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THE
2005/09/29
ISSUE
05
VOLUME 60
THE UNIVERSITY OF WINNIPEG STUDENT WEEKLY
»
INSIDE
News
Comments
Diversions
Features
Arts & Culture
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Sports
THE UNIVERSITY OF WINNIPEG STUDENT WEEKLY
SEPTEMBER 29, 2005
VOL. 60
ISSUE 05
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ON THE WEB
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uniter.ca
02
07
08
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21
02 CAPTAIN PAUL WATSON
11 SEEDS OF CHANGE
GREENPEACE CO-FOUNDER DENOUNCES SEAL HUNT
STRUGGLE CONTINUES U OF M RESEARCHERS BATTLE UNIVERSITY
16 SECOND ANNUAL CANADA-PALESTINE FILM FEST
THE LONG AND SHORT IN FILM PREVIEW
21 ULTRA MEGA RADIO
INSIDE THE WEEKLY SPORTS SHOW ON CKUW 95.9 FM
♼
September 29, 2005
02
The Uniter
VOL.60 ISS.05
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06 BEAT
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BEAT REPORTER
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» Alan MacKenzie
FEATURES EDITOR
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HUMOUR EDITOR
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PHOTO EDITOR
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LISTINGS COORDINATOR
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COPY & STYLE EDITOR
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DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
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2005
NEWS EDITOR: DEREK LESCHASIN
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September
29
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THIS WEEKS CONTRIBUTORS
Brett Hopper, Jon Symons, Stephen Harfield,
Richard Leibrecht, David Christiansen, Jill
Johnson, Josh Boulding, Brad Pennington,
Robyn Heibert, Beverley Maiers, Kalen Qually,
Kristy Rydz, Robbie Lietiphin, Cody Creed, Ben
White, Mike Duggan, William O’Donnell, Iain
Ramsay, Tiffany Bartel, Stephen Harfield
The Uniter is the official student newspaper of the University
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LOCATION
Room ORM14
University of Winnipeg
515 Por tage Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 2E9
COVER IMAGE
PHOTO BY: DAVID TAN
Greenpeace Co-Founder Denounces Seal-Hunt, Urges Boycott
Beverley Maiers
C
aptain Paul Watson, founder and
president of the Sea Shepherd
Conservation Society and co-founder of
Green Peace, visited Riddell Hall on Sept. 17
with a fervent message about the effects of a
mismanaged bureaucracy.
Watson has embarked on a cross-Canada
speaking tour this month. His goal is to raise
awareness and promote action against commercial
seal-hunting operations on the Canadian east
coast, which amount to the death of nearly one
million seals each year, including many babies.
Although the hunts are mostly carried out by
off-season fishers, Watson thrusts his outrage
towards the Canadian government’s Department
of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO).
While the Department of Fisheries and
Oceans does not directly finance the seal-hunts,
they’ve demonstrated underhanded support
for the practice. Part of this consists of DFOdispatched ships, sent to crash icebergs for sealing
vessel convoys, Watson claims.
Since allowing the slaughters to recommence
in 1996, the DFO has continually raised its annual
killing quota, currently set at 975, 000. The
government is seemingly lenient on the quota’s
enforcement, however, as they allow hunters to
keep track of the figures themselves.
“I’ve worked all over the world,” Watson
told his audience, listing countries such as Costa
Rica, Mozambique, and Senegal as examples,
“and let me tell you… I have never come across
a bureaucracy more incompetent or more
mismanaged than the Department of Fisheries
and Oceans in this country.”
He went on to explain that the ineffectiveness
of the DFO has led to the “collapse of commercial
fisheries,” on Canada’s east and west coastlines, and
that the “[DFO is] responsible for the irreparable
damage that’s been done to the ecosystems of the
northwest Atlantic Ocean.”
Cod stocks have been diminished by 96
percent in the Canadian Atlantic. According to
Watson, the DFO wrongly believes that reducing
the harp seal population will aid the species’
replenishment.
“Harp seals are not a threat to the recovery
of cod,” Watson stated, denying that harp seals
consume enough cod to affect its stock. “We all
know [that the cod were wiped out because] of the
greed of the fishing industry.”
He also mentioned that the foremost marine
animal consumer in the world happens to be the
domestic housecat.
In his effort to oppose the seal slaughter,
Watson is advocating a boycott against all
Canadian seafood, using Red Lobster as a poster
target. He believes that economic constriction is
the only force that will influence the Government
of Canada to ban seal hunting.
Watson emphasized individual action as a
crucial means for change. In addition to a boycott
of Canadian seafood, he urges individuals to write
letters to the Canadian government, or to sign an
international petition against the seal hunt.
Information about the campaign and
about the Sea Shepherd Conservation
Society can be found on the organization’s
website, at www.seashepherd.org.
Photo by: Wade Andrew
Captain Paul Watson speaks at the University of Winnipeg
“I have never come across a bureaucracy more
incompetent or more mismanaged than the
Department of Fisheries and Oceans in this country”
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The Uniter
NEWS EDITOR: VIVIAN BELIK
E-MAIL: [email protected]
SENIOR EDITOR: LEIGHTON K LASSEN
E-MAIL: [email protected]
September 29, 2005
NEWS 03
NEWS EDITOR: DEREK LESCHASIN
E-MAIL: [email protected]
Photo by: Vivian Belik
Winnipeg Celebrates Car Free Day
Alan MacKenzie
BEAT REPORTER
W
innipeg hosted World Car Free Day
event on Sept. 22 in the Exchange
District, where the city was presented
the Commuter Challenge award for the third
year in a row from a local environmental
group.
Pagtakhan told the small crowd gathered in
front of Mondragon.
The Commuter Challenge is an annual
national competition, which encourages
active living and reduction of greenhouse gas
emissions, the leading cause of climate change
and air pollution, according to Resource
Conservation Manitoba. During the week of
June 5 -11, participating schools and businesses
travel by transit, cycling, carpool, or any other
environmentally friendly mode of transportation.
This year, 48 municipalities took part, and with
over 9 thousand participants, Winnipeg had
the largest per capita rate of participation in
its category: cities with a population less than
1 million.
One block of Albert Street, from Bannatyne
“With the rising cost of gasoline,
to McDermot, was closed to traffic for five
hours to observe the event, which was intended more people are looking to other forms
to focus awareness on the social, economic of transportation, be that rollerblading,
and environmental benefits of reduced car use. cycling, or public transit,” Pagtakhan said.
LaRochelle said that, with recent
Over 200 people showed up throughout the day
to enjoy live music, free cake and bike washes, increases in fuel prices, the time is right for
interest in leaving the car at home. Public
and an old fashioned game of street hockey.
Serge LaRochelle, coordinator with outrage over gas prices, he said, resulted in
the non-profit group Resource Conservation more media interest in the event than was
Manitoba, said planning for the event began initially expected. He said the Winnipeg
Free Press ran two
in early September, so
articles leading up to
there was little prep or
the event, and radio
promotion time. However,
stations CJOB and
in addition to a decent
BOB FM ran reports
turnout at the barelythroughout the day.
advertised street party, over
Several television
500 people signed on to an
stations, he noted,
on-line contest promoting
covered the event as
alternative transport that
well.
was tied in with the event.
“Obviously
He said organizers heard
we didn’t have the
about other Canadian
kind of numbers
cities hosting Car Free Day
–
Councillor
Mike
Pagtakhan
as the Commuter
events and got involved as
Challenge, but this is
well.
a scaled down event in
Winnipeg’s Car Free
comparison,” he said.
Day, LaRochelle said, was
“We’re impressed
spearheaded by two Albert
Street businesses--Natural Cycle, a courier and with the turnout considering it was the
bike repair service, as well as Mondragon first year and we had so little time to
Bookstore and Coffeehouse--and city councillor promote it.”
Toronto was the first North American
for the Point Douglas ward, Mike Pagtakhan,
who rode to the street party on his bicycle to city to officially observe Car Free Day
in 2001, according to the carfreeday.ca
accept the commuter challenge award.
“On behalf of his worship Mayor Sam website. Other Canadian cities taking part
Katz and the City of Winnipeg, I am honoured this year included Ottawa, Montreal, and
to accept the Commuter Challenge Award,” Vancouver.
“With the rising cost
of gasoline, more
people are looking
to other forms of
transportation, be that
rollerblading, cycling,
or public transit”
Photo by: Justin Pokrant
Downtown Community
Welcomes Student
Involvement
Robyn Hiebert
S
tudents interested in getting involved in
downtown Winnipeg have no shortage
of opportunities. This was especially
evident on Wednesday, Sept. 21, as the
University of Winnipeg hosted “Whatʼs Here
for You in the Community” Day. Located in
the Atrium on the University of Winnipeg
campus, the event took place from 10-2
p.m. and featured displays from different
community organizations on and around
campus.
Throughout the day, students strolling
to and from classes stopped to chat with
representatives at tables displaying colourful
fl yers, pamphlets, and photos. One such
organization was Klinic. Self-described as a
community health centre, Klinic offers health
services, counseling, and community health
and education services for students and the
wider downtown community.
Kate Smith, the co-coordinator of Klinic
on campus, was on hand to answer questions
and spread the word about Klinic’s mission
and services. When asked who typically takes
advantage of Klinic’s services, Kate replied
that “we’re kind of here for everybody.” She
also said that a main goal of Klinic this year
is to foster connections with existing student
organizations and “to work collaboratively with
other groups.” With a main office located at
380 Portage, Klinic is currently in the process
of moving into its new on-campus location at
WRITE TO US AT [email protected] OR COME DOWN
ORM14 BULMAN CENTRE AT THE UNIVERSITY
OF WINNIPEG. GENERAL CONTRIBUTOR MEETINGS WILL BE HELD THE
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12:30-1:30PM IN THE UNITER OFFICE. EVERYONE IS WELCOME. IF
YOUʼRE AN ASPIRING WRITER, WRITE FOR THE UNITER.
2Mc14N McNamara Hall, Spence Street. An
open house is tentatively being planned for
sometime in Oct.
Also present was the West Central Women’s
Resource Centre, advertising The West Central
Community Cupboard, a small store where
people on a tight budget can come to stock
up on basic necessities. Understanding that
students are often limited fi nancially, Resource
Centre administrator Linda Orr explained that
students are welcome to take advantage of these
services, as well as give back by volunteering. In
fact, she admitted that volunteers are the lifeblood of the organization, and said, “everything
is done by volunteers.” As an added incentive
to get involved, the centre provides references
and certificates for volunteers.
Other organizations present included: the
musically-oriented West End Cultural Centre
(WECC); Job Resource Centre, House of
Opportunities; “temporary staffi ng service,”
Core Labour Opportunities; and The Spence
Neighborhood Association Inc., which runs
a weekly after-school program known as
“Building Belonging,” for children ages 8-12.
In conjunction with “What’s Here in the
Community Day,” on Sept. 19 students were able
to check out various student-run associations on
campus during “What’s Here for You” Day.
Luring students into the bowels of the Bulman
Centre with promises of peanuts, pizza, and
other sweet and salty temptations, leaders of
the various organizations answered questions
and invited students to sign up for upcoming
events and e-mail updates. A sampling of the
organizations present included: The Japanese
Animation Association of Winnipeg ( JAAW),
The English Students Association, Peer
Support, Christian Varsity Fellowship, and the
Muslim Students Association.
Students interested in learning more
about Klinic can check out www.klinic.mb.ca.
Those interested in fi nding out more about the
Community Cupboard or The West Central
Women’s Resource Centre are invited to drop by
the centre at 583 Ellice Ave., phone 783-3173 or
774-8975, or e-mail [email protected]
hotmail.com
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September 29, 2005
The Uniter
NEWS EDITOR: VIVIAN BELIK
E-MAIL: [email protected]
SENIOR EDITOR: LEIGHTON K LASSEN
E-MAIL: [email protected]
NEWS EDITOR: DEREK LESCHASIN
E-MAIL: [email protected]
Hearing Loss, the Silent Epidemic
Un
ite
D
r“
St
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te
r”
04 NEWS
NA
TH
AN
COMPILED BY DEREK LESCHASIN
JO
Th
e
AV
IS
World News Report
Streeter: What do you think about the Manitoba Liquor
Commission’s current Be UnDrunk Campaign and it’s
message about binge drinking?
Anthony Tordiffe - UWSA Programming
“I think it’s a phenomenal campaign. People that are going
out to get loaded make it harder for people who just want to
go out and have a good time.”
Illustration by: Tiffany Bartel
Jen LeGras – Student
“It’s a good campaign. I try to drink less but it’s hard not to
[drink], it’s hard to say no.”
“There is no cure for damaged ears and exposure
over time causes more and more damage”
Whitney Light
BEAT REPORTER
Rob Sokalski – Student
“It’s a good idea. It makes you think about it. Makes you not
want to drink as much. As for the TV commercials, they’re
a bit unrealistic but it promotes not being retarded when you
drink.”
Chris Goss – U of W Staff Member
“I think drinking in young kids is way too common. There’s
too much underage drinking. I’ll be more conscious the next
time I go out.”
April Derowin – Student
“If you’re going to go out, you don’t need to drink to have
fun. If you’re going to drink, drink responsibly. The radio
commercials get you thinking about what can happen, like
ending up in the hospital or in a fight.”
Terrina Barsalou – Student
“I think the commercials send a powerful message. They
show you as the one making a fool of yourself; which you
would want to avoid.”
W
hen was the last time you wore
earplugs to a rock show? If you
canʼt remember or have never worn
earplugs, consider the following.
The human ear detects sounds in the
range of 0 to 180 decibels (dB). The average
rock show pummels your eardrum at 115 dB
or more, as do sandblasters. According to the
American Hearing Research Foundation, the
safe exposure limit at this intensity is only 15
minutes per day. That’s a pretty short concert.
Over the past several years, concern
has been growing in the medical community
as it becomes evident that more people are
experiencing hearing loss at a younger age. A
number of recent articles in the media suggest
that youth are not recognizing the daily threats
to their ears. They regularly attend literally
deafening shows and even quiet moments are
plugged-in with personal CD and MP3 players.
In the April 2005 edition of the medical
journal Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School
researchers released a study on the awareness
amongst youth of noise-induced hearing loss
(NIHL). They found that of nearly 10,000
participants who answered a survey through
MTV’s website, only 8 percent described
hearing loss as “a very big problem”. The
dominant issue was alcohol/drug abuse at 50
percent. Acne was rated at 18 percent.
The results are troublesome, given
the seriousness of hearing damage and its
prevalence. The Harvard study noted that
a study done as early as 1985 found that 40
percent of study participants aged 16 to 25 had
measurable hearing loss.
What many youth may not know is that
NIHL is irreversible, cumulative, and may
affect more than just your ears. That is, there
is no cure for damaged ears and exposure over
time causes more and more damage. A person
won’t notice NIHL as it begins. It’s when
understanding speech becomes difficult that
one may realize there’s a significant problem.
Also, because NIHL may affect one’s
ability to understand speech, it is also associated
with feelings of isolation and socialization
problems.
Karen Efron, an audiologist at St. Boniface
General Hospital says hearing loss “can in turn
affect social and emotional well-being”. The
same is true of related conditions like tinnitus
(constant ringing in the ears) and hyperacusis
(extreme sensitivity to even moderately loud
sounds).
The best prevention is education, which
young people apparently aren’t getting.
Efron says she expects to see more young
people coming in for hearing tests because of
low awareness of the potential for NIHL. In the
MTV survey, only 9 percent reported having
any education about hearing in school.
Prevention comes in the form of earplugs
and following the recommendations for
reasonable noise exposure, information that
is widely available on the internet. Despite
earplugs being available for purchase at most
drugstores, the MTV survey suggests that many
concertgoers aren’t using them. Only 14 percent
of respondents reported ever using earplugs.
There is one group of young people,
however, who has taken up the habit of wearing
earplugs - the musicians.
Bob Turner is a Winnipeg audiologist
who offers clients custom hearing protection.
Says Turner, “The provision of custom
hearing protection is most notable in the music
industry.”
He’s seen a surge of interest over the past
several years in musicians’ earplugs, a special
type of earplug that attenuates the dB level
reaching the inner ear equally over a range
of frequencies thus eliminating the distortion
caused by typical disposable earplugs.
Turner says most of musicians’ earplugs he
fits are for individuals aged 18 to 27. They’ve
recognized the concern and are investing
in custom protection. The special earplugs
do cost, but buyers feel the price is small
compared to the life-long value of protecting
their hearing.
Rob Samuels is a local freelance drummer
who recently invested in musicians’ earplugs.
They cost him $184 but, says Samuels, “it’s
defi nitely worth it,” considering how much time
he spends at noisy venues. Asked about what
prompted him to consider hearing protection,
Samuels jokes, “I’ve been using the word
‘What?’ way too many times lately.”
The sound at bars and concert venues isn’t
about to be turned down any time soon. The
kids like it loud. Perhaps if more of them knew
their rock heroes were taking action against
NIHL, they would too.
Ger m an y - Green Party
leader Joshka Fischer, one of
Germany’s most popular politicians,
announced last week that he is
resigning leadership of the party,
Deustche Welle reported.
His
announcement came at the first
meeting of the Green Parliamentary
Group after the federal election of
Sept. 18.
Fischer said that after 20 years
he wishes to “trade freedom for
power”, though he will continue to
sit as a regular representative.
Meanwhile, at press time,
confusion continued to reign over
which party would hold power in
Germany. A number of coalitions
are possible, but none seem likely.
The Christian Democrats gained
only a percentage over the former
ruling Social Democrats, leaving
the balance of power in the hands
of the smaller parties, including
the Greens.
Isr ael – Famed Nazi-hunter
Simon Wiesenthal was laid to
rest in Herzliya last Friday, Ynet
News reported. While his funeral
was attended by dignitaries from
governments across the globe,
the absence of a single minister
from the Israeli government was
glaringly noticeable. Only one
deputy minister was in attendance.
Wiesenthal, a survivor of the
Holocaust and concentration camps,
passed away last Tuesday at the age
of 96. After the Second World
War, Wiesenthal devoted his life
to seeing that those responsible for
the Holocaust faced justice. With
the help of a network he developed,
Wiesenthal was able to track down
over a thousand Nazi war criminals
who eventually faced trial.
India – The Indian government
has announced that it will make
secondary schooling (grades 6-12)
free for girls from single-child
families, BBC reports. The move
comes in a bid to strengthen India’s
dwindling female population, and
encourage population control.
Families with no more than two
girls will pay only fifty percent of
normal fees.
A scholarship of $45 per
month will also be offered for postsecondary studies, but it is limited
to non-professional courses.
There is a strong preference
for male children in India, with
many selective abortions occurring
as well as discrimination against
female children. Then too, many
families have more children in
hopes of producing a male child.
The Uniter
NEWS EDITOR: VIVIAN BELIK
E-MAIL: [email protected]
SENIOR EDITOR: LEIGHTON K LASSEN
E-MAIL: [email protected]
NEWS 05
NEWS EDITOR: DEREK LESCHASIN
E-MAIL: [email protected]
Every Albertan gets a
piece of the surplus pie
Province promises every Albertan $400
September 29, 2005
MEET MBA PROGRAM
REPRESENTATIVES
FROM:
Alberta, Asper,
Athabasca, Brock, Calgary,
Carleton, DeGroote, Ivey,
McGill, UNB Saint John,
Ottawa, Queen’s,
By Nathan Sharpe
CUP ALBERTA AND NORTHERN BUREAU CHIEF
L
ETHBRIDGE, Alta. (CUP) -- Everyone
living in Alberta will receive a $400
cheque through a one-time provincial
handout that is predicted to arrive on Jan. 1,
2006, although the date is not official.
Clint Dunford, the MLA for
Lethbridge-West and Minister of
Economic Development made it clear
this was reward money for being part of
Alberta’s prosperity.
He said that in years now long
past, there were cuts made by the
Conservatives with promises of sharing
wealth generated in healthier fi nancial
times. Dunford was blunt when he
described Alberta’s current fi nancial
situation.
“There is quite a lot of money,” he
said.
When asked about the fi gure,
Dunford said “it became basically a
math equation.” He broke down the
surplus and said that a third will be
divided into capitol endowment funds
for the future, another third will go
back into infrastructure to improve the
transportation infrastructure, and the
last third goes straight into Albertans’
pockets.
The offi cial opposition is not
as excited though. LIberal Leader
Kevin Taft was heavily critical of
the handout.
“It’s as if the government has won
the lottery, and instead of choosing to
invest the money into the future of
Alberta, they’re blowing it all in one
place.”
Although $400 sounds nice,
Taft put forth other ways that the
money could be spent such as the
elimination of health care premiums,
or the possibility of free tuition for
post-secondary students for years to
come.
Taft drew comparisons with the
state of Alaska also shares its wealth
with its citizens. The American state
has a $32 billion fund that collects
interest; which is in turn paid out to
Alaskans, approximately $845 each.
The Conservatives hinted the
$400 may not be the last payment.
The Government is not making
any promises, but if the province
continues on its current trend, more
money may be in the future.
For now though, the province is
handing out the cheques to anyone
who lives in Alberta that is not in
prison.
Rotman, Royal Roads,
Saskatchewan, Schulich,
Simon Fraser, Victoria,
Wilfrid Laurier...
Discover
the
MBA
program
that’s right
for you!
INFORMATION
SESSION
October 6, 2005
4:30 – 7:30 pm
Delta Winnipeg
350 St. Mary Avenue
Winnipeg
w w w. c a n a d i a n m b a f a i r s . c o m
New Club Sparks Debate
Over Gun Rights
By Andrei Liveanu
THE MCGILL DAILY (MCGILL UNIVERSITY)
M
ONTREAL (CUP) -- Firearms
enthusiasts may soon have a club of
their own at McGill.
The McCord Rifle Association is a
non-political club for students who enjoy
using fi rearms recreationally, and who
want to challenge the negative perceptions
toward guns in society. The Society of
Students of McGill University Council
will decide at its meeting today whether to
grant the group interim club status.
MRA co-founder Alex Kitz estimated
that the club received 150 signatures at
Activities Night. He emphasized that the
group attracted diverse membership.
“There was no single typical person,
no redneck with a trucker hat,” he said.
Students who showed interest in
the club included those who partake in
shooting sports, former cadets and scouts,
as well as people who said that they don’t
support gun ownership but would be
interested in attending club meetings for
the sake of debate.
Kitz and co-founder Jacob Itzkowitz,
also the VP External of the Arts
Undergraduate Society, plan on organizing
trips to gun clubs around the city to give
their members the opportunity to practice
their shooting skills in a safe environment.
They also plan on inviting officials from
the RCMP or the Canadian military to
give demonstrations on fi rearm safety.
“Fear of guns is a bad thing,” said
Itzkowitz. “Even if you are not comfortable
fi ring a gun, it is an important life skill to
know how to handle and dismantle a
fi rearm.”
The two founders have not,
however, taken a stance on issues such
as recreational hunting and automatic
weapons, preferring to allow club
members to decide the MRA’s position
on these matters.
Itzkowitz said that he also hopes to
challenge stereotypes of gun owners.
“We have an intensely liberal
atmosphere at McGill, and fi rearms tend
to be associated with conservatives, but
this is not necessarily true,” Itzkowitz
said. “People see fi rearms as such an
American thing, but there is a fair amount
of gun ownership in Canada.”
Leon Mwotia, SSMU VP Clubs and
Services, believes that there is sufficient
interest in guns and gun-ownership
rights to warrant a full-status club within
SSMU.
“I think that it is our prerogative as
progressive, forward-thinking members of
this society to allow this group the space
to pursue their interests unencumbered,”
Mwotia said.
If Council approves the MRA’s
constitution, the group could be given
full-club status within three months.
Photo by: Wade Andrew
The Royal Winnipeg Ballet at What’s Here for you day
September 29, 2005
06
The Uniter
UWSA
COMMENTS EDITOR: DANIEL BLAKIE
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
Robbie Leitiphin
I
n this world of image and anti-image
i-i-im
-im
mag
mage
agge
age
images I was thinking a lot about
o t myy
anti-corporation beliefs. One issue
ue that
ue
hhaat
hat
is a popular topic for debate is Starbucks
buck
bu
buck
uuccks
ckks
Corporationʼs growth in Manitoba. For a lot
of left-wing, local-minded, prairie-positive
Winnipeggers, the emergence advancement
of Starbucks Corporation into Winnipegʼs
“coffee scene” seemed like an encroachment,
a violation of our grassroots style. Oh, it
was big news all right, Starbucks making
the big move to monopolize yet another
provinceʼs coffee industry (even though there
had been three locations in Winnipeg for
years before Starbucks finally aggressively
pursued growth in this region). I remember
just a couple of years ago that local news
stories were investigating the potentially
negative effects its growth might have on the
local “un-corporate” coffee houses.
A lot of this media attention was motivated
by a growing local movement in Winnipeg that
was targeting the giant and “evil” Starbucks
Corporation. They had no organized name
but you could fi nd them amongst the crowds
on Corydon in front of Roca Jack’s and Second
Cup, and on University campuses. Some of
these people, I have found out, also would like
to ban The Body Shop, The Gap, and WalMart. When walking on Corydon during this
time I noticed protest signs urging the general
public to ban Starbucks, think local and, well,
we know the rest. Since the kafuffle started two
years ago I have come to realize something
that’s missing in the anti-Starbucks debate.
But before I discuss that (there is a
disclaimer coming here), I just want to say that I
believe in and support all humanitarian, earthloving movements. My belief system includes
an anti-war, animal-loving, ‘think Global
– act Local’, and anti-globalization mentality.
Remaining loyal to these movements as much
as possible is important to me, but sometimes
isn’t a luxury I can afford. I am also a proud
fan of Michael Moore’s, in-your-face, antiBush political agenda. But most importantly, I
believe in democracy.
What does this have to do with my mocha
– chai – Venti – double - half/calf - doppio
espresso (this is not an actual drink) you say?
Metric
By Matt Cohen
Since the 1790s, countries from around the
world have jumped on the metric bandwagon; throwing their previous system to the
wind and adopting a more refined measuring unit. I love the metric system. Call me
crazy, but I take comfort in knowing that
I’m 1.83 metres tall and weigh 88.45 kilograms. It’s a small reassurance, but it’s one
many don’t take solace in. We’re part of an
elite club, but I feel that some of our members aren’t living up to their full potential.
We all know how to do it, but some of you
have never quite made the switch. I think
the problem may be systemic. Take our
X
September 29, 2005
07
Comments
Well, it has to do with the unfortunate but
necessary truth about how our (Canada’s)
democracy works, and the fact that it involves
a free market. Even though there are probably
not many of us who do not scorn the ‘power of
the few’ covertness of most corporations today,
we can’t deny the ugly truth that capitalism is
alive and well in this country. We exist in it,
rely on it, and benefit from it. Even when we are
disadvantaged by capitalism, the reality is that
our materialistic society depends on it more
and more to satisfy our high standards of living,
and, alternately, at some point in our lives, may
have even been disadvantaged by it to some
degree, even if we do not always benefit, or the
harm outweighs the good.
While this is all well and good, and
common sense to most of us, I know some of
you are still asking what this has to do with my
grande-extra pump - non-fat - no foam - no
water-- chai latte (this IS a drink – my drink)??
Socrates would argue, in the interest of truth,
that those who are arguing for something
should know most about what it is they’re
arguing for. In that vein, I have tried to be as
informed as I can be about the choices that I
make and in what I stand for. Fortunately, in
regards to Starbucks, I am informed. Here are
just a few of the little known facts that you may
not know about Starbucks:
*Starbucks’ main charity of choice is
literacy, of which they give fi nancial aid and/or
sponsorships in the stores regionally, nationally
and internationally.
*Starbucks has a mandate to support
specific charities through grants and monies
that are matched through employee’s volunteer
time. They have many other ways of supporting
charities that does not include giving money in
exchange for advertising. It’s true! Look it up.
*Starbucks has a strong commitment to
recycling, and the environment on a local and
global scale. On their web-site (www.starbucks.
com) they write that they have identified and
addressed three high-impact environmental
issues including the sourcing of their coffee, tea
and paper, their transportation of people and
products, and their store design and operations
driver’s license for example. Our height is
measured in feet and inches. How can the
average person be expected to know how
many centimetres they are if government
documents are using imperial measurements? I’m not six feet, I’m 1.83 metres tall.
I mean, if you want to be specific, I’m 183
centimetres, but I’m certainly not 72 inches
tall. Measurements aside from height have
made the switch. We use kilometres instead
of miles and Celsius instead of Fahrenheit.
People, we’re almost there.
On record, there are only three countries in
the world that haven’t adopted the metric system:
Liberia, Myanmar, and the United States. I can
understand if these countries don’t want to
change because of the cost of conversion. New
tape measures for a nation don’t come cheap.
That’s about the only excuse I am able to accept.
Any other reason verges on anti-metric. It’s
X
For the Love of Starbucks
The Uniter
(energy, water, waste
reduction and recycling).
Also, each store has a well
integrated recycling program.
*ALL Starbucks coffee is fairly traded.
*Starbucks invests heavily into coffee
farmers’ communities, their families, and in
the environmental sustainability of the growing
area.
*Part-time employees at Starbucks are
eligible to receive benefits.
*Unlike most other companies, another
strong argument for the anti-anti-Starbucks
position is that Starbucks, for the most part,
does not advertise. Instead of spending on
advertising, they direct their resources to the
initiatives mentioned above.
this kind of attitude that expels terms like the
Canadian gallon. It’s the same thing as a gallon
(3.79 litres), except there are 4.55 litres in one.
A Canadian gallon? I thought that was a litre.
Apparently it’s not.
I’m sure Canada will fully adopt the metric
system eventually, but it will be a bittersweet
victory. The only way that will happen is when
the older generations die off and the new ones
replace them. Metrication and mortality; it’s a
sad truth. Until such time, it’s up to us to push
this system forward. We’re Canadians, we use
the metric system: learn it, use it, and accept it.
A new measurement system isn’t going to sweep
the world any time soon. When it does, we’ll
probably adopt it and never fully use it. Why
break with tradition right?
So, while I occasionally cringe at the price
of my chai latte, it’s good to know that the coffee
shop I frequent thinks globally and acts locally. I
feel justified in my anti-anti-Starbucks position.
It’s also good to know that they didn’t have to
cram the Starbucks image or some foolishly
addictive jingle down my throat to make me
want to enter their store. So, if you are a fan of
Starbucks but have been hissed at when you say
their name (I have) or you get a weird look (I
have), you can use these facts to back you up if
you ever feel the need to defend the image you
are giving when you walk down the halls with
your Starbucks coffee. Besides the good reasons
for going to Starbucks that I already mentioned
in this article, they also make a mean chai!
A brief history of metrication in Canada
1971 – Metric Commission Canada
appointed to oversee change. Conversion is
expected to be complete by 1980.
1976 – All prepackaged food products
required by law to declare mass or volume in
metric units.
1977 – Every speed limit sign in the
country changed to kilometres on the Labour
Day long weekend.
1984 – Newly elected Conservative
government halts promotion of metric system.
2005 – Most Canadians don’t know how
tall they are in centimetres or how much they
weigh in kilograms.
08
Comments
The Uniter
X
September 29, 2005
Lament for a Spoon
Sargastic
D. Riving
Daniel Blaikie
COMMENTS EDITOR
T
his is a wee piece in honour
of our fallen comrades,
many of you will remember
them: the spoons, the forks, the
butter knives. Where has all
the cutlery gone? Of course
there does exist on campus
a bastardized version of our
former friends. These fiendish
creatures are collectively known
as ʻplastic cutleryʼ.
I’d be happy to call them
scabs, for that would mean that
our stainless steel friends were
only on strike. But alas, it is not
so. Instead, the sturdy cutlery that
formerly resided in our cafeteria
have been completely removed;
thrown out, melted down to make
cheap jewelry, used in some sort
of strange modern art piece, who
knows?
And for what? To save a few
bucks? Preposterous! Who could
put a price on something with
which we are so intimately related? I doubt if
there is anyone among us that can claim to have
caressed more objects at the university with
their tongue – or people for that matter –than
the various stainless steel cutlery of yesteryear.
Gone are the days of slurping a satisfying
spoonful of soup off a solid steel spoon. Gone
are the days of knowing, really knowing, that
your fork could penetrate the cafeteria’s daily
special without losing all but one of its prongs.
Gone are the days of using your knife not to cut,
our muffi ns are too tough for that, but bludgeon
your way through the concrete exterior of your
banana-nut treat. Far from being able to rise to
the challenges of lunchtime, today’s cutlery is
limp and bendy. Old before its time. Reconciled
to its impending doom.
It meets its fate stoically – I’ve never
heard one complain – usually after
every meal. Yes, I’m talking about
being committed to the ol’ poubelle,
the ‘cupboard under the sink’. Don’t
pretend you don’t know what I’m
talking about. There are some of us
who try to save this cutlery, to use
it the next time. A valiant effort, to
be sure, but ultimately doomed to
failure. Time is the enemy. Maybe
we reuse it for a day or two, maybe
a week. But we become lazy. It sits in
our bag for days, weeks on end. Until,
one day, we pull it out.
By this time it has become
either its own biosphere, or it is more
pockmarked than your nice car after
a midnight romp along country
roads. Eventually, most of them fi nd
their way to a trash can, and then the
landfi ll, and we are left knowing that
another straw has been added to the
back of the camel that is our planet.
Not so with our stainless friends.
They knew their place in the world.
They knew that if people were to
continue to eat off them, these people
would need a planet on which to eat.
These steel utensils, bedrock in our
times of need, offered themselves up
time and time again, to be used,
and then used again, never asking
for more than a little soap, water,
and maybe a thank-you from time
to time.
And now they’re gone. Why? Because
people were taking them home? Who could
blame them? Couldn’t we have given a
quarter to the cafeteria people as collateral?
To be returned when the cutlery was brought
back safely and unharmed?
Maybe it’s too late for questions, I
don’t know. What I do know is that these
loyal spoons, forks, and knives shouldn’t
be so easily forgotten. They were good not
only to us, but the planet too. And their
last official mention shouldn’t be left to
corporate executives in an Aramark or
Chartwells boardroom somewhere. So I
offer this humble tribute, and bid them
adieu.
Gas prices have become so high that
what once took us from point A to point
Z only now takes us to point E, which
coincidentally stands for expensive,
empty, and enough. People have had
enough of today’s ‘Gassasination’.
What can you do to make up for these
prices? Ride exotic animals. Take back
your saddles and silver spurs and ride
the powerful ostrich. Feel your hair wave
about while riding the reliable tortoise.
Let the classy penguin carry you home
from a night out drinking. I suggest
that you buy a horse with real ‘horse
power’. On the other hand, you may feel
horses are “too commercial”. Why not
try the exotic zebra as an alternative? Of
course there will be people who will want
to sup up their animals. Maybe get a
spoiler for the hippo you take to school,
or a new sound system for the lazy
donkey you bought second hand. Either
way, people would put their personal spin
on their animal and stop burning gas.
This idea might seem ridiculous but
ask yourself, is it anymore outrageous
than the prices we’re paying to drive our
cars?
Straight Faced: Faced
Stephen Harfield
Preface:
Perhaps you’ve heard it said, without it
being coy,
That all work and no play makes Jack a
dull boy.
Well, dear friends, that saying no longer
has its use,
For in the lands of academe, it meets
with much abuse.
For dullness, after Seinfeld, in this world
doth reign,
and those well ‘quipped with words amuse
us with refrain.
Ironical observances, they call their
wisdom “rants”
To lift us from the world, and please us
with their cants.
To ranters we must aspire, in solemnity
and glee,
I tell you it is so, my tale doth prove it
verily.
Objectors to this, (alas ‘twas I among
you both in word and deed),
Listen to my vision, portending warning
you must heed.
Anti-Climactical
Encounter with
“Straight Faced”
Imagine my surprise, upon my evening
ritual of cognac and Cohen*, that i
should hit upon his rant so discreetly
advertised in its headline, yet so rich in
its explorations of banality. With haste i
donned my finest stockings and overcoat,
and embarked upon the world of the
night in the hope that i too might find
a fanciful engagement with everything
trivial to report.
upon my way i met a man whose calming
gait assured me he was one who had
purpose and answers. without the least
bit of trepidation i exclaimed, “Forsooth,
dost thou know the ways of the world?”
“Aye!” he replied, “having traveled far
and long, having plundered the depths
of man’s wisdom, i am well versed in the
ways that send gentle spirits like yours
in heavy vexation. Tell me, what is it you
desire?”
“Truly,” I rejoined, “the fates do smile
on this our fortuitous encounter, for
my quest is nothing less than what your
worldly experience endows. Cast your
light of knowledge upon me, and show me
the paths of boredom, so that i may regale
the world with tales of insignificance!”
“a manly quest it is,” quoth he, “and in
whose pursuit hath torn many weary
hearts asunder. but be warned, fine
fellow, that the path is lined with peril
and asketh much of a stout resolve to
resist the temptations of, in parlance
parochial, ‘having a life.’ Do these qualities
your nature possess?”
“Nay,” quoth I “for my spirit doth often
tremble in ecstasy under the weight of
that hideous joy that comes to those
ill-content with the amusements of
self-delusion. mine own merriment doth
consist astray of those enviable persons
whose dotage upon the inconsequential,
for purposes of such divine dispensations
recovered therein, surely make them
gods among men.”
“I tell you the truth,” replied he, “that
this path dost then elude you. thou must
go into the world and live a constant
shame, with hopes that those whom
you encounter will see you as a beacon,
and mend their ways. For only through
relentless self-absorption shalt thou find
the rivers of happiness and communion
that do converge in newspaper rants.”
...
with a shudder i woke. it was all but a
dream, but looking upon my computer
i rested content, that my message did
prove that i too am devoid of all worthy
pursuits.
*Straight Faced is a weekly column in the
Uniter by Matt Cohen
Stephen Harfield
The Uniter
HUMOUR EDITOR: MATT COHEN
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
Diversions
Cody Creed
Off Kilter Is Okay
Mike Duggan
Off Kilter Is Okay
Mike Duggan
Before They Were Famous
Matt Cohen
BY: BEN SNAKEPIT
S NAKEPIT
IN
IS A DAILY LOG OF THE LIFE OF
AUSTINN TX,
B EN S NAKEPIT. D RAWING
PLAYING IN THE LEGENDARY
J CHURCH ,
THREE PANELS A DAY,
B EN
TAKES US THROUGH THE DAILY GRIND OF LIVING
TOURING , WORKING , PARTYING , FALLING IN AND OUT OF LOVE , AND JUST BEING
B EN .
S NAKEPIT APPEARS IN THE U NITER COURTESY OF YOUNG A MERICAN COMICS (YAC), WITH CONSENT TO REPUBLISH FROM THE AUTHOR . TO LEARN
MORE ABOUT
Fun Chokes
Iain Ramsay
S NAKEPIT
ANDOTHER PUBLICATIONS BY
YAC,
CHECK OUT WWW.YOUNGAMERICANCOMICS . COM
September 29, 2005
09
September 29, 2005
The Uniter
Features
010
Terry Fox: A Real Canadian Idol
Fox Facts
By Lori Ebbitt
Features Editor
E
xcitement filled the air as
the countdown reached
its end and the throng of
people set out together. This wasn’t
a race—just the continuation of
one man’s brave journey that began
25 years ago; Terry Fox’s Marathon
of Hope.
Walkers,
runners,
cyclers,
and
rollerbladers, all united in the name of cancer
research, departed from The Forks on Sept. 18
to embark on the five-kilometre route that lay
ahead. With no clouds in sight, the sun warmed
up an otherwise crisp Sunday morning.
As I walked with my boyfriend over the
Esplanade Riel pedestrian bridge, an incredible
feeling tugged at me from inside. Here I was,
with a mass of people stretched out before me
and behind me, all taking part in one event
with an ultimate goal simply of helping others.
It’s the feeling you only get from actually
doing something—actively participating
in a cause—rather than just donating from
the comfort of your home. That’s not to say
that donations aren’t important; every penny
counts, and Terry’s own goal had simply been
to raise one dollar per person living in Canada.
But personally, I have always felt far more
satisfaction from the act of getting involved
directly.
I’m not in any way insinuating that I do
this on a regular basis. Not even close. I think
a lot of people today, including myself, forget
what can be accomplished in just a few hours
of their time. From the fi rst step I took on the
Terry Fox Run this year, memories of learning
about Terry and of my fi rst participation in the
event while in elementary school came flooding
back. I hadn’t participated in the run since then
and I forgot just how powerful a feeling it leaves
you with, to think that you’ve helped further
Terry’s dream, even if you are just one person.
Terry was only one person, and look what he
accomplished.
He has now been gone longer than he was
ever alive. Terry would have been 48 years old
if he had lived to see the 25th year of his legacy.
Terry’s Dream
Terry was born in Winnipeg on July 28,
1958, and attended elementary school in the
city before moving to Port Coquitlam, BC,
where he spent the rest of his life. He became an
athlete, playing football, and taking up crosscountry running to please a high school coach
he thought very highly of.
At the age of 18, he went to the doctor
complaining of a pain in his knee. In less
than two weeks, he was diagnosed with a rare
case of osteogenic sarcoma (bone cancer), and
underwent surgery where doctors were forced
to amputate his right leg 15 centimetres (six
inches) above the knee.
Instead of feeling sorry for himself, he was
influenced by all the other cancer patients he
met (many children), and he decided that he
had to do something in hope of making some
kind of difference. Terry was inspired after
reading an article about an amputee named
Dick Traum who had run in the New York City
Marathon. He devised his plan to run across
Canada to bring awareness to the cause, and
thus the Marathon of Hope was born.
He trained for 18 months before starting
Terry
x
o
F
Run
the cross-country expedition. On April 12, 1980,
he dipped his artificial leg in St. John’s harbour,
and began his run. No part of the journey was
easy, and just as coverage and support for the
run began to gain real momentum, Terry had
to stop running. Becoming too ill to carry on,
he ended his journey on Sept. 1, 1980, just past
Thunder Bay, ON. Numerous people (including
the entire Toronto Maple Leafs hockey team)
offered to fi nish the race for him. He turned
them down because he was determined to get
better and fi nish the race.
But the cancer had spread to his lungs.
Terry, unfortunately, didn’t get to fi nish what
he had started. He died on June 28, 1981,
just one month shy of his 23rd birthday.
good doing it, but it wasn’t until a girl named
Miranda in my school was diagnosed with
cancer that I began to think differently about it.
At fi rst, I was just shocked that someone I knew,
someone my age, could get cancer. The day that
I learned she’d died was the day that cancer
became absolutely 100 per cent real to me.
I remember attending a ceremony for
her in the school gym. The song “Somewhere
Out There” played out over the silence, and I
promised myself I’d never forget that moment.
The whole school remembered, and it
made the Terry Fox run that much more
important, because it became about real people.
Terry’s Legacy
That’s why people still run today—for
family members with cancer, for friends with
cancer, and even for people they’ve never
met. Relationships were a key part of what I
took from this year’s run, because it seemed
everyone was there for someone.
I was walking for Miranda; a boy named
Logan from my second grade class, whom I
later found out died of leukemia; for Duncan,
a family friend; and for Ksanya, a beautiful
woman I’d never met, but had heard so much
Terry Fox is a hero. That is what I learned
every year at school, and it’s how most people
my age found out about Terry in the fi rst place.
Every year in elementary school, we all ran
for a cause that few people could fully grasp at
that age.
We raised money for the run every year;
because we were told it was a good cause. I felt
Terry’s Footsteps
5,000 km/3,107 mi – distance Terry ran in
training for the Marathon of Hope
42 km/26 mi – average distance Terry ran
every day of his cross-country run
20 143 days & 5,373 km/3,339 miles
– days and distance Terry totaled when he
stopped running just outside of Thunder Bay
$20,000 – amount raised on the highway in
one day in southern Ontario
5 hours & $10 million – amount of money
raised by the CTV network telethon held on
Sept. 9, 1980
18 – age that Terry was diagnosed with cancer
22 – age that Terry died
760 – site locations around the world that
participated in the first Terry Fox Run
300,000 – number of people who took part in
the first Terry Fox Run
$3.5 million – amount of money raised during
the first Terry Fox Run
$360 million – amount raised to date in Terry
Fox’s name from the Terry Fox Run
Illustration by: David Tan
about in the months leading up to her passing.
Some people were taking part alone, others with
friends, and some took part as whole families.
I came across one family (of varying ages)
near the end of the walk, all wearing identical
t-shirts honouring the memory of a loved one
who had passed away from cancer. When
done with a school or a family, the run isn’t
just about fi nding a cure for cancer; it becomes
a matter of family, memories, support and
teaching children the value of helping others.
Through most of the walk, I was behind a
young father and his son, who was about
three years old. The little boy was all over
the place; running off into a field, through
the hedges into someone’s yard, and even
back the way he’d come. He is (probably) too
young to understand what he was doing there.
But they were there, doing this together. If he
does the run every year, just like I did while in
school, it will come to mean something to him.
And another generation will follow in Terry’s
footsteps of hope.
The Uniter
FEATURES EDITOR: LORI EBBITT
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
September 29, 2005
Features
011
Fate of Film Questions Academic Freedom
U of M Researchers Battle University
Derek Leschasin
NEWS PRODUCTION EDITOR
W
hile
increasingly
controversial, the issues
surrounding the use of
Genetically Modified Organisms
(GMOs) are mired in a grey area
of uncertainty and misconception.
Many among the public are
uncertain of what GMOs entail,
and others are subjected to horror
stories and misinformation from all
sides of the debate.
One aspect of the debate, the
growing of genetically modified canola
in Canada, is becoming increasingly
important. And yet the question still
seems unanswered: are genetically
modifi ed crops the answer to the
world’s food shortages – or are they a
nightmare?
Stephane McLachlan, an Associate
Professor at the University of Manitoba,
and Ian Mauro, a PhD student, have
completed a fi lm project aimed at
clearing up some of this confusion.
They say what complicates things is that
they’ve been engaged in negotiations
with the U of M for the last several years,
with the university preventing them from
screening their work. This battle now
seems to be coming to a head.
They explain that the voices of
some of the people closest to this issue
are often missing from the debate – the
farmers, the people who have fi rst-hand
experience in growing genetically
modified crops. As it stands today, there
are only three countries in the world
whose farmers use genetically modified
seeds: Argentina, the United States, and
Canada.
In 2001, McLachlan says, he
developed a research project he hoped
would fi ll this gap in the dialogue
surrounding GMOs. The results of this
project would be released as a video
documentary, a format far different from
the usual mode of dispersing academic
research. In addition to the format,
the other element that would make the
project unique would be the subject: the
Photo by: Wade Andrew
experiences of Canadian farmers who
were growing genetically modified crops.
It would essentially be risk-assessment
research, trying to fi nd out the pitfalls
and benefits of GMO crops from those
who depend on them to make a living.
McLachlan enlisted the help of
Mauro to travel across the country
and conduct multiple interviews with
these farmers. Accompanying Mauro
would be Jim Sanders, an independent
fi lmmaker who jointly runs the local
fi lm company DadaWorld Data. These
fi lmed interviews would make up the
bulk of the documentary, featuring
farmers detailing their experiences.
“We didn’t have as much capacity
around fi lm-making then as we do now,”
explains McLachlan. “It was very
collaborative, we made sure that Ian
and Jim drove around the countryside
together, Jim behind the camera and
Ian interviewing people. The content
of those interviews... shaped the video’s
direction.”
“The research that we have
collaborated on is the fi rst publicly
funded farmer-focussed risk assessment
of GMO crops in Canada, if not North
America,” says Mauro.
By Nov. 2002, the documentary,
titled “Seeds of Change” was complete,
and the three were looking for a way to
disseminate their fi lm. An outside funder
expressed interest in helping to screen
the fi lm publicly, and at this point their
plans became derailed.
“What it boiled down to was that
the university collective agreement gave
the university a 50 per cent stake in the
copyright of the video,” says Mauro,
“and the university... demanded that
we do various things before they would
be comfortable either releasing the fi lm
or before they would be comfortable
signing over their stake in the fi lm to
us.” Mauro blames this turn of event on
outdated copyright rules at the university,
which were developed with classroom
instruction videos in mind. Had the
researchers published their results in
book form, Mauro says, the university
would not have had the same right to
prevent its release.
What followed has been months
upon months of negotiations between the
University and the researchers in what
has so far been a vain effort to fi nd a way
to release “Seeds of Change” with both
parties’ consent.
“They’ve had so many kinds of
different demands that they’ve put us
through and when we satisfy one series
of demands, a whole other series of
demands come up,” says Mauro.
Joanne Keselman, vice-president
(research) at the U of M, argues that
the main issue in this debate is that
McLachlan, Mauro, and Sanders had
set up an independent company with the
three of them as shareholders as a means
of releasing “Seeds of Change”.
She says that there is a distinction
between the footage Mauro and Sanders
took while conducting research, and the
documentary itself. Further, that the
documentary is a project independent of
the university.
“We have no interest in the
documentary,” says Keselman, but the
university has a stake in the raw footage
used in the documentary. Keselman says
that the university will allow the footage
to be used so long as “a standard set of
business conditions” used when dealing
with off-campus parties are met.
The conditions Keselman lists
are that the University of Manitoba be
completely disassociated from “Seeds
of Change”, and that the consent of the
subjects in the raw footage be obtained.
“We have to be assured that the
raw video footage will be ultimately used
in a fashion that the research subjects
understand,” she says. “I understand
that the researchers have secured
permission... through personal release
forms.” But Keselman adds that she has
yet to see these forms.
Both Mauro and McLachlan think
that the university’s stated concern for
the people in their video is more about
public relations than anything else.
“When you look at the protocols
that we had in terms of involving the
participants and letting them know
about the video and what it contained,
it far exceeds the industry standard and
in fact any standards that I’ve seen,”
McLachlan says.
As for the university’s argument
that a video documentary was not
part of McLachlan’s original research
proposal: “That’s preposterous,” Mauro
says. “It’s been part of the plan from the
beginning.”
Jim Sanders feels that the
university’s position is one based on a
fear of what companies like Monsanto,
which will soon have a space in the
U of M’s SmartPark, will do once the
fi lm is released. Sanders likens it to the
“culture of fear” he says he and Mauro
experienced while speaking to farmers.
“They’re so fearful of a lawsuit
because of Monsanto’s precedent for
suing people... I think the same thing has
pervaded into the university climate.”
Sanders plans to soon make “Seeds
of Change” available for free downloading
on the website of DadaWorld Data.
“I’ve never really worried about the
commercial interests of this film, for me it’s
just about getting it out there.”
At the same time, McLachlan and
Mauro, along with Sanders, are planning
to screen their film to the public in the next
month or two, regardless of the reaction
they may face from the university.
“I would say at this point it would be
Continued
The Uniter
FEATURES EDITOR: LORI EBBITT
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
Features
012
Continued From p.11
irresponsible of us to do anything else. It
would be irresponsible of us to somehow
think that further negotiations would
resolve this issue,” says McLachlan.
Among the organizations backing
the film is the Canadian Association of
University Teachers (CAUT). James Turk,
the executive director of CAUT, says he
is “very concerned” about the U of M’s
position.
“There is no acceptable reason to
prevent scientific and academic research
from being released,” says Turk. “We want
to draw attention to what’s happened so it
doesn’t happen to anyone else.”
No one seems certain of what will
happen if “Seeds of Change” is released
without the U of M’s consent. When asked,
Keselman refused to speculate, and neither
of the researchers nor Sanders seem overly
concerned. Sanders, in fact, believes the
University is mainly in a bluffing position.
“I think it would be counterproductive for anyone to actually suppress
FREE iPod
with LG handset
the film or sue us,” says Sanders.
In the end, Mauro and McLachlan
seem most deeply concerned with the
debate their project was planned to delve
into – the future of biotechnology in society.
They are also worried about the links their
university and others have formed with
corporations like Monsanto, ever since
funding from governments began to dry
up and universities were forced to search
for other sources.
“It’s hard to draw causal links
between the university and their motives...
But at some level that’s irrelevant. What’s
+
FREE
happened to us has... effectively amounted
to an infringement of an academic’s right
to publish,” says Mauro.
“When you have a technology
like GMO crops that have been released
on broad acres throughout the world,”
says McLachlan, “and the only real riskassessment that’s going on is being done by
the corporations themselves, when a public
voice…is compromised...you’re basically
getting into a situation where there’s zero
accountability for the public and society
at large to evaluate this technology.”
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September 29, 2005
The Uniter
ARTSFEATURES
EDITOR: M
EDITOR
IKE L:EWIS
LORI EBBITT
E-MAIL
E-:MAIL
ARTS
: [email protected]
[email protected]
CAUNITER.CA
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: 786-9497
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Features
Atmosphereʼs
Forecast Looks
Bright
September 29, 2005
013
By Brett Hopper
I
tʼs a rare treat these days to
come across a hip-hop act
that promotes peace and nonviolence the way Atmosphere does.
“If no one in your crew walks
around with a gun, say shhh…”
sings Slug, the group’s rapper and
lyricist, describing his own crew
in a testament to his hometown of
Minneapolis on the hidden track
called “Shhh” off of 2003’s Seven’s
Travels. The group’s previous
full-length, distributed by punk
label Epitaph Records, did have
its share of bleak and depressing
anecdotal scenarios. However, the
positives can be found if you listen
hard enough.
On Oct. 4, 2005, the
underground hip-hop innovators,
and cult superstars from Minnesota
will release their fi fth studio
album, called You Can’t Imagine
How Much Fun We’re Having.
“It is what it is, it’s straight
up. Every song has a purpose,
I’m very proud of the new record,
more so than any other record
that I’ve been a part of,” Slug
explains. “I like to keep things
simple, and nowhere is that more
evident in my music than on this
particular record.”
The group’s previous release
was dubbed by many critics as
experimental, however Slug
would like to point out that it
wasn’t experimental in the true
sense of the word, it was merely an
experiment for Atmosphere itself.
“We’re
a
lot
more
straightforward than people gave
us credit for on Seven’s Travels.
I’m the guy who likes to sit back
and watch Family Guy on a daily
basis. We will never be another
Aesop Rock.”
To promote their upcoming
release the duo have been making
a trek across Canada, and they
will be coming through Winnipeg
at the Ramada Inn with their
“Pour Me Another” tour on Oct.
1.
Formed in 1994, Atmosphere’s
original lineup consisted of rapper
Spawn, producer ANT (Anthony
Davis), and DJ Slug. Since then,
however, Spawn has left to pursue
a solo career under the name Rek
the Heavyweight, leaving Slug
(Sean Daley) to take over the
mic, and a rotation of extremely
talented DJ’s to fi ll the void behind
the decks (usually that spot is fi lled
by Brad Forste, aka Mr. Dibbs).
The peak of Atmosphere’s
popularity thus far came in 2002
with the release of God Loves Ugly.
Where Slug’s introspective lyrics,
along with ANT’s producing
skills, really came to the forefront
of underground hip-hop.
Rhymesayers Entertainment,
the record label created almost a
year after the release of their debut
EP Overcast, is the brainchild of
Sean Daley and Anthony Davis.
“Rhymesayers came about
out of necessity, it was never about
doing it independently because
we hate the mainstream way,”
clarifies Slug. “It was more like
‘hey, nobody gives a fuck about us
here in Minneapolis and if we’re
going to do this, we’re going to
have to do it ourselves.’”
R h y m e s a y e r s
Entertainment, still based in
Minneapolis, now promotes
both Minnesotan and national
groups, such as Eyedea &
Abilities, Brother Ali, Mass
Hysteria, MF Doom, and Soul
Position, to name a few. The
label has also recently started
their own clothing and record
shop called The Fifth Element,
located in Minneapolis, and
hopes to pursue other ventures
in the near future.
“Who knows what’s next.
Personally I’d like to see a rec
centre for kids to go to after
school… a place that teaches
kids self defense, but also teaches
them long division.” Continuing
his thoughts, Slug says, “We got
ideas of what we can do for the
community to remain positive
inf luences, not just on rap, but
on kids as well. Even if you
don’t like rap, you can still feel
comfortable.”
You see, if you look hard
enough, you can f ind the
positives. Hopefully the new
album will be as well received by
the masses as ANT and Slug are
anticipating, but for now we’ll
just have to wait and see.
For more information check
out www.rhymesayers.com
RichardLiebrecht
Fuzed, the poem
By Richard Liebrecht
Winnipeg Poetry House
fresh local poets with live
release,
414 Academy, Sept. 16;
“admission $6, or free with
CD.”
Sit down with a hot Spanish
coffee,
ready to mellow to the sound of
outspoken, but underenthused
poets;
another great assignment.
Three typewriters beat
out that misguided assumption.
Words fly like a three gun
salute
to the cracked city, sexuality,
everything that matters
to the tune of a ‘do it yourself ’
instructional tape.
Everything is live:
the words, the creation, the CD.
The disc Fuzed.
“Poetry and music. Compiled.”
- Disc Cover
a hearty mix of the House’s best.
“Everything recorded over the past
year” of live performances,
says Lindsey Wiebe, programming
coordinator. “For poets, it’s a chance
to share… chance to enhance…in
front of an audience.”
Poets range from new to the next
with music from violin to electric
sampling the society we live in,
downtown and down the hall.
“The theme? The love of poetry,
the expression,” says Lindsey. The
disc raises money to keep the poetry
coming from the Poetry House to
the streets across Canada.
“You have 20 rules, right? We
take three,”
says Dave Streit, member of the
group Poor Tree.
Dearly departed street poet, Winnipeg Legend Marvin Francis, paid
tribute with tracks of his own
The three poets fire in harmony,
pumping sound like a V-3.
Find out more, take a listen, on disc
or live. Check out
www.winnipegpoetry.com.
September 29, 2005
014
The Uniter
ARTS EDITOR: MIKE LEWIS
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
Arts & Culture
WRITERʼS FEST REVIEW:
THE BACKWARDS GLANCE
By Jon Symons
W
ednesday at the Winnipeg
International Writerʼs
Fest was all about
introspection, longing and personal
refection as six writers from around
the world immersed the audience
in stories about characters who
are put on this world to figure
out their place in it. The evening
opened strongly, with a pair of
writers - Dionne Brand and Ray
Robertson - whose works are set in
contemporary Toronto.
Brand’s captivating reading
from her new novel, What We All
Long For, was the perfect way to start
the show. Whether reading the novel’s
opening section, or describing one
character’s haunting recollection of
his youth in a refugee camp, Brand’s
crisp, poetic prose and outstanding
eye for detail may very well have had
much of the audience flooding the
book table at intermission.
Robertson, meanwhile, was
hilarious as he read from his latest
novel, Gently Down the Stream. With
jokes about dogs who appear to be
giving each other blow-jobs, a glimpse
into a doomed suburban marriage
and references to Booker T and the
MG’s, Eddie Cochrane and Carson
McCullers, Robertson inherited the
role of his protagonist, Hank, came off
as a less obsessive version of Hornby’s
Rob Fleming, and was, in my mind,
the highlight of the evening.
Ex-Winnipeger Liam Durcan’s
story, “A Short Journey by Car” from
the collection of the same name, was
one of the most imaginative I’d heard
in a while, told from the point of
view of Stalin’s dentist as he struggles
to deal with the repercussions any
tiny misstep in his work will have.
Durcan is a born storyteller, as he
slowly let the story unravel itself with
ease using everyday, uncomplicated
language. Nicole Brossard was the
writer who most explored the theme
of the evening as her characters
are often described as looking back
longingly at the past in Brossard’s
gentle, elegant prose.
Stan Dragland’s prose poetry
was on display as he read his poems
“Mr. Iceberg” and ‘Come All Ye”
from the collection Stormy Weather.
Reading with a witty, folksy demeanor,
Dragland captured the essence of
the Newfoundland he writes about
and downplayed the subject matter,
essentially about a lonely man left to
put his life back together after the end
of his marriage.
The only weak point of the
evening was the story told by Danish
playwright Ulla Ryum, whose
reading style reminded me of that
little kid reading in the intro of
Bright Eyes’ “Fevers and Mirrors”.
Ryum’s story about a girl taking care
of her grandmother in the wilds of
Greenland was effective in its subject
matter - Grandma’s dying and the
kid’s reflecting on her life - but tended
to drag at points with an overdose of
pondering.
Juice No Grapefruit
By David Christiansen
D
elighted by
their final
product,
University of Winnipeg
creative writers and
their editors revelled
in metaphor and
celebrated the sestina at
the Juice book launch
last week.
Juice, the popular creative
writing journal, features
100 percent University of
Winnipeg content. The
exciting unveiling was, as
in past years, incorporated
into Thin Air, the Winnipeg
International
Writers’
Festival.
At the launch roughly
fi fteen writers shared their
work with a receptive
audience
in
Eckhart
Grammatte Hall. Despite the
festive atmosphere, the dark
subject matter of the works of
some writers
qu ieted
the
Hall.
84-yearold Diana
Gordon read
her
Juice
contribution,
a poem inspired by a woman
in an Edouard Manet painting.
Gordon imagined the subject
of the painting being killed by
her husband. Writer Ashley
MacLennan read her ‘stream
of consciousness’ piece entitled
‘Sublimation’, which depicted
the brutal effects of depression on
those surrounding the affected
person.
Lighter moments were
provided courtesy of writers like
Jon Symons, who read from his
fi rst published work of fiction,
‘Thanks For Taking My Heart
- I Really Didn’t Need It That
Badly Anyways’. The narrator
in Symons’ work laments his
social awkwardness, describes his
contempt for the bar scene, and
his failure to capture his long-time
love, Amanda Empton. Feeling
“hopelessly
uncomfortable
within large, crowded groups of
sweaty idiots,” Symons’ cynical
narrator is developed with a
sense of humour.
Before
reading
from
their works, authors briefl y
described their, at times, unlikely
inspirations.
Inspirational
material ranged from fi ne art to
family relationships, to fruit-fly
trapping strategies, to a nighttime walk to the bus stop through
Winnipeg’s core.
This year’s edition of Juice,
the fi fth, is another milestone
for the journal. It has expanded
by over 50 pages since 2000’s
inaugural issue. Funded and
published by the U of W Library,
Juice exists to showcase student
material, but also to familiarize
aspiring authors with the
publishing process.
“Writing
and
being
published is often a ‘Catch22,’” says Juice contributor and
English graduate MacLennan.
She says it is difficult to publish
without any experience, and that
experience often comes from
being published. Juice is ideal
for developing writers’ resumes,
since the journal has its own
ISSN number. A journal having
such a number is a recognized
publication
by
industry
standards.
Editor Cynara Geissler
stressed that, although the journal
receives many polished pieces,
it has the time to work with
students who need help editing
their submissions. Geissler, who
selected the distinctive shade
of pink paper that lines Juice’s
covers, added that the journal is
already collecting applications for
writing, art and graphics for its
sixth volume, due in September
2006.
This year’s cover, adorned
by a four-photograph montage,
depicts Winnipeg’s severe
summers and winters. Some
controversy surrounded 2002’s
cover, which featured a bare
midriff with an undone button
on the pants. The gender of the
photograph’s subject was not
readily identifiable. Juice, Vol. 5
is the Editors’ third consecutive
choice of a more tame cover.
However, as all Juice
contributors
and
editors
maintain, the journal’s content
is what gives it its raison d’itre.
For $5, Juice, although not a
beverage, provides a refreshing
opportunity to experience U of
W creative writing at its best.
The Uniter
September 29, 2005
Arts & Culture 015
Re-orienting Park Visitors
By Jill Johnson
O
n Sept. 6, Gallery 1C03
opened its doors for the
first art exhibition of the
school year: Lesbian Rangers: ReOrientation Week. Local artists
Shawna Dempsey and Lori Milan
have brought U of W an ecologically
adaptable
performance
and
installation art piece, which combines
a sense of humor and irony with a
conscious effort to draw awareness
to the diversities that we experience
as both new and old students, staff
and faculty at the university. Both
components - the performance
and the installation - are integral to
initiating an individuals’ response.
When Dempsey and Milan perform
the Lesbian Rangers, their methods are sitespecifi c. That is, as Lesbian Rangers, their
resources are developed and implemented
in ways that are useful for a particular
environment. Yet their exhibit as a whole
maintains an elemental awareness of issues
regarding social constructions of gender and
sexuality, and acceptance of diversities.
The artists’ roles as performers are a
crucial component to the exhibition, and
their presence was uniquely appropriated for
U of W; becoming the suitable hosts for Reorientation Week. With the look of authority
in their park ranger uniform, Lesbian Rangers
Dempsey and Milan roamed the campus,
distinguishing their roles by assisting those
lost and frazzled while also bringing a sense
of normalcy to those roles by engaging in
conversations with all kinds of people. As
well, throughout the week the Lesbian Rangers
took part in UWSA coordinated events- this
ended in triumphant success- as their
team of Eager Beavers won the Rock
Climb! Their active roles on campus
during the fi rst week of classes were
necessary and essential in attempting to
integrate empowering values and beliefs
regarding the differences embodied by
students, staff and faculty at U of W.
Furthermore, in conjunction with
the performance, the Lesbian Rangers have
transformed Gallery 1C03- (located on
the fi rst fl oor in Centennial Hall, under
the escalators) into a ‘Base Camp’, which,
with precision, simulates a stereotypical
park ranger offi ce. From rubber fl oor
panels, to paint- by- numbers that hang
on false wooden walls, the artists have
explored pre-conceptions regarding
art and the function of an art gallery
setting. In their creation of a conceivable
and familiar setting the artists form
a relationship with individuals. A
relationship is established in the sense
that the contrived setting presents the
possibility for an individual to make
the installation relative to personal
experience. Through becoming aware of
the characteristics of their surroundings
an individual can make further inquiries
and a personal, thus unique, response to
the art.
This fi rst exhibition in Gallery 1C03
expands the parameters and intentions of
art. With Lesbian Rangers: Re-Orientation
Week, Dempsey and Milan provide a
foundation from which an audience can
critique social values; a foundation to
not only be observed, but also interacted
with. The atmosphere created by the
artists within the gallery, and while
they assume their roles, clears the way
for greater freedom of thought and
expression by bringing to the forefront
the importance of understanding and
accepting differences.
September 29, 2005
016
The Uniter
ARTS EDITOR: MIKE LEWIS
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
Arts & Culture
The Occupation Will Still Be Televised
By Mike Lewis
Peace, Propaganda, and the Promised
Land (80 min.)
Directed by Bathsheba Ratzkoff and Sut
Jhally
Playing – Sept. 30
Does the news coverage refl ect
the reality on the ground? This is the
question asked by Peace, Propaganda, and
the Promised Land. The fi lm covers the
P.R. campaign being waged by Israel in
their desire to win over popular opinion
in their confl ict with Palestine. The fi lm
states this campaign began after the
1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon. After
some bad press, Israel took steps to
control what was said regarding the
nation of Israel and the actions of their
military. According to the fi lm, Israel
has a say in the way every article having
to do with Israeli actions in the Middle
East is written, right down to the words
used. The word “occupation” is deemed
unacceptable, for example, and was used
in only 4 percent of all reports concerning
Israel in 2002. This fi lm is a powerful
expose of all the things you thought were
left unsaid but were afraid to ask about.
On the Objection Front (63 min.)
Directed by Shiri Tsur
Playing – Oct. 1
It was not a political decision. It
was about human rights. It was a choice
made by members of the Israeli Defense
Force (IDF) to not participate in further
military operations in the Palestinian
territories. The fi lm tells the story of a
group of soldiers and pilots who left the
armed forces and signed the “Refuseniks
Letter” in protest of actions taken against
Palestinian civilians. In response to their
actions, they were jailed for up to a
month. The fi lm allows the men to tell
the story of why they left and follows the
personal trials faced by each, ranging
from the jail time to being ostracized
from their own hometowns. It shows men
who feel there are more important things
in life than being a “Zionist hero,” such
as family, being a good father, being a
good friend. In the end, it is not a fi lm
about politics. It’s a fi lm about human
beings simply wanting to be humane.
No Less Powerful
The Short and the Sweet of the Canada Palestine Film Festival
By James Patterson
Planet of the Arabs (10 min.)
Directed by Jaqueline Salloum
With only a few minutes, a couple
of hard rock songs, and a flurry of
Hollywood fi lm and television clips,
Jaqueline Salloum shines a powerful
spotlight on how media has portrayed the
disconnect between Western and Middle
Eastern cultures. The mockumentary
style provides a stunning portrayal of
Hollywood’s archetypes. The content
becomes even more poignant when
one considers the bigger picture of how
our entertainment may have aided
these ideas to become internalized into
contemporary dialogue and debate. The
end result… an awareness that we need
more understanding and probably less
entertainment.
Arab a Go-Go (2 min.)
Directed by Jaqueline Salloum
Starting with visuals similar to ‘60s
and ‘70s beach bum fi lms, mixed with
visuals from movies, soap operas, and
dance fi lms, Arab a Go-Go is a collage of
material found in Arab fi lms placed to the
regional dance music. Played alongside
Planet of the Arabs (see above) it provides
a startling contrast to the perceived and
the actual cultural realities.
95.9 FM CKUW Campus/Community Radio
Top 10 CD - Albums
September 16 - 22, 2005
! = Local content * = Canadian Content *NB = RE denotes Re Entry NE = New Entry
LW TW Artist
Meen Erhabe (Who’s the Terrorist?) (4
min.)
Directed by Jacqueline Salloum
With the political prowess of early
Ice-Cube music, the Palestinian hiphop group DAM (Blood) tells a tale of
marginalization, angst, and desperation
of youth in Palestine. Although much of
the scenes in the video lack the context
and background to formulate clear and
decisive opinions about the much larger
debate, the brutally violent standoffs
and beatings depict the human side of
the day-to-day horror that is foreign to
many of us.
Recording
Label
1 1 *New Pornographers Twin Cinema Matador
2 2 !The Farrell Bros. This is a Riot Stumble
3 3 *The Most Serene Republic Underwater Cinematographer Arts & Crafts 4
4 *Caribou The Milk of Human Kindness Domino
7 5 The Raveonettes Pretty in Black Columbia
12 6 *Sianspheric RGB
Sonic Unyon
NE 7 *Cuff the Duke Cuff the Duke Hardwood
10 8 !Mood Ruff I Do My Own Stunts Slocoach
NE 9 Brian Jonestown Massacre We are the Radio Tee Pee
14 10 *Various Artists -40
COCOSOL1DC1T1
The Uniter
ARTS EDITOR: MIKE LEWIS
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
September 29, 2005
Arts & Culture 017
TEDIOUS MINUTIAE
Or: Ineffectively Detailing One’s Cultural
Consumption for the Uncaring
Installment #3
By Ben MacPhee-Sigurdson
Read:
-The Daily Show with Jon
Stewart Presents: America
(The Book) – A Citizen’s Guide
to Democracy Inaction (2004,
Warner Books)
Watched - television:
-57th Annual Emmy Awards
(CBS)
-The Sopranos, episodes 5457 (Movie Central/HBO)
Drank:
-Valpantena “Falasco”
2003 Valpolicella Ripasso
(Verona, Italy)
So I always ramble about The
Sopranos, then last week I proceeded to
speak so fleetingly of a book as lush as
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. Where is
the justice in this world? I’m not ready
to talk about that book yet, but in
the meantime, how about something
that won’t involve too many poetic
metaphors? In fact, America (The Book)
is modeled after a school textbook.
Jon Stewart graces the book’s cover,
peering meekly at a bald eagle on
his desk, but inside are the fruits
of many comedy writers’ labours: a
foreword by Thomas Jefferson, mock
timelines throughout history (i.e.
‘The Five Most Interesting Moments
in Senate History’) and diagrams (i.e.
‘The Cabinet: Yes-Men of Freedom’).
Chapters are laid out like a history
textbook’s, complete with discussion
questions (“What the hell does it
mean to ‘rock’ a vote? Can a vote be
R&B’d?”) and! classroom activities
(i.e. “Ask your students to choreograph
an interpretive dance or compose a
tome poem that represents the spirit
of their favorite piece of legislation
currently under consideration by a
Senate subcommittee”).
Most fans of The Daily Show with
Jon Stewart likely own this book. It’s
great to have lying around all the
time because you can literally pick
it up, open it to any page, and fi nd
something immediately hilarious. It’s
full-colour, with lots of meaningless
diagrams and is brilliantly arranged;
the care put into this book is
astonishing.
Much the same can be said of
the show itself, which won two Emmy
Awards… oh yeah! Sweet segue! That
was nice. I won’t spend too much
time talking about this show except
to say that I have never seen anything
as hideous as Patricia Arquette
squeezed into this awful dress that,
miraculously, was paler than she was.
Her hair looked like something out
of Dune. The worst. Worst! Earth,
Wind and Fire opened the show,
joined by the Black-Eyed Peas, for an
abysmal version of “September” with
lyrics modified to mention the shows
nominated for Emmys. Shame.
Most of the comedy-oriented
awards were shoved in Ray Romano’s
direction for his now-departed
Everybody Loves Raymond (my subtitle:
“although I’ve never met anyone
who watches the damn show, so who
the hell is ‘everybody’?”), or to the
intolerable Desperate Housewives.
Noticeably absent from The
Emmys was (were?) The Sopranos
(magical segues, no?). Because there
weren’t enough episodes last year for
the show to qualify, I didn’t get to
hear James Gandolfi ni speak without
his Jersey dialect, which I have been
really, really wanting to hear.
Do you really want me to recap
the episodes again? Nah. It’s a lot of
the same: copious food consumed,
a lot of drinks and smoking and
swearing, a couple people roughed
up, some sex, and people complaining
about other people “busting their
balls”. And all skillfully written and
directed. In fact, Steve Buscemi, who
has directed a few episodes of the
show, is now a character in the show,
playing Tony’s cousin… well… Tony.
The big thing is that he wants to stay
“a civilian” (i.e. not involve himself
in the life of crime) now that he’s
out of the can, and opts to follow his
passion… massage therapy. Some of
those dudes are so gigantic; Buscemi
working them over in the chair was
gold.
Speaking of big Italians, on to
the wine. Yes, I know, you are in
awe of my transitions. Witness my
transitory fi nesse! The name of the
wine may look somewhat complicated,
but it goes like this: Producer, Name,
Vintage, Region, Style. Let’s just say
lots of European wine labels aren’t
consumer-friendly for the beginning
oenophile. As for grape varieties, in
typical European style it is not always
so simple, but is rather a blend of
Corvina, Molinara and Rondinella,
which is then aged using the ripasso
method. Without throwing together
a PowerPoint presentation, it’s like
this: the grapes are left to dry out
on wooden racks in the sun, so they
shrivel up and make the juices more
concentrated. The wine is dense and
full-bodied, with a hint of raisiny
sweetness to counterbalance its
earthy spiciness in what is otherwise
a dry red wine. It’s about $17 and
only available at private wine stores
– not at the MLCC. Would be perfect
with some pasta ! in a marinara
sauce, some baked ziti, or (for you
carnivores) a gigantic hunk of cow.
Cooked, I might add.
Send me your tedium:
[email protected]
The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves
By Mike Lewis
ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR
“I’ve had teeth knocked
out while playing a show,”
she says. I am immediately set on edge. She’s not
one to be trifled with. She
brushes it off as simply
alcohol mixed with a riotous time. It’s all part of the
show, she says. I think to
myself, ‘wow, this lady is
tough’. I had witnessed it
first hand last year when
her band played the Pyramid, and continued to
play despite being the
target of a beer bottle
aimed to injure. Both Lucia Cifarelli and KMFDM
proceeded to give the
bottle thrower the best
“fuck you” imaginable.
They played even harder
than they had up to that
point, and the fans, the
real fans, were left feeling like they’d witnessed
something raw and powerful and ultimately satisfying on a carnal level.
So, how do I tell the frontwoman of one of the biggest, most intense, most
powerful bands on the
planet that my tape recorder has died and thus
I’ve lost the majority of
the interview? I don’t.
I couldn’t. Lucia had
me rooted in place from the
beginning. While her answers
to my questions were articulated
slowly, it only served to highlight
the fact that each word was
well thought-out, each sentence
carefully measured; nothing
this woman does is without
ref lection. It should come as no
surprise then, that I discover
her attitude regarding the
behaviour of certain concertgoers. She understands the
situation and thus is completely
in control of it, even when you
may think otherwise.
Case in point: the new
KMFDM album, Hau Ruck. The
band’s third album since reforming
in 2001 is a collection of some
of the most varied and unique
material that they’ve assembled
since 1995’s Nihil. Present are all
the usual trademarks: the spoken
word in German, the utterly
huge drums, and chaotic guitar
interplay. However, this album
takes all those elements and drives
them up a notch. The album is
more dynamic than past efforts.
The dance elements, such as “Hau
Ruck,” stand out next to the fullon metal assault of tracks like
“Free Your Hate,” and both songs
serve to accentuate the almost
sensual moments found in tracks
such as “Real Thing.” This record
will have the disaffected youth of
today out on the dance f loor in
no time, shaking their vinyl-clad,
black-eyeliner-wearing, ‘I hate
everything’ asses from the first
note.
Lyrically, the album contains
the usual ranting about the current
administration in the United States
(see “New American Century”).
Lucia also mentions that some new,
more personal topics are touched
on. In “Professional Killer”, the
singer explores the mentality of the
perpetrators involved in the wave
of Columbine copycat killings,
and tries to understand what it
must have been like for those kids.
A stand out track on the record is
the tongue-in-cheek commentary
“Feed Our Fame”. Opening with
the chant “KMFDM sucks!” it is a
tailor-made, fist-pumping anthem;
perfect for getting the audience to
shout along at the shows.
“Sometimes I’d be on message
boards,” says Lucia, “and I’d read
things written by so-called fans
about the band. They’d have all
this personal information about
us that just wasn’t true.” Rather
than get upset, the band decided
to “take the piss” out of them. “It’s
just about that whole scenario,
where they claim to be fans and
then they sit at their computers
and complain about every little
thing. It inspired what I think is a
really funny song,” she explains.
“It’s taking the piss out of them,
but in it we also take the piss
out ourselves (laughs).” When
asked about whether or not she is
bothered by that sort of behaviour,
she replies, “You know, maybe
it’s just age, but I find that as I
get older, that sort of thing just
becomes less and less important.
It even becomes kind of silly and
you just start to ignore it. We just
wanted to acknowledge that the
whole ‘fame’ thing can be pretty
silly.”
All in all, Lucia’s contributions
to the album and the band are
unmistakable. She is more involved
in the overall process than ever
before, contributing lyrics, melody,
and even some programming.
“I’m in this band 100
percent,” she says. “It’s my first
priority.” Indeed, the entire band
is in it all the way. The band runs
the entire operation by themselves,
something that Lucia believes helps
to make the band more endeared
by fans. “It’s almost grassroots in
its operation, and it keeps us really
close to the fans. We almost always
greet the fans after shows, and
get to know them. Then, in turn,
they help us by getting involved
in promoting the show, or simply
buying the album.”
Buying the album is another
point Lucia addresses. At the time
of the interview, I had not yet
received the album, as the band
were taking steps to prevent its
release for as long as possible.
When asked about the use of the
internet for stealing albums, she
says it’s something she doesn’t
understand. “I like to have the
whole thing in my hands,” she
explains. “I like to see the cover
art, read the liner notes, and just
take it all in. I’m a music lover.”
So, after the now-famous
tragedy of the broken tape
recorder, I can only hope I’ve
done her justice. Any woman,
or man for that matter, that can
walk into an established band
like KMFDM and take charge
is worthy of respect. Hell, any
band that can continue to put out
original material that is not only
good, but inspiring, for over 20
years is a band to be revered. And
anyone that can take a bottle to
the head and still play as hard as
ever is definitely worth checking
out. And you can do just that this
Friday, Sept. 30, at the Pyramid
Cabaret.
For more information on
KMFDM, visit www.kmfdm.net
September 29, 2005
The Uniter
Page 18
LISTINGS COORDINATOR: NICK WEIGELDT
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
018 [email protected]
For September 29th onwards.
ON CAMPUS
ONGOING
THE UNITER will hold General
Contributor Meetings the first
Monday of every month. These
meetings will be for those who
are interested in contributing
to the paper and need some
direction, or want to write
for several different sections.
It is also an opportunity to
meet Uniter staff and other
Uniter contributors. Meetings
are held in the Uniter office,
located on the mezzanine level
of the Bulman Centre, 0RM14.
Everyone is welcome to attend.
NOMINATIONS are taking
place for positions on the
UWSA Board of Directors. The
following Directorships are
currently vacant: Adaptive
Services, Part-Time/ Mature,
Science, Vice President
Internal, and Lesbian Gay
Bisexual Transgender *. All
nominees must have a 2.0
GPA to become candidates.
Deadline for nominations is
Friday, Oct. 7 at 12:30 p.m.
Nomination forms are available
in the UWSA General Office
0R30. Contact Chief Elections
Commissioner Ben Wickström
at [email protected] for
more information. The Chief
Elections Commissioner’s office
hours are posted outside of the
Office of the Chief Elections
Commissioner in room 0R24
located in the Bulman Students’
Centre.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE PARTNERS
needed in the English Language
program, U of W Continuing
Education Massey Building,
294 William Avenue. Language
partners are native (or fluent)
English-speaking volunteers
who give ESL (English as a
Second Language) students an
opportunity to practice English
outside of the classroom and to
learn more about the Canadian
way of life. The day and time
partners meet is decided by
the student and the Language
partner. Time commitment 1-2
hrs/week. A letter of reference
is available after completion
of the program. Contact Rina
Monchka, 982-1151, email
[email protected]
DO YOU SPEAK ENGLISH?
Are you taking even a single
course through the English
department? If you answered
yes to either of the above
questions, then the English
Students Association wants
you! Speak English with
like-minded people, consult
our semi-professional papereditors, party like a poet. The
ESA meets every Wednesday
during the free period in 2A47,
the English Studies Common
Room. Join us there or e-mail
our simply amazing president,
Susie Taylor, at [email protected]
com for more details.
JUICE, THE U OF W CREATIVE
WRITING JOURNAL VOLUME 6
SUBMISSIONS are due January
1, 2006. Juice accepts fiction,
drama, creative non-fiction
and poetry submissions from
current U of W and Collegiate
students and recent alumni. 10
pages max for prose, 6 poems
max for poetry. All submissions
should be double-spaced, on 8
1/2 X 11 paper and must include
a digital copy (disk, cd, email)
in MS-Word [.doc], Rich Text
[.rtf] or Plain Text [.txt] format.
All pages should be numbered
and include the author’s name.
A separate sheet should be sent
that includes the author’s name,
student number, complete
mailing address, phone number
and email address. Submissions
can be dropped off at the dropboxes located at the UWSA Info
Booth, UWSA Bulman Centre
Office, or the Writer’s Collective
(5th Floor archives). Email
submissions to [email protected]
gmail.com. See submission
guidelines on our website
http://juice.uwinnipeg.ca.
EVENTS
PEER SUPPORT PRESENTS: Randi
Hunter, Rainbow Resource
Centre Counselor and Volunteer
Coordinator. Talk about
homophobia, Gender Issues,
Relationships, R.R.C. volunteer
program. Thursday, Sept.
29th, 6:30 p.m. in room 3C27.
Everyone welcome and free to
attend.
HISTORY CONFERENCE:
“MENNONITE HOSTS AND
REFUGEE NEWCOMERS” A
two-day conference hosted
by The Chair in Mennonite
Studies. In 1979 and 1980
thousands of Southeast Asia
refugees, escaping the ravages
of the Vietnam War and war
in neighbouring countries,
came to Canada. Many of these
newcomers were hosted by
Canadian Mennonites, creating
new relationships and changing
the nature of the Canadian
Mennonite churches. Twentyfive years after this moment
in history, this conference
analyzes, evaluates, reflects
and celebrates. This conference
features presentations from
scholars, hosts, and newcomers.
September 30th - Oct 1st, 8:30
a.m. - 9 p.m. Keynote: Dr. Lloyd
Axworthy, “Refugees and Global
Citizenship,” Friday, 7:00 p.m.
SPENCE FALL FUN FAIR! Come
and Celebrate Our Community’s
Talents! October 1st 12 p.m.-4
p.m. on Spence Street between
Portage and Ellice. Stop by
for entertainment with local
musicians and entertainers;
children’s area with clowns, face
painting and games; vendors’
area with food, used and new
items for sale; Check out the
Skills Bank Table and learn
about local job opportunities.
PUBLIC LECTURE: PREVENTING
ABORIGINAL LANGUAGE
LOSS Over the past decade
an unprecedented number
of speakers of Aboriginal
languages in Manitoba and
across Canada have adopted
English as their principal (and
in many cases only) means of
communication. If this trend
continues, within a generation
only a handful of Canada’s 50
Aboriginal languages will still
be viable. In this talk, Dr. George
Fulford discusses the challenges
Aboriginal-language speakers
face--particularly in urban
areas. Through a discussion
of his ongoing research with
the School District of Mystery
Lake in Thompson and with
the Ministry of Education,
Citizenship and Youth, he
will explore what Applied
Anthropologists (and other
social scientists) can contribute
to help prevent the loss of
Canada’s Aboriginal languages.
Oct 1st, 11am-12:30pm in room
3D01.
SAFEWALK AWARENESS
WEEK Dedicated and friendly
volunteers are available to walk
you to your car, bus stop or
residence. Safewalk Awareness
Week is a chance for you to
meet the Safewalk volunteers
and learn more about this
valuable service provided by
the UWSA. October 3rd – 6th.
READING CULTURES SPEAKERS
SERIES presented by the
English Department. A Literary
and Cultural Studies Faculty
Colloquium.
Everyone
is
welcome to attend. Oct 7th: Peter
Ives, UW Politics Department,
“The Politics of Culture”. Room
2M70.
VIRTUOSI CONCERTS Peter
Vinograde, piano, is presented
performing “INTO THE FUTURE”
- Includes works by Bach
(Fantasy in a- & Partita No.
5), Mendelssohn, Scriabin,
Rachmaninoff, a Canadian
premiere by Alfred Fisher and
a world premiere by Michael
Matthews. October 8th EckhardtGramatté Hall, 8pm. Tickets
$28 adults / $26 seniors / $16
students. Call 786-9000 or visit
www.virtuosi.mb.ca.
READING CULTURES SPEAKERS
SERIES presented by the
English Department. A Literary
and Cultural Studies Faculty
Colloquium. Everyone is
welcome to attend. Oct 14th:
Mavis Remier, UW English
Department, “The Phenomenon
of Harry Potter”. Room 2M70.
BROWN BAG LECTURE SERIES
PRESENTS Dr. Parvin Ghorayshi,
Department of Sociology.
Please join the Office of the
Vice-President (Research,
International & External Affairs)
for the 3rd Annual “Brown Bag
Lecture Series”. This event is
open to the general public.
Everyone is welcome to bring
their lunch and join us for this
informal gathering to highlight
Dr. Ghorayshi’s research and
share in her success. Get to
know her and what she’s doing!
October 19th, 12:30pm-1:00pm
in room 3C01.
Executive Director of the
Indigenous Peoples Council on
Biocolonialism. October 21st.
The University of Winnipeg
Aboriginal Self-Governance
Program would like to invite
students, faculty, staff, and
the public to the 2005 - 2006
Harry Daniels Distinguished
Lecture Series. Debra Harry is
Northern Paiute, from Pyramid
Lake, Nevada. Harry serves as
the Executive Director of the
Indigenous Peoples Council
on Biocolonialism (IPCB), a USbased non-profit organization
created to assist Indigenous
peoples in the protection
of their genetic resources,
Indigenous knowledge, and
cultural and human rights
from the negative effects
of biotechnology. Lecture
runs from 12:30pm-1:30pm
in room 1L13. Please join Ms.
Harry following her lecture for
refreshments in the Aboriginal
Student Services Centre from
1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. This event
is free and all are welcome to
attend. For more information,
contact Wendy Fontaine at
786-9305.
VIRTUOSI CONCERTS Concerts
with Commentary: Yi-Jia
Susanne Hou, violin. Her
Virtuosi Concerts debut
performance 2 years ago was
hailed as “one of the most
stunning violin recitals in
Winnipeg in years” (Winnipeg
Free Press). Oct 29th, EckhardtGramatté Hall, 8pm. Tickets
$28 adults / $26 seniors / $16
students. Call 786-9000 or visit
www.virtuosi.mb.ca.
INTERNATIONAL DRAG KINGS
EXTRAVAGANZA (IDKE) is a
four day gathering of all those
interested in dragking culture.
The weekend hosts an academic
conference, film festival, art
show, numerous shows, as well
as a brunch. Past representation
included: Canada, The United
States, Germany, Japan,
Australia, Ireland and the United
Kingdom. For the first time,
IDKE is being hosted outside
the United States. Winnipeg’s
GenderPlay Cabaret is the
proud host of IDKE 7. It’s an
awesome and mind-blowing
international gathering you
won’t want to miss! October
21st, 9am-4pm, conference
runs Oct 20th – 23rd. Discount
registration package for $75
until they are all sold out.For
more information visit www.
idkewinnipeg.com.
USING GRAPH THEORY TO
SOLVE INSTANT INSANITY by
Dr. Oellermann. October 5th,
12:30pm-1:20pm in room 1L06.
No prior knowledge of graph
theory required.
HARRY DANIELS DISTINGUISHED
LECTURE SERIES: DEBRA HENRY,
STUDENT SERVICES
WORKSHOP: Test-Taking.
WORKSHOPS
AND
SEMINARS
MATH PROBLEM-SOLVING
SEMINARS w/ Professor
Visentin. For students planning
to try either of the upcoming
math contests or for students
simply interested in learning
some techniques for solving
interesting math problems.
Mondays 12:30pm-1:20pm in
room 3M61.
Oct 12th, 49pm-5:15pm in
room 2C11. Student Services is
offering a series of free study
skills session for all University
of Winnipeg and Collegiate
students. You are welcome to
attend one session or all the
sessions, as you wish. Please
sign up by contacting [email protected]
uwinnipeg.ca at 204.786.9789,
or sign the sheet on the door at
room 2B16. See you there!
CAREER RESOURCE CENTRE
Need some help with your
resume? Wondering how to
mine the hidden job market?
The Career Resource Centre will
be offering the following free
workshops for students:
Resume:
Tues., Oct. 18, 2:30 - 3:30 Room
3M58
Tues., Nov. 22, 11:30 - 12:30
Room 2C15
Job Search:
Wed., Oct. 5, 12:30 - 1:30 Room
3M65
Thurs., Oct. 20, 2:30 - 3:30 Room
3M58
Mon., Nov. 14, 12:30 - 1:30 Room
3M65
Interview Preparation:
Wed., Nov. 16, 12:30 - 1:30 Room
3M65
Thurs., Nov. 24, 2:30 - 3:30 Room
2C15
To register, please call 786-9231
or email
[email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF WINNIPEG
DIVISION OF CONTINUING
EDUCATION
Seminar: Establishing &
Monitoring a Budget
October 1st, 9am-5pm at DCA,
294 William Ave
The participants of the seminar
will:
1. Gain familiarity with
accounting terms and principles
that form the basis of the
language of business.
2. Learn techniques for
recording and summarizing
business transactions for any
organization.
3. Learn techniques in preparing
basic balance sheet and income
statements.
Program: Arts And Cultural
Management
Registration or Information:
982-6633
Title: Event Management
Instructor: L. Bowering
The Uniter
LISTINGS COORDINATOR: NICK WEIGELDT
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
September 29, 2005
[email protected] 019
continued
Classifieds
Ticketmaster.
Date: Nov 8-Nov 22/2005
Time: 3 Tuesdays, 9:00-3:00pm
Cost: $350.00
Location: 294 William Ave.
Registration or Information:
982-6633
STRATOVARIOUS Sep 30th
West End Cultural Centre 8pm.
Tickets $26.50 in advance
through Ticketmaster.
Title: Cultural Career
Management for the SelfEmployed
KMFDM Sep 30th The Pyramid
Cabaret 8pm. Tickets $28.00 at
The Crypt, Ticketmaster.
Instructor: J. Slivinski
Date: Nov 19-Nov 26/2005
Time: 2 Saturdays, 9:00-12:30pm
Cost: $175.00
Location: 294 William Ave.
Registration or Information:
982-6633
CONVERGE Sep 30th Collective
Cabaret Exclaim! Aggressive
Tendencies Tour w/ Terror,
Cursed, Mare. Tickets $20 in
advance at Into The Music, Sk8.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DO YOU LIKE WORKING WITH
NEWCOMER CHILDREN? Do
you believe you can change
our community? If you said yes,
you are invited to our programs
as a volunteer! The Citizenship
Council of Manitoba Inc.
International Centre is looking
for student volunteers to help
new arrivals to Canada learn
English and feel welcome in our
country. Opportunities exist for
volunteers to give their time
and support to the Centre’s
Immigrant Children and Youth
Programs including Sports
Activities for Newcomer Kids,
Empowerment for Newcomer
Kids and Newcomer Kids
Welcome Program. If you’d like
to help out, contact Si-il Park
at 943-9158 or at [email protected]
hotmail.com.
STATS CANADA 2005-2006
Mathematical Statistician
Recruitment Campaign.
October 3rd, 12:30pm-1:20pm in
room 3M59.
AROUND TOWN
CONCERTS
MODERN LIFE IS WAR, UNDER
PRESSURE, KEN-MODE,
FIRST STRIKE, NO FOOLIN’
Sep 29th Red Road Lodge (new
Occidental) 7pm. All ages,
tickets $7.
THE ARCADE FIRE Sep 30th
Burton Cummings Theatre
w/ Wolf Parade, The Belle
Orchestre 8pm. Tickets $21.87 at
POUR ME ANOTHER TOUR
feat ATMOSPHERE Oct 1st
Ramada Marlborough Event
Centre w/ Blueprint, P.O.S 8pm.
Tickets $28 in advance through
Ticketmaster.
PLANETARIUM AT NIGHT At
9pm on the first Saturday of
the month, the Planetarium
goes “Alternative”. Every show
offers new live, improvised
programming including live
LOUD music. Oct 1st features
Starving For Gravity. Tickets
$7.50.
CAFÉ JAZZ hosted by Jazz
Faculty members the first
Sunday of the month. Oct 2nd
Manitoba Conservatory of Music
and Arts (105-211 Bannatyne
Ave) 3pm-5pm. Drop in fee is
$6 adults/$4 students; 9 session
pass available for $50 adults/$32
students. Call 943-6090.
BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA Oct
3rd Pantages Playhouse Theatre
8pm. Tickets $39.50 through
Ticketmaster.
AUDIOSLAVE Oct 4th
MTS Centre 7pm. Tickets
$37.50/$47.50 through
Ticketmaster.
MARTYN JOSEPH Oct 4th
West End Cultural Centre 8pm.
Tickets $17 in advance at WECC
and Ticketmaster or $20 at the
door.
HEDLY Oct 5th & 6th w/ Faber.
West End Cultural Centre 8pm.
Oct 5th sold out. Tickets for Oct
6th $15 in advance at WECC or
through Ticketmaster/$20 at
the door.
GROUNDSWELL CONCERT
SERIES begins its 15th year
presenting bold, distinctive
experiences in contemporary
music on October 6th at 8pm
at the Winnipeg Art Gallery.
‘Moment in the Sun’ by Shauna
Rolston, Susan Hoeppner and
Heather Schmidt. Subscriptions
are $69 adult/$59 senior/$29
student; individual tickets are
$19/$17/$9 and available by
calling 943-5770 or emailing
[email protected]
DJ FLEUR and MAMA
CUTSWORTH, are presenting
the first installment of the
SÜGAR DANCE PARTY SERIES
at the Graffiti Gallery 109
Higgins on October 7th, a night
that focuses on the rarity of
a female-driven party night.
One of the few places where
folks can find solid dance
music – from old FUNK and
dirty DISCO, to HIP-HOP and
ELECTRO PUNK – the evening
is unique in that it has been
primarily created in order to
provide a comfortable space for
all dance fans – whether they’re
queer, straight, female or male.
9pm-1am, admission $4.99 at
the door or $4 with donation of
a non-perishable food item.
CANADIAN JAZZ CONCERT
SERIES presents Tom Van
Seters Quartet featuring Dan
Thompson. Oct 7th Salle PaulineBoutal at the Franco-Manitoban
Cultural Centre 7 :30pm. Season
tickets are available for $75
adults/$50 students and seniors.
Individual tickets are $22.50 in
advance ($25 at the door) for
adults, $15 for students and
seniors. For tickets call 233-8972
or visit the Franco-Manitoban
Cultural Centre box office at 340
Provencher.
WORLD HOSPICE DAY
VARIETY SHOW hosted by
Maggi May Robinson. Oct
8th Elim Chapel (546 Portage
across from the CBC). Featured
performers include Ron Paley,
Frank Burke, Four On The
Floor, The Maggi May Trio and
the Elim Chapel Choir. Tickets
$10 and available at McNally
Robinson Booksellers.
THE HOLD STEADY Oct 11th
w/ The Paperbacks. West End
Cultural Centre 8pm. Tickets $10
in advance at Into The Music,
WECC and Ticketmaster or $12
at the door.
FEIST Oct 13th w/ Jason Collett
and New Buffalo. Pantages
Playhouse Theatre 8pm. Tickets
$27.50 through Ticketmaster.
ART & SOUL PRESENTS ‘IN
STEREO’ Oct 15th Winnipeg Art
Gallery. Every great period in
time can be captured by the
music of its era. Every important
part of your life can be brought
back with song. Every haircut
you regretted can be traced
back to a musician you thought
was cool. This year, Art & Soul
is stuffing the entire history of
music into one small building.
Tickets $55/$50 for members
before Oct 8th; $65/$60 after. To
order call 786-6641 ext 207 or
visit www.instereo.ca.
COMEDY
ADVERTISE YOUR
LOCAL BUSINESS
HERE
COMEDY NIGHT featuring Big
Daddy Taz and Friends. Oct 1st
Pantages Playhouse Theatre
7:30pm. Tickets $10.50 through
Ticketmaster.
THE COMEDY BUS featuring
Crumbs, Ron Moore, The Steve
Breadstone Experience, Janet
Shum, Jefferson Sinclair, Nick’s
Troubled Pile & more. Oct 15th,
Gas Station Theatre. More info
TBA.
RUMOR’S COMEDY CLUB
2025 Corydon Ave Sep 27th30th: Dean Jenkinson. Oct 1st:
David Merry. Oct 4th-15th: Sugar
Sammy.
IMPROV SUPPER CLUB
Mondays, Toad in the Hole Pub
& Eatery, 8, 9, 10, 11pm.
JACK ‘UM AND ATTACK ‘EM
IMPROV featuring Ron Moore.
Tuesdays, The Park Theatre &
Movie Café, 8pm. $4.99.
FILM
CINEMATHEQUE 100 Arthur
St Sep 29th – Oct 2nd 7pm &
9pm: “The Occupation Will
Still Be Televised” 2nd Annual
Canada-Palestine Film Festival.
Oct 3rd – Oct 6th 7pm: ‘Winter
Soldier’, shot by an anonymous
filmaker’s collective in 1971,
this is one of the most powerful
anti-war films ever made. Oct
3rd – 6th 9pm: ‘De-Railroaded:
The Story of Larry “Wild Man”
Fischer’ Josh Rubin, 2004. Oct
7th-13th: Sunset Story 7pm:
‘Sunset Story’ by Laura Grabbert
shows it is possible to grow old
with dignity, grace and humour.
Oct 7th – 13th 9pm:
LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, GRE PREPARATION SEMINARS. COMPLETE
30 HOUR SEMINARS. PROVEN TEST TAKING STRATEGIES. PERSONALIZED PROFESSIONAL
INSTRUCTION. COMPREHENSIVE STUDY MATERIALS. SIMULATED PRACTICE EXAMS.
FREE REPEAT POLICY. PERSONALIZED TUTORING AVAILABLE. THOUSANDS OF SATISFIED
STUDENTS. 1.800.779.1779. WWW.OXFORDSEMINARS.COM.
TEACH ENGLISH OVERSEAS.
E.S.L. TEACHER TRAINING CERTIFICATION COURSES. INTENSIVE 60 HOUR PROGRAM.
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES. DETAILED LESSON PLANNING. INTERNATIONALLY
RECOGNIZED TEACHING CERTIFICATE. JOB GUARANTEE INCLUDED. THOUSANDS OF SATISFIED
STUDENTS. 1.800.779.1779.
WWW.OXFORDSEMINARS.COM.
September 29, 2005
The Uniter
LISTINGS COORDINATOR: NICK WEIGELDT
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
020 [email protected]
AWARDS &
FINANCIAL AID:
INFORMATION
UPDATED WEEKLY
Cal Callahan Memorial Bursary- Pipe
Line Contractors Assoc. of Canada:
This award is available to sons,
daughter, or legal wards of persons
who derive their principal income
from the Pipeline Industry and whose
employers are members of the Pipe
Line Contractors Assoc. of Canada. Each
year, this association offers a bursary
or bursaries totaling six thousand
dollars to eligible students enrolled in
undergraduate studies at recognized
Universities or Colleges in Canada.
Applications are available in the Awards
office in Graham Hall.
Deadline date: September 30th 2005.
National Aboriginal Achievement
Foundation:
NAAF scholarship applications for
2005-2006 are now available. There
are a variety of deadline dates,
depending upon program of study.
These scholarships are available to all
Canadian resident Aboriginal Students
(First Nations, Metis and Inuit) who are
enrolled in full-time post-secondary
studies. Award amounts will vary. Juries
review each application individually.
Submit your application NO SOONER
than two weeks prior to the deadline.
Applications available at www.naaf.ca
or at the Awards Office in Graham Hall.
Deadline: March 31 and September 30
for Fine Arts Programs(music, drama,
visual, media arts)
Canadian Recreational Canoeing Assoc.
- Bill Mason Memorial Scholarship Fund
This memorial scholarship of $1,000
is to assist with the education of
tomorrow’s environment stewards
and to ensure the memory and spirit
of Bill Mason is vibrant. Environmental
studies students are good candidates
for this bursary. You will have to provide
a statement of philosophy regarding
your beliefs with reference to the
environment, to outdoor education
and to how it pertains to the ethics of
land and water. You must also have an
academic standing of B+ or greater.
Applications are available on line at
www.paddlingcanada.com/scholarship/
application
Deadline: September 30th 2005.
Holstein Canada Education Awards:
Three scholarships of $1,000.00 are
being offered to students.
1) must be a member of Holstein
Canada, or a son/daughter of a member.
2) must have completed at least one
year of university or college.
3) must submit an official transcript of
the two most recent semesters.
4) must be returning to school within
the calendar year.
Apply on line at www.holstein.ca Go
to the Young Adults Link and awards
section.
Send application on-line and follow
up with official transcripts to : Kim
Leblond, Holstein Canada Education
Awards, 20 Corporate Place, P.O. Box
610, Brantford, ON N3T 5R4 Deadline:
4:00 p.m. (eastern) Friday, September
30, 2005
Manitoba Hydro, Awards Bursaries and
Scholarships:
If you are in any of these designated
groups: a woman, an Aboriginal person,
a member of a visible minority, or a
person with disabilities, Manitoba
Hydro offers 11 Employment Equity
Bursaries of $1500.00 and Summer
Employment for students entering
first-year studies at the University
studying Computer Science, Commerce
or Engineering. Applications are
available in the Awards and Financial
Aid Office, located in Graham Hall. More
information at www.hydro.mb.ca
Deadline: October 1st 2005
Rhodes Scholarships for 2006:
These scholarships are tenable at the
University of Oxford, England. They are
granted for two years with a possibility
of a third year. Scholars are required to
go to Oxford in October 2006. Three of
the eleven scholarships will be given to
Western Region Canadians. You must be
a Canadian citizen or person domiciled
in Canada, born between Oct 2 1981
and Oct 1 1987, and have received an
undergraduate degree before taking up
this scholarship. Applications available
by contacting the Provincial Secretary
of The Rhodes Scholarship Trust,
Hedley Auld at 204-934-7354 or email
[email protected] We also have a few
applications available in the University
of Winnipeg Awards Department.
Deadline: October 14 2004.
Bridget Walsh Scholarship for Single
Parent Irish Women:
The Bridget Walsh scholarship is on the
basis of academic merit or promise as
well as financial need. It is awarded to
low-income, single-parent Irish women
in Canada who wish to pursue their
education at university or college levels.
Scholarship values vary from year to
year depending on royalties. Contact:
Mary Broderick, Chairperson, Bridget
Walsh Scholarship, 205 Mountainview
Road North, Georgetown, ON, L7G 4T8,
Tel: (416) 873-0873.
Deadline: October 15 2005
Dennis Lyster Leadership Bursary:
This bursary will provide a maximum
of $5000 to promote the development
of leadership within co-operatives and
credit unions. This bursary is intended
to encourage, help and assist students
or employees of credit unions or cooperatives to undertake studies, which
will contribute to the development
of co-operatives and credit unions in
Canada and elsewhere. Applicants for
the bursary will be assessed on the
following criteria:
1) be a member of a credit union or
co-operative.
2) be a student with co-operative
leadership potential.
3) be a student of academic and
professional excellence.
4) be a student who values excellence.
5) be a student who has community
spirit.
6) be a student who is a Canadian
citizen.
7) be a student with demonstrated
financial need.
8) be a student 40 years of age or less as
of January 1 2006.
For further information, please contact
Marketing & Communications at
306-956-1904 or email to! [email protected]
concentrafinancial.ca Applications are
also available in the Awards & Finanical
Aid office, located in Graham Hall.
Deadline: October 21 2005.
Dennis Franklin Cromary Memorial
Fund:
The primary purpose of the Dennis
Franklin Cromarty Memorial Fund is to
financially assist others in fulfilling their
aspirations. Decisions will not be based
solely on academic records. Criteria:
the recipient must be a member of
Nishnawbe Aski. The University student
candidate must have completed one
year of post secondary education with a
consistently successful academic record,
and be confirmed as continuing the
program. Applicants should provide the
following:
(i) a three page essay on the topics
mentioned below
(ii) a letter of reference from a current
teacher, or an elder or mentor.
(iii) proof of current academic record.
Essay topics to be covered:
· An introduction including: your name,
the name of your community, year level,
program, school’s name and general
information about yourself.
· Educational goals
· Career plans
· Why do you think it’s important to stay
in school?
· Community and volunteer work .
· Hardships you’ve encountered.
· How you contribute to your family,
school & community.
Go to website www.dfcromartyfund.
ca for more information. Applications
are also available in the Awards office in
Graham Hall.
Application closing date: 5:00 p.m.
October 31st.
Surfing for more Dollars?
ALWAYS CHECK OUT www.
myuwinnipeg.ca Student Services
Link
Try these websites for more
possibilities! These two sites will
lead you through Canadian-based
scholarship searches.
www.studentawards.com
www.scholarshipscanada.com
Special Awards for High-Need Students:
The U of W provides opportunity for
students who have high levels of
financial need to apply for a variety
of scholarships and bursaries offered
through our Awards and Financial Aid
Dept. To be eligible for a “scholarship”,
your overall GPA should be 3.00. To
be eligible for a “bursary” you must
have satisfactory academics GPA 2.0.
Application forms are available in
Student Services, main floor of Graham
Hall.
Note: Louis Riel Institute Bursaries – At
the U of W, Metis students can apply
for this scholarship by filling out the
following two forms.
a)
Special Awards for High
Needs Students Application:
Return this form to Student
Services, Awards & Financial Aid
office in Graham Hall.
b) Louis Riel Institute application:
Send this form to The Louis Riel
Foundation 150 Henry Ave. Wpg
MB R3B 0J7. Allow sufficient time
for processing and provide proof
of ancestry.
Deadline date: October 3 2005.
University of Winnipeg Work-Study
Program:
This program is designed to provide
supplementary financial assistance
through part-time campus employment
to students at the University of
Winnipeg. To be eligible for the WorkStudy program you must
a) be registered as a full-time student
in a degree program at the University
of Winnipeg in the 2005/2006 academic
year.
b) have completed successfully 30 credit
hours.
c) be on regular status at the University
of Winnipeg.
d) receive a government student loan of
at least $1000 for 2005/2006 as a result
of financial need, or obtain a student
line of credit for 2005/2006 of at least
$1000 from a banking institution.
Documentation of financial need will
be required.
On October 3rd, you will be able to pick
up applications and job descriptions in
Student Services, located on the main
floor of Graham Hall.
Deadline: October 19th - return
completed applications to Awards &
Financial Aid Department in Student
Services.
Lorraine Latremouille Fellowship:
Applications for this fellowship are
invited from University of Winnipeg
students who will be registered in an
undergraduate degree program during
the 2005 - 2006 academic year and who
will be conducting research in the area
of family violence. The research must
meet the criteria for sponsorship and
affiliation by RESOLVE and a copy of the
final research report or thesis must be
filed with RESOLVE.
Application forms are available through
Research Services, in the Office of the
Vice-President (Research, Graduate
Studies and International Studies),
4CM02, Library Mezzanine.
Deadline date: November 1 2005.
Mr. & Mrs. ONG Hoo Hong Memorial
Bursary in Religious Studies:
Established in 2003 by Gim Ong, this
bursary fund will provide help to
students who meet the following
criteria.
1) a student whose GPA is a minimum
of 2.5
2) a student who is facing unique
financial hardships, such as students
with dependents or students with a
disability.
3) a student who is enrolled in a
University of Winnipeg biblical studies
course during the 2005-2006 academic
year.
4) a student who has documented
financial need; CSL/MSL or a Student
Line of Credit. Proof is required.
Applications are available in the Awards
and Financial Aid office, located on the
first floor of Graham Hall. The value of
the bursary is variable, but normally up
to $1000.00.
Anthony J. Besarabowicz Bursary:
This annual award of $1000 will be
awarded to a certified teacher who
has taught for at least one year and
who registers at the University of
Winnipeg in a degree, diploma or
certificate program leading to further
qualifications, not necessarily in the
field of education. The applicant must
be planning to return to teaching in
Manitoba. Preference will be given to a
student in need of financial assistance.
You will need to supply information
about your previous teaching
experience, your current program
of studies, your future plans for
employment in the field of education,
and your need of financial assistance.
Applications are available from the
Awards and Financial Aid office, located
in Graham Hall.
Deadline: January 6 2006.
Grace Thomson Memorial Bursary:
This bursary is presented in memory
of Grace Thomson. It is awarded to an
aboriginal woman who is registered
currently in any year of the B.Ed
program at the Winnipeg Education
Centre. The value of the award is $1000.
Applications are available at WEC from
Kevin Lamoureux, or the Awards and
Financial Office, located on the main
floor of Graham hall on the U of W
campus.
Deadline: January 6 2006.
Winifred Gamble Bursary:
This bursary is presented in honour of
Winifred Gamble, a longtime member
of the University of Women’s Club
and a former chair of the University
Women’s Club Scholarship Committee.
It is awarded to an aboriginal student
who has completed 30 credit hours
and is registered currently in the
second year of the B.Ed program at the
Winnipeg Education Centre. The value
of the award is $600. Applications are
available at WEC from Kevin Lamoureux,
or the Awards and Financial Aid Office,
located on the main floor of Graham Hall
on the U of W campus.
Deadline: January 6 2006.
The Awards and Financial Aid staff at the
University of Winnipeg will continue to
keep you informed of available awards,
scholarships and bursary opportunities.
Please direct your questions regarding
awards and scholarships to Tanis
Kolisnyk. [email protected]
The Uniter
SPORTS EDITOR: MIKE P YL
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PHONE: 786-9497
FAX: 783-7080
Sports
September 29, 2005
021
Crosby, the Cap, and the Castaways
photo by Mike Pyl
The Sports Fanʼs Radio Fix
By Josh Boulding
H
ave you ever wondered
what happened in that
Wesmen game last week?
Or maybe youʼre a big fan of the
Blue Bombers? If you like sports,
then Ultra Mega Sports Show,
broadcasting weekly on CKUW 95.9
FM on Mondays, 4:30-5:00 p.m.,
is your ticket to the other side of
sports.
After sitting down with the
hosts, Thomas Asselin and Rhys
Kelso, I learned that the Ultra
Mega Sports Show is about more
than just the statistics. With
Rhys, a graduate of our esteemed
university and a current student
at Red River in the Creative
Communications program, and
Thomas, majoring in Politics with
the hope of entering a journalism
program, the show has had some
pretty interesting talks during its
weekly half-hour block.
Both Tom and Rhys have
been and are involved with the
Uniter, contributing to the paper
off and on with articles over the
last year. Thomas has been with
CKUW 95.9 FM since he started
here at the University of Winnipeg,
and had been gunning for a radio
show. After meeting in December
of 2004, Rhys, Thomas and
then-Uniter sports editor Leighton
Klassen put together the idea of a
sports talk show, taking it, almost
jokingly, to Art Ladd, the program
director at the station.
In February, when a spot
opened up, the radio station told
them it was a go and the Ultra
Mega team has been on-air since
Feb. 19, 2005.
What goes on in the show, you
ask? After a short introduction,
usually followed by the week’s
highlights of games and a short
commercial break, the two will
hold a main event. Main events
have included table discussions,
debates, predictions, Tom’s day at
the Bomber stadium and sometimes
player interviews, either live or
pre-recorded.
They’ve had sports stars from
Wes Lysack and other Bomber
players to U of W’s own Heather
Thompson and Joanne Wells and
many other players for the Wesmen
teams.
The plans for the next few
months are to hopefully get some
interviews within the Manitoba
Moose organization, as well as
many more Wesmen players and
staff. Next on the list of interviews
is the Wesmen coaching staff. You
may hear one of their voices on the
Ultra Mega show soon.
The coverage includes sports
in general, but focus will be on
Wesmen events and exclusive
interviews with local sports teams.
Like most of CKUW, the Ultra
Mega Sports Show is geared away
from the mainstream.
The Wes Lysack Interview,
as it is now known, has been wellreputed by listeners and has already
garnered many requests for hard
copies. Should any one wish to
obtain a copy of any pre-recordings
of the Ultra Mega Sports Show,
feel free to visit CKUW above the
Buffeteria and ask about the show
and its hosts.
“It wasn’t on-air, but that
was pretty funny,” says Rhys, one
of the hosts of the show, about
Wes Lysack’s interview, citing
the safety’s, shall I say, colourful
language. Evidently a lot of creative
editing went into that project.
“One thing to mention with
Wes Lysack,” said Tom, the other
host, “he actually took a whole
afternoon to spend with us to do
the interview.”
The prospects for the next
year look good for coverage. Some
exciting things should be happening
with the Ultra Mega Sports Show.
Tune in Mondays from 4:30 to 5
p.m. on CKUW 95.9 FM.
Finally, it’s hockey season!
It’s been nearly a year and a half,
but fret not, hockey fans; salvation is
fi nally upon us. With the inaugural
faceoff of the 2005-06 National
Hockey League less than a week away,
two of the Uniter’s most studious and
knowledgeable puckheads weigh in with
their thoughts that have undoubtedly
been locked in the Zamboni’s garage for
far too long.
The New Hockey League
By Kalen Qually
You might as well throw it
all in a blender. Seriously, don’t
even look at those. Give them to
me, why would you need rosters
and standings from two years
ago? Maybe you’ve been craving
hockey that bad for this long,
you actually think those mean
something? Who is Martin St.
Louis, anyway? Welcome to the
re-launch of a sport, the dawn of
a new era. Say hello to the New
Hockey League. Gone are the
days of the neutral zone champs.
To all the perennial powerhouses
in the West, I bid you adieu. Adios
small-market basement dwellers,
bonjour salary cap. With more
transactions than a bank, forget
what you thought you knew
about the NHL. It’s time for
the hardly-mighty Wings, the
not-so-bankrupt
Peng uins,
and the not-as-frivolous New
York Rangers. With the new
f inancial-retardant cap, these
ain’t the Rangers you know.
Like your sister on the Atkins
diet, it’s amazing the difference
a year makes.
Don’t you worry, Martin
St. Louis will be as relevant
as ever in the newly advertised
abolishment of “clutch and grab”
hockey. With stretch passes,
no-hooking zones, and goalie
handicaps, this league was made
for Marty. There is now more
opportunity for higher scoring,
fast-paced, and entertaining
hockey, but other than that,
what can we expect? The whole
league looks so different that it’s
pretty difficult to say for sure,
but there are a few things I am
certain of…
1) Welcome back Penguins circa
early ‘90s. Lemieux is ready to
suit up this year, alongside his
protégé and rookie phenom Sidney
Crosby. With the lotto-acquisition
of Crosby, the Pens were able to
attract free agents Ziggy Palffy,
Sergei Gonchar, John Leclair, and
Jocelyn Thibault. Footnote (and
a significant one at that): Mark
Recchi signed with the Penguins
prior to the lockout.
2) Calgary, Vancouver, and
San Jose are the new Red Wings,
Stars, and Avalanche. The former
dominant trio in the West is depleted
and aging, not necessarily in that
order. Because of the salary cap,
Detroit, Dallas, and Colorado must
learn to plug holes with prospects
instead of money, and until that
happens, the Flames, Canucks, and
Sharks will likely continue to lead
the Western Conference.
3) The Washington Capitals
will suck. The Caps traded away
Jaromir Jagr, Robert Lang, Sergei
Gonchar, and Peter Bondra prior
to the lockout. While the Penguins
are more reconstructed than Cher’s
face, Washington is going to make
like Kirstie Alley and keep the ugly.
For the Caps, the only transaction
of significance this summer was
the signing of 2004 first overall
draft pick, Alexander Ovechkin. A
player they were only able to draft
because they sucked three years
ago, too. The 1974-75 Capitals set
the standard for sucking, going
8-67-5. Realistically, this Capitals
team could break that record.
Changing of the guard
By Kristy Rydz
The face of the NHL is
changing. Literally. For the first
time in recent memory, fans will
be tuning into a league lacking in
veterans and abundant in youth.
The long list of retirees reads
like a former All Star Game roster,
including Scott Stevens, Ron
Francis and most notably Mark
Messier. These icons of the game
are leaving immense holes not only
in organizations but in the league
itself, gaps of enforcers, scorers,
grinders and leaders. Not only are
the on ice personalities changing,
the dynamics behind the bench
will shift dramatically as well.
With ‘The Great One’ assuming
the coach’s role for his Coyotes
this season, another facet of the
league’s metamorphosis is revealed.
The jury is still out on whether or
not Gretzky will excel in his new
position or f lounder. But really, it’s
Wayne Gretzky, what has he not
done well?!
Enter the new blood.
After 301 days of an excruciating
lockout, an overwhelming sigh
of relief came from not only the
NHLPA, but also players that hadn’t
even stepped onto NHL ice yet.
There will definitely be a noticeable
insurgence of rookies thanks to the
prolonged work stoppage that halted
the addition of the past two year’s
draft picks. Filling the gaps are
players like Alexander Ovechkin,
the top draft pick from 2004, from
whom Washington hopes to extract
talent and leadership, as well as
names like Winnipegger Cam
Barker with the Blackhawks and
Jack Johnson in Carolina. However,
the name on everyone’s lips is Sidney
Crosby. He’s been targeted as the
next big thing, and with due reason.
Scoring goals, breaking records and
spreading his Gretzky-like fi nesse
all over the ice, Crosby is under
incredibly scrutiny and pressure to
live up to the greats who came before
him. Stay tuned this season to see
if he cracks under the pressure or
flourishes in the spotlight.
Here’s what I’m wondering:
what is the defi nition of a “great”
these days? With all the changes
that the league has undergone in
the past year - a vicious lockout,
thinly-spread talent among all 30
teams, a direct result of the new
collective bargaining agreement
including a hard salary cap, and
the implementation of a stirring new
set of rules, is it possible for these
new players to fi ll the shoes of the
“greats” who came before them? Has
the game changed in such drastic
ways that we need to determine a
new standard of “greatness”? Only
time will tell.
September 29, 2005
The Uniter
022
Sports
NFL Picks
Each week the Uniter Sports team will attempt to
disseminate and scrutinize five of the upcoming
week’s most intriguing National Football League’s
match-ups for ours and your (the reader’s) leisure.
The parody of the NFL consistently embarrasses
even the most knowledgeable of analysts. Why
not let it embarrass us too?
Game #1: Dallas @ Oakland
“I may be taking a risk on this pick, but
my gut feeling is that Oakland is going to
fi nally pull through and take their fi rst win of
the year. The build-up for this game may not
point towards Oakland at all considering the
three previous week losses, but one might ask,
‘How much longer will it really take’? Exactly!
The Oakland Raiders haven’t played a horrible
game in my books. A little bit of inconsistency
may have done it, or maybe just the lack of
discipline, where the penalties can take a real
toll on a team, but with a few minor adjustments
I believe this team may just push over the top in
their next match against the Dallas Cowboys.”
– Justin Geisheimer
Thomas Asselin says: Oakland
Justin Geisheimer says: Oakland
Sheri Lamb says: Dallas
Mike Pyl says: Oakland
Kalen Qually says: Oakland
Game #2: St. Louis @ NY Giants
“The St. Louis Rams are a long way from
being the greatest show on turf, and until the
Rams allow RB Steven Jackson to have the 20+
touches he desires, the Rams will not reach what
potential they do have on offense. On the other
side of the ball, Eli Manning doesn’t seem to
have that ‘deer in the headlights’ look anymore,
and the Rams defense is virtually non-existent.
G-Men take it in East Rutherford.” – Kalen
Qually
Thomas Asselin says: St. Louis
Justin Geisheimer says: NY Giants
Sheri Lamb says: NY Giants
Mike Pyl says: NY Giants
Kalen Qually says: NY Giants
Game #3: San Diego @ New England
“After falling behind in the standings
winless after Week 2, the Chargers rebounded
with a resounding victory over an improving
New York Giant squad. LaDainian Tomlinson,
near-unanimously the best back in the league,
is coming off a monster of a game. San Diego’s
defense is undoubtedly solid. Quarterback Drew
Brees is quietly getting the job done. That being
said, I can never bet against Bill Belicheck, Tom
Brady, and the Champs. After dropping their
clash with Carolina, some were doubting the
Patriots, forecasting another Steeler victory last
weekend. How did that turn out, again? Sure,
they’re seriously banged up, but they’re still the
Patriots.” – Mike Pyl
Thomas Asselin says: New England
Justin Geisheimer says: New England
Sheri Lamb says: New England
Mike Pyl says: New England
Kalen Qually says: New England
Brock swimmer
crosses Lake
Ontario
Melissa Brannagan
completes remarkable
feat in near-record time
Game #4: Seattle @ Washington
“This is an easy pick for everyone; Seattle
has been great against weak teams this season,
and their 37-12 thumping of Arizona this past
week is a good example of their dominance
over the weak. Washington is coming off a bye
and should be well rested and prepared for this
game. Unfortunately for the Redskins, a weak
team themselves, Seattle will not blow a 13
point lead in the 4th like Dallas did two weeks
ago. Seattle should win this one, with little
effort required.” – Thomas Asselin
Thomas Asselin says: Seattle
Justin Geisheimer says: Seattle
Sheri Lamb says: Seattle
Mike Pyl says: Seattle
Kalen Qually says: Washington
Game #5: Detroit @ Tampa Bay
“The Lions are a tough bunch to figure
out. The fi rst week, they emphatically handed
Green Bay their fi rst of what will be many
losses. Week 2, they are thumped by the Bears,
hardly a model of offensive efficiency. Detroit
will go as far as perplexing QB Joey Harrington
will take them. One game he shows flashes of
the franchise player the Lions took him to be
on draft day, the other he rouses Ryan Leaf
analogies. A stellar supporting cast surrounds
him; it’s up to him to decide how he uses it. Now,
why will they beat the undefeated Buccaneers?
I’m not exactly sure. Rookie Cadillac Williams
has shown he’s the truth; he’s on pace for 2,000
yards! But you know he’s due for an off game….
right?” – Mike Pyl
Thomas Asselin says: Tampa Bay
Justin Geisheimer says: Tampa Bay
Sheri Lamb says: Tampa Bay
Mike Pyl says: Detroit
Kalen Qually says: Tampa Bay
Standings
Pyl
Asselin
Qually
Symons
Verville
Lamb
13-2
11-4
11-4
6-4
8-7
7-8
.867
.733
.733
.600
.533
.467
By Rob Terpstra
THE BROCK PRESS (BROCK UNIVERSITY)
S
TE. CATHARINEʼS, Ont. (CUP) -- A
determined swimmer, a momentous
event and a sincere cause were all
celebrated as Brock Universityʼs Melissa
Brannagan braved the waves of Lake
Ontario to cross the great lake in just
under 17 hours.
The 23-year-old swimmer said
she was aided by scores of individuals
both during her preparation for the
swim and while she was in the water
from Aug. 9 to Aug. 10. Brannagan
said she was grateful for the unending
support she received along the way.
“My crew and the people behind
the scenes made this swim happen for
me,” she said. “I did the easy part.
The actual crew on the swim gave so
much time and effort—most of them
staying up for the entire swim, if not
only to support me, but also to allow
me to focus on the swimming part.”
The swimming part was
certainly something that will feature
as a highlight in the university’s
sporting history. The recent graduate
completed the swim in the fi fth fastest
time recorded in history for a female,
and became the 39th swimmer to
cross Lake Ontario.
Arriving in Marilyn Bell Park
in Toronto, aptly named after the
pioneer of women’s open-water
swimming, Brannagan swam for 16
hours and 11 minutes, just one hour
off the women’s all-time record.
Swimming in changing conditions
and in the darkness of the lake,
Brannagan triumphed and completed
the 51km journey in surprisingly good
spirits.
“It was quite the moment to hit
the wall,” Brannagan said. “I had
goose bumps hearing the cheers of
everyone waiting for me ... I couldn’t
wait to get out of the water, my skin
was so pruny, but in a way I didn’t
want to get out. I loved every minute I
was in the water and in a way, I didn’t
want it to be over.”
Unaware at the time of the swim,
several technical obstacles had to be
overcome by the swimmer’s crew. One of
the boats following Brannagan actually
lost power and a Zodiac infl atable
device, used to navigate Brannagan’s
course, kept losing air, forcing the team
to constantly re-infl ate it.
Brannagan said that the night
portion of the swim was kind to her, with
relatively calm conditions. However, as
she drew closer to her destination, the
waves started to increase in severity and
at several times she thought she was
swimming backwards.
As with any long swim, fatigue
relatively slowed down her pace in the
closing kilometres.
“I was worried about swimming
at night in the dark,” Brannagan said.
“Those fears were erased with the calm
water that I had–I was surprised at how
comfortable I was in the middle of the
lake in the pitch dark.”
One of the key personnel on
Brannagan’s team was her coach at
Brock, Peter Bradstreet, who was an
integral part in the training, pacing, and
actual swim.
“Peter was fantastic–he was the fi rst
face that I saw each time that I stopped
to eat,” Brannagan said.
“There were quite a few times that
I was looking so forward to breaking
to eat so that I could talk to him. We
spent some of the breaks talking about
my stroke ... other times were just spent
laughing and joking.”
Brannagan fi rst approached the
gargantuan task by dedicating it to a
friend back in her hometown who had
lost her mother to cancer. Brannagan
was able to collect pledges and during
the planning stages of the swim decided
to donate the money to Sick Kids
Hospital in Toronto.
“It’s amazing how powerful the
mind is,” Brannagan said. “Athletics
and swimming in particular taught me
that, but that is something that can also
be translated to everyday life. I think
that is a mantra anyone can relate to.”
The Uniter
Sports
UWSA Business
Manager Excels
on the Court
September 29, 2005
023
By Brad Pennington
T
he sport of tennis and its popularity seem to
be on the rise as more and more people begin
playing or watching it. It is known as a sport
that requires skill and quick reflexes, as well as a
good eye to pick off the back corner of the court. And
not only is it athletically diverse, it can also be played
for a lifetime either casually or competitively.
Some of you might be surprised to
hear that a member of our very own
Students’ Association is a doubles tennis
champion. Tom Brown, business manager
of the UWSA, and his doubles partner of
15 years, Dave Wilken, recently won the
men’s doubles championship at the Bob
Mitchell Doubles Tennis Tournament,
which is held every summer in Clear Lake
in Riding Mountain National Park, a
tournament that Brown has visited every
year since his early teens. More than a
month after the fact, however, Brown was
still beaming.
“Winning Clear Lake was absolutely
priceless,” Brown said of his achievement.
Tom has been playing the sport of
tennis for about 30 years, and plays every
summer in numerous local tournaments,
competing in both singles and doubles
events. This past August he competed
in the senior national championships in
Saskatoon and made it to the quarter
fi nals in both singles and doubles.
Despite his recent success, Brown, the
competitor that he is, is always trying to
improve his skills. That, assuredly, will be
followed by even better results.
“(Tennis) is a very challenging
game,” he said. “There’s always room for
improvement.”
Brown once used to be the tennis pro
at the Tuxedo Tennis Club in 1984/85
before moving to a position at the Health
Sciences Centre in the volunteer offices.
He has also been teaching squash parttime for about 12 years at Court Sports
on Taylor Ave., as well as right here
at the University of Winnipeg. Brown
also competes in squash and in Ultimate
Frisbee.
His interest in the sport of tennis
stems from his father and the rest of his
family, as they all competed in tennis in
some way or another. Even at the ripe
young age of 74, Brown’s mother is still
playing every summer with friends, and
even in competitions.
Brown’s interests in the game include
its challenge, the strategy involved, and
the social aspects that are involved with
every tournament and its competitors.
September 29, 2005
The Uniter
024
Think youʼre in
TOUCH
WITH YOUR FEELINGS?
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