memoirs Written For and About People
3. Inquiry in the Library 4. Short Stories 5. Script Writing/Plays
6. Poetry 7. Brochures 8. Feature Articles 9. Persuasive Letters
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, October 31 at 3:30/2:30 pm CT
(Programs 1-9; 4 hours, 30 minutes)
How To Improve the Quality of Writing Conferences C K
Length: 4 programs; 30 minutes each Audience: classroom and
English/language arts teachers, all levels Cost: $40
Quality writing conferences in a variety of settings—and at a variety
of stages in the writing process.
1. Prewriting Conferences 2. Quick Conferences 3. Revision
Conferences 4. Response Groups
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Tuesday, November 7 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT
(Programs 1-4; 2 hours, 45 minutes)
Write in the Middle: A Workshop
for Middle School Teachers C K
Length: 8 programs, 60 minutes each Audience: Middle level
teachers, grades 5-8
Write in the Middle: A Workshop for Middle School Teachers is a KET
production, funded by a grant from Annenberg and part of the
Annenberg/CPB schedule (p. 118).
Write in the Middle explores strategies and practices that help middlelevel students become confident and proficient writers.
Both the videos and the guide can be purchased from Annenberg at 1-800LEARNER.
PROGRAM TITLES
Workshop 1. Creating a Community of Writers
Workshop 2. Making Writing Meaningful
Workshop 3. Teaching Poetry
Workshop 4. Teaching Persuasive Writing
Workshop 5. Teaching Multigenre Writing
Workshop 6. Responding to Writing: Teacher to Student
Workshop 7. Responding to Writing: Peer to Peer
Workshop 8. Teaching the Power of Revision
Kentucky’s Underground Railroad C K
Length: 4 programs; 30 minutes each Audience: social studies and
history teachers, intermediate and secondary levels Cost: $25.
An exploration of Pre-Civil War Kentucky history and enslaved
African Americans’ quest for freedom.
1- 2. The History of Slavery and the Fugitive Slave Movement in
Kentucky 3. Freedom: A Basic Need 4. Artistic Expression and the
Fugitive Slave Movement
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 21 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 2 hours)
special education
About Autism C K
Length: 2 programs; 60 minutes each Audience: teachers, all levels
Cost: $12.50 per program; $25 for the series or tape off air (see schedule below).
These programs examine the issues surrounding autism-signs to look
for in early development, effective early intervention programs, and
strategies to help children with autism achieve in school. Renee Shaw
hosts.
Program 1: About Autism: Diagnosis and Early Intervention
Program 2: About Autism: Success in School
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, August 23 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Wednesday, October 25 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Wednesday, January 17 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Your Child With Special Needs C K
Length: 2 programs; 60 minutes each Audience: see below
Cost: $12.50 per program; $25 for the series or tape off air (see schedule below).
Local experts, service providers, educators, and parents discuss
such topics as entering the special education system, the legal
rights of students with special needs, and planning for the transition from high school to the real world. Renee Shaw hosts.
Program 1: Public School Resources
(Audience: teachers & parents, K-12)
Program 2: From High School to the Community
(Audience: students with disabilities, 11-12; teachers & parents, 11-12)
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, August 23 at 6:00/5:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Wednesday, October 25 at 6:00/5:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
Wednesday, January 17 at 6:00/5:00 pm CT (Programs 1-2; 2 hours)
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Block Feed I:
Tuesday, October 3 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Tuesday, October 10 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
Block Feed II:
Tuesday, December 5 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Tuesday, December 12 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
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PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT
The workshop features an extensive Web site (www.learner.org/workshops/middlewriting/), with lesson plans, classroom materials, student writing samples, and audio interviews with teachers and writing
experts. An interactive feature allows you to respond to student drafts
and compare your responses with those of another teacher. You also
can download the Write in the Middle workshop guide, which provides
specific information about the eight programs plus discussion questions and activities.
social studies
special programming
Childhood Obesity Prevention C K
Length: 1 program; 60 minutes Audience: teachers, all levels
Cost: $12.50 or tape off air (see schedule below).
Kentucky experts discuss the causes of childhood obesity as well as
ways to prevent obesity.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, September 6 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (1 hour)
Wednesday, November 1 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (1 hour)
Wednesday, January 24 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (1 hour)
Just Ask: A Call-In on Teen Depression C K
Length: 1 program; 60 minutes Audience: teachers, 6-12, parents
Cost: $12.50 or tape off air (see schedule below).
This program was recorded live on August 13, 2003 – so the 800 number
will not be active. Mental health professionals representing organiations
who work extensively with teen depression answer viewers’ questions
about teen depression. www.ket.org/teendepression
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Inside Writing Communities, Grades 3-5
Length: 16 programs, 30 minutes each
Audience: Teachers in grades 3-5
A professional development series produced by KET debuts on the
roster of Annenberg video workshops in January 2007.
Inside Writing Communities: Grades 3-5, the second professional development workshop KET has produced for Annenberg, is available free
to teachers nationwide. (Write in the Middle: A Workshop for Middle
School Teachers was the first KET/Annenberg collaboration.)
Wednesday, September 6 at 5:00/4:00 pm CT (1 hour)
Wednesday, November 1 at 5:00/4:00 pm CT(1 hour)
Wednesday, January 24 at 5:00/4:00 pm CT(1 hour)
KET traveled throughout the country to videotape teachers in grades 3
through 5 modeling teaching strategies and reflecting on their practice.
National experts on teaching writing contributed to the series as advisors and on-air commentators.
Promise Not to Tell? A Teacher’s Guide to Recognizing
and Responding to Child Sexual Abuse C K
Inside Writing Communities, Grades 3-5 helps teachers improve their
writing instruction through research-based strategies, interactive
online exercises, and classroom examples. Sixteen 30-minute videos
— eight session videos and their corresponding classroom videos —
demonstrate how the writing workshop motivates students and helps
develope proficient writers.
NETA AWARD WINNER
PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT
Sheryl Block, literacy resource teacher for Simpsonville Elementary in Shelby Co.,
is one of eight teachers and the only Kentucky teacher appearing in Inside Writing
Communities, Grades 3-5
Length: 3 programs; 20 minutes each Audience: teachers, counselors,
and administrators, all levels Cost: $7 per program or tape off air
(see schedule below). (Note: April is Child Abuse Awareness Month.)
Mental health and law enforcement professionals, teachers, and
adult survivors providing insight and advice on dealing with child
sexual abuse. 1. Recognizing and Responding 2. Reporting and
Investigating 3. Dealing with Long Term Consequences
An extensive Web site reinforces the videos and offers a model for
on-site professional development. The site includes an online viewing
guide, resources, eight interactive activities, and a downloadable facilitator guide.
Both the videos and the guide can be purchased from Annenberg at
1-800-LEARNER or wwww.learner.org.
BROADCAST SCHEDULE
Wednesday, September 27 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Wednesday, November 8 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Wednesday, March 28 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Wednesday, April 11 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
Wednesday, April 18 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-3; 1 hour)
TEACHING MATERIALS
To download the booklet for this series, go to: www.ket.org/education/guides
SESSION VIDEO
1. Building a Community of Writers
3. Reasons for Writing
5. Reading Like a Writer
7. Teaching the Writing Craft
9. Conversations With Student Writers
11. Conversations Among Writing
Peers
13. Learning To Revise
15. Writing Across the Curriculum
CLASSROOM VIDEO
2. Teacher as Writer
4. Choice and Independence in
the Writing Workshop
6. Reading-Writing Connections
8. Teaching a Specific Writing
Strategy
10. Teacher Conferences
12. Peer Conferences
14. Modeling Revision
16. Content Writing
BLOCK FEED ON KET3
Tuesday, November 15 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 1-4; 4 hours)
Thursday, November 17 at 4:00/3:00 pm CT (Programs 5-8; 4 hours)
122 • 2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos
KET4—The Annenberg/CPB Channel
Just for teachers!
Audience: Middle and high
school teachers, all content
areas
More Reading Strategies in Action,
an innovative CD-ROM-based
professional development tool
produced in collaboration with
the Kentucky Department
of Education, is designed to
help secondary teachers whose students struggle to read and understand
textbooks, exam questions, and other informational reading. More Reading
Strategies in Action demonstrates how teachers can introduce their students to
the strategies used by successful readers without sacrificing content instruction.
Flexible, convenient PD workshops
Challenge yourself at:
www.ket.org/education/ket4.htm
Cross-indexed by subject—mathematics, science, social studies,
and English/language arts—and by reading strategy, More Reading
Strategies in Action features video clips of Kentucky teachers describing
and illustrating how they incorporate reading instruction into their
everyday teaching.
In interviews, the teachers explain why they teach certain strategies, how
they integrate the strategies into their lessons, and the successes they’ve
had helping students understand and retain written information.
Literary Strategies
in Action
KET and the Kentucky Department of Education jointly
present a new professional development resouce to support Kentucky's implementation of the national Reading
First project. The CD-ROM-based resource is modeled after the popular and widely used More Reading
Strategies in Action.
KET and the KDE are at work this year on the next phase
of the project which will be ready in the summer of 2007.
Reading Next (working title) will focus on the challenges
of teaching struggling readers in grades 4-12 and provide
video illustrations of a variety of strategies to meet a variety of student needs.
How can my school get a copy of
More Reading
Strategies in Action?
Photo: Rick McComb
In the fall of 2003, the Kentucky Department of Education destibuted one set of More
Reading Strategies in Action to every middle
and high school in the state. You can use
this set to copy more discs, or you can order
additional copies by calling Darlene Carl at
1-800-432-0951, ext. 7271.
2006/2007 M�Instructional Videos�
• 123
PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT
Literacy Strategies in Action CD-ROM set includes two
disks. The KDE distributed copies at its summer institutes
and to every elementary school in Kentucky. You are free
to copy those disks or you can order additional copies by
calling Darlene Carl at 1-800-432-0951, ext. 7271.
More Reading Strategies in Action includes four color-coded discs, one for each
content area, plus a disc for reading specialists and a “Getting Started” disc
with technical information and software. Each content disc has a subject-specific entry page. From there, you can access classroom clips and interviews
featuring teachers in all four content areas; downloadable teacher materials; a
glossary of reading strategies; and an annotated bibliography.
TEACHER’S GUIDE ORDER FORM
This form may be photocopied.
Please use this form to order teacher’s guides from KET. Allow three
weeks for delivery. Add shipping and handling charge to each order.
Please do not send cash.
____
____
____
____
1004
1185
1186
1012
____
____
____
____
____
____
1017
1631
1019
1204
1020
1160
____ 1189
____ 1190
____ 1043
____ 1055
America’s Special Days ...........................................$4.50
Backyard Safari.......................................................$10.00
The Big A ...................................................................$5.00
A Bill of Rights:
What No Just Government Should Refuse .............80¢
Cursive Handwriting Series A ...............................$5.00
Deutsch macht! (German Can Be Fun!) ..............$10.00
Different and the Same............................................$5.00
Doodle......................................................................$10.00
Drug Avengers..........................................................$2.50
Economics: The Production, Distribution And
Consumption of Goods and Services ...................$2.00
Flirting or Hurting: Sexual Harassment
in Schools ..................................................................$1.00
Great Campaigns of the Civil War ........................$8.00
It Figures....................................................................$1.45
Lab Safety: The Accident at Jefferson High ............30¢
Write the order quantity for each guide in the blank at the left of the
series title. Write totals in this box and send the entire form along
with a purchase order or a check payable to KET. Please do not
send cash. Note: If paying with a personal check, you must add 6%
Kentucky sales tax.
Mail to: KET, The Kentucky Network • Teacher’s Guides
600 Cooper Drive • Lexington, KY 40502-2296
Fax to: 859-258-7399
Subtotal:
$ ________________
6% tax
$ ________________
Shipping/handling: $ ________________
1–5
6–10
11–15
16+
items
items
items
items
$1.00
$2.25
$3.25
$4.25
Amount Enclosed: $ ________________
School Name: ___________________________________________
School Address: ________________________________________
(No P.O. Boxes Please)
City: __________________________
,
KY Zip:_____________
Phone ( ______ )__________________________________________
Name of Person Ordering: ________________________________
Billing Address if Different from Shipping Address:
_________________________________________________________
Lyric Language
____ 1058 Series I (covers all languages in series) ........... $6.00
____ 1059 Series II (advanced covers all languages .................
in series) ............................................................ $6.00
____ 1062 Math Basics ....................................................... $8.95
____ 1063 Math Basics Workbook .................................... $10.00
____
____
____
____
____
Math Vantage:
1167 Data Analysis Unit ............................................. $5.00
1168 Language of Math ............................................. $5.00
1069 Patterns Unit ...................................................... $5.00
1169 Proportional Reasoning Unit ............................. $5.00
1070 Spatial Sense Unit ............................................. $5.00
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
1162 Media Mania ...................................................... $3.50
1074 Mrs. Cabobble’s Caboose ................................. $1.30
1158 Native Americans Series ................................... $1.50
1217 Passport to Japan: Konnichiwa ......................... $7.50
1633 Passport to Weather and Climate ................... $25.00
1253 Posie Paints ...................................................... $3.00
1083 Pyramid ............................................................. $3.50
124 • 2006/2007 M Appendices
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
1085 Read On: Cover to Cover.................................. $4.95
1141 Real Science! II ................................................. $4.00
1164 Real Science! III ................................................ $4.00
1092 Roman City Modules ......................................... $3.60
1099 The Short Story ................................................. $1.15
1170 Statistics: Decisions Through Data ................... $4.00
1159 U.S. Geography: From Sea To Shining Sea ..... $1.00
1146 Violence: Reversing the Trend .......................... $1.00
1118 Voices & Visions .................................................. .25¢
1134 Zoo Zoo Zoo ...................................................... $1.00
VIDEO TAPE PRICE LIST
KET Tape Duplication Service Ordering Information
Please read the following information carefully before you order.
Then, use the Tape Duplication Service Order Form on the next
page to order videotaped programs from KET.
This duplication service is intended for use by Kentucky
elementary and secondary schools. The fees charged cover
duplication and tape stock costs only. They do not cover
copyright for use in perpetuity. Any tapes acquired by
schools through this service may be kept only for the taping rights period as defined in this 2006/07 KET School
Resources book. These rights are listed on the pages containing the program descriptions. In the spring of 2007,
KET will publish a list of those programs that will have to
be erased at the end of the school year.
The prices listed are effective July 1, 2006.
All orders must be accompanied either by payment or by an authorized purchase order. Please do not send cash. Allow 3 weeks from
the date KET receives your order for delivery of your tapes.
Following is a list of ITV series available through KET’s videotape
duplication service for the 2006/07 school year.
Series (programs/length)
Price
2003 Great Kentucky Gospel Shout Out (1/60) ............... $12.50
America Past (12/15s) ......................................................... $37.50
Art History I: A Century of Modern Art (10/15s) .......... $35.00
Art History II: A Survey of the Western World (12/15s) $37.50
Art On-Air (12/30s) ............................................................. $75.00
Art to Heart (8/30s) ............................................................. $50.00
¡Arte y más! (Program 0, PD & Programs 1-60) DVD only ........
$127.00
4100 Arts Alive (13/15s) ............................................................... $47.50
4101 Arts Express (20/15s) .......................................................... $62.50
Arts Tool Kit (Dance) 4809-videos; 4810-DVDs ........ $89.00/$8.00 s/h
Arts Tool Kit (Drama) 4797-videos; 4798-DVDs ....... $99.00/$8.00 s/h
Arts Tool Kit (Visual Arts) 4818-videos; 4819-VHS .. $99.00/$8.00 s/h
4582 [email protected]: James Still's Legacy: River of Earth (1/60) .......
$12.50
4799 Careers in Printing (1/10) ................................................... $10.00
4801 College and You—Why Not? Tackling College with a
Disability (1/25) ................................................................... $10.00
4016 Crafting Tradition (1/60) .................................................... $12.50
4744 Creating Stories & Music (1/90) ........................................ $15.00
4741 Cursive Handwriting (22/15s) ........................................... $60.00
4771 DanceSense (10/15s) ............................................................ $37.50
4106 Dancing Threads: Community Dances (4/30s) ............... $25.00
4742 Destinos (26/30s).................................................................. $87.50
4708 Deutsch macht Spass! (German Can Be Fun!) (10/30s) . $62.50
4654 An Electronic Conversation with George Ella Lyon (1/60) . $12.50
KET Electronic Field Trips (see pages 28-33 for titles) ....... $12.50 each
4792 Entrepreneurs in Kentucky (1/120) ................................. $17.50
4761 Events of the 20th Century (8/15s) ................................... $25.00
4779 Everyday Voices (5/30s)...................................................... $37.50
4740 Fat Albert & the Cosby Kids (30/15s) ............................... $75.00
4814 From the Brothers Grimm (16/20s) and (4/25s) ............. $67.50
4500 From the Shadows of the River (1/30) ............................. $10.00
4039 Hymnody of Earth (1/60) ................................................... $12.50
4126 It Figures (28/15s) ................................................................ $87.50
4582 James Still’s River of Earth (1/60) ..................................... $12.50
4811
4782
4812
4813
4099
4833
4822
4128
4601
Just for Me (6/15s) ............................................................... $22.50
Kentucky Afield for Kids (per program – specify program
number and/or original airdate): ...................................... $12.50
4131 Kentucky Chautauqua (1/60) ............................................ $12.50
4114 Kentucky GeoQuest (4/30s) ............................................... $25.00
4831 Kentucky in Africa (1/24) ................................................... $10.00
4132 Kentucky’s Natural Heritage (8/15s)................................ $25.00
4133 Kentucky’s Story (9/15s)..................................................... $35.00
4709 Kentucky's Underground Railroad: (1/60) ...................... $12.50
4749 Latin Roots for English Word Power (6/30s) .................. $37.50
4794 Living by Words (1/90) ....................................................... $29.95
4805 Liz’s Circus Story (1/60) ..................................................... $12.50
4461 Looking at Painting (3/60s) ................................................ $37.50
4832 Looking From the Inside Out (15/155) ............................. $50.00
4802 Los Constructores de Cerritos del Uruguay (1/27) ........ $10.00
4711 Lyric Language (14/20s) ..................................................... $57.50
4122 Making Grimm Movies (3/20s) ......................................... $12.50
4803 Making of News Quiz (1/20) ............................................. $10.00
4138 Math Basics (11/30s) ............................................................ $87.50
4140 Math Works (28/15s) ........................................................... $87.50
4674 Media Mania (4/20s) ........................................................... $15.00
4060 Mountain Media (5/30s) ..................................................... $37.50
4493 Native American Exhibit (1/20) ........................................ $12.50
4061 A Native Presence (1/60) .................................................... $12.50
4143 Old Music for New Ears (22/15s)...................................... $72.50
4804 The Prehistoric Mounds of Uruguay (1/24) .................... $10.00
4482 Real Science! II (6/20s) ........................................................ $25.00
4750 Real Science! III (13/30s) ..................................................... $70.00
4793 The Remarkable Clarks (1/30) ........................................... $10.00
4663 Richard Davis on Jazz (6/60s) ............................................ $75.00
4808 Saludos (36/15s) ................................................................... $87.50
4146 The Short Story (16/15s) ..................................................... $50.00
4517 Signature (6/60s) .................................................................. $75.00
SignatureLIVE:
4080 Bobbie Ann Mason (1/60).......................................... $12.50
4081 Ed McClanahan (1/60) ............................................... $12.50
4083 Sing Out for Freedom (1/60) .............................................. $12.50
4147 Solve It (18/15s).................................................................... $60.00
4710 Spanish Media Collection (30/15-30s) .............................. $60.00
4593 Street Skills (4/30s) .............................................................. $25.00
4631 Student Lessons with Barry Lane (6/40s) ........................ $37.50
4751 Teletales (15/15s) .................................................................. $50.00
4150 Telling Tales (16/15s) ........................................................... $50.00
4743 Tracks: Impressions of America (12/15s) ......................... $37.50
4665 Truth & Consequences: Federal Crimes & Teenagers (1/60).....$12.50
4152 U.S. Constitution (6/30s) .................................................... $37.50
4748 Up Close & Natural (15/15s) ............................................. $50.00
4712 Voices and Visions (6/60s) .................................................. $75.00
4745 Well, Well, Well with Slim Goodbody (15/15s) ............... $50.00
4746 Women of Kentucky: Our Legacy, Our Future (1/60) .... $12.50
4594 Words Like Freedom/Sturdy Black Bridges (1/60) ........ $12.50
4666 World of Our Own: Kentucky Folkways (8/30s) ............ $50.00
4161 Write Ideas (10/3s) ............................................................... $10.00
4747 Zoo, Zoo, Zoo (16/15s)........................................................ $50.00
order form on back
2006/2007 M�
Appendices• 125
VIDEO TAPE SERVICE ORDER FORM
Use this form to order videotaped programs, including professional
development seminars, from KET. Payment (make checks payable to
KET) or purchase order must accompany order. Please do not send
cash. This form may be photocopied. To order by phone, call KET
Tape Duplication at (800) 945-9167, or fax this form to (859) 258-7399.
Shipping/Handling Charges:
Please add the cost of shipping and handling to your order
according to the following chart.
Any tapes acquired through this service may be kept only for the
taping rights period as defined in this 2006/2007 KET School Resources
book. For more information, please read page 125 before filling out
this form.
MERCHANDISE TOTAL
ADD
up to $30.00
$30.01 to $60.00
$60.01 to $100.00
$100.01 to $130.00
$130.01 to $160.00
$160.01 to $200.00
over $200.00
$3.95
$4.95
$5.95
$7.95
$8.95
$9.95
$10.95
Bill to:
Ship to: (if different)
Name
Name
School
School
School Address
School Address
City
, KY (Zip Code)
City
No P.O. Boxes Please
, KY (Zip Code)
School telephone number
❑ Payment enclosed ❑ Please bill the school—our purchase order number is
Note: If paying with a personal check, you must add 6% Kentucky sales tax.
Qty
Item #
Title of Program/Series
Return to:
KET Tape Duplication,
600 Cooper Drive,
Lexington, KY 40502-2296
FAX: (859) 258-7399
Please allow three weeks for delivery
from the date KET receives your order.
126 • 2006/2007 M Appendices
Item Cost
Subtotal
6% tax (only if paid w/ personal check)
Shipping & handling
TOTAL
Amount
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
2003 Great Kentucky Gospel Shout Out (7-12) ............................. 22
2007 World's Largest Concert (Primary-6) .................................... 21
The Almost Painless Guide to American Civics (5-12) .............. 101
America Past (8-12) ...........................................................................110
American Voices (7-12) .................................................................... 108
America's Special Days (Primary) ................................................... 98
America's Veterans (2-9).................................................................. 100
Ancient Civilizations (6-12) ............................................................ 108
AP Physics and Honors Physics .....................................................114
Appleseed John (3-7) ......................................................................... 23
Art History I: A Century of Modern Art (6-12) ............................. 25
Art History II: A Survey of the Western World (6-12) .................. 26
Art On Air (4-6) .................................................................................. 24
Art to Heart (PD for Pre-Primary) .......................................... 18/121
Arte y más! (K-Primary) .................................................................... 38
Arts Alive (6-9) ................................................................................... 17
Arts Express (Primary-6) .................................................................. 16
Arts Tool Kit........................................................................................ 14
Backyard Safari (Primary-6) ............................................................. 76
Between the Lions (Primary)............................................................ 65
Beyond the Page (3-5)........................................................................ 70
The Big A (Primary) ........................................................................... 23
A Bill of Rights… (10-12) ................................................................ 102
The Biology Of... (7-12) ..................................................................... 88
[email protected]: James Still’s Legacy “River of Earth” (9-12) ....... 73
Bullying/Character Education (3-5) ............................................... 53
Career Encounters (10-12)................................................................. 59
Careers in Printing (7-12) .................................................................. 57
The Character Education Series (Primary-4) ................................. 49
Classic Animal Tracks (5-12) ............................................................ 84
College and You—Why Not?
Tackling College with a Disability (9-12) ................................... 58
Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trips (4-12)................... 104
The Complete Cosmos (5-12) ........................................................... 85
Concepts in Nature (Primary-6) ...................................................... 78
Cover to Cover (Primary-4) .............................................................. 69
Crafting Tradition (5-12) ................................................................... 25
Creating Stories and Music (4-5) ..................................................... 62
Cursive Handwriting Series A (Primary) ....................................... 61
Cyberchase (3-7) ................................................................................. 44
DanceSense (5-10) .............................................................................. 16
Dancing Threads: Community Dances from Africa to Zuni
(Primary-8) ...................................................................................... 15
Destinos (9-12) .................................................................................... 41
Deutsch macht Spass! (German Can Be Fun!) (4-6) ...................... 36
Different and the Same (Primary) ................................................... 48
Doodle (Primary-12) .......................................................................... 24
Drug Avengers (Primary-6) .............................................................. 51
Econ and Me (Primary-5).................................................................. 50
Economics: The Production, Distribution, and
Consumption of Goods and Services (4-6) ................................ 96
The Eddie Files (3-6) .......................................................................... 43
Electric Money (8-12) ......................................................................... 96
An Electronic Conversation with George Ella Lyon (5-12) ......... 73
Electronic Field Trip Through Geologic Time (4-12) .................... 28
Electronic Field Trip to a Beef Cattle Farm (4-12) ......................... 28
Electronic Field Trip to a Coal Mine (4-8) ...................................... 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Horse Farm (4-12).................................. 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Newspaper (4-12) .................................. 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Pig Farm (4-8) ........................................ 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Veterinary Clinic (4-12) ......................... 29
Electronic Field Trip to a Watershed (K-8) ..................................... 30
Electronic Field Trip to an Orchard (4-12)..................................... 30
Electronic Field Trip to Fort Harrod and Fort
Boonesborough (4-8) ..................................................................... 30
Electronic Field Trip to Horse Cave Theatre (5-12) ...................... 31
Electronic Field Trip to KET (4-12) .................................................. 31
Electronic Field Trip to Mammoth Cave (4-12) ............................. 31
Electronic Field Trip to Perryville (4-12) ....................................... 31
Electronic Field Trip to the Aviation Museum
of Kentucky (4-12).......................................................................... 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Falls of the Ohio (4-12) ...................... 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Forest (4-8) .......................................... 32
Electronic Field Trip to the KY Center for the Arts (6-12) ........... 32
Electronic Field Trip to the Kentucky Opera (6-9) ........................ 33
Electronic Field Trip to the Louisville Zoo (4-12) ......................... 33
Electronic Field Trip to the Mountain Homeplace (4-12) ............ 33
Electronic Field Trip to the National Weather Service (5-12) ...... 34
Electronic Field Trip to the Post Office (Primary) ......................... 34
Electronic Field Trip to the Speed Museum (6-12)........................ 35
Electronic Field Trip to Toyota (4-12) .............................................. 35
Electronic Field Trip to White Hall Historic Site,
Home of Cassius M. Clay (4-12) .................................................. 35
Ellis Wilson—So Much to Paint (9-12) ............................................ 27
English Composition: Writing for an Audience (9-12) ................. 63
Entrepreneurs in Kentucky (1-12) ................................................... 95
Events of the 20th Century (7-12) .................................................. 109
Everyday Voices (10-adult) ............................................................... 64
Explore More (6-8) ............................................................................. 85
Exploring the World of Music (9-12)............................................... 22
Fat Albert & the Cosy Kids (Primary-7) ......................................... 52
Flirting or Hurting Sexual Harassment in Schools (11-12) .......... 56
Forest Family Forever (Primary-5) .................................................. 78
From the Brothers Grimm (4-8) ....................................................... 71
From the Shadows of the River (4-12) ............................................ 25
GED .....................................................................................................116
Gee Whiz in Agriculture (4-5) .......................................................... 81
German Program...............................................................................114
Great Campaigns of the Civil War (6-12) ..................................... 108
Great Native American Leaders (3-8) ............................................. 92
Great Native American Nations (3-8) ............................................. 93
Hand in Hand (2-3)............................................................................ 92
Head To Toe (Primary) ...................................................................... 48
Healthy Body Healthy Mind (4-8)................................................... 54
Hollywood Homeroom: Producing Classroom Videos with
Hollywood Magic (K-12 ..............................................................112
Human Rights: Youth Perspectives (9-12).................................... 102
Humanities Connections (7-12) ....................................................... 17
Humanities Themes ..........................................................................115
Humanities Through the Arts .........................................................115
Hymnody of Earth (5-12) .................................................................. 21
I Love Music (Primary-6) .................................................................. 91
I'm Safe on Wheels (K-2)................................................................... 48
Inside Our Human Body (7-12) ....................................................... 89
Inside The Living Cell (6-9) .............................................................. 86
Inside Story With Slim Goodbody (2-6) ......................................... 53
Inventing Flight (7-9) ......................................................................... 87
It Figures (4) ........................................................................................ 44
James Still's River of Earth (7-12) .................................................... 73
Just For Me (Primary)........................................................................ 49
Kentucky Afield for Kids (4-7) ......................................................... 82
Kentucky Archaeology (7-12) ........................................................... 95
Kentucky Chautauqua (7-12) ......................................................... 109
2006/2007 M�
Appendices• 127
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
Kentucky GeoQuest (4) ..................................................................... 96
Kentucky in Africa (4-12) ................................................................ 104
The Kentucky Legislature: Behind the Scenes (4-12) ................. 100
Kentucky's Learning Goals and Academic Expectations .............. 8
Kentucky's Natural Heritage (6-12) ............................................... 83
Kentucky's Story (4-5) ..................................................................... 103
Kentucky's Underground Railroad… (4-12) ................................ 105
KET School Video Project 2006: My Kentucky Home (K-12) .....111
KET School Video Project 2007: My Kentucky Home (K-12) .....111
Know It All (3-6)................................................................................. 61
Lab Safety: The Accident at Jefferson High (7-9) .......................... 88
Latin Program ....................................................................................115
Latin Roots for English Word Power (9-12) ................................... 64
Liberty Hall (4-12) ............................................................................ 105
Life in Marine and Freshwater Environments (6-12) ................... 87
Life Skills/Character Education Series (5-9).................................. 54
Living By Words (9-12) ..................................................................... 74
Living the Story: The Civil Rights Movement in KY (6-12) ....... 94
Living the Story: The Rest of the Story (6-12) ............................... 94
Liz’s Circus Story (6-12) .................................................................... 23
Looking at Painting (9-12) ................................................................ 27
Looking At Picasso (8-12) ................................................................. 26
Looking from the Inside/Out (Primary-5)..................................... 51
Los Constructores de Cerritos del Uruguay .................................. 41
Lyric Language (Primary-6) ............................................................. 36
Making Grimm Movies (6-12).........................................................113
Making News Quiz (4-12) ...............................................................112
Maps and Globes (4-12) .................................................................... 97
Math Basics (9-12) .............................................................................. 46
Math Can Take You Places (3-6) ...................................................... 43
Math Vantage (7-9)............................................................................. 45
Math Works (5) ................................................................................... 44
Mathica's Mathshop I (Primary) ...................................................... 42
Mathica's Mathshop II (Primary) .................................................... 43
Media Mania (Primary-4) ................................................................111
The Middle Ages (7-12) ................................................................... 109
Middle School Kids Speak Out (6-9) ............................................... 56
More Books from Cover to Cover (5-6) .......................................... 72
Mountain Media (9-12) ....................................................................113
Mrs. Cabobble's Caboose (Primary) ................................................ 19
My America (1-6) .............................................................................. 99
My Beautiful House (Primary-6) ..................................................... 91
NASA Connect (4-8) .......................................................................... 86
NASA SCIence Files (3-5) ................................................................. 79
NASA's Destination Tomorrow (9-12) ............................................ 89
Native American Exhibit (4-8) ........................................................ 93
Native Americans Series (2-5) .......................................................... 92
A Native Presence (4-12) ................................................................... 94
Natureworks (3-6) .............................................................................. 80
News Quiz (5-8) ............................................................................... 100
North American Biomes (4-8) .......................................................... 82
Old Music for New Ears (Primary-8).............................................. 20
Our Earth (7-12).................................................................................. 89
Our Presidents in American History (5-12) ................................. 106
Passport to Japan - Konnichiwa (4-8) ............................................. 93
Passport to Weather & Climate (6-9)............................................... 86
Physics ................................................................................................114
Planet Neighborhood (6-12) ............................................................. 87
Posie Paints (Primary-3).................................................................... 24
The Prehistoric Mounds of Uruguay (4-12) ................................. 105
128 • 205/2006 M Appendices
Professional Development ...............................................................117
Pyramid (5-9) .................................................................................... 106
Read On: Cover to Cover (4-5) ........................................................ 70
Reading Rainbow (Primary) ............................................................ 65
Real Science! II (5-10) ......................................................................... 83
Real Science! III (5-10) ....................................................................... 84
Real World Science (4-6) ................................................................... 81
Red Light, Green Light, Have You Heard? (Primary-6) .............. 51
The Remarkable Clarks (5-12) ........................................................ 107
Richard Davis on Jazz Teleconference (PD) ................................... 21
Rivers of North America "The Ohio River" (4-8) ......................... 97
Rivers of the World (4-12) ................................................................ 98
Roman City Modules (5-12) ........................................................... 107
Sacagawea (3-6) ................................................................................ 103
Saludos (Primary-5) ........................................................................... 39
Shakespeare Shorts (9-12) ................................................................. 74
The Short Story (7-12)........................................................................ 73
Signature (9-12) .................................................................................. 74
SignatureLIVE (10-12) ....................................................................... 75
Signing Time! (Preschool-3) ........................................................ 38/47
Sing Out for Freedom (7-12)............................................................. 21
Solve It (6) ........................................................................................... 45
The Spanish Media Collection (Primary-12).................................. 40
Statistics: Decisions Through Data (10-12) ..................................... 46
Street Skills (9-12) ............................................................................... 58
Student Lessons with Barry Lane (4-8)........................................... 63
Take a Look I (Primary-4) ................................................................. 77
Teach Me Japanese (Primary-5) ....................................................... 37
Teacher's Guide Order Form .......................................................... 124
Teen Issues (7-12) ............................................................................... 57
Teletales (Primary) ............................................................................. 67
Telling Tales (Primary-8) ................................................................... 69
Tracks: Impressions of America (4-8) ............................................ 103
Truth and Consequences: Federal Crimes & Teenagers (11-12).. 60
Tumbletown Tales (K-3) .................................................................... 42
TV411 (7-12) ........................................................................................ 55
Twentieth Century History (11-12) .................................................110
U.S. Constitution (6-12) ................................................................... 102
U.S. Geography: From Sea To Shining Sea (4-8) ........................... 97
Under 18: Under the Law (6-8) ...................................................... 101
Up Close and Natural (Primary) ..................................................... 76
Videotape Price List ......................................................................... 125
Videotape Service Order Form ...................................................... 126
Violence: Reversing the Trend (5-10) .............................................. 55
Viruses on the Rise (10-12) ............................................................... 90
Visualizing Cell Processes (9-12) ..................................................... 90
Voices & Visions (10-12) .................................................................... 75
Well, Well, Well with Slim Goodbody (Primary) .......................... 49
When I Grow Up (1-4)....................................................................... 53
Wind in the Willows (Primary-8) .................................................... 22
Winter: Season of Darkness/Season of Light (4-12) ..................... 17
Women of Kentucky: Our Legacy, Our Future(4-12).................. 106
Women's Work (6-12)......................................................................... 56
Words Like Freedom/Sturdy Black Bridges (9-12)....................... 23
Work, Energy, and the Simple Machine (5-8) ................................ 83
Workplace Essential Skills (9-12) ..................................................... 59
The World of Nature II (Primary-6) ................................................ 79
World of Our Own: Kentucky Folkways (8-12) ............................ 26
Write Ideas (4-6) ................................................................................ 62
Zoo Zoo Zoo (Primary) ..................................................................... 77

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