O-Line`s JOb: Keeping The sTars CLean

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O-Line`s JOb: Keeping The sTars CLean
August 30-September 5, 2013, Vol. 6, Issue 36
Wiseacre to
Open City’s
First Taproom
Baptist lays off
61 employees
»
Baptist Memorial
Health Care has
laid off 61 workers
in a system-wide
restructuring plan. The
positions ranged from
pharmacists to registered
nurses. P. 25
The city’s newest craft
brewery is officially
open for business now
that Wiseacre Brewing
Co. has begun pouring
pints at its 2783 Broad
Ave. taproom. P. 27
•
Fayette
•
Tipton
•
•
Madison
•
(AP Photo/AL.com, Vasha Hunt)
Shelby
Mean
Streets
Coaches prepare for grind, spotlight of
SEC football P. 18
Alabama coach Nick Saban reacts to a question about a trip to Ireland, which he said he knows nothing about, during the Southeastern Conference
football media days in Hoover, Ala., in August. Despite his incredulity at the question, Saban is accustomed to the bright lights of the SEC.
O-Line’s Job:
Keeping The
Stars Clean
School Board
Crossing
The school board will
no longer need a semicircle with 23 seats
at its next meeting in
September. P. 22
They don’t get any of
the glory, but linemen
have a huge task –
protect the QB. P. 16
•
•
weekly digest: page 2
Education: page 6
Law: page 15
LAW TALK: page 26
EDITORIAL: page 34
A Publication of The Daily News Publishing Co. | www.thememphisnews.com
www.thememphisnews.com
2 August 30-September 5, 2013
weekly digest
Get news daily from The Daily News, www.memphisdailynews.com.
The Memphis News | almanac
August 30-September 5, 2013
This week in Memphis history:
>>>>> 2008: The Levitt Shell in Overton Park opened its inaugural concert
season with Amy LaVere and Justin Townes Earle following a $1.3 million
renovation that improved the sound system and took out the shell’s
benches in favor of an open green area.
>>>>> 1993: Local and state leaders broke ground at Memphis International
Airport for a new $177.5 million runway and a $36 million FedEx Aircraft
Maintenance Facility.
>>>>> 1974: ZZ Top at the Liberty Bowl capped what had been a busy summer at the stadium, then known as Memorial Stadium. In July, Eric Clapton had played the stadium with Lynyrd Skynyrd and Foghat opening.
>>>>> 1973: At a forum on “no fault” divorce legislation pending in Nashville, Shelby County Divorce Proctor Poston Cox argued no fault divorce
would make divorce too easy and lead to the breakup of the traditional
American family. But attorney Joe Sasser of Legal Services Association
countered existing divorce laws created a “severe hardship” of families
by requiring a listing of causes.
>>>>> 1943: On the front page of The Daily News, new gas rationing coupons were being issued to take effect with the first of September. The
new coupons reflected smaller amount of gasoline for each coupon as
part of the war effort. “Gas station attendants are not allowed to honor
the old coupons after Sept. 1, so be sure to make the change and save
embarrassment and perhaps, bad feeling, all around,” the notice read.
Archer-Malmo Listed
Among Fast-Growing Firms
group is an advocate for women on worklife balance and workplace equity issues.
Memphis-based marketing communications firm archer-malmo is included
on the fourth annual Agency 100 list from
industry publication “The Agency Post.”
The list includes the fastest-growing
advertising and marketing agencies in the
U.S.
The agencies listed on the Agency 100
demonstrated substantial growth over the
past three years.
Founded in 1952, archer-malmo employs 130 full-time professionals and was
listed as having a 46 percent growth rate.
Miss Lee’s Preschool
Earns Reaccreditation
Miss Lee’s Preschool, the preschool
of Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal School, has
been reaccredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children.
The accreditation includes more than
450 criteria and 10 standards on which a
preschool’s operations are judged every
five years.
The preschool, which was founded in
1924 and became part of Grace-St. Luke’s
Episcopal School in 1987, has been accredited since 1998.
Miss Lee’s has a current enrollment
of 125 students, including three new
classrooms for 2-year-olds that opened in
August. The new classrooms were added
in an expansion several years ago during a
renovation of Grace-St. Luke’s.
Local Business Women’s
Group Looks to Re-Form
A group of local businesswomen is
meeting Friday, Aug. 30, to discuss reestablishing a Memphis chapter of the
Business and Professional Women of Tennessee.
The group is meeting at 11:30 a.m. at
Jason’s Deli, 3473 Poplar Ave.
Meeting organizer Martha Ervin said
the group welcomes any woman who is
interested in “sharpening your leadership
skills, developing opportunities to meet
and share experience with other women
and becoming more informed on issues
crucial to women in business.”
Ervin is finance chair for Business and
Professional Women of Tennessee, a state
affiliate of BPW Foundation. The national
Chamber Teams Up With
Gazelles Growth Institute
The Greater Memphis Chamber has
teamed up with online executive education company Gazelles Growth Institute
to offer members access to online training
from the nation’s top business experts at
an exclusive discount.
The Gazelles Growth Institute has
similar arrangements with other chambers
Join the Team
and Share the Pennies!
Josh Pastner, Head Coach,
University of Memphis Men’s Basketball
WORLD-CLASS CANCER CARE IN MEMPHIS.
For over three decades, The West Clinic has been a leader in the fight against cancer in
the Mid-South. Recently, we joined forces with Methodist Healthcare and The University
of Tennessee Health Science Center to create the West Cancer Center — an innovative
partnership that provides even more resources, expertise, technology and research here
in Memphis. Now you can fight cancer at home, stay near the doctors you know and be
with the people you love. It’s a winning combination. With the West Cancer Center in
your corner, you have all the advantages of home fighting on your side.
World-class cancer care is here at home. Memphis Fight On lets you see the remarkable
stories of those who are fighting cancer. Watch their stories, or share one of your own,
at MemphisFightOn.com.
SM
MemphisFightOn.com
By adding a few extra pennies
to your bill each month, you can
help a neighbor in need through the
MLGW/MIFA Share the Pennies program.
When you sign up to give, your donation
helps elderly and disabled customers receive
emergency energy efficiency repairs to their
homes.
As a thank you for joining the Share the
Pennies team, you’ll receive a coupon for a
FREE 4-pack of Compact Fluorescent Lights
redeemable at participating The Home Depot
stores.
To enroll in Share the Pennies, go online to
mlgw.com/sharethepennies or call MLGW
Customer Relations at (901) 528-4887.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 3
Get news daily from The Daily News, www.memphisdailynews.com.
of commerce across the U.S., including the
Manhattan Chamber of Commerce and
the Greater Austin Chamber of Commerce,
and plans to expand its offer to chambers
in Canada and Australia as well.
Through these partnerships, chamber
members are able to purchase a corporate
membership at a 10 percent discount.
US Economy Grew At
2.5 Pct. Rate in Spring
The U.S. economy grew at a 2.5 percent
annual rate from April through June, much
faster than previously estimated. The steep
revision was largely because U.S. companies exported more goods and imports
declined.
The Commerce Department said
second-quarter growth was sharply higher
than the initial 1.7 percent rate it reported
last month. And the growth this spring
was more than double the 1.1 percent rate
from January through March.
The improvement in the trade deficit
helped offset a weaker government spending.
Economists expect growth will stay at
an annual rate of around 2.5 percent in the
second half of the year, helped by steady
job gains and less drag from federal spending cuts. Still, some say higher interest
rates might restrain the economy’s expansion in the second half.
Rates could rise even further if the
Federal Reserve decides to reduce its $85
billion a month in bond purchases at its
September meeting. The Fed will consider
the stronger second-quarter growth when
making a decision next month. The bond
purchases have helped keep long-term
borrowing rates low.
30-Year Mortgage Rates
Decline to 4.51 Percent
Average U.S. rates for fixed mortgages
declined this week but stayed close to their
highest levels in two years.
Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said
Thursday that the average rate on the 30year loan fell to 4.51 percent. That’s down
from 4.58 percent last week, the highest
since July 2011.
The average on the 15-year fixed
mortgage dipped to 3.54 percent from 3.60
percent, also the highest since July 2011.
Rates have risen more than a full
percentage point since May when Chairman Ben Bernanke first signaled that the
Federal Reserve might reduce its bond purchases later this year. The purchases have
helped keep long-term interest rates low.
Mortgage rates remain low by historical
standards. But the sudden spike in rates
could slow the housing recovery’s momentum.
U.S. sales of newly built homes
dropped 13.4 percent in July to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 394,000, the
government said last week. That’s the lowest level in nine months.
Also in July, fewer Americans signed
contracts to buy homes for the second
straight month, according to the National
Association of Realtors. Still, the decline
has been modest and the level of pending
homes sales remains close to a 6 ½ -year
high reached in May.
Mortgage rates have been rising because they tend to follow the yield on the
10-year Treasury note. The yield also has
surged on speculation that the Fed’s stimulus will slow. But the rate on the 10-year
note declined this week to 2.78 percent
from 2.90 percent last week.
Unemployment Benefits
Applications Fall to 331,000
The number of Americans seeking
unemployment benefits remained near
the lowest level in more than five years last
week, a sign that companies are cutting
few jobs.
First-time applications for benefits
fell 6,000 to a seasonally adjusted 331,000,
the Labor Department said Thursday. The
four-week average, a less volatile measure,
inched up 750 to 331,250 after falling to
its lowest level since November 2007 the
previous week.
Applications for unemployment
benefits reflect layoffs. At the depths of the
recession in March 2009, they numbered
670,000. The average has fallen 10 percent
this year.
All told, nearly 4.5 million people
weekly digest
received unemployment benefits in the
week that ended Aug. 10, the latest period
for which figures are available. That’s about
30,000 more than in the previous week.
The figures “signal no let-up from
the recent pace in employment growth,
which has been strong enough to keep
unemployment trending down,” said Jim
O’Sullivan, an economist at High Frequency Economics. “If anything, claims are
suggesting further acceleration.”
Though employers are cutting few jobs,
most have yet to start hiring aggressively.
Fewer layoffs can increase net job gains,
even if hiring doesn’t rise much.
Employers have added an average of
192,000 jobs a month since January. That’s
enough to gradually lower the unemployment rate, which fell to 7.4 percent in July.
Nineteenth Century Club
Hearing Continues
Testimony continued for a third day
Wednesday, Aug. 28, in the Shelby County
Chancery Court hearing on the sale of the
Nineteenth Century Club building.
At issue in the case before Chancellor
Walter Evans is whether the sale to Union
Group LLC was valid. Plaintiffs, some of
whom are members of the nonprofit organization, are contesting it.
Club President Lynn Heathcott continued her testimony at Wednesday’s hearing. Heathcott, whose testimony began
Tuesday afternoon, was president of the
www.thememphisnews.com
4 August 30-September 5, 2013
weekly digest
Get news daily from The Daily News, www.memphisdailynews.com.
club during the building’s sale this year to
the Union Group, which plans to demolish
the building and build a restaurant.
Heathcott testified the club’s membership dwindled over the years and that the
mansion needed repairs beyond the club’s
capital budget to make.
On cross-examination, attorney and
Shelby County Commissioner Steve
Mulroy questioned Heathcott about the
membership vote to list the property for
sale and to sell it to Union Group. Mulroy
questioned what constituted a member
in good standing for voting purposes and
how much discretion Heathcott had in
determining whether members who had
paid their dues partially or were behind in
the payments could vote.
Nonprofit Alliance
Expanding, Moving
The Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence
is expanding and plans to move from 5100
Poplar Ave. to 1919 Lynnfield Road, Suite
200, in September.
“We want to make it easier for our
more than 200 agency members from West
Tennessee, East Arkansas and North Mississippi to engage with us and participate
in events and networking,” said Nancy
McGee, who leads the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence.
McGee said the alliance has been
working to let the Mid-South nonprofit
sector know that the organization provides
training, education, management consulting, research and advocacy outreach.
“The main thing we want to accomplish is for the nonprofit sector to develop
a clearer understanding of what we do,”
McGee said.
Small-Business Loan
Workshop Set for Sept. 9
Sue Malone, the founder of San
Francisco-based group Strategies for Small
Businesses, will facilitate a small-business
loan workshop in Memphis Sept. 9.
The event, to be held at the Renaissance Business Center at 555 Beale St., will
feature Malone discussing funding availability for startup businesses or expansion
options for current businesses.
The public is invited to the workshop,
which will be hosted by Tennessee Small
Business Development Center and the
U.S. Small Business Administration. It will
be held from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with
another from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 pm. At the
conclusion of the workshop, attendees can
have a loan application ready to submit.
Battledish Competition
Coming to Memphis
The international chef competition
Battledish is coming to Downtown Memphis in October.
Six chefs will compete for titles such
as “most delicious” and “most creative” as
well as for best modern, best cocktail and
“most authentic.”
The event is Oct. 5 at 2 p.m. All ticket
holders will get to vote for their favorites,
along with a panel of guest judges.
Chefs and other details will be released
weekly. The contest website at dishcrawl.
com/memphisbattle has more information and registration details.
Homeless Organizers Host
‘Know Your Rights’ Event
Members of Homeless Organizing for
Power and Equality, an organization made
up of men and women who are currently
or formerly homeless, will be hosting the
fourth in a series of “Know Your Rights”
workshops for the city’s homeless.
The workshop will be Saturday, Aug.
31, at St. Mary’s Episcopal, 700 Poplar Ave.
Members of H.O.P.E.’s Street-Watch
initiative will be available to help individuals fill out surveys about their experiences
with the Memphis Police Department.
Organizers with the Street-Watch
initiative will also have complaint forms
available to document instances of police
harassment.
“We believe that over time, we can use
data compiled from these complaints to
pinpoint areas where police harassment
is most likely to occur, what time of day or
night, and begin to weed out officers who
believe that a badge and a gun give them
the right to treat people on the streets of
Memphis like second-class citizens,” said
Marcus Mitchell, a project organizer.
Visible College Starts
Student Work Program
Visible Music College is launching a
student work-scholarship program this
fall.
The new program will employ 70 students in positions transferrable to the professional, post-collegiate world. Students
will work hours weekly in recruitment
and advancement, media and marketing,
building management, music publishing,
hospitality, admissions and more.
The college is preparing to start its fall
semester with a capacity enrollment of
129. Students moved in to campus housing
in Memphis on Aug. 10.
US Home Prices Rise
12.1 Percent in June
U.S. home prices rose 12.1 percent in
June from a year earlier, nearly matching a
seven-year high. But month-over-month
price gains slowed in most markets, a sign
that higher mortgage rates may weigh on
the housing recovery.
The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20city home price index slowed only marginally from May’s year-over-year gain of 12.2
percent, the fastest since March 2006. And
all 20 cities posted gains from the previous
month and compared with a year ago, ac-
The 3rd AnnuAl
MeMphis Rese aRch and innovation expo
Meet the area’s top scientists and learn about their cutting-edge research. Join the conversation about local
entrepreneurship, hear about managing global risk, and listen as the head of Procter & Gamble — one of the
world’s most innovative and successful corporations — discusses his experiences growing a $100 billion company.
THE 3rd ANNUAL MEMPHIS rESEArCH ANd INNOVATION EXPO
Thursday, October 3 | 9 a.m.–3 p.m.
FedEx Institute of Technology on the University of Memphis Campus
Admission is FREE | memphis.edu/fedex | 901.678.5105
Parking is available, for a fee, in the
Innovation Drive Garage, across from the FedEx Institute.
Seating is limited for the speakers portion of the event.
A Tennessee Board of Regents Institution • An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action University.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 5
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cording to the report released Tuesday.
Home prices in Las Vegas soared 24.9
percent from a year earlier to lead all cities.
Purchases by investors have helped.
Other cities hit hard by the housing
bust also posted stunning gains in the past
year. Prices have jumped 24.5 percent in
San Francisco and nearly 20 percent in
both Los Angeles and Phoenix.
Still, 14 of the 20 cities posted smaller
gains in June compared with May. That’s
unusual considering June is the middle of
the summer buying season.
And in cities less affected by the housing crisis, gains have been more modest.
Prices in New York and Cleveland are
about 3 percent higher than a year earlier.
Prices rose 5.7 percent in Washington,
D.C., and 6.7 percent in Boston.
Most economists expect the overall
index to slow to single digits in the coming
months, which they see as a more sustainable pace.
Dot Foods to Build
Dyersburg Plant
Dot Foods Inc., an Illinois company
that redistributes food to convenience
stores, vending machines and other food
service vendors, will build a $24 million
distribution center in Dyersburg, Tenn.
Company officials and state and
Dyersburg leaders announced the plans
Monday, Aug. 26, in Dyersburg.
The warehouse, the company’s first
in Tennessee, is to be built on Tenn. 211
in the Dyersburg Industrial Park and will
mean 157 new jobs in the Dyer County
area in the warehouse’s first three years.
A temporary office opens in the fall,
with the center itself scheduled to open in
September 2014.
The company begins hiring truck
drivers and looking for management staff
immediately.
The 166,494-square-foot warehouse
will include frozen, refrigerated and ambient storage as well as a 9,500-square-foot
garage for tractors and trucks.
The center will serve Dot customers in
a five-state area.
District Attorney Offers
Bikes for School Attendance
Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich is offering a bike to each
student with perfect attendance in 12 elementary and middle schools in the Shelby
County Schools system and Achievement
School District.
The Bike Rewards program is funded
by the Hyde Family Foundation and is part
of the District Attorney General’s office
Truancy Reduction Program.
The bicycles will be awarded at the end
of the school year to students who have no
absences and no tardy occurrences for the
entire year.
The elementary schools in the program
are Ford Road, Hickory Ridge, Shannon,
Celebrate What’s Right
Creating World Class Public Education
Westwood and Winridge.
The middle schools in the program
are Chickasaw, Georgian Hills, Hamilton,
Hickory Ridge, Ridgeway, Sherwood and
Westside Achievement.
The schools have approximately 7,500
students.
PepsiCo Executive Shares
Rags-to-Riches Story
When Richard Montanez started working for PepsiCo, he was a janitor.
Today, he’s 56, he heads multicultural
sales and community promotions across
PepsiCo’s North America divisions, and he
is the company’s top Latino executive.
Montanez was this month’s featured
speaker of the Lipscomb Pitts Breakfast
Club.
He spoke to a crowd Thursday, Aug. 22,
at the BRIDGES facility Downtown about
how he achieved success after inventing
the idea and recipe for “Flamin’ Hot Cheetos” – one of the company’s top-selling
snacks – and how that success had roots
early in his childhood.
“Let me tell you about everything that
came my way when I was your age,” Montanez told the young people in the crowd
at BRIDGES. “Nothing came my way when
I was your age!”
Instead, his was a classic rags-to-riches
story. “Why can’t I fit in like everyone else?”
he asked his mom at one point during his
grade school years. It was at a time when
weekly digest
other children shot him quizzical looks
when he’d do “strange” things like take out
his packed lunch and unwrap – a burrito.
“This is who you are,” his mother told
him. One day, she packed him an extra
burrito to give to a friend. Soon, he was
sharing his food.
And after that, he was selling burritos for 25 cents. It was an anecdote that
displayed his early affinity for seizing opportunity.
“Young people, be who God created
you to be,” Montanez said. “Once you fall
in love with yourself, you’re free.”
Once he got a foot in the door at
PepsiCo mopping floors, he made up his
mind: “I’m going to mop this floor where
everybody who walks on it is going to look
twice.”
Boscos Brings Back
Derailleur Ale
Boscos Restaurant and Brewing Co. on
Sunday, Sept. 1, will be bringing back its
Derailleur Ale custom brew.
The light, hoppy beer will be available
for sale at all Boscos locations in Tennessee
and Arkansas.
Boscos Squared in Overton Square
also will celebrate the beer’s return with an
evening of beer and live music Sunday.
The event begins at 5 p.m., and all proceeds from the evening will benefit Boscos
Cycling and the Mid-South Chapter of the
National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
Playing with your baby
helps his brain develop.
And you’ll probably win
until he’s at least 3.
Go to TUCI.org for a copy of the Parents Guide to Kindergarten Readiness.
Chris Barbic
Dorsey Hopson II
Brad Martin
A discussion with Dorsey Hopson — Interim Superintendent of Shelby County
Schools and Chris Barbic — Superintendent of the Achievement School District,
the two leaders at the nexus of urban education in Memphis. Moderated by Brad
Martin — Interim President, University of Memphis.
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Noon-1:30 pm
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6 August 30-September 5, 2013
contributors
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news
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Eric Ba r nes
Associate Publisher & Executive Editor
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andy meek
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Banking/Financial Services/Accountants, Markets & Economy,
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t took three weeks into the unified
school system’s first school year for
Memphis Police to get a memo that
they were to respond to calls at Shelby
County Schools within the city of Memphis.
The information bulletin from Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong went
out to all officers Thursday, Aug. 22, the
same day that a 5-year-old kindergarten
student at Westside Elementary School
walked into the Frayser school with a gun
in his backpack and the gun went off in
the backpack. Prior to police roll calls that
day, Armstrong said a verbal order was
given: “If you get a call to a school you are
to respond, especially if it is an emergency
call.”
Armstrong and interim schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson showed the
sometimes-active political fault line between the school system and the Memphis
Police Department is active once again.
They held separate press conferences
the same afternoon with each critical of
the way the other’s department operates.
“I felt that he should have picked up
the phone and called the police director,”
Armstrong said of Hopson.
Hopson expressed frustration because
long before the July 1 merger effective
date and the Aug. 5 school year start – “all
summer long,” he said – schools officials
had been talking with the administration
of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. seeking a basic “yes” or “no” to the question of
whether Memphis Police would be in or
out of the former Memphis City Schools
once the merger began. So were county
government leaders.
As the school year began, the city’s
response, according to Hopson, was Memphis Police would remain through the end
of December in Memphis schools, where
they had resource officers assigned before
the merger, to train Shelby County Sheriff’s
deputies. Then they would be out of the
schools resource officer business.
Hopson said the response from police
in the last three weeks when there have
been calls involving schools in Memphis
was different from call to call.
“Sometimes they come and sometimes
they don’t,” Hopson said.
Hopson talked and met with Wharton
before Thursday’s incident at Westside over
his concerns about the response and again
after the incident.
“We shouldn’t be playing politics with
kids’ safety,” Hopson added.
As Hopson was responding to ques-
tions about the incident, Memphis Police
brass issued a written statement saying
police officers would be on the campuses
of all Memphis schools in the Shelby
County Schools system except 15 that currently have Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies assigned to them.
Armstrong said instead of calling
schools security and then schools security
reporting the incident to police, administrators at Westside should have called
9-1-1.
“The Memphis Police Department
would have responded had we been given
the proper information. The problem here
is that a city school employee called the
board of education rather than calling
9-1-1,” Armstrong said. “When something
like that happens, I can’t even tell you how
much information has to be obtained. For
us to have to extract that information from
people that’s giving us second-hand information – it’s just unacceptable.”
The last time public schools administrators and Memphis Police clashed was
2008 during the tenure of interim Memphis City Schools superintendent Dan
Ward. A series of shootings on Memphis
City Schools campuses prompted fears by
then-Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton and
Memphis Police Director Larry Godwin
that the incidents would escalate into
more campus and off-campus violence.
Both were adamant that some principals were not reporting such incidents and
Godwin declared that his officers would
respond and go onto campuses even if
they weren’t called by the school system.
Incoming schools superintendent
Kriner Cash immediately beefed up the
school system’s security force and sought
state legislation to commission security
officers as what amounted to a police force
for the school system. Godwin opposed it
in Nashville and it didn’t get very far.
Meanwhile Wharton sided with Cash’s
desire to see an alternative to taking school
children to Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court for detention once police were
called to a school campus. Police officers
had little choice but to take the children
into custody until alternative resolution
programs and the issuance of juvenile
summons for non-violent offenses began
to be used.
Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person Jr.
was among those who agreed that in too
many cases students with problems at
schools including refusing to tuck in their
shirttails were entering the juvenile justice
system when they didn’t have to.
Hopson ordered hand-held metal
detectors to be used starting last week in
elementary schools. It’s a move he made
reluctantly.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 7
news
E n t r ep r e n e u r s h i p
Nonprofit Sector
Fetch Brings
Ikea Delivery
to Memphis
Andy Meek
[email protected]
I
The Levitt Shell at Overton Park once again will be one of the host venues for Rock for Love, the annual
three-day fundraiser for the Church Health Center that is in its seventh year.
(Christopher Reyes)
Mission of Love
Rock for Love brings annual awareness to Church Health Center
Richard J. Alley
Special to The Memphis News
The seventh annual,
three-day fundraiser
for the Church Health
Center, providing health
care for the working
uninsured, kicks off the
evening of Thursday,
Sept. 5, with a VIP
barbecue at Ardent
Studios.
B
eginning Sept. 5, Memphis will
once again come together to
Rock for Love.
The seventh annual, three-day fundraiser for the Church Health Center,
providing health care for the working
uninsured, will kick off that Thursday
evening with a VIP barbecue at Ardent
Studios.
And this year there’s a twist.
“While it’s a VIP barbecue for
donors, bands, sponsors and friends
of the center, there is a public ticket
component so folks from the community can purchase a ticket, or a table
for that matter,” said Jeff Hulett, public
relations and communications coordinator for the Church Health Center.
The following night sees a bill of
four bands at Young Avenue Deli in
Cooper-Young, featuring the Side
Street Steppers, Reemus Bodeemus,
Hope Clayburn’s Soul Scrimmage and
Kaleidophonix, as well as DJ Devin
Steel between sets. Saturday puts a
new spin on the raucous tradition with
a family-friendly event at Overton Park
in the afternoon.
“It’s free, but we’re encouraging
donations and beer will be for sale,”
Hulett said.
The afternoon will feature various
kids activities, arts and crafts tables,
the Grizzlies’ bounce houses and a
bake sale. It all will be happening close
to the newly renovated and opened
playground, with an atmosphere Hulett compares to the popular Memphis
Rock-n-Romp events.
That same night sees a concert
at the Levitt Shell, featuring up-andcomers Mark Stuart with Kait Lawson,
as well as Patrick Dodd, John Kilzer
and Kirk Whalum.
“That should be a lawn filler,
should be just a great night,” Hulett
said.
The show is free but, Hulett adds,
“We’re going to have an army of Levitt
Shell and Church Health Center volunteers out there raising money for both
entities.”
Along with the music shows and
children’s activities, an online auction
is ongoing and has already raised close
to $2,000. T-shirts are for sale and a
new compilation CD featuring participating bands will be out soon.
Rock for Love was the brainchild
of Church Health Center employees
Marvin Stockwell and Hulett, and their
friend J.D. Reager, all Memphis musicians.
“We weren’t fundraisers; we’re still
not. We’re not part of the fundraising
department,” said Stockwell, communications director for the organization.
“Rock for Love was a project that we
didn’t necessarily have time to do, but
we almost viewed as our volunteer
project.”
Reager is solely a volunteer to the
Church Health Center.
The first hurdle was a name, and
as Stockwell cast about for something
quick and catchy, he kept coming
back to the overarching theme of the
Church Health Center’s mission to the
community, reading it in Bible verses
and seeing it manifested in the sculptures on the center’s Peabody Avenue
grounds: Love. Playing off the name of
a fundraiser already in place, Concert
of Love, which featured the music
of church choirs, Stockwell, a hardplaying guitarist and singer himself,
coined Rock for Love. The three leveraged their years as working musicians
to put together a lineup.
Since the first year, when funds
rock for love continued on P29
kea doesn’t have a store in Memphis, and
the retailer doesn’t deliver some products
to Memphis – which is why Ben Colar and
two other guys created a venture to give fans of
the retailer a guaranteed personal delivery service. Fetch is their newly launched enterprise
that will allow Memphis-area consumers to
create a list of items from Ikea. The Fetch guys
charge a little extra to make it worth their while,
and they’ll take those lists, drive to the Ikea
store in Atlanta and bring the items back.
The first run is Sept. 6. Items will be picked
up and brought back to Memphis to be delivered the following day. It was a trip to the
Atlanta store that led the guys behind Fetch to
see firsthand the niche they think they can fill.
“Earlier this year, the three of us and our
families took a road trip together just to pick
up some furniture from Ikea,” Colar said. “We
all love Ikea furniture, but we were frustrated
that we couldn’t get it shipped to Memphis.
So imagine three guys, their wives, three kids
under the age of 6 and one more baby on the
way, all packed into two cars, driving to Atlanta
on a furniture run.
“After a few hours in the Atlanta Ikea store,
we all started adding up the cost of gas, parking, meals, two nights in a hotel, plus the hassle
of trekking through the store in search of the
items we wanted, and trying to fit $1,000 of
merchandise into our cars for the drive back.”
That’s when they realized that if they were
willing to load up the cars with family and
make a weekend out of it, there may be others who would do it, too. And even more who
would want to but couldn’t, or wouldn’t – and
would prefer instead that someone else do it
and deliver to their doorstep.
“So we decided to try it out and see how it
goes,” Colar said.
There’s no limit on the size of orders. Fetch
will pick up individual items for shoppers as
well as come back with enough furniture to
outfit any office or restaurant that needs it.
Fetch also will deliver beyond Memphis.
According to its website, shoppers in Arkansas
and Mississippi towns that border Memphis
are welcome to order, but those shoppers are
encouraged to email Fetch to see if they’re too
far away and if special fees will apply.
The Fetch website is www.wecanfetch.it.
Colar said if Ikea ever does open a store in
Memphis, “we’d consider it a success.”
“That means Ikea sees the demand in
Memphis, and we think Memphis would be
better off for it,” he said. “We created Fetch to
meet a specific need that we saw. If an Ikea
store opens here, the need goes away, and we’re
fine with that. We have discussed expanding
our services to deliver other products not available in Memphis, but that would be further
down the road.”
Check out Fetch at twitter.com/wecanfetchit and facebook.com/wecanfetchit.
www.thememphisnews.com
8 August 30-September 5, 2013
Re a l E s tat e & De v el o p m e n t
United Housing Meets Milestone
Jennifer Johnson Backer
[email protected]
“
Our team is solely
focused on helping
families become
financially stable.”
– Tim Bolding
Executive director, United Housing Inc.
(Courtesy of United Housing)
Lisa Brice, left, with United Housing’s Tim Bolding, became the organization’s 3,000th homeowner.
L
isa Brice was living in a
Memphis-area townhouse
with her two teenage
daughters when the water was
turned off in the community back
in January.
Before that, Brice had dealt
with a leaky roof and water that
was erratically turned off and on.
“We had enough leaks to fill a
swimming pool,” said Brice, who
had purchased the townhouse
about seven years ago. After the
water was turned off, the community was condemned – leaving
Brice with few options to sell her
townhouse.
Brice and her two daughters
made daily visits to her mother’s
home, where they showered and
had access to running water. In
the meantime, Brice, a disabled
veteran and retired Internal Revenue Service employee, began
searching for a new home.
With help from a Realtor, she
fell in love with a newly rehabbed
home in Frayser that she thought
might fit in her budget.
It turned out the four-bed-
room, two-bathroom home had
been rehabbed by United Housing Inc., a nonprofit affordablehousing agency that helps
families in the city of Memphis,
Shelby County and throughout
West Tennessee. The agency
reported a $52 million economic
impact on the local housing market during its 2013 fiscal year.
The agency helps both firsttime and recurring homebuyers
purchase homes, and provides
free homebuyer and foreclosure
prevention education.
By late spring, Brice had been
referred to a free United Housing
homebuyer education course,
where she also learned she was
eligible for grant funding to help
cover her down payment and
closing costs.
With the help of United
Housing, she received $27,000
in grants through the Neighborhood Stabilization Program and
the Memphis-Shelby County
Helping Homebuyers Program.
She closed on the $47,000 home
in June.
Brice’s home purchase also
marked a very personal milestone
for United Housing. She was the
agency’s 3,000th customer.
“Every room is beautiful,”
Brice said. “I don’t mind cleaning this house up – I want to do
it to make sure it shines. It’s been
amazing.”
Brice said the homebuyer
education course also helped her
work through the complex mortgage application process.
“They really broke it down
and explained what every single
page is for,” she said. “I thought
that was the most fascinating
part.”
In fiscal 2013, United Housing
says the agency counseled 1,076
area individuals and families. The
organization also assisted 284
families purchase a home, while
helping save 257 homes from
foreclosure.
“While it’s clear that we were
able to make a significant difference over the last year, we still
have a lot of work ahead of us,”
said Tim Bolding, executive director of United Housing. “Our team
is solely focused on helping families in our community become
financially stable.”
Bolding said United Housing’s
homebuyer education classes
are free and available to all local
residents free of charge.
“Word of mouth is our most
common referral,” he said. “The
homebuyer education course is
an A to Z about everything you’d
want to know about being a
homebuyer, from knowing how
much you can afford to what your
credit looks like.”
Homebuyers like Brice who
receive grant assistance or who
purchase United Housing homes
also attend the homebuyer education courses.
“Lisa’s story reminds us of
why we do what we do,” Bolding
said.
Brice says she still can’t
believe how everything worked
out. She also loves the neighborhood.
“I give thanks every morning,”
she said. “It’s an amazing place
with these amazing people.”
Rates Are Rising, Rates Are Rising
On July 22, 1981, the federal funds
rate (the interbank overnight benchmark
rate) hit a historic high of 22.36 percent.
On Dec. 11, 2011, it bottomed at .04 percent. Between 1981 and today, large company stocks returned nearly 11 percent
on an annualized basis. As consensus
suggests, falling interest rates undoubtedly make stocks more valuable.
While today’s rates may remain
historically low for an extended period,
their absolute lows have most likely been
printed. The Federal Reserve has pegged
the overnight rate at 0 percent and
suppressed long-term rates by purchasing $85 billion a month of long duration
Treasuries and mortgages. We now seem
to be entering the phase where this policy
may reverse. The mere suggestion of a
turnabout has led to rising rates. Yes,
the overnight federal funds rate remains
anchored at 0 percent, but the 10-year
Treasury has climbed from 1.43 percent
to 2.84 percent. Will rising rates lead to
falling stocks? The historic correlation
between intermediate term bond yields
and the S&P 500 is slightly negative. This
implies that an uptick in yields leads to
a decline in stock values. Case closed?
Not so fast.
Peering deeper into the relationship
between stocks and bond yields, we
find that if rates rise on rising economic
expectations, stocks and yield correlations are positive, but if rates rise on
rising inflationary expectations, correlations turn negative. To translate, as yields
rise off their lows in an economic recovery, stocks tend to perform well. Once
inflationary pressures build and yields
climb to more punitive levels, stocks tend
to struggle with competition, anticipation
of earnings pressure, and the threat of
economic recession. Recent observations add confirmation. Between 1/1/09
and 12/31/09, the 10-year Treasury yield
increased by 1.65 percent to 3.85 percent; simultaneously, the S&P 500 gained
26.46 percent. Between 9/1/10 and
3/31/11, yields increased by 1.00 per-
that rising rates equals falling stocks
cent to 3.47 percent; simultaneously, the
prove false. Stocks did return 11 percent
S&P 500 gained 27.78 percent. Finally,
annually between 1981 and 2013 as
between 7/25/12 and last week, yields
Treasury rates collapsed, but they also
increased by 1.47 percent to 2.9 percent;
returned 10.4 percent between
simultaneously, the S&P 500 gained
1954 and 1981 as Treasury
roughly 30 percent. When interest
rates soared. With inflation
rates and stock prices rise in tanlow and economic growth
dem the returns can be substanescalating, rising rates
tial. In fact, according to research
should correlate with rising
done by the Leuthold Group, there
stock prices. Eventually,
have been 12 distinct incidents
when inflation escalates
since 1955 when yields
and economic growth
and stock prices rose
David S. Waddell
the worldly
stagnates, rising rates
together. The average yield
investor will negatively correlate
increase was 1.69 percent
with stock returns. While
during these episodes,
the stock market may fall from here …
while the average stock index increase
please don’t blame interest rates rising
was 35.3 percent. Does that mean that
on economic optimism.
we could count on another 30 percent
gain if rates rise further from here? UnforDavid Waddell, who is regularly featunately not, when yields climb above 3
tured in the Wall Street Journal, USA Today
percent, correlations become less meanand Forbes, as well as on Fox Business
ingful until rates rise above 5-6 percent,
News and CNBC, is president and CEO of
when they turn decisively negative.
Memphis-based Waddell & Associates.
So the frequent arguments you hear
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 9
Money&Markets Extra
Mobile
banking
Steve Streit is the founder and CEO
of prepaid card company Green Dot.
This summer his company launched a
new bank unit called GoBank, whose
accounts, he says, are aimed at people
new to bank accounts or fed up with
the fees at traditional banks.
Insider
Q&A
Are you worried about increasing
competition from JPMorgan Chase,
U.S. Bank, American Express and
others? In July 2012, your stock
price plunged 61 percent in one day
after you warned that you couldn’t
predict how new competitors would
affect sales. It’s only this month
that the stock has regained those
losses.
It was very scary times for us. When
you have a big-sized company, when
Who he is:
Founder and CEO of
Green Dot
What he says:
Green Dot is
expanding beyond its
prepaid cards.
Steve Streit
products and new segments.
you have parking lots and glass and
steel, people have this sense that
you’re invincible. I don’t think people
realize that companies are like human
beings. You can be healthy one day
and not feel well the next. There are
many nights that I went to bed during
that period in complete flop sweats.
(The bank announced last month
that profit and revenue grew 4 percent
in the second quarter of this year.)
GoBank charges customers an
optional monthly fee. Optional? You
really think anyone’s going to pay
that?
“Anyone” is a broad statement. Will
everyone? No. Will some? Yes. If you
think we’re not any good, don’t pay us
anything. If you like us, then tip us. We
work for tips.
Are you trying to become less
dependent on Wal-Mart?
About 66 percent of our revenue comes
out of Wal-Mart. So we love Wal-Mart
and at the same time we recognize,
and they do too, that it’s important
for us to diversify. So we’re launching
other retailers and new channels of
GoBank wasn’t your first choice for
the bank’s name. You wanted to call
it Bank of Dog, right?
A dog is loyal, would never hurt you,
would never cheat you, they don’t really
have tempers unless they get older and
they’re not feeling well. And I thought,
“That’s how banks should be viewed.”
A bank should be your companion, not
your enemy. But the name itself, people
thought it was bizarre.
You put a picture of your schnauzer,
Professor Dog, on your GoBank
card. What do people usually
request to put on their card?
With women, it’s almost always a baby,
a dog or a boyfriend. If you’re a guy it’s
more often a car, scenic or a dog.
We have a lot of people who try to
use copyrighted photos — they’ll take a
picture of a Corvette from a Chevrolet
brochure, which we can’t do. I don’t
know if we’ve had any pornographic
issues, so that’s good.
Interviewed by Christina Rexrode.
Answers edited for content and clarity.
AP
Hedge fund faves
Where is the “smart money” investing these
days?
Goldman Sachs offers insight in its latest
analysis of the stocks that appear most often
among the 10 largest holdings of hedge funds.
Each quarter the investment bank identifies the top
The smart money These 10 stocks appear
50 stocks held by hedge
the largest holdings of hedge funds.
funds that own between 10
and 200 stocks.
Top-10 holding
As a group, on a
(Number of
quarterly basis, these
hedge funds)^
stocks have outperformed
the Standard & Poor’s 500
1. AIG (AIG)
69
index 63 percent of the
time since May 2001, and
2. Google (GOOG)
65
have slightly edged out the
3. Apple (AAPL)
50 -6
broader market this year.
The three most widely
4. General Motors (GM)
42
held stocks, AIG, Google
5. Citigroup (C)
37
and Apple also topped the
list at the end of 2012. New
6. Microsoft (MSFT)
32
entrants into the top 10
7. Charter Comm. (CHTR)
30
since that time are Charter
Communications, Hertz
8. priceline.com (PCLN)
30
Global and 21st Century
9. Hertz Global (HTZ)
29
Fox. Nexen, JPMorgan
Chase and Qualcomm
10. 21st Century Fox (FOXA)
28
have moved out of the top
S&P 500
10.
Sources: FactSet; Goldman Sachs
Returns through Aug. 29
^ As of June 30
BEHIND THE BRAND
C A S H A M E R I C A I N T E R N AT I O N A L ( C S H )
Greenbacks and gold
Cash America International makes
money on consumer loans and the
sale of goods its customers hawk for
cash.
The company, based in Fort Worth,
Texas, operates more than 960 pawn
shops, payday loan and check
cashing centers across the U.S. and
Mexico, under names such as
Cashland, SuperPawn and Cash
America Payday Advance.
The company has been wrestling
with tepid loan demand
over the past year as
many consumers
remain wary of taking on
debt. Its merchandise
sales business also has
suffered as the price of
gold has fallen, leading
to lower revenue from
most frequently among
Total
return
YTD
Priceearnings
ratio*
32%
26
21
26
12
19
13
23
the commercial sale of scrap gold.
In July, the company cut its
third-quarter and full-year earnings
estimates.
Still growing: Despite its challenges,
Cash America is taking steps to grow
its business. It recently bought 34
pawn shops in Georgia and North
Carolina from rival PawnMart for
about $62 million.
Bright spot: The company's online
lending segment
has been growing,
adding customers
in the U.S. and
United Kingdom.
That's helped
boost the unit's
revenue and
earnings.
16
28
13
59
Thursday’s close:
Price-earmings ratio:
Price change YTD:
S&P 500 YTD:
Revenue 2012:
Revenue 2013 (est.):
lost money
52
31
50
32
40
12
16
15
* Trailing 12 months
$42.92
13*
8%
15%
$1.8 bil.
$1.8 bil.
As of June 30, Cash
America had 964
stores, including 90
franchised check
cashing centers and
47 pawn stores in
Mexico.
Revenue through the first six months of the year totaled $879.1 million,
up 1 percent versus the same period last year.
AP
Source: FactSet Data through Aug. 29 *Trailing 12 month results
Alex Veiga • AP
LocalStocks
COMPANY
TICKER
AT&T Inc
T
AutoZone Inc
BancorpSouth
Boyd Gaming
Community Hlth Sys
Corrections Corp
Cummins Inc
Delta Air Lines
Dillards Inc
Dover Corp
DuPont
Education Realty Tr
FedEx Corp
Fst Horizon Natl
AZO
52-WK RANGE
LO
32.71 2
CLOSE
HI
39.00
341.98 8 452.19
12.55 9
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4.75 8
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26.07 6
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85.88 9 128.30
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DAL
8.42 9
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71.69 2
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54.90 0
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41.67 9
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8.44 2
11.77
EDR
FDX
83.92 9 113.34
FHN
8.54 7
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GTx Inc
FRED
12.30 7
17.71
GTXI
1.31 1
7.24
Intl Paper
IM
14.77 9
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Kellogg Co
K
Freds Inc
Ingram Micro
Isle Capri Casino
Kirklands Inc
Kroger Co
LifePoint Hosp
Macy’s Inc
Medtronic Inc
ISLE
KIRK
KR
4.75 7
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36.30 6
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33.65
421.52
19.81
12.16
40.30
+.07
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DIV
COMPANY
1.80
Merck & Co
TICKER
... Mid Amer Apartments
0.20f
Monsanto Co
...
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0.25e
1.92 Navistar Intl
52-WK RANGE
LO
CLOSE
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THUR.
CHG %CHG
YTD% 1YR%
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DIV
MRK
40.02 7
50.16
47.10
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MAA
60.38 1
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38.81
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...
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2.78
33.64
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Nike Inc B
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44.83 9
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+0.6
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19.64
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10.97 0
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s
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PNK
s
t
Pinnacle Entert
s +50.3 +106.6 dd
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6.19 8
10.52
9.49
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RNST
16.53 8
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25.72
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SNN
50.74 8
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-17.5
8
0.24
+7.5 10 0.24f
1.80
-0.5
t
t
t
+0.1
t
t
s +18.4 +24.7 22
0.60
Smucker, JM
SJM
81.60 8 114.72
105.80
+.48
+0.5
t
t
s +22.7 +27.1 20 2.32f
+1.2
t
t
s +14.5 +30.9 19
0.20
+0.6
s +20.7 +21.7 19 0.24a
24.67 7
36.29
32.42
+.12
+0.4
t
t
STI
t
t
Suntrust Bks
s +14.4 +31.7
+0.7
t
t
t
Synovus Fincl
SNV
1.99 9
3.52
3.30
-.02
-0.6
t
t
s +34.7 +64.7 dd
+0.6
t
t
s +33.2 +48.6 12
...
Sysco Corp
SYY
29.75 4
36.05
31.95
+.48
+1.5
t
t
t
+1.8
+7.0 19
1.12
+1.5
s
t
s +19.7 +40.4 20
1.20
Trustmark
TRMK 20.76 7
27.98
25.39
+.10
+0.4
t
t
s +13.0
+9.5 15
0.92
+0.9
t
t
t +33.4 +19.4 dd
...
t
t
t
+1.8
s
s
s +90.9 +111.3 23
...
+1.0
t
t
s +41.4 +66.7 13
0.60
-67.6
-19.6 88 0.44f
+7.1 +15.2 75 1.33e
-64.1 dd
...
-0.5
s
t
t +22.2 +14.2 19
+0.7
t
t
t +14.3
+11.8 13
1.00
...
+0.5
t
t
s +26.4 +30.1 14
1.12
0.40
0.04
TSN
14.91 9
32.40
28.91
+.46
+1.6
t
s
s +49.0 +84.3 14
0.20
UPS class B
UPS
69.56 8
91.78
85.71
+.07
+0.1
t
t
t +16.2 +18.1 60
2.48
Utd Technologies
UTX
74.44 8 107.86
100.46
+.48
+0.5
t
t
s +22.5 +26.6 15
2.14
Valero Energy
VLO
27.89 4
48.97
35.80
+.03
+0.1
t
t
s
+4.9 +28.6
Verso Paper Corp
VRS
0.70 1
2.05
.74
...
...
t
t
t
-30.8
-60.4 dd
...
Wright Medical Grp
WMGI 18.89 6
28.41
24.14
-.30
-1.2
r
t
t +15.0 +18.8 dd
...
... Tyson Foods
+8.5 +21.6 23 1.84f
8
9 0.90f
Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of
dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12
months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.
www.thememphisnews.com
10 August 30-September 5, 2013
Bundle of Joy
Can Cost You
Bundle of Cash
Ray’s Take
I was asked once if two could live as cheaply as
one. I answered, “Certainly, as long as one of them
didn’t eat or wear clothes.” Most couples realize having a baby is going to mean extra expenses. However,
many are shocked when they realize just how high
those expenses are. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, a child born in 2011 will cost an
average of $235,000 to raise to age 17. That number
doesn’t include a penny for private tuition or college.
Fortunately, that is spread over all those years.
The bad news is that for even low-income families,
raising a child still costs $212,000.
Of course, planning – and saving – for these additional expenses makes the most sense. Long
before families are started, I suggest
couples live on one of
their incomes, saving
all of the other. That
helps create a pretty
good portfolio and
accustoms the
family to a singleincome source,
ray & dana Brandon
rays of wisdom
should they
decide one of
them should be a stay-at-home parent.
If you are planning on using professional childcare, learn what your planned provider charges.
Start penciling that amount into your monthly budget before the baby arrives so you get the feel for its
impact, setting aside the money for later.
At the very least, sit down together before the
baby is born to develop a new household budget,
remembering to factor in food, clothing, diapers,
medical care, and all the equipment babies need.
Finally some good news: the cost per child
decreases with more children. Where do the savings
come from? Shared bedrooms, hand-me-downs,
and bulk food purchases account for most of it.
Having said all of this, let me say that being a parent is probably the greatest privilege and joy of my
life, and the rewards swamp the expenses a million
to one every day. But the hard cold facts are that you
can’t pay a bill with feelings.
Dana’s Take
It’s back-to-school time, so let’s talk about the
cost of private schools for pre-K-12. Tuitions vary
from parochial to private, but count on $10,000 per
year per child, starting at age 3 through 18. The lifetime cost of raising a child just went up by $150,000
in today’s dollars. Many private high schools charge
closer to $20,000 a year, so bump that number up
to over $200,000, per child. Add meal plans, uniforms and sports. Gulp.
Without deliberate planning, tuition and childcare expenses can sap dollars intended for college
and other goals. Grandparents, bless their hearts,
help with tuition for about a third of private school
students. Scholarships can help, too.
A good education can be a great investment. If
a private education is on your dream list for your
children, start the conversation and start planning.
As Ray says, “Every dream deserves a plan.”
Ray Brandon is a certified financial planner and
CEO of Brandon Financial Planning (www.brandonplanning.com). His wife, Dana, has a bachelor’s
degree in finance and is a licensed clinical social
worker. Contact Ray Brandon at [email protected]
G ov e r n m e n t
Talking Points
Corker talks Syria, housing in Memphis stop
Andy Meek
[email protected]
(Memphis News/Andrew J. Breig)
U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., was in Memphis Monday to discuss everything from Middle East policy to the housing
market. He appeared at an event hosted by the Memphis Area Home Builders Association.
Corker on Aug. 26 spoke to a
lunchtime crowd on a range
of subjects – everything
from Middle East policy
to the housing market’s
incremental recovery.
N
ot long after appearing on
two morning news shows
to assert that U.S. military
action in Syria is imminent, U.S.
Sen. Bob Corker started his week
with a list of Memphis appearances
that included speaking to a lunchtime crowd on a range of subjects –
everything from Middle East policy
to the housing market’s incremental
recovery.
The midday appearance
Monday, Aug. 26, by the Tennessee
Republican was at an event hosted
by the Memphis Area Home Builders Association and was billed as
a discussion of legislation he’s put
forward dealing with the future of
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. But
the talk also turned to other pressing national challenges – some so
pressing that the senator had to
take a private call in a hotel kitchen
before the event, and at least one
national political figure was trying
to reach him during the event.
To an audience that included
bankers, real estate agents and in-
dustry professionals – as well as political figures such as Shelby County
Trustee David Lenoir – the senator
noted a lighter mood compared to
his last visit with the group. A reference, of course, to the dark days
after the housing bust, when the
first priority among national leaders
like Corker was dealing with the
aftermath of the Great Recession.
Housing industry professionals
at some tables at the MAHBA event
talked among themselves about the
recession’s aftermath while waiting
for Corker, some pointing out how
they’d survived by outliving bankrupt competitors. Today, Corker
even has a daughter now in the real
estate business. She’s a real estate
agent in Nashville, and he said she
has several homes under contract.
“When I first came (to Memphis), I told you I was going to be
a pragmatic person who tries to
solve problems facing our country,”
Corker told the crowd, a theme he
tried to use to connect each of the
disparate topics he mentioned.
He turned, for example, to
the new outbreak of violence in
the Middle East and to Syria, the
government of which has recently
been criticized for using chemical
weapons on civilians.
“I understand – especially after
the recession we went through –
why someone might say, ‘Why do
we care about what’s happening in
other parts of the world,’” Corker
said. “I can understand why people
want to feel that way.”
Corker leans more toward an
interventionist stance, though,
because he says what happens
around the world sends ripples even
down to the local level. There are
companies in the Memphis area,
for example, that he noted employ
people around the globe and have a
presence internationally.
In Egypt, which has been
particularly volatile lately, Corker
pointed out something he thought
some in the crowd might not know:
that U.S. ships move through the
Suez Canal on a priority basis. And
how instability in the Middle East
affects energy prices, which influence housing activity.
Thus came his point that economic stability around the world is
important to the U.S.
“And we need to play an appropriate role,” he said.
The legislation he came to address was his bill to replace Fannie
and Freddie with a privately capitalized system. But mostly, he spoke
in broader terms about financial
policy, bemoaning, for example,
the presence of “few real business
people in the Senate.”
Corker was the subject of numerous headlines as he walked into
the MAHBA event, because of his
Syria remarks earlier in the day. “I
do think action is going to occur,”
he said on NBC’s “Today Show”
Monday.
In Memphis that same day,
Corker also was due to speak at The
University of Memphis’ new student
convocation, as well as to sit for at
least one local TV interview.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 11
E d u c at i o n
He a l t h C a r e & B i o t e c h
Martin Sets Priorties For
University of Memphis
Report: Tennessee
Workers’ Comp
Payments Decline
Jennifer Johnson Backer
Bill Dries
[email protected]
[email protected]
O
n the first day of the academic year at The University of Memphis, Monday, Aug. 26, yoga was on the
schedule of the university’s interim president, Brad
Martin.
Specifically it was yoga at 12:30 p.m. in the University
Center with anyone who wanted to show up or happened
to be walking through. At that time each weekday, a different physical activity will be held for 20 minutes at the
University Center.
Martin, who became interim president in July following the retirement of Shirley Raines, also has a list of eight
priorities for his tenure.
The list includes growing enrollment on the campus of
approximately 22,000 students by 2,000 students through
2016 and moving the graduation rate up about 10 percentage points to 55 percent.
“We think we have an enormously powerful product
here,” Martin said last week during a break in a gauntlet of
meetings with faculty, trustees and visitors board members
on a campus that was already showing signs of life for the
new academic year. “We’ve got the capacity to serve more
students than we are serving today.”
Getting to a 55 percent completion rate over six years
of attendance, which is the national average for college
students, still depends greatly on the drive of individual
students.
Martin admits he has encountered questions about the
university’s role beyond that.
“How do they do it for Memphis basketball? One hundred percent of the basketball players who play for Coach
(Josh) Pastner who don’t go to the NBA early in their career
graduate from The University of Memphis – some of them
in three years,” Martin said. “They’re busy. They’ve got
other things going on. They didn’t all come out of that most
elite of private schools. They figure out ways to help those
people who want to succeed, succeed. And we are going to
do that for anybody at The University of Memphis, whether
they are a student-athlete or in the music department.”
Martin also has a $40 million capital plan for athletic
Martin
facilities that will continue the shift underway to facilities
on the Park Avenue campus, with some sports, including
women’s basketball and volleyball, remaining on the Central Avenue campus.
“But the bulk of our facilities will be on Park Avenue.
Football, baseball obviously are already there, and terrific
new track incentives,” he said. “With that campus as pretty
much a greenfield with abilities for easy access, the citizens
can come and go and enjoy elements of the university that
are a little more difficult to access because of parking and
our physical location today.”
What longtime university backers and alumni call the
South campus is already undergoing a transformation, with
the construction of a new building that will be anchored by
the Loewenberg School of Nursing.
Look next year for a new Goodlett Road entrance to the
campus and a master plan for the entire area.
On the education front, Martin wants to put new emphasis in the college of education on producing high-level
teachers, as judged by student achievement, to teach in
Memphis-area schools.
brad martin continued on P29
What’s Your Policy?
Most people who volunteer with
nonprofits are ethical and deeply committed to the organizations and institutions
they serve. But sometimes in the midst
of doing good there may be a tendency to
sidestep best practices that build credibility. One way to ensure credibility is for
the board to craft, approve and implement fundraising guidelines, policies
and procedures. These should be clearly
worded and should support the work of
board members, volunteers, staff and
donors.
We advise our clients to take the time
to identify the full spectrum of guidelines, policies and procedures needed to
support their fundraising efforts – before
launching a campaign. Choosing to adopt
policies on an “as needed” basis is choosing to be reactive instead of proactive.
When policies and procedures are clearly
communicated, the work of fundraising is
made easier.
For example, if you do not have a
pledge policy in place, it can be frustrating for a volunteer solicitor to learn that
the three-year pledge she secured from
a local business leader requires a signed
pledge form. If she had known, she would
have informed the donor at the time she
solicited the pledge. Having to come back
to secure a signed pledge form means
reopening negotiations. It provides the
donor with an opportunity to reconsider
her giving. It sends the signal that your
organization does not have its house in
order. It can frustrate volunteers who are
giving their valuable time.
Take the guesswork out of fundraising. Define your policies and procedures.
If unusual circumstances arise, respond
Tennessee is one of 22 states where total
workers’ compensation payments to injured
workers and costs borne by employers decreased in 2011, according to a new report from
the National Academy of Social Insurance.
The state’s employers paid $783.7 million
in workers’ compensation benefits, down 0.1
percent from 2010, the report said.
Private firms in Tennessee with fewer than
five employees are exempt from mandatory
coverage.
Workers’ compensation data are used to
gauge everything from health care spending to
the cost of workplace injuries and are financed
exclusively by employers in most states. Typical
coverage pays 100 percent of medical costs
for insured workers beginning with the day of
injury and cash benefits for lost work time after
a waiting period of three to seven days. Benefits
vary according to the duration and severity of
the injury.
About 96 percent of U.S. employees are
covered by unemployment insurance.
Nationally, workers’ compensation payments rose in 2011 as the U.S. economy continued to recover, NASI said.
Total benefits climbed 3.5 percent to $60.2
billion. The calculations include a 4.5 percent
gain in medical care spending and a 2.6 percent increase in wage replacement benefits.
Total costs to employers jumped 7.1 percent to $77.1 billion. In 2011, workers’ compensation covered an estimated 125.8 million
workers, an increase of 1.1 percent compared
with 2010.
Marjorie Baldwin, chair of NASI’s Workers’
Compensation Data Panel and an economics
professor at Arizona State University, said the
gain in workers’ compensation benefits shows
the U.S. economy is improving.
the guidelines, policies and procedures
to them. But have the fundamentals in
should be implemented by staff and
place and apply them consistently. Nothreferred to on an ongoing basis.
ing can lose the goodwill of an investor or
Details on policies and procevolunteer more quickly than
dures for consideration are
a situation where the rules
available from the Associaare changing constantly.
tion of Fundraising ProfesTake time and work
sionals (AFP) website
with your board, staff,
www.afpnet.org. We also
volunteers and donors
include examples of polito develop guidelines,
cies (and what they relate
policies and procedures
MEL & Pearl shaw
that are credible and
FUNdraising Good Times to) in our recent book
“Prerequisites for Fundin line with your mission
raising Success.” Following
and culture.
the AFP Donor Bill of Rights and the AFP
Here is a three-step process you can
Code of Ethics are two items all nonprofuse as you put policies in place. Step one:
its should review and consider adopting
the development committee of the board
is responsible for drafting guidelines, poli- as part of their fundraising policies.
cies and procedures. They can work with
Mel and Pearl Shaw are the authors
your development staff, with a consultant,
of “Prerequisites for Fundraising Sucor with Internet resources to craft these.
cess.” They position nonprofits for funStep two: the documents created in step
draising success. Visit them at www.
one should be brought to the full board
saadandshaw.com.
for approval. Step three: once approved,
www.thememphisnews.com
12 August 30-September 5, 2013
S m a ll B u s i n ess
Collier Paints a Business On
Her Professional Canvas
“
I just knew in the
back of my mind I
wanted to do this
for my whole life.”
– Dorothy Collier
Owner, Dorothy Art
(Dorothy Collier)
Dorothy Collier left her job as a teacher last year to pursue her painting venture, Dorothy Art. Now, she
finds herself a nominee in the Martha Stewart American Made competition.
Andy Meek
[email protected]
D
orothy Collier’s career
path has unfolded similarly to many enterprising professionals marking time
before fully committing to their
passion.
Up until late last year, the
longtime painter was employed
as a middle school teacher partly
because it provided an attendant
level of predictability that artists don’t necessarily enjoy. The
incremental pull of the canvas,
though, became more than a
place where Collier ensconced
herself on weekends and eventually emerged as a representation
of a fresh career slate – so much
so that she said goodbye to teaching in November and has since
been building up Dorothy Art,
her painting venture.
For her business, she creates original oil paintings. Not
only is her work displayed and
sold around the city and in
Nashville, but in the past month
she participated in Front Porch
Art’s “Art For Squares” event as
The ____ Way
Each professional entity has a way of
handling business. This way is encoded
with spoken and codified rules and unspoken and non-verbal clues on how to
perform. What gets done, how decisions
are made and how money gets allocated
can be defined as “culture.” This way, then,
is an explicit and implicit set of rituals that
reward or punish based on its own complicated, internal logic.
This way, the culture, has adapted over
the years. Still, this way is now a welldefined machine of productivity. It weeds
out unfitting talent and risks, and it refines
work and the flow of work to a crystalline
precision. This way creates a shorthand,
and saves money, time, and preserves the
sense of the place.
Think about it for a minute. What
is your organization’s way for handling
presentations, new product decisions,
new market assessments, service issues,
resolving conflicts? What are the processes, check points, keys to enrollment and
styles of presentation that have become
the default way in your organization? How
are people rewarded or punished?
Now, do yourself and your organization a valuable favor. Acknowledge that
this way is only an agreed upon construction of reality, a mental model and not
reality itself.
Here is why: noticing the norms of a
model, a way, and then consciously unlearning some of its defaults are key steps
in taking breakthrough, disruptive innova-
well as the recent Orpheum Art
Sale, among other events. What’s
more, she’s also in the running for
some major recognition.
Collier is a nominee in the
Martha Stewart American Made
competition, voting for which
is underway now. According to
the contest, “Through American
Made, Martha Stewart and the
editors of ‘Martha Stewart Living’
are spotlighting the next generation of great American makers.
The journey culminates in a
signature event in New York City
where makers from across the
country gather to discuss, create,
and explore. It’s here that our
2013 American Made winners
are honored for innovation and
excellence in their field.”
Winners will be announced
Sept. 24.
“My mom’s a full-time artist
in Nashville, I studied art at Ole
Miss, and I just knew in the back
of my mind I wanted to do this
for my whole life,” Collier said. “I
wanted to start teaching to have
a sturdy ground at first, but that
eventually didn’t seem as much
fun as painting, like I’d been doing on the weekends.”
The shift started happening
as commissions for work started
rolling in, and she used word of
mouth and the online site Etsy
to disseminate her work and her
brand. That’s what helped her
realize her hobby could be something more.
A few months ago, she converted the upstairs space at her
home into a study. She doesn’t
have a set schedule by which she
paints – sometimes in the morning, sometimes the evening, but
“I do work a lot better at night.”
In an interview with her
posted to the website of Front
Porch Art, she said her favorite
thing about having a booth at
festivals and events is meeting
new customers and introducing her art to them. At the same
time, she still frets over the usual
unknowns, like whether her potential clientele is attending the
show, if the weather will hold up
and if she has enough inventory
on hand.
“I sell in lots of shops around
here like at Gild the Lily, and I
work at Gild the Lily a couple of
days a week so I can talk face to
face with customers,” she said,
referring to the East Memphis gift
shop. “I’m on Etsy, I’ve got some
stuff at Sheffield Antiques Mall, at
On a Whim – a clothing store in
Germantown – and in some galleries in Nashville as well.”
ity, the culture will not allow you to dream
tions to the market.
valuable dreams.
You see, every culture has antibodRemember, those who are called to inies built into the system. New ideas are
novate have to be systems thinkers and vitypically rejected as vehemently as foreign
sionaries. Luckily, both are learnable skills.
objects are rejected by a body. The ____
The factor that stymies innovation most is
way may be your biggest obstacle.
the unconscious defaults
Therefore, you have to
of a company culture.
develop the visionary
Those who recognize
ability to zoom out and
the system’s operating
get a real sense of the
assumptions and gently
market potential of a
inspire others to stretch
new business concept
their thinking on
without the blinding
shackles of “how we
JOCELYN ATKINSON behalf of the orgado it today” limiting
& michael graber nization change the
let’s grow culture in countless
the thinking.
positive ways.
Sure, there is a
time for risks assessment, validation,
Jocelyn Atkinson and Michael Graand a synthesis period of how we, as the
ber run the Southern Growth Studio, a
____ way, take this completely new line of
strategic growth firm based in Memphis.
business in a channel to market, but if you
Visit www.southerngrowthstudio.com
don’t cultivate this keen zooming out abilto learn more.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 13
News m a ke r s
Moore Rejoins Girls Inc.
As President/CEO
Kate Simone
[email protected]
Lisa Moore recently joined Girls Inc. of Memphis
as president/CEO, returning to the organization
where she began her career in the late 1980s. In her
new role, Moore said, she will provide leadership and
support to equip Girls Inc. of Memphis to effectively
and efficiently fulfill its mission of equipping all girls
to live strong, smart and bold.
Hometown: Memphis
Experience: I have my undergraduate and master’s in education with a
youth development concentration.
I began my career as a volunteer
at then-Girls Club of Memphis and
quickly grew in the organization
nationally over a 10-year period
as a center director in Memphis; a
program director in Lynn, Mass.; executive director in Haverhill, Mass.;
then regional director for Girls Inc.
national. I returned to my hometown
of Memphis and was vice president
at BRIDGES for 10 years.
I launched my leadership consulting
practice, Dancing Water in 2009. I
had a great opportunity to take my
skills to the corporate world as a
leadership trainer with FedEx Services for two-plus years. When the
opportunity to return to my roots
at Girls Inc. of Memphis presented
itself, I jumped with both feet. I am
thrilled to come full circle and bring
what I have learned in my journey back to the organization that
started it all!
Family: I have two wonderful, funny,
smart children: Brianna, 19, a sopho-
Cullum
Ashley Cullum has been
promoted to vice president
of business development at
Paragon National Bank. Cullum has been with Paragon
since 2008, most recently
serving as associate vice
president of business development.
Thaddeus Wilson, an associate professor at The University of Tennessee Health
Science Center, has been
appointed to the University
of Tennessee board of trust-
more at Webster University in St. Louis; and Dylan,
12, a seventh-grader at
White Station Middle
School.
Moore
Favorite quote: “The
purpose of life, after all, is
to love it, to taste experience to the
utmost, to reach out eagerly and
without fear for newer and richer experience.” – Eleanor Roosevelt
The sports team(s) you root for:
Memphis Tigers, Memphis Grizzlies
and LSU Tigers
What’s playing on your stereo
right now? Dave Matthews (I love
you say stereo, ha ha.)
Activities you enjoy outside of
work: Laughing and sharing a meal
with friends. Love live concerts
and being out on the lake with my
best friend.
What talent do you wish you had?
I wish I could sing on stage and it
sound great!
How and when did you first be-
come involved with Girls Inc.? In
1987, when I graduated from college
and living in Greenlaw (now Uptown),
I was asked to see if we could use
the gym at the Girls Club on Seventh
Street (the LDT Center) to host adult
aerobics classes that I would teach.
I went to ask, fell in love and never
taught aerobics classes to adults,
but instead volunteered to facilitate
with girls one day a week, then it
was two days a week, then I became
the assistant center director within a few months.
If you could give one piece of advice to young people, what would
it be? If I could give one piece of
advice to young people it would be:
Be love. Love yourself for the unique
creature you are, give love to others in actions and words, and love
your community by being your best
and taking an active role in efforts to
make life better for us all.
ees by Tennessee Gov. Bill
Haslam. Wilson is an associate professor of radiology
and biomedical engineering
and imaging.
Faculty Scholars. Waller
teaches reproductive health
nursing, medication safety
and nursing skills using
simulation.
Melody Norris Waller, an
instructor in The University
of Tennessee Health Science
Center College of Nursing,
has been chosen as one of
the American Association
of College of Nursing and
Johnson & Johnson Campaign for Nursing’s Future
Fall 2013 Minority Nurse
The University of Tennessee Health Science Center
College of Medicine Alumni
Council has named its 2013
Outstanding Alumnus award
winners: Dr. H. Norman
“Butch” Noe, a pediatric
urologist; Dr. Dennis Black,
a professor of pediatrics
and physiology at UTHSC;
Dr. Charles White Sr., a
family medicine physician;
and Dr. Charles Handorf,
a UTHSC professor of
pathology.
Waller
Dr. James Wilson, a partner
with Memphis Obstetrics &
Gynecological Association
PC, has been named physi-
cian of the month by Saint
Francis Hospital-Bartlett.
Wilson has practiced with
MOGA since 1994.
Twenty-two attorneys
from the Memphis office
of Glankler Brown PLLC
have been listed in The Best
Lawyers in America 2014:
Louis F. Allen, Stewart G.
Austin Jr., Saul C. Belz,
David Blaylock, William L.
Bomar, R. Grattan Brown
Jr., Oscar C. Carr III, Lee J.
Chase III, Michael P. Coury,
B. Douglas Earthman,
Lynn A. Gardner, Charles
W. Hill, John I. Houseal
Jr., R. Hunter Humphreys,
Robert L. Hutton, William T.
Mays Jr., Robert D. Meyers,
George Nassar Jr., Arnold
Perl, J. William Pierce
Jr., Douglas P. Quay and
Randall B. Womack.
10 Ways To
Attract Pinterest
Followers
In its first three years,
virtual scrapbooking site Pinterest has
taken social media by
storm – growing to an
impressive 70 million
users.
If you’re new to
Pinterest, it’s a
Lori turnerwilson
virtual scrapbookguerrilla
sales
ing site that allows
and marketing
users to “pin”
images they like and share those pins with
friends. It’s akin to online window-shopping,
with the option to flag and organize photos of
items you like for later viewing.
These images are often linked to online
content, such as product websites, making
Pinterest a viable marketing tool for retailers
with interesting, visual products – especially those conducive to consumer impulse
buying.
Pinterest’s user base was initially dominated by female consumers, who today still
make up about 80 percent of total users.
Next to the table were big brands, with recent
studies citing about 60 percent of the world’s
top brands having Pinterest accounts.
According to USA Today, Pinterest now
has its sites set on the small-business
market, with many small businesses keenly
aware that most “pinners” are in shopping
mode while on the site and open to spending.
As with most social media sites, you need
followers for your pinning to be worth your
effort. Bear in mind that the total quantity of
followers is less important than the number
of targeted followers, as the latter are more
easily converted to buyers.
1. Pin regularly – at least five to 30 times a
day depending on the number of active
boards you maintain.
2. Product pins featuring pricing are 36
percent more apt to be “liked,” according to
socialfresh.com.
3. Add meaningful comments to popular pins
but focus on your market.
4. Include a link to your Pinterest account
in your other social media bios, on your
website, and in your email signature.
5. Place your most popular boards in the top
row of your Pinterest page.
6. Contribute quality pins to group boards
with a lot of followers.
7. Follow pinners, with a large following of
their own, who follow boards related to your
business category.
8. Pin newsworthy content so you’re seen as
a thought leader.
9. Use search-friendly keywords when writing
captions for your pins so they are likely to
show up in relevant searches. Avoid a laundry list of keywords; instead, work them
into your captions in a meaningful way.
10. Follow those following your competitors,
as they are likely to be interested in your
boards as well.
Lori Turner-Wilson is an award-winning
columnist and CEO/Founder of RedRover Sales
& Marketing, www.redrovercompany.com. You
can follow RedRover on Twitter (@redrovercompany and @loriturner) and Facebook
(facebook.com/redrovercompany).
www.thememphisnews.com
14 August 30-September 5, 2013
He a l t h C a r e & B i o t e c h
Baptist Still Growing in DeSoto Co.
Jennifer Johnson Backer
[email protected]
Since 1988, Baptist Memorial Hospital-DeSoto has more than
doubled in size, from 130 beds to 339 beds. Employment at the
hospital has grown from 200 employees to nearly 2,000.
T
wenty-five years ago,
Baptist Memorial Health
Care Corp. built a 130-bed
hospital in DeSoto County, Miss.,
on the site of a former dairy farm.
At the time, the county had
more cows than people, and
naysayers said Baptist Memorial
executives were taking a huge
risk. Today, DeSoto County is one
of the fastest growing counties in
Mississippi, according to Forbes,
which also attributed the explosive population growth to growing
health care options in the region.
Since 1988, Baptist Memorial Hospital-DeSoto has more
than doubled in size, from 130
beds to 339 beds. Employment at
the hospital has grown from 200
employees to nearly 2,000.
Baptist Memorial executives
built the hospital “on faith that
the growth of the population in
Northwest Mississippi was going
to continue to be there,” says
James Huffman, CEO of Baptist
Memorial Hospital-DeSoto.
“When we got approval from
the state to construct a 130-bed
hospital, it had basic primary care
medical services that you would
find in a small rural hospital,” he
said. “But the hospital has subsequently grown along with DeSoto
County and this whole Northwest
Mississippi Corridor.”
Population growth in the
Northwestern Mississippi corridor
has fueled multiple additions and
expansions at Baptist Memorial
Hospital-DeSoto, including everything from cancer care to cardiology. That means more patients
can receive medical care that is
closer to home, rather than having
to make the trip to Memphis for
treatment.
“When you are that ill, it’s difficult to travel,” Huffman said.
Jamie Tucker, who was one of
the first babies born at the hospital, says the hospital has served as
both an important employment
and health care resource for her
family.
When Tucker was a baby, her
father was diagnosed with brain
cancer and received treatment
at the hospital. Her mother was
spending so much time at the
hospital, that workers eventually
helped her secure a job to help the
family financially.
Today, Tucker works at Baptist
Memorial Hospital-DeSoto as a
lab technician. She is currently in
the midst of a one-year training
program that will prepare her to
assist cardiologists and nurses in
the cardiac catherization lab.
“I love working with people
in general and working with
patients and my coworkers,”
said Tucker, who has lived in the
region her whole life. “That’s why
I chose health care. The hospital
is the main health care provider
in DeSoto County. It’s very convenient.”
In addition to providing primary health care and emergency
trauma care, Baptist Memorial
Hospital-DeSoto was ranked the
No. 1 heart program in Mississip-
pi in 2012 by HealthGrades. The
ranking was based on data from
the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid, which showed the hospital’s response time averaged 30
minutes faster than the national
best practice benchmark. The
hospital also delivers about 2,000
babies per year and provides
comprehensive cancer care.
As the entire Baptist Memorial Hospital system adopts medical electronic records from Epic
Systems, patients also will be
able to seamlessly track their care
online from start to finish, Huffman said. The hospital system
(Greg Campbell)
Baptist Memorial Hospital-DeSoto CEO James Huffman and other
supporters help the hospital celebrate its 25th birthday.
also has adopted navigators that
help guide patients through the
complex cancer treatment process, from the earliest detection
of a tumor to scheduling a biopsy
and radiation and chemotherapy.
baptist continued on P29
G ov e r n m e n t
City Sanitation Changes
Start With Fragile Pact
Bill Dries
[email protected]
C
hanges in city sanitation services
would move toward a plan that
could change decades of a system in
which anything Memphians put by the curb
gets picked up for a monthly solid waste fee,
no matter how much is on the curb.
But first, the groundwork for that transition has to get seven votes on the Memphis
City Council.
The agreement worked out between
Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration and the American Federation of
State, County and Municipal Employees,
which represents sanitation workers,
includes a $1,000 monthly pension supplement for older workers who retire. The
terms include an expansion of privatization
to about 40,000 homes in the Southwind
area that the city plans to annex next year.
“Obviously we have not gotten or
received any flak from (Local) 1733 when
we speak of allowing the private haulers to
take on Southwind once it comes on line,”
said City Public Works director Dwan Gilliom on the WKNO-TV program “Behind
The Headlines.” “In terms of outsourcing
more services, I am satisfied with the plan
we have.”
But the terms say nothing about future
privatization beyond that. That leaves the
union and the administration with different
and conflicting numbers about who can do
what services for less. Key to the plan before
the council is avoiding those numbers at
least for now. When the topic shifts to further privatization of sanitation services, the
consensus on the plan the Memphis City
Council considers again next month can
become tenuous.
The program, hosted by Eric Barnes,
publisher of The Daily News, can be seen at
video.memphisdailynews.com.
“With all things being equal, we would
love for the men and women of 1733 to do
that work,” AFSCME executive director Gail
Tyree said, adding that she believes city
employees could do the same work more
inexpensively.
Gilliom cites a city comparison from a
year ago.
“It wasn’t as cheap as we thought it
was,” Gilliom said. “But it’s a little bit cheaper for us to outsource the services than it is
for us to provide the same level of services
with in-house crews.”
“But is it outsourcing with the exact
same services?” Tyree replied.
Gilliom said it was.
Memphis City Council member Kemp
Conrad, who has advocated more privatization of sanitation services in the past, said
the current deal is one he can live with.
“All things being equal, I’d rather see city
crews do the work. My goal is to deliver the
best service as efficiently as possible in a
way that’s fair to the people that are paying
for it and the retirees,” Conrad said. “About
25 percent of the city is already outsourced.
So it’s not like this is a new concept.”
But Conrad still has concerns about
the retirement supplement, which he said
amounts to a defined benefits program and
which comes with some political realities.
“Usually benefits only go up. They don’t
usually go down. What happens in a year
if there aren’t those savings? What if the
cost of fuel spikes and goes up like we’ve
seen the last few years?” Conrad asked. “Do
you think we are going to the 86-year-old
retiree? Are we going to reduce his check?
Probably not. So what is going to happen?
It’s going to be on the taxpayer to pay for it.”
“This is not a defined benefit program,”
city Chief Administrative Officer George Little responded, saying such programs have
a city and employee contribution. “This is
being funded entirely out of the savings that
would be realized. … We all have skin in the
game.”
Tyree said the supplement for workers
who currently can’t afford to retire on just
Social Security was key to her union’s agreement on the other parts of the plan.
“The concern we have is that we have
senior employees and if they go out and
they get this lump sum – two or three years
with family members being strapped for
cash – they are going to be back at our door
asking what can the local do,” she said.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 15
Te c h n o l o g y
L aw & t h e C o u r t s
Ubiquiti Faces Tech
Giants in Internet Push
Andy Meek
[email protected]
S
ome of the biggest technology
companies have begun making
moves toward the same goal being pursued by Ubiquiti Networks Inc.,
the wireless communications company
founded by Memphis Grizzlies owner
Robert Pera.
Pera’s Ubiquiti is trying to “close the
digital divide,” a phrase the company
often employs, by building network communications platforms for use by almost
anyone around the world. The company
is especially targeting areas outside the
U.S. that are underserved by Internet
connectivity – while companies like
Google and Facebook in recent weeks
have announced their intention to do
the same.
In different ways, both Google and
Facebook have publicly embraced their
own versions of the goal of connecting
more people to the Internet. Facebook
founder Mark Zuckerberg is pushing a
concept called Internet.org – an initiative
involving a group of tech and telecommunications companies helping bring
Internet access to the few billion people
who don’t have it now.
In early 2013, Google launched “Project Loon,” its effort to provide Internet
access in remote parts of the world by
using balloons that will beam down wireless Internet signals.
Ubiquiti’s penetration of its own
potential customer base keeps growing.
The company – ownership of which gave
Pera the wealth he used to buy the Grizzlies last year – already has more than 10
million devices deployed in more than
180 countries.
The San Jose, Calif.-based company
announced this week that it has shipped
its one millionth UniFi enterprise Wi-Fi
access point. In celebration of that milestone, the one millionth UniFi access
point is plated in 24-karat gold.
"Enterprise buyers have quickly
discovered that cutting-edge, highperformance Wi-Fi technology doesn't
have to be expensive," Pera said in a
statement released about the milestone.
"Ubiquiti is proving that by eliminating
inefficient business practices, we can
disrupt incumbents in a highly competitive market and deliver great value to
customers."
A Forbes article this month noted
that Ubiquiti’s latest earnings report
was met “with exuberant buying on Wall
Street” and that the company’s revenue
has grown “dramatically” over the last
four quarters.
In a kind of manifesto about the Internet.org project Zuckerberg posted to
Facebook, he wrote that only 2.7 billion
people are online today, or a little more
than one-third of the world’s population.
“Even though projections show most
people will get smartphones in the next
decade, most people still won’t have data
access because the cost of data remains
much more expensive than the price of
a smartphone,” the Facebook founder
wrote.
As an example of that same kind
of work performed by Pera’s Ubiquiti,
his company recently helped equip
the Universidad del Azuay, among the
top universities in Ecuador. It educates
about 6,000 students and has in the
past had problems with wireless equipment and technology from other manufacturers.
The school’s wireless network was
down frequently, according to Ubiquiti,
and its management was complicated.
So the school turned to Ubiquiti to help
cover the campus and its public areas
with reliable wireless access – one more
victory in what’s becoming a race to wire
the rest of the unwired world.
Pera
Goldin Appointed to Appeals Court
Bill Dries
[email protected]
Shelby County Chancellor Arnold Goldin has been tapped
to replace Alan Highers on the Tennessee Court of Appeals at
the end of next year when Highers retires. Tennessee Gov. Bill
Haslam appointed Goldin Tuesday, Aug. 27, to the appeals court
post that opens when Highers finishes his full term of office.
The appointment is a reflection of the normal process for
filling judicial vacancies in a political vacuum that includes
some conflicting dates that would complicate the process.
Highers is one of four appellate judges who announced this
year they intend to retire at the end of their current terms, Aug.
31, 2014, without seeking re-election in the 2014 appellate judicial retention elections.
But it is unclear whether Goldin goes on the judicial retention ballot for the appeals court in the August 2014 elections.
The election date, Aug. 7, is before the end of the terms of the
retiring judges.
Usually judges in those courts and trial courts retire during
their term of office with the governor filling the vacancy before
an election, and the appointed incumbent then goes on the ballot in the retention election.
In appointing Goldin, Haslam used the judicial selection
method that ended in June when the Tennessee legislature failed
to renew the existence of the Judicial Nominating Commission.
The governor must pick one of three finalists submitted by the
commission or get a second slate from the commission of three
more finalists.
The commission was a casualty of political score settling
between the leaders of the House and Senate in the final days of
the 2013 legislative session in Nashville. A bill from one chamber
was defeated in the other, and the other chamber then returned
the favor. One of the two bills that was defeated was the renewal
of the nominating commission.
The legislature could restore the nominating commission
when it returns to session in January. But voters across the state
will vote in November 2014 on an amendment to the Tennessee
Constitution that, if approved, would abolish permanently the
nominating commission but keep the system of judicial retention elections.
The governor would appoint judges without having to pick
from a slate of approved finalists, and the legislature would
confirm his judicial nominations. Those on the nominating
commission, before it went out of business, took the notices of
retirement in 2014 they had from Highers and two other appellate court judges and recommended sets of three finalists for
each position as well as an alternate set of three finalists for the
governor to choose from in the event he rejected the first set.
They interviewed applicants and made their recommendations before going out of existence with the July 1 start of the
new fiscal year.
Cooper: ‘False
Promises’
Prompted
Merger
Challenge
Bill Dries
[email protected]
T
ennessee Attorney General Robert Cooper said the
state joined the U.S. Justice Department and five others
states in opposing the proposed $11
billion merger of U.S. Airways and
American Airlines, because of the
state’s experience with past airline
mergers.
“I don’t need to remind people
in Memphis that false promises in
previous mergers have never materialized,” Cooper told a group of 100
Tuesday, Aug. 27, at the Memphis
Rotary Club, referring to the 2008
Northwest Airlines-Delta Air Lines
merger and its impact on airfares and
air service at Memphis International
Airport.
Cooper said the state joined the
legal action this month opposing
the mergers because of “significant
concerns that the merger will result in
decreased competition and increased
prices.”
The effect would be “another blow
to Memphis air traffic,” said Cooper,
adding that past mergers also have had
a negative impact on Tennessee’s three
other major airports.
Executives from both airlines said
earlier this month they will pursue the
merger and mount a “strong defense”
against the court action challenging
the plan.
During the Memphis stop, Cooper
also defended the state’s method of
selecting the attorney general.
Unlike other states, the office –
which serves as the attorney for the
executive and legislative branches – is
appointed by the Tennessee Supreme
Court.
“I think Tennessee already has the
best system in the nation,” Cooper
said. “Being appointed by the Supreme
Court allows me, and any attorney
general, to run the office in a nonpartisan manner. An appointed A.G.
doesn’t have to worry about offending
contributors.”
Republican state Sen. Brian Kelsey
proposed a bill in the 2013 legislative
session that would have changed the
office to one chosen by popular election.
“If change is needed, I would say
that other states should emulate Tennessee, not the other way around,”
Cooper said, without mentioning the
proposal or others that would also
change the method of selection.
www.thememphisnews.com
16 August 30-September 5, 2013
sports
F o o t b a ll
O-Line’s Job: Keeping
The Star Players Clean
Don Wade
Special to The Memphis News
O
f all the talented yet
anonymous offensive
linemen in the country,
Vanderbilt senior Wesley Johnson
might be the closest thing to a
6-5, 295-pound invisible man as
there can be. Johnson has made
38 straight starts and was expected to make his 39th on Thursday,
Aug. 29, against Ole Miss.
The ultimate offensive line
cliché – and it’s true – is that
the guys up front never get any
TV time, or hear their numbers
called, unless they have been
caught holding. Johnson has
never been caught holding during his college career. Repeat,
never. Which either makes him
college football’s boy next door
or the game’s top O-Line fugitive
– always one step ahead of the
whistle-blowers.
His explanation for this
incredible feat? Good coaching, always playing through the
whistle, keeping his hands inside
and his feet moving. All right,
fine. But there has to be more.
Does he ask officials about the
wife and kids? About where they
vacationed in the summer? Tell
them they look like they’ve lost
weight?
“Yeah,” Johnson said, “I try to
suck up as often as I can and not
yell at them or anything.”
But there is talk back and
forth between the respective offensive and defensive fronts – “it
gets about as bad as you think
it does,” he said – and Johnson
does not try to convince you he
is Mr. Clean.
“Every team has one or two
guys who might be pretty dirty,”
he said. “I’m pretty sure I might
be one of those guys for our
team.”
Get ’er done
While literally hundreds of
reporters surrounded Texas A&M
quarterback Johnny Manziel in
a ballroom at SEC Media Days,
teammate and offensive lineman
Jake Matthews talked to a small
gathering of reporters across the
room.
“You guys need to pay more
attention to me,” Matthews said
with a laugh and nod toward
the reigning Heisman Trophy
winner.
In short, Matthews’ job
description is this: Keep Johnny
Football clean.
Coaches lose sleep, hair and
appetite worrying about their
offensive line. Even coaches
named Nick Saban. The two-time
defending national champion
Alabama Crimson Tide lost three
All-SEC first-team linemen in
center Barrett Jones, right tackle
D.J. Fluker and left guard Chance
Warmack. Because of that, the
Tide may give senior quarterback
A.J. McCarron more latitude in
the passing game.
“In order for us to do that we
have to have our running game
and play-action,” said returning
right guard Anthony Steen.
Although Tennessee
struggled through a 5-7 season
last year, the Vols gave up a
league-low eight sacks – a huge
improvement from 40-plus the
previous season.
“It’s been three years of
grinding, grinding, grinding,”
said tackle Antonio “Tiny”
Richardson. “Two years ago, they
were saying we were one of the
worst lines in the country. Now
they’re saying that we’re one of
the best.”
In fact, Richardson and
teammate Ju’Wuan James both
project as NFL players and Richardson was First-Team All-SEC
Preseason as voted on by the
leagues’ coaches, and James was
second-team. But even two great
players do not a good O-Line
make.
“You want that group to play
like a nickel and not five pennies,” said Houston coach Tony
Levine.
Smart … and hungry
Offensive linemen are a
breed apart. And no, tight ends
don’t really count as offensive
linemen.
“We’re like a hybrid,” said
Memphis tight end Alan Cross.
“We run routes, get a little show
time.”
Show time for a true O-Line
Johnny Football Ever-Elusive, NCAA Ever-Inept
While there is a paper trail from
the sale of No. 2 jerseys back to Texas
A&M and the NCAA, and a direct line
to the word “hypocrisy” in your nearest
Merriam-Webster Collegiate dictionary,
there apparently is no paper trail here.
So we get a weird, almost surreal, joint statement from the NCAA
and Texas A&M. Together, apparently,
they have determined that the Aggies’
Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback
Johnny Manziel will be suspended for
the first half of the Rice game on Saturday, Aug. 31.
The statement said there was no
“evidence” Manziel had received payment for signing 4 million autographs.
OK, I made that number up. But he
apparently signed his name a suspiciously large number of times out of the
goodness of his heart, which was why
he reportedly had about a six-hour chat
with the NCAA last weekend.
He received the two-quarter suspension, the statement said, for violating an
NCAA rule. In short, that rule prohibits
a student-athlete (what a quaint term)
THE PRESS BOX
DON WADE
from allowing his name or likeness to be
used for any commercial purpose.
Do I believe Johnny Football probably accepted something more than
Monopoly money for all those autographs? Yes, I do. And I’m guessing
you do, too. Most certainly, the NCAA’s
crack investigators believe that.
But they have come up empty,
swinging and missing at every highprofile case they try to make as though
it’s a Mariano Rivera cutter.
At SEC Media Days in July, when the
latest Johnny Football controversy was
“oversleeping” and missing meetings at
the Manning passing camp, which led to
Manziel going home early, he said: “I’m
learning every day. There are situations
you learn to shy away from. I used to
be a person that watched ESPN and
SportsCenter all day, every day. I shy
away from it now.”
Count on video of him Saturday in
College Station on the sidelines in the
first half, and under center in the second
half. And yes, this will dominate ESPN
coverage and lead SportsCenter all day
and night.
One of Manziel’s best traits is his
elusiveness. He is now more elusive
than ever, having scrambled through a
web of allegations and accusations to
emerge virtually untouched. His uniform
will be clean and pristine when he hits
the field for the second half of the Rice
game.
More important for the College Football Industry, he’ll be front and center
when No. 1 Alabama and current No. 7
Texas A&M play in College Station on
Sept. 14. The Game of the Year has been
saved.
Meanwhile, the NCAA investigation
into the University of Miami athletics
continues into infinity. Oh, and look
over here, a fresh story coming from an
advance copy of a book, “The System:
The Glory and the Scandal of Big-Time
College Football,” by Armen Keteyian
and Jeff Benedict. A story that is the fire
to all this Johnny Football smoke.
The book’s authors say that the father of a noted freshman told them two
schools – one from the SEC and one
from the ACC – offered $600,000 to
get the prized recruit. The dad also says
they ultimately picked a school that did
not make an inappropriate offer.
The player in question? Texas A&M
receiver Ricky Seals-Jones, who could
be catching a pass from Johnny Manziel
as soon as Saturday – in the third
quarter.
If the pass goes for a touchdown,
Seals-Jones should have Johnny-I-Beatthe-System autograph the ball.
No charge, of course.
Don Wade’s column appears weekly
in The Daily News and The Memphis
News. Listen to Wade on “Middays with
Greg & Eli” every Tuesday at noon on
Sports 56 AM and 87.7 FM.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 17
sports
guy comes at the dinner table.
“Barrett Gouger can put away a lot
of food,” Johnson said of Vandy’s 6-4,
307-pound redshirt freshman. “He can
take down like four or five Baconators at
Wendy’s. It’s pretty cool.”
Not that Johnson gets cheated. Just
that morning, he had gone to Pancake
Pantry.
“I always get the sausage and cheese
omelet with sweet potato pancakes,” he
said. “It’s awesome. I crushed mine.”
Which is more or less what Johnson,
another NFL prospect, has done in games.
In this age of statistics for everything,
Vanderbilt Sports Information reports he
has made 152 “knockdown blocks” and 37
“intimidation blocks.” More impressive,
he’s allowed just 6.5 sacks in 1,021 pass
attempts against SEC teams, or one sack
for every 157 pass plays.
It is not all brute strength.
“There are itty bitty nuances you have
to be able to see at the blink of an eye and
make a decision,” Johnson said.
Scouting reports help, sure, but Arkansas center Travis Swanson – another top
pro prospect – gets a lot of mileage from
watching film and looking for opponents’
“tells.”
“Not a lot of guys know they do it,”
Swanson said. “Then you come up to the
line and they get that little look in their
eye (when they know you have figured
something out). It’s kind of a funny
reaction.”
(Cal Sport Media via AP Images)
Texas A&M offensive lineman Jake Matthews told reporters: “You guys need to pay more attention to me,” Matthews said, nodding to
reigning Heisman Trophy winner, quarterback Johnny Manziel. In short, Matthews’ job description is this: Keep Johnny Football clean.
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www.thememphisnews.com
18 August 30-September 5, 2013
(AP Photo/al.com, Julie Bennett)
COV E R S TORy
Auburn head coach
Gus Malzahn watches
a drill during the first
day of practice earlier
this month. Malzahn
begins his second
season at Auburn.
Mean Streets
A
Coaches prepare for grind, spotlight of SEC football
Don Wade
Special to The Memphis News
labama’s Nick Saban can walk
anywhere he wants in the Southeastern Conference – college
football’s roughest neighborhood
– and no one can lay a finger on
him.
His teams have won the national championship in three of
the last four years. Overall, SEC
teams have won the title seven
consecutive years and the league
is a dream destination for head
coaches – until it turns into a
grinding, weekly nightmare.
Somebody, after all, has to
absorb all those losses that make
everyone else look so good. Four
of the SEC’s 14 coaches have
been replaced since last season for a 28.6 percent turnover
rate that sounds rather like an
ominous crime stat. Last season,
Arkansas, Auburn, Kentucky and
Tennessee went a combined 3-29
in the SEC, 14-34 overall, and
each of those coaches ultimately
saw his resume inside a white
chalk outline.
“The bottom line is you
have to be successful,” said Gus
Malzahn, who has returned to
Auburn, where just three seasons
ago he was offensive coordinator
under Gene Chizik on the Tigers’
14-0 national championship
team led by quarterback Cam
Newton. “I think all coaches,
especially in this league, understand that.”
Though it is difficult to succeed on first down, it is possible.
Look at James Franklin, who
has made Vanderbilt relevant
in games and not just math
competitions. Look at first-year
coaches Hugh Freeze at Ole Miss
and Kevin Sumlin at Texas A&M
and the way they “overachieved”
in 2012.
Auburn hired Malzahn
away from Arkansas State (9-3
in his only season as a head
coach) to bring Auburn back to
prominence. Immediately, if not
sooner. That’s the job description at Arkansas and Tennessee
as well.
But even at Kentucky, firsttime head coach Mark Stoops
doesn’t want to settle for tamping down goals, though it makes
more sense than the fans’ overly
ambitious dreams.
“It’s really, to be honest with
you, an uncomfortable situation
for me because it’s not my style
to try to temper those expectations,” said Stoops, whose
brother Bob has had much success at Oklahoma. “I think the
educated fan knows where we
are as a program, knows we have
a lot of work to do.
“But the flip side of that is
I want that excitement. Our
season tickets are up. People are
excited and anticipating a good
year, because we certainly are.
We’re not going out there to put
all this hard work in, to not compete, and not try to win games.”
The message to the fans can
be a delicate line to walk. At Tennessee, the perception was that
players had quit giving effort by
the end of Derek Dooley’s third
year and second straight 1-7 conference season. First-year coach
Butch Jones, with a military
haircut and a record that boasts
bowl trips in five of six years at
Cincinnati and Central Michigan,
is about changing attitude and
work ethic above all else.
“Tennessee fans, they just
want to see effort,” said senior
Vols offensive lineman Ja’Wuan
James. “That’s what all of them
talk about. They want to go out
there and see Tennessee football.”
And that would be enough,
just giving great effort?
“Well, at some point they’re
going to get frustrated” if the
wins don’t come, James said,
reality always just around the
next corner.
Getting Well
Each of the programs that
made a coaching change has a
story to tell, some more sordid
than others. The Razorbacks
followed the literal off-the-road
disaster that was Bobby Petrino
with the on-the-field embarrassment overseen by John L.
Smith. Arkansas won just four
games in 2012 and lost three of
four homes games to start the
season, including in overtime to
the vaunted Louisiana-Monroe
Warhawks.
Enter first-year coach Bret
Bielema, who led Wisconsin to
seven straight bowl games and
three consecutive Rose Bowls.
But on Dec. 5, 2012, when he
walked into his first Arkansas
team meeting, those past successes mattered far less than the
fact that many of his players were
looking at their third coach in
three years.
“Everybody sat in that room
with a different story,” Bielema
said. “Yeah, they had all just gone
4-8. They might have been the
starting right corner, backup defensive tackle, second-string left
guard on punt (coverage). But
everybody went through it.”
Including senior defensive
end Chris Smith, who said,
“Coach Bielema’s going to bring
Band-Aids to the hurt program.”
Malzahn also found a team in
need of healing. First, the Tigers
had been rocked by their own
scandal – reported widespread
synthetic marijuana use among
players during the 2010 team’s
national championship run.
Then they fell all the way to 0-8
in the SEC last season, the final
indignity a 49-0 loss to archrival
Alabama.
“When I first got here, I
had to do some Dr. Phil-ing,”
Malzahn said. “There were some
mental scars.”
Which Bielema believes isn’t
necessarily a bad thing.
“To me, scars are a good
thing,” he said. “Scars are a daily
reminder of things you’ve persevered. If you can accept what’s
happened in the past, if we can
move forward together, take
every day for what it is, you’re
going to have this be a growing
experience instead of a dying
experience.”
Freeze, who, like Malzahn,
joined the SEC coaching ranks
after one very successful year at
Arkansas State, inherited an Ole
Miss team with a fragile psyche.
The Rebels had gone 2-10 in 2011
and were 1-15 in the SEC over
the last two years under Houston
Nutt. Predictions for Freeze’s first
season were almost apologetic –
tough situation, tough schedule,
so sorry, coach, you may not win
more than three or four games.
Instead, the Rebels won all
the games they were supposed to
win, took advantage of Auburn
and Arkansas having down
years, beat Mississippi State in
the Egg Bowl, and finished with
a 38-17 victory over Pittsburgh
in the BBVA Compass Bowl for
a totally unexpected 7-6 season.
And the record easily might have
been 9-4; the Rebels lost by three
to Texas A&M and by one to
Vanderbilt.
“We were fortunate in year
one,” Freeze said recently, as
he now stares ahead at an even
more challenging schedule. “I
would not be quite truthful to
stand here and tell you we didn’t
have some fortune go our way.”
While much was made of
quarterback Bo Wallace playing
hurt, Freeze admits it was rare
to be able to start the same five
offensive linemen every game
and to have the receiving corps
in place all season. The defensive
line incurred only minor injuries
as well.
“The expectations that are
www.thememphisnews.com
(AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Texas A&M coach Kevin Sumlin now understands the spotlight
of SEC football, thanks in part to a particular quarterback.
others, has been back to UT to
speak to players about the pride
of wearing the orange and white
and understanding the football
program has a history that current players will contribute to in
one way or another.
Said offensive lineman Tiny
Richardson: “I’m not just representing myself, but a line of guys
who came through here and have
been successful.”
Perhaps all this encouragement and support will help. But
once the games start, there’s
really nothing Peyton Manning,
John Calipari or even Jerry Jones
can do for their teams. The SEC’s
new coaches will amass records
that, at the end, will be their own.
Auburn cornerback
Chris Davis took inspiration
from the huge turnout at
their spring game – evidence of a “new day” – because last season it became
common to look up into
the stands at Jordan-Hare
Stadium and see fans leaving early.
“They say they’re back
on the ‘Gus Bus,’” Davis
said. “We all are.”
At least for now. In the
safety of the preseason, just
before the doors open and
these four new coaches and
their still-healing teams
step into the mean streets
of the SEC.
(AP Photo/Dave Martin)
First, the marketing plan
Malzahn returned to Auburn speaking of a “new day.” At
Kentucky, players parrot Stoops’
“attack the day” theme.
“If I’m doing a rep on the
bench press, I’ll be mad at myself
if I do three reps hard and take
one of them off,” linebacker Avery Williamson said. “That’s what
it means to attack the day.”
At UT, Butch Jones speaks
of “building a championship
culture” to bring the Vols back
among college football’s elite
programs. “We talked about
doing that brick by brick,” Jones
said. “That’s not a fancy slogan.
We really meant that every brick
is symbolic of every individual in
our football family.”
On the front end, players
seem universally bought into
their respective “new days” and
building projects. Vols defensive
lineman Jacques Smith calls
Jones “genuine.”
Arkansas defensive end Chris
Smith says of Bielema, “He’s a
very outspoken guy. Hog fans like
that. What you see is what you
get.”
Of course, what fans really
like is winning at a level that
exceeds expectations. Tangible
improvement might be enough
in year one, but only if fans and
other self-appointed experts,
such as sports writers and broadcasters, believe they see more
improvement on the horizon
based on recruiting.
Jones has received strong
reviews in this area. Bielema has
his eyes on Texas.
“We have a certain alumni
(Cowboys owner Jerry Jones) that
built a stadium in the middle of
Texas that is very big,” Bielema
said. “He won a national championship when he was a player at
Arkansas. Jerry Jones had made
the commitment he wants to
make everything he can about
Arkansas great.”
Stoops has a pretty powerful ambassador in his own right:
former University of Memphis
basketball coach and current
Kentucky hoops icon John Calipari.
“Coach Calipari, he could not
be any better,” Stoops said. “We
bring recruits in, he visits with
them.”
Peyton Manning, among
(top photo)
M i s s i s s i p p i l i n e b a c ke r D e n ze l
Nkemdiche and second-year football
coach Hugh Freeze confer during
practice. “The expectations that
are coming now with our program,
I ’ m ve r y c a re f u l ,” Fre eze s a i d .
(bottom photo)
Arkansas defensive end Chris Smith
says of new coach Bret Bielema, “He’s
a very outspoken guy. Hog fans like
that. What you see is what you get.”
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coming now with our program,
I’m very careful,” Freeze said. “I
told every group I went to this
spring, I tell our team quite often,
that unrealistic expectations always produce frustration. … Our
task in year two is to maintain
the enthusiasm and energy from
both our fans and our players
as we continue to strive to be
relevant in the SEC West.”
Translation: in 2013 Ole Miss
may discover that a big step
forward is sometimes followed by
a small step backward.
(AP Photo/Patric Schneider)
August 30-September 5, 2013 19
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www.thememphisnews.com
20 August 30-September 5, 2013
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Celebrity Hosts Scheduled to Appear: U of M Tigers Coach Josh Pastner, Rockey the Redbird, Sirius XM’s George Klein, West Clinic
Docs, Pink Heals Memphis/Mid-South, FOX 13’s Valerie Calhoun, Joey Sulipeck, Greg Coy, Darcy Thomas & Earle Farrell, LOCAL
24’s Joyce Peterson, WMC TV’s Ursula Madden, WREG’s Marybeth Conley, Q107.5’s Liz Luedeman, CJ Lusk and Chris Taylor,
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Why Bet Against Breast Cancer?
By joining us at Bet Against Breast Cancer, you will help fund Wings’ Lymphedema and
Form Fitting Programs for breast cancer survivors. Form Fitting provides breast prostheses
and bras post mastectomy, while the Lymphedema program provides compression
garments for those with lymphedema, a pooling of fluid in the arm. All of Wings programs
and services are offered free of charge to anyone touched by cancer.
Le Fleur
Joseph C. DeWane, MD
Sandy Nichols, Paulsen’s Printing, Path Forward IT, Temperature Inc., Lifesigns: The Prevention Group,
Women’s Care Center of Memphis, The West Clinic
L’Ecole Cullinaire, Highland Capital Management, LLC, Dr. Lou Adams – Plastic Surgery Group of Memphis,
Dr. Alyssa Throckmorton, Reg & Virginia Steele
Memphis Health + Fitness, Memphis Magazine, At Home Memphis & Mid South, Memphis Flyer, Memphis Parent, MBQ
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 21
Mutually
Beneficial
Networking
S MA L L- B U S IN E S S S P OT L IGHT
Frost Bake Shop Ready
To ‘Engineer Cakes’
Richard J. Alley
Special to The Memphis News
A
ll American Sweets was the
confection of chef Bill Kloos Jr.,
who moved from St. Louis to
Memphis to take over the operation of
Yia-Yia’s Euro Café and later would go
on to open Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse
and Wine Bar.
His dreams, though, were bigger
and sweeter, and once he convinced
his parents, Bill and Lynne, to relocate
from the Midwest to the Bluff City, the
specialty dessert business was off and
running.
Well, maybe not quite running.
“This really started in their apartment making a cake a day, or two cakes
a day,” Kloos Jr. said. “Where now we’re
making 75 to a hundred a day.”
And beginning earlier this month,
there was a need to bake even more
as the Kloos family opened Frost Bake
Shop, the retail arm of All American
Sweets. Located in Laurelwood Shopping Center, just down the walkway
from another sweet Memphis institution, Dinstuhl’s Fine Candies, Frost
sits in a corner bay recently vacated
by clothier James Davis, which has
hemmed in its total retail space.
A week before the grand opening,
Frost’s 2,000-square-foot store was a
tangle of conduit, extension cords and
cabling as work was underway to ready
the space, designed by Veronica Tansey
of Fleming Associates Architects PC,
for its big day.
Kloos takes pride in the business
being family-owned, and the tradition of baking with family recipes and
only from scratch with no commercial
mixes. The menu has custom birthday,
(Memphis News/Andrew J. Breig)
Bill Kloos Jr., and his parents, Bill and Lynne, have opened Frost Bake Shop in the
Laurelwood Shopping Center, where they will sell their line of “engineered cakes.”
wedding, layer and seasonal cakes,
along with cupcakes, pies, cheesecakes
and cookies. A staff of 15 works the
5,000-square-foot All American Sweets
baking facility in Bartlett, and Kloos
said the biggest problem for them is a
good one to have: “How do we make
sure we make enough stuff to keep this
place going?”
Product will be delivered daily to
Frost for purchase, pickup for custom
orders or eating in at the small seating
space. A few items will be baked onsite
and some light decorating and detail
work will be done as well.
“Our goal is if somebody comes in
and wants six cakes, we’ll have them,”
Kloos said.
When the idea for a retail space was
initiated, Kloos thought immediately
of the heavily trafficked East Memphis
intersection of Poplar Avenue and
Perkins Road Extended. As to their
specific location, credit is given to the
management of Laurelwood, particularly leasing and management agent
Leonard Lurie, who took the time to
discuss the business plan and visit the
Bartlett facility. Kloos said Laurelwood
“made them feel wanted.”
Kloos appeared unfazed as the
sounds of saws and hammers clanged
around him. And he doesn’t have much
to worry about as demand is high and
his creations are well-known, even if
their origin is not yet.
The cakes are served at restaurants
all over town, including Lucchesi’s
Ravioli & Pasta Co., Fleming’s, Bogie’s
Delicatessen & Catering Co., Soul Fish
Café, Boneheads and new neighbor
Bronte Bistro in the Booksellers at
frost continued on P29
Many business professionals think of
networking as mainly attending events and
exchanging business cards. Then you go back
to your office and connect on LinkedIn or
some similar networking service and wait for
the magic to happen. And it rarely does.
Keep doing that if you
feel it is a productive use
of your time, but also
consider building a
solid network of mutually beneficial networking
partnerships. Here is an
example illustratchris cRouch
ing what I mean by
SMART STUFF
4 WORK
mutually beneficial
partnerships.
Years ago we decided to replace some
carpeted flooring with hardwood flooring in a
few rooms in our home. We, of course, called
a hardwood-flooring specialist to get a cost
estimate for the work. He told us all about
how he would do it and what it would cost
and then told us we would also need a good
baseboard carpenter and painter to complete
the job. We then said, “That sounds fine,
who do you recommend?” He basically told
us that he didn’t know anyone and that we
would have to take care of that on our own.
We were a bit surprised that he did not have
any recommendations whatsoever.
In this case, it seems that skilled baseboard carpenters and painters would make
excellent mutually beneficial partners for
the flooring specialist. They could easily help
each other develop business since there is a
natural and logical correlation between the
services they provide. After this experience, I
looked at networking events differently. When
someone came up to me at an event and
handed me his or her business card I thought
two things: Is this person potentially a mutually beneficial partner for me and, am I willing
and able to help them?
To answer these questions, I must ask
questions and find out if there are any natural
and logical correlations between the services
I provide and the services they provide. And,
I need to find out if I am comfortable recommending them. In other words, are they good
at what they do? Finding answers to these
questions is a highly productive thing to do
at networking events. Developing mutually
beneficial networking partnerships requires
more time and effort. However, if you take the
time to develop such partnerships, the payoff
will be significantly higher.
Once you decide to develop a mutually
beneficial networking partnership with another professional, then what? Here’s my first
recommendation – take a chance, go first
and get them a new prospect or client, with
no expectations or strings attached. People
are much more likely to put forth a sincere
effort to help you if you help them first. The
concept of reciprocal altruism dictates that
the other party will likely want to return any
significant favor. Adopt the attitude that the
only people you need to get even with in life
are those who have helped you.
Who would make a great mutually beneficial networking partner for you?
www.thememphisnews.com
22 August 30-September 5, 2013
E d u c at i o n
School Board Crossing
Downsized membership brings countywide board to crossroads
Bill Dries
[email protected]
(Memphis News/Andrew J. Breig)
Interim schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson begins working with a seven-member countywide school
board starting in September. The 23-member school board held its final meeting last week.
T
he Shelby County Schools
board will no longer need
a massive semi-circle with
23 seats at its next meeting in
September.
The board that has been in
place since October 2011 as one
of the first moves toward unification of Shelby County’s two
public school systems becomes
a seven-member board effective
Sunday, Sept. 1.
The 16 members of the old
Memphis City Schools and
Shelby County Schools boards
who cast their last votes Tuesday,
Aug. 27, as school board members left a body that they have
changed and that has changed
them in the almost two years it
was around.
Snowden Carruthers was
elected to the Shelby County
Schools board four months before everything changed and he
was on his way to becoming part
of the merged school board.
“The experience has not
been at all what I was expecting when I ran for the Shelby
County Board of Education,”
said Carruthers, a career educator in Shelby County Schools. “I
felt like I knew the system well
enough that I had a good grasp
on what was going on.”
Tomeka Hart, one of those
on the Memphis City Schools
board who first voiced the idea
of a consolidation of the school
systems, thought it would mean
an early end to her second term
in office.
“What I wasn’t expecting was
that I would still be on the board
up until now. I thought 2011
once the citizens of Memphis
voted and said yes, I thought
we’d be gone then and there
would be new district lines
drawn,” she said. “I didn’t intend
to run even then. I wasn’t expecting the judge to say everybody
stay on and we’re going to add
seven.”
As they go off the board, Carruthers and Hart have different
perspective on the results but a
common hope for what comes
next.
“The people have been
nice to work with. I don’t agree
with much of what’s gone on,”
Carruthers said. “I know what
the law says, but when you give
something up you’ve given it up.
My feeling has been all along
here that because of the numbers you’re giving it up to take
it all over again. I would hope
that’s not the way it all comes
out. We’ve put too much time in
this now to see it fail.”
Hart doesn’t hesitate to
describe parts of the experience
and formation of the merged
school district as “chaos.”
“There’s nothing this huge
that can’t be chaotic. All of the
movements that we honor today
they were chaos,” she said, referring mostly to the uncertainty as
the merger and the reaction to
the merger in the suburbs moved
into U.S. District Court for the
Western District of Tennessee. “I
thought the chaos would happen
but I thought that the school
system would thrive.”
She believes it has a month
into the first school year for the
unified school district.
And Hart said she also
accepts that the district will
probably change with the next
school year with the formation
of suburban school districts.
“While I hoped we could
be one school system, I still
think those who are pushing for
separate systems, it’s because
they think that is the best way
to provide an education,” she
said. “I just hope that one day
we can realize whether there’s 20
school board continued on P28
Entrepreneurial Spirit Alive in Memphis
Steve Jobs once said, “Here’s to the
crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the
troublemakers, the square pegs in the
round holes … the ones who see things
differently … they push the human race
forward, and while some may see them
as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to
think they can change the world, are the
ones who do.”
Perhaps some people do call them
crazy. Most folks refer to them as Entrepreneurs.
An Entrepreneur is comfortable with
ambiguity, and motivated by challenge.
Succeeding against all odds is a familiar
journey of those who ride a roller coaster
of emotional highs and lows. They meet
both challenge and opportunity with
enthusiasm and passion, and define what
they do by hard work and dedication.
They don’t stop creating for either success or failure.
These risk-takers share a common
thread of ensuring continuous improvement by discovering new ways of thinking
and doing. And the hub of this entrepreneurial spirit is right here in Memphis; the
Society of Entrepreneurs (SOE).
Founded in 1991, the Society of Entrepreneurs was the vision of Walker Uhlhorn,
founder of Uhlhorn Security Group. A successful entrepreneur himself, he believed
in that old adage, ‘Fire, ready, aim,’ so he
gathered together a group of kindred
spirits, like Art Seessel, Henry Turley, L.R.
Jalanek, and a few more of those who
sail against the wind. The creative energy
flowed, and the Society of Entrepreneurs
was born.
According to Ulhorn, “The purpose of
the SOE is to foster the development of
the entrepreneurial spirit, and to recognize
the contributions of entrepreneurs to business and the community.”
The founding group believed that
ness acumen and
succeeding against all odds can be
civic responsibility.
modeled, and that an entrepreneur
Pearson Crutcher,
has a responsibility to create more
executive director of
entrepreneurs. It is noteworthy that
the SOE proclaims,
really great people believe that oth“I have the best job
ers can be really great too.
in the world. I get to
Since that time,
interact and work with
the SOE has grown to
DR. MARY C. McDONALD
some of the most
include visionary leadguest column
creative and inspiring
ers in many fields who
people in the world.
have helped shape our
They are committed to passing on their
community, and the world, including Fred
wisdom so that fledgling entrepreneurs
Smith, Kemmons Wilson, Pitt Hyde, Abe
can be supported and encouraged.”
Plough, Clarence Saunders and more than
As member Jack Belz said, “Entreprea hundred others, all here in Memphis.
neurship is the very essence of America
What a track record Memphis has
and Western free enterprise society.”
in launching new ideas, new ways of
And it’s alive and well in Memphis. See
thinking and doing. It is the home of the
for yourself at SOEMemphis.com.
entrepreneurial spirit. They are also social
entrepreneurs, who seek new ways to lift
Contact Dr. Mary C. McDonald, a Naour city, and find solutions to challenges
tional Education Consultant, at 574-2956
that will help all citizens learn, work and
or visit mcd-partners.com.
prosper. They embody the best of busi-
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 23
Sports
AAC Ready for High-Exposure Debut
Don Wade
Special to The Memphis News
T
he new American Athletic Conference kicked off Thursday night,
and nine of the league’s 10 teams
play during college football’s opening
weekend.
ESPN will televise two of the games,
other ESPN networks will carry another
six games, and NBC will televise Temple
at Notre Dame. It’s a high-exposure start
for the league formerly known as the Big
East.
“We’ve got great media markets in this
league,” Connecticut coach Paul Pasqualoni said, adding, “In Memphis, there’s a
tremendous passion for football.”
The University of Memphis is the lone
school not playing in week one, opening its season Sept. 7 at 3:30 p.m. against
Duke at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.
“It’s a little different,” second-year
Tigers coach Justin Fuente said of having
a bye the first week. “But I like the fact we
get to go to school for two weeks before
we actually play. I also like the fact we
play three games and then have (another)
bye week.
“I look forward to getting to sit around
and watch games,” Fuente said of the
upcoming weekend. “Let somebody else
sweat third and eight.”
Widespread conference realignment
led to this year’s version of the American Athletic Conference. Left over from
the Big East: UConn, Cincinnati, Louisville, Rutgers and South Florida. Temple
comes in from the Mid-American and
Memphis is joined by former Conference USA members Central Florida, SMU
and Houston. But Rutgers and Louisville
are short-timers, departing after this
year. East Carolina, Tulane and Tulsa
join next year, and Navy comes aboard in
2015.
Louisville is ranked No. 9 in the AP
preseason poll and is the favorite to gain
the league’s Bowl Championship berth
R E A L E S TAT E R E CA P
Henry Turley Co. Files
Permits for South Junction
Eric Smith
S Front St
[email protected]
W Carolina Ave
Florida St
E Carolina Ave
S Main St
Georgia Ave
South Junction
xxxxx
727 E. Mann Circle; 726. E. Mann Circle; 725 W. Mann Circle;
35 W. Georgia Ave.; 649 Florida St.; 18 W. Carolina Ave.;
9 E. Carolina Ave. Memphis, TN 38103
Permit Costs: $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.5
million; $1.4 million
Project Cost: $10.4 million
Permit Date: Applied August 2013
Completion: TBA
Owner: Henry Turley
Tenant: South Junction apartments
in this, the last year of the BCS system.
And Cardinals coach Charlie Strong said,
“I don’t see any drop-off at all” from the
Big East. Only time and the playing of the
games will determine if he’s right, but for
teams that left Conference USA for the
American, there is no question that the
games are about to get tougher.
“There are better teams, more athletic
teams,” said Southern Methodist coach
June Jones. “I thought UCF was one of
the more talented teams in Conference
USA, and every team in the American
looks like UCF on film. They’ve got a lot
of athletes.”
Said Fuente: “June’s right. There’s a
marked difference head to toe.”
The league also has a lot of experienced head coaches, from Jones and
Pasqualoni to UCF’s George O’Leary and
Cincinnati’s Tommy Tuberville.
“You’re gonna find some oldfashioned football in this conference,
which is not bad,” said Tuberville, who
has coached at Auburn and Ole Miss.
Contractor: Montgomery Martin
Contractors LLC
Details: A development group led
by Henry Turley Co. has filed a
series of building permits totaling
$10.4 million for the 197-unit South
Junction apartments Downtown.
Henry Turley Co. filed seven multifamily permits with the city-county
Office of Construction Code Enforcement for the vacant northwest
and southeast corners of Carolina
Avenue and Florida Street, in the
South Main Historic Arts District.
The permits call for “three-story
wood framed apartment buildings”
at the following addresses: 727 E.
Mann Circle, 726. E. Mann Circle,
725 W. Mann Circle, 35 W. Georgia
Ave., 649 Florida St., 18 W. Carolina
Ave. and 9 E. Carolina Ave.
The first six addresses show permit
amounts of $1.5 million each, and
the last shows a permit amount of
$1.4 million.
The project’s owner, South Junction
Partners, was granted a paymentin-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) incentive
through the Memphis Center City
Revenue Finance Corp. that will
save the company $4.1 million in
taxes over 15 years.
Plans filed with the CCRFC call
for an “urban infill multifamily
residential development,” according
to the application for 178,678 square
feet of space.
Henry Turley Co. submitted the
plans and application to the Design
Review Board and Turley is one of
the partners in South Junction along
with Billy Orgel.
Montgomery Martin Contractors
LLC is the general contractor.
“I’m anxious to go play against all those
coaches.”
Tuberville said he knows it may take
a while for the conference name to gain
recognition, but he believes the league’s
spread-out geography ultimately will help
recruiting.
“We cover a lot of states,” he said. “It’s
going to be an attractive conference for a
lot of athletes.”
And from the very first weekend,
recruits can see conference teams playing
against schools from the Big Ten (Cincinnati plays Purdue) and the Big 12 (SMU
plays Texas Tech), not to mention Temple’s trip to Notre Dame.
“We’re playing three teams ranked
in the final AP Top Ten: Notre Dame,
Texas A&M and South Carolina,” said
American Athletic Conference Commissioner Mike Aresco. “We obviously have
an opportunity to make a statement, to
have some signature wins. Which is the
way we want it. Things should be decided
on the field.”
7859 U.S. 64
Memphis, TN 38133
Sale Amount: $3 million
Sale Date: Aug. 19, 2013
Buyer: 7859 Stage LLC
Seller: CM&W GP
Loan Amount: $1.8 million
Loan Date: Aug. 19, 2013
Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA
Details: A local affiliate of Delray
Beach, Fla.-based Belford Ventures
has paid $3 million for the multitenant retail building at 7859 U.S. 64
(Stage Road) in Northeast Memphis.
The entity 7859 Stage LLC bought
the 72,472-square-foot building in an Aug. 19 warranty deed
from Memphis-based CM&W GP,
a partnership composed of Phil
Chamberlain, Jon McCreery and
Jack Whitaker. That group bought
the property in 2005 from SKN LLC
for $2.5 million.
Built in 1993, the retail property
sits on 2.8 acres on the south side of
Stage Road east of Kate Bond Road
and near Wolfchase Galleria. The
Shelby County Assessor of Property’s 2013 appraisal is $3.2 million.
The building formerly housed Richwell Furniture Gallery and is now
home to American Freight Furniture
and Mattress, which opened its first
Memphis store in November. The
store marked the Delaware, Ohiobased retailer’s fifth location in Tennessee and 75th store nationwide.
In conjunction with the purchase,
7859 Stage LLC filed a $1.8 million
loan through JPMorgan Chase Bank
NA. William Belford signed the
trust deed as managing member
of the borrower.
www.thememphisnews.com
24 August 30-September 5, 2013
Me m p h i s s ta n d o u t
Greaud Keeps MEM Operating Smoothly
greaud
Richard J. Alley
Special to The Memphis News
A
s Memphis International Airport
expands and contracts depending
on the time of day, the state of the
airline industry and the financial climate,
much of the responsibility of keeping the
facility running smoothly falls to John
Greaud.
The vice president of operations for
the Memphis-Shelby County Airport
Authority and his team of approximately
240 employees are charged with seeing
that day-to-day functioning of the airport
remains at a constant.
The MSCAA owns and operates three
airports – Memphis International, General DeWitt Spain north of Downtown and
Charles W. Baker in Millington – yet most
of the focus of Greaud’s work and resources are on Memphis International.
FedEx, UPS, Wilson Air Center, Tennessee Air National Guard and Signature
Flight Support all lease ground from the
Airport Authority but are responsible for
managing and maintaining their own
facilities.
Three divisions fall under Greaud’s
purview.
The maintenance division includes
maintaining the structure and public
spaces of the terminal, the landscaping,
runways, taxiways and road systems,
but not the detail maintenance of space
leased by individual airlines and concessionaires. This division is also responsible
for vehicle fleet maintenance for Memphis International, Baker and Spain.
The development division handles
environmental, planning, design and
construction of the facilities.
The third of Greaud’s divisions is operations, which covers the airport’s police
department, communications center
and ID office. It is responsible for emergency planning, certification through the
Federal Aviation Administration and the
coordination to ensure they meet those
requirements daily, Transportation Security Administration coordination, and
aircraft rescue and firefighting.
In addition to these three divisions,
Greaud also oversees the customer service
department and its 65 volunteers, and the
Dorothy L. Bobbitt Health Station, which
is contracted out to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.
It’s a massive job, he admits, “and
that’s part of the reason there’s not a typical day, it’s all over the place, I go wherever I need to based upon the time.”
The son of an Air Force pilot, Greaud
moved around a lot as a child.
“People ask me where I’m from and I
say, ‘I don’t know,’” he says with a laugh.
For the record, he was born in Texas
and lived in England, South Carolina,
Las Vegas, and Virginia for high school
and college. His career began with
training from Virginia Tech, followed by
four years in the U.S. Air Force as a civil
engineer.
“I did a variety of things there, to
include essentially what my development division does, and then for a while
I was involved in the maintenance end
of things,” Greaud said. “So that’s where
I started my airport experience, in the
military.”
A year as a district manager for Taco
Bell gave him experience – though vastly
different from his engineering background – as a manager.
“Part of what the Air Force does with
their officers when they come in is they
teach you to be a manager,” he said. “As
I was seeking positions outside the Air
Force, I knew I didn’t want to sit behind a
design desk all day long and do detail design; that’s just not my personality. I need
to interact with people and be involved in
other things.”
He would eventually find his way back
to the tarmac, though, and landed his first
job with a civilian airport in Birmingham,
Ala., as an engineer.
He came to Memphis International in
1989 as a projects engineer in the development division, where he worked for
nine years before becoming director of
maintenance for another nine. He began
his current position in 2008.
Greaud retired from the Air Force
Reserve in 2011, and enjoys spending
time now with his wife, Joanna, their two
children, Josh and Julie, and two grandchildren. When it comes time to unwind,
he hits the water with the Collierville Ski
Club.
With such extensive experience with
airports and the airline business, Greaud
sees firsthand the current state of his
industry with its airline mergers and a
change in philosophy from chasing market share to chasing profit – and yet he
remains cautiously optimistic for Memphis International.
“What I see going forward,” he said,
“is that we will see a slight increase – slow,
steady growth – in local traffic.”
Economy
Conference to Bridge Training-Employer Gap
Bill Dries
[email protected]
A Sept. 4 conference with state officials
on workforce development tackles issues
statewide and how Memphis is performing.
O
ut of the near-crisis in
hiring workers after the
city’s set of economic development plums in the last three
years came a workforce training
formula that has worked.
But many of the city’s companies aren’t aware of that formula
or the existing programs that
grew out of what amounted to
an emergency response by local
leaders. That’s according to a
recent survey of manufacturing
company leaders by the Greater
Memphis Chamber.
There have been other indications of a disconnect that can be
bridged between the programs
and employers.
At a Memphis roundtable
on jobs hosted by Tennessee
Gov. Bill Haslam a year ago this
month, the plant manager at the
Unilever plant in Covington said
he couldn’t find the kind of training programs he needed. John
Churchill, who helped create the
job training programs at Southwest Tennessee Community College that were the breakthrough
for finding workers for the
Electrolux and Blues City Brewing
projects, responded.
“It ended up resulting in
Southwest Tennessee Community College customizing a training
program that yielded Unilever the
employees it needed,” said state
Senate Republican leader Mark
Norris of Collierville. “It turned
out great.”
So on Sept. 4, Norris wants
those running the programs
and those needing them to get
together in the same room at The
University of Memphis in a process he describes as a “mini-jobs
conference.” That’s a reference to
the Tennessee Jobs Conference of
the late 1970s that set a long-term
economic development agenda
for the city. Norris’ goal is a bit
different, however. It is more of
an attempt to coordinate what
is already working but that more
employers need to know about.
“It starts with the premise that
without the state doing anything
and without the City Council doing anything else, there is already
a lot of good that is already being
done in this community in this
arena,” he said. “Rather than
the state rolling out a big new
program or anybody else doing
that, let’s all sit down together
shoulder to shoulder and get a
smattering of some examples of
that.”
State Labor Commissioner
Burns Phillips will be there with
other state officials and local
elected leaders. But Norris also
wants to hear from leaders of the
Boys and Girls Clubs technology
training program, an effort with
a 100 percent job placement rate
for each of the last three years.
Meanwhile, University of
Memphis interim president Brad
Martin wants to develop human
capital plans with the area’s top
30 employers, aimed at what their
new jobs will be in the next 10
years.
“I’m focusing on a very narrow band,” Martin said. “My
guess is we don’t know what
those jobs are. Over the next 10
years they are probably going
to be different than what they
were for the last 10 years. We are
going to be meeting with the top
30 employers in the market and
creating strategies about how The
University of Memphis teaches
people exactly what they need in
order to fill those jobs in the future at their specific businesses.”
Norris is realistic about other
obstacles beyond just getting
employers in the same room with
those running workforce training
programs.
In June, Haslam signed into
law the Labor Education Alignment Program, sponsored by
Norris. The program allows
those in workforce programs like
the ones already underway in
Memphis to be paid a competitive wage while training without
it affecting student financial assistance they otherwise get.
Norris describes it as a return
to apprenticeship-type programs.
“We’re trying to restore that.
That’s easier said than done.
A lot of these departments do
not like to cooperate. They just
don’t. We’re finding out where the
impediments are and where the
barriers are internally,” he said.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 25
h e a lt h ca r e & b i ot ec h
Community
Fertile Ground
Future looks bright as Botanic Garden turns 60
Baptist Says
Restructuring
Will Include
61 Layoffs
Jennifer Johnson Backer
[email protected]
B
(Memphis News/Andrew J. Breig)
Memphis Botanic Garden celebrates its 60th anniversarys with the Diamonds & Denim party, to be held
Friday, Sept. 13, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $60, and are free for Roots members.
Richard J. Alley
Special to The Memphis News
I
n 1947, two parcels of land on the
eastern boundaries of Memphis
were purchased for $400,000 to be
used as a new city park.
At the suggestion of political boss
E.H. Crump, an avid bird enthusiast,
the park was nearly named Bluebird,
yet would come to be known as Audubon Park, home to a shooting range
and golf course among other amenities.
There was no area set aside for
formal gardens at the time. In 1953,
however, 2,500 rhizomes donated by
the family of Morgan Ketchum were
planted on the east end of the park,
known afterward as the Ketchum Memorial Iris Garden. The idea self-pollinated, and garden clubs and societies
such as the Memphis Men’s Garden
Club and the Memphis Wildflower
Society soon had their way with plantings. The city moved its rose collection
from Overton Park to what was rapidly
becoming heralded as the Gardens of
Audubon Park.
Sixty years later and that rich patch
of dirt has blossomed into the Memphis Botanic Garden with 28 specialty
gardens spread over 96 acres in the
heart of the city. The 1960s saw growth
as the Goldsmith family honored department store founder Jacob Goldsmith with a large donation to create
the Goldsmith Civic Garden Center as
a community gathering place. Three
years later the Memphis City Council
formally designated it the Memphis
Botanic Garden, and in 1969, the foundation was formed that would manage
the city-owned property.
In 1996, local philanthropists Helen
and J.B. Hardin made a significant
donation and Hardin Hall was built,
creating space for receptions, conferences and a grand main entrance.
“That event certainly helped the
Garden in terms of being able to generate income and sustain the operation,”
executive director Jim Duncan said of
the logistical reformation. Having said
that, Duncan noted that hard times
were ahead for the attraction.
“I was approached in 2004 about
providing a business touch to the Garden,” he said. “Our membership had
declined to about 809 families at that
time, we were about $600,000 in debt,
we only had a staff of about 19 people
and did not have enough gardeners,
candidly, to create an attraction that
people wanted to see. … It was a challenging situation.”
That plot of land for flowers, shrubs
and trees, which had begun almost
as an afterthought and practically by
accident in 1953, had been set on a
new path. There was a sense of urgency
by Duncan and his staff to become
better stewards of this city treasure. A
renewed focus on the earned income
component, the revenue-generating
events that could be counted on year
in and year out, would help them see
their goal.
“It was difficult with the Garden’s
status being what it was then to ask
people for money simply because, as
we said, we hadn’t earned the right at
that time to ask for donations,” he said.
They hired additional salespeople
to boost rentals, revamped the model
for the premier fundraiser, Live at the
Garden, and “just focused on doing the
things necessary to … increase revenue
and decrease expenses.”
Over the next few years Memphis
Botanic Garden paid off its debts,
became a Level IV Arboretum (the
highest classification achievable), was
recognized as one of 15 certified Hosta
Trails in the country, and increased
staff to the point that there are more
horticulturists today than there was
total staff nine years ago. A horticulture center was built, as were specialty
gardens such as those for photography
and herbs, and in 2009, a $5.73 million,
2.25-acre children’s garden was created.
Duncan said My Big Backyard
“pretty much changed the face of us”
and is one reason that membership has
grown to more than 3,500 families.
Live at the Garden continues to
dominate fundraising, setting attendance records year after year.
“We realize that every decision we
make has a financial implication and
we run this place like a business, and it
works well,” Duncan said.
Much of that business-minded philosophy includes looking to the future
and a capital campaign is underway
to build a permanent stage for Live at
the Garden. Another goal is to attract
young professionals. Last year The
Roots, a membership level just for that
demographic, was created.
“We’re really trying to connect
younger people back with the Garden … in both horticulture and social
outlets,” said Ashley Mayer, manager of
special events and sponsorship.
Benefits include free entry to
events such as Food Truck Garden Parties, Cocktails in the Garden, and the
upcoming Diamonds & Denim party
to celebrate the 60th anniversary – the
diamond anniversary – of Memphis Botanic Garden. The event will be held on
Friday, Sept. 13, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are
$60, and are free for Roots members.
aptist Memorial Health Care Corp. this
week laid off 61 employees in a systemwide restructuring plan.
The eliminated positions ranged from
pharmacists to registered nurses, said Ayoka
Pond, director of public relations and internal
communications at Baptist Memorial.
Earlier this month, Baptist Memorial also
laid off 23 managers from its 14-hospital
system.
“In many cases, it’s really a transition from
one type of position to another,” Pond explained. “Really, as a net total, we are adding
more positions than we are eliminating.”
The 61 employees who lost their jobs
worked at six Baptist Memorial locations, including Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women,
Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis, Baptist
Rehabilitation Hospital-Germantown and
Baptist Trinity Homecare and Hospice in the
Memphis area.
Pond said the laid off employees are encouraged to re-apply for the roughly 500 open
positions currently available system-wide.
Many of the new positions were created to
support the hospital’s plan to roll out electronic
health records, an initiative Baptist officials
have dubbed OneCare, Pond said.
“That’s something that is not only a need
for our patients, but it is also a federal requirement,” she explained.
Electronic health records are supposed to
take full effect by 2015 under the Affordable
Care Act – but the rollout is far from complete
in many parts of the nation.
Doctors and hospitals have received more
than $6 billion in government funding to make
the change, Reuters reported, citing the Health
Information Management Systems Society, a
nonprofit organization promoting information
technology.
Baptist officials said staffing changes were
also driven by health care reform, sequestration, insurance exchanges, and declining
government reimbursements. While these
programs are designed to lower the cost of care,
increase access and improve quality of care,
local health care providers must also change in
order to be successful in this new era of health
care, Baptist officials said in a statement.
“Health care is going through unprecedented change, and we’ll all have to do more
with less,” said Jason Little, Baptist Memorial’s
executive vice president and chief operating officer. “Therefore, it’s important for us to spend
wisely while continuing to offer high-quality
care.”
The announcement came the same week
Baptist filed a $14.7 million permit application
with the city-county Office of Construction
Code Enforcement for a new rehabilitation
facility at 1240 S. Germantown Road.
Indianapolis-based commercial real estate
developer Duke Realty Corp. filed the permit
for the planned 60,000-square-foot, 49-bed
rehab hospital that will replace Baptist’s facility
on Exeter Road.
www.thememphisnews.com
26 August 30-September 5, 2013
E n t r ep r e n e u r s h i p
m e m p h i s L a w Ta lk
Four Memphis
Startups Win
Spots in ‘The TENN’
Kasser Tackling Tax Law
With Glankler Brown
Andy Meek
Richard J. Alley
[email protected]
M
emphis’ startup community continues
collecting recognition beyond the city
limits to go along with the steady attraction of new platforms, investments, mentors
and programs for startups here.
Earlier this week, all four startups from Memphis that competed for a spot in The TENN – Tennessee’s first master accelerator program – made
it through.
To do that, those four companies first participated in the state’s first-ever “Demo Day,” Aug.
27, organized by LaunchTN. The four companies
from Memphis, which comprise almost half of the
first batch of The TENN, are Mobilizer, Screwpulp,
Health & Bliss and View Medical.
During this week’s Demo Day event, they
joined 16 other companies, all of which were
graduates from Tennessee’s nine startup accelerators. Those companies made pitches, vying for
one of 10 spots in The TENN, sponsored by the
Blackstone Charitable Foundation.
“The Memphis teams did a great job,” said
LaunchTN CEO Charlie Brock. “They presented
their opportunity, and the progress they’ve made
clearly impressed the judges. I think it showed the
sector-focused accelerators are beneficial.”
The next step for the Memphis companies
will be to join the rest of The TENN on a statewide
bus tour. They’ll meet with leaders of top corporations, angel investors and venture capitalists from
across the state. During the master accelerator
program, the companies also will fly to California
and to the East Coast to network with investors.
According to LaunchTN, other benefits of the
new accelerator include access to master mentors, investors, entrepreneurs and business leaders throughout Tennessee.
The news about the four Memphis startups,
meanwhile, comes the same month that Start
Co., formerly LaunchYourCity Inc., essentially
expanded its footprint from Memphis all the way
to the West Coast with an office in San Francisco.
Start Co. also has added a few new employees
to support the enterprise in Memphis. And it has
announced a partnership with JumpStart Inc., a
nationally recognized nonprofit venture development organization. That partnership will attempt
to capture data related to creating and developing high-growth ventures, among other things.
Mike Mozenter, president of JumpStart’s regional
consulting arm, said the group chose to work with
Start Co. because of its track record supporting
high-growth tech startups in Memphis.
“Two and a half years ago, Start Co. (LaunchMemphis at the time) was having difficulty
raising social, political and financial capital in
the Memphis area,” Start Co. co-president Andre
Fowlkes wrote in a recent open letter. “Actually,
most of its support was coming from outside the
region, from Nashville, with the exception of a few
gracious sponsors here locally.
“A lot of progress has been made since we
first began talking with JumpStart, and they have
identified great efforts and programs to build on.
These efforts come in the form of not just what
Start Co. is building, but others in the region, such
as Memphis Bioworks, EmergeMemphis, University of Memphis and much more. ... We have an
opportunity to stop imagining and finally come
together to begin.”
Special to The Memphis News
J
ake Kasser has joined the firm
of Glankler Brown PLLC as an
associate.
A Germantown High School
graduate and the son of parents in
the medical field, Kasser entered The
University of Memphis as a walk-on
safety for the Tigers football team.
The advisers he worked with guided
him toward his chosen field of accounting, and by his sophomore year
he’d garnered an athletic scholarship.
Upon graduating, Kasser went on
to get a master’s degree in accounting
with a concentration in tax.
“When I was in grad school, (law
school) was a thought,” he said. “I
talked to my parents about maybe
doing that. I think my mom suggested it at some point, and that’s when I
started to give it some real thought.”
He earned a CPA license and,
after graduate school, worked a
brief time for the accounting firm of
Whitehorn Tankersley & Davis. Then
Kasser decided that if he was going to
go on to law school, “that would be
the best time to go ahead and do it
and not wait.”
He entered the University of
Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School
of Law with the intention all along
to focus on transactional law, as
opposed to litigation, specifically
anything “related to business or tax
… that was my background,” he said.
While in school, Kasser served as
a staff member of The University of
Memphis Law Review and as articles
editor of The University of Memphis
Law Review editorial board.
As a first-year student, he worked
for the Mason Law Firm, which
focuses mainly on estate planning.
For the next two years he worked for
the divorce firm of Rice, Amundsen &
Caperton PLLC. He graduated magna
cum laude in May and is awaiting
results from the bar exam.
The exam itself became more
challenging than normal, he said,
when during the all-essay portion on the first day, his computer
malfunctioned. He was told to start
hand-writing the exam but that there
would be no extra time allowed. Kasser successfully completed the exam,
and the very next day he proposed
to fiancée Jenna Leppert, a dental
hygienist with Avery & Meadows.
It’s been a good year for Kasser,
having graduated law school, becoming engaged and going to work for
one of the oldest and most-respected
firms in the region. His experience in
the offices of Glankler Brown so far
has been with learning policies and
procedures, but he said the attorneys
and staff have gone above and be-
Kasser
“When I was in grad school, (law school) was a
thought. I think my mom suggested it at some
point, and that’s when I started to give it some
real thought.”
– Jake Kasser
Glankler Brown PLLC
yond when it comes to helping him
get situated and welcoming him into
the family.
“They’ve helped me out a ton,” he
said. “I think once I get super busy,
it’ll be a little rougher, but everyone
here has been so nice and helpful,
and I couldn’t have asked for a better
work atmosphere, honestly.”
Though he freely admits that
the detail-oriented area of law he’s
chosen to pursue is “not the most
exciting stuff in the world,” he’s eager
to dive in and begin practicing what
he’s studied so hard to learn. And
though the excitement level may fall
somewhere beneath standing on the
football field under bright lights, he
feels practiced and capable to handle
whatever is thrown his way. From the
occasion of his first tax course while
an undergraduate student, learning
the legal aspects of tax, to the more
detailed statutory laws and case law
as a graduate student, Kasser could
see where he eventually wanted to
end up.
“I think I was introduced in the
tax perspective first and that’s what
I started to grow to do and enjoy it,”
he said
As in learning defensive plays and
carrying them out to the letter, Kasser
enjoys the routine of tax law and the
expertise required. As for his work
with Glankler, he says, “It couldn’t
have been a better fit for what I
wanted to do.”
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 27
S m a ll B u s i n ess
Wiseacre Brewery Set to Open City’s First Taproom
Andy Meek
[email protected]
T
he city’s newest craft brewery is
officially open for business.
Wiseacre Brewing Co. held a
ribbon-cutting ceremony Wednesday,
Aug. 28, for its 13,000-square-foot brewery at 2783 Broad Ave., and the fledgling
brewery unveil its taproom and some of
its craft beers to the public Friday, Aug.
30, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
The brewery’s taproom, which will
be open Fridays and Saturdays, will
feature a variety of beers on tap, including two year-round brews, Tiny Bomb
American Pilsner and Ananda India
Pale Ale.
Wiseacre announced a few months
ago it will package Tiny Bomb and
Ananda in a can, making it the first craft
brewery in Tennessee to can beer.
The ribbon-cutting at Wiseacre,
meanwhile, also represents the kickoff of a new loan fund from River City
Capital, which contributed funding to
Wiseacre.
The new loan fund is a result of
the city of Memphis working with the
Memphis-area banking community as
“
By bringing more
private investment to
the urban core such as
Wiseacre’s $1.7 million
and eight new jobs ...
we can help to increase
property values and
support neighborhood
businesses.”
– Josh Poag
River City Capital
well as national foundations. River City
Capital has made its first loan to Wiseacre,
which is owned by brothers Kellan and
Davin Bartosch.
“Our core, inner-city neighborhoods
are some of our most under-utilized assets,” said River City Capital board chair
Josh Poag. “By bringing more private
investment to the urban core such as
Davin and Kellan Bartosch of Wiseacre Brewing Co.
Wiseacre’s $1.7 million and eight new jobs
projected over the next year, we can help
to increase property values and support
neighborhood businesses.”
Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.
about two years ago started meeting
with area banks to enlist their support in
the creation of an inner-city redevelopment loan fund. Banks including First
(Memphis News/Andrew J. Breig)
Tennessee Bank, Paragon National Bank,
Metropolitan Bank, Independent Bank,
Iberiabank and Regions Bank all participated and committed $550,000.
The New York-based Surdna Foundation also provided a three-year $400,000
grant to allow River City Capital to set up
a loan loss reserve fund, market its loan
products and hire a new loan officer.
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28 August 30-September 5, 2013
Fred’s Profit Falls on Year-Ago Charges
The company reported net income of $3.3 million, or 9 cents
per share, for the quarter that ended Aug. 3. That is down from
net income of $6.1 million, or 17 cents per share, in the prior
year’s quarter.
The Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Fred’s Inc. reported Thursday that its fiscal second-quarter
net income fell sharply because of a sizable tax benefit a year ago, but adjusted
results showed improved profitability.
While the discount retailer’s sales
have been improving and helping its
profits, it warned that its lower-income
customers are still feeling economically
pressured.
The company, based in Memphis, has
697 general merchandise stores across the
Southeast.
school board continued from P22
systems or one system, we can work
together as one county to provide a
quality education.”
Hart thinks that while unexpected,
a 23-member school board worked
well.
“I think it was beneficial to have on
both sides people with some experience to help work with those seven
members. Now they can move forward,” she said. “For all of the work
that needed to be done, it was easy to
divide that labor.”
Carruthers believes just the size
of the board made it more difficult to
get the work that needed to be done
accomplished sooner.
“There are still so many unknowns
and so many things that are unsolved.
I just wish them the best,” he said of
the seven-member school board. “I
think they will be able to do a lot better
job with seven people than 23.”
The next school board meeting is
a Sept. 17 work session followed by a
Sept. 24 voting meeting.
With the September meetings,
the smaller school board will move
back to the auditorium at the Board of
Education building from the nearby
Teaching and Learning Academy that
had enough space to accommodate a
school board only 10 seats shy of the
size of the Tennessee Senate.
The auditorium where the old
Memphis City Schools board once met
got a new coat of paint last week in
preparation.
And by the work session, the board
should be back up to a full seven
members with the Shelby County
Commission scheduled to appoint
a new board member to the vacant
District 6 seat at its Sept. 9 meeting.
The seat became open when Reginald
Porter resigned to become chief of
staff to interim schools superintendent
Dorsey Hopson.
Fred’s CEO Bruce Efird said that the
second quarter was helped by stronger
customer traffic in stores, increased
spending during each visit, improved
margins and lower expenses.
The company reported net income of
$3.3 million, or 9 cents per share, for the
quarter that ended Aug. 3. That is down
from net income of $6.1 million, or 17
cents per share, in the prior year’s quarter.
The prior year’s results included a $4 million, or 11 cents per share, benefit tied to
a state income tax settlement and other
tax matters.
Revenue increased 2 percent to $482.2
million from $470.8 million. Revenue
from stores open at least a year
increased 2.2 percent following a
decline of 1 percent last year. This is
considered a key indicator of a retailer’s financial performance as it strips
away the effect of recently opened or
closed stores.
The quarter’s profit met market
expectations and revenue exceeded
them. Analysts polled by FactSet, on average, were anticipating earnings of 9 cents
per share for the quarter on revenue of
$480.6 million.
Fred’s said that it anticipates the
competitive climate will be intense and
the operation environment will be challenging in the second half of the year. This
echoes the sentiment of many retailers,
from Macy’s to Wal-Mart, which have lowered their full-year forecasts on weaker
consumer spending patterns.
“Discretionary spending for lowerincome consumers – a key customer
segment for Fred’s – is expected to remain
under pressure,” Efird said.
He said the company’s merchandising programs, expansion of the number
of pharmacies in stores and other efforts
are designed to meet these economic and
competitive challenges.
The company said it expects earnings for the year to fall between 81 and 86
cents per share; analysts were anticipating 84 cents per share.
Fred’s also said that it expects it will
earn 19 to 23 cents per share on revenue
gains between 1 and 3 percent. Based
on its third-quarter revenue of roughly
$450.6 million last year, that suggests revenue of $455.1 million to $464.1 million.
Analysts had forecast earnings of 22
cents per share for the quarter on revenue
of $461.4 million.
Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.
All rights reserved. This material may
not be published, broadcast, rewritten or
redistributed.
S m a ll B u s i n ess
Conference to ‘Connect Dots’
For Women Business Owners
Lesley Young
Special to The Memphis News
M
arketing firm owner Amy
Howell could write a book on
her experience as a female
business owner. As a matter of fact, she
has.
“It’s a subject near and dear to my
heart, and a message I continue to carry,” said Howell, who published “Women
in High Gear” this March.
It’s not much of a stretch that Howell,
who has owned Howell Marketing
Strategies LLC for 17 years, will host a
roundtable discussion at this year’s Tennessee Women’s Business Conference,
presented by Women’s Business Enterprise Council South on Sept. 12 at the
University of Memphis Holiday Inn.
“It’s a great opportunity to spread the
word about the Women’s Business Council and let everyone know that there
are good things happening for women
in business and hopefully grow that,”
Howell said.
In its fourth year, the conference exists to create awareness concerning the
importance of national certification for
women business owners, to provide networking opportunities and to enhance
women business owners’ skills with various presentations.
“We try to make sure we put together
events that corporations will attend so
that women can further make relationships with these corporations,” said
event chairwoman Mary Singer, owner
of CRG2 Sustainable Solutions and a
WBECSouth volunteer.
WBECSouth is one of 14 regional
partners with the national organization
Women’s Business Enterprise National
Council (WBENC), a nonprofit that is the
largest third-party certifier of businesses
owned, controlled and operated by
women in the United States and which
advocates women-owned businesses as
suppliers to U.S. corporations.
“To truly scale your business, you
need the ability to work with larger
corporations,” Singer said. “The standard around WBENC certification is kept
at the highest level of integrity allows
women to work all over the U.S. That
means being called to the table for contracts that you would otherwise never
have the opportunity to get. That’s a very
big deal.”
The conference runs from 8:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. and will include a keynote
luncheon led by Banneker Industries
CEO Cheryl Snead, and discussions on
topics including financial well-being,
effective pricing, marketing, benefits,
social media and sustainability, among
others.
“Mary Singer has long been a
personal hero and friend,” said Pam
Mattingly, director of client relations for
Pickering Firm. “Her passion for helping
others towards success is truly awesome, and she is a primary reason I am
involved in this conference.”
Mattingly has experienced firsthand
the importance of a gender-friendly
culture in the business place.
“Pickering thinks outside the gender
and has encouraged my growth within
the firm – and not just as a woman, but
also as a non-technical professional,”
Mattingly said. “Pickering’s board,
principal owner program and key team
members include women, and I have
been fortunate to work with a company
that taps into our talent and nurtures
personal growth.”
Some of the industries scheduled to
attend the conference include banking,
government, real estate, communications, transportation, engineering and
manufacturing – companies that are
“looking to do business with women.”
“The opportunity to network is just
as valuable if not more than any other,”
said Megan Murdoch, the client development manager of CBIZ MHM LLC.
Howell said the conference’s timing
is perfect.
“I recently read an article in the Wall
Street Journal stating that women were
optioned out of business. That is not
what we need,” Howell said.
“We need women in the work force,
and we need women in a position to hire
other women and to help women by
recognizing quality and rewarding good
work.”
To find out more about or to register for the conference, visit wbecsouth.
org/gwgt2013. For more information
about WBENC, visit wbenc.org and for
information about WBECSouth, go to
wbecsouth.org.
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 29
»
happenings
The Center for Southern Folklore will present the
Memphis Music & Heritage Festival Saturday, Aug. 31,
and Sunday, Sept. 1, from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Main Street
between Peabody Place and Union Avenue. The event will
include music, food, and arts and crafts vendors. Cost is
free. Visit southernfolklore.org for a list of performers.
» Community
Eyewear Gallery will host free back-to-school
vision screenings Friday, Aug. 30, from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. at the store, 428 Perkins Road Extended.
Space is limited. RSVP at 763-2020.
Business and Professional Women of Tennessee members will meet Friday, Aug. 30,
at 11:30 a.m. at Jason’s Deli, 3743 Poplar Ave.,
to discuss re-establishing a Memphis chapter.
The state organization is an affiliate of the BPW
Foundation, an advocate for women on work-life
balance and workplace equity issues. Email
[email protected] or call
489-5481.
Lipscomb Pitts Breakfast Club will hold a
happy hour mixer and opening celebration at
Tamp & Tap on Friday, Aug. 30, from 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. at the coffee and beer shop in Van Vleet
Flats, 122 Gayoso Ave. Cost is Dutch treat. Visit
thelpbc.com.
Cochon Heritage BBQ competition and tasting event will be held Friday, Aug. 30, at 5:55
p.m. at Beale Street Landing, at Beale Street
and Riverside Drive. Five teams of chefs will
each prepare one heritage-breed pig to win
audience votes in six categories. Tickets are
$125; VIP tickets, which include 5 p.m. entry, are
$200. Visit heritagebbq.com.
The Memphis Zoo will host Zoo Brew on
Friday, Aug. 30, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the
zoo, 2000 Prentiss Place. The event will include
beers from around the world, live music and
food. Tickets are $35 for members and $40
for nonmembers; VIP tickets, which include
admission to the Teton Trek VIP Lounge, are $55
for members and $60 for nonmembers. Visit
memphiszoo.org.
The Orpheum will screen “Rebel Without a
Cause,” part of the Pat’s Picks classic movie
series, Friday, Aug. 30, at 7 p.m. at the theater,
203 S. Main St. Tickets are $7 for adults and
$5 for children 12 and younger. Visit orpheummemphis.com.
WLOK will host the 2013 WLOK Stone Soul
Picnic, a music festival featuring national and local gospel artists, Saturday, Aug. 31, from 1 p.m.
to 10 p.m. at Tom Lee Park, on Riverside Drive
Downtown. Cost is free. Visit wlok.com.
Laughs for Le Bonheur, a fundraiser comedy
show featuring Gary Owen, Jermaine “Fun-
nymaine” Johnson and Ambrose Jones III, will
be held Saturday, Aug. 31, at 7 p.m. at The New
Daisy Theatre, 330 Beale St. The event will be
hosted by Quincy Pondexter of the Memphis
Grizzlies and Thaddeus Young of the Philadelphia 76ers. Tickets start at $50. Visit laughsforlebonheur.org.
The Daily News’ offices will be closed Monday,
Sept. 2, in observance of Labor Day. Offices
will reopen Tuesday, Sept. 3, at 8:30 a.m. and
remain open through normal business hours.
Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, Sept. 4,
from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at DeVry University, 6401
Poplar Ave., sixth floor. Credit expert Craig Cline
will present “How to Improve Your Credit Score.”
Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz or call Jo Garner at 482-0354.
Memphis Light, Gas & Water Division will
hold a board meeting Wednesday, Sept. 4, at
1:30 p.m. in the MLGW board room, 220 S. Main
St. Visit mlgw.com.
Cooper Young Night Out will be held Thursday, Sept. 5, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at businesses
in the Cooper-Young neighborhood. Visit cooperyoung.biz for a list of activities.
The Mid-South Area Pulmonary Hypertension Support Group will meet Thursday, Sept.
5, at 6 p.m. at Logan’s Roadhouse, 2710 N. Germantown Parkway. Keynote speaker Timothy
Ballard will present “Insights on Exercise Testing
and Exercise in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension” at 7 p.m. RSVP to [email protected]
com or 463-8688.
» THE ARTS
The South Main Art Trolley Tour will be held
Friday, Aug. 30, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the
South Main Historic Arts District. Email [email protected]
southmainmemphis.net.
Leadership Memphis Gallery 363 will hold
an opening reception for Catherine Erb’s inaugural photography exhibit Friday, Aug. 30, from
6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the gallery, 363 S. Main
St. The show can also been seen by appointment. Call 452-8033.
Memphis College of Art-Downtown will hold
an opening reception for “Blurring Dimensions”
Friday, Aug. 30, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Hyde
Gallery in the Nesin Graduate Center, 477 S.
Main St. Runs through Sept. 20. Visit mca.edu.
Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference
Center will host Nate Evans and the Temptations Revue in concert Saturday, Aug. 31, at 8
p.m. at BPACC, 3663 Appling Road. Tickets are
$25. Visit bpacc.org or call 385-6440.
Theatre Memphis presents “The Royal Family”
through Sept. 1 on the Lohrey Stage, 630 Perkins Road Ext. Visit theatrememphis.org.
Memphis Botanic Garden will hold a meetand-greet reception for Chantel Barber’s
“Nature’s Portraits” art exhibit Thursday, Sept.
5, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Visitors
Center gallery, 750 Cherry Road. The exhibit will
be on display through Sept. 30. Call 636-4100.
The Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s
School presents “Thought=Art,” featuring
works by Tara Browning, Michael Gravois and
Billy Moore, in the Levy Gallery, 60 Perkins Road
Extended. The exhibit runs through Sept. 13.
Visit buckmanartscenter.com.
The Circuit Playhouse presents Tony
Award-winning drama “Red” through Sept. 15,
at the theater, 51 S. Cooper St. Buy tickets at
playhouseonthesquare.org.
Playhouse on the Square presents “Les
Miserables” through Sept. 15 at Playhouse, 66
S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.
Eclectic Eye hosts the “Musings of an
Unconscious Mind” by Joseph Arthur at the
boutique’s Midtown showroom, 242 S. Cooper
St. The show runs through Sept. 25. Visit
eclectic-eye.com.
baptist continued from P14
brad martin continued from P11
rock for love continued from P7
“Today, health care is not just a local
issue, but a national issue,” Huffman
explained. “As we go through massive
changes in how health care is delivered,
it’s about making care more efficient and
providing care in the most cost-effective
manner, while eliminating duplication of
services.”
Huffman said the adoption of electronic health records and more primary care
physicians that are employed directly by
the Baptist Memorial Health Care system
makes it easier to focus on preventative
care for everything from diabetes management to asthma.
“When we are all working in the same
structure, we are more efficient and effective at delivering care,” he said. “In the
future, there are going to be more people
that need care and fewer dollars to provide
that care.”
While health care delivery in the past
may have focused more on physical buildings, Huffman said future expansion is
likely to include adding more primary care
physicians and preventative services.
“We hope we don’t need to add additional in-patient beds,” he said. “We are
focused on preventing and treating the
major causes of death in Mississippi,” including heart and cardiac issues, diabetes
and obesity.
Population growth in DeSoto County
also recently spurred the opening of Methodist Le Bonheur’s $100 million hospital
in suburban Olive Branch. The 60-bed
hospital could ultimately employ about
500 workers and grow to 100 beds.
“I call them great teachers,” Martin
said. “We’ve got a college of education
with a huge amount of capacity, a lot of
talent. We believe we can produce up
to 500 great teachers a year for this core
market. That’s transformational over 10
years if we do that.”
Martin also plans to meet with the
region’s top 30 employers to seek out
how the university can train workers
specifically for jobs at their businesses
over the next 10 years.
Under Raines’ tenure, the university
was already reaching out to software
manufacturers, and the university is
deeply involved in software testing and
development.
Martin’s goal is to keep looking
years ahead for ideas and indications of
what new jobs will be on the horizon.
raised totaled about $7,500, the total
has climbed each year, with last year
seeing $50,000. As impressive as that
is, it’s a mere drop in the open guitar
case for the Church Health Center’s
annual budget of $16 million.
Rock for Love, however, has a different mission. It is the largest event
the center puts on, and it’s the awareness, Hulett says, on which you can’t
put a price.
“The positive damage we want to
do is in friend-raising and awarenessraising, and saying, ‘Hey, we’re here
to serve you if you need us,’ or we’re
sowing seeds trying to get that next
generation of support,” he said.
“These young folks that are coming to
the shows, in five, 10, 15 years, are going to be the people that will have the
frost continued from P21
Laurelwood.
At Lucchesi’s on Sanderlin Avenue at
Mendenhall, manager Mike Robilio said
the treats they offer from All American
Sweets – strawberry, caramel, coconut,
lemon and banana cakes, Mississippi
Mud and cupcakes – all sell well. Despite the opposing nature of retail over
wholesale, and the dessert competition
in town, Robilio has high hopes for the
Kloos’ newest venture.
“I think it’s great,” Robilio said. “I
welcome them and I hope they do well.
I think they will, they seem to have a
great group of people there.”
“We’re kind of the best-kept secret,”
Kloos said. “There are hundreds of
thousands of people eating our cakes
every year and they have no idea who’s
making them.”
Kloos said he believes a retail presence will push people to those restaurants as his staff is able to better share
their availability.
capacity to give.”
Stockwell has been thrilled over
the years with the eagerness for
involvement of the musicians and
bands – part of the very core of those
the Church Health Center seeks to
help – and the question of its success
is no question at all for him.
“Why has it grown? Because Memphis is generous,” he said. “Our music
community and our creative community are generous, and they want
to give back, and they see that the
Church Health Center is an organization that’s helped them.”
Sponsors of Rock for Love 7
include SunTrust Bank, Huey’s,
WMC-TV, Clear Channel Radio, Sun
Studio, Elvis Presley Enterprises and
the Memphis Convention & Visitors
Bureau. For more information, visit
rockforlove.org.
“We’ll sell 10,000 cakes to restaurants this year,” Kloos said. And with
300 wedding cakes made in a year, he
added, “The great thing is that everybody loves cake.”
Bill Kloos the elder is an engineer by
trade and Kloos the younger took that to
heart nearly 10 years ago when new to
the bakery business.
“We engineer cakes,” Kloos said. “We
took cakes apart to find out what makes
it moist, what makes it tender, why it’s
so good. That’s how we got here today.”
www.thememphisnews.com
30 August 30-September 5, 2013
Week of 8/19/13 - 8/25/13
crosswords
The Weekly
Crossword
The Weekly Crossword
ACROSS
1 Back of the
neck
5 Wander
9 Fictional sleuth
14 Type of code
15 Land unit
16 Yard machine
17 Tabloid fodder
18 Author's dream
20 Suffix with
"skeptic"
21 Up to the task
22 Tissue layer
23 Knee jerk, e.g.
25 Woolly beast
29 Part of DNR
30 Mouth-watering
32 Highchair wear
33 Postcard-pretty
36 Place to build
37 Fountain fare
38 Railroad worker's transport
40 Early
42 "Render ____
Caesar..."
43 Canyon edge
45 Hit the hay
46 Costa del ___
47 Judge's
issuance
49 Sewing kit item
50 Prosperous time
52 Arrange in pairs
56 Roswell sighting
57 Devoted
58 Playground
game
59 Captivated
63 Bumper blemish
64 Assumed name
65 More than
nudge
66 Aborted, at
NASA
67 Pullman feature
68 One and ____
69 Before long
DOWN
1 Lowest point
2 Greet the dawn
3 Forever
1
2
3
by Margie E. Burke
4
5
14
15
17
18
6
7
8
9
23
29
30
38
31
43
44
47
48
51
52
54
55
56
57
49
53
58
64
65
66
67
68
69
61
28
45
63
60
27
41
62
59
26
37
40
39
50
13
32
36
35
42
12
22
25
34
11
19
24
46
10
16
21
20
33
Edited by Margie E. Burke
Copyright 2013 by The Puzzle Syndicate
4
5
6
7
Break bread
44 Explosive
55 Spur to action
Yeshiva leader
measure
59 Beatles
Spotted cat
47 Clumsy
adjective
Weapons
48 Make public
60 Pub order
stockpile
51 Old gold coin
61 Knight's title
8 Gathered
53 Annapolis stu62 Gone by
together
dent, informally 63 "CSI" evidence
9 Nose-wrinkling
54 Radio letter
after sierra
10 Sea anenome,
for one
11 Leatherworker's
tool
12 Sandra or Ruby
Answer to Last Week's Crossword
13 Miss the mark
19 Splash in drops
S O F A
A R R A Y
A M I D
21 Lofty space?
O P A L
C H O R E
P O N E
D E R M A T I T I S
24 Time-share unit
P L E A
A D M I T
26 Shameful act
N O D
H E A R T
27 Apple beverage
G O F E R
D E A R T H
I S T H M U S
G I R L
28 Put down
31 Type of story
D A R T
S T R E S S
P R Y
O K A Y
T O O T H
F L O E
33 Librarian's
L I P
W I N D U P
I O T A
warning
B R A E
P A I N T E R
34 Week
Kayak's of
kin 8/19/13 - 8/25/13
A T T A I N
P A N D A
35 Throw a fit
F A N
E L A T E
37 Peaceful protest D E I S T
A N T E
F U N D R A I S E R
39 Free from, with
P O L L
O M E G A
S H A G
"of"
T R E Y
B E L O W
T Y R O
41 Lukewarm
Sudoku

Edited by Margie E. Burke
Edited by Margie E. Burke
Difficulty : Easy

 
  






 


 




 

Copyright 2013 by The Puzzle Syndicate
Emphasis Issues
What’s Coming Up
SEPTEMBER 6
CONSTRUCTION
&
DESIGN
SEPTEMBER 13
HEALTH CARE
SEPTEMBER 27
EDUCATION
HOW
TOTOSOLVE:

HOW
PLAY

Each row must contain the

numbers 1 to 9; each column
must contain the numbers 1

to 9; and each set of 3 by 3

boxes must contain the

numbers 1 to 9.

OCTOBER 11
ARCHITECTS
&
ENGINEERS
Answer to Last Week's Sudoku



























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August 30-September 5, 2013 31
August 30 - September 5, 2013 3 1
public notices
Foreclosure Notices
Fayette County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated August 31, 2005, and the Deed
of Trust of even date securing the same,
recorded September 8, 2005, at Book
D796, Page 1 in Office of the Register
of Deeds for Fayette County, Tennessee,
executed by Mary E Yager and James
L Yager, conveying certain property
therein described to William Graig Hall
as Trustee for ABN AMRO Mortgage
Group, Inc.; and the undersigned, Wilson
& Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on September 9, 2013 on
or about 10:00 A.M., at the Fayette
County Courthouse, Somerville, Ten‑
nessee, offer for sale certain property
hereinafter described to the highest
bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead,
dower, and all other exemptions which
are expressly waived in the Deed of
Trust, said property being real estate
situated in Fayette County, Tennessee,
and being more particularly described
as follows:
The following described lot or parcel
of land situated in the 12th Civil
District of Fayette County, TN, and
being more particularly described as
follows, to‑wit:
Tract Number 2: Beginning 20 feet
West of center in road at Southeast
corner of the Northeast Quarter Sec‑
tion 18 and ran North 670.0 feet to a
stake 20 feet West of center in road;
thence with the residue of the North‑
east Quarter of Section 18 West 550
feet to a stake at Northwest corner
of the 8.4 acres; thence South with
the residue 686 feet to stake in South
boundary line; thence with the North
boundary line of Lewis East 550 feet
to the Point of Beginning; containing
8.4 acres, more or less.
Less and Except
Being a part of the James L. Yager
8.4 acres as recorded in Deed Book
280, Page 200 in the Fayette County
Register’s Office, Fayette County,
Tennessee and being more particu‑
larly described as follows:
Beginning at a point in Honeysuckle
Road, 200 feet West of centerline,
said point being located 220.83 feet
North of the Southeast corner of James
L. Yager and the Northeast corner of
R. L. Lewis (114/28); thence North
88 degrees 12 minutes 49 seconds
West a distance of 544.95 feet to a
point in the East line of Nancey Hall
(251/808); thence along said East
line North 01 degrees 04 minutes 06
seconds East a distance of 434.81
feet to a point; thence along the
North line of Yager and the South line
of Charles Baker (330/687); South
89 degrees 33 minutes 05 seconds
East a distance of 545.74 feet (called
550.0 feet) to a point in Honeysuckle
Road (20 feet West of centerline);
thence along Honeysuckle Road
South 01 degrees 10 minutes 10
seconds East a distance of 447.54
feet to the Point of Beginning and
containing 5.52 acres.
[Legal Description revised pursuant
to attorney’s affidavit filed May 16,
2013 as Instrument 13003128]
ALSO KNOWN AS: 430 Honeysuckle
Road, Moscow, Tennessee 38057
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest
in the above-referenced property: Mary
E Yager; James L Yager; ABN AMRO
Mortgage Group, Inc.; Trustmark Na‑
tional Bank
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
817‑234876
DATED August 7, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 16, 23, 30, 2013
Fin11593
Foreclosure Notices
Madison County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated May 4, 2007, and the Deed of
Trust of even date securing the same,
recorded May 7, 2007, at Book T1798,
Page 117 in Office of the Register of
Deeds for Madison County, Tennessee,
executed by Joyce Jenkins, conveying
certain property therein described to
Atty. Arnold M Weiss, a resident of
Shelby County as Trustee for Mortgage
Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as
nominee for Homecoming Financial, LLC
(fka Homecomings Financial Network,
Inc.), its successors and assigns; and
the undersigned, Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on September 12, 2013 on
or about 11:00 A.M., at the Madison
County Courthouse, Jackson, Tennes‑
see, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder
FOR CASH, free from the statutory right
of redemption, homestead, dower, and
all other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property
being real estate situated in Madison
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Being Lot Number Three Hundred
Twelve (312), Section III, Briar Hill
Subdivision a plat of which appears of
record in Plat Book 9, at Page 120,
in the Register’s Office of Madison
County, Tennessee reference to
which plat is hereby made for a more
particular description of said lot.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 51 Sedgefield
Drive, Jackson, Tennessee 38305‑
5976
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest
in the above-referenced property: Joyce
Jenkins
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
1455‑230460
DATED August 8, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 16, 23, 30, 2013
Fin11594
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated April 30, 2004, and the Deed of
Trust of even date securing the same,
recorded May 5, 2004, at Book T1579,
Page 641 in Office of the Register of
Deeds for Madison County, Tennessee,
executed by Franklin L. Compton and
Annie S. Compton, conveying certain
property therein described to Arnold M.
Weiss, Esq. as Trustee for Wells Fargo
Home Mortgage, Inc.
; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed
Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on September 26, 2013 on
or about 11:00 A.M., at the Madison
County Courthouse, Jackson, Tennes‑
see, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder
FOR CASH, free from the statutory right
of redemption, homestead, dower, and
all other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property
being real estate situated in Madison
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Being Lot Number One Hundred Six
(106), Phase 2, Section 1, Station
Oaks, a Plat of which appears of
record in Plat Book 9 at Page 302
in the Register’s Office of Madison
County, Tennessee.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 42 Union Fort Drive,
Jackson, Tennessee 38305‑6484
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest in
the above-referenced property: Franklin
L. Compton; Annie S. Compton
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
1286‑237656
DATED August 7, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 16, 23, 30, 2013
Fin11596
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated March 25, 2004, and the Deed of
Trust of even date securing the same, recorded March 31, 2004, at Book T1568,
Page 492 in Office of the Register of
Deeds for Madison County, Tennessee,
executed by Marilyn McBride, conveying
certain property therein described to
Lawyers Title Insurance Corp as Trustee
for Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., as nominee for Sunset
Mortgage Company, L.P., its successors and assigns; and the undersigned,
Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having
been appointed Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on September 26, 2013 on
or about 11:00 A.M., at the Madison
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County Courthouse, Jackson, Tennes‑
see, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder
FOR CASH, free from the statutory right
of redemption, homestead, dower, and
all other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property
being real estate situated in Madison
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Beginning at a stake in the Southwest
corner of B.F. Wallace’s lot in the
North margin of Crescent Avenue
at a point 202 feet East of the East
margin of Prospect Avenue; runs
thence West with the North margin
of Crescent Avenue 50 feet to Long’s
Southeast corner; runs thence North
with Long’s East boundary line 150
feet to an alley; thence East with said
valley 50 feet to Wallace’s Northwest
corner; thence South with West line
of said Wallace lot 150 feet to the
point of beginning; in the Register’s
Office of Madison County, Tennessee,
to which plat reference is hereby made
for a more particular description of
said property.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 143 Crescent
Avenue, Jackson, Tennessee 38301‑
4365
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
Continued on page 32
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32 August
August 30
30-September
32
- September5,5,2013
2013
public notices
Foreclosure Notices
Continued from page 31
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest in
the above-referenced property: Marilyn
McBride; Wells Fargo Financial Bank;
Norwest Financial Tennessee, Inc.;
Wells Fargo Financial Bank
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
1286‑237715
DATED August 7, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 16, 23, 30, 2013
Fin11597
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated August 28, 2007, and the Deed of
Trust of even date securing the same, recorded August 31, 2007, at Book T1810,
Page 1071 in Office of the Register of
Deeds for Madison County, Tennessee,
executed by Natarsha Rutherford and
Natarsha Rutherford, conveying certain
property therein described to Atty. Arnold
M Weiss, a resident of Shelby County
as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee
for Homecomings Financial, LLC (f/k/a
Homecomings Financial Network, Inc.),
its successors and assigns; and the
undersigned, Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on September 19, 2013 on
or about 11:00 A.M., at the Madison
County Courthouse, Jackson, Tennes‑
see, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder
FOR CASH, free from the statutory right
of redemption, homestead, dower, and
all other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property
being real estate situated in Madison
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Being Lot Number 73 in Section IV
of Skyview Estates, a plat of which
is of record in Plat Book 3, Page 41,
Register’s Office for Madison County,
Tennessee, reference to which is
hereby made far a more complete
description.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 8 Rainbow Cove,
Jackson, Tennessee 38305
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest in
the above-referenced property: Natarsha
Rutherford; Natarsha Rutherford; Ten‑
nessee Housing Development Agency
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
931‑182931
DATED August 16, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 23, 30, Sept. 6, 2013Fin11600
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred
in the performance of the covenants,
terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust
Note dated October 2, 2001, and the
Deed of Trust of even date securing the
same, recorded October 10, 2001, at
Book T1326, Page 680 in Office of the
Register of Deeds for Madison County,
Tennessee, executed by Jerry L. Bingham
and Robin Bingham, conveying certain
property therein described to Kathy Winstead of Knox County as Trustee for A
Mortgage Link Llc; and the undersigned,
Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having
been appointed Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on September 19, 2013 on
or about 11:00 A.M., at the Madison
County Courthouse, Jackson, Tennes‑
see, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder
FOR CASH, free from the statutory right
of redemption, homestead, dower, and
all other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property
being real estate situated in Madison
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Beginning at a point in the South
margin of the Mifflin Road, said point
being in the Northeast corner of the
Stanford tract; runs thence South
25 degrees 30 minutes West with
Stanford’s East margin a distance of
448 feet to a point; runs thence East
a distance of 350 feet to a. point in
Alvie Bledsoe’s Southwest corner;
runs thence North with Bledsoe’s
West margin, a distance of 428.5
feet to a point in the South margin of
said Mifflin Road; runs thence West
with the South margin of said road
a distance of 180 feet to a point;
runs thence North 76 degrees 45
minutes West 80 feet to the point
of beginning, containing 3.0 acres,
and being a lot on Mifflin Road, as
surveyed by McAlexander Engineer‑
ing on July 11, 1985
ALSO KNOWN AS: 1124 Mifflin Road,
Jackson, Tennessee 38301
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest
in the above-referenced property: Jerry
L. Bingham; Robin Bingham; P&G Jack‑
son Employees Federal Credit Union;
Discover Bank, Issuer of Discover Card;
Earl Bingham or Successors, Trustee
of The Potter’s House, an Inter Vivos
Land Trust dated June 30, 2011; The
Potter’s House, an Inter Vivos Land
Trust dated June 30, 2011; E Trade
Bank, A Virginia Corporation
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
700‑207555
DATED August 19, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 23, 30, Sept. 6, 2013Fin11599
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated March 27, 2009, and the Deed of
Trust of even date securing the same,
recorded April 1, 2009, at Book T1854,
Page 1525 in Office of the Register of
Deeds for Madison County, Tennessee, executed by Steven M. Smith
and Aleeta C. Smith, conveying certain
property therein described to John
Clark, a resident of Weakley County as
Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., acting solely as a
nominee for First State Bank and First
State Bank successors and assigns;
and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed
Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on October 17, 2013 on
or about 11:00 A.M., at the Madison
County Courthouse, Jackson, Tennes‑
see, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder
FOR CASH, free from the statutory right
of redemption, homestead, dower, and
all other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property
being real estate situated in Madison
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Beginning at a stake in the East
margin of Chickering Road at the
Northwest corner of Lot Number 194
in Section II of Belle Meade Estates
Subdivision, a plat of which appears of
record in Plat Book 2, Page 228 in the
Register’s Office of Madison County,
Tennessee, runs thence North 75
degrees 45 minutes East with the
north line of said Lot Number 194 a
distance of 240 feet, more or less, to
a stake; thence North 25 degrees 15
minutes West a distance of 110 feet
to a stake in the Southeast corner
of Lot Number 196; thence South
75 degrees 45 minutes West with
the South line of said Lot Number
96 a distance of 220 feet to a stake
in the East margin of Chickering
Road; thence South 14 degrees 15
minutes East with the East margin of
Chickering Road a distance of 125
feet to the point of beginning. Being
Lot Number 195, Section II, of Belle
Meade Estates.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 106 Chickering
Road, Jackson, Tennessee 38305
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest in
the above-referenced property: Steven
M. Smith; Aleeta C. Smith; North Star
Capital Acq. LLC
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
817‑225056
DATED August 14, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 23, 30, Sept. 6, 2013Fin11601
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default having been made in
the payment of the debts and obligations
secured by a Deed of Trust executed on
July 16, 1998, by Gale Moore to Sheila
B. Stevenson, Trustee, for the benefit
of National City Mortgage Co. dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company
and appearing of record in Register’s
Office of Madison County, Tennessee,
in Book T1139, Page 234; and
WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of
said Deed of Trust was last transferred
and assigned to PNC Bank, National
Association and
WHEREAS, PNC Bank, National Association, as the holder of the Note for
which debt is owed, (“Note Holder”),
appointed the undersigned, Priority
Trustee Services of TN, LLC, as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed or to be
filed for record in the Register’s Office
of Madison County, Tennessee, with all
the rights, powers and privileges of the
original Trustee named in said Deed of
Trust; and
WHEREAS, pursuant to Tenn. Code
Ann. § 35-5-117, not less than sixty
(60) days prior to the first publication
required by § 35-5-101, the notice of the
right to foreclose was properly sent, if
so required; and
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the Note
Holder, and that the undersigned, Priority
Trustee Services of TN, LLC, Substitute
Trustee, or its duly appointed attorneys
or agents, by virtue of the power and
authority vested in it, will on Thursday,
September 19, 2013, commencing at
1:00 p.m. at the Main entrance (North
Door) of the Madison County Courthouse
location in Tennessee, proceed to sell
at public outcry to the highest and best
bidder for cash, the following described
property situated in Madison County,
Tennessee, to wit:
Beginning at a stake in the east margin
of Webber Avenue, 450 feet south of
the south margin of Bryant Street, the
southwest corner of Lot No. 51; runs
thence east with the south margin of Lot
No. 51, 257 feet to a stake; the south
east corner of Lot No. 51; thence south
50 feet to a stake; thence west with the
north margin of Lot No. 49, 257 feet to
a stake in the east margin of Webber
Avenue; thence north and parallel with
the east margin of Webber Avenue 50
feet to the point of beginning. Being
designated as Lot No. 50 of the Bryant
Subdivision, plat of which appears of
record in Plat Book 1, Page 109, in the
Register’s Office of Madison County,
Tennessee.
Being the same real estate conveyed
to the grantors herein by deed recorded
in Deed Book 0586, Page 907, in the
Register’s Office of Madison County,
Tennessee.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 38 Webber Street,
Jackson, TN 38301
CURRENT OWNER(S): Gale Moore
The sale of the above-described property
shall be subject to all matters shown on
any recorded plan; any unpaid taxes;
any restrictive covenants, easements or
set-back lines that may be applicable;
any prior liens or encumbrances as
well as any priority created by a fixture
filing; and any matter that an accurate
survey of the premises might disclose.
Substitute Trustee will only convey any
interest he/she may have in the property
at the time of sale. Property is sold “as
is, where is.”
For every lien or claim of lien of the
state identified above, please be advised notice required by § 67-1-1433
(b)(1) was timely given and that any
sale of the property herein referenced
will be subject to the right of the state
to redeem the land as provided for in §
67-1-1433(c)(1).
All right and equity of redemption,
statutory or otherwise, homestead, and
dower are expressly waived in said Deed
of Trust, and the title is believed to be
good, but the undersigned will sell and
convey only as Substitute Trustee.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of
the sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place for
the sale set forth above.
PRIORITY TRUSTEE SERVICES OF TN,
LLC
1587 Northeast Expressway
Atlanta, Georgia 30329
770-234-9181
File No.: 1516713
Web Site: www.JFLegal.com
Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, 2013Fin11602
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of
Trust Note dated January 22, 2004, and
the Deed of Trust of even date securing
the same, recorded January 30, 2004, at
Book T1553, Page 868 in Office of the
Register of Deeds for Madison County,
Tennessee, executed by Anthony K. Williams and Christi D. Williams, conveying
certain property therein described to R.
Bradley Sigler as Trustee for Mortgage
Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as
nominee for Franklin American Mortgage
www.thememphisnews.com
www.thememphisnews.com
August30
30-September
August
- September 5,
5, 2013
2013 33
33
public notices
Company, its successors and assigns;
and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed
Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice
is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and
payable; and that an agent of Wilson
& Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor
Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and
authority vested in and imposed upon
said Successor Trustee will, on October
31, 2013 on or about 11:00 A.M., at
the Madison County Courthouse, Jack‑
son, Tennessee, offer for sale certain
property hereinafter described to the
highest bidder FOR CASH, free from
the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions
which are expressly waived in the Deed
of Trust, said property being real estate
situated in Madison County, Tennessee,
and being more particularly described
as follows:
Being Lot Number 504, Section V
of Cotton Ridge Estates, a plat of
which appears of record in Plat Book
9, Page 202, in the Register’s Office
of Madison County, Tennessee, refer‑
ence to which plat is made for a more
particular description of said lot.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 43 Whitney Cove,
Jackson, Tennessee 38305
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest in
the above-referenced property: Anthony
K. Williams; Christi D. Williams
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
1286‑142930
DATED August 27, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 30, Sept. 6, 13, 2013Fin11604
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
AND SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
Default having been made in the terms
and conditions of payments, pursuant
to a certain Deed of Trust executed by
Jeff A. Davis and Charlene F. Davis,
h/w, to Michael S. Hoover, Trustee,
dated the 22nd day of October, 2001,
and being of record in Book T1330,
Page 210, Register’s Office for Madison
County, Tennessee, referred to herein
as the deed of trust, which conveyed
certain real property, appurtenances,
estate, title and interest therein in trust
to secure the indebtedness described
therein, which indebtedness is now due
and unpaid and has been declared in
default by the lawful owner thereof,
Beneficial Tennessee, Inc. Appointment
of Substitute Trustee having been duly
executed by the holder of the note
and beneficiary of said Deed of Trust
and appointing William Timothy Hill as
Substitute Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, William Timothy
Hill, Trustee, pursuant to the said Deed
of Trust, having been requested by the
owner and holder of said indebtedness
so to do, by virtue of the authority and
power vested in me by said deed of trust
and appointing of Substitute Trustee will
on the 20th day of September, 2013,
at 12:00 noon, on the front door of the
Madison County Courthouse, Jackson,
Madison County, Tennessee, sell at
public outcry to the highest bidder for
cash (or credit upon the indebtedness
secured, if the holder is the successful purchaser) the following described
property located in Madison County,
Tennessee, to wit:
Real Estate Lying and being in the Ninth
Civil District of Madison County, Tennessee, as referenced in Plat Book 7, Page
26, of the Register’s Office of Madison
County, to which reference is made
for a more complete description of the
land herein conveyed. Containing 3.01
acres, as surveyed by David Hall Land
Surveying Company, RLS #943, on May
28, 1977. Tax ID. #124/4.14
Being the same property conveyed to
Jeff A. Davis and Charlene F. Davis by
Deed at Book 574, Page 438, recorded
6/3/1997, Register’s Office for Madison County, Tennessee.
This is improved property known as 803
Deep Gap, Jackson, TN.
Other interested parties: Jackson Tennessee Hospital Co.
If there is any discrepancy with the
street address, the legal description
will control.
At the time of this publication, the §
35‐5‐117 notice of the right to foreclose
was timely forwarded. The sale of the
property described in said Deed of Trust
shall be subject to any and all instrument
of record, prior liens, encumbrances,
deeds of trust, easements, restrictions,
building lines, unpaid taxes, assessments, penalties and interest, if any. All
right and equity of redemption, homestead, dower and all other exceptions are
expressly waived in said Deed of Trust,
and the title is believed to be good, but
the Substitute Trustee will convey and
sell only as Substitute Trustee. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale
to another day or time certain without
further publication, upon announcement
at the time for the above.
This is an attempt to collect a debt and
any information obtained will be used
for that purpose.
This 28th day of August, 2013.
William Timothy Hill, Substitute
Trustee
Aug. 30, Sept. 6, 13, 2013Fin11605
Foreclosure Notices
Shelby County
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
Default having been made in the
payment of the debts and obligations
secured to be paid by a certain Deed
of Trust executed November 15, 2004
by Lillian Jane York, an unmarried person, to Southern Trust, as Trustee, as
same appears of record in the office
of the Register of Shelby County, Tennessee, in Instrument No. 04200969
and re-recorded at Instrument No.
05003758 and modified at Instrument
Numbers 08086234, 10043955, and
12057881, and the undersigned having been appointed Substitute Trustee
by instrument recorded in the said
Register’s Office, and the owner of the
debt secured, Midfirst Bank, having
requested the undersigned to advertise
and sell the property described in and
conveyed by said Deed of Trust, all of
said indebtedness having matured by
default in the payment of a part thereof,
at the option of the owner, this is to
give notice that the undersigned will, on
Thursday, October 3, 2013 commencing
at 10:00 AM, at the Auction.com Room
at the Comfort Inn Downtown, 100 North
Front Street, Memphis, TN 38103,
Shelby County, Tennessee proceed
to sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash, the following
described property, to-wit:
Situated in County of Shelby, State
of Tennessee.
Lot 25, First Addition to Riverwood
Farms Subdivision, as shown on plat
of record in Plat Book 123, Page 6, in
the Register’s Office, Shelby County,
Tennessee, to which plat reference
is hereby made for a more particular
description of said property.
Tax Parcel ID: 096501-A00025
Property Address: 1458 Wood Trail,
Cordova, TN
All right and equity of redemption,
homestead and dower waived in said
Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to
be good, but the undersigned will sell and
convey only as Substitute Trustee.
ARNOLD M. WEISS, Substitute
Trustee
Weiss Spicer Cash PLLC
File # 1882-0108673-FC
Aug. 31, Sept. 7, 14, 2013Fin11606
Foreclosure Notices
Tipton County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated February 27, 2004, and the Deed
of Trust of even date securing the same,
recorded March 3, 2004, at Book 1124,
Page 819 in Office of the Register of
Deeds for Tipton County, Tennessee,
executed by Margaret J. Raines, conveying certain property therein described to
Jeanine B. Saylor as Trustee for 1st Trust
Bank for Savings; and the undersigned,
Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having
been appointed Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on October 2, 2013 on or
about 10:00 A.M., at the Tipton County
Courthouse, Covington, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter
described to the highest bidder FOR
CASH, free from the statutory right of
redemption, homestead, dower, and all
other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Tipton
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Lot 36, McLister Place Subdivision,
as recorded at Plat Cabinet G, Slide
72, in the Register’s Office of Tipton
County, Tennessee to which plat
reference is hereby made for a more
particular description of said lot.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 152 Royal Oaks
Drive, Brighton, Tennessee 38011
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens or
encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter
that an accurate survey of the premises
might disclose. In addition, the following
parties may claim an interest in the
above-referenced property: Margaret J.
Raines; Erin Capital Management, LLC
Assignee of Providian National Bank
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
1286‑100457
DATED August 8, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 16, 23, 30, 2013
Fin11595
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated September 30, 2008, and the
Deed of Trust of even date securing
the same, recorded October 6, 2008,
at Book 1413, Page 702 in Office of
the Register of Deeds for Tipton County,
Tennessee, executed by John Spicer,
conveying certain property therein described to Charles E. Tonkin, II as Trustee
for Mortgage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., as nominee for Mortgage
Investors Group, its successors and
assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson
& Associates, P.L.L.C., having been
appointed Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on October 2, 2013 on or
about 10:00 A.M., at the Tipton County
Courthouse, Covington, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter
described to the highest bidder FOR
CASH, free from the statutory right of
redemption, homestead, dower, and all
other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Tipton
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Lot 8, Campground Acres, Section A
as recorded at Plat Cabinet E, Slide
51 of the Tipton County Register’s
Office to which reference is hereby
made for a more particular descrip‑
tion of said Lot.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 4776 Campground
Road, Munford, Tennessee 38058‑
3463
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest
in the above-referenced property: John
Spicer
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
1286‑237758
DATED August 8, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 16, 23, 30, 2013
Fin11598
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms,
and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note
dated April 18, 2008, and the Deed of
Trust of even date securing the same,
recorded April 30, 2008, at Book 1393,
Page 714 in Office of the Register of
Deeds for Tipton County, Tennessee,
executed by Victoria Gardner and Antwan Moore, conveying certain property
therein described to Nashville Title as
Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for
First Choice Funding, Inc., a Delaware
Corporation, its successors and assigns;
and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed
Successor Trustee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby
given that the entire indebtedness has
been declared due and payable; and
that an agent of Wilson & Associates,
P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue
of the power, duty, and authority vested
Related Info
Also read our daily edition, The Daily
News, in print or online every business
day for public notices for Memphis &
Shelby County.
Go to www.memphisdailynews.com or
call 683.NEWS for more information.
in and imposed upon said Successor
Trustee will, on October 23, 2013 on or
about 10:00 A.M., at the Tipton County
Courthouse, Covington, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter
described to the highest bidder FOR
CASH, free from the statutory right of
redemption, homestead, dower, and all
other exemptions which are expressly
waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Tipton
County, Tennessee, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Being at Lot Number 2, Block B,
Tatlock Subdivision, as recorded in
Plat Book 1, Pages 51 and 52, of the
Register’s Office for Tipton County,
Tennessee, and thus described:
Beginning at a point in the Northwest
line of Pinecrest Street, said point
being a common corner of Lots 3
and 2; thence Northeasterly along
said Northwest line a distance of
150.00 feet to a point in the North‑
west boundary line of the subdivision;
thence Southwestwardly along said
Northwest line a distance of 100.00
feet to a corner of Lot 3; thence South‑
eastwardly along the line dividing Lots
2 and 3 a distance of 150.00 feet
to the point of beginning, according
to survey of Larry L. Campbell dated
April 18, 1989.
ALSO KNOWN AS: 1505 Pine‑
crest Street, Covington, Tennessee
38019
This sale is subject to all matters
shown on any applicable recorded plat;
any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines
that may be applicable; any statutory
rights of redemption of any governmental
agency, state or federal; any prior liens
or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any
matter that an accurate survey of the
premises might disclose. In addition, the
following parties may claim an interest in
the above-referenced property: Victoria
Gardner; Antwan Moore
The sale held pursuant to this Notice
may be rescinded at the Successor
Trustee’s option at any time. The right
is reserved to adjourn the day of the
sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon
announcement at the time and place
for the sale set forth above. W&A No.
700‑149920
DATED August 23, 2013
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.,
Successor Trustee
FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.
MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.
COM
Aug. 30, Sept. 6, 13, 2013Fin11603
Thoughtful
Interesting
Concise
blog.memphisdailynews.com
www.thememphisnews.com
34 August 30-September 5, 2013
opinion
Children Must Remain
Chief Focus of Schools
W
ith the Labor
Day weekend,
the first school
year of the
unified Shelby
County Schools
system marked several milestones.
The one we think counts the most
is that we are a month into the school
year, and this is the point at which
school system leaders hope to have
just about every child who is going to
attend public schools in Tennessee
enrolled.
There are all sorts of reasons why
some children don’t make it to school
on the first day or the first week of the
school year. Some are unavoidable.
None of them change the importance
of what is happening in schools across
the country these days, including ours.
Education today is about student growth and intervention when
students fall behind. Time is of the
essence, which one could argue has
always been the case in the development of children. But now, more than
ever, that time is measured in hours
and days, not weeks and months.
A lengthy delay in students getting
to their first day of the school year
may be something that happens every
school year. But it is not something
that should be taken lightly or accepted without continuing efforts to get as
many children as possible in school on
the first day of everybody’s school year.
Much to his credit, former Memphis City Schools superintendent
Kriner Cash was appalled by the ac-
ceptance of the late school year start
for some students, and he began his
tenure in Memphis by battling the
inertia around what is a legitimate
problem for education.
Students who for whatever reason
can’t start on time must be helped, and
probably helped more given that some
of them will not only start late but will
change schools several times once the
school year does begin for them.
But that shouldn’t stop a community wide effort with a simple goal that
can be repeated over and over again
– the first day of school comes after
school registration and school registration is just as important as the first day
to have students ready to learn.
With better coordination of the
multiple community efforts that include free backpacks and school supplies and other back-to-school steps
keyed around the registration date
and not the first day of school – we can
have an opening day of classes that
may not be perfect but will certainly
be a better school year start.
While we are on the subject of coordination, we can’t help but conclude
that the school security problems that
are totally needless would have been
avoided had City Hall fish or cut bait
on whether Memphis police would be
involved after the merger took effect.
Instead school officials heard too
many instances of “maybe” and “we’ll
get back to you” when a decision was
needed to plan for one of the most
critical elements of school life outside
the classroom.
LEAP of Faith
MEMPHASIS
dan conaway
A STEP IN SYNC.
I have in my possession a rare document, evidence of a shared spark of
hope, a light at the end of all the tunnel
vision, a warm fire in that cold cave in
Nashville.
I have a letter signed by two gentlemen of color – one black and blue, one
white and red – pledging cooperation
in a state program that could genuinely
and uniquely benefit Memphis rather
than target and isolate it. Think of it as
Auburn and Alabama, Ole Miss and Mississippi State, Pelosi and Boehner, wet
ribs and dry ribs, humans and Klingons
– all together to save the universe.
I have a letter jointly from and
signed by state senator Reginald Tate,
Chair of the Shelby County
Legislative Delegation, and state
senator Mark Norris, Senate Majority
Leader.
Told you it was rare.
But before I put it on eBay, I’m going
to hold onto it long enough to see if it
works out. If it does, a lot more of us
are going to work and it’s going to be
worth a lot more than just the words and
promises we’re used to around here.
The letter is an invitation to city
council chair Edmund Ford and the
council to join “A Conversation About
Work” to be held next week at the
University of Memphis. The letter names
Offense Best Defense
In Music Lawsuit?
filed by Thicke and co-songwriters Pharrell
The crossword clue was “Gray areas,
Williams and T.I. The defendants are Marvin
maybe.” The answer was BORDER LINES.
Gaye’s family, Funkadelic and Bridgeport
With 11 letters, it fit nicely across the
Music.
puzzle’s center.
The Thicke group claim that the
When I saw the word “lines”
Gaye group has alleged that “Got to
was involved, I pulled for
Give It Up” and “Blurred Lines” have
“blurred” to be the first word.
striking similarities, that they “feel”
Too many letters, though. In
or “sound” the same. And that the
“Blurred Lines,” we have a pop
“Gaye defendants are claiming
culture-intellectual property
ownership of an entire genre, as
dispute. News of which did not
opposed to a specific work.”
break until suit was filed.
VIC FLEMING
Funkadelic is said to have
The plaintiffs claim to
I SWEAR
claimed there’s an inapproprihave “the utmost respect for
ate similarity between Blurred Lines and
and admiration of Marvin Gaye, Funkadelic
its song, “Sexy Ways.” Bridgeport owns the
and their musical legacies,” but must “relucrights to both “Sexy Ways” and “Got to Give
tantly file this action in the face of multiple
It Up.”
adverse claims from alleged successors
So, you get the scenario: A demand
in interest to those artists.” Read that: “No
letter goes out from one group to the other:
respect and admiration at all for the actual
“You copied off my paper. You made an A.
defendants.”
Now, I demand some of what that A is getBefore reading the rest of this column,
ting you.”
take a trip over to YouTube and listen, first,
“I did not copy off your work. I made this
to the Marvin Gaye song “Got to Give It Up.”
A all on my own. Leave me alone.”
Which was No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot
Before the claimants could sue, the
100 for a week in June 1977. How it got there
A-makers preempted the effort. They claim
I’ll never understand.
(might we presume adamantly?) that
Now, listen to Robin Thicke’s song
“there are no similarities between plaintiffs’
“Blurred Lines.” The latter is in its 10th or
composition and those the claimants allege
11th week as Billboard’s No. 1 song. See last
they own, other than commonplace musical
sentence of prior paragraph.
elements. … Plaintiffs created a hit and did it
Now make a list of the similarities
without copying anyone else’s composition.”
and differences. I jest, of course, with that
Meanwhile, all involved hope “Blurred
directive (what do you think this is, a test?).
Lines” just keeps on keeping on. And the
However, having listened to the two tunes
rest of us can sit back and enjoy the music.
back-to-back, you might better understand
why there is litigation pending.
Fleming is a district court judge in Little
My source is the Huffington Post, which
Rock. Contact him at [email protected]
cites The Hollywood Reporter. Suit was
various commissioners and representatives from state acronyms, education
officials, funding foundations, not-forprofits and important people who will
attend and they hope will attend.
The two most important words in the
preceding paragraph are conversation
and hope. In the case of conversation,
we’ve forgotten that progress is impossible unless we can talk to each other.
As for hope, those with the least
need of it are systematically removing it
from those who need it the most.
What they’re going to talk about next
week is LEAP (Labor Education Alignment Program), the new law championed by Norris and enacted last year
that allows students at Tennessee’s
technology centers and colleges the
opportunity to combine occupational
training in a high-skill or high-technology
industry with academic credit and to apply that experience toward a degree.
A conversation between the people
who need jobs done, the people who
need to teach and train others for those
jobs, and the people who need the jobs.
A conversation about the pragmatic
return of self-worth and community to
replace soul-sucking unemployment
and under employment. A conversation about a solution to the problem
that experts predict is coming in five
years – over half of all jobs in Tennessee
will require postsecondary credentials
beyond a high school degree.
In short, a joint conversation about
hope.
Over the past few years, I’ve come after Mark Norris hard in this column, and
while I’m not apologizing for that nor he
to me for doing things that fry my bacon,
I’d like to say this to my old friend.
Pull this off and the next one’s on me,
and you can name the place.
I’m a Memphian, and we’re about to
share a conversation.
Dan Conaway is a lifelong Memphian, longtime adman and aspiring
local character in a city known for them.
Email: at [email protected]
www.thememphisnews.com
August 30-September 5, 2013 35
SEMINAR
SERIES
SEMINAR
SERIES
2013
CARE
2013 HEALTH
HEALTH
CARE
STATE
OF THE INDUSTRY
STATE OF THE INDUSTRY
Thursday, September 19th
@ 3:30 PM, Brooks Museum Of Art Auditorium
1934 Poplar Ave • Memphis, TN 38104
Join us foR a CoMpRehensive oveRvieW of the state of the
health CaRe industRy. ouR panel of industRy expeRts Will take
an in-depth look at the tRends, Challenges, oppoRtunities &
outlook foR the futuRe.
KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Reginald W.
CoopWood,
M.d. President/CEO
Regional Medical Center
Dr. Reginald W. Coopwood is currently the President and CEO
of Regional Medical Center, the position he has held since
March 1, 2010. Prior to moving to Memphis, Dr. Coopwood was
the CEO of the Metropolitan Nashville Hospital Authority. A
board certified surgeon, Dr. Coopwood served as Associate
Clinical Professor of Surgery at Vanderbilt University School
of Medicine and Associate Professor of Surgery at Meharry
Medical College. He currently is on the faculty of the University
of Tennessee in the Department of Surgery.
The concerted spirit that Dr. Coopwood inspires in those at
Regional Medical Center and across our city is remarkable. His
giving, compassionate approach has had a positive impact on
both the health system and the community it serves. His work at
Regional Medical Center is complemented by his commitment
to the health and well-being of the individuals in our community.
sponsored by:
SEATING IS LIMITED – REGISTER ONLINE NOW
http://seminars.memphisdailynews.com
www.thememphisnews.com
36 August 30-September 5, 2013
Nice place you’ve got here.
We’d like to help you
keep it that way.
We’re Georgia-Pacific and proud to be growing in Memphis.
It’s exciting to be part of the community and we look forward
to building a bright future with you in the coming years.
GP.com
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