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RIO
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Th u r s d a y, A u g u s t 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Foreign
students
get more
scrutiny
In the news
Sticky situation
Thursday: Hot and humid;
high 89-94, low 73-78
Friday: Humid, p.m. rain;
high 91-96, low 74-79
High tide: 6:03 a.m., 6:24 p. m.
US official makes 500
visits to Mass. schools
to enforce regulations
Sunrise: 5:47 Sunset: 7:50
Complete report, B7
Baltimore officials vowed to
overhaul the city’s police
department after the Jus-
By Laura Krantz
tice Department found wide
discrimination against black
residents in poorer communities. A2.
A Pentagon report tells of
Guantanamo detainees who
have been cleared for release despite fears that they
may return to battle. A7.
At least 13 infants were
killed as flames swept
GLOBE STAFF
ED FARRAND/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Francis “Cadillac Frank” Salemme, wanted in the death of Edward “Wimpy” Bennett, was brought into Boston
police headquarters in December 1972. Salemme operated as boss of the New England Mafia in the 1990s.
Charge upends ex-mobster’s new life
US protection stops as Salemme is held in 1993 murder of witness
through the maternity wing
of a Baghdad hospital. A3.
By Shelley Murphy
Jay Ash seeks a job shift
GLOBE STAFF
from state economic development and housing secretary to Cambridge city
manager. B1.
The Supreme Judicial Court
tentatively accepted rules
to improve public access to
criminal court records. B1.
Approval is expected Thursday for a 656-unit complex
of apartments and condos
in Andrew Square. C1.
Former deputy mayor and
MBTA chief Robert Kiley
died in Chilmark at 80. He
He left his life as a Mafia don decades ago, disappeared into the federal
witness protection program, and was
living quietly in Atlanta as Richard
Parker, an unassuming octogenarian
who loved to read and exercise.
But Francis “Cadillac Frank” Salemme’s past caught up with him
Wednesday, when he was arrested at a
Connecticut hotel and escorted to a
Boston courthouse in handcuffs to face
a new charge for an old crime: the
1993 murder of a witness during a fed-
eral investigation.
It was deja vu for Salemme, a contemporary of James “Whitey” Bulger’s
who will turn 83 this month. Arriving
in court, he smiled slightly when he
spotted Fred Wyshak, the veteran prosecutor who helped send him to prison
twice before, seated at the prosecution
table and quipped, “Hey, Fred, fancy
seeing you here!”
His casual demeanor belied the severity of the charge, which allows prosecutors to seek the death penalty.
Salemme, who served as boss of the
SALEMME, Page A15
Steven A. DiSarro’s remains were
discovered in March.
Democrats guard against overconfidence
ran the transit systems in
New York and London after
leaving Boston. B1.
Leery of expecting
Trump to be routed
An aide said Governor Chris
Christie of New Jersey lied
New e-mail questions
Files appear to link the Clinton Foundation and the State Department. A10.
Worries over hacking
By Tracy Jan
about the 2013 plot to
block traffic to the George
Washington Bridge. A10.
GLOBE STAFF
RIO
American gymnast Simone
Biles looks to defy an Olympic jinx and make history at
the Games in events beginning Thursday. D1.
WASHINGTON — Donald Trump’s
downward polling spiral, and predictions of a potential rout in November,
have introduced complacency as a new
enemy for Democrats, who have a simple warning for their troops: Don’t get
cocky.
Hillary Clinton’s campaign officials
and Democratic lawmakers are gleeful
about Trump’s mid-summer meltdown,
Democrats gird for the release of more
damaging material from a Russian cyberattack. A12.
Praise and pause
The NRA embraces Trump; business
leaders in the state back away. A8, C1.
but still fret about the danger of underestimating the New York real estate
mogul. Never mind that Trump has
fallen behind in some polls by double
digits, or that the electoral map favors
Democrats.
The historic presidential race pitting the first female nominee of a major party against a celebrity businessman and political outsider had defied
all political conventions and still promises to be a topsy turvy, lump-in-yourthroat ride until the very end.
“I wouldn’t be too quick to rejoice in
Mr. Trump’s faux pas,” said Representative Michael Capuano, a Massachusetts
Democrat. “People have underestimated Donald Trump since day one, and I
DEMOCRATS, Page A10
FOREIGN STUDENTS, Page A15
Little-known
dual roles for
city official
Development aide also
a real estate partner
By Astead W. Herndon
GLOBE STAFF
BOOTHBAY HARBOR, Maine — The
waterfront restaurant is slammed for
lunch, and the oldest waitress — by far
— is buzzing around with iced tea, fried
haddock, Bloody Marys, and Asian
chicken salad.
“Awesome, great to see you,” the 58year-old McSeagull’s waitress says, smiling and waving a menu at a familiar
customer.
“Are you . . . ?” another patron asks,
cocking his head, unable to finish the
question before Ann LePage provides
the answer. “Yes, I’m the governor’s
wife,” LePage says. “We’d love to take
care of you.”
And so it has gone this summer for
three double-shifts a week for Maine’s
first lady, who said she took the first
In the Roxbury real estate community, Carl Hyman is described as a likable
and helpful figure who has helped guide
improvements in the neighborhood
through his longtime position as a senior property manager in City Hall’s Department of Neighborhood Development.
Few know this: Since 1998, Hyman
and a former city employee have led a
real estate firm named Melbourne
Street Partners, which has bought, developed, and sold properties near such
hot spots as Highland Park and Dudley
Square — areas Hyman’s agency helped
nurture.
In 2000, the city agency also awarded the former city employee, architect
Harold Raymond, about 100,000 square
feet in discounted Roxbury public property. Hyman, who oversees unused city
property as part of his job, never disclosed that Raymond was his business
partner.
Neighborhood development officials
say Hyman’s involvement in a real estate company while he works for the
city does not constitute a conflict of interest under the city’s regulations. And,
through the company’s lawyer, Jim Ma-
LEPAGE, Page A11
HYMAN, Page A14
‘I wanted something, I wanted to work for it, and I went out and got it.’
POINT OF VIEW: LEILA PHILIP
ANN LEPAGE, wife of Maine Governor Paul LePage, about making extra money to pay off a car
“Each semester I work
hard to devise new ways
to make students slow
down, to suspend judgment, to sustain focus —
in other words, to prevail
in the face of discomfort,
not to avoid it.” A16.
Maine’s first lady takes up a full plate
By Brian MacQuarrie
GLOBE STAFF
For breaking news, updated
stories, and more, visit our website:
BostonGlobe.com
VOL . 290, NO. 42
*
Suggested retail price
$1.50
$2.00 outside Metro Boston
$2.50 in Florida
YOON S. BYUN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Ann LePage gave a high-five to customer John Libby of Phippsburg,
Maine, while working at McSeagull’s in Boothbay Harbor.
THE TAX IS ON US
Up to
FLOORING
35
SALE!
th
The federal government is stepping
up oversight of the surging number of
international students in high schools
and universities nationwide, and an immigration official has made hundreds of
visits to Massachusetts schools to ensure they comply with complex regulations and prevent fraud.
The scrutiny reflects the US government’s resolve to ensure that schools adhere to national security rules about foreign students that arose after the Sept.
11, 2001, attacks. The laws require
schools to closely document how many
students they have, what they study,
where they live, and when they come
and go.
In the past two years, Immigration
and Customs Enforcement has deployed 57 field representatives across
the country to help schools with what
can be a daunting web of regulations.
There are 63,000 international students
in Massachusetts, according to ICE.
“While our field representatives
work with schools to ensure their continued success . . . they also serve as
[ICE’s] eyes and ears on the ground if
they encounter situations of gross fraud
or negligence,” said agency spokeswoman Carissa Cutrell.
The ICE field representative for Massachusetts estimates he has made 500
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T h e
A2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
The Nation
410
34
30
7
0
Number of people stopped at least
10 times from 2010-15.
At least 95 percent were black.
Number of black residents stopped
at least 20 times during 2010-15.
Number of times one black man
was stopped in less than four years.
None of the stops resulted in charges.
Number of African-Americans
who were stopped 30 times or more
from 2010-15.
Number of people of any race other
than black who were stopped more
than 12 times.
SOURCE: Associated Press
Baltimore vows changes after federal inquiry
Police practices
were faulted in
blistering report
By Lynh Bui
and Peter Hermann
WASHINGTON POST
WASHINGTON — Baltimore’s top law enforcement
and political leaders vowed a
sweeping overhaul of the city’s
police force after the Justice Department issued a searing rebuke of the agency’s practices,
which federal authorities say
ºElderly woman fatally shot
during police event. A13
regularly discriminated against
black residents in poorer communities.
Officials warned, however,
that changing a department entrenched in a culture of unconstitutional policing would be a
slow process and could cost
millions.
‘‘Police reform won’t happen
overnight or by chance,’’ Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney
General Vanita Gupta said at a
news conference unveiling the
findings of the report Wednesday. ‘‘It’s going to take time and
it’s going to require a focused
and sustained effort.’’
Gupta said there were ‘‘longstanding systemic deficiencies’’
within the Baltimore Police Department and that ‘‘sustainable
reform’’ was necessary to keep
both officers and the community safe.
The sharp indictment of the
agency came in an extensive report the federal government released this week after a 14month ‘‘pattern or practice’’ investigation of the city’s police
force.
The inquiry found that a police force rooted in ‘‘zero tolerance’’ enforcement that started
in 1999 but ended a decade ago
has created a deep divide between police and many members of the community it serves.
The city’s policing strategy, lack
of training, and inattention to
officer accountability has cultivated an agency that allows and
encourages officers to stop, arrest, or search black residents
with little or no legal justification. The report also found that
officers engaged in unnecessary
force against juveniles, people
with mental health issues, and
people who were restrained
and presented to no threat.
‘‘BPD deployed a policing
strategy that, by its design, led
to differential enforcement in
African-American communities,’’ the report stated. ‘‘But
BPD failed to use adequate policy, training, and accountability
mechanisms to prevent discrimination, despite longstanding notice of concerns about
how it polices African-American communities in the city.’’
In other words, according to
the 163-page Justice Department report: ‘‘The relationship
between the Baltimore Police
Department and many of the
communities it serves is broken.’’
KIM HAIRSTON/THE BALTIMORE SUN VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vanita Gupta (right), a Justice Department official, said the process is going to take time and require a sustained effort.
To many in the AfricanAmerican commuity, the report
was familiar reading.
Danny Marrow, a retired
food service worker, said that
over the years, he has been
stopped and hassled repeatedly
by police.
‘‘It started when I was 8
years old and they’d say, with
no probable cause, ‘Hey, come
here. Where are you going?’ ’’
he said. ‘‘No cause, just the color of my skin.”
Mayor Stephanie RawlingsBlake said while the findings of
the report are ‘‘challenging to
hear,’’ the investigation creates
a ‘‘crucial foundation’’ that will
allow Baltimore to change the
department.
‘‘It’s so very important that
we get this right,’’ RawlingsBlake said.
Now that the investigation is
complete, city officials will
work with the Justice Department to implement a series of
court-mandated reforms outlined in what is known as a
‘‘consent decree.’’ The mayor
said it could cost the city anywhere from $5 million to $10
million annually to make the
suggested changes, which include improved training programs and new technology and
equipment to modernize the
police force.
The court-enforced order
will be independently monitored and designed to sustain
reform regardless of who is the
police commissioner or mayor,
justice officials said.
City police Commissioner
Kevin Davis said that he has already fired some officers as a result of the Justice Department’s
investigation. Davis also said
that he would not tolerate policing that is sexist, racist, or discriminatory.
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this report.
Daily Briefing
Fish bypass plan draws opposition
US budget deficit up 10% in a year
BILLINGS, Mont. — Montana and federal wildlife officials have lined up in opposition to a $57 million concrete
dam and fish bypass that the
US government says would
help an endangered fish species in the Yellowstone River.
The Army Corps of Engineers and Interior Department
are proposing the irrigation
dam and bypass on the lower
Yellowstone. That’s where aging pallid sturgeon have been
trapped for decades downstream of their spawning
grounds.
WASHINGTON — The federal government last month
recorded the biggest monthly
budget deficit since February,
and the deficit so far this budget year is running 10 percent
higher than a year ago.
The Treasury Department
said Wednesday that the deficit came in at $112.8 billion in
July, highest since February’s
$192.6 billion but down from
$149.2 billion in July 2015.
For the first 10 months of the
budget year, which ends Oct.
1, the deficit was $513.7 billion, up from $465.5 billion a
year earlier.
The government runs a
deficit when it spends more
than it collects in taxes and
other revenue.
So far this budget year, government revenues are flat
from a year earlier but spending is up 2 percent. Spending
rose on interest payments and
Medicaid. Revenue from corporate taxes is down 12 percent so far this year, reflecting
a drop in business profits.
The Congressional Budget
Office predicts the 2016 deficit
will total $590 billion, up from
But wildlife officials belonging to a pallid sturgeon recovery group dismissed the proposed project’s alleged benefits
for the fish as ‘‘unfounded’’
and ‘‘purely theoretical.’’
The group includes representatives of state and federal
wildlife agencies, the Army
Corps of Engineers, and Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation.
It puts the Interior and Army Corps in the awkward position of promoting a project opposed by a group that includes
members of their own staffs.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
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last year’s budget gap of $439
billion, largely because of lower-than-expected revenues.
Budget deficits add to the
US debt, now $19.4 trillion.
That figure includes $5.4 trillion the government owes itself, mostly from borrowing
from Social Security.
The Center for a Responsible Budget estimates that Hillary Clinton’s budget plans—
including an expansion of the
Affordable Care Act — would
add $250 billion more to the
debt over a decade.
It is recalculating its assessment of Donald Trump’s tax
and spending plans after the
Republican presidential nominee offered a revamped plan
this week. Trump’s earlier plan
would have added $11.5 trillion to the debt over a decade,
largely through tax cuts.
The new plan, which scaled
back the tax cuts, would add
‘‘significantly less’’ to the debt
— though Trump’s plan to reduce business taxes alone
would swell the debt by $2.55
trillion over 10 years, the
group says.
‘Grim Sleeper’ gets death penalty
LOS ANGELES — A serial
killer known as the ‘‘Grim
Sleeper’’ was sentenced to
death Wednesday for the murders of nine women and a
teenage girl that went unsolved for years as the body
count grew in a poor section of
Los Angeles haunted by the
scourge of crack cocaine.
Lonnie Franklin Jr. was
sentenced in Los Angeles
County Superior Court after
family members of his victims
spoke about the pain they had
endured for decades.
‘‘I can’t think of anyone I’ve
encountered in all my years in
the criminal justice system
that has committed the monstrous crimes that you have,’’
Judge Kathleen Kennedy told
Franklin.
The killings occurred over
more than two decades during
the crack epidemic, and community members complained
that police didn’t investigate
because the victims were black
and poor, many of them drug
users and prostitutes.
Franklin, 63, a former trash
collector and onetime garage
attendant for Los Angeles police, denied any role in the killings to investigators but didn’t
utter a word in his defense
during his lengthy trial.
Prosecutors connected him
to the crimes through DNA,
ballistics, photos, and the
words of the sole known survivor, who managed to get away
after being shot. A Polaroid
photo of her partly nude and
bleeding from her wound was
found in Franklin’s garage.
The killer earned his moniker because police once theorized that during stretches of
time without a reported slaying, he was perhaps in prison
for other crimes or laying low.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Slide victim reportedly decapitated
KANSAS CITY, Kan. — The
10-year-old boy killed during a
ride on the world’s tallest waterslide was decapitated in the
accident, a person familiar
with the investigation said
Wednesday. Authorities have
yet to explain how it happened.
The person was speaking
on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to speak publicly
about the death of Caleb
Schwab Sunday on the ‘‘Verruckt’’ raft ride at the Schlitterbahn WaterPark in Kansas
City, Kansas.
Two women who are not
family members were also in
the raft at the time and were
treated for facial injuries. The
boy’s parents — Republican
state Representative Scott
Schwab and his wife, Michele
— have not spoken publicly
since the death.
Verruckt — which in German means ‘‘insane’’ — featured multiperson rafts that
make a 168-foot drop at
speeds of up to 70 miles per
hour, followed by a surge up a
hump and a 50-foot descent to
a finishing pool.
The park reopened
Wednesday except for a large
section that includes the
waterslide, although its towering profile greeted visitors
when they drove through the
entrance. Access to the Verruckt was blocked.
Schlitterbahn spokeswoman Winter Prosapio said the
company was not discussing
Sunday’s tragedy out of respect
for the family.
The water park passed a
private inspection in June that
included Verruckt, according
to a document released by a
Kansas state agency.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAROLYN KASTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A biofilm has darkened sections of the Jefferson
Memorial in Washington, D.C., over the past few years.
Grimy film mars Jefferson Memorial
WASHINGTON — It’s
black, grimy and growing, but
what exactly is engulfing one
of the nation’s most hallowed
monuments?
Conservationists are baffled as to how to stop a microbial invasion that’s been slowly
covering the Jefferson Memorial, causing the 73-year-old
white neoclassical structure to
take on a dingy look.
National Mall and Memorial Parks Chief of Resource
Management Catherine Dewey says the biofilm became noticeable less than a decade ago
and has grown ‘‘immensely’’ in
recent years.
The Park Service is experimenting with several cleaning
solutions that could be used to
remove the algae, bacteria,
and fungi without damaging
the marble.
But officials aren’t sure
whether any of the efforts can
prevent the organisms from
coming back.
Microbiologist Federica Villa says she doesn’t know
whether the biofilm is damaging the stone.
WASHINGTON POST
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A3
The World
13 infants die in fire at Baghdad hospital nursery
Rescue stymied
by locked door,
missing keys
By Falih Hassan
and Omar Al-Jawoshy
NEW YORK TIMES
BAGHDAD — If there were
one safe place in Iraq, it should
be a hospital nursery, locked
down for the night with dozens
of babies nestled inside.
Here, not even that is a given. When a fire started late
Tuesday night in the maternity
wing of one of Baghdad’s main
hospitals, it quickly engulfed
the babies’ room. And then, in
another Iraqi tragedy in a horrifying line of preventable ones,
nothing worked.
Hospital workers raced to
save the infants, but no one
could find the keys to unlock
the nursery. Inexplicably, no
nurses seemed to be inside. Apparently, none of the fire extinguishers functioned. It took
nearly an hour and a half for
firefighters to arrive.
Some thought the initial
cause may have been an oxygen
tank explosion that set off an
electrical fire. But on Wednesday morning, only one thing
was certain: At least 13 infants
were dead, and with them a
small piece of Iraq’s future.
There was Yaman Muaad, a
baby boy born by Caesarean
section on Tuesday who died a
few hours later. There was Jafar
Kahtan, a baby being treated
for breathing difficulties. Zahra
Hussein was born on Monday;
her grandfather was frantically
looking for her on Wednesday.
Many more were unaccounted for. And at least 25 people,
mostly infants, were being
treated for burns or smoke inhalation.
All Iraqi officials could manage was what they typically do
in the face of tragedy: establish
a committee.
“A c o m m i tt e e h a s b e e n
formed to investigate the incident, and so far we don’t know
the reasons of the incident,” Dr.
Ahmed al-Hadari, a spokesman
for the Health Ministry, said at
a news conference on Wednesday. “We are waiting the results
of the investigations.”
After years of unsolved tragedy and unanswered demands
for improvements, hardly anyone here believes official promises anymore.
“Such tragedies have become normal to Iraqi officials,
and this case will be closed, just
as the other ones,” said Adnan
Hussein, acting editor-in-chief
at Al Mada, one of Baghdad’s
daily newspapers.
In their agony and tears as
they gathered outside Yarmouk
hospital Wednesday morning,
families of the dead babies were
inconsolable. Some even made
accusations of arson, though
there was no evidence to support that.
“There was screaming,” said
Mariam Thijeel, the mother of
Yaman, describing the scene at
the hospital early Wednesday.
“The power was cut off, and
then the doors got locked on us,
and there was no man in the
newborn section, and we could
not save any babies.”
She described a scene of
panic and chaos. People, she
said, desperately tried to find
someone with keys to the hospital wing. “We asked the help of
one of the employees, but she
said, ‘I cannot help you with
anything, because it’s a fire,’”
Thijeel said.
Zainab Ali, Jafar’s mother,
said: “Today I have come to see
him and I was told, ‘A fire happened in the newborn unit, and
your baby died.’”
She said she had heard that
none of the fire extinguishers
worked.
A third mother, Shayma Husain, came to the hospital looking for her infant son, Haider
Mohammad Azeez. Angry and
tearful, she compared the leaders of the government-run hospital with the militants of the
Islamic State — saying, in effect, that politicians and terrorists were both responsible for
Iraq’s endless trauma.
Painful reminders of the
Iraqi state’s degradation are all
around. The United States
spent tens of billions of dollars
of reconstruction money in Iraq
to build hospitals and schools
and improve electricity. Yet the
lights are on just a few hours a
day from the public grid. Generators, if Iraqis can afford
them, provide the rest.
Hospitals are facing deprivation not seen since the economic sanctions of the 1990s,
in part because plummeting oil
prices have left the government
impoverished in the middle of a
war against the Islamic State.
“The structure of the system
of the state is wrongly built, and
there is no seriousness in building state institutions,” said
Ahmed Saadawi, a prominent
writer who chronicled Baghdad’s tragedies in his prize-winning novel, “Frankenstein in
Baghdad.”
Many Iraqis say the state’s
dysfunction is caused by a political system the Americans
helped establish that is based
on sectarian quotas.
KARIM KADIM/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Families of newborn babies who died in a fire gathered Wednesday outside a maternity
ward; below, fire-damaged incubators were removed from the hospital.
SABAH ARAR/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Daily Briefing
S. Sudan rejects call for more UN troops
Senate votes to try Brazil president
RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazil’s Senate on Wednesday voted overwhelmingly to put suspended President Dilma Rousseff on trial, bringing the
nation’s first female president
a step closer to being permanently removed and underscoring her failure to change
lawmakers’ minds the last several months.
After some 15 hours of debate, senators voted 59-21 to
put her on trial for breaking
fiscal rules in her managing of
the federal budget. It was the
final step before a trial and
vote on whether to definitively
remove her from office, expected later this month. The
political drama is playing out
while Rio de Janeiro is hosting
the Olympic Games, which
run through Aug. 21.
The outcome was widely
expected: The Senate already
voted in May to impeach and
remove Rousseff from office
for up to 180 days while the
trial was prepared.
Wednesday’s vote underscored that efforts to remove
her may have actually gained
steam despite her attempts to
woo senators who have expressed doubt about the governing ability of interim President Michel Temer.
Senators pushing for her
removal only needed a simple
majority to call for the trial.
Not only did they get much
more than that, they also garnered an ample margin over
the super-majority — at least
54 — they will need to permanently remove her.
Jose Eduardo Cardozo, who
was attorney general in Rousseff’s administration and is
leading her defense, said that
he would look at appeals to the
nation’s top court and that several senators who voted in favor of this move may be reluctant to take the heavier step of
removing her from office.
‘‘In that way, the final vote
isn’t tethered to today’s result,’’
he said.
Still, the situation does not
look hopeful for Rousseff, the
first female president in Latin
America’s largest nation. Previous appeals to the Supreme
Federal Tribunal, the nation’s
top court, have failed.
JUBA, South Sudan —
South Sudan on Wednesday
rejected a US proposal for the
UN Security Council to send
4,000 additional troops to the
East African country to restore calm, saying it ‘‘seriously
undermines’’ its sovereignty
and threatens a return to colonialism.
Government spokesman
Michael Makuei said the proposal gives the United Nations
the ability to govern. The proposal also calls for a vote on
an arms embargo on South
Sudan if Secretary General
Ban Ki-moon reports within a
month that authorities have
blocked the regional force.
The Security Council could
vote Friday on the proposal,
which comes after a former
US special envoy suggested
last month that the UN and
African Union temporarily administer the country after
fighting broke out once again.
South Sudan’s pushback
comes as UN officials say the
government has begun a
crackdown that includes seizing dozens of passports of UN
workers and imposing restrictions on travel and delivery of
food aid.
Deadly fighting in the capital, Juba, last month raised
fears of a renewed civil war after an August 2015 peace deal
and worsened a humanitarian
crisis.
Rebel leader and former
first vice president Riek
Machar fled during the fighting and says he will return only when regional peacekeepers
secure the capital.
An East African political
body, IGAD, last week said
South Sudan had agreed to a
regional force, but Makuei on
Wednesday disagreed and
said the government had not
been consulted.
Under the US proposal, the
regional force would report to
the UN force that numbers
more than 12,000 peacekeepers but has been criticized for
not protecting civilians. The
regional force would protect
the airport and promote ‘‘safe
and free movement’’ in and
out of the capital.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
GREEK CULTURE MINISTRY VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Plane crash survivor wins lottery
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — After he escaped unharmed from the burning
wreckage of an Emirates airplane that had crash-landed in
Dubai, Mohamed Basheer already considered himself
lucky.
Then came the call telling
him he had won $1 million.
‘‘I said, ‘Don’t joke!’ ’’ the
62-year-old Indian recounted,
laughing inside the auto-body
repair shop where he works in
Dubai. ‘‘They said, ‘Yes, you
are the winner!’ I said, ‘No!’ ’’
Basheer won Dubai Duty
Free’s Millennium Millionaire
sweepstakes Tuesday with a
ticket he purchased July 6, just
before he boarded an Emirates
flight to head to India’s Kerala
state and his hometown of Pallickal.
Yet perhaps his luckiest
numbers were yet to come as
he boarded Emirates flight
EK521 on Aug. 3 to return to
Dubai. Sitting in seat 26G,
Basheer said the flight passed
normally for the 300 onboard
until the Boeing 777-300 attempted to land at Dubai International Airport, the
world’s busiest international
airfield.
The plane hit the runway,
bounced, and slammed into
the ground again. The cabin
quickly filled with smoke
when the plane came to a halt.
‘‘Nobody knows what’s happening,’’ Basheer said in an interview Wednesday. ‘‘But I'm
not scared. . . . I was supporting the people and also I saved
my life.’’
He jumped out of the airplane’s emergency exit and
down the slide, before turning
back to see the fire spreading
as others fled.
Basheer says he’ll use the
money to support his family
and start a charity in Pallickal.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A 3,000-year-old skeleton of a teenager was found in an
altar at the top of Mount Lykaion.
At Zeus worship site, a human skeleton
ATHENS — At the top of a
mountain once worshipped as
the birthplace of the god
Zeus, archeologists have
made a sinister discovery that
might corroborate one of the
darkest legends of antiquity.
Excavations this summer
on Mount Lykaion uncovered
the 3,000-year-old skeleton
of a teenager amid a mound
of ashes built up over a millennium from sacrificed animals.
Greece’s Culture Ministry
said Wednesday that the skeleton, probably of an adolescent boy, was found in the
heart of the 100-foot ash altar.
Excavators say it’s too early
to speculate on the nature of
the teenager’s death but the
discovery is remarkable because the remote Mount
Lykaion was for centuries associated with the most nefari-
ous of Greek cults: Ancient
writers — including Plato —
linked it with human sacrifice
to Zeus, a practice that has
very rarely been confirmed by
archeologists anywhere in the
Greek world and never on
mainland Greece.
According to legend, a boy
was sacrificed with the animals and all the meat was
cooked and eaten together.
Whoever ate the human part
would become a wolf for nine
years.
‘‘Whether it’s a sacrifice or
not, this is a sacrificial altar,’’
said excavator David Gilman
Romano, professor of Greek
archeology at the University
of Arizona.
The mountaintop in the
Peloponnese region is the earliest known site where Zeus
was worshipped.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Massacre suspect back in Guatemala
GUATEMALA CITY — A
former Guatemalan soldier accused of taking part in the
massacre of more than 200
people in 1982 during the
country’s civil war stepped onto Central American soil
Wednesday after failing to persuade the United States not to
deport him because he fears
for his life.
Santos Lopez Alonzo, 64,
was sent to Guatemala City
on a charter flight and Guatemalan authorities took him into custody, US Immigration
and Customs Enforcement
said.
Upon his arrival, Lopez insisted to reporters that he was
innocent.
Lopez served with an elite
unit of the Guatemalan army
and is among four former soldiers arrested after coming to
the United States years after
the slaughter of villagers in
Las Dos Erres. Two are serving
time in American prisons for
immigration crimes and one
was deported and sentenced to
more than 6,000 years in prison.
In an interview last week at
the California immigration detention facility where he was
held, Lopez said he guarded
women and children during
the slayings but killed no one.
He said he fears retribution
from Guatemalan authorities
or other inmates for helping
US investigators prosecute a
former comrade.
‘‘I’m afraid I’m going to be
tortured and they’re going to
kill me in my country, because
I gave testimony to a grand
jury,’’ Lopez said. ‘‘Because I
talked about them and everything they did.’’
More than a dozen former
soldiers have faced arrest warrants in Guatemala on allegations of participating in the
massacre that wiped out the
village.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
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Militias claim to
retake ISIS base
Loss of Libyan
city would be
blow to militants
By Rod Nordland
NEW YORK TIMES
CAIRO — Progovernment
Libyan militias backed by the
United States said Wednesday
they had seized the Islamic
State’s last stronghold in the
country, in the seaside city of
Sirte. If confirmed, the capture
would be a severe blow to the
militant organization’s expansion into North Africa.
Militia announcements
quoted by Libyan news agencies and television outlets said
the militia fighters were still
hunting remnants of the Islamic State forces hiding in residential neighborhoods in Sirte.
But the militias claimed to
have taken the heavily fortified
Ouagadougou Center, which
the Islamic State had used as its
headquarters.
In a statement broadcast on
Misrata TV, a station based in
the nearby city of Misrata, Mohamed al-Ghassri, a spokesman
for the attacking militia force,
said the Ouagadougou Center
and a nearby hospital had been
captured.
The center had underground bunkers and fortifications dating from the era of
Moammar Gadhafi, the longtime leader of Libya over thrown nearly five years ago.
The Islamic State’s loss of
Sirte would signify the culmination of a summer-long offensive
by militias from Misrata, under
the auspices of the Government
of National Accord.
Over the last 10 days, the militias have been supported by
heavy US airstrikes, using
drones based in Jordan. The US
Africa Command has reported
28 airstrikes from the beginning of that campaign, Aug. 1,
to Aug. 8.
The Islamic State had held
Sirte for the past year. Its occupation of the city represented
the organization’s most brazen
expansion from its power bases
in Iraq and Syria.
T h e m i l i t i a s ’ o ff e n s i v e
against the Islamic State had reduced the area they controlled
from 150 miles of coastline to
the area immediately around
the city.
The birthplace of Gadhafi,
Sirte is also where the Libyan
dictator was killed by antigovernment militia fighters in
2011.
Officials at the Pentagon
said they could not confirm
that the Islamic State’s headquarters in Sirte had fallen. Libya’s hodgepodge of militias, answering to three different factions claiming to control the
country, have often been prone
to exaggerated claims.
Promilitia factions also reported that a Libyan air force
warplane had been shot down
by Islamic State fighters in Sirte
on Wednesday.
The territory seized by the
Islamic State in Libya had been
considered the most important
of the group’s overseas wilayats,
or provinces.
As early as October 2014, extremists in the Libyan city of
Darnah pledged allegiance to
the Islamic State, and a month
later, the Islamic State leader,
Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, named
Libya as one of the group’s official provinces.
IHLAS NEWS AGENCY VIA REUTERS
Police and government officials at the scene Wednesday of a bomb blast in Kiziltepe that killed three and injured 25.
12 die in attacks on Turkish soldiers, police
Government
blames rebels for
three bombings
By Suzan Fraser
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANKARA, Turkey — A wave
of attacks targeting police and
soldiers in Turkey’s predominantly Kurdish southeast killed
at least 12 people on Wednesday, as Turkey was still dealing
with the aftermath of a failed
military coup attempt that
threatened the government.
Officials said rebels of the
Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or
PKK, launched simultaneous
bomb attacks targeting police
vehicles in the city of Diyarbakir and the town of Kiziltepe,
killing eight people, while four
soldiers were killed in a separate attack near the border with
Iraq hours earlier.
The attack in Kiziltepe was
caused by a roadside bomb that
went off as a police bus was
passing by. Three people were
killed and at least 25 others
were wounded there, including
at least five children aged between 2 and 5, said an official,
who spoke on condition of anonymity in line with government
regulations.
At the same time, a car
bomb explosion targeting police in a historic part of Diyarbakir killed at least five civilians
and wounded 12 others, the Diyarbakir governor’s office said.
The explosion occurred at a security checkpoint at a bridge
over the Tigris River.
The attacks came hours after
an earlier attack, also blamed
on the PKK, killed four soldiers
and injured nine others near
the Iraq border. The private Dogan news agency said that attack targeted military vehicles
and was carried out with improvised explosives as well as
rockets fired from northern
Iraq.
Clashes between the PKK
and Turkey’s security forces resumed last year after a tenuous
cease-fire collapsed and the
PKK has frequently targeted
police or military with roadside
explosives or car bombs.
Wednesday’s attacks came
as the country is still reeling
from a violent coup attempt on
July 15 that killed at least 270
people. The government has
blamed the failed coup on the
supporters of US-based Muslim
cleric Fethullah Gulen and has
embarked on a sweeping crackdown on his followers.
The country is also combating the Islamic State group,
whose militants have carried
out a series of bloody attacks in
Turkey in the past year.
Earlier this week, PKK commander Cemil Bayik threatened
attacks against police in Turkish cities.
Since hostilities with the
PKK resumed last summer,
more than 600 Turkish security
personnel and thousands of
PKK militants have been killed,
according to the state-run Anadolu Agency. Human rights
groups say hundreds of civilians have also died.
Turkey and its allies consider the PKK a terror organization.
Taliban reported to be closing in on key city
Afghan officials
rush in troops
to defend region
By Mirwais Khan
and Lynne O’Donnell
ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan
— Afghan troops are being deployed to the capital of the key
southern province of Helmand
amid intense fighting with the
Taliban in surrounding areas
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and fears the city could fall to
the insurgents within days, officials said Wednesday.
According to Kareem Atal,
the head of Helmand’s provincial council, Taliban insurgents
have completely surrounded
Lashkar Gah after weeks of intense fighting across the province. Army and police units
have now been pulled back
from checkpoints farther afield
and brought back to reinforce
the city. Also, ‘‘new forces are
arriving’’ in the city, he added.
The fighting has closed all
the highways leading into Lashkar Gah, forcing up prices for
food and other basics inside the
provincial capital, Atal said.
Doctors Without Borders,
the international medical charity, has reduced its international
staff in Lashkar Gah and is
maintaining basic emergency
and surgical services, said the
country representative Guillem
Molinie.
‘‘We are concerned about urban fighting — it is getting closer to the urban center,’’ he said.
Helmand is a strategically
important province for both the
Kabul government and the Tali-
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ban, whose insurgency is now
in its 15th year. The province
produces opium, which is the
raw material for most of the
world’s heroin and which funds
the insurgency.
Southern Afghanistan is
considered the Taliban heartland. During the Taliban’s
1996-2001 rule of the country,
they made neighboring Kandahar province the seat of their
extremist regime.
In an indication of the seriousness of the Helmand situation, senior Kabul officials, including the deputy interior
minister and the deputy chief of
the military staff, are in Lashkar Gah, along with elite Afghan forces, said Sediq Sediqqi,
the Interior Ministry’s spokesman.
‘‘All our focus is on Helmand
right now,’’ he said. ‘‘We know
that the threats are high.’’
Dawlat Waziri, the defense
ministry spokesman, said 60
percent of the Taliban’s forces
were foreign fighters — usually
a reference to Pakistanis — and
were well trained.
Waziri conceded that two
districts are under Taliban con-
trol, Baghran and Dishu, but
denied reports by local officials
that 80 percent of the province
outside Lashkar Gah has fallen
to the insurgents.
The US military is providing
air suppor t but no ground
troops, he said, adding ‘‘we
have enough ground troops to
fight.’’
Last September, the Taliban
seized the northern city of Kunduz for a few days before they
were pushed out by Afghan
forces, backed by US airstrikes.
At the time, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and the
commander of US and NATO
forces in the country, General
John Nicholson, vowed no other city would fall to the insurgents.
However, the spokesman for
US forces in Afghanistan, Brigadier General Charlie Cleveland,
said late Thursday that he
doubts reports of the Taliban
closing in on Lashkar Gah. He
said military bases in the province were still receiving fuel
supplies by road.
‘‘The view we still have is
that overall Lashkar Gah is not
about to fall,’’ Cleveland said.
Russia declares daily 3-hour
cease-fires to get aid to Aleppo
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOSCOW — Russia’s military said Wednesday that fighting in Aleppo will cease for
three hours daily to allow humanitarian aid deliveries, but it
was unclear whether rebels had
agreed. And a United Nations
official said a break in fighting
for at least 48 hours was needed
to get sufficient aid into the city.
Lieutenant General Sergei
Rudskoi of the Russian military’s General Staff said ceasefires will be observed from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. He did not say if
the rebels agreed to respect the
halts in hostilities, or explain
how they would be enforced.
He said Russia supports the
UN proposal to oversee the aid
deliveries, adding the Russian
military is talking with the UN
and the US military.
In Washington, the State Department said all parties to the
Syrian conflict must abide by
the UN request to ensure access
for humanitarian supplies.
Rudskoi told a briefing in
Moscow that humanitarian
convoys will be formed near
Handarat and will move on the
strategic Castello road. At the
United Nations, humanitarian
chief Stephen O’Brien said 48
hours and a two-lane road are
the minimum needed to get aid
into Aleppo. ‘‘When we’re offered three hours, then you
h av e t o a s k w h a t c o u l d b e
achieved in those three hours?’’
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Wildfires sweep parts of France, Portugal
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Dozens of blazes
kill four, destroy
scores of homes
By Barry Hatton
and Elaine Ganley
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MARSEILLES, France —
Fires whipped by high winds
ravaged swaths of southern
Fr a n c e a n d Po r t u g a l o n
Wednesday, killing at least four
people, burning scores of
homes and forcing the evacuation of thousands, including
tourists.
In France, multiple fires
formed a column marching toward the Mediterranean port
city of Marseille. Hundreds of
miles away, a fire swept overnight into Funchal, the capital
of Portugal’s Madeira Islands,
killing three elderly people and
leaving more than 300 with minor burns and smoke inhalation. A forest watchman was
killed on the mainland during
the night when one of more
DUARTE SA/REUTERS
Crews worked Wednesday to fight a fire in Funchal, the
capital of Portugal’s Madeira Islands.
than 100 blazes engulfed the
caravan he was sleeping in 95
miles north of Lisbon.
Two people were reported
injured, one seriously, as the
fire in southern France moved
toward Marseille, firefighters
said, and 20 to 25 homes were
burned. At least 6,670 acres
were devastated. Four firefighters were injured, three serious-
ly, battling a separate blaze in
the nearby Herault region —
brought under control as was a
fire in an industrial area outside Marseille that stocks oil
and petrochemicals.
The Marseille airport rerouted incoming flights to clear the
path for firefighting aircraft,
while officials in France’s second largest city were bracing
for flames that risked lapping at
its doors. Thick layers of ochrecolored smoke dimmed the afternoon skies of sun-drenched
Marseille, while black plumes
rose above Vitrolles and
Pennes-Mirabeau.
Firefighters in both countries battled multiple blazes
fanned by high winds and fed
by brush in a hot, dry summer,
considered fire season in both
countries. A full 186 wildfires
were counted Wednesday on
Portugal’s mainland.
The blazes were exceptionally powerful in both countries,
roaring through Madeira and
southern France at the height of
the tourist season — a mainstay
of the economy of Madeira islands, off northwest Africa.
Portugal’s National Civil Protection Service reported 14 major wildfires burning out of control in mainland Portugal.
About 4,500 firefighters were
part of a massive operation
there, supported by 28 waterdumping aircraft and 1,300 vehicles.
Plans for Chinese nuclear plant halted after protests
By Chris Buckley
NEW YORK TIMES
BostonGlobe.com
BEIJING — Bowing to days
of passionate street protests, a
city government in eastern China said Wednesday it had halted any plans to build a nuclear
fuel plant there. The reversal
was the latest indication of how
public distrust could hold back
China’s ambitious plans for expanding its nuclear power in-
dustry.
The government of Lianyungang, a city near the coast of Jiangsu province, announced the
retreat in a terse message online. “The people’s government
of Lianyungang has decided to
suspend preliminary work for
selecting a site for the nuclear
cycle project,” it read, referring
to a proposed plant for reprocessing used fuel from nuclear
plants.
No reason was given, but it
appeared clear enough. In recent days, residents have taken
to the streets to oppose any decision to build the plant nearby.
The main urban area of Lianyungang is just 20 miles
southwest of a large and growing nuclear power plant on the
coast, but the idea of a nuclear
fuel reprocessing facility also
being built in the area seemed
to push public unease to a new
height.
A 21-year-old Lianyungang
resident with the surname Tang
said Wednesday that demonstrators had been chanting “Oppose nuclear waste, defend our
home.” She did not want her
full name used, citing fear of reprisal.
“Nobody wants this kind of
thing built in their own home,”
Tang said.
China’s authoritarian leaders are wary of local protests escalating into broader challenges to their power. But local governments have often given
ground in the face of growing
public opposition to chemical
plants, waste incinerators, and
other potential sources of pollution.
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Well, here you go.
CHARLES DHARAPAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS/FILE 2013
A newly released unclassified report details the suspected
backgrounds of more than 100 Guantanamo detainees.
Guantanamo
debate fueled by
report’s release
Militant histories
of prisoners still
held are detailed
By Deb Riechmann
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A new
report on Guantanamo detainees tells the stories of former
Al Qaeda bomb makers and
bodyguards as well as low-level militant cooks and medics
who have been transferred or
cleared for release — despite
fears they are at risk of returning to battle.
The Pentagon gave the unclassified report to Senator
Kelly Ayotte, Republican of
Ne w Ha m p s h i r e , w h o h a s
been pushing the Obama administration for years to be
more transparent about who is
being transferred out of the
prison at Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba. She shared it with the
Associated Press and posted it
online Wednesday.
‘‘By clearly detailing some
of the disturbing terrorist activities and affiliations of detainees at Guantanamo, the report demonstrates why these
terrorists should not be released — they pose a serious
risk to our national security,’’
Ayotte said in an e-mail response to questions.
The remaining detainees
‘‘will no doubt’’ return to the
fight once released, she said,
noting that the Defense Department told her that 93 percent of the detainees still at
Guantanamo as of late last
year were high risk for reengagement in terrorism.
Many of the detainees have
or had been held without
charge for more than 14 years
at the military prison, which
Obama has pledged to close.
The report tells the story of
detainees such as Karim
Bostan, who once ran a flower
shop and later was accused of
running an Al Qaeda-affiliated
explosives cell believed to have
targeted US-led coalition forces in eastern Afghanistan. He’s
been at Guantanamo for more
than 13 years, but has been
cleared for transfer to a country willing to accept him.
It also, however, tells the
s t o r y o f Mu h a m m a d S a i d
Salim Bin Salman, a Yemeni
who traveled to Afghanistan to
train at an Al Qaeda camp. He
says he became a cook and
never fought because he suffers from back pain. Deemed a
medium intelligence risk, he
was cleared for release and
transferred to Oman in January following 14 years of detention.
D av i d R e m e s , a h u m a n
rights lawyer who represents
several detainees, says dangerous men are not being released.
‘‘Holding the men at all was
a deep injustice and a lasting
stain on the US. These men
shouldn’t have been in Guantanamo in the first place,’’
Remes said. ‘‘It’s one thing to
prosecute detainees for attacks
on the US. . . . It is quite another thing — and contrary to the
values the US says it is committed to — to hold men for
many years, who are accused
of no crime.’’
The Office of the Director of
National Intelligence reports
that 5 percent of Guantanamo
prisoners released since President Obama took office have
reengaged in militant activities and another 8 percent are
suspected of it. That compares
to 21 percent confirmed and
14 percent suspected during
the Bush administration.
Opened in January 2002,
the prison once held about 770
detainees. Bush transferred
more than 500 and, so far,
Obama has transferred 162
detainees to other countries.
The report given to Ayotte
covers 107 detainees who were
at the prison as of Nov. 25,
2015, the day Obama signed
the 2016 defense policy bill,
which required the administration to provide more information to Congress about the
detainees. The population has
been whittled to 76 today.
Republican lawmakers accuse Obama of rushing to
downgrade detainees’ threat
status to clear them for transfer so he can make good on his
campaign pledge to close the
prison before he leaves office
in January. Myles Caggins III,
a spokesman for the National
Security Council at the White
House, declined to predict
whether Obama will achieve
his goal, but said the United
States continues to work with
countries willing to receive 34
detainees — nearly half the remaining prison population —
who have been cleared for
transfer.
The GOP-led Congress has
tried to slow or stop detainees
from being transferred out
and has banned any from being moved to US prisons.
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The Nation
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
CAMPAIGN 2016
C
NRA remains a strong,
heavy-spending Trump ally
By Nick Corasaniti
and Alexander Burns
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NEW YORK — Donald
Trump’s candidacy has driven
away throngs of Republican
elected officials, donors and
policy experts. But not the National Rifle Association.
With Trump increasingly
isolated and hobbled by controversies of his own making, the
powerful gun-rights group has
emerged as one of his remaining stalwart allies in the Republican coalition, still aggressively
committed to his candidacy.
The association has spent
millions of dollars on television
commercials for Trump, even
as other Republican groups
have kept their checkbooks
closed and Trump’s campaign
has not run ads of its own. The
NRA’s chief political strategist,
Chris Cox, gave a forceful testimonial for Trump at the Republican convention; Trump has repeatedly praised Cox and the
association’s executive vice
president, Wayne LaPierre.
A n d o n Tu e s d a y, w h e n
Trump roiled the race anew
with a rough comment — his
critics interpreted it as a suggestion that “Second Amendment people” could attack Hillary Clinton or the judges she
would appoint if elected president — the association rushed
to defend his remark as no
more than an attempt to rally
gun enthusiasts to vote.
Allies of Trump and the association describe their politic a l a l l i a n c e a s a m a r r i a ge
forged out of urgent necessity:
an unlikely pairing of a former
gun-control proponent who
lives in a Manhattan skyscraper
with an advocacy group typically seen as speaking for gun
manufacturers and the hunters
and sportsmen of Middle
America.
But Trump has effectively
reached out to the pro-gun
community with a message of
fierce support for Second
Amendment rights. And the
NRA, spurred by concern about
Clinton’s power to nominate
Supreme Court judges, has reciprocated his overtures with
enthusiasm.
Helping to establish that
connection have been Trump’s
sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, avid
hunters with ties to the NRA.
Donald Jr., Trump’s oldest son,
spoke about the importance of
gun rights on a visit to Capitol
Hill in the spring.
‘Chris and Wayne
and all their
people at the
NRA, these are
people that love
our country.’
DONALD TRUMP,
on the NRA leadership
On the campaign trail,
Trump makes a show of embracing the association and its
leadership, while accusing Clinton of seeking to do away with
the Second Amendment.
“ We’re going to help the
NRA, who are great people,” he
said Tuesday in Fayetteville,
N.C. “They’re fighting hard,
they’re fighting hard. Chris and
Wayne and all their people at
the NRA, these are people that
love our country.”
The alliance with Trump
comes at a moment of peril for
the NRA and its agenda, as
Democrats threaten to take
control of the Senate and polls
show the public increasingly
supportive of at least modest
new limits on the sale and possession of firearms.
Clinton and other Democrats have run explicitly against
the NRA in this election, attacking the gun lobby for opposing
laws intended to restrict gun
sales to people with mental illnesses or whose names are on
the federal terrorism watch list.
They have held up the NRA as a
uniquely sinister organization
and cast themselves as opponents of the group rather than
of gun owners in general.
In her acceptance speech at
the Democratic convention last
month, Clinton said the country could not have a president
“in the pocket of the gun lobby.”
The NRA has spent nearly
$6 million this year on advertising supporting Trump, focusing
its latest efforts on the swing
states of Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania,
where Trump and running
mate Mike Pence have been
campaigning heavily. That sum
— a tiny fraction of what has
been spent on commercials
backing Clinton — is the largest
expenditure for ads helping
Trump in the general election.
At this point in the last two
elections, the NRA had not
spent a single dollar on ads
backing the Republican nominees, John McCain in 2008 and
Mitt Romney in 2012, according to the ad tracking firm Kantar Media/CMAG. In 2004, the
association spent just $61,000
aiding President George W.
Bush’s reelection bid.
Grover Norquist, an antitax
activist who sits on the rifle association’s board, said the 2016
race was uniquely explosive because control of the Supreme
Court hangs in the balance and
Clinton has spoken critically of
judicial decisions that take a
broad interpretation of the
right to own guns.
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T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
A9
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A10
T h e
The Nation
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
CAMPAIGN 2016
C
Democrats on guard against overconfidence
DEMOCRATS
Continued from Page A1
was amongst those people. I
w o n’ t u n d e r e s t i m a t e h i m
again.”
Just one day after Senator
Elizabe th Warren taunted
Trump with a tweet about him
“losing to a girl,” she told the
Globe that she “won’t relax until the election is over and
Trump is declared the loser —
big time.”
“The Republicans underestimated Trump throughout the
primary process, and we can’t
make the same mistake in the
general election,” the Massachusetts Democrat said in an emailed statement.
Since the Republican and
Democratic conventions ended
last month, Clinton’s poll numbers have jumped; the latest
national average calculated by
Real Clear Politics gives her a
nearly eight-point lead.
Clinton has deep vulnerabilities. For starters, she has not
been viewed as trustworthy by
a majority of Americans, and
her unfavorable rating in polls
averages 54 percent. But
Trump thus far has been unable to focus attention on his rival’s weaknesses, including
continued controversy over her
use of a private e-mail server
while she was secretary of state
and a subsequent FBI investigation. A new batch released
Tuesday raised questions about
ties between donors to her family’s charity and the State Department.
While a Gallup survey
showed in July that 82 percent
of Americans think the country
is on the wrong track, Trump
also has not tied that successfully to President Obama and
the Democrats’ choice for his
successor. Instead of making
the election a referendum on
Obama and Clinton, he has
made it a referendum on himself by making inflammatory
statements and yanking media
attention away from anyone
else.
Moreover, despite numerous pledges by Republicans
that Trump would turn a corner and act more presidential,
he has shown little inclination
to become a more disciplined
candidate. In recent weeks,
Trump has criticized the Muslim parents of an Army captain
killed in combat, invited the
Russians to hack into State Department e-mail, and on Tuesday, suggested that gun advocates take action against Clinton, which was widely
interpreted as a threat of violence.
Former House speaker Newt
Gingrich, a key Trump ally, de-
CHRIS KEANE/REUTERS
Hillary Clinton held a rally in Des Moines on Wednesday while Donald Trump attended one in Abingdon, Va.
EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
nounced the reaction to
Trump’s comment as ‘‘absurdity.’’
‘‘He’s better than he was a
week ago — I think he’s learned
some very painful lessons,’’ Gingrich said, according to the Associated Press. He predicted
Trump would ‘‘continue to
grow’’ as a candidate.
Trump also has not aired
campaign spots, which would
have sunk most candidates by
now, but his strategy of dominating news cycles is keeping
him at least competitive.
“ This is about the thousandth time I’ve heard pundits
say Trump has really done it
now,” said Senator Claire McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat.
“Last summer everybody was
chortling about what a ridiculous notion Trump was. Then
he marches right to the nomination.”
While many within the
Washington Beltway may view
Clinton’s victory as a foregone
conclusion, McCaskill said, “I
live in the wrong part of the
country to take any part of this
election for granted.”
Capuano said he has been
urging his fellow Democrats to
avoid letting down their guard
since the Democratic National
Convention, where he delivered the message over breakfast at a downtown Philadelphia hotel.
“They better hear this. Otherwise they are going to wake
up Nov. 9 and not feel very
good,” Capuano told the Globe.
E-mails show State, Clinton Foundation links
WASHINGTON — A new
batch of State Department emails released Tuesday showed
the close and
CAMPAIGN sometimes
NOTEBOOK overlapping
interests between the Clinton Foundation
and the State Department
when Hillary Clinton served as
secretary of state.
The documents raised new
questions about whether the
charitable foundation worked
to reward its donors with access and influence at the State
Department, a charge that
Clinton has faced in the past
and has always denied.
In one e-mail exchange, for
instance, an executive at the
Clinton Foundation in 2009
sought to put a billionaire donor in touch with the US ambassador to Lebanon because
of the donor’s interests there.
In another e-mail, the foundation appeared to push aides
to Clinton to help find a job for
a foundation associate. Her
aides indicated that the department was working on the request.
Clinton’s presidential campaign, which has been shadowed for 17 months by the
controversy over the private email server she used exclusively while at the State Department, had no immediate comment on the documents.
The State Department
turned the new e-mails over to
a conservative advocacy group,
Judicial Watch, as part of a
lawsuit that the group brought
under the Freedom of Information Act.
The documents included 44
e-mails that were not among
some 55,000 pages of e-mails
that Clinton had previously
given to the State Department,
which she said represented all
her “work-related” e-mails.
NEW YORK TIMES
Trump says ISIS honors
Obama as its founder
SUNRISE, Fla. — A day after his remarks that appeared
to suggest physical harm could
befall Hillary Clinton, Donald
Trump sprayed his fire at President Obama on Wednesday, accusing him of creating the Islamic State and saying the terrorist group honors him.
“In many respects, you
know they honor President
Obama,” Trump told a raucous
and rowdy crowd in Florida on
Wednesday night. “He’s the
founder of ISIS. He’s the founder of ISIS. He’s the founder. He
founded ISIS.” He added, “I
would say the cofounder would
be crooked Hillary Clinton.”
During an extended riff on the
crisis in Crimea, Trump added
extra emphasis on the president’s full name, saying that it
occurred “during the administration of Barack Hussein
Obama.”
Trump’s statement marked
an escalation in his recent criticism of the Obama administration’s handling of the terror
threat, as he had previously on-
ly accused Clinton of a founding role in the terror group. His
suggestion that the president
was honored by ISIS recalled
an earlier controversy when
Trump seemingly implied that
the president had some connection to the terrorist massacre of 49 people at the Pulse
nightclub in Orlando in June.
“He doesn’t get it or he gets
it better than anybody understands,” Trump told Fox News
in June. And the use of the
president’s middle name recalled Trump’s questioning of
Obama’s faith during his crusade several years ago to prove
that Obama, who is Christian,
was not born in the United
States.
The Republican candidate
also found himself in an awkward camera framing, immediately after criticizing the Clinton campaign for the appearance of Seddique Mir Mateen,
the father of the gunman at the
Pulse nightclub, at her own
campaign event this week.
“Wasn’t it terrible when the
father of the animal that killed
these wonderful people in Orlando was sitting with a big
smile on his face right behind
Hillary Clinton?” Trump said.
Yet sitting behind Trump
was Mark Foley, a former Republican congressman who resigned after being confronted
with a series of sexually explicit
messages he sent to underage
congressional pages.
Trump seemed not to be
aware of the disgraced former
congressman’s presence as he
tried to cast doubt on the Clinton campaign’s account that it
had not known who Mateen
was.
“When you get those seats,
you sort of know the campaign,” Trump said.
NEW YORK TIMES
Appeals court stays ruling
on voter ID in Wisconsin
NEW YORK — A federal appeals court Wednesday blocked
a lower court from allowing
voters in Wisconsin to cast ballots without photo identification, stating that the lower
court had been too lenient in
loosening a state voter ID law
that had already been declared
discriminatory.
The injunction, issued by a
three-judge panel of the Seventh US Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, adds a new
measure of confusion into a
fierce battle over the 2011 law
in a battleground state, three
months before the presidential
election.
But it did not affect a second federal court ruling in July
that loosened Wisconsin’s photo ID law in a different manner: allowing any registered
voter struggling to get one of
the accepted forms of ID to obtain voting credentials at any
state motor vehicle office.
The July ruling also broadened the types of ID that college students can present at
polling places.
NEW YORK TIMES
“Even after the worst month
that I’ve ever seen any politician go through, he’s still within striking distance. Any other
human being who has done
half of what he’s done would
have been discounted by now.”
Robby Mook, Clinton’s campaign manager, sent out a fundraising e-mail to donors this
week that was obtained by the
Globe. The subject line? “Wake
up call.”
“We are pleased with where
the race stands but cannot rest
for a single day or take anything for granted,” Mook wrote.
“We have to take seriously the
threat that Donald Trump
could outraise us.”
The Clinton campaign
raised $90 million in July, its
best month so far. Trump, who
only recently started fund-raising, reported $80 million, far
exceeding expectations.
“As we’ve seen over the past
month, this race remains incredibly fluid, much more so
than recent presidential election,” Mook wrote. “We fully expect the polls to tighten again.”
Much of Democrats’ optimism was fueled this week by
Stuart Rothenberg, a nonpartisan political analyst whose
Tuesday column in the Washington Post predicted that
three months from Election
Day, the die has already been
cast in Clinton’s favor.
In an interview, Rothenberg
said that he’s received a flurry
of criticism from both sides in
response to his conclusion. Republicans accused him of bias;
Democrats feared he would
jinx their candidate. “Look, I’m
just a handicapper,” he said.
The Clinton campaign has
many reasons to be confident,
Rothenberg said, but “it’s not as
if everybody’s going to hibernate now for three months.”
“I’ve gotten so many tweets
at me from so many regular
people telling me what an idiot
I am that it makes me believe
that the Trump people really
think they ’re in the game,”
Rothenberg said. “And as long
as they’re punching, you better
believe that the Democrats and
the Clinton people will punch
back.”
Representative Jim McGovern, a Massachusetts Democrat, said promising poll numbers don’ t bring him much
comfort.
“Oftentimes during the day I
feel good about the way things
are going,” McGovern said.
“Then I go to bed at night and
wake up in a cold sweat remembering a conversation
with someone I had on an airplane who loves Donald
Trump.”
Former congressman Barney Frank, another Massachusetts Democrat, warned that
even if a Clinton win is near
certain, “it’s not just important
that Donald Trump lose, but
that he loses worst that anybody ever has so the reasonable
conservatives can take their
party back. We need him to be
totally repudiated.”
Tracy Jan can be reached at
[email protected] Follow
her on Twitter @TracyJan.
Aide texted that Christie
‘flat out lied’ about bridge
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Governor
Chris Christie of New Jersey
lied to reporters when he said
he did not believe any senior
member of his staff knew about
the plot to block traffic to the
George Washington Bridge, one
of his aides told a colleague in a
text message that was part of a
court document filed Wednesday.
“Are you listening?” the aide,
Christina Renna, texted a colleague. “He just flat out lied.”
Renna added that if certain
e-mails were discovered, “it
could be bad.”
According to a filing in US
District Court in Newark, Renna sent those texts on Dec. 13,
2013, as Christie was fielding
questions from reporters about
his knowledge of the alleged
scheme to tie up traffic three
months earlier on the New Jersey side of the bridge. The filing
was made by lawyers for Bill
Baroni, who was Christie’s top
executive appointee at the Port
Authority of New York and New
Jersey, which operates the
bridge.
Federal prosecutors contend
that two lanes leading to the
bridge were abruptly closed to
punish the Democratic mayor
of Fort Lee for declining to endorse Christie’s bid for reelection. Baroni and Bridget Anne
Kelly, a former deputy chief of
staff to Christie, a Republican,
are scheduled to stand trial in
that case next month.
Christie said he had been
unaware of any plot at the time
of the Dec. 13 news conference
and had been assured by his
staff members that they too
were unaware. He said his campaign chief, Bill Stepien, had also vowed that he had no knowledge of such a plot.
“Oh, yeah, I’ve spoken to Mr.
Stepien, who’s the person in
charge of the campaign, and he
has assured me the same thing,”
Christie said during the news
conference.
As soon as Renna heard
that, she texted Peter Sheridan,
a campaign worker: “He just
flat out lied about senior staff
and Stepien not being involved.”
Sheridan responded that
Christie was “doing fine” and
“holding his own up there,” according to the filing.
Renna replied: “Yes. But he
lied.”
Christie, speaking to reporters Wednesday morning after
appearing on a sports talk radio
show, disputed Renna’s claim,
according to the Associated
Press.
“I absolutely dispute it,” he
said. “It’s ridiculous. It’s nothing new. There’s nothing new to
talk about.”
Henry Klingeman, a lawyer
for Renna, said that “Ms. Renna
will answer questions publicly
when she testifies at the upcoming trial, not before.”
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Double
shifts for
Maine’s
first lady
LEPAGE
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
The Nation
A11
SM
YOON S. BYUN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Continued from Page A1
Ann LePage, wife of Maine Governor Paul LePage, looked
over a menu while putting in an order at McSeagull’s.
waitressing job of her life — and
a perpetual-motion one at that
— to save enough money to pay
off a car.
“I want to do something on
my own, just to prove that I
can," LePage said Monday. “I
wanted something, I wanted to
work for it, and I went out and
got it.”
If this is a publicity stunt to
soften the image of a controversial governor, it’s hard and hectic duty. Co-workers, mostly college age, shake their heads as
Ann LePage bustles about the
restaurant, order book in hand,
craning her neck to check on
her tables.
Governor Paul LePage is often viewed as a stubborn and
pugnacious grouch, but his wife
seems to have carved out a parallel universe here at the edge of
a beautiful harbor.
“She’s just a normal person
— a kind, wonderful person,”
bartender Melissa Ruel said
while serving thirsty tourists.
“She’s a very hard worker.”
Ann LePage wears a black
McSeagull’s apron and shirt
that proclaims “Eat, drink, and
flounder — just for the halibut.”
She changes shoes between the
two shifts, a 14-hour odyssey in
which LePage is almost always
on her feet.
L ePage said she once
worked as a loan-processor at a
bank, but that she has primarily
been a stay-at-home mother.
Between them, the LePages
have raised five children.
“She’s from a different generation,” said Jackie Barnicoat,
the restaurant manager. “If
she’s not waiting tables, she's
cleaning. It’s been an awesome
experience for all of us.”
LePage said she is saving her
earnings to pay off a Toyota
RAV4 that belonged to her
mother, who lived with the LePages during a terminal illness
and died in October.
Word of that goal has gotten
around. So much so, Barnicoat
said, that a Toyota dealer from
Texas called the restaurant and
tried to sell LePage a car.
And on Monday, a woman
from Houston walked up to
LePage and handed her a $20
bill — for the “car fund.” Linda
Lively, the donor, included $10
of her own money in that contribution and another $10 from
a friend back home.
“We both worked really hard
for our cars, and we want to
help a woman in need,” Lively
said, smiling broadly between
bites of her salad.
Paul LePage, a fiscally conservative Republican and former businessman, is the lowestpaid governor in the country at
$70,000 a year. He tried but
failed this year to boost the next
governor’s salary to $150,000,
slightly above the national average of $135,000.
“A g o v e r n o r e a r n i n g
$70,000? That’s ludicrous,” said
Laurie Milton, a cousin of Ann
LePage’s from Florida who was
making her first visit to McSeagull’s.
A n n L e Pa ge d i d n o t s ay
whether she agrees with Milton, but she acknowledged that
the money is good at McSeagull’s, where her daughter
averaged $28 an hour last year,
including tips. And by working
double shifts — from 8:30 a.m.
to about 10:45 p.m. — LePage is
maximizing her bounty from
the tourist business in this
small town, where she and the
governor own a second home.
“It’s been a great, great season, and look at that view,” LePage said, sweeping her arm toward the harbor. “It's like working in paradise.”
But paradise is not immune
from politics. Barnicoat said
some c us tomers were displeased that the restaurant
hired LePage, whose husband
supports Donald Trump and
has made enemies during his
two terms as governor.
In addition to a scorchedearth relationship with Democrats in the Legislature, LePage
has uttered a long string of incendiary comments. LePage
has said he would tell President
Obama “to go to hell,” that the
Internal Revenue Service is “the
new Gestapo,” and that out-ofstate drug dealers impregnate
young white girls when they do
business in Maine.
At McSeagull’s, Barnicoat
said, politics are left at the door.
“Look, there's nothing Republican about the food we
serve,” Barnicoat said.
On Monday, even Bert Ely, a
customer from Virginia who
wore a hat that mocked Trump,
could only laugh and enjoy the
moment as LePage served his
party of four.
Barnicoat said complaints
have dwindled, and that LePage
is now something of a celebrity
at the restaurant, even though
she’s a celebrity who carries a
pail of soapy water to wipe
down the windows, doors, and
tables when she’s not busy.
“I think this is great. It gives
her a chance to meet the folks
her husband is serving,” said
the Rev. Dorothy Curry, an
Episcopal priest from San Diego who spends time on nearby
Squirrel Island.
LePage said she expects to
work until Columbus Day, despite being “tired and useless”
when the second of her back-toback double shifts ends on Friday nights.
And there is room for improvement, she conceded.
“My biggest challenge is I eat
no seafood,” LePage said. “I’m
from Maine, but I can’t tell one
from another. My recommendation is always the fried haddock sandwich.”
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A12
The Nation
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
CAMPAIGN 2016
C
Democratic officials fear
e-mail hack may be larger
Party braces for
release of more
private material
By Eric Lichtblau
and Eric Schmitt
NEW YORK TIMES
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978-706-7132 • [email protected]
WASHINGTON — A Russian
cyberattack that targeted Democratic politicians was bigger
than it firs t appeared and
breached the private e-mail accounts of more than 100 party
officials and groups, officials
with knowledge of the case said
Wednesday.
The widening scope of the
attack has prompted the FBI to
broaden its investigation, and
agents have begun notifying a
long list of Democratic officials
that the Russians may have
breached their personal accounts.
The main targets appear to
have been the personal e-mail
accounts of Hillary Clinton’s
campaign officials and party
operatives, along with a number of party organizations.
Officials have acknowledged
that the Russian hackers gained
access to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which is the fund-raising
arm for House Democrats, and
to the Democratic National
Committee, including a DNC
voter analytics program used by
Clinton’s presidential campaign.
But the hack now appears to
have extended well beyond
those groups, and organizations like the Democratic Governors Association may also
have been affected, according
to Democrats involved in the investigation.
Democrats say they are bracing for the possibility that more
damaging or embarrassing internal material could become
gh
NOW Throu
22nd
Mon. Aug.
public before the November
presidential election.
T h e a tt a c k h a s a l r e a d y
proved politically damaging.
On the eve of the Democratic
National Convention in Philadelphia last month, Florida
Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned as DNC
chairwoman after WikiLeaks
released a trove of hacked internal e-mails showing party officials eager for Clinton to win
the nomination over Senator
Bernie Sanders of Vermont.
US intelligence agencies
have said they have “high confidence” that the attack was the
work of Russian intelligence
agencies. It has injected a heavy
dose of international intrigue
into an already chaotic presidential campaign as Democrats
have alleged that the Russians
are trying to help tilt the election toward the Republican
nominee, Donald Trump.
Trump stunned Democrats
and Republicans when he said
last month that he hoped Russian intelligence services had
successfully hacked Clinton’s email, and encouraged them to
publish whatever they may
have stolen, though he said later that he was being sarcastic.
Intelligence and law enforcement officials, however,
are taking the issue seriously.
FBI officials briefed staff
members of House and Senate
intelligence committees last
week on the investigation into
the theft of e-mails and documents from the Democratic National Committee. Briefings for
other congressional committees are expected soon.
Much of the briefing to the
committee staff focused on the
fact that US intelligence agencies have virtually no doubt that
the Russian government was
behind the theft, according to
one staff member, who spoke
on condition of anonymity to
discuss elements of the confidential briefing.
The extension of the hack’s
scope beyond the DNC and the
House Democratic committee
added a troubling new element
to the case, the staff member
said.
US authorities remain uncertain whether the break-in to
the committee’s computer systems was intended as fairly routine cyberespionage or as part
of an effort to manipulate the
presidential election.
Russian motives are still an
open question, said a federal
law enforcement official, who
also spoke on condition of anonymity.
There is no evidence so far
that the theft penetrated the emails of lawmakers or staff
members who serve on the intelligence committees, two staff
members said.
The FBI says it has no direct
evidence that Clinton’s private
e-mail server was hacked by the
Russians or anyone else. But in
June, FBI Director James B.
Comey said that intruders had
tried, and that any successful
intruders were probably far too
skilled to leave evidence of their
intrusion behind. Law enforcement officials said he had the
Russians in mind.
Clinton’s aides were concerned about the possibility of
an outside breach after a hacker
calling himself “Guccifer” got
into the e-mail account in 2013
of Sidney Blumenthal, a longtime confidant of Clinton’s who
often e-mailed her on her private server, according to documents released Wednesday.
So far, it does not appear
that the Russian hackers sought
or gained access to any computer systems used by Trump, who
is known to avoid e-mail, officials said.
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T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
T h e
B o s t o n
Fla. police event turns fatal
Woman, 73, shot
during training
demonstration
G l o b e
The Nation
A13
Sales Tax Holiday
LIMITED TIME OFFER
By Tamara Lush
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUNTA GORDA, Fla. — A
police ‘‘shoot/don’ t shoot’’
demonstration in Florida went
shockingly awry when an officer shot and killed a 73-yearold former librarian with what
police said was real ammunition used by mistake at an
event designed to bring police
and the public together.
Authorities didn’t immediately say how a gun with a live
round came to be used at Tuesday evening’s demonstration,
noting blank rounds are typically used in such classes.
A Punta Gorda police
spokesman identified the officer as Lee Coel and said Coel
has worked for the department since 2014.
She said Coel frequently
gave department presentations and tours, ‘‘specifically
role-playing in these shoot/
don’t shoot scenarios.’’
Coel has been placed on administrative leave, and the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement is investigating.
‘‘ The officer involved is
grief-stricken,’’ Police Chief
Tom Lewis said at a news conference Wednesday. “We’ve got
officers assigned to him to
make sure he’s psychologically
stable.’’
Mary Knowlton, a community volunteer, was shot after
being randomly selected to
take part in the role-playing
scenario illustrating the splitsecond decisions an officer
CHRIS O’MEARA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Steve Knowlton said Wednesday that his father was
devastated by the shooting. He said he forgives the officer.
must make about firing. It was
part of a popular citizens academy attended by 35 people, including her 75-year-old husband.
Her son, Steve, said his father was devastated.
The younger Knowlton said
in an interview Wednesday at
his parent’s home that, on his
mother’s behalf, he was forgiving Coel.
‘‘There’s too much hate in
this world, in America, we always feel like we need revenge
and it doesn’t solve anything,’’
HACKETT, Ark. — An Arkansas deputy died Wednesday
after being shot while responding to a call at a house, the sheriff said.
Sebastian County Deputy
Bill Cooper was pronounced
dead at a hospital around 1:15
p.m., Sheriff Bill Hollenbeck
said during a news conference.
Hackett Police Chief Darrell
Spells was also shot and suffered superficial wounds.
Hollenbeck said the suspect,
34-year-old Billy Monroe Jones,
wanted to cause a ‘‘ruckus’’
ahead of a court appearance.
The sheriff said Jones was
due in a Fort Smith courtroom
Wednesday for a hearing on
whether a previous suspended
sentence should be revoked.
Court records show he has had
a drug conviction, along with a
handful of minor charges.
After the shooting, the suspect barricaded himself inside
the house for more than 4½
hours before being arrested.
Authorities said the injured
officers went to the home,
about 6 miles from the Oklahoma border, after Jones pointed
a weapon at his father, who
called 911.
After the shootings, dozens
of police vehicles, including a
SWAT truck, quickly descended
on the area. The shootings occurred in a rural, wooded area
near Hackett, a town of about
800 residents.
James Markward, who lives
nearby, said he heard a commotion early Wednesday.
‘‘It woke me up this morning, the gunshots. Of course I
didn’t know what was going
on,’’ the 72-year-old said in telephone interview. ‘‘My neighbor
called me and asked if I was
shooting, and I said ‘No, not
me.’ ’’
Markward said the shooting
suspect once helped him split
wood but added he hadn’t seen
the man in a few years.
‘‘As far as I know, he was all
right,’’ he said.
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MORNING SHOW
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he said. ‘‘I obviously can’t say
it’s easy to forgive, but it needs
to be done. She’s watching me
now.’’
Police Lieutenant Katie
Heck said officers in such
demonstrations normally use
‘‘simunition guns,’’ which are
real-looking weapons that fire
a nonlethal projectile with reduced force.
The class, put on by the
Chamber of Commerce and
the Punta Gorda police station, was one lesson during a
weeks-long curriculum.
Suspect’s ‘ruckus’ proves fatal for deputy
ASSOCIATED PRESS
triple
bonus
US Representative Bruce
Westerman, whose district includes part of Sebastian County,
didn’t have details about the incident but voiced support for
police statewide.
‘‘This has to stop,’’ Westerman said. ‘‘It’s a shame the
price that law enforcement officers are paying right now.’’
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th
August 11
is
day!
Utility accidents are
dangerous and costly.
Housing, a limited liability
company that was awarded
100,047 square feet of vacant
Roxbury land in November
2000. The LLC was given the
land at a hugely discounted
rate after winning approval
from the Department of Neighborhood Development and the
office of then-Mayor Thomas
M. Menino.
For months, Hyman and
Raymond have not responded
to phone calls requesting their
comment about Melbourne
Street Partners, its business
practices, or its several lawsuits
against Rolando Pam and two
of his sons, Tyler and Kyle.
Raymond and Hyman, records show, started Melbourne
Stree t Par tners in the late
1990s with developer Warren
Fields after the two spent years
working together in the Neighborhood Development department, which develops affordable housing, revitalizes business districts, and manages
city-owned lots. Deed transfers
show the company purchased
o n e p r o p e r t y o n Tr e m o n t
Street in 1999 for $600,000 but
remained otherwise inactive
until around 2004, just as
Menino published his Roxbury
Strategic Master Plan with the
help of the department in
which Hyman works.
Menino identified key areas
of Roxbury for possible development: among them Bartlett
Yard — the Massachusetts Bay
Transportation Authority’s
374,300-square-foot bus depot.
By the end of 2004, Melbourne Street Partners owned
three properties about a halfmile from the proposed project: a property on Highland
Park Avenue, bought in October 2003; a vacant lot on Fort
Avenue, bought in January
2004; and a three-decker on
Beech Glen Avenue, purchased
in August 2004, according to
records.
In November 2004, records
show, Hyman privately bought
a n o t h e r t h r e e - d e c k e r, o n
Atherton Street, for $400,000.
Hyman then transferred the
property to Melbourne Street
Partners for $1 in 2006, around
the time MBTA and Boston Redevelopment Authority began
to formally explore private development at Bartlett Yard. The
Atherton Street property, near
Egleston Square, is about one
mile from Bartlett Yard.
A year later, Melbourne acquired its last property, a home
on Marcella Street, for $1. The
firm acquired the property
from Raymond, who had purchased it in 2005 for $460,000.
This home is also located about
a half-mile from Bartlett Yard.
Records show the firm has
reaped the benefits from rising
home values in the area. For instance, Melbourne Street Partners purchased the Beech Glen
Avenue property for $535,000,
then renovated and sold it as
three individual units years later for a total of about $900,000.
Last year, in a project more
than a decade in the making,
community developers began
renovations at Bartlett Yard,
which will become a mixed-use
development space called “Bartlett Place,” with hundreds of
housing units, an open-air
market, and arts and entertainment venues. The project is being privately spearheaded by a
local nonprofit, Nuestra Comunidad Development Corporation, and Windale Developers
Inc., which jointly acquired the
former MBTA yard and won
development approval from
the Boston Redevelopment Authority.
If Hyman and Melbourne
Street retain their current
properties, they will almost
certainly continue to grow in
value.
Under state and city ethics
guidelines, it is not inherently a
problem if a public employee is
involved in a real estate company — even if that employee
stands to benefit from activity
‘There is no requirement under
state ethics laws that we investigate
our employees’ activities outside
the workplace.’
LISA POLLACK, Department of Neighborhood Development
overseen by the development
agency.
Yet, the arrangement could
raise questions of a potential
conflict. Pam Wilmot, executive director of Common Cause
Massachusetts, the state ethics
watchdog group, said private
business relationships by government officials almost always require a closer examination.
“Anytime you have a private
business and are working in
government, there’s a potential
for both the perception of conflict of interest and real conflict
of interest,” Wilmot said.
Lisa Pollack, spokeswoman
for the Department of Neighborhood Development, said department leaders were unaware of Hyman’s role in Melbourne Street Partners until
the Globe contacted them for
comment; she said Hyman
never disclosed the company to
superiors.
But Pollack also said disclosure requirements would kick
in only during highly specific
circumstances: if Hyman were
a direct participant in the city’s
work around Bartlett Yard, if
he coordinated with colleagues
who directly worked on the
project, or if Melbourne Street
Partners opposed city activity
at a property directly adjacent
to its own lot.
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“There is no requirement
under state ethics laws that we
investigate our employees’ activities outside the workplace,
especially when there is no reason to believe that there is a
conflict,” Pollack said in an email. “Should an employee be
found to have violated these
policies, it would result in rapid disciplinary action.”
Though Hyman never
worked on the specific city
team that oversaw the Bartlett
Yard development process,
land records indicate he,
through Melbourne Street
Partners, developed a property
next to another city-owned lot.
The Marcella Street property
his company purchased and
renovated is surrounded by
public land, including a cityowned vacant lot directly next
door, at 127 Marcella St.
However, since Hyman never interacted with the city
property, meaning he did not
oppose a zoning issue there as
a private business person, Pollack said he was not required to
disclose his company.
“There’s no connection in
Carl Hyman’s role in the City of
Boston and any decisions [Melbourne Street] has made,” said
Ma r a n o , Hy m a n’s l aw y e r.
“None.”
City payroll records show
Hyman, a longtime employee
of the agency’s real estate team,
was hired in 1992, earned
more than $88,000 in 2015,
and now holds the title of senior project manager. Officials
said Hyman is responsible for
the management of city-owned
parcels, which means coordinating property preservation,
performing inspections, and
overseeing demolitions at both
public and private properties.
Recently, records show, Melbourne Street Partners has fallen into disarray after it became
entangled with Pam and his
two sons. The Pam family has
been accused in civil litigation
of trying to illegally obtain
more than 20 properties worth
at least $6 million.
In 2010, Melbourne Street
Partners sold its properties on
Highland Park and Fort Avenue to Tyler Pam for $300,000,
then later claimed in court that
Pam never paid the agreed-upon price.
In another lawsuit filed later in civil court, Hyman and
Melbourne Street Partners
claimed Rolando and Tyler
Pam conspired to defraud the
firm of millions of dollars in
property. The lawsuit alleges
that the Pams worked with
Raymond to illegally acquire
two of the firm’s properties, on
Tremont and Marcella streets.
Previously, Rolando and Tyler Pam denied wrongdoing in
these cases but refused to detail how long they have known
Hyman and Raymond or the
extent of their business relationship.
Through Marano, Hyman
denied knowing the Pam family and asserted that the Pams’
relationship is strictly with
Raymond. Marano portrayed
Hy m a n a n d F i e l d s — tw o thirds of the Melbourne Street
Partners — as innocent victims
in another one of the Pam family’s controversial real estate
activities.
“They just haven’t been able
to get away with this one,” Marano said.
Raymond, who also sits on
the board of Boston Renaissance Charter School, has not
returned calls and a letter requesting comment.
The firm’s most recent lawsuit against the Pams is pending in Suffolk County civil
court while lawyers provide
discovery evidence. In total,
Melbourne Street Partners has
sued Rolando Pam and his sons
over four separate properties,
which constitute more than
two-thirds of its total portfolio.
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T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
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B o s t o n
G l o b e
Nation/Region
A15
Former Mafia boss charged with 1993 murder
SALEMME
Continued from Page A1
Ne w England Mafia in the
1990s, is charged with the May
10, 1993, slaying of South Boston nightclub manager Steven
A. DiSarro, whose remains
were discovered in March by
investigators acting on a tip.
DiSarro was buried in a Providence lot owned by a man facing federal drug charges.
Salemme denies he killed
DiSarro and “is ready to fight
this case tooth and nail,” Salemme’s attorney, Steven Boozang, said after the court hearing. “This is old stuff that has
been dredged up from the past,
but he’ll face it head-on as he
always has.”
The murder in question
stretches back more than two
decades, to a time when the
mob in New England was being battered by federal prosecutions. DiSarro was 43 when
he vanished 23 years ago and
was presumed murdered.
The recent discovery of his
remains let his family finally
lay him to rest. “We buried him
this weekend and had a small
ceremony,” DiSarro’s son, Nick,
said during a brief telephone
interview Wednesday. “I am really glad that there is progress
and they are moving forward.
I’m looking forward to finding
out the details.”
The magistrate judge granted a request by the prosecution
to keep an FBI affidavit filed in
support of Salemme’s arrest
under seal.
While Salemme is charged
with murdering a witness, authorities have not disclosed
whether DiSarro was cooperating with authorities when he
vanished, or whether investigators were planning to call him
as a witness during a federal investigation that was underway
in 1993 against Salemme and
his son, Frank.
DiSarro had acquired The
Channel, a now-defunct nightclub, between 1990 and 1991
and Salemme and his son had a
hidden interest in the club, according to court filings by the
government in prior cases.
The new charge against
Salemme marks the first time
anyone has been charged with
DiSarro’s murder. However,
Salemme pleaded guilty in
2008 to lying and obstruction
o f j u s t i c e f o r d e ny i n g a ny
knowledge about DiSarro’s
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE
Steven A. DiSarro’s remains were found in March in Providence. DiSarro was 43 when he vanished 23 years ago and was presumed murdered.
death and was sentenced to
five years in prison.
Salemme also spent 15
years in prison for attempting
to kill an Everett lawyer in
1968 by planting dynamite in
his car. The lawyer lost a leg in
the explosion.
After his release, Salemme
was being groomed to take
over as mob boss, igniting a
war with a renegade faction.
He survived after being shot by
rival gangsters outside a Saugus pancake house in 1989 and
was indicted on federal racketeering charges in 1995 along
with others, including Bulger,
gangster Stephen “The Rifleman” Flemmi, and Rhode Island mobster Robert “Bobby”
DeLuca.
In 1999, after learning that
Bulger and Flemmi were longtime FBI informants, Salemme
agreed to cooperate with authorities against the pair and
their handler, retired FBI agent
John J. Connolly Jr. In e xchange he served only eight
years in prison and was admitted to the federal witness protection program.
In 2003, Flemmi began cooperating with authorities and
claimed he walked in on the
murder of DiSarro at
Salemme’s estranged wife’s
home in 1993, according to a
US Drug Enforcement Administration report filed in federal
court in Boston. He claimed
that Salemme’s son, Frank, was
s trangling DiSarro, while
Salemme, his brother John
Salemme, and another man,
Paul Weadick, watched.
Flemmi said Salemme was
concerned about DiSarro’s
friendship with a man who was
cooperating in the federal investigation targeting Salemme
and his son. He also told investigators that Salemme later
told him DeLuca was present
when they buried DiSarro.
Salemme’s son Frank died
in 1995.
Salemme was kicked out of
the witness protection program in 2004 when he was
charged with lying about
DiSarro’s killing but was allowed back into the program in
2009 after finishing his sentence.
Court filings indicated that
Salemme was using the name
Richard Parker while in Geor-
gia.
He was living “a healthy lifestyle,” exercised as much as
possible, and was a voracious
reader, Boozang said.
“He’s a guy that learned his
lesson,” Boozang said. “He paid
his debt to society. For 21 years
he hasn’t been in trouble.”
But , Nick DiSarro said,
“None of that takes away the
fact that he murdered someone.”
Dressed in a short-sleeved
navy blue polo shirt and olive
green khakis when he appeared in court Wednesday, the
gray haired former Mafia don
was slightly tanned and looked
fit and trim. When told to rise,
he took a few moments to get
to his feet.
US Magistrate Judge Don-
‘It’s nice to have somebody available when you’re in that gray area.’
GLENDA UNDERWOOD, registrar, New England School of Optometry, referring to the complexity of federal regulations
US stepping up oversight of foreign students
FOREIGN STUDENTS
Continued from Page A1
visits to schools from Cape Cod
to the Berkshires over the past
two years, helping them with
questions and flagging situations that don’t seem right.
Nationwide, the department
monitors more than 1 million
international students pursuing academic or vocational
studies, a number that has increased as much as 10 percent
annually in recent years.
Local schools said they welcome the help, because regulations can be confusing and ambiguous.
“It’s nice to have somebody
available when you’re in that
gray area,” said Glenda Underwood, registrar at the New England School of Optometry on
Beacon Street in Boston. On a
recent ICE visit, she greeted
field representative John Deziel
with a highlighted printout of
her 138 international students
and a stack of file folders —
backup documentation.
The optometry school was
just one stop for Deziel on a
busy day of visits around the
city. He also checked in at a floristry school on Marlborough
Street that is preparing to admit its third international student next year, and Northeastern University, a nationwide
leader in international students, with 10,500.
In a black suit and a tie and
toting a rectangular black bag,
Deziel looked the part of a government regulator. As the visits
began, he pulled out a thick
leather binder with the initials
ICE on the front. But that’s the
most intimidating thing about
him. With a soft voice and dis-
JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Immigration official John Deziel met with the president of the School of Fashion Design,
Denise Hammon, reminding her that students must pay a federal fee to enter the country.
arming smile, he asks schools
how he can help.
Before he arrives at a school,
Deziel does his homework. He
has access to a federal database
and checks how many international students a school has registered. If that number doesn’t
match the records at the school,
it could signal a problem.
At some schools, Deziel
speaks with school officials almost in what could be a foreign
language of government acronyms and form numbers: I-94,
I-17, and I-20.
At other places, it’s vernacular. At the tiny floristry school,
Deziel asked owner Steven Rittner whether he had sent a formal acceptance letter to a Nigerian student, which she could
use at the embassy to help obtain her visa. He had not, so
Deziel advised him how to write
it.
In some cases, Deziel has
found schools that aren’t following the law. Most of the time
it’s not on purpose, he said. In
other cases, ICE has caught
those who try to illegally profit
off the international student
system.
In April, 21 international
student recruiters and others
across the country were indicted for allegedly conspiring with
more than 1,000 students to
fraudulently maintain student
visas through a “pay-to-stay”
college in New Jersey that was
actually fake, set up by the government to catch fraudsters.
Not long ago, the School of
Fashion Design on Newbury
Street was out of compliance
with regulations, Deziel said.
Af ter many visits with the
school’s new president, the situation is resolved.
Deziel recently stopped back
by the School of Fashion Design
on Newbury Street, where high
schoolers were busy cutting
and laying out fabric amid
mannequins dressed in furlined coats and low-backed evening gowns. He reminded president Denise Hammon to make
sure students pay the international student fee so they will
be allowed to enter the country
at Logan Airport.
“I noticed a lot of them have
paid, but there are a couple
who haven’t,” he told Hammon.
The fashion school has a relatively small number of international students — two currently, and nine expected this
fall. The government has certified 8,681 schools nationwide,
and 77 percent of them have 50
or fewer students.
Many schools ask Deziel
whether they should use
agents, the sometimes-controversial consultants who recruit
students for many schools and
are paid by the student and
sometimes also by the school.
Deziel doesn’t advise schools
one way or the other, but tells
them agents aren’t necessary. In
the past two years, he has seen
schools become much more
savvy about identifying dishonest agents, he said.
Schools said they have noticed the ways the international
student-monitoring program
has evolved over the years,
mostly for the better. Having a
real person to call for help is a
huge improvement, they said.
“It’s like night and day,” said
Rittner, at the floristry school.
“It’s amazing.”
Laura Krantz can be reached at
[email protected]
Follow her on Twitter
@laurakrantz.
ald L. Cabell ordered Salemme
held without bail pending the
resolution of the case. The
prosecutor said Salemme had a
histor y of fleeing to avoid
charges and recently fled Atlanta, where he was in the witness protection program, and
was captured in Connecticut.
Salemme did not challenge
the government’s request to
hold him without bail. However, Boozang insisted that Salemme was not in hiding, but
rather, “He was on his way
back to answer any charges
that might have been coming
forth.”
Shelley Murphy can be reached
at [email protected]
Follow her on Twitter
@shelleymurph.
Study backs
Pacific Coast
as first path
to Americas
By Malcolm Ritter
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Researchers
have found new evidence that
the first Americans migrated
south from Alaska via the Pacific Coast, rather than a route
hundreds of miles inland along
the Rocky Mountains.
T he colonization of the
Americas began after people arrived from Siberia, crossing an
ancient land bridge into Alaska.
Huge ice sheets largely blocked
the way south, but a gap in Canada was long thought to provide an ice-free corridor for migration into the continent.
That idea ran into a problem
as archeologists documented
human presence in the Americas at earlier and earlier times.
The corridor appeared some
15,000 to 14,000 years ago as
the ice sheets retreated, but
studies suggest that people had
reached South America by at
least 14,700 years ago. Even if
one accepts the earliest date for
the corridor, it’s hard to believe
the migration could have gone
so far south, so fast.
So in recent years many scientists have concluded the first
southward migrants traveled
along the Pacific Coast instead,
either in boats or on land.
The new research, released
Wednesday by the journal Nature, casts further doubt on the
inland corridor. It suggests that
even after the corridor appeared, it wasn’t suitable for
migration until about 12,600
years ago. That’s because it
lacked plants and game that
people would need to sustain
themselves on the long journey,
researchers said.
A16
Editorial
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Opinion
BOSTONGLOBE.COM/OPINION
Editorial
Trump’s
glass-tower
view of the
‘working class’
F
OR SOMEONE who incessantly
boasts about his business genius,
Donald Trump sure sounded like he
was treading into unfamiliar territory Monday during a speech in which
he outlined his economic policy. As Trump haltingly read from a teleprompter before a Detroit
Economic Club audience, it became clear that
most of the bullet points had been crafted by
someone else — someone charged with making
the Republican presidential candidate’s suspect
proposals come across as feasible.
Equally evident was Trump’s disconnect
from the so-called working class voters he
vowed to lift out of their financial malaise by
reducing taxes and creating “millions of new
and really good-paying jobs.” Several of his
primitively sketched ideas, while ostensibly
aimed at boosting the fortunes of middle-income taxpayers, actually illustrated a fundamental ignorance of their everyday realities.
In calling for a reduction in the number of
federal tax brackets from seven to three, Trump
aligned himself with a previously floated Republican plan to create
three income-tax tiers — at
12, 15, and 33 percent. “For
many American workers,
their tax rate will be zero,”
he said without elaborating. Or without mentioning
that the highest income
earners, who now pay a top
rate of 39.6 percent, stand
to benefit most. That would
widen, not narrow, the nation’s income gap.
Another promise Trump made Monday —
that “no family will have to pay the death tax” —
also does not apply to most taxpayers. Estate taxes are assessed only on those who leave behind
assets of $5,450,000 or more — about 1 in 500 of
the approximately 2.5 million people who die annually fall into that category, according to the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. Given the cost
of housing, long-stagnant wages, exorbitant college tuition, and shrinking retirement savings,
many Americans’ already modest estates are
crumbling. Others get by on a weekly basis, with
little in equity or cash as a safety net. The concept
of having an “estate” is nearly unfathomable.
Following his daughter Ivanka’s lead at the Republican National Convention, Trump told the
crowd in Detroit that he would allow parents to
“fully deduct the average cost of child care spending from their taxes.” What that means precisely is
— like most Trump proclamations — unclear. The
Internal Revenue Service already allows taxpayers
to write off a significant portion of child care expenses. Besides, many people who struggle to pay
for child care so both parents can work don’t earn
enough to itemize their deductions. And if those
who can afford to send their kids to high-end child
care centers also were able to fully deduct those
bills, wouldn’t this become yet another break that
primarily favors the affluent? Trump has probably
never contemplated such questions. Paying for
child care was never an issue in his household.
It may be too much to ask someone who has
long enjoyed a penthouse view of the world to
truly identify with the working class. But can’t
he at least come down to the ground floor once
in awhile?
Why I teach
By Leila Philip
A
S I DRIVE up the tree-lined entrance to the college where I teach,
I’m thinking about the list I wrote in May, when summer was going
to last forever and I was sure I could finish my new book, even sort
the boxes of papers from our move 12 years ago. My August migration back to campus always involves a stage of grieving. I pass the
clock tower and, in a fit of delusional thinking, tell myself I still
have time — 30 days until classes begin.
My office door opens with a click and there they are on the table, the stack of books I plan
to teach this fall in my two sections of Introduction to Creative Writing, along with a folder
of notes about ideas for new readings and writing exercises. My goal is for students to experience the class assignments as spontaneous, in order to break down their inhibitions toward writing, but creating this sense of surprise requires careful planning. I have a long list
of things I have to do now, which is why I’m in my office with a heavy heart in early August.
As soon as I start working through my notes on the upcoming syllabus, my mood lifts
and I remember why I love teaching. Often students come into my class unable to write
the first simple assignments, but by the end of the semester they leave amazed at what
they have produced. Helping students discover their voice on the page
I try to model for
students the
importance of
listening and
tolerance, dialogue
and critical thinking
is both exciting and humbling. This kind of learning experience can
be transformative for students, and it would not be possible if I had to
worry about mandated trigger warnings designed to shield students
from facing uncomfortable feelings in the classroom. Fortunately, my
college has no policy mandating their use.
I am thinking about a profoundly moving classroom moment last
spring when two students read their work aloud. One had written a
scene of playing basketball with his father as a kid, while his father
was dying of cancer. The other student wrote about first hearing her
abcde
mother tell her about her family’s flight from Cambodia through the killing fields of Pol
JOHN W. HENRY Publisher
learning process. Each semester I work hard to devise new ways to make students slow
MIKE SHEEHAN Chief Executive Officer
down, to suspend judgment, to sustain focus — in other words, to prevail in the face of
Fou n d e d 1 8 7 2
Pot. The discussion that followed both of these pieces of writing was electric with intellectual and emotional engagement.
Life cascades into the classroom, as it should. Discomfort is an essential part of the
BRIAN McGRORY Editor
ELLEN CLEGG Editor, Editorial Page
discomfort, not to avoid it.
The rate of mental illness among college students is a concern. According to a 2015
American College Health Association survey, 58 percent of college students said they felt
CHRISTINE S. CHINLUND Managing Editor/News
“overwhelming anxiety” in the past 12 months. That’s up more than 49 percent since
DAVID SKOK Managing Editor/Digital
2009. I am increasingly alert as a teacher for signs of distress — a missed class, unanswered e-mails, failure to complete work — and I don’t hesitate to take action. But the
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most basic tenets of psychology emphasize that enabling people with anxiety disorders to
avoid the things they fear is unhelpful. My students are not frail; they write stories that
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tell themselves and the world who they are and who they want to be. In the process, they
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affirm their strength and humanity.
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I have worked with students who have chosen to write about racial profiling and racism, suicide, violence, loss, sexism, rape, and homophobia. These topics come up, and
when they do, they require my full attention and engagement to navigate successfully. Perhaps sometimes I fail at this, but I always try, and by doing so I model for students the importance of listening and tolerance, dialogue and critical thinking. Trigger warnings seem
to be designed to do the opposite, silencing hard discussions about things that matter.
As soon as I slip back out of my office, I’m once again enveloped in August sun,
those precious remaining days of summer. But I no longer dread the start of the semester; I’ve been reminded of why I teach in the first place.
Leila Philip is a professor in the English department at the College of the Holy Cross. Her latest
book is “Water Rising,” a collaboration with artist Garth Evans.
HANNA BARCZYK FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
His economic
blueprint
showed how out
of touch he is
with most
taxpayers.
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
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B o s t o n
G l o b e
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A17
Inbox
ERIC FEHRNSTROM
Romney’s lesson unheeded
I
F MITT ROMNEY taught Republicans anything, it’s that
you can run on entitlement
reform and win with seniors.
Too bad Donald Trump didn’t learn
that lesson.
It’s hard to position yourself as a
deficit hawk, as Trump has done, and
not take on the ballooning costs of
Medicare and Social Security. Trump
had the perfect opportunity to correct
this defect when he presented his
economic plans at a speech this week
in Detroit. Like
so much about
Trump’s stumbling campaign,
it turned out to
be a missed opportunity.
To be sure,
Trump’s economic plan contained much that
should be pleasing to conservatives.
Tax cuts for individuals, a moratorium on federal regulations, repeal of
Obamacare, and a lower corporate
tax rate are among the highlights. If
there’s one bright spot for Trump, it’s
that polling continues to show him
with a slight lead over Democrat Hillary Clinton on the question of who
can best handle the economy.
But in laying out his economic vision, Trump made no mention of entitlements.
Asked about the omission, David
Malpass, a senior Trump advisor,
told CNN: “Donald Trump wants the
You can run on
entitlement
reform and win
seniors.
federal government to have really
strong finances, but there doesn’t
have to be cuts in the entitlements to
get there.” What you need, he said,
“is a lot of growth.”
Or, as Trump reportedly told
House Speaker Paul Ryan in a closeddoor meeting in May, “There’s no way
a Republican is going to beat a Democrat when the Republican is saying,
‘We’re going to cut your Social Security’ and the Democrat is saying, ‘We’re
going to keep it and give you more.’ ”
Perhaps nothing better exemplifies the “rigged system” that Trump
complains about than the oft-told lie
that people can count on Social Security and Medicare to be there for
them, without making the changes
that will sustain those programs into
the future. Trump, like so many candidates before him, apparently believes that cutting benefits is the
“third rail” of American politics. If so,
he missed what turned out to be a
major turning point in 2012.
Romney boldly put entitlement reform alongside jobs as one of his
main issues. He proposed adding to
the retirement age and lowering the
growth rate in benefits for those with
higher incomes. He called for turning
Medicare into a premium support
system where existing spending is repackaged into fixed benefit amounts
for each senior, enabling them to
shop for coverage.
To an extent not previously seen,
Romney ran on comprehensive plans
to introduce competition into Medicare and put Social Security on a path
to long-term solvency. He doubled
down on it all by selecting Ryan as
his running mate, who, as a member
of the House, had endorsed a controversial policy to partially privatize Social Security.
The Democratic response was predictable: Frighten seniors. President
Obama’s campaign manager argued
that Romney “would end Medicare as
we know it.” Democrats ran ads
showing a man shoving an elderly
woman in a wheelchair off a cliff.
Obama himself told Florida’s seniors
that, if Romney wins the election,
“You’re on your own.”
When the dust settled, the usual
Democratic scare tactics had lost
their shock value. Romney won voters 65 and over by 12 points, 56-44.
In the battleground state of Florida,
with more seniors than any other
state, Romney won the 65-plus age
group by a whopping 17 points.
Clinton wants to expand Social Security and Medicare, but at least she’s
honest enough to propose higher taxes to pay for it all. Trump needs to be
equally honest and make clear there
is no growth fairy to solve our entitlement woes. As Romney proved, he
has nothing to fear.
Eric Fehrnstrom is a Republican
political analyst and media
strategist, and was a senior adviser to
Governor Mitt Romney.
DAN WASSERMAN
MICHAEL A. COHEN
Trump crosses a dangerous line
T
WENTY YEARS ago, I wrote
one of my first ever opinion
pieces about the incitement
by the Israeli right that, I argued, contributed to the “climate of
divisiveness that made the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
possible” in November 1995.
Two decades later, I find myself in
the unimaginable position of writing
about even worse incitement taking
place in an American presidential
election.
At a campaign event Tuesday in
North Carolina, Donald Trump said
of his opponent Hillary Clinton that
she “wants to abolish, essentially
abolish, the Second Amendment.”
He went on, “If she gets to pick her
judges, nothing you can do, folks. Although the Second Amendment people, maybe there is, I don’t know.”
The first part of the statement is
pure fabrication. Clinton has said on
numerous occasions that she has no
intention of abolishing the Second
Amendment (something, by the way,
that neither she nor the Supreme
Court could actually do if they wanted
to). Trump — along with other Republicans — keeps asserting this made-up
charge, knowing full well it feeds the
paranoia and anxiety of pro-gun voters. It is emblematic of the fundamen-
tal dishonesty with which the GOP is
conducting this presidential campaign.
But of course, the real headline
from Tuesday’s event was Trump’s
dark insinuation that one way to stop
Clinton from appointing judges to
the Supreme Court would be to engage in armed insurrection . . . or assassinate Clinton.
The Trump campaign, of course,
has argued that the candidate’s
words were taken out of context and
that he really meant that pro-Second
Amendment voters should rally behind his candidacy. He was talking
about the “power of unification,”
claimed Trump aides.
Yet it was a mere month ago that
Al Baldasaro, a Trump supporter,
New Hampshire Republican delegate, and advisor on veteran’s issues,
said Clinton should be “put in the firing line and shot for treason” because of her actions related to Benghazi. While the Trump campaign said
it didn’t agree with Baldasaro’s comments, they were not condemned.
When political leaders look the
other way at calls for political violence — or in the case of Trump, tacitly embrace it — they are giving validation to those who might turn such
rhetoric into action. Trump’s words
are giving permission, even planting
a seed in the heads of unstable individuals who are predisposed to violence. This is dangerous rhetoric that
has no place in a mature democracy.
Indeed, earlier at the same event
in North Carolina, Trump said that
Clinton will “destroy the country
from within.” It’s a statement that in
some ways is worse than his discussion of the Second Amendment, because it suggests a Clinton victory
would represent an existential threat
to the United States . . . and how does
one respond to an existential threat?
Trump’s words on Tuesday could
empower someone to do something
terrible — just as the incendiary rhetoric of the far right in Israel helped
lead to the murder of Yitzhak Rabin.
The man who has violated every
political norm in this country
crossed a terrifying line this week.
Every Republican politician must
swiftly and unambiguously condemn
what Trump has said.
For the first time in this presidential race I am genuinely afraid . . .
that at some point in the future I
might have to write again the same
op-ed I wrote 20 years ago.
Michael A. Cohen’s column appears
regularly in the Globe. Follow him on
Twitter @speechboy71.
Action on assault
weapons stirs
controversy
Congressional delegation backs
enforcement of assault weapons ban
WE ARE proud to stand united in our support for Attorney
General Maura Healey as she courageously works to enforce the assault weapons ban.
Maura Healey is not creating new laws. She is enforcing
a law the state legislature put on the books nearly 20 years
ago to protect our communities from gun violence. And, as
Attorney General, she has that authority and responsibility.
Massachusetts has already seen a decline in assault
weapon sales and significant compliance by manufacturers
and gun dealers since the announcement. Healey’s leadership is making our communities safer.
Furthermore, the hateful rhetoric used against her is
disgraceful and does nothing to further the debate or make
our communities better. Hate speech has no place in our
Commonwealth.
SENATOR ELIZABETH WARREN
SENATOR EDWARD J. MARKEY
REPRESENTATIVE RICHARD E. NEAL
REPRESENTATIVE JAMES MCGOVERN
REPRESENTATIVE NIKI TSONGAS
REPRESENTATIVE JOSEPH P. KENNEDY III
REPRESENTATIVE KATHERINE CLARK
REPRESENTATIVE SETH MOULTON
REPRESENTATIVE MICHAEL E. CAPUANO
REPRESENTATIVE STEPHEN F. LYNCH
REPRESENTATIVE WILLIAM KEATING
Keep policy
disagreements
and personal
attacks separate
THANK YOU, Yvonne Abraham, for your column calling out the vile attacks
against Attorney General
Maura Healey (“AG faces
sexist, antigay slurs after
imposing gun ban,” Metro,
July 30). We are chairs of
Democratic city and town
committees in Western
Massachusetts writing in
support of the attorney general’s action to close the
loopholes that omitted virtually identical, but not specifically named, firearms in
the assault weapons ban.
Her common sense move
enforces laws already on
the books, laws that would
remove deadly assault
weapons from our streets.
Like Abraham, we also
decry and condemn the sexist and homophobic attacks
on the Attorney General. It
is one thing to disagree
with the actions of a public
servant, even passionately
care about those differences, but quite another to
stoop to the level of ignorant personalized attacks. It
would appear the attackers
are so blinded with rage
they are incapable of communicating disagreement
in a rational way. It is precisely that level of irrationality, anger, and perceived
imperviousness that makes
ownership of these types of
guns dangerous.
ELIZABETH SILVER
Northampton
LAURIE GARCIA
Easthampton
RAY DREWNOWSKI
Holyoke
ROBERT PAM
Amherst
JANET CAIN
Southampton
BARBARA MAGNUSON
S. Hadley
Consider the
terrifying power
of these weapons
REGARDING ATTORNEY
General Healey’s initiative
to continue enforcing the
assault rifle ban, I’m aware
that this legislation is considered by some to be imprecise in its definition of
what, exactly, constitutes
an assault rifle. However, I
believe the concerns recently cited by the secretary of public safety and
others are characterized by
logic chopping that only
serves the gun lobby.
I urge anyone who has
an interest in this matter to
Google search “Fast Mag
Change AR-15.” This will
lead to YouTube clips of a
shooter reloading his AR-15
with oversized magazines in
one second, without removing the gun from his shoulder. This is what’s at issue
here — an anti-personnel
weapon capable of delivering 60 rounds in less than a
minute. This murderous capacity is what the gun lobby
would have us ignore.
State Senators Tarr and
Humanson have initiated
bills that would forbid the
attorney general from putting forward rules or regulations that govern or limit
the sale of such guns.
Shouldn’t these gentlemen
be turning their considerable talents to crafting legislation that will unambiguously keep these weapons
of destruction out of the
marketplace?
My son was killed in a
school shooting by a man
using a semiautomatic rifle
and 30-round magazines.
Many lives were saved
when one of the magazines
failed to seat properly,
causing the gun to jam.
His equipment was cheap
and he was too inexperienced to clear the malfunction. Imagine if he’d had a
better gun and more time
to practice.
GREG GIBSON
Gloucester
Pot calling the
kettle unilateral
IN A recent letter to the editor by Steve Kramer (“Healey’s one-woman effort
against assault weapons is a
welcome step,” Letters, July
27) commenting on Attorney General Maura Healey’s
recent interpretation of
what constitutes an “assault” rifle, Mr. Kramer says
the unilateral nature of Ms.
Healey’s action is “of little
concern.” I’d like to make a
few word changes to his
comments, and then ask if
he and others who see
nothing wrong with this approach if they still agree:
“The fact that the effort was
unilateral, without negotiation with prochoice organizations, is of little concern.
Planned Parenthood and
other prochoice advocates
have never been known to
be bilateral participants in
efforts to promote reasonable restrictions on abortion. Ashcroft’s effort will
encounter friction from
prochoice advocates and
providers. So be it.”
I strongly suspect the
answer depends on whose
ox is being gored.
STEPHEN MATHIS
Boston
Letters should be written exclusively to the Globe and
include name, address, and daytime telephone number.
They should be 200 words or fewer. All are subject to
editing. Letters to the Editor, The Boston Globe, P.O. Box
55819, Boston, MA 02205-5819; [email protected]; fax:
617-929-2098
T h e
A18
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
DEAR GOVERNOR BAKER:
More than 90 companies and investors — including 46 with operations right
here in Massachusetts — wrote a letter last week urging you to support a more
ambitious Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). RGGI caps carbon pollution
from power plants and has successfully reduced emissions while creating jobs
and maintaining economic growth.
Why Did They Write?
They know that unchecked climate change
poses a real threat to business and proactively
addressing it presents one of the greatest
economic opportunities of the 21st century.
Why Now?
A decision on whether to strengthen RGGI will
be made by the end of the year. As you and the
other governors involved in RGGI evaluate this
opportunity, companies and investors want you
to know that a strong economy depends upon
a healthy environment.
Why More Ambition?
Because RGGI works. In order to help prevent
catastrophic climate change, we can and must
do more. That’s why companies and investors
are calling for a five percent annual cap
reduction starting in 2020.
Acadia Center found:
The economy
grew
%
24
“Our support is firmly grounded
in economic reality,” they wrote.
“Continuing reductions beyond 2020
will provide certainty for companies
to plan and invest for the future,
make the region an attractive place
to do business, and continue to
lower electricity rates for consumers,”
the companies wrote.
“By continuing to set ambitious
targets, RGGI states will create
incentives for economic growth and
continue their legacy of climate
leadership,” the investors wrote.
as emissions
dropped
%
30
since 2008 across RGGI states.
Signatories include:
Amherst College
Arjuna Capital
Arup
Autodesk
Baldwin Brothers Inc.
Business Wisdom
Calvert Investments
Christopher Reynolds Foundation
Clean Yield Asset Management
Clif Bar & Company
Co-op Power
EILEEN FISHER, Inc.
Ethical Electric
Gap Inc.
Green Century Capital Management
Greenough
IKEA North America Services, LLC
JLL
JNArchitects
Levi Strauss & Co.
Linda Harrar Productions
Melina/Hyland Design Group
Oaktree Development
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
Saunders Hotel Group
Sierra Club Foundation
Signature Sustainability
Staples, Inc.
Sustainability Roundtable Inc.
Tech Networks of Boston
Tel-Affinity Corporation
The Lion Company, Inc.
The McKnight Foundation
The North Face
Thornton Tomasetti
Transformpreneur.com
Trillium Asset Management, LLC
TripZero
Tsoi/Kobus & Associates
Unitarian Universalist Association
VF Corporation
Walden Asset Management
WeNeedaVacation.com, LLC
Worthen Industries, Inc.
Zaurie Zimmerman Associates, Inc.
Zevin Asset Management, LLC
To read the letters, visit: www.ceres.org/RGGI2020
Metro
B
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, AU G US T 1 1 , 2 01 6 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / M E T R O
Yvonne Abraham
Suffolk’s
firing squad
Who on earth would
want to be president of
Suffolk University now?
What a massive hash
the board of trustees
has made of that place
and its reputation. The
downtown college
prides itself on turning
out socially conscious graduates and civic leaders, the kinds of people who make
a city great. Pity the poor faculty and
students, who strive to embody those
ideals even in the midst of chaos — chaos created by people who are supposed
to be the grown-ups, but have acted like
impetuous children.
This should have been over six
months ago. Almost as soon as she took
her new job as president, Margaret
McKenna — who had had 22 successful,
incident-free years as president of Lesley
University — displeased the board of
trustees at Suffolk, the wired men and
women who really ran the place. McKenna’s main transgression appears to
have been wanting to fire George Regan,
the PR guy paid obscene amounts of
money by Suffolk for 27 years to do little
more than cause trouble and, with his
allies, undermine a succession of leaders.
McKenna was Suffolk’s fifth president
in five years, including interims. But
somehow the trustees never saw themselves as the problem. Not even after
they were told by accreditors to establish
sane boundaries and good governance.
They tried to fire McKenna, but she refused to go, bolstered by the support of
students, faculty, and alumni united as
never before.
In February, the board and McKenna
reached an agreement that resulted in
the May departure of board chairman
Drew Meyer, and a commitment by
McKenna to leave by the fall of 2017.
That should have been the end of it.
But the board couldn’t let it go, hiring
another PR firm to burnish their images.
And a vengeful Regan fired off a torrent
of accusations against McKenna that the
college then spent massive amounts of
money investigating. (They won’t say
how much, but at a school that depends
on tuition for almost all of its revenue,
whatever it cost was way too much.)
In July, the investigator reported that
Regan’s claims were baseless. But get
this: the board held an emergency meeting to discuss the findings and decided
to fire McKenna — who was already
leaving — anyway. The trustees had her
vacate the premises immediately, with a
police escort.
Why do such a dramatic, humiliating
thing? Amazingly, two weeks later, as the
students and teachers who rallied
around McKenna prepare to return to
campus, we still don’t know.
McKenna released a statement saying
the board told her she was fired because
of her communications with the school’s
accrediting agency, and because she’d
talked to the Globe.
That seems pretty tame, not nearly
enough to merit the drastic step taken
by the board, and the damage it has
done. McKenna had already agreed to
quit: Ditching her like this reopens all
the board’s self-inflicted wounds, and
does further harm to the university. Why
not keep her in her position, and quietly
begin the search for her successor?
New board chairman Robert Lamb
called McKenna’s account of her firing
“misleading at best,” but refused to say
any more. Lamb was supposed to be
turning the place around, but it looks
like the board turned him around. He
and interim president Marisa Kelly have
been working hard to convince students,
faculty, and alumni that they want stability at last for Suffolk. But stability can
come only through transparency, which
is still sorely lacking down there on
Tremont Street. Neither the university’s
spokesman, nor Larry Rasky, whose firm
is paid handsomely to contain the damage this heinous year has wrought,
would comment on the firing Wednesday.
Suffolk University — now on its sixth
president in six years — desperately
needs a stellar chief who will be allowed
to do her job, and for a long time.
Firing McKenna without explanation
has made finding that person almost impossible.
Yvonne Abraham is a Globe columnist.
She can be reached at
[email protected] Follow
her on Twitter @GlobeAbraham.
Key Baker aide may leave Cabinet
State’s economic development chief is pursuing city manger’s position in Cambridge
By Joshua Miller
GLOBE STAFF
Governor Charlie Baker’s economic development and housing chief, who helped
lure GE’s world headquarters to Boston
and oversaw a sharp drop in the number of
homeless families in motels at state expense, may soon exit the administration.
Jay Ash, the former longtime city manager of Chelsea, has applied to be Cambridge’s next city manager and will leave
his current position should he get the new
job, he told the Globe.
One of Baker’s first big moves after his
2014 election was announcing that Ash, a
Democrat, would be his secretary of housing and economic development. That was
widely viewed as a sign that Baker, a Republican, planned to govern in a biparti-
san way.
Should Ash leave, it would likely be the
first major departure from the administration.
Ash, 54, said he loves working with
Baker. And he said he enjoys his current
gig overseeing a wide-ranging bureaucracy
— departments that lure businesses to
Massachusetts; oversee the licensing of
specialists like psychologists, athletic
trainers, and funeral directors; and provide shelter to homeless families. But, he
said, the job opening in Cambridge is an
opportunity to further explore his area of
expertise: municipal management.
Ash, an affable raconteur, also suggested that he finds the statewide Ping-Ponging his job requires to be trying, and he
ASH, Page B4
Jay Ash, 54,
says he’d like
to have a job
that will
allow him to
focus on
problems in a
more indepth way
that he can in
a job with
statewide
responsibilities.
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
Access
to court
records
revised
SJC restores some
online availability
More options
for copying added
By Todd Wallack
GLOBE STAFF
ON THEIR OWN TURF
P H O T O E S SAY B Y J E S S I C A R I NA L D I
G L O B E S TA F F
W
ith the world’s attention focused on the Olympic
Games in Brazil, a decidedly different type of
competition was held in a small corner of New
England Tuesday, as farmers took to the field
for the second annual Farmer Olympics in Vershire, Vt. After taking part in warm-up events that included a hay
bale toss, the crowd gathered for an opening ceremony, where a
quartet performed the Olympic theme song on kazoo. When the
competition began, 60 farmers sprinted up a steep hill, empty bins
and shovels in hand, for the Manure Relay. The event was sponsored by the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont. In
the end it was a team from Cedar Circle Farm in East Stepford that
took the gold. Their team’s name? Soil’d.
R Merle Russell of Humble Hill Farm
tossed a bail of hay.
R Niko Horster of Shire Beef held the
torch in the opening ceremony.
R Gillian Wyman of Root 5 Farm held
aloft their team’s mascot, “Broc”.
R Members of Cedar Circle Farm
celebrated winning the seeding relay.
The Supreme Judicial Court
has tentatively approved a new
slate of rules for accessing Massachusetts court records, including partially restoring access to
basic criminal court information
online.
Und e r t h e n e w ru l e s , t h e
courts will gradually start allowing the general public to look up
basic docket information online
for almost all criminal cases —
such as the status of the case and
list of upcoming hearings — by
entering the docket number for
each case; users will not be able
to look up criminal cases by defendant name online. The courts
already allow the general public
to look up basic information on
most civil cases on the Internet.
The move comes a month after the courts abruptly blocked
lawyers and journalists from accessing online data about criminal cases (except for cases where
lawyers had entered an official
court appearance), sparking an
outcry from reporters, prosecutors, attorneys, and clerks. The
courts said they made the move
because they were concerned
that certain organizations were
systematically downloading civil
case information (and could
have potentially downloaded
criminal data as well). But the
courts declined to name the organizations downloading the data, provide more details about
how they were misusing the information, or fully explain how
it caused any harm.
In a statement, the courts
said they tried to balance the
need to give the public greater
access to court records, while also trying to guard the privacy of
litigants, victims, and witnesses.
SJC, Page B4
Robert Kiley, force behind MBTA overhaul, dies
Mayoral candidate later became head of N.Y., London subway systems
By Bryan Marquard
GLOBE STAFF
Mr. Kiley served as
deputy mayor during
Kevin White’s tenure.
As Robert Kiley contemplated running for Boston mayor in the early
1980s, he took note of his qualifications
in a manner that could hardly have been
more understated. “I wouldn’t be a neophyte, a novice,” he offered, adding, “I
know government as well as anyone in
my generation. I have served at all three
levels: federal, state, and local.”
Mr. Kiley, who was 80 when he died
Tuesday in his Chilmark residence from
complications of Alzheimer’s disease,
filled his resume with jobs that would be
capstones in the careers of many public
servants.
He became the so-called “superchief”
of a reorganized MBTA in 1975, extending subway lines and diversifying the
workforce by gender and race. A few
years earlier, he had arrived in Boston as
a deputy mayor under Kevin White and
was responsible for keeping the public
safe at the outset of court-ordered busing
to desegregate schools.
And before that? Mr. Kiley cut his
teeth in government service as a CIA
agent. He assisted in the covert funding
of student groups and foreign youth un-
til a magazine article blew his cover and
he switched to serving as executive assistant to the agency’s director.
In all those jobs, colleagues recalled
him as the calm in the center of often
swirling storms. “I preferred staying lowkey because I find you get a lot more
done that way,” he told the Globe.
The storms he weathered weren’t always metaphoric. Mr. Kiley “put together a superb team which for four years
gave the T strong new leadership,” Michael S. Dukakis, who as governor appointed Mr. Kiley CEO of the MassachuKILEY, Page B6
B2
Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
New England
in brief
NANTUCKET
Partners’ bid to fix wage data is rejected
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services denied an appeal from Partners HealthCare to correct some bad math. Partners submitted wage information for its tiny Nantucket Cottage Hospital that contained math errors, causing wages at the
hospital to appear lower than they are. Because the rural hospital sets wage reimbursement statewide, the mistakes will contribute to a $110 million cut in Medicare reimbursements to
hospitals statewide and could lead to layoffs. The federal agency said Partners submitted the correct data too late. Timothy
Gens of the Massachusetts Hospital Association said the decision will prompt challenging and difficult decisions.
BOSTON
Journalist loses ruling on sources
KEITH BEDFORD/GLOBE STAFF
Mayor Martin J. Walsh told the group of about 60 young people that their past mistakes do not define their potential.
Youth program celebrates successes
Walsh praises its
participants
By Astead W. Herndon
GLOBE STAFF
They had come from neighborhoods far and near, overcoming hardships both systemic and self-inflicted. Jamal
Molina, 20, said he skipped so
much of high school that he will
soon begin his third e xtra
school year. Sterling Goss-Davis, 19, did not have the technical skills to get a job, he said.
Thomas Barbuto, 18, said he
was arrested for robbery as a juvenile.
Yet Wednesday afternoon,
during the completion ceremony for one of Boston’s summer
employment programs targeting at-risk youth, none of these
past struggles mattered — at
least for the moment. Boston
Mayor Martin J. Walsh, Boston
Police Superintendent William
Gross, and other civic and private sector leaders gathered at
the Bruce Bolling Municipal
Building in Roxbury to celebrate the youths’ recent successes.
“As you graduate, as you go
back to school, you can’t only be
thinking about the four blocks
you live in. You got to be thinking about the world,” Walsh
said in his remarks. “I want you
to take these opportunities you
had this summer and invest it
in your future.”
Walsh’s impassioned speech
leaned heavily on his personal
history as a former college
dropout and alcoholic. His
principal message to the group
of about 60 young people —
most of whom had experienced
court troubles or were identified by officials as gang members — was that their past mistakes do not define their potential.
“I felt like I could relate to
[ Walsh],” said Barbuto, the
teenager. “He came from our
level and lifestyle to being one
of the top people” in the city.
Other speakers pressed on
s i m i l a r t h e m e s a s Wa l s h ,
though few spoke with rivaled
fervor. Freddie Velez, the assistant deputy director for Youth
Options Unlimited Boston, the
nonprofit that organized the
program, praised the young
men and women for their summer of dedicated labor.
According to Velez and YOU
Boston, participants in the
summer program completed
thousands of hours of tasks, including demolition and remodeling work through the Boston
Redevelopment Authority,
mentoring students in Boston
Public Schools, preparing
meals for needy locals, and agricultural help through a horticultural society. YOU Boston’s
summer program, which is in
its 15th year and works with
14- to 24-year-olds, also assigns
an individualized case manager
for each of its participants and
works with employers to secure
permanent employment after
the summer for those not in
school.
The program worked with
more than 100 young people
this summer, officials said.
“You hear about the negative
things that young people are
doing like shootings and arrests, but all of you here made a
conscious decision to say,
‘That’s not who we are,’ ” Velez
said.
Gross, the police superintendent, said the program “helps
to break negative stereotypes”
and prove that the participants’
“lives have worth.”
“We can’t arrest away problems; we need supportive programs just like this,” Gross said.
His supporting evidence was
seated a few feet away.
Barbuto, once arrested for
robbery, said the summer program has taught him “it feels
better to work for something
rather than take it.” Molina,
who admitted he spent many of
his high school days wasting
away, is now reinvigorated to
secure his diploma, he said.
“If you give me a task, I can
do it,” Molina said. “I just need
the opportunity.”
Devin Edwards, a 22-yearold intern with the mayor’s office of Health and Human Services, got that opportunity
through YOU Boston years ago.
After dropping out of high
school, encountering legal
problems, and working a slew
of minimum wage jobs,
Edwards connected with Velez
and completed a professional
boot camp. In his current role
at City Hall, Edwards works
closely with Health and Human
Services Secretary Felix Arroyo
and helps schedule his day.
At the Wednesday ceremony,
outfitted in a suit and tie, Edwards served as the keynote
speaker.
“My advice to you is that
anything is achievable. In any
mistake there is a choice, and
you can choose to better that
mistake,” he said.
Seated in the back was his 9year-old brother, Atticus, who
later called Edwards a “role
model.” Also seated: Edwards’s
mother, Mildred Plaza, who
said seeing her son speak
brought tears to her eyes.
“I would not have expected
this when he was 18,” Plaza
said, flashing the smile of a
proud parent.
Astead W. Herndon can be
reached at astead.herndon
@globe.com. Follow him on
Twitter @AsteadWH.
Waltham man arrested in double-stabbing
By Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
A 37-year-old Waltham man
was arrested Wednesday for allegedly stabbing two women,
including one victim who is in
her 80s, inside a city home earlier in the day, officials said.
The attack occurred shortly
before 1 p.m. inside a house on
Weston Street, according to
Middlesex District Attorney
Marian T. Ryan's office.
An 83-year-old woman suffered a cut on her hand, and the
second victim, age 52, suffered
multiple stab wounds and was
listed in critical condition on
Wednesday afternoon, Ryan’s
office said in a statement.
Both women were taken to
area hospitals.
The suspect, Emanual Louis, 37, fled from the scene but
was later apprehended by
Waltham police, authorities
said. Officials did not indicate
when or where he was arrested.
“The victims and the suspect
in this incident are known to
each other and this attack is not
random,” said the statement
from Ryan’s office.
The two women and Louis
“are not related to each other or
Louis,” Meghan Kelly, a Ryan
spokeswoman said in an e-mail.
“The investigation into this
matter is still ongoing,” Kelly
said.
Prosecutors did not disclose
a possible motive for the attack.
Louis faces charges of armed
assault with intent to murder,
assault and battery with a dan-
gerous weapon causing serious
bodily injury, and assault and
battery with a dangerous weapon on a victim over 60.
He is scheduled to be arraigned Thursday in Waltham
District Court.
A Waltham police dispatcher said no one was available to
comment.
Travis Andersen can be reached
at [email protected]
Follow him on Twitter
@TAGlobe.
A federal judge has ruled that political commentator Glenn
Beck must disclose the names of confidential sources he used
while reporting that a Saudi Arabian student was involved in
the Boston Marathon bombing. Judge Patti Saris ruled Tuesday
in a defamation lawsuit filed by Abdulrahman Alharbi, who
was injured in the 2013 deadly bombing. The conservative
commentator continued to report that Alharbi was involved in
the attack after federal officials said publicly he was not. Saris
said Beck must disclose the identities of at least two Homeland
Security employees who allegedly gave Beck’s associates information supporting the commentator’s assertion hat Alharbi
was the ‘‘money man.’’ (AP)
T rider dies after falling on tracks
A 30-year-old man who fell on the MBTA tracks Tuesday night
died a short time later, authorities said. The Quincy man fell
and struck the third rail at the Park Street MBTA station. He
was pronounced dead at Massachusetts General Hospital.
MBTA Transit Police Superintendent Richard Sullivan said the
circumstances of the fall are under investigation, but no foul
play is suspected.
WINCHENDON
Man charged after fatal altercation
A 32-year-old man died after a fight with another man inside a
Winchendon residence Tuesday night, police said. Police Chief
David P. Walsh said his officers responded to a residence on
Spruce Street around 7 p.m. and found an unresponsive man
inside. He was pronounced dead at Heywood Hospital in Gardner, according to Timothy Connolly, spokesman for Worcester
District Attorney Joseph D. Early Jr. Thomas Maxwell, 49, of
East Street in Winchendon, is in custody and is charged with
aggravated assault and battery, officials said.
NEWTON
Allston man killed in accident on I-95
An Allston man was killed early Wednesday in a single-vehicle
rollover crash on Interstate 95 in Newton, according to State
Police. The victim was identified as Jack Jardin. officials said.
State Police said in a statement that Jardin, 21, was behind the
wheel of a 2014 Jeep Wrangler traveling north on I-95, near exit 22, when he lost control of the vehicle. The vehicle rolled
over and came to a rest in the median around 2:16 a.m., State
Police said. The cause of the crash remains under investigation,
State Police said.
BROCKTON
Man denied parole in shaken-baby case
Michael J. Lyons, the Brockton man convicted 15 years ago of
shaking his 2-week-old son to death, has been denied his first
attempt at parole, according to the Plymouth district attorney’s
office. The state Parole Board denied Lyons’s bid on Aug. 3,
nearly six months after a hearing was held. Lyons, now 50, was
convicted of second-degree murder in 2001 for fatally shaking
Jacob Lyons inside the family home in Brockton on June 28,
1998. Under state law, defendants convicted of second-degree
murder are sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of
parole after 15 years. He will be eligible for another parole
hearing in 2021.
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Tiny size makes this blue lobster an even extra rare find
By Dylan McGuinness
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
When Wayne Nickerson, a
35-year lobsterman, pulled a
trap from the water off Plymouth Monday morning, there
was a glaring outlier among
the greenish-brown batch.
“It was more brilliantly blue
than the bluest hydrangea
you’ve ever seen,” Jan Nickerson, Wayne’s wife, said. “It was
almost fluorescent. It was almost glowing.”
It was a rare catch. Tony
LaCasse, spokesman for the
New England Aquarium, said
some estimates have placed
the odds of a blue lobster at 1
in 2 million, though those
numbers may need updating.
This one, aptly named Bleu,
was even more rare because it
weighed two pounds, LaCasse
said. At that size and color, it’s
surprising the creature wasn’t
eaten by a larger animal.
This wasn’t the Nickersons’
JAN NICKERSON
This rare blue lobster was caught off the Plymouth coast.
first blue lobster. In 1990,
Wayne caught one that was
displayed in a tank at a Manomet lobster pound, Jan said.
LaCasse said there have
been a number of local sightings reported recently. And a
couple of factors contribute to
that increase, LaCasse said.
One is social media, which
makes sightings more widely
reported and acknowledged.
Another is basic math: Nearly
100 million lobsters land in
the United States every year.
By those odds, there’s bound to
be around 50 found, if the 1 in
2 million odds are correct. The
blue lobster finds off Massachusetts in recent years also
could be explained simply by
one blue female, LaCasse said.
Nickerson said Bleu was an
instant attraction.
When Nickerson’s boat returned to the pier, he called
over his friend who runs a children’s tour boat called Lobster
Tales.
“He asked the children, ‘Do
you want to see the blue lobster?’ ” Jan Nickerson said.
“The children cheered like crazy. That was the best part for
me. It was so cute.”
The lobster was taken to a
safe and secure location, Nickerson said. Bleu was separated
from other lobsters, who Nickerson says are often aggressive.
Dylan McGuinness can be
reached at
[email protected]
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T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Metro
‘We have a
responsibility to
use taxpayer
money wisely. It’s
not just, ‘Give it all
to the horsemen.’
That can’t be how
we make a
decision, frankly.’
B3
DRAPED FOR THE
DAY — Wednesday’s
heavy rain did not stop
the Jammes family,
Marie Pascal, Oliver,
and Marie,
visiting from Toulouse,
France, from taking a
walk through the
Public Garden.
Thursday’s forecast
calls for humidity and
temperatures rising
ahead of a cool front.
The humid air will
linger overnight with
some clouds. Full
report, B7
GAYLE CAMERON,
Massachusetts Gaming
Commisson
Brockton
horse
racing
plan dies
State won’t offer
financial support
SUZANNE KREITER/GLOBE STAFF
By Laura Crimaldi
GLOBE STAFF
It looks like thoroughbred
horse racing won’t return to the
Brockton Fairgrounds this summer, after all.
Chris Carney, whose family
owns the 60-acre fairgrounds,
said he is tabling plans to host
15 days of racing after the Massachusetts Gaming Commission denied a portion of a $4.2
million request to support the
event.
“I won’t run,” Carney said after the vote. “ The numbers
don’t add up.”
In a unanimous decision,
the commission authorized
nearly $3.2 million for the races, but denied about $1 million
for racetrack upgrades and other expenses.
“This is taxpayer money,”
said Commissioner Gayle Cameron. “We have a responsibility
to use taxpayer money wisely.
It’s not just, ‘Give it all to the
horsemen.’ That can’t be how
we make a decision, frankly.”
Brockton organizers had
sought to tap into a horse racing fund established by the
state’s 2011 casino law for cash
prizes awarded to a winning
horse’s owner, trainer, and jockey. The fund receives 9 percent
of gambling re venue from
Plainridge Park Casino in Plainville and a portion of licensing
fees paid by casino developers.
As of June 30, the fund contained just over $13 million, according to the commission.
The commission approved
$2.5 million in prizes, $400,000
for training and stalling horses
in Brockton for 16 weeks, and
$262,000 in administrative
costs for the Massachusetts
Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, which was helping to
organize the races.
Michael Morizio, a lawyer
for the Carney family, said his
client is not seeking to make a
profit on the races, which were
scheduled to begin Sept. 5.
Track owners had hoped the
fairgrounds would become
home to a $677 million casinoand-hotel complex, but the
commission voted down the
project in April. The Brockton
Fairgrounds last hosted thoroughbred horse racing in 2001,
Morizio said.
“We’re not trying to make
any money,” Morizio said. “This
is not something that’s to benefit [the Carney] family at all.”
William G. Lagorio, president of the Massachuse tts
Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, said the races and
training in Brockton could create 60 to 90 full-time jobs.
“It’s all about jobs,” he said.
“ We’re saving an industr y.
We’re saving farms.”
Robert Scarano, general
counsel for the horsemen’s association, said his group may
ask the commission to reconsider.
“There’s still a window of opportunity here. I think there’s a
way, maybe, to make this work,”
Lagorio said. “We weren’t completely shut down today.”
In June, the commission approved $2.4 million to support
six days of horse racing at Suffolk Downs. The track held race s i n Ju l y a n d e a r l i e r t h i s
month. Another race is planned
for Sept. 3-4.
Laura Crimaldi can be reached
at [email protected]
Follow her on Twitter
@lauracrimaldi.
Advocates raise concerns about child marriage
Nearly 200 wed
in 4-year span
By Jim Morrison
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
In Virginia, the minimum
marriage age was recently
raised to 18, a change meant to
protect children from being
forced into wedlock. Similar
legislation has been introduced
in Maryland, New Jersey, and
New York.
But in Massachusetts, there
is no minimum age to get married, as long as minors receive
judicial approval. Minors don’t
need a lawyer, and the petition
is only half a page. Parental approval is required, although
with several exceptions.
Between 2010 and 2014, almost 200 children were married in Massachusetts, according to the latest available rec o r d s f r o m t h e s t at e’s
Department of Public Health.
Judges approved 92 percent of
marriage petitions from minors
over that span, probate court
records show.
More than 85 percent of the
children were girls, who often
married significantly older
men. Two 17-year-old girls, for
instance, married 39-year-old
men, records show. Two 15year-old girls also received ap-
proval to marry men in their
mid-twenties.
Child marriage is typically
associated with developing
countries, but children’s advocates say the practice is more
widespread in the United States
than many realize.
“Unfortunately, it does not
shock me,” said Fraidy Reiss,
founder and executive director
of Unchained At Last, a New
Jersey-based group that seeks
to end child marriage in the
United States. “Overwhelmingly, these are minor girls marrying adult men, and often there’s
a significant difference in their
ages. Especially in states where
there is no minimum age, we’re
seeing shocking instances of
children as young as 12 getting
married.”
Statistics on child marriage
are difficult to obtain. The Department of Public Health provided only limited information
several months after a public
records request and multiple
appeals to the secretar y of
state’s office.
Marriage petitions are not
publicly available to protect minors’ privacy.
The children who were married lived in nearly 70 communities, but about 25 percent
were from either Springfield or
Worcester, cities with large im-
Perseids meteor
shower will pack an
extra punch tonight
By Olivia Quintana
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
If you’re a fan of meteor
showers, get excited because
the Perseids are on their way.
The peak of the annual
shower is expected to roll
around Thursday evening into
Friday morning, according to
Christine Pulliam, a spokeswoman for the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophsyics.
This year marks an especially important year, with more
meteors expected than usual,
Pulliam said. While the Perseids showers typically feature
meteors falling at a rate of 60 to
90 meteors per hour, this year
there are expected to be up to
150 meteors per hour.
Pulliam says this is all
thanks to Jupiter.
“All meteor showers come
from comet dust, and we’re expecting to see an especially
thick dust stream this year,”
Pulliam said. “The gravity of Jupiter influences the amount of
dust, and it nudged this especially large patch of dust in our
direction.”
Pulliam said what people see
during meteor showers are actually small bits of cosmic dust
entering the Earth’s atmosphere.
“They’re going very fast and
when they enter the Earth’s atmosphere, they burn up and
they glow, and that’s what we
see as the streak of the meteors,” Pulliam said.
The showers
typically feature
about 60 to 90
meteors per hour,
but this year there
are expected to be
up to 150 per hour.
Every year, as the Earth is
moving through its orbit, it
passes a location where the
Swift-Tuttle comet had passed
through in its own orbit, Pulliam said. The Earth is hit with
the leftover dust from the comet, creating an annual meteor
shower.
“I’ ve heard some people
comparing a meteor shower to
driving through a swarm of
flies,” Pulliam said. “You’re driving through and all of a sudden
it just hits you.”
Pulliam said anyone looking
to watch the meteor shower
should try to stay away from
city lights and find a clear horizon. The most meteors will likely be visible after midnight, in
the early hours of Friday morning.
Olivia Quintana can be
reached at
[email protected]
Follow her on Twitter
@oliviasquintana.
migrant populations.
State Representative Kay
Khan, a Newton Democrat and
chairwoman of the Joint Committee on Children, Families
and Persons with Disabilities,
said she was shocked to learn
how many children were married in recent years, and
couldn’t imagine why a judge
would approve it.
“It’s disturbing. I can’t think
of a good reason, myself, why
any family would want to put
their child through that,” Khan
said. “If they’re coerced, it’s a
form of child abuse, really. I
can’t imagine a judge giving
that OK.”
Khan said she would consider filing legislation to prohibit
child marriage.
Children’s advocates say it is
often difficult to determine
whether teenagers are getting
married of their own volition or
being coerced by their family. If
they are being pressured, the
marriage winds up legitimizing
what would otherwise be considered rape, advocates say.
The legal age of consent in
Massachusetts is 16, but that
does not apply to married couples.
“Incredibly, the state’s minimum marriage age laws enable
someone who would otherwise
land on a sex offender registry,
instead to head for a gift registry,” said Jeanne Smoot, senior
counsel for Policy and Strategy
for the Tahirih Justice Center, a
Virginia-based group that
works to protect immigrant
girls and women.
The Tahirih Justice Center
lobbied for the recent change in
Virginia, where nearly 4,500
children were married from
2004 to 2013, according to the
group. About 90 percent of the
underage spouses were girls,
some as young as 13.
Advocates say child marriage is harmful in a variety of
ways. Children who marry are
less likely to finish high school
and far less likely to complete
college, and as a result have
more limited career opportunities. They are at greater risk of
being subjected to violence, and
are more likely to have mental
health problems, studies have
shown.
Massachusetts requires parental permission, but provides
several exceptions, and advocates say the provision offers little reassurance that the child’s
wishes are respected.
“Massachusetts has relied
on another dangerous assumption, which is parental consent
should be sufficient reassurance that the young person’s interests are being served,” Smoot
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said. “Parental consent can conceal parental coercion.”
Reiss grew up in a strictly
Orthodox Jewish family in New
York City and at 19 was forced
by her family into an arranged
marriage to a man she barely
knew. He abused her, and prevented her from using birth
control, she said.
“ Pr e tt y s o o n , I h a d tw o
daughters and I wasn’t allowed
to have a job or bank account or
credit cards.”
After 12 years of marriage,
Reiss decided to attend college.
After graduating, she got a job,
filed for divorce and left with
her two daughters. Her family
and community shunned her
and even today consider her
dead.
Children who get married
cannot easily escape dangerous
or unhealthy relationships, she
said. In some states, minors
may lack the legal standing to
initiate divorce.
“These children are playing
in an adult field where they’re
not equipped to play,” Reiss
said. “If they’re married to an
adult, think of that huge imbalance of power. They don’t have
equal resources.”
Jim Morrison can be reached at
[email protected]
gmail.com.
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Metro
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Default ruling set
against former
Cambridge nanny
GLIDING BY — A
man popped a
wheelie along the
reflecting pool in
the Christian
Science Plaza in
downtown Boston
on a recent
morning.
Suit over death
‘For the parents
of baby proceeds who can’t bring
By Patricia Wen
GLOBE STAFF
A Middlesex County civil
clerk on Wednesday entered a
default ruling against a former
Cambridge nanny who has
been named in a wrongful
death lawsuit filed by the parents of a 1-year-old girl who
died in her care.
According to court records,
Aisling Brady McCarthy, who
now lives in Ireland, was served
a copy of the lawsuit on July 8
and has failed, within the maximum 20 days allowed by the
courts, to “file an appearance,
answer,” or issue any other “responsive pleading.”
A hearing date for damages
is now expected to be scheduled
sometime this fall, said Martha
Coakley, an attorney representing Sameer Sabir and Nada Siddiqui, the parents of Rehma Sabir. During this hearing, Coakley said, the parents will seek a
way to prevent McCarthy from
profiting from their daughter’s
death, through book deals or
movie rights, and will outline
the voluminous evidence they
say shows their daughter was
killed by McCarthy in 2013
through blunt trauma to the
head and violent shaking.
“For the parents who can’t
bring Rehma back, they want to
set the record straight,” Coakley
said in a telephone interview.
McCarthy, who has consistently denied she ever harmed
the child, was indicted on murder charges three years ago in a
case that received global attention, but the charges were
dropped last August. Prosecutors had said Rehma’s brain
swelling, head bruises, eye damage, and other forensic evidence
showed that she was killed, but
McCarthy’s defense attorneys
offered medical experts proposing alternative causes for her
death, such as an uncommon
bleeding disorder or an immune
deficiency issue. A medical examiner ultimately changed the
manner of death from homicide
to “undetermined,” leading to
the charges being dropped by
prosecutors.
It was not easy for Rehma’s
parents to locate McCarthy in
Ireland, where she was deported following the dropped prosecution because she had been
SJC
Continued from Page B1
Rehma back, they
want to set the
record straight.’
MARTHA COAKLEY, lawyer
for Sameer Sabir and Nada
Siddiqui, whose child, Rehma,
died in 2013
living illegally in the United
States. After the lawsuit was
filed in February, the parents
asked for, and received, an extension of time.
According to a court record,
a Belfast investigator working
for a firm hired by Rehma’s parents approached a blondehaired woman in her 30s in a
home in County Cork, Ireland,
asking her, “Are you Aisling
Brady McCarthy?” The woman
replied, “Yes I am.”
When the case was filed last
winter, one of McCarthy’s criminal attorneys, Melinda Thompson, said Rehma’s parents were
“compounding the tragedy” of
their child’s death by filing this
lawsuit. She said that their
medical evidence showed Rehma may have had preexisting
medical issues contributing to
her death and that McCarthy
deserves to try to rebuild her
life in Ireland.
Coakley, the former attorney
general in Massachusetts, said
she has received no word that
McCarthy has retained an attorney in this civil case. According to lawyers familiar with
wrongful death cases, if McCarthy remains unresponsive, Rehma’s parents will be able to argue — unopposed — for some
type of judgment. Coakley said
Rehma’s parents will seek,
among other considerations,
“injunctive relief that would not
allow the defendant to profit
from selling her story.”
“Nada and I took this step
solely to ensure that the truth is
told and that she does not ever
profit financially from the
death of our daughter, Rehma.
Today brings us closer to this
goal,” Sameer Sabir said.
Patricia Wen can be reached at
[email protected]
Follow her on Twitter at
@GlobePatty.
DINA RUDICK/GLOBE STAFF
Man held in Worcester crime spree
By Dylan McGuinness
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
and Travis Andersen
GLOBE STAFF
A Worcester man accused of
a violent crime spree, including
allegations of rape and armed
robbery and threatening to
“spray” police officers with an
assault weapon, was ordered
held without bail during his arr a i g n m e n t We d n e s d a y i n
Worcester District Court.
Antonio Damon, 35, pleaded not guilty to charges that also included kidnapping, carjacking, assault to rape, and assault with a dangerous weapon,
District Attorney Joseph D. Early Jr.’s office said.
Damon is due back in court
for a dangerousness hearing on
A u g . 2 2 . Hi s l aw y e r, S e a n
McGinty, could not be reached
for comment.
Damon is alleged to have
committed an hour-long crime
spree late Tuesday afternoon
through downtown Worcester.
At about 5 p.m., Damon
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went into an office on Main
Street, where he allegedly raped
a woman at knifepoint, placing
his hands around her throat
a n d s t e a l i n g h e r c a r ke y s ,
Worcester police said in a statement. About 10 minutes later,
Damon is alleged to have accosted a 21-year-old woman as
she left her office on Main
Street, and forced her to drive
off with him in her blue Subaru
Forester, police said.
The attack was reported by
the woman’s boyfriend, who
was talking on the phone with
her, and flagged down a police
officer on Grove Street.
At about the same time, another woman approached the
officer, to report that she had
just been involved in a hit-andrun crash involving a blue Subaru Forester.
About 20 minutes later, police found the car abandoned in
a driveway of a home on North
Ashland Street. The woman
told police Damon had grabbed
her throat and sexually assault-
ed her, the statement said.
A short time later, police received a report of an armed robbery on nearby Denny Street.
When officers arrived, an employee told them that Damon
had forced himself into the
business at about 6 p.m.
Several employees locked
themselves inside the bathroom for safety. A male employee confronted Damon, who
snatched a gold chain from the
man’s neck. The employee spotted Damon holding the knife,
and ran outside, police said.
Damon was found crouching down in a corner of the
building. Damon complied
with a police order to show his
hands, but refused to put his
hands behind his back, and resisted arrest, police said. He
was taken into custody.
Dylan McGuinness can be
reached at
[email protected]
Travis Andersen can be reached
at [email protected]
They also said they tried to
respect the Legislature’s intent
to restrict access to the state’s
centralized database of criminal records (known as CORI),
even though the federal courts
have ruled that the public has
a constitutional right to access
the indexes of court cases. Citizens will still be able to search
for criminal cases by defendant name at the courthouse,
but not online.
The new rules also cover a
variety of other issues. For example, the rules make it clear
that members of the public
can use a mobile phone or other device to take a picture of a
court document, instead of
having to pay a clerk roughly
$1 per page to make a copy.
In addition, the rules give
the courts broad discretion to
p r o v i d e o r d e ny s t at i s t i c s
about court cases, but also direct the courts to generally deny requests for raw data — potentially making it harder for
journalists and researchers to
perform their own analysis of
court records.
The courts indicated that a
provision of the rules dealing
with attorney access to cases
was provisional and could be
refined later. “We are looking
for greater attorney access,”
said Martin W. Healy, chief legal counsel for the Massachusetts Bar Association, who
added that the group was generally pleased with the rules.
Robert Ambrogi, an attorney and executive director of
the Massachusetts Newspaper
Publishers Association, had a
mixed reaction.
Ambrogi praised the SJC
for making it easier to copy
court records, but was disappointed the rules continue to
severely limit the public’s access to actual documents online for now and bar people
from searching for criminal
cases by defendant name online.
“In this day and age, court
records should be equally
available to the public online
and in person,” Ambrogi said.
Todd Wallack can be reached
at [email protected]
Follow him on Twitter
@twallack.
Ash seeks top Cambridge job
ASH
Continued from Page B1
struggles with the necessarily
quick and superficial relationships with many of the people
he meets along the way.
“Every time I go into a community, I hear what the community’s wants and needs are. I
want to stay there and help
them solve those wants and
needs — and I have to get to my
next appointment,” Ash said.
“So the ability to focus more intensively on one place than a little bit of attention on a lot of
places is something that is appealing to me.”
Should Ash win the position,
he’s poised to see a hefty salary
bump. In 2015, Ash, who works
out of an office building on Beacon Hill, made $156,000, state
records show. The current Cambridge city manager’s annual
salary is $330,000.
A Chelsea native who early
in his career served as a State
House aide, Ash made a name
for himself as his hometown’s
city manager from 2000 to
2014. He is widely credited
with turning around the economic fortunes of what was
once seen as one of the Boston
area’s grittiest municipalities.
As a Cabinet secretary, he
sees his biggest economic development accomplishments as
helping reel in General Electric
to move its world headquarters
to Boston, he said, being part of
the team that enticed IBM’s
Watson Health business to
Cambridge, and helping to convince Kronos Inc. to keep its
headquarters in Massachusetts.
But Ash, who grew up poor
and whose family struggled
‘The ability to
focus more
intensively on one
place than a little
bit of attention on
a lot of places is
something that is
appealing to me.’
JAY ASH
On his rationale for seeking the
Cambridge city manager job
with homelessness for a time
when he was a child, said he is
most proud of helping to reduce the number of homeless
families housed in motels.
When Baker and Ash began
their new jobs in January 2015,
there were 1,500 families in
state-funded motels and hotels.
On Wednesday night, there
were 331, according to a public
records request.
Massachusetts is the country’s only right-to-shelter state.
When eligible poor families can
show they are homeless because of domestic violence, natural disaster, no-fault eviction,
or health and safety risks, the
state is mandated to provide
housing. That can take the form
of a room in a shelter or, if there
aren’t any left, a hotel or motel.
But hotels and motels are often an inadequate option for
families because they separate
them from relatives and
friends, familiar schools, a
clean place for children to play,
a kitchen, and public transit.
Ash and the administration
have focused on ramping up a
program started under Democratic Governor Deval Patrick
that now provides up to $8,000
to help pay for rent, utilities,
and other housing expenses so
families can stay in their
homes, or defray the costs of
staying with a friend or relative.
“If you told me I could have
GE or empty out hotels and motels? No question, you know.
You’re going to empty out the
hotels and motels,” Ash told the
Globe earlier this summer.
Ash was expected to soon
file a formal but voluntary disclosure about his job application to avoid any appearance of
a conflict of interest, said his
spokesman, Paul McMorrow.
Asked about Ash’s Cambridge application, Tim Buckley, adviser to Baker, responded
in an e-mail. He said the governor and Lieutenant Governor
Karyn Polito believe Ash is “doing a terrific job on behalf of the
people of Massachusetts and
support his decision to explore
this opportunity.”
Baker, Polito, Ash, and other
top officials gathered at a State
House event Wednesday for
Baker to sign into law a bill
aimed at spurring economic development across the state.
The Cambridge City Council
plans to pick a city manager in
late September, according to its
website.
Joshua Miller can be reached at
[email protected]
Follow him on Twitter
@jm_bos and subscribe to his
e-mail update on politics at
bostonglobe.com/political
happyhour.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
DEATH NOTICES
ABINGTON
WILLIAMS, Christopher
Donald
ACTON
HILL, Anthony
ARLINGTON
McCARTHY, Jeanne T.
BELLINGHAM
HEFFERMAN, Matthew S.
ROACH, Margaret A.
BOSTON
BEECHER, Myrna Joy
DiPERRI, James S.
JONES, Charles P.
LANDRY, Esther F.
MEGNIA, Francis P. Sr.
MORLEY, Nancy
SARA, Rev. Solomon I., SJ
BRIGHTON
WHEATON, Evangeline D.
“D’arcy”
BROOKLINE
WHEATON, Evangeline D.
“D’arcy”
BURLINGTON
LANDRY, Esther F.
McCARTHY, Jeanne T.
WILLIAMS, Christopher
Donald
CAMBRIDGE
McCARTHY, Jeanne T.
CONCORD
HILL, Anthony
DEDHAM
HOPKINS, Richard F.
LUNA, Evelyn
MEGNIA, Francis P. Sr.
DORCHESTER
MADDEN, Mary M.
McCORMACK, Donald J.
MORLEY-CHRIST, Margaret
Lynda
DRACUT
AGUIAR, Patricia V.
EASTON
HOPKINS, Richard F.
NORWOOD
LUNA, Evelyn
McCORMACK, Kathaleen L.
MEGNIA, Francis P. Sr.
ROACH, Margaret A.
WESTON
SARA, Rev. Solomon I., SJ
PEABODY
AGUIAR, Patricia V.
WINCHESTER
BEECHER, Myrna Joy
LINCOLN
BEECHER, Myrna Joy
SCITUATE
McCARTHY, Mildred M.
MORLEY-CHRIST, Margaret
Lynda
MANCHESTER BY THE
SEA
PISANI, Triestina
SOUTH BOSTON
DiPERRI, James S.
KELLY, Thomas F.
McCARTHY, Mildred M.
MANSFIELD
MEGNIA, Francis P. Sr.
MARSHFIELD
McCARTHY, Mildred M.
STONEHAM
PISANI, Triestina
MAYNARD
HILL, Anthony
WALPOLE
HOPKINS, Richard F.
MEDFORD
CUDDY, Teresa M.
WALTHAM
DiPERRI, James S.
LANDRY, Esther F.
McCARTHY, Jeanne T.
PENNEY, Barbara A.
SUTHERLAND, Steven J.
MENDON
MORLEY, Nancy
MILFORD
HEFFERMAN, Matthew S.
SUTHERLAND, Steven J.
WATERTOWN
LANDRY, Esther F.
MILTON
HESSION, Mary Z.
KELLY, Thomas F.
LOTTI, John J.
WELLESLEY
BEECHER, Myrna Joy
WHEATON, Evangeline D.
“D’arcy”
NATICK
BEECHER, Myrna Joy
WEST ROXBURY
LUNA, Evelyn
MEGNIA, Francis P. Sr.
NEEDHAM
QUINNAN, Gerald V., Sr
WESTFORD
WILLIAMS, Christopher
Donald
NEWTON
SUTHERLAND, Steven J.
DEATHS
AGUIAR, Patricia V. (Joslin)
CUDDY, Teresa M. (Cullen)
In Florida, formerly of Peabody
and East Boston, unexpectedly
passed away on July 26th. Devoted mother of Traci-Anne
Bisson of Dracut and Damian
Aguiar of Peabody. Dear sister
of Mary Lou Screnci and her
husband Dennis of Peabody,
Bernardine Joslin of East Boston. Former wife of Thomas
Aguiar of Peabody. Cherished
grandmother
of
Maridian
Dooley and Brendan Bisson.
Also survived by her many
fond nieces, nephews, and
cousins. Family and friends will
honor Patricia’s life by gathering in the Ruggiero Family
Memorial Home, 971 Saratoga
Street, (Orient Heights), EAST
BOSTON, on Saturday, August
13th from 12 pm to 2 pm with
a prayer service in our Serenity Chapel at 1:45 pm. Funeral
home is handicapped accessible, children’s lounge available, courtesy valet parking
front entrance. For more info:
www,ruggieromh.com.
Of Reading formerly of Medford, August 9, 2016 at the age
of 59. Devoted wife of Michael
F. Cuddy. Beloved mother of
Michael Cuddy and his wife
Rebecca, Brian Cuddy and his
wife Jane and Steven Cuddy
and his wife Brooke. Cherished
grandmother of Paige Teresa
Cuddy who is now two months
old. Caring sister of Denise
Singleton and her husband
Ted, Doreen Oughton and her
husband Quinton Lewis, Paula
Uttaro and her husband Ray,
James Cullen and his wife Di
and Stephen Cullen and his
wife Adrienne. Teresa was
also survived by her in-laws as
well as many loving nieces and
nephews. She was the loving
daughter of Geraldine (Silvey)
and the late Paul Cullen who
passed away on July 4, 2016.
A Funeral Service Celebrating
Teresa’s Eternal Life will be
held on Saturday, August 13th
at 11am in the First Congregational Church, 25 Woburn St.,
Reading, MA 01867. Please go
directly to church. Family and
friends are cordially invited to
gather and share memories
with the Family on Friday, August 12th from 4-8pm in the
Doherty-Barile Family Funeral
Home, 11 Linden St. READING. Parking attendants and
ramped entrance are available.
In lieu of flowers donations can
be made to neuroendocrine
cancer research through Dr.
Kulke, DFCI, 450 Brookine Ave.,
D1220, Boston, MA 02215 with
memo “In memory of Teresa
Cuddy for Program in Neurendocrine Carcinoid Tumors”. For
directions or to send a memorial condolence www.barilefuneral.com or www.facebook.
com/BarileFamilyFuneralHome.
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston
617-569-0990
BEECHER, Myrna Joy
(MacClary)
Of Lincoln, formerly of Wellesley and New Canaan, CT, died
unexpectedly in her sleep at
home on August 8th. Myrna
was born in Melrose on December 18, 1934. She was predeceased by her brother Alfred
Hollingsworth
Allen.
Myrna
leaves her two sisters Priscilla
Miriam MacGregor of FL and
Carol Lee Lom of Cambridge.
Myrna leaves behind her five
devoted children Joy Althea
Emerson (Jerome Paun) of CT;
Gregory Robert Beecher (Rose)
of Winchester; Joel T Beecher
of Arlington; Jennifer Beecher
Cooper (Gordon) of Natick
and Pamela Miriam Beecher of
CT. Myrna leaves nine grandchildren all of whom adored
her Ashley (Jose), Hilary, Felicity, Matthew, Thomas, Charles,
Ted, William and Nina. Myrna’s
passion was her children and
grandchildren. Myrna was a
constant supporter of all her
children listening patiently, advising wisely and celebrating
joyous times. Myrna was a well
known artist, a patron of the
arts subscribing to the Boston
Ballet, The Opera House and
BU Huntington Theater as well
as a member of The Wellesley
Country Club. After raising her
children, Myrna pursued her
lifelong dream of becoming an
artist. She attended School of
the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA)
studying under Barney Rubinstein, Bob Bart, Don Sibley and
Heidi Whitman. Myrna was selected for SMFA exclusive 5th
Year Certificate Competition.
She continued her education
with Catherine Kehoe at Mass
College of Art and workshops
with Joel Janowitz. Myrna is a
26 year SMFA Medici artist. Her
work is on display in dozens of
private and public collections
including Avon Breast Center
at Mass General Hospital. She
has shown her work at Clark
Gallery; Concord Art Association; Danforth Museum of Art;
Bromfield Art Gallery; Gallery
84 Chuck Levitan Gallery and
many more. Visiting hours in
the George F. Doherty & Sons
Funeral Home 477 Washington St. (Rt. 16) WELLESLEY Friday August 12th from 5-8pm.
Funeral Service in the funeral
home on Saturday August 13th
at 11am. Relatives and friends
kindly
invited.
Internment
Lakeside Cemetery Wakefield.
Expressions of sympathy may
be made in Myrna’s memory
to The Museum of Fine Arts,
230 Fenway, Boston, MA 02115
for its Scholarship Fund in her
name. For directions and guestbook gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Wellesley 781 235 4100
CECERE, Peter
89, of Lexington, MA, formerly
of Huntington, NY, on
Aug. 9, 2016. Beloved
husband
of
Mildred
(Baccari). Loving father
of Peter, Laura, Michael
(Maria), and Melissa. Cherished
grandfather of four grandchildren. Dear brother of Mary
Palazzo and Isabel Ruggiero.
WWII U.S. Army Veteran. Visiting hours will be held Friday
Aug. 12 at the Douglass Funeral Home, 51 Worthen Rd., LEXINGTON, from 4pm to 8pm.
Relatives and friends are kindly
invited. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be
made to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline
Ave. Boston, MA 02215. Services will also be held in New York
with interment at St. Charles
Cemetery, Farmingdale, NY.
Douglass Funeral Home
Lexington (781) 862-1800
www.douglassfh.com
WOBURN
McCARTHY, Jeanne T.
ROSLINDALE
LUNA, Evelyn
LONGMEADOW
DiPERRI, James S.
Doherty – Barile Family Funeral Home
Celebrating Life ~ Sharing Memories
781.944.1589
CURRELL, Nancy Jeanne
Passed away unexpectedly at
home in Bridgewater, MA.
on Aug 7, Loving daughter
of Nancy L. Currell of Melvin
Village, NH. A service of remembrance will take place on
Saturday, Aug. 13 at 11:00 at
the Melvin Village Community
Church, 476 Governor Wentworth Highway, Melvin Village,
NH 03850. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made to :
Giftofhearingfoundation.org
or the charity of one’s choice.
For full obituary
www.costellofuneralhome.com
WEYMOUTH
MOORE, Ric A.
WINTHROP
DUPLIN, Joseph R., Sr.
SCHIPANI, Georgia D.
REVERE
PISANI, Triestina
SCHIPANI, Georgia D.
LEXINGTON
CECERE, Peter
OUT OF STATE
FLORIDA
AGUIAR, Patricia V.
MAINE
PENNEY, Barbara A.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
CURRELL, Nancy Jeanne
JONES, Charles P.
SCHIPANI, Georgia D.
WILLIAMS, Christopher
Donald
NEW JERSEY
CURRELL, Nancy Jeanne
NEW YORK
CECERE, Peter
RHODE ISLAND
HEFFERMAN, Matthew S.
TEXAS
QUINNAN, Gerald V., Sr
OUT OF COUNTRY
GREECE
WHEATON, Evangeline D.
“D’arcy”
DEATHS
HILL, Anthony
93, of Acton, formerly of Maynard. Beloved husband for 66 years
of June (Hood) Hill.
Father of Steven
of Gardner, Dr. Susan Williams and her husband
Robert of Beaver Creek, OH,
Peter and his wife Cathy of
Townsend, Greg of Acton and
the late Linda June. Brother of
Helena Hill of Maynard and the
late Anna Hill. Also survived
by 4 grandchildren and 4 great
grandchildren. Graveside service Friday, August 12th at 10
am in Mt. Hope Cemetery, 166
Central Street, Acton.
Army
Veteran, WW II.
For obituary and online guestbook visit
www.deefuneralhome.com.
Dee Funeral Home of Concord
978-369-2030
Caring for families since 1868
HODGKINS, Mary M. (Vespa)
Of East Boston, passed away
peacefully at home on August
9, surrounded by her loving
family. Please go to notice listed under Sheils.
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston 617 569 0990
HOPKINS, Richard F.
Of Dedham, August 8, 2016. Beloved husband of Judith (Martell) Hopkins. Devoted father
of Arlene Mulrey of Walpole,
Brian Hopkins of Dedham, Teresa Carter of Easton, and the
late Lauren Elias. Grandfather
of Melissa Keurulainen, Kayla
Hopkins, Brianna Elias, Timothy Mulrey, Kristen Mulrey, and
Matthew Elias. Brother of Francis Hopkins and his wife Ann
of Gulf Breeze, FL. Member of
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners Local 1121.
Funeral from the George F.
Doherty & Sons Funeral Home,
456 High St., DEDHAM, Saturday, Aug. 13 at 8am followed
by a Funeral Mass in St. Mary’s
Church, Dedham, at 9am. Relatives and friends kindly invited.
Visiting hours at the funeral
home, Friday, Aug. 12 from
4-8pm. Interment private. Online guestbook and directions
at gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
DUPLIN, Joseph R., Sr.
Of Winthrop, August 7, 2016.
Beloved husband of
Elizabeth
“Betsy”
(Rowlinson) Duplin.
Devoted father of
Carolyn Milordi and
her husband Richard of Lynnfield, Joseph R. Duplin Jr. and
his wife Dianne of Winthrop,
Timothy Duplin and his wife
Danette of West Boylston, Angela Hickey and her husband
David of Winthrop, Maureen
Mirabile and her husband Robert of Beloit, WI, Andrew Duplin and his fiancee Lauren Barman of San Francisco, CA, and
Matthew Duplin and his girlfriend Courtney Halas of Winthrop. Adored grandfather of
Brittany, Madyson, and Christian Milordi, Taylor, Julia and
the late Joseph III Duplin, Noah
and Harris Duplin, Caroline,
Bridget and David Hickey and
Sarah and Benjamin Mirabile.
Dear brother of the late John
“Jack” Duplin. Also survived by
several nieces and nephews.
Funeral from the Maurice W.
Kirby Funeral Home, 210 Winthrop St., WINTHROP, on Sat,
August 13, at 9am, followed by
a Funeral Mass in St. John the
Evangelist Church-Winthrop at
10am. Relatives and friends are
invited. Cremation to follow
will be private. Visiting hours
will be held in the funeral
home on Fri, from 4-8pm. In
lieu of flowers, donations can
be made to the Joseph R. Duplin Sr. Memorial Scholarship
Fund c/o the Webster First Federal Credit Union, 15 Woodside
Ave., Winthrop, MA 02152. Joe
was a U.S. Navy Veteran serving
from 1956-58. He won the 1963
North American Star Class Racing Championship and moved
on to win the 1963 World Star
Class Racing Championship. In
1966 he won the European Star
Class
Racing
Championship.
He was also a Winthrop Youth
Hockey coach. Joe was a member of the Cottage Park Yacht
Club and the Winthrop Lodge
of Elks #1078. For guestbook
and directions, please visit
www.mauricekirbyfh.com
Maurice W. Kirby Funeral Home
Winthrop 617-846-0909
DiFRANCESCO, Mary M. (Vespa)
Of East Boston, passed away
peacefully at home on August
9, surrounded by her loving
family. Please go to notice listed under Sheils
JONES, Charles P.
83, formerly of King Hill Road,
New London, NH, died Tuesday, August 9, 2016 at Wheelock Terrace in Hanover, NH.
He was born in Boston, MA on
February 28, 1933 the son of J.
Paul and Jessie (Gillis) Jones.
Charlie graduated from Boston
University and lived in Boston
until moving to New London in
1970. After moving to NH he
worked for Stuart Nelson Insurance Company in Concord and
then Colby Insurance Agency
in New London where he was
co-owner. He was a member of
Our Lady of Fatima Church, the
New London Rotary Club and
a former member of the Lake
Sunapee Yacht Club.
Charlie
was an avid skier and tennis
player. He also enjoyed traveling and kayaking. His first
wife,
Constance
(Coughlin)
Jones, died in 2004. He was
also predeceased by a brother,
Carroll Jones. Members of his
family surviving include his
wife, Emily (Walker) Jones of
New London, NH; 21 nieces
and nephews and 6 stepchildren. A service will be held on
Saturday, August 13, 2016 at
1:00 P.M. at Our Lady of Fatima
Church, 724 Main Street, New
London, NH. Burial will be in
Swampscott Cemetery, Swampscott, MA at a later date. Memorial contributions may be
made to the New London Rotary Club, P.O. Box 1408, or
Loaves and Fishes, 724 Main
Street or to Lake Sunapee Region Visiting Nurse Association
Hospice, P.O. Box 2209, all New
London, NH 03257. To sign an
online guestbook visit www.
chadwickfuneralservice.com.
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston 617 569 0990
KELLY, Thomas F.
HEFFERMAN, Matthew S.
DiPERRI, James S.
Of South Boston, August 4,
2016. Beloved husband of Mary
T. (Curran) DiPerri. Father of
Rev. James M. DiPerri, Pastor of
Our Lady’s Church in Waltham,
Noreen Tolosky and her husband, Mark, of Longmeadow
and Mary Theresa DiPerri of
South Boston. Grandfather of
Matthew and Patrick Tolosky.
Family and friends will honor
and remember Jim’s life by
gathering for calling hours on
Thursday, August 11th from 4 to
7 p.m. in Saint Brigid’s Church,
845 East Broadway, South Boston and again in Our Lady Comforter of the Afflicted Church,
880 Trapelo Road, Waltham,
on Friday, August 12th from 4
to 7 p.m. A Funeral Mass will
be offered at 10 a.m. on Saturday morning in Our Lady Comforter of the Afflicted Church,
Waltham. Jim’s son and namesake, Father Jim DiPerri will be
principal celebrant. Burial will
be in Saint Bernard’s Cemetery,
Concord. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made
to Our Lady Comforter of the
Afflicted Parish, 920-R Trapelo
Road, Waltham, MA 02452 or
to Saint Brigid’s Parish, 845 E.
Broadway, South Boston, MA
02127. For complete obituary, guest book and directions
please visit www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
Honor your loved one’s memory
with a photo in The Boston Globe.
Ask your funeral
director for details.
B5
DEATHS
LOTTI, John J.
READING
CUDDY, Teresa M.
CURRELL, Nancy Jeanne
O’SULLIVAN, Mari
HYDE PARK
LUNA, Evelyn
McCORMACK, Kathaleen L.
G l o b e
DEATHS
By city or town
EAST BOSTON
AGUIAR, Patricia V.
DiFRANCESCO, Mary M.
HODGINS, Mary M.
SCHIPANI, Georgia D.
SHEILS, Mary M.
DEATHS
B o s t o n
54, passed away on Saturday,
August 6, 2016 at Kent Hospital
in Warwick, RI. For 32 memorable years, he was the beloved
husband of Elizabeth A. (Barrette) Hefferman of Warwick,
RI. Born in Milford, MA, he was
the son of Robert E. and Marlene R. (Haskell) Hefferman of
Bellingham, MA.
Besides his wife and parents,
he is survived by three sons:
Gerald M. Hefferman and fiancée Elizabeth Tashash, Scott
B. Hefferman and girlfriend
Katherine Smith, and Patrick E.
Hefferman and fiancée Rachel
Ravelo; two siblings: sister Elizabeth H. Ooi and her husband
Boon Ooi of Washington, D. C.,
and brother Nathaniel C. Hefferman and wife Bobbie Carlton of Lexington, MA; and a
large, loving extended family.
A Catholic Prayer Service with
words of remembrance will
take place at Carpenter-Jenks
Funeral Home & Crematory,
659 East Greenwich Avenue,
West Warwick, RI, on Saturday,
August 13 at 10:00 AM. Calling hours will be Friday, August
12 from 5:00 to 8:00 PM. Burial
will be private.
In lieu of flowers, donations in
his memory may be made to
the Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society at donate.lls.org. Remembrances may be shared
at his family’s memorial page
at
rememberingmatt.weebly.
com. For more information,
see carpenterjenks.com.
HESSION, Mary Z.
Age 94, August 10. Visitation
will start Friday morning at
9AM prior to Funeral Mass at
St. Elizabeth’s Church at 10.
Complete notice to follow.
Alfred D. Thomas Funeral Home
Milton
(617) 696-4200
77, Aug. 8, of Milton, formerly
of South Boston.
Tom died with his
family around him
after a courageous
battle with terminal
illness. He leaves his beloved
wife of 40 years, Lorraine (Stanley); his son T.J.; his son Kevin
and wife Sarah; and his grandson Tillman. Tillman brought
Tom great joy. Brother of Coleman Kelly, of Plymouth; Margie
Kelly, of Milton; and the late
Mary O’Sullivan, Patrick Kelly,
John Kelly and Bartholomew
Kelly. Beloved uncle of many
nieces and nephews. A Mass
of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Agatha Church,
Friday, Aug. 12, at 10:30am.
Visiting hours in the Dolan Funeral Home, 460 Granite Ave.,
EAST MILTON SQUARE, Thursday 4-8pm. Interment Milton
Cemetery. Late Vet. U.S. Army.
For further information please
visit www.dolanfuneral.com
LANDRY, Esther F.
Of Waltham, August 9, 2016.
Daughter of the late Charles
and Mary (Gingrass) Landry. Sister of Regina Short of Burlington and the late Irene Higgins,
Angelina Usseglio, Theresa Silvio, Gladys Stuhre, Ruth Coleman, and Rita McDonald. Also
survived by many nieces and
nephews and their families.
Family and friends will honor
and remember Esther’s life by
gathering on Monday, August
15th, at 10 am in The Joyce Funeral Home, 245 Main St., (Rte.
20), WALTHAM before leaving in procession to Saint Jude
Church, 147 Main St., Waltham,
where her Funeral Mass will be
celebrated at 11 am. Burial will
follow in Saint Patrick’s Cemetery, Watertown. For complete
obituary, guestbook, and directions, please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
Of Milton, died August 8, 2016.
John was born in South Boston
and grew up in Dorchester.
John was a teacher for over
30 years in the Boston public
school system. Beloved husband of 37 years to Mike McCabe of Milton. Son of the
late Ezio and Clara Lotti. Loving brother of Jenny Cahill of
Marshfield, Esther O’Keefe of
Quincy, Bruno Lotti of Marshfield and George Lotti of
Marshfield. Predeceased by his
brother, Paul Lotti. John is also
survived by many nieces, nephews and close friends. Relatives
and friends are respectfully
invited to attend the visiting
hours on Friday 8:30-10:00 AM
in the Keohane Funeral Home,
785 Hancock St., QUINCY. A Funeral Mass will be held in St.
Ann’s Church, Quincy at 10:30
AM. Cremation to follow. In
lieu
of
flowers,
donations
may be made to: The Jimmy
Fund c/o Dana Farber, PO Box
849168, Boston, MA 022849168. See www.Keohane.com
or call 1-800-Keohane for directions & online condolences.
DEATHS
McCARTHY, Mildred M.
Langone (Lynch)
Of Scituate formerly of Marshfield August 8, 2016. Devoted
mother of Ann Langone of
Dorchester & Monica Langone
of Quincy. Beloved wife of the
late Richard McCarthy. Cherished grandmother of Rose &
Victor. Dear sister of Emma Edwards. Also lovingly survived
by her many nieces & nephews.
A visiting hour will be held in
The Casper Funeral Home 187
Dorchester St, SO. BOSTON,
Saturday from 9-10:30 A.M.
Followed by a Funeral Mass in
St. Augustine Chapel (next to
funeral home) at 11A.M. Interment will be private. For online
guestbook
casperfuneralservices.com
LUNA, Evelyn (Caban)
August 9, 2016. Beloved wife
of Alberto Luna and her loving
dogs Ty and Mia. Loving daughter of the late Thomas and Andrea Caban. Dear sister of Lilly
Rivera, Brunilda Rivera, Edwin
Caban, Carlos Caban, Mercedes
Caban, Elsie Perez and the late
Johnny Caban, Hector Caban
and Maria M. (Caban) Cordero.
Loving aunt of Israel Rivera,
Elizabeth Reyes, Lissette Rivera, Jonathan Wells, Tanya Cordero, Julie Rodas, Terrence J.
Perez and Alex Perez. Funeral
from the P.E. Murray- F.J. Higgins George F. Doherty & Sons
Funeral Home, 2000 Centre
St. WEST ROXBURY on Friday,
Aug. 12th. at 9am. followed by
a Funeral Mass in Sacred Heart
Church, Roslindale at 10am.
Visiting hours Thursday 4-8pm.
Relatives and friends kindly invited. Interment Mt. Benedict
Cemetery.
Her faith always
kept us strong. We will miss
her dearly. Online guestbook
and directions at
pemurrayfuneral.com.
P.E. Murray-F.J. Higgins
George F. Doherty & Sons
West Roxbury 617-325-2000
MADDEN, Mary M.
In Dorchester, August 8th. Beloved daughter of the late
Edward G. and Mary M. (MacIsaac) Madden. Loving sister
of Virginia and her husband
Hugh Mullen of Marshfield,
Anne Fancelli and her late husband Dario, Robert Madden,
Dorothy and her husband Robert Dunford, all of Dorchester,
and the late Edward and his
wife Barbara Madden, and
Jack Madden. Favorite aunt
of Laura Ortiz, Kelly Collins,
Christopher Mullen, Michael
Mullen, Kevin Mullen, Julie
Mullen, Beth Donovan, Dario
Fancelli, Joseph Madden, Brian
Dunford, Sarah Zaphiris, and
Molly Murphy. Survived by
many grandnieces and nephews, cousins, and friends. Mary
was a retired math teacher at
Boston College High School
for 29 years and part of the
B.C. High family for almost 40
years. Mary’s family would like
to express their sincere gratitude to the doctors, nurses,
and staff at Compass on the
Bay, the Bostonian Nursing
Home, and Boston Medical
Center, for their care and kindness to her and her family. A
celebration of Mary’s life will
be held with a memorial visitation at B.C. High, on Friday
morning, August 12, at 9 A.M.
Followed by a Funeral Mass at
10 A.M. Relatives and friends
invited. In lieu of flowers, donations in Mary’s memory may
be made to Boston College
High School, 150 Morrissey
Boulevard,
Dorchester,
MA
02125. For guestbook, www.
jmurphyfh.com. Arrangements
by the Murphy Funeral Home,
DORCHESTER.
McCARTHY, Jeanne T.
(O’Sullivan)
In Burlington, formerly of Arlington, Tuesday August 10,
2016. Loving wife of John J McCarthy and mother of Stephen
of Roslindale, Brian of Freeport,
ME, Elaine and Randolph Briggs
of Norwalk, CT and Karen of
Groton. Devoted grandmother
to Nina, Lydia, Simon and Elizabeth. Beloved sister of the late
Msgr. Francis G. O’Sullivan and
cherished cousin of Paul and
Janet Andrews and their family
in Woburn. Jeanne (O’Sullivan)
McCarthy was born February
8, 1932 to Jeremiah and Mary
(Harkins) O’Sullivan in Woburn.
She received her early education at St. Charles School in
Woburn where she graduated
in 1949. Throughout her youth
Jeanne also helped in her father’s neighborhood grocery
store (“Sully’s”) in the Green
Street area of Woburn. Mrs.
McCarthy enrolled at Regis
College in 1949. In her junior
year she began courses at Boston University in the emerging
field of Speech, Language and
Hearing Therapy. The following year Mrs. McCarthy started as a student teacher in the
Waltham School Department
where she continued teaching
part-time while completing a
masters degree as a speech and
hearing therapist.
This was
the precursor to many years
teaching in Waltham. Jeanne
met John McCarthy at a Newman Club St. Patrick’s Day party
in the late 1950s and the two
were married in November of
1959. They moved to Arlington the following year and
Mrs. McCarthy withdrew from
teaching when the first of her
four children was born in 1961.
Ten years later she returned to
speech therapy as a working
mother and remained a fixture
in the Waltham Public Schools
until her retirement in 1992.
In retirement Jeanne and John
traveled the US, the Caribbean
and Europe and worked as volunteers with the Boston Museum of Science and the Friends
of the Boston Harbor Islands.
Mrs. McCarthy was active in the
St. Eulalia (Lexington) chapter
of Voice of the Faithful and
served as a mentor and advocate for immigrant families
from Haiti living in Cambridge.
Funeral from the Keefe Funeral
Home, 5 Chestnut St. (Adjacent
to Saint Agnes’ Church) Rte. 60
ARLINGTON on Saturday at 8
am. Funeral mass in Saint Eulalia’s Church, Ridge St., Winchester at 9 am. Relatives and
friends invited. Visiting hours
Friday from 4-8 pm. Burial in
Calvary Cemetery, Woburn. In
lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to: Alzheimer’s Association of Mass/NH 480
Pleasant St.
Watertown, MA
02472 http://alzmass.org.
To
send an online condolence visit
www.keefefuneralhome.com
McCORMACK, Donald J.
In Dorchester, August 6th, age
85 years. Beloved husband of the late Mary L.
(Lynskey). Loving son of
the late Joseph H. and
Helen M. (Denehey) McCormack. Dear friend of Garry
and Maryellen Pilato of Mattapan. Survived by several nieces
and nephews. Visiting hours in
the Murphy Funeral Home,
1020
Dorchester
Ave.,
DORCHESTER, Friday 5-7 P.M.
Funeral Mass in St. Gregory
Church, Saturday morning, August 13, at 10 A.M. Relatives
and friends invited. Veteran
Korean War – U.S. Air Force.
Late retired employee of General Motors Co. for over 25
years. Former business manager and Eucharistic Minister for
St. Gregory Church for many
years and member of the
Knights of Columbus, Dorchester Lower Mills Council #180.
Donations in his memory may
be made to St. Gregory Church,
2223 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester, MA 02124. Interment in St.
Joseph Cemetery, West Roxbury. For directions and guestbook,
www.jmurphyfh.com.
Funeral Home handicapped accessible with ample parking.
McCORMACK, Kathaleen L.
(Derrah)
Formerly of Hyde Park, August
9, 2016. Beloved wife of Henry
F. McCormack. Devoted mother
of James H. McCormack, Katherine M. Dempski, John J.,
Robert J. and Patricia J. McCormack. Loving sister of James
Derrah. Also
survived by 13
grandchildren and 4 greatgrandchildren. Funeral from
the O’Neill Funeral Home, 59
Peirce Street (corner of School
Street), MIDDLEBORO, Saturday at 9 AM. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated in
Sacred Heart Church at 10. Interment Saint Mary Cemetery.
Visiting hours Friday, 4-7 PM.
For guestbook and obituary:
www.oneillfuneral.com
MEGNIA, Francis P. Sr.
Of Dedham, August 8, 2016.
Retired
Boston
Police Officer. Beloved husband of
Elizabeth (Baldyga)
Megnia.
Devoted
father of Francis P. Megnia Jr.
of Dedham, Betty A. McIntyre
and her husband Don of Norwood, Denise M. Megnia of
Mansfield, Kenneth J. Megnia
and his wife Ester of West
Barnstable. Also survived by 9
grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Brother of
Carol Bray of Quincy, Patricia
Cabral of Dorchester, and the
late John and Robert Megnia.
Funeral from the George F. Doherty & Sons Wilson-Cannon
Funeral Home, 456 High St.,
DEDHAM, Friday at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass in
St. Anne Church, Readville, at
10 a.m. Relatives and friends
kindly invited. Visiting hours
in the funeral home on Thursday from 4-8 p.m. Interment in
Brookdale Cemetery, Dedham.
In lieu of flowers expressions
of sympathy may be made in
Francis’ memory to American
Cancer Society, 30 Speen St.,
Framingham, MA 01701. For
directions and guestbook,
gfdoherty.com.
George F. Doherty & Sons
Dedham 781-326-0500
MOORE, Ric A.
Of Weymouth, formerly of
Huntington Beach, CA, died
unexpectedly August 8, 2016.
Ric was an avid Red Sox fan, a
skilled landscaper and Counting Crows enthusiast. He always looked forward to 4th of
July festivities and random adventures in life. He will be sadly
missed. Beloved son of David
and Mae Moore of CA. Devoted father of Jeremy Moore
and his wife Danielle of CA,
Heather Flannery and her late
husband Robert of Randolph,
Stephanie Fox of Randolph,
Kori Moore and her husband
Matthew White of Rockland
and Alexis Moore and her companion Zachary Breen of Weymouth. Cherished Grampie of
Connor, Kyliegh, Ireland and
Winter. Loving brother of Julie
Moore of CA and Bruce Moore
of AZ. Loving companion of
Susan Rubin of Weymouth.
Best friend of the late Edwin
“Doc” Mitchell.
Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend the
visiting hours on Friday 4-7 PM
in the McDonald Keohane Funeral Home EAST WEYMOUTH
at 3 Charles Street (corner of
Charles & Middle Street). A Funeral service will follow in the
funeral home Friday at 7 PM.
In lieu of flowers, donations in
memory of Ric may be made
to Jimmy Fund, 1309 Beacon
Street, Brookline, MA 02446.
See www.Keohane.com for directions and online condolences or call 781-335-0045.
T h e
B6
DEATHS
DEATHS
B o s t o n
G l o b e
DEATHS
Obituaries
SCHIPANI, Georgia D. (Chrystal)
MORLEY-CHRIST, Margaret
Lynda (McMahan)
PISANI, Triestina “Tina”
(Malfitano)
Of
Scituate,
formerly
of
Dorchester entered into eternal life on August 8, 2016. Beloved wife of Karl R. Christ and
the late Robert J. Morley. Devoted mother of Robert J. Morley of Rockland, Craig Morley
and his wife Christina of Holbrook and Karl R. Christ, Jr.
and his wife Julie of Rockland.
Cherished Nana to Andrew J.
and Bryson Morley, Kameron
and Faith Christ. Loving sister
of Kathleen M. Morrissey and
her husband David, William C.
McMahan and his wife Gwen,
Mary Lou Graham and her husband Bob, Robert E. McMahan,
Joseph S. McMahan and Steven M. McMahan. She is also
survived by many nieces and
nephews. Daughter of the late
Edwin C. and Elsa McMahan.
Lynda devoted her life to giving compassionate care to the
elderly. She worked for many
years for the Norwell VNA and
later in life served as a home
health aide. She was an avid
tennis player and loved gardening. She enjoyed her chocolates, wine and scratch tickets. Visitation Saturday August
13, 2016 from 1-3 PM followed
by a funeral service at 3 PM at
the Richardson-Gaffey Funeral
Home, 382 First Parish Road,
Scituate, MA. Following services, family and friends are invited to gather at the GAR Hall,
353 Country Way, Scituate. In
lieu of flowers, contributions
in her memory may be made
to Scituate Etrusco Associates ,
Inc., PO Box 265, Scituate, MA
02066.
On August 8th, 2016. Beloved
wife of the late Pasquale “Pat”
Pisani. Loving mother of Karen
Strating and her husband Harry
of Manchester by the Sea and
Paul Pisani and his wife Rosemary of Revere. Dear sister of
Rocco Malfitano and wife Lorraine of Stoneham, Anthony
Malfitano and wife Sheila of
Revere, and the late Maria Stasio and Vito Malfitano. Adoring grandmother of Tiana Lane
and husband William, James
Pastore and wife Alexandra,
Paul Pisani Jr and wife Catherine, Damian Pisani and wife
lisa, and Anthony Pisani. Cherished great-grandmother of
Olivia, Arya, and Peyton and
is also survived by many loving
nieces, nephews, and cousins.
Tina was the owner of Tina
Mafitano School of the Dance
in Revere for over 42 years
where she was known as “Miss
Tina.” When putting recitals
together her family would be
behind her every step of the
way from lighting and staging
to set design. She was known
in Revere for her dancing and
wonderful singing voice. During WWII Tina would sing for
the Troops at the USO. Her
faith, being an important part
of her life, led her to become
one of the founders of the St.
Mary’s of Assumption church
choir where she was a soloist.
Most of all she was loving and
dedicated to her family. She
will be sorely missed by all who
knew her. Funeral from the
Paul Buonfiglio & Sons-Bruno
Funeral Home, 128 Revere St,
REVERE on Saturday, August
13th at 8:00am. Funeral Mass
from St. Mary’s of The Assumption Parish at 9:00am. Relatives
and friends are kindly invited.
Visiting hours will be Friday
4-8pm. Interment Woodlawn
Cemetery.
For
guest
book
please visit Buonfiglio.com
Richardson-Gaffey Funeral Home
781-545-0196
MORLEY, Nancy
(nee Sheehan)
85, passed away on August 8,
2016, surrounded by her loving family after a short period
of declining health. She leaves
her son Jack and his wife Cindy
of Fernandina Beach, FL; her
son Steven and his wife Carole
of Mendon, MA; her daughter
Tracy and her husband Michael
of Dubai; and loving grandchildren, Garrett, Parker, Christian,
Bailey & Kale. She was pre-deceased by her daughter Valerie
Morley Mesch. She also leaves
behind her sister Marilyn Hardin & many nieces & nephews.
Nancy
graduated
from
Dorchester Girls High School.
She travelled the world helping
others through her Alcohol &
Drug Education & Counseling
Nancy was a caring, spiritual,
and strong woman who would
easily befriend you. She enjoyed
travelling in her RV, working
at the opera, traveling abroad
and the New England Patriots.
Skiing was a favorite pastime.
But most of all she enjoyed art
and painting, it really provided
a bright spot in her day.
The family would like to give
special thanks to Nancy’s dear
friend, Diana Dearth for her
love, friendship and support
as well as the caretakers from
Avow Hospice for their compassion and devotion, which
went above and beyond. In accordance with Nancy’s wishes,
a celebration of life will take
place at a later date. The family
asks that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Avow
Hospice, 1095 Whippoorwill
Lane, Naples, FL 34105.
O’SULLIVAN, Mari (Hanabergh)
Of Reading August 8, 2016.
Beloved wife of David H.
O’Sullivan. Devoted mother of
Sarah A. O’Neill and her husband Liam of Philadelphia, PA;
Timothy D. O’Sullivan and Emily A. O’Sullivan both of Reading.
Cherished sister Gerard
Hanabergh and his wife Lisa
of Briarcliff Manor, NY and the
late Donald Hanabergh. Cherished sister in-law of Marj Hanabergh of East Islip, NY.
A
Memorial Mass will be held
on Saturday, August 13 at St.
Athanasius Church 300 Haverhill St. Reading at 10:30am.
Visiting hours will be Friday
at the Douglass, Edgerley and
Bessom Funeral Home 25 Sanborn St. (corner of Woburn St.)
Reading
from
4:00-8:00pm.
Burial is private.
In lieu of
flowers contributions may be
made Mari’s memory to DanaFarber Cancer Institute Division of Development and the
Jimmy Fund 10 Brookline Place
West, Floor 6, Brookline MA
02445-9924. For directions and
on line guest book visit johnbdouglassfuneralhome.com
Of East Boston, passed away
peacefully on July 28th, 2016.
Beloved wife of over sixtythree years to Anthony Schipani. Devoted mother of Donna Schipani, Lisa Hayes, Carole
Sousa, and David Schipani.
Dear sister of Dr. Richard Chrystal. Cherished grandmother of
Nicholas, Vincent, and Kelsey
Hayes, Apryle Donohoe, and
Ann Howell. Adored greatgrandmother of George and
Rae. Family and friends will
honor Georgia’s life by gathering on Monday, August 15th
from 11:00am to 12:00 noon
in The Most Holy Redeemer
Church, 72 Maverick Street,
(Maverick Square) East Boston,
followed by a Mass in celebration of her life at 12:00 noon.
For more info or to send an online condolence
www.ruggieromh.com
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston
617 569 0990
SHEILS, Mary M. (Vespa)
Of East Boston, passed away
peacefully at home on August
9 surrounded by her loving
family. Funeral Monday. Visting Sunday 4-8. Complete notice Friday’s edition. For more
info www.ruggieromh.com
Ruggiero Family Memorial Home
East Boston (617) 569-0990
SUTHERLAND, Steven J.
Of
Milford
formerly
of
Waltham, unexpectedly Aug.
8th, 2016 at the age of 46. Visiting Hours on Friday from 4 –
8 p.m. with a Funeral Service
celebrating Steven’s Life Saturday at 11:00 a.m. For complete obituary, guest book &
additional information please
refer to:
www.BrascoFuneralHome.com
Waltham 781-893-6260
“Creating Meaningful Memories”
WHEATON, Evangeline D.
(Demeter) “D’arcy”
In
Brighton,
formerly
of
Brookline, August 10, 2016.
Beloved wife of the late John
Wheaton and Licia Christos.
Devoted mother of Nicholas of
Brighton, Speare and his wife
Maria of Buzzards Bay, Lesley
and his wife Phyllis of Brighton. Sister of Connie Prescott
and the late Betty Christou,
Alex Demeter, and Nicki White.
Grandmother
of
Nicholas,
Keith, Daniel and Gregory
Christos. Visiting Hours in the
Lehman Reen & McNamara Funeral Home, 63 Chestnut Hill
Ave. (nr. Brighton Courthouse)
BRIGHTON, Friday, August 12th
from 4-8 pm. Funeral Service in
Funeral Home Saturday, August
13th at time to be announced.
Interment Walnut Hills Cemetery, Brookline.
Longtime
member of the Brighton Lodge
of Elks #2199. Funeral Home
Handicapped Accessible. For directions and guest book please
visit www.lehmanreen.com
By Daniel Victor
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — John Saunders, a widely known ESPN
and ABC sportscaster who
guided viewers through many
premier sporting events over
the last 30 years, died Wednesday, ESPN and his family said.
He was 61.
The family, in a statement,
said he had been ill for the past
few days but the cause of death
was not yet known.
Mr. Saunders was a familiar
presence on fall Saturdays as
the host of ABC’s studio coverage of college football and the
ESPN show “College Football
Live.” He anchored coverage of
the College Football Playoff national championship game and
hosted the postgame trophy
presentation.
On Sundays, he was the host
of “The Sports Reporters,” an
ESPN roundtable of journalists
that largely resisted the shouting and argumentative style of
shock jocks in favor of measured, one-at-a-time takes on
sports issues, personalities, and
events.
There was no trace of bombast in his presentation. As other sports broadcasters yelled
progressively louder, Mr. Saunders was calm, steady, and
good-natured — “a voice of reason in our often unreasonable
discourse,” as Mike Greenberg,
an ESPN host, said on Twitter.
Since starting at ESPN in
1986, Mr. Saunders had been at
the center of the network’s biggest franchises. He hosted the
channel’s studio coverage of
college basketball and had
ESPN IMAGES VIA AP FILE/2013
Mr. Saunders led broadcasts
of many seminal sports
events since joining ESPN.
called play-by-play of college
basketball since 1990.
He also hosted “Baseball Tonight” from 1990 to 1993.
Mr. Saunders was frequently involved in ESPN’s coverage
of major games. He hosted the
NHL Stanle y Cup playoffs
broadcasts from 1993 to 2004,
“SportsCenter” coverage of the
NCAA basketball Final Four
from 1991 to 1993, the World
Series broadcasts from 1990 to
1992, and the Major League
Baseball All-Star Game broadcasts from 1990 to 1992.
He was a founding member
of the V Foundation for Cancer
Research, named for Jim Valvano, a former North Carolina
State basketball coach and
ESPN broadcaster who died of
cancer in 1993.
‘‘He was as close to Jimmy V
as anybody at ESPN,’’ said Dick
Vitale, who has worked at
ESPN for decades with Mr.
Saunders and considered him
one of his closest friends.
Mr. Saunders has been the
master of ceremonies at Vitale’s
gala and V Foundation fundraiser in Sarasota, Fla., in 10 of
11 years the event has been
held, said the longtime college
basketball analyst.
“John was an extraordinary
talent, and his friendly, informative style has been a warm
welcome to sports fans for decades,” John Skipper, the president of ESPN, said in a statement. “His wide range of accomplishments across
numerous sports and championship events is among the
most impressive this industry
has ever seen.”
Mr. Saunders was born on
Feb. 2, 1955, in Ajax, Ontario.
He was an all-star defenseman
in junior league hockey and
played at Western Michigan
University from 1974 to 1976
before transferring to Ryerson
Polytechnical in Toronto.
He had broadcast jobs in
Ajax and Toronto before moving to Baltimore, where he anchored daily sports reports. He
was hired by ESPN in 1986 to
anchor “SportsCenter.”
On “SportsCenter” Wednesday, Hannah Storm struggled
to report the news of Mr. Saunders’ death, calling him “our
generous and talented and beloved colleague.”
Mr. Saunders leaves his
wife, Wanda, and two daughters, Aleah and Jenna.
Material from the Associated
Press was used in this report.
Robert Kiley; led transit systems
QUINNAN, Gerald V., Sr
92, of El Paso, TX, formerly of
Needham, August 8, 1923 April 17, 2016. Relatives and
friends are invited to attend a
Mass of Christian Burial on Saturday, August 13th at 10AM in
St. Joseph Church, 1362 Highland Ave. Needham, followed
by interment in St. Mary’s Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations in Mr. Quinnan’s name
may be made to St. Joseph
Parish, 1382 Highland Avenue,
Needham, MA 02492. For full
obit, directions or to share a
memory please visit
www.eatonfuneralhomes.com
Eaton Funeral Home
781-444-0201
ROACH, Margaret A. “Peggy”
(Pennie)
Of Bellingham, former longtime resident of Norwood,
passed away at home on August 9, 2016. Beloved daughter
of the late Paul E. and Helen T.
(Cahill) Pennie; loving mother
of Walter D. Roach, III of Bellingham, Paul M. Roach and his
wife Ann of Norwood, Linda J.
Noonan and her husband Kenneth of Norwood and Kevin M.
Roach and his wife Kate of Norwood; cherished grandmother
of Michael, Casey, Sean, Robert, Bridget, Morgan, Molly
and Kevin; devoted sister of
Paul E. Pennie, Jr. and his wife
Doris of Mansfield and Jean
M. Gouthro and her husband
Jim of Walpole. She is also survived by many loving nieces
and nephews. Funeral services
will be held on Saturday, August 13th at 10:00am from the
Gillooly Funeral Home, 126
Walpole Street (Rte. 1A), NORWOOD, followed by a Mass of
Christian Burial at 11:00am in
St. Catherine of Siena Church,
547 Washington Street, Norwood. Interment will be private. Visiting hours will be on
Friday from 4:00-8:00pm at the
funeral home. In lieu of flowers,
memorial
contributions
may be made to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, 230
East Ohio Street, Suite 500,
Chicago, Illinois 60611-3201 or
www.pulmonaryfibrosis.org
Gillooly Funeral Home
Norwood
(781)-762-0174
www.gilloolyfuneralhome.com
KILEY
Continued from Page B1
WILLIAMS, Christopher
Donald
Age 33, passed away unexpectedly, Aug., 2016 at his beautiful home that he constructed in
Westford, MA. Married to Jennifer Mitsch on Oct. 29, 2006,
they were the proud founders of First Class Carpentry Inc.
based out of Burlington, MA.
Chris was the loving father
to Jasmine Williams, Sierra
Wheaton-Williams,
Lily
Williams, and Reed Williams; also
survived by his loving parents,
Donald & Pamela Williams
(NH), Mike & Tere Mitsch (NH),
and Laura Mitsch (Burlington,
MA); Dedicated brother to Karrie & James Mitschmyer (NH),
Dan & Holly Mitsch (NH), Cherie & Jason LaCroix (RI), and
Amy Nason (Turners Falls, MA).
He will also be missed by his
grandparents, aunts, uncles,
nieces, nephews, cousins and
extended family who loved
him dearly. Formerly of Greenville, NH, Chris was extremely
creative, a gifted builder, an accomplished contractor, and was
dedicated to supporting the
lives of people with disabilities.
He loved hunting, fishing, and
spending time with his family. Arrangements: Relatives &
Friends are invited to attend his
memorial visitation on Friday,
August 12, 2016 from 4 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at the J A Healy Sons
Funeral Home, 57 North Main
St., WESTFORD, MA 01886. A
cremation burial service will
be held at the Cathedral of the
Pines in Rindge, NH on Sunday, August 14th at 11:00 am.
In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to help offset the
unexpected cost of funeral expenses and remaining funds
used to support the children.
Checks can be made out to the
“Christopher Williams Memorial Fund” and delivered to any
TDBank branch.
J.A. Healy Sons Funeral Home, 57 North
Main St., Westford, MA 01886 (978)692-6502
www.HealyFuneralHome.com
SERVICES
Affordable Cremation
$
Of Sanford, ME, formerly of
Waltham, August 7, 2016. Wife
of the late Raymond I. Penney.
Mother of Dawn M. Hamel and
grandmother of John P. Hamel,
both of Sanford, ME. Sister of
the late Patricia Olivadoti, Margaret M. Stoney, Richard and
Joseph Ferguson. Also survived
by several nieces and nephews.
Family and friends will honor
and remember Barbara’s life
by gathering for calling hours
in The Joyce Funeral Home,
245 Main Street (Rte. 20),
WALTHAM, on Sunday, August
14th from 4 to 7 p.m. and again
at 9 a.m. on Monday morning
before leaving in procession to
Saint Mary’s Church, 133 School
Street, Waltham where her Funeral Mass will be celebrated
at 10 a.m. Burial will follow
in Mount Feake Cemetery,
Waltham. Memorial donations
may be made to the American
Cancer Society, 30 Speen Street,
Framingham, MA 01701. For
complete obituary, guest book
and directions please visit
www.JoyceFuneralHome.com
John Saunders, longtime voice on ESPN
Lehman Reen McNamara Funeral Home
617 782 1000
Brighton
FUNERAL
SERVICES
PENNEY, Barbara A.
(Ferguson)
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
SARA, Rev. Solomon I., SJ
Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at Georgetown University,
in Weston on August 8, 2016.
Beloved son of the late Ishu &
Elizabeth (Kollo) Sara. Brother
of Thomas Sara of Vancouver,
WA and the late Shamoun
Sara. Father is also survived
by his many Jesuit Brothers.
Reposing at Campion Center,
319 Concord Rd., Weston. Visiting Hours Thursday, August 11
from 3-5 pm. with a prayer service at 4:30 pm. Concelebrated
Funeral Mass in the Chapel of
the Holy Spirit, Campion Center on Friday, August 12 at 10
AM. Relatives and friends are
invited. Interment will follow in the Jesuit Cemetery at
Campion Center, Weston. In
lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to Jesuit Community,
Campion Center, 319 Concord
Rd., Weston, MA. 02493 to support its ministry of care for elderly and infirm Jesuits.
Brady & Fallon Funeral Home
617 524 0861
Share your memories.
Celebrate a life and share your
thoughts and memories in an online
guestbook. Visit boston.com/
obituaries and follow the prompts.
1310 complete
617 782 1000
Lehman Reen & McNamara
Funeral Home
www.lehmanreen.com
Serving Greater Boston
500 Canterbury St.
Boston, MA 02131
617-524-1036
www.stmichaelcemetery.com
CANNIFF MONUMENT
(617) 323-3690
800-439-3690 • 617-876-9110
531 Cummings Highway, Roslindale
583 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge
MON-FRI 9-9; SAT 9-5, SUNDAY 12-5
SWEENEY BROTHERS
HOME FOR
FUNERALS, INC.
One Independence Ave., Quincy
617-472-6344
Serving Quincy & The South Shore
setts Bay Transportation Authority, said in an e-mail. “The
T didn’t collapse during the
Blizzard of 1978. It stepped up
and provided thousands of people with solid public transportation at a time when the city
was virtually paralyzed.”
During his 1983 bid for Boston mayor, Mr. Kiley dropped
out when his poll numbers languished in the low single-digits.
New York Governor Mario Cuomo then appointed him to run
New York’s Metropolitan Transit Authority.
At the time, the nation’s
largest transit system “was
completely covered with graffiti
– 6,200 cars, 480 stations, the
depots, the shops,” Mr. Kiley
told The New Yorker for a 2004
profile. “It was a kind of leprosy.” He instituted a zero-tolerance policy for graffiti and farebeaters and implemented a
host of improvements. Ridership, which had declined in the
years before he took over, rebounded during his seven-year
tenure.
In 2001, a decade after leaving the New York transit job,
Mr. Kiley was recruited by Ken
Livingstone, London’s thenmayor, to become that city’s
first commissioner of transport.
Mr. Kiley couldn’t resist trying
to breathe new life into the
world’s oldest subway system,
after having done the same in
Boston and New York. “This is
like Mount Everest,” he told the
Globe in 2001. “How could I say
no?”
Robert Raymond Kiley was
born in Minneapolis on Sept.
16, 1935. His father, Raymond,
was a Woolworth Co. executive.
His mother, the former Georgianna Smith, strongly believed
in public service, Mr. Kiley told
the Globe.
After graduating from St.
Thomas Military Academy in
St. Paul, Mr. Kiley went to the
University of Notre Dame, from
which he received a bachelor’s
in business administration that
“sort of reflected my father’s influence,” he recalled.
While in college, he considered becoming a lawyer, telling
the Globe that “three times I got
a c c e p t e d t o Ha r v a r d L a w
School, and three times I ended
up not going.” Instead, he became president of the National
Student Association and then
took graduate courses at Harvard for about 15 months before leaving without a degree.
Joining the CIA in the early
1960s, he traveled to 87 countries by the time he was 30, often passing himself off as a US
GLOBE STAFF FILE/1977
Robert Kiley (center), with Boston Mayor Kevin White
(left) at South Station, was dubbed the “superchief” of the
reorganized MBTA.
Agency for International Development official, according to
The New Yorker profile.
When Ramparts magazine
revealed his CIA work, he became executive assistant to the
d i r e c t o r, R i c h a r d He l m s .
“When I went to the CIA executive suite, I thought I would
have an opportunity to see what
really went on in government,”
he told the Globe, adding that
he didn’t much like what he
saw and left in part because he
was troubled by the Vietnam
War.
He was assistant director of
the Police Executive Research
Forum in Washington before
joining White’s administration.
While he was serving as deputy mayor, Mr. Kiley and his
wife, the former Patricia Potter,
and their two children went on
a vacation to Fire Island on
Long Island, N.Y. He left early
to fly back for work meetings,
and while Mrs. Kiley was driving back to Boston, she and
their 2-year-old daughter, Jessica, died after their car was
struck on Interstate 95 in the
Bronx. The couple’s 4-year-old
son, Christopher, was badly
burned and died later. The family’s baby-sitter was critically injured.
“The world suddenly stops,”
Mr. Kiley told the Globe in
1981. “There are either resources there that you can draw on or
there aren’t. It is the kind of reserve resources that you don’t
check on very often in your life,
and you just discover that they
are there.”
In 1976, he married Rona
Shuman, who formerly was a
NAACP Legal Defense Fund executive. They divided their time
between Cambridge and Chilmark and have two sons, David
o f Wa s h i n gt o n a n d B e n o f
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Mr. Kiley “had a huge influence on their lives,” she said,
adding that “he was a very special person, and I feel very fortunate that we had all this time
together.”
A private service is planned
for Mr. Kiley, who in addition to
his wife and two sons leaves a
sister, Kathleen Goloven of
Sarasota, Fla., and a granddaughter.
Known for his analytical approach to reviving three of the
world’s largest transit systems,
Mr. Kiley attributed his self-discipline at work to his “strong
Catholic upbringing” in the
Midwest.
In between running the New
York and London transit systems, he was president of the
Fischbach Corp. construction
company, a member of the
Kohlberg & Co. private equity
firm, and president of Partnership for New York City, a business group.
Upon Mr. Kiley’s arrival in
London, a British diplomat
toasted him at one gathering,
saying: “You are the most important American to come to
Britain since Dwight Eisenhower.”
Nevertheless, his hiring by a
leftist London mayor popularly
known as “Red Ken” was unusual, by the measure of both
men.
“I never dreamed I would be
trying to recruit a CIA agent,”
Livingstone told Mr. Kiley in
their first conversation, the
Globe reported in early 2001.
“I never expected to be hired
by an unreconstructed Marxist
socialist,” Mr. Kiley replied.
Bryan Marquard can be
reached at
[email protected]
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
B7
DAILY BRIDGE CLUB
Boston’s forecast
FRIDAY
TODAY
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
SATURDAY
6 A.M.
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
MONDAY
SUNDAY
NOON
6 P.M.
6 A.M.
NOON
6 A.M.
6 P.M.
NOON
BY FRANK STEWART
6 P.M.
South dealer — N-S vulnerable
Humidity and temperatures will rise ahead of
a cool front pushing
eastward to the coast.
Humidity will linger overnight
with patchy clouds.
Breezy, hot and humid
with times of clouds
and sun; an afternoon
shower or thunderstorm
around. Humidity and clouds
linger overnight; very warm.
HIGH
89-94
LOW
73-78
Still hot and humid with
intervals of sun and
clouds with thunderstorms around in the
afternoon. Humid with partly
cloudy skies overnight.
HIGH
91-96
LOW
74-79
HIGH
91-96
LOW
67-72
Cloudy and not as
warm but humid with a
couple of showers and
a thunderstorm through
the day. Humid overnight with
clouds and a strong thunderstorm.
Mostly cloudy and not
as hot; humid with a
shower or thunderstorm in the afternoon.
Overnight will be considerable
cloudy with heavy showers late.
HIGH
75-80
LOW
66-71
HIGH
81-86
LOW
68-73
North
♠ Q7
♥ AJ5
♦ AQ54
♣Q874
West
East
♠ K86
♥K763
♦ KJ62
♣63
♠9432
♥ Q 10 9 8
♦ 10 8 7 3
♣5
South
♠ A J 10 5
♥42
♦ 9
♣ A K J 10 9 2
South
1♣
1♠
3♣
New England
forecast
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Tides
TODAY: An approaching cool front will cause a spike in
temperatures and humidity. There will be an isolated thunderstorm in the southwest.
TOMORROW: A front stalled out over the region
will spark spotty showers and thunderstorms, with
strong storms in the afternoon in the north.
EXTENDED: A stalled frontal boundary
and unsettled atmospheric conditions will
bring showers and thunderstorms to New
England throughout the weekend.
A.M. P.M.
Boston high
Height
Boston low
Height
High tides
6:03 6:24
8.5 9.2
---12:07
--- 1.7
High tides
Old Orchard ME 5:53 6:15
Hampton
Beach NH
6:07 6:29
Plum Island
6:18 6:43
Ipswich
5:52 6:14
A.M. P.M.
Gloucester
Marblehead
Lynn
Scituate
6:03
6:03
6:10
6:07
Plymouth
Cape Cod
Canal East
Cape Cod
Canal West
Falmouth
6:08 6:33
5:54 6:18
4:51 5:15
5:47 6:08
Boston’s recent climate
Yesterday
High/low
79/68
Mean
74
Departure from normal +1
Departure for month +13
Departure for year +375
7 p.m. rel. humidity 90%
Actual Temperatures
Temperatures are
today’s highs
and tonight’s lows.
Degree days
Yesterday
Monthly total
Normal to date
Season total
Season normal
Last year to date
High tides
6:24
6:24
6:29
6:32
A.M. P.M.
Hyannis Port
Chatham
Wellfleet
Provincetown
7:17
7:03
6:17
6:11
7:33
7:22
6:38
6:32
Nantucket
Harbor
Oak Bluffs
New Bedford
Newport RI
7:11
6:16
2:24
2:17
7:29
6:49
2:57
2:50
(valid at 7 p.m. yesterday)
Heat
0
0
0
7
0
1
Cool
9
101
84
633
511
535
Normal Temperatures
120
Aug. readings
Avg. daily high
Avg. daily low
YTD avg. temp.
Actual
82.2
67.3
52.5
Norm.
80.9
65.7
50.6
Record Temperatures
Yesterday’s high 79°
1949
Record
high
101
100
Normal
high
81
80
New England marine forecast
Boston Harbor
Wind
Seas
Temp
SW 4-8 kts.
1-2 ft.
91/75
East Cape


Small craft advisory
Gale warning  Storm warning
Wind
Normal
low
65
60
Seas
Record
low
Temp
Vineyard
SW 7-14 kts.
2-4 ft.
84/73
Cod Canal
SW 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
87/74
Nantucket
SW 8-16 kts.
1-3 ft.
79/71
Buzzards Bay
SW 7-14 kts.
1-3 ft.
86/74
Provincetown
S 6-12 kts.
1-2 ft.
87/72
40
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
July
August
0.23 0.25"
0.20"
For current Charles River Basin water quality, call (781) 788-0007 or go to http://www.charlesriver.org.
Almanac
5:47 a.m.
7:50 p.m.
14:03
2:16 p.m.
Mount Washington (7 p.m. yesterday)
Weather
Dense fog
Visibility
1/16 of a mile
Wind
northwest at 27 m.p.h.
High/low temperature
57/49
Snow depth at 7 p.m.
0.0”
0.10"
T
T
0.05"
0.02
T
T
0.01
0.04
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
FULL
Aug. 18
LAST
Aug. 24
NEW
Sep. 1
FIRST
Sep. 9
July
A good astronomy night! – A. MacRobert
24 Hr. Precipitation
This evening, the moon forms a tilted diamond
shape with Mars, Saturn and Antares below it.
Late tonight, the Perseid meteors should be at
their peak.
Yesterday
0.23”
Precip days in August
4
0.00"
August
(valid at 7 p.m. yesterday)
Month to date
0.29”
Norm. month to date 1.20”
Year to date
18.83”
Norm. year to date 26.60”
Climate data are compiled from National Weather Service records and are subject to change or correction.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016
“Does the name Pavlov ring a bell?” — graffiti
I’ve heard psychology defined as the study of how to pull
a habit out of a rat. Reading the opponents’ cards — my
topic this week — may involve psychology as well as logical
thinking.
When I watched today’s deal, South landed at a good contract of six clubs. It would have been cold without a heart
opening lead, but West led the 10 of hearts. South took the
ace, drew trumps and tried a diamond to dummy’s queen,
hoping to get a discard for his heart loser. But East won, and
the defense cashed a heart.
Declarer gave himself a 50-50 chance (and a chance to
go down two), but his play was psychologically inferior. He
should draw trumps with the A-Q and next lead dummy’s
queen of spades.
If East has the king, he will often cover, and South will be
home, losing only one heart trick. If East fails to cover, South
can reasonably infer that he doesn’t have the king. So South
takes the ace and relies on the diamond finesse.
DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ Q 7 ♥ A J 5 ♦ A Q 5 4 ♣ Q 8
7 4. Your partner opens one spade, and you bid two clubs. (A
2NT response would be a conventional forcing raise.) Partner
rebids two spades, you jump to 3NT and he tries four hearts.
What do you say?
ANSWER: Your partner suggests six spades and four hearts.
Though slam is conceivable, he has promised no extra
strength. Bid four spades to play at the eight-card trump fit.
Partner may hold K J 10 9 6 3, K Q 7 6, K, 5 3.
THIS DAY IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, Aug. 11, the 224th day of 2016. There are
142 days left in the year.
Today’s birthdays: Actress Arlene Dahl is 91. Former Mass.
speaker Sal DiMasi is 71. Singer Eric Carmen is 67. Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak is 66. Wrestler-actor Hulk Hogan is 63.
Singer Joe Jackson is 62. Playwright David Henry Hwang is 59.
Actress Viola Davis is 51. Actress Anna Gunn is 48. Actress
Merritt Wever is 36.
ºIn 1909, steamship Arapahoe became the first ship in North
America to issue an S.O.S. distress signal, off North Carolina.
ºIn 1934, the first federal prisoners arrived at Alcatraz Island
(a former military prison) in San Francisco Bay.
ºIn 1954, formal peace took hold in Indochina after seven years
of fighting between the French and Communist Viet Minh.
ºIn 1965, rioting and looting that claimed 34 lives broke out
in the predominantly black Watts section of Los Angeles.
ºIn 1984, during a voice test for a paid political radio address,
President Reagan joked that he had ‘‘signed legislation that
will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.’’
ºIn 1997, President Clinton made the first use of the line-item
veto, rejecting three items in spending and tax bills. (The Supreme Court later struck down the veto as unconstitutional.)
ºIn 2014, Academy Award-winning actor and comedian Robin Williams, 63, killed himself in Tiburon, Calif.
ºLast year, federal authorities charged that an international
web of hackers and traders had made $100 million on Wall
Street by stealing a look at corporate press releases before they
went out and then trading on that information.
SUDOKU
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
6 3 9 2 5
B PLUS BY TIMOTHY E. PARKER
ACROSS
5 8
2 1
9 1 6 4 3
8
6
2 8 5 9 1
8 7
6 3
KENKEN
©2016 KENKEN PUZZLE.
TRADEMARKNEXTOY,LLC/
DIST. BY UFS, INC.
WWW.KENKEN.COM
0.15"
0.06
3 9 8 6 4
Each row and
column must contain
the numbers 1
through 6 without
repeating. The
numbers within the
outlined boxes, or
cages, must
combine using the
given operation (in
any order) to
produce the target
numbers in the
top-left corners. Fill
in the single-box
cages with the
number in the
top-left corner.
0.15
Moon phases
Sunrise
Sunset
Day length
Moonrise
Fill in the grid so
that every row,
every column, and
every 3x3 box
contains the digits 1
through 9. Puzzle
difficulty levels:
Easy on Monday
and Tuesday, more
difficult on
Wednesday and
Thursday, most
difficult on Friday
and Saturday. Tips
and computer
program at
www.sudoku.com.
53
1964
Yesterday’s low 68°
Martha’s
1 Fence bridger
6 Thai monies
11 “Fawlty Towers”
network
14 Mom or pop of
a mom-and-pop
operation
15 French farewell
16 The whole schmear
17 Beatnik with a beat
19 “The Matrix”
character
20 1965 Alabama
march site
21 Some plums
23 Some cats
27 Work out a
cryptogram
28 Unit of gene activity
29 “Pay to ___” (check
words)
31 Mortise
complement
32 Fussy old hen?
33 It may be slung
36 Joule fragments
37 Certain Disney
Dalmatian
38 British title
39 Scandinavian rug
material
40 Composer
Carmichael
41 Native American
group
42 Rustic shelter
44 “Groaned” partner
45 Go to, as a show
47 Whopper tellers
48 Pediatrician’s
patient
West
North
East
Pass
Pass
1♦
Pass
Pass
2♥
Pass
6♣
All Pass
Opening lead — ♥ 10
49 “When Harry Met
___ ...” (1989)
51 ___ out (dress up)
52 Leaps of faith?
58 “It’s no ___!”
59 All excited
60 Tsar’s edict
61 “As to”
62 Dropped hints
about
63 Lamp denizen
DOWN
1 Open up the
floodgates, so to
speak
2 Tango requirement
3 Motel relative
4 Drumstick,
essentially
5 Shoreline problem
6 They lead to
a walk
7 Famous gardener
8 “Howdy!”
9 Golf gadget
10 It’s for skilled
operators
11 City on the
Penobscot River
12 Suffer a gash
13 Near
18 Ball-___ hammer
22 Blackjack card
23 Schlepper
24 Mimicry
25 It might be a fat cat
in India
26 Ringling ___
27 Carpentry groove
29 Cry in a crowded
hall
30 Touchy or
sensitive
32 Gravy server
34 Brown pigment
35 Ownership
documents
37 Small waterway
38 Dull as dishwater
40 Lady’s clutch
41 Man-shaped
drinking mug
43 Wriggling swimmer
44 Denver’s height
45 Become
troublesome
46 The items yonder
47 Admiral’s command
49 Agitation
50 Home to the Taj
Mahal
53 Mysterious craft
54 Hawaiian
instrument,
shortened
55 One overboard?
56 Letters of inflation
57 Have good eyesight
B8
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
HOROSCOPE
BLISS by Harry Bliss
IF TODAY IS YOUR BIRTHDAY:
Watch out for someone who
promises wealth but offers only
questionable schemes. Think
for yourself and don’t give in
to idle promises and wishful
thinking. Manage your money
carefully. Your numbers are 7,
12, 15, 27, 34, 36, 47.
ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Bring about positive changes.
Meditate, go on a retreat or learn
something new that will help
you move forward in a positive
manner. Don’t let a disagreement
with a colleague slow you.
“Wait, so his first whole sentence was ‘I
don’t want to work, I just want to bang
on the drum all day’?!”
[email protected] by Rob Harrell
MONTY by Jim Meddick
BIG NATE by Lincoln Peirce
POOCH CAFE by Paul Gilligan
FRAZZ by Jef Mallett
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
You’ll be questioned about your
choices. Don’t give in to emotional blackmail, bribery or poor
judgment. Do your best to show
discipline, and focus on selfimprovement.
CANCER (June 21-July 22): You
will gather enough confidence
to sway someone’s opinion and
impress others with your insight
and plans. Take charge of a project and put your knowledge and
skills to use.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Fix your
surroundings or you will be subject to criticism. Consider what
you can learn in order to make
financial gains. You shouldn’t
have to spend a lot.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Speak
up, but be willing to listen to the
feedback you receive. It’s important to compromise if you want
to get things done. An argument
will not solve problems.
BIZARRO by Dan Piraro
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Do your
part or someone will complain.
You may know how to keep
the peace from a distance, but
this time hands-on help will be
required. Don’t waste time trying
to talk your way out of a tough
situation.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Let
your emotions help you get a
glimpse of what’s possible. Compassion and realistic solutions
will help you get what you want
personally and professionally.
Don’t give in to negativity.
DOONESBURY by Garry Trudeau
GET FUZZY by Darby Conley
CURTIS by Ray Billingsley
MISTER BOFFO by Joe Martin
TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Pay
close attention to how others
respond to your requests. Their
reactions will help you decide
what your next move should be.
Refuse to give in to someone’s
unrealistic expectations.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):
Think twice before you make a
move or get into a debate that
governs your reputation or future
prospects. Focus on personal
improvements and changing your
surroundings.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):
Take pride in what you do and
stay away from those who want
to take advantage of you. Taking
care of personal affairs should
help you alleviate any problems.
WHATZIT?
Find the phrase, saying or name in this
arrangement of letters.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Step
up the pace and take measures
to finish what you start. Being
responsible will help you avoid
being tested by others.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Problems with friends and relatives
will send you on a tailspin. Try
to get along with your immediate
family members, but don’t give
in to a situation that you know is
detrimental.
TODAY’S PUZZLE
SOLUTIONS
Crossword
Sudoku
7
2
3
5
8
6
9
4
1
1
9
5
7
4
3
8
6
2
6
4
8
9
1
2
7
5
3
3
5
6
1
2
8
4
7
9
9
1
4
6
7
5
2
3
8
2
8
7
4
3
9
5
1
6
5
7
2
3
9
1
6
8
4
8
6
1
2
5
4
3
9
7
Kenken
WHATZIT?
After all is said and done
DILBERT by Scott Adams
RED & ROVER by Brian Basset
BY EUGENIA LAST
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T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
CORNERED by Baldwin
ZIPPY “Is Misbehavin’” by Bill Griffith
THE PAJAMA DIARIES by Terri Libenson
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE by Lynn Johnston
HEART OF THE CITY by Mark Tatulli
NON SEQUITUR by Wiley
ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
DUSTIN by Steve Kelley & Jeff Parker
PLUGGERS by Gary Brookins
If you spot what appears to be a ninja warrior, a hockey player
or maybe a Ghostbuster, chances are it’s just a plugger
gardener.
PRICKLY CITY by Scott Stantis
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM by Mike Peters
RHYMES WITH ORANGE by Hilary Price
JUMPSTART by Robb Armstrong
ROSE IS ROSE by Pat Brady & Don Wimmer
ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson
B9
B10
T h e
B o s t o n
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
G l o b e
Names
Mark Shanahan & Meredith Goldstein
with Emily Sweeney
Another Mezrich
book to be adapted?
It looks like another Ben Mezrich
book is being made into a movie.
Variety reports that Fox and Temple
Hill have acquired movie rights to
Mezrich’s forthcoming book, “Woolly:
The True Story of the De-Extinction of
One of History’s Most Iconic Creatures.” Slated to be
published by Simon
& Schuster’s Atria
Books in fall 2017,
it tells the story of a
geneticist and a
team of scientists who
try to bring back the woolly mammoth
from extinction, according to Variety.
Of course, this won’t be the first time
Mezrich’s writing will be adapted for
the big screen. His 2009 book “The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of
Facebook, A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius, and Betrayal” was the basis for
the 2010 film “The Social Network,”
and his book “Bringing Down the
House: The Inside Story of Six MIT
Students Who Took Vegas for Millions” was made into 2008’s “21.”
PURITAN & CO.
Chefs planning
Child tribute dinner
Julia Child’s birthday is coming up
(she would have turned 104 on Aug.
15), and a group of chefs is planning a
special celebration of her life at Puritan & Co. at 1166 Cambridge St., Inman Square. Next Wednesday, Puritan
& Co.’s chef-owner Will Gilson (above)
and guest chefs will look to their favorite recipes from Child’s “Mastering the
Art of French Cooking” and offer
guests a multi-course meal inspired by
the beloved culinary icon. Among
those participating will be Nookie
Postal from Commonwealth, Rich
Edes of Temple Bar, Patrick Campbell
of Café ArtScience, Marissa Rossi, the
pastry chef at Puritan & Co., and Meg
Thompson of Townsman. There will
be one seating for the Julia Child tribute dinner —at 7 p.m. — and it’s available by reservation only. For more information, call 617-615-6195 or visit
www.puritancambridge.com.
STACEY HOWARD
Missing kitty causes
a stir in Mashpee
Brady gives some special fans a thrill
Despite the rain, five cancer patients and their families had their day brightened when Tom Brady took time
out from training camp to meet them — including Bernadette McDonnell from Plymouth, who got her football signed by the Pats QB. The Joe Andruzzi Foundation and Patriots Charitable Foundation hosted their
Dream Camp event, which included a chance to watch practice from a VIP tent, throw some footballs on the
field, and enjoy a meet-and-greet with Pats players.
Helberg on being
in tune with Streep
MIKE SPENCER PHOTOGRAPHY
Junilda “Muñeca” Diaz (right)
and her mother, Mayra, with
actor-comedian Sinbad.
Scholarship surprise
at Berklee concert
When Junilda “Muñeca” Diaz went to
the Berklee City Music scholarship
concert Tuesday night, she thought
she was there to play bass and support
her friends. Little did she know, she
was about to receive a four-year, fulltuition scholarship to Berklee College
of Music. After her performance, the
18-year-old Charlestown resident listened as Lee Whitmore, the school’s
vice president of education outreach,
and social entrepreneurship, called
the names of the scholarship recipients, and was surprised to hear an extra one awarded. “I never thought
once it would be me at all,” she said. “I
had no idea.” She screamed and ran up
to the stage. “It was just like ‘The Price
Is Right’,” she said. Diaz was one of
eight students to receive a full scholarship at the event, emceed by actor-comedian Sinbad.
Globe correspondent Sonia Rao
contributed. Read local celebrity news
at www.bostonglobe.com/names.
Names can be reached at [email protected]
globe.com or at 617-929-8253.
Homeland
It was hard enough playing a classically trained pianist in director Stephen Frears’s new film without having to work with one of the most celebrated actresses of all time.
“She’s Meryl Streep. I’m not,” Simon Helberg recalls thinking on the
set of “Florence Foster Jenkins,”
Frears’s biopic about the aspiring opera singer infamous for her poor
rhythm, pitch, and tone.
In the film, which opens Aug. 12,
Streep plays the tone-deaf title character whose partner, played by Hugh
Grant, shields her from the truth regarding her lack of talent. Helberg,
who’s best known for his role on TV’s
“The Big Bang Theory,” plays Cosme
McMoon, the unlucky accompanist
who joins Florence on her journey to
Carnegie Hall.
During a visit to Boston to promote the film, Helberg said he had six
months to dust off his piano skills,
practicing at all hours to prepare for
cacophonous performances that
would be filmed live.
“I had to know the pieces backwards and forwards,” he said. “I had
to know them well to dismantle them,
to shatter them into a million pieces
when Meryl started singing.”
Helberg said he actually admires
Florence for her blissful innocence,
which he likened to the “blind ambition” of his early career.
“I think there’s a freedom in freeing yourself of the baggage of ability,”
the actor said, “because what we’re
looking at then is someone [who’s]
unabashedly herself. It celebrates the
passion of amateurs. That’s inspiring.”
We hear that a near “cat-astrophe”
was averted recently at Willowbend
in Mashpee when a furry guest at
George Regan’s mansion went missing. When the Persian cat named Lotti wandered off and didn’t return for
hours, Regan notified police and rallied friends such as NewsMax executive editor Ken Chandler and Willowbend owner David Southworth to be
on the lookout for the missing kitty.
Mashpee Police Chief Scott Carline
also rallied his officers and they
searched high and low for the cat, to
no avail. “We really didn’t have any
luck,” he said. In a last-ditch effort to
lure Lotti back, they opened the garage and put out a food dish, and
thankfully, that did the trick.
Lotti returned to Regan’s home safe
and was reunited with owner Karyn
Frisch. What could have been a sad
ending turned out to be “very happy,”
Carline said.
Here and there
NICK WALL/PARAMOUNT PICTURES
Meryl Streep and Simon Helberg in “Florence Foster Jenkins.”
The contrast between Florence
and the legendary actress who’s portraying her is stark, as Streep has
been nominated for an Academy
Award 19 times — the most of any actor — and won three. But Helberg
says Streep has Florence’s spirit,
which she shared with others on set.
“Meryl is like a wave that you get
caught up in, and she takes everyone
with her and makes everything better,” he said. “For her, it’s all about
telling the story and making the movie. It’s not about her performance, or
just her. It’s about the whole.”
The two bonded over their characters’ clashes, but a closeness eventually develops between Cosme and Florence.
“Where [Streep] went, I went. If I
fell off, she brought me back up,” Hel-
berg said. “That’s what the CosmeFlorence relationship was like in real
life. It’s what the accompanist’s job is,
to anchor the singer, but you breathe
together.”
Despite the fact that real-life
Cosme died the same year Helberg
was born, the actor said he formed a
connection with the pianist. He drew
inspiration from the little that’s
known about their relationship, and
filled in the gaps with material from
other opera accompanists and screenwriter Nicholas Martin’s words.
The best part about playing a historical figure?
“You grow to love these people as
you play them,” Helberg said. “It’s
more meat to kind of — marinate?
There’s got to be a better comparison.
I shouldn’t have picked poultry.”
The Go Go’s were seen dining at
Saltie Girl on Dartmouth Street on
Tuesday night. We hear that the
band, in town on their Farewell Tour,
dined on lobster. . . . Boston Comic
Con is happening this weekend at
the Seaport World Trade Center. The
three-day comic book convention
kicks off Friday and the celebrity
guest list includes Gillian Anderson
from “The X-Files” and William
Shatner, among many others. Mayor
Marty Walsh is expected to greet
Shatner on Saturday morning and
deliver a proclamation to the legendary “Star Trek’’ actor. . . . Could the
streets of Brockton look like Detroit?
The Enterprise reports that portions
of the city will be used in Kathryn
Bigelow’s film about the 1967 Detroit riots starring John Boyega, Will
Poulter, Ben O’Toole, and Jack Reynor. Several scenes of the yet-to-betitled movie have already been shot
in Dorchester.
‘If you came to our house, you’d think we’d been living in Brazil. Everyone around speaks
Portuguese. Which I wish I’d learned more at this point.’ TOM BRADY, on wife Gisele Bundchen’s love of Brazil
Reunited at Royale, Belly hits all the right notes
By Marc Hirsh
MUSIC REVIEW
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
ROBERT E. KLEIN FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
Belly’s Tanya Donelly (left) and bass player Gail Greenwood at Royale.
When Belly appeared on the early
’90s alternative-rock radar, there was
effectively nothing like it. Plenty of
bands built careers around the same
type of swaying, magical-realist
dream pop that poured out of Tanya
Donelly ’s pen, and there was no
shortage of bent, aggressive guitar
groups. But Belly had the vision to
fuse the two seemingly opposed approaches into a singular voice, and
the band was rewarded with a nearhit in “Feed the Tree,” followed by
near-indifference therafter.
Tuesday’s show at Royale, which
officially kicked off Belly’s first US
tour in over two decades, could have
been a chip-on-the-shoulder attempt
to reclaim whatever lost glory (real or
imagined) it felt was its due. Instead,
this was exactly the sort of casual affair that reunions should be but rarely are, with no real stakes beyond the
musicians remembering that their
band was kind of great once.
The set list seemed to be con-
BELLY
At Royale Boston, Aug. 9 (repeats
Aug. 12)
structed largely without obligation,
with singles and radio favorites
tossed in where they flowed best instead of being withheld for a delayedgratification climax. And there was
an easygoing camaraderie between
the band members; whenever they
spoke to one another or to the audience, their banter looked and sounded genuinely unrehearsed.
The songs were a different matter,
showing a fierce focus that nonetheless breathed in the best possible way.
Although occasionally mixed to a
frustratingly indifferent thump, Gail
Greenwood played her bass with a
muscularity that bordered on athletic, and the crack of Chris Gorman’s
drums kept even a moody dirge like
“Low Red Moon” tight. So too did the
intensity of Donelly’s piercing, astringent voice, which had lost none of its
luster over the years.
Donelly used that intensity well on
the dark, pinging roar of “Dusted,” as
well as a tough, terrific new song with
the apparent working title “Punished,” which she sang as if focusing
on an object of pity and contempt.
B u t B e l l y ’s s o f t n e s s a l s o c a m e
through in the watery swirl of “Stay,”
“The Bees,” and “White Belly,” where
the hint of tremolo in Thomas Gorman’s guitar added a vaguely unsettling air.
Fusing both sides of its personality
together, the band was never better
than on “Red,” whose surrealistic lastdance verses gave way to an aggressive chorus consisting of a single
chord hit over and over again with a
disconcerting lack of signposts suggesting where to come back in. Belly
held it together without an inch of
slippage.
Marc Hirsh can be reached at
[email protected]
Business
C
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, AU G US T 1 1 , 2 01 6 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / B US I N E S S
Apple falls into a
Andrew
Square
project
nears OK
PRODUCT
RUT
BRA to hear about
housing, retail plan
Innovation is slowing
dramatically, not only
at the iPhone and Mac
maker, but across the
consumer tech world
By Tim Logan
GLOBE STAFF
From the piers of the Seaport to the
blocks around the Broadway T station,
big development has transformed
swaths of South Boston over the past
10 years.
Now it’s Andrew Square’s turn.
A 5-acre complex of apartments
and condominiums between Old Colony and Dorchester avenues is set for a
hearing, and likely approval, by the
Boston Redevelopment Authority on
Thursday. At 656 units, it would be
one of the largest new housing developments in the city. And a wave of big
projects soon could follow as the BRA
rezones Dorchester Avenue.
Dubbed Washington Village, the
project would turn a sprawling block
of low-slung laundries and auto shops
into a nine-building complex of condo
and apartment buildings reaching as
high as 21 stories. They would be set
around an open plaza and restaurants,
retail, and — the developer hopes — a
grocery store.
PRELLWITZ CHILINSKI ASSOCIATES
The development would be a ninebuilding complex of condo and
apartment buildings.
It’s a bid to give Andrew Square the
combination of housing and neighborhood amenities it lacks today, developer David Pogorelc said. And it’s a
chance to launch large-scale development in a place that has long been
overlooked.
“This area hasn’t seen the same level of interest as some other parts of
South Boston,” Pogorelc said. “It has
been kind of neglected.”
That could soon change.
Andrew Square is at the heart of a
planning study the BRA has been
working on for a year along Dorchester
Avenue in South Boston. The agency
issued a draft version in June that
would rezone now-industrial blocks
north of Andrew for residential and
commercial buildings as high as 300
feet. It could bring 6,000 to 8,000 new
units of housing along the 144-acre
corridor over the next 20 years. A final
version of the study is expected later
this year, a BRA spokesman said.
Already, developers are circling.
Two smaller condo and apartment
buildings are under construction on
Hiawatha Bray
TECH LAB
Y
ou haven’t usually heard “same
old, same old” applied to Apple
— until recently. Get used to it.
If the rumors are right,
Apple will unveil a new iPhone
next month that will differ little from the
one in my shirt pocket. An improved camera and the elimination of the old-school
headphone jack are about all we can look
forward to.
Still, iPhone loyalists will have at least a
little incentive to line up outside the Apple
store. Not so the millions who use Apple’s
venerable line of Mac personal computers.
Shop for one of these, and your choices are
mostly the same as they were a year or
more ago.
Certainly the popular Retina MacBook
Pro is showing its age, having gone without
an update for well over a year. But it’s
much worse for other models. Apple’s lowcost Mac Mini hasn’t been updated since
2014. Then there’s the Mac Pro, Apple’s
top-of-the-line machine for movie editors
and graphic artists. The Mac Pro was stateof-the-art when it was released over 2½
years ago, and it had a
price tag to match:
$4,000. Yet today, Apple’s
still selling the same machine, at the same price.
That would be commercial
suicide in the Windows PC world.
Raza Haider, executive director of
commercial computing at Dell Inc., said
his company upgrades pretty much every
model every year. “We always want to
make sure that our users are getting the
latest and greatest performance,” Haider
told me.
Dell has no choice. If it rested on its laurels the way Apple has done, a horde of rival Windows PC makers would happily
take up the slack. After all, Windows machines are utterly interchangeable. Don’t
like the features on the latest Dell? Buy an
HP or a Lenovo instead. Your software
won’t care which brand of computer it
runs on, so get the hottest one you can
afford.
It’s different with Apple.
TECH LAB, Page C8
GLOBE STAFF PHOTO ILLUSTRATION
Presidential election maroons local executives
Trump
prompts
some GOP
backers
to look
elsewhere
DOT AVE., Page C4
By Beth Healy
GLOBE STAFF
Former Republican lieutenant governor
Kerry Healey says she can’t vote for Donald
Trump.
Putnam Investments chief executive
Robert Reynolds, a loyal GOP backer, said
he is “focused on the House and Senate
campaigns.”
And private equity veteran Scott Sperling, a major Hillary Clinton fund-raiser in
2008 and Mitt Romney supporter in 2012,
has not yet embraced a candidate.
“I just don’t see myself being there at this
RIO
Bold Types
DOES OLYMPIC FLAME
STILL BURN IN BOSTON?
point for either candidate,’’ said Sperling,
co-president of Thomas H. Lee Partners in
Boston.
For many Republican-leaning business
executives in Massachusetts, known in the
past for vocal political positions and deep
pockets, this is a tortured election season
that has them sitting on the sidelines.
“I don’t worry about Donald Trump
launching a nuclear missile or wreaking
havoc for Wall Street,’’ Sperling said. But he
does worry about the Republican nominee’s
off-the-cuff remarks.
“It’s not my style, and I think it’s one of
After what happened last year, you’d think
it would be too hard for Marty Walsh to watch
the Summer Olympics.
Actually, the mayor catches as much as he
can on a 52-inch-screen TV at his Dorchester
home. He spent several hours over the weekend watching women’s soccer, men’s basketball, and all kinds of swimming.
“I love watching the Olympics,” Walsh said.
Of course, he would have been in Rio had
Boston’s bid for the 2024 Summer Games not
collapsed last July. Representatives of potential
host cities typically attend the
competition to woo members of the International
Olympic Committee.
Instead of Walsh, LA
Mayor Eric Garcetti is in
Brazil.
“It’s fine,” Walsh said
of losing the bid. While
he is rooting for
LA, it will be
tough if an
American city
gets the nod.
“I will think
about what
the things that makes him someone that
lots of people can’t support,” said Sperling,
who is no fan of the Obama administration’s
financial regulations, which he believes
Clinton will continue.
It’s a microcosm of the dilemma Republicans around the country have faced: deciding what to do about Trump.
Nationally, Republican figures including
former Treasury secretary Henry Paulson
and Hewlett-Packard executive Meg Whitman have shifted their support to Clinton in
the wake of some of Trump’s controversies.
BUSINESS VOTE, Page C6
could have been,” he said.
Steve Pagliuca, the former chairman of
Boston 2024, is not only watching the Olympics, but he will be down in Rio next week to
make the case for LA.
Pagliuca, a Bain Capital honcho who is also
co-owner of the Celtics, in June joined the
board of Los Angeles 2024, the group that is
trying to bring the Summer Games to LA.
In addition to basketball, Pagliuca likes to
watch tennis and beach volleyball. While in
Rio, he plans to meet up with the US Olympic
Committee and the LA 2024 team.
“They have a great plan in LA and great
support from population and government,”
Pagliuca wrote in an e-mail. “I think we have
real shot for LA to win it in 2024. Fingers
crossed.”
As for former Boston 2024 CEO Rich Davey, he isn’t watching much Olympic coverage.
“Funny, I haven’t been able to,” Davey
wrote in an e-mail. “I have DirecTV in Boston,
and they seem to be in a fight with NBC!”
SHIRLEY LEUNG
From Big Development to Big Soda,
BRA’s Nick Martin moves on C4
Marty Walsh
(left) still loves
watching the
Olympics, even
if it’s from
home; Steve
Pagliuca (right)
is in Rio de
Janeiro
representing
the Los Angeles
bid committee;
and Rich Davey
(center) is in a
DirecTV-NBC
Olympic
blackout.
C2
Business
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
TALKING POINTS
HEALTH CARE
PRESS GANEY
TO GO PRIVATE
FANTASY SPORTS
BAKER SIGNS BILL
CODIFYING RULES
Agenda
Press Ganey Holdings Inc., a health care research and consulting firm based in Wakefield, is
going private in a $2.35 billion deal. The company said it has entered into an agreement to
be acquired by the global private equity group EQT. Shareholders will receive $40.50 in
cash per share, a 20 percent premium on the stock’s average price this year. Press Ganey’s
board unanimously approved the deal, which is expected to be completed in the fourth
quarter of 2016. Chief executive Patrick Ryan said the transaction will allow Press Ganey to
accelerate spending on acquisitions and product development. “I look forward to partnering with [EQT] as we develop new solutions to advance patient-centered care in the United
States and internationalize the business in the next phase of our development,” Ryan said in
a statement Tuesday. The deal comes about a year after the company went public on the
New York Stock Exchange. — PRIYANKA DAYAL MCCLUSKEY
Regulations governing daily fantasy sports
issued by Democratic Attorney General
Maura Healey earlier this year have been
written into Massachusetts law. Republican
Governor Charlie Baker signed a bill
Wednesday codifying the rules, which include a minimum age of 21 for participating
in the online contests. Baker said giving the
regulations the force of law is good for the
state’s burgeoning ‘‘innovation economy’’ as
well as the fast-growing fantasy sports industry. Baker said it was important to establish guidelines under which companies like Boston-based DraftKings and New York-based FanDuel can operate. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
ECONOMIC DATA
US mortgage rates
New numbers for the average 30-year,
fixed-rate mortgage will be released
Thursday. Last week, Freddie Mac
reported the average 30-year, fixed-rate
mortgage declined to 3.43 percent from
3.48 percent the week before.
HEDGE FUNDS
WORLD’S BIGGEST
HEDGE RESOLVES
HARASSMENT CLAIM
The world’s biggest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, said it had resolved a high-profile
harassment claim filed against it by an employee who recently left the firm. Christopher
Tarui, 34, who worked as an adviser to several large institutional investors in Bridgewater,
filed his harassment complaint in January and had been on paid leave since the beginning
of the year. He took a job this week as a director with Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co., the
large private equity firm, a move it confirmed on Wednesday. Tarui also is dropping any
claims he has against Bridgewater, and the hedge fund agreed to “waive employee restrictions,” allowing him to move to his new job, a Bridgewater spokesman said Wednesday. The
spokesman for Bridgewater added that Tarui “did not receive any payment of compensation
in connection with his decision to withdraw his claims.” Douglas Wigdor, a lawyer for Tarui,
declined to comment. In early January, Tarui filed a sexual harassment complaint with the
Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, in which he claimed his
male supervisor had repeatedly propositioned him for sex. — NEW YORK TIMES
EVENT
FAST FOOD
WENDY’S LATEST
CHAIN TO REPORT
WEAK EARNINGS
Wendy’s is the latest major fast-food chain to report weaker-than-expected sales
growth, with the hamburger company saying people aren’t dining out as much
because it has gotten even cheaper to eat at home. The chain known for its
Frosty shakes and square burgers said Wednesday that sales edged up 0.4 percent at North American restaurants open at least 15 months in the second
quarter. Analysts polled by FactSet forecast a 2.4 percent increase. The results
from Wendy’s follow disappointing sales from other chains including McDonald’s, Burger King, Dunkin’ Donuts, and Starbucks. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Networking Now
Business professionals looking for a job,
new to a job, and looking for a support
network of individuals in a similar
situation are invited to a Networking Now
Boston event. Refreshments will be
served. Thursday, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
Community Work Services, 174 Portland
St., fourth floor, Boston. Free.
JOBS
MORE OPENINGS,
HIRINGS IN JUNE
RIDE-HAILING
UBER FILES
COMPLAINT AGAINST
HUNGARIAN
RESTRICTIONS
US employers advertised more openings and hired more people in June, adding to evidence
that the job market has rebounded from a brief soft patch in the spring. The number of job
openings rose a modest 2 percent to 5.6 million in June from 5.5 million in May, the Labor
Department said Wednesday. Still, that figure remains below the 5.8 million openings
advertised in April, the highest on records going back 16 years. Hiring increased 1.7
percent in June to 5.1 million, a solid level but below a recent peak of 5.5 million in
February. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ride-hailing company Uber filed a
complaint on Wednesday with the
European Commission against
Hungary, where legislation came into
force in July practically banning the
service. Rob Khazzam, Uber’s general
manager for Central Europe, said the
company’s aim was to return the
service to Budapest, where it began
operations in late 2014. Uber had
160,000 users and 1,200 drivers in
Hungary. Legislation approved by
parliament in June and enforced from July 24 allows authorities to fine Uber and similar
services, block their websites and apps, ban the cars of drivers for up to three years, and
suspend their licenses for six months. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
CLASS
Back to school
General Assembly Boston is having an
introductory data science class for people
who want to know what it is and why it
matters. Attendees will explore and
visualize data and learn how data
scientists can help solve a variety of
problems for companies. Thursday, 7:30
PHARMACEUTICALS
ELI LILLY DRUG FOR
BREAST CANCER FAILS
TO MEET EFFICACY
CRITERIA IN TRIAL
Eli Lilly & Co. fell in New York trading after a breast cancer treatment failed to meet interim
efficacy criteria in a late-stage trial, possibly delaying its entry to market. The drugmaker
was evaluating the treatment of advanced breast cancer with its abemaciclib drug, given in
combination with another medicine, fulvestrant. An independent panel recommended continuing the study without modification, and final results are expected in the first half of
next year, Indianapolis-based Lilly said in a statement. The trial involves 669 patients
whose disease had progressed following multiple treatments. — BLOOMBERG NEWS
to 9:30 p.m., General Assembly Boston,
51 Melcher St., Boston. $35.
WORKSHOP
Software bootcamp
Entrepreneurs in the early stages of
developing a software product, or
professionals interested in doing software
RETAIL
RALPH LAUREN LOSES
MONEY, BUT NOT AS
MUCH AS EXPECTED
Ralph Lauren swung to a first-quarter loss as it spends
heavily to turn itself around, but the damage was not as
bad as many had expected and its shares rose faster
than any other Wednesday on the Standard & Poor’s
500. Just months after taking over as CEO for founder
Ralph Lauren late last year, Stefan Larsson (far left, with
Lauren) initiated significant changes. He is the first person other than Lauren to hold the title. In addition to
slashing costs to right the company’s balance sheet, Larsson tightened its focus on the brands that made Ralph
Lauren known worldwide. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
product management for a startup, are
encouraged to attend this bootcamp.
Attendees will learn what it’s like to work
on a product development team and how
to use wireframes and diagrams to test
and convey ideas. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., General Assembly Boston, 51
Melcher St., Boston. $120.
EVENT
Startup showcase
Come out to Boston New Technology’s
BROADBAND
FEDERAL APPEALS
COURT OVERTURNS
FCC RULE ON
BROADBAND
EXPANSION
A federal appeals court has overturned a Federal Communications Commission ruling allowing city-owned broadband services to expand into areas overlooked by commercial providers. The decision issued Wednesday comes as part of a dispute between the FCC and two
states, Tennessee and North Carolina, about expanding superfast internet service in their
respective cities of Chattanooga and Wilson to surrounding areas. Both states had passed
laws preventing such expansion. The FCC last year voted 3-2 to override those laws. The
states then asked the US Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit to review the FCC’s ruling. The
appeals court said that the FCC’s order pre-empted the state laws and ‘‘the allocation of
power between a state and its subdivisions,’’ but the FCC does not have the authority in federal law to do so. — ASSOCIATED PRESS
August Startup Showcase and hear from
seven tech product companies. The event
includes presentations, Q&A sessions,
and networking with the Cambridge
startup community. Monday, 6 to 9 p.m.,
Akamai Technologies, 150 Broadway,
Cambridge. Free.
Events of note? E-mail us at
[email protected]
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
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C3
Valeant reportedly under criminal investigation
By Caroline Chen
BLOOMBERG NEWS
SAN FRANCISCO — Valeant
Pharmaceuticals International is
the subject of a criminal probe by
federal prosecutors, who are investigating whether the drugmaker defrauded insurers by hiding its
ties to a mail-order pharmacy, the
Wall Street Journal reported.
The US attorney’s office in New
York is pursuing an unusual legal
theory, previously unreported,
that Valeant and the closely linked
mail-order-pharmacy, Philidor Rx
Services, allegedly defrauded in-
surers by hiding their close relationship, the Journal said, citing
unidentified people familiar with
the matter.
“We cannot comment on rumors about third party investigations, and cannot comment on or
speculate about the possible
course of any investigation,”
Valeant spokeswoman Laurie Little said. “Valeant has been cooperating and continues to cooperate
with the ongoing Southern District of New York investigation.”
Prosecutors are looking into
whether Philidor made false state-
Valeant’s
relationship with
Philidor, a
specialty
pharmacy,
was closer
than
usual.
ments to insurers about its ties to
Valeant, the Wall Street Journal
said.
Philidor, a specialty pharmacy
now defunct, filled prescriptions
for Valeant dermatology drugs
such as toenail fungus treatment
Jublia.
Prosecutors are investigating
whether insurers thought Philidor
was neutral rather than in the service of Valeant, the Journal reported.
Valeant came under scrutiny
last year over issues including its
business practices, particularly its
relationship with Philidor, which
was helping boost drug sales. The
drugmaker severed its ties with
Philidor in October, following reports about tactics the mail-order
pharmacy allegedly used to gain
more insurance reimbursements
for Valeant medicines.
They included submitting
claims using other pharmacies’
identification numbers and altering codes on some doctors’ prescriptions.
Specialty pharmacies are common in the drug industry, where
they fill prescriptions typically for
complex drugs, such as those that
require cold storage. Valeant’s relationship with Philidor was closer than usual. Valeant had paid
$100 million for an option to buy
Philidor for nothing any time in
the next 10 years, and consolidated Philidor’s financials into its
own.
Valeant has disclosed in filings
that it’s the subject of investigations by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the US
Attorney’s offices in Massachusetts and New York, among others.
Third day of woes
for Delta fliers
The system the airline uses
to check in and board passengers as well as dispatch its
planes is still slow, Gil West,
Delta’s chief operating officer
said Tuesday.
The problems started early
Monday when, according to a
statement by West, critical
piece of equipment failed at
the airline’s headquarters. It
caused a loss of power and key
systems and equipment did
not switch over to backups as
designed.
Delta extended a travelwaiver policy to help stranded
passengers rearrange their
travel plans. It offered refunds
and $200 in travel vouchers to
people whose flights were canceled or delayed at least three
hours.
Airlines have been packing
more people in each plane, so
when a major carrier has a
technology crash it’s harder to
find seats for the waylaid. Last
month, the average Delta flight
was 87 percent full.
By Scott Mayerowitz
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NICOLE BENGIVENO/NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Delta fliers
faced delays, cancellations,
and more headaches Wednesday as the Atlanta-based airline struggled with its computer systems for the third
straight day.
More than 300 flights were
canceled by the afternoon, in
addition to the 800 scrapped
Tuesday and 1,000 canceled
Monday. Hundreds of other
flights were delayed Wednesday.
Delta Air Lines said in a
statement during the morning
that it planned to resume ‘‘normal operations’’ by Wednesday
afternoon but by 2 p.m. had
yet to do so. Hundreds of thousands of passengers have been
stranded overnight throughout the ordeal, many spending
the night in airports around
the globe. Others were put up
in hotels by Delta, including
2,300 in Atlanta alone Tuesday
night.
A customer went through a self-checkout display for fruit and vegetables at a grocery store in East Meadow, N.Y.
Shoplifting common at self-serve checkouts
By Christopher Mele
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — Self-service
checkout technology may offer convenience and speed,
but it also helps turn law-abiding shoppers into petty
thieves by giving them “readymade excuses” to take merchandise without paying, two
criminologists say.
In a study of retailers in the
United States, Britain, and
other European countries,
professor Adrian Beck and
Matt Hopkins of the University of Leicester in England said
the use of self-service lanes
and smartphone apps to make
purchases generated a loss
rate of nearly 4 percent, more
than double the average.
Given that the profit margin among European grocers
is 3 percent, the technology is
practically a nonprofit venture, according to the study,
which was released this
month.
The scanning technology,
w h i c h g r e w i n p o p u l a r i ty
about 10 years ago, relies
largely on the honor system.
Instead of having a cashier
ring up and bag a purchase,
the shopper is solely responsible for completing the transaction. That lack of human intervention, however, reduces
the perception of risk and
could make shoplifting more
common, the report said.
Studies have been inconclusive about whether the systems actually promote more
pilfering, but researchers believe they are a gateway for
shoppers to act in ways they
ordinarily would not.
“Retailers could find themselves accused of making theft
so easy that some customers
who would normally — and
happily — pay are tempted to
commit crime, especially
when they feel ‘justified’ in doing it,” the researchers said in
a statement.
The study examined nearly
12 million shopping trips
from four retailers in Britain,
two in the United States, and
one each in Belgium and the
Netherlands between December 2013 and February 2015.
One million shopping trips
were audited in detail,
amounting to 6 million items
checked. Nearly 850,000 were
found not to have been
scanned, the report said, making up 4 percent of the total
value of the purchases. Proving intent — de termining
whether it was deliberate or
an oversight — and deciding
whether to press charges can
be “a legal and customer rela-
tions minefield,” the report
noted.
The National Retail Security Survey by the National Retail Federation last year reported losses of $44 billion
due to shoplifting, employee
theft, fraud, and errors. About
$17 billion of that was connected to shoplifting.
Retailers wrestle with the
question of whether the potential losses outweigh the
benefits, which include reduced personnel expenses. Lisa LaBruno, the senior vice
president for retail operations
at the Retail Industry Leaders
Association, said in an e-mail
that retailers “continue to test
and identify effective methods
for mitigating the risks.”
In t h e s t a t e m e n t , B e c k
said: “Both loved and loathed
by consumers, with the phrase
‘unexpected item in the bagging area’ striking dread into
many a shopper, self-scan
technologies are growing in
use and likely to become even
more prominent.”
Store employees assigned
to self-service lanes are often
monitoring too many at once
t o b e e ff e c t i v e , s a i d R e a d
Hayes, a research scientist at
the University of Florida and
the director of the Loss Prevention Research Council.
Ha y e s s a i d t h e c o u n c i l
works with 40 US retailers, including department and bigbox stores and supermarkets,
and two have discontinued
the self-service systems, citing
a lack of use or high rate of
theft.
“Public view monitors”
perched either above or at eye
level at the self-service machines can help combat theft,
Hayes said. Shoppers appear
on the screen, with a sign noting they are being watched.
Random controlled trials have
found increased sales in lanes
with the monitors, meaning
there were fewer deliberate or
careless losses, Hayes said.
In a behavior known as
“neutralizing your guilt ,”
shoppers may tell themselves
that the store is overpriced, so
taking an item without scanning is acceptable; or they
might blame faulty technology, problems with product bar
codes, or claim a lack of technical know-how, the report
said.
The study quoted one respondent as saying that people who do not normally steal
may come to realize that
“when I buy 20, I can get five
for free.”
“Maybe I’ll continue to do
that,” the person said.
Viacom battle outcome
may affect credit rating
By Lucas Shaw
BLOOMBERG NEWS
LOS ANGELES — Viacom
Inc. needs to slash its dividend
and improve its poor performance to avoid a cut to its credit rating, Moody’s Investors Service said, changing its outlook
to negative from stable.
Viacom, owner of MTV and
Comedy Central, was spared an
immediate downgrade of its
Baa2 rating during the ongoing
dispute over control of the company, Moody’s said Tuesday in a
statement. A court fight between controlling shareholder
Sumner Redstone and chief executive Philippe Dauman could
l e a d t o a s h i f t i n s t rat e g y,
Moody’s said.
Credit-rating companies are
reexamining Viacom as it combats dual crises: a flagging busi-
ness and a fight for control.
Fitch downgraded Viacom last
week. The company paid out
more than $600 million in dividends in the past year and has
net debt of $12.1 billion, according to data compiled by
Bloomberg. Moody’s calculates
Viacom’s debt at about 4.1
times earnings before interest,
tax, depreciation, and amortization, and says the company
needs to reduce that ratio below
3.25 in the next 18 months.
Viacom, based in New York,
declined to comment.
The stock has declined 47
percent over the past two years
as the company has suffered
steep declines in viewership of
its US cable networks. The
shares fell 1.3 percent Wednesday, to $41.74. Advertisers have
followed young viewers from
JOHN SPINK/ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
Yu You Yang of Beijing napped while waiting at a Delta
counter Wednesday at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.
IN MEMORIAM
Analysis Group Celebrates
the Legacy of
Karl “Chip” Case
Professor of Economics Emeritus
Wellesley College
1946 – 2016
REUTERS/FILE
Controlling shareholder Sumner Redstone (left) and chief
executive Philippe Dauman are fighting in court.
Viacom’s channels to YouTube
and Facebook, leading to eight
straight quarters of shrinking
domestic advertising sales.
“Lack of signs of improvement in operating momentum,
further deterioration in credit
metrics and importantly, continuation of ill afforded dividend payments in the face of diminishing financial strength,
together are cause for the negative outlook,” Moody’s said.
Dauman has attempted to
improve the company’s liquidity by selling a stake in Paramount Pictures. Representatives of Redstone say he strongly opposes any sale.
If Dauman prevails in court,
Moody’s said, Viacom will have
sufficient liquidity from the sale
proceeds and dividend reduction to reduce debt and bring
leverage to a level consistent
with its current rating.
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Business
Health Care
Mass. General forging ties with N.H. hospital
Will team up with Catholic Medical to offer specialty services
By Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
GLOBE STAFF
Massachusetts General Hospital is
planning a new clinical partnership
with Catholic Medical Center in Manchester, N.H, its second move into
the Granite State in recent months.
Mass. General, the largest
teaching hospital in New England,
and Catholic Medical said they will
work together to increase access to
specialized services for residents of
Southern New Hampshire. Doctors
from both hospitals will collaborate
o n h e a r t s u r g e r y, s t r o k e c a r e ,
substance abuse treatment, and
health services for veterans.
Leaders of both hospitals said it
makes sense to team up because
they’re located just about an hour
apart. Physicians from Mass. General
may train physicians in New
Ha m p s h i r e a n d t r a v e l t h e r e t o
provide certain services under the
affiliation. Mass. General also could
see a bump in referrals from Catholic
Medical, a 330-bed hospital, as part
of the deal.
“New Hampshire is not that far,”
said Dr. Peter Slavin, president of
Mass. General. “It’s much closer to
Boston than many parts of Massachusetts. It has a large and growing
population, so it’s an important area
for us to serve.”
Dr. Louis Fink, executive medical
director of the heart and vascular
center at Catholic Medical, said in a
statement that it will be especially
helpful to collaborate on treatments
for patients with “uncommon or exceptionally complex” conditions.
Manchester’s other major medical
center, Elliot Hospital, is also looking
to link up with a larger health
system. Earlier this year, Elliot hired
a firm to help it explore potential
partnerships, a process that drew
interest from Lahey Health of
Burlington and others. Elliot
ultimately decided to discuss an
affiliation with DartmouthHitchcock of Lebanon, N.H.
Mass. General, meanwhile, is also
planning to acquire WentworthDouglass Hospital in Dover, N.H.,
pending regulatory approvals.
That would be the first out-ofstate acquisition for Mass. General
and its parent company, Partners
HealthCare, which is Massachusetts’
dominant health care system.
Partners faced opposition last year
when it tried to acquire three Massachusetts hospitals. It eventually
dropped those deals, and Partners’
chief executive, Dr. David Torchiana,
said the health system would look to
grow in other states and other countries.
Priyanka Dayal McCluskey
can be reached at
[email protected]
Follow her on Twitter
@priyanka_dayal.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF/FILE 2015
Dr. Peter Slavin, president of Mass. General, says that New Hampshire’s
growing population means “it’s an important area for us to serve.”
Restaurants
Health violations shutter Sweetgreen shop
Back Bay restaurant faces reinspection before reopening
B o s t o n
G l o b e
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Andrew
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project
nears OK
DOT AVE.
Continued from Page C1
Dorchester Avenue, and builders are
locking up larger sites. Last month, a
machine shop sitting on one-third of
an acre sold for $3 million, according
to Suffolk County property records.
Pogorelc owns a 6-acre empty lot just
north of the T station, though he says
he has no plans there yet.
His plans at Washington Village —
especially the restaurants and new retail — are welcome news to Dennis
O’Connor, who has lived on nearby
Ward Street for a decade. The neighborhood has drawn a lot of new residents in recent years, he said, but
there aren’t many places to go or
things to do.
“If you want a pizza, there’s plenty
of places. If you need a liquor store,
we’ve got those,” O’Connor said. “But
it’s lacking places to sit down and eat.
It’s lacking a supermarket.”
Big new development can bring
those sorts of things, though O’Connor
worries the bigger re-zoning, if not
handled wisely, could lead to Andrew
Square becoming overbuilt.
“You only get one shot at this,”
O’Connor said. “We don’t want to
push developers away, but we want to
make sure we get it right.”
And some say the pace of development is already too fast.
In an e-mail to city officials this
week, South Boston resident Debbie
O’Toole argued the neighborhood has
seen too much building as it is.
“South Boston has endured too
much development without regard to
the negative effects to residents and
community,” she wrote. “We can’t
park. We can’t afford to rent or buy a
place to call home.”
Pogorelc said he’s hoping Washington Village will address that last part,
at least.
He has agreed to set aside 17 percent of units at prices that are affordable to lower- and middle-income residents, and is aiming the rest at a middle-class clientele that has largely been
left out of the current building boom,
something he can do, in part, because
of the scale of the project. He’s also
planning to sell a majority of units —
408 — as condos, a shift from the rental construction that has characterized
many big projects of late.
“We like the stability of homeownership,” he said. “It’s going to be hugely successful. There’s going to be a lot
of happy people pushing baby carriages in this neighborhood in a few
years.”
Tim Logan can be reached at
[email protected] Follow him on
Twitter at @bytimlogan.
By Megan Woolhouse
GLOBE STAFF
City health inspectors have temporarily shuttered an upscale salad
shop in the Back Bay after it racked
up a host of health violations and a
customer reported feeling ill.
Salad chain Sweetgreen at 659
Boylston St. initially failed a city inspection in June when it was cited for
issues related to improper sanitation,
keeping food at the wrong temperature, standing water on the floor, and
other risks that could lead to foodborne illness, according to inspection
records.
On Monday, an unidentified customer reported to the city that she
had experienced diarrhea and fatigue
for more than two days after eating a
Sweetgreen spicy sabzi salad, a dish
made with sprouts, baby greens,
chicken, and quinoa, according to the
records.
The illness, though not verified by
the health department, prompted a
reinspection on Tuesday. When additional violations were found, the city
temporarily suspended the restaurant’s operating permit. The most recent violations included:
R Gloves continuously worn by employees preparing ready-to-eat foods.
R Containers that were in disrepair or cracked.
R “Built up soils on ceiling and attached fixtures” in the kitchen.
T he L os Angeles-based chain
issued a statement Wednesday that it
had made changes to its operations,
including giving an employee at the
Back Bay restaurant a role focused on
food safety and “best-in-class
culinary practices.”
It was unclear whether such
practices would apply to all
restaurants in the chain.
“A t S w e e t g r e e n , w e h av e a n d
maintain strict standard operating
Bold Types
The upscale salad chain’s other
Boston stores were not affected by
the action in the Back Bay.
procedures to run our stores,” president Karen Kelley said in the statement. “Each and every team member
is thoroughly trained in these measures.”
She said the company was working to get the restaurant reopened “as
soon as humanly possible.” It remained unclear when that would be.
City officials said the Back Bay restaurant must be reinspected again
before it can reopen.
Lisa Timberlake, a spokeswoman
for Boston Inspectional Services, said
the company must also work with a
consultant for the next three months
and submit weekly reports on its
corrective actions as part of an
improvement plan.
“We’ve given them these guidelines,” she said. “Hopefully this will
help them get back on track and stay
on track.”
Sweetgreen operates five locations
in Boston. None of the others has
been closed.
Megan Woolhouse can be reached at
[email protected] Follow
her on Twitter @megwoolhouse.
Nick Martin’s voice
going silent at the BRA
The Boston Redevelopment Authority is in the market
for a new voice.
After two-and-a-half years on the ninth floor of City Hall,
BRA spokesman Nick Martin (right) is leaving the
development agency at the end of this month, for a new job
running public affairs for Coca-Cola in New England.
A veteran of Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s final term,
Martin was spokesman for the Boston Public Health
Commission before jumping to the BRA under Mayor
Martin J. Walsh and BRA director Brian Golden.
Approachable and unflappable, Martin played a key role in
Walsh’s push to open up the often-opaque agency,
managing communications around two critical audits, a
controversial urban renewal extension and an epic building
boom.
But after eight-plus years in city government, Martin
said, he wanted some private-sector experience. Coca-Cola
offered a great opportunity (he’ll succeed, and work with,
another former Menino hand, Jennifer Cruikshank.) So he’s
moving on. And now Martin’s job could be yours.
Last week, the BRA advertised an opening for a director
of communications, with a salary range of $100,000 to
$125,000 and the usual Boston residency requirement.
Whoever gets it will likely have a big hand in the
agency’s rebranding — the so-called nextBRA project that
design firm Continuum is working on this summer. And in
the city’s ongoing Imagine Boston 2030 planning effort.
Of course, they’ll be on the receiving end of a lot of
phone calls from reporters. So while among the BRA’s job
requirements is “media relations experience,” we at Bold
Types would suggest that they might add “media relations
enthusiasm” to the list. Martin had it. And the BRA’s new
spokesperson will need some too. — TIM LOGAN
CHRIS MORRIS FO
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G l o b e
Business
C5
STAT
Brains’ gene activity,
shown in living color
Neuroimaging might reveal
genetic role in mental health
By Sharon Begley
STAT
DAVID L. RYAN/GLOBE STAFF
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M
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DORCHESTER AVE.
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Joe Moakley
Park
93
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SOURCE: Boston Redevelopment Authority
GLOBE STAFF
PRELLWITZ CHILINSKI ASSOCIATES
A decade of change for
women-led businesses
When Aileen Gorman started ranking the “Top 100” women-led businesses in the state 15 years ago, few, if
any, on the list cleared $10 million in
annual revenue.
Now that’s almost the bare minimum for entry.
It’s one of Gorman’s points of pride
as she prepares to retire from The
Commonwealth Institute after nearly
two decades as its executive director:
calling attention to such a wide range
of businesses and the women who run
them.
The nonprofit was launched by Lois Silverman in 1997, as a way to encourage female entrepreneurs in the
area. The institute became an important force for networking, mentorship,
and training opportunities for women.
Gorman joined soon after its inception, and was instrumental in launching the “Top 100” list. Annual revenue
is just one piece. The group also looks
at workforce size, innovation, and
management diversity. (PR firm Weber Shandwick, whose New England
operations are led by Micho Spring,
topped the list last year.)
“Women-led businesses are just as
effective as men,” Gorman said. “We
don’t have as many, but they’re just as
effective.”
She recently turned 70, and is looking forward to spending more time on
travel and painting. She’ll retire later
this year, to give the institute time to
hire a replacement.
“You kind of reach a point where
you realize, ‘I think it’s time for new
ideas, somebody who gets more excited about things like tweeting and
blogging, and things like that,’ ” Gorman said. — JON CHESTO
Overhead: not always
a bad thing
Dan Pallotta is taking his pro-overhead crusade international.
The founder of Topsfield-based
Charity Defense Council has railed for
years against the conventional wisdom that nonprofits should spend little on overhead costs like fund-raising.
He argues the opposite: that if nonprofits spent more on overhead, they
could do more charitable work, since
raising more money would result in
more resources.
Now he’s bringing that message to
Canada, where he’s launching a digital
ad campaign that includes head shots
of employees of Furniture Bank — a
Toronto charity that provides used furniture to families in need — declaring,
“I’m overhead.” They also describe the
work they do, like marketing, which is
classified as an overhead expense.
“Many people in the general public
see overhead as a bad, wasteful thing,”
said council spokesman Jason Lynch,
“but if overhead is used in the right
way it can spur a lot of growth . . . and
big social change is not going to happen unless you invest in things that
will help you grow.”
The campaign will also feature
Bruce MacDonald, CEO of Torontobased Imagine Canada, which promotes the charitable sector, discussing
social impact.
Also: Lynch says Charity Defense
Council will soon have a Boston presence at Impact Hub, a collaborative
working space on Milk Street.
— SACHA PFEIFFER
The developers’
plan would
turn a
sprawling block
(above, the
view from
Tuckerman
Street) of
laundries and
auto shops into
a development
with 656 units
of housing. The
housing would
be set around
restaurants,
retail, and —
the developer
hopes — a
grocery store.
When the farm
is at your table
You’ve heard a lot about the farmto-table movement, but rarely is the
farm quite this close.
Sonia Lo, a Harvard Business
School graduate, trained chef, and
self-described farmer and entrepreneur, has plans to open a quick-stop
salad restaurant in Boston, with a hydroponic garden under its roof.
The idea of using “the latest in indoor agriculture technology” to create
“the shortest harvest-to-plate time in
the produce industry” might seem a
little unappetizing. But Lo has some
well-known backers. She has raised
$1.5 million from angel investors that
include Boston Market founder
George Naddaff and former Dunkin’
Donuts president Will Kussell.
Lo is not new to the world of hydroponic farming — where crops are
grown with LED lights and no soil.
She is chief executive of FreshBox
Farms, a startup founded in 2013 that
grows greens in corrugated container
cars inside a Millis warehouse. The
company supplies lettuce to Roche
Bros. and other area supermarkets.
Some alternative medicine experts
claim there are health benefits associated with eating food soon after harvesting because of an abundance of
phytonutrients. Lo offered a simpler
reason for eating fresh-grown greens.
“I just think it tastes better,” she
said.
No word yet where the new restaurant will be located.
— MEGAN WOOLHOUSE
Can’t keep a secret? Tell us. E-mail
Bold Types at [email protected]
Don’t let the pretty tangerine and
lemon-yellow glow in the brain pictures fool you. If its inventors are
right, an elegant new neuroimaging
tool provides more than fetching pictures: It shows for the first time where
genes are being turned on or off in living brains, scientists reported
Wednesday.
Until now, gene activation in human brains could be detected only in
dead ones. By revealing DNA’s on-off
choreography in brains that are still
thinking, feeling, and remembering,
the new technique promises to reveal
genetic underpinnings of mental
health and, perhaps one day, detect
the earliest hints of a brain being
gripped by Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, or other diseases.
“This is really exciting, pioneering
work,” said John Satterlee of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, who
coordinated the NIH’s program to
study patterns of gene silencing and
gene activation, and who was not involved in this study. “They took us to a
place we didn’t know anything about”
— patterns of gene expression in living
human brains — “and showed us the
lay of the land.”
Brain epigenetics — which genes
are turned on or off in different structures — has become a hot topic as neuroscientists realized that the sequences of inherited DNA explain very little
about psychiatric illnesses. In contrast, which genes are turned on and
off might be important in brain disorders, including addiction, Alzheimer’s
disease, Rett syndrome, depression,
and schizophrenia, as well as age-related changes. And because life events
can alter genes’ on-off state, epigenetic
changes might be how experiences
cause long-term changes in the brain.
‘[Dead] brains and
living brains will look
very different.’
JACOB HOOKER, research leader, on
tool that shows changes to living brain
Gene activity “is so responsive to
the environment, we simply can’t
study it outside of its natural context,”
said chemist Jacob Hooker of Massachusetts General Hospital, who led the
research, published in Science Translational Medicine. “[Dead] brains and
living brains will look very different.”
The new technique is a cousin of
PET. Traditional PET detects the emission of subatomic particles called positrons from radioactively tagged glucose, the brain’s energy source, and reveals which brain regions are active.
This version of PET detects positrons
coming from radioactively tagged
“Martinostat,” a small molecule Hooker and his colleagues created in 2012.
Given intravenously, the molecule
slips through the blood-brain barrier.
Once in the brain, it binds to enzymes
called HDACs that turn off genes — including genes important in forming
synapses and, therefore, learning and
memory. PET detects the positrons,
and presto: a brain map showing
where genes are being turned off.
Hooker’s team administered Martinostat to eight healthy volunteers. The
scientists were trying to show the technique could work in living brains, but
beyond that proof of principle they also made some tentative discoveries.
The molecules that silence genes
were most abundant in the cerebellum, in the back of the brain, which
regulates movements, and the putamen, which does that plus coordinate
some forms of learning.
More striking than the differences
among brain regions was the unexpected similarity among people. Regions with lots of gene silencing in one
person’s brain were also regions with
lots of silencing in others’ brains,
while regions without much gene silencing were also mostly the same.
The uniformity suggests there
might be a baseline pattern of gene activation in healthy, living brains. If so,
deviations from that pattern might be
used to diagnose illnesses before
symptoms appear.
“I’m hoping these colorful maps let
us compare healthy brains with the
brains of people with schizophrenia,
Alzheimer’s, and other diseases,” pinpointing regions with aberrant patterns of gene expression, Hooker said.
Sharon Begley can be reached at
[email protected] Follow
Sharon on Twitter @sxbegle.
C6
Business
T h e
25
THE BOSTON GLOBE
Index of publicly traded companies in Massachusetts
Globe 25 index
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Boston as a solar powerhouse?
Mitsubishi teams
up with Nexamp in
Financial District
Mitsubishi Corp.’s road into the
US solar business has taken the
Japanese conglomerate to Liberty
Square in Boston’s Financial District.
That’s the home of Nexamp Inc.,
the solar developer and installer
that sold a “near majority” stake to
a Mitsubishi energy subsidiary on
Monday.
Paula Zagrecki, a vice president
at Mitsubishi’s Diamond Generating Corp., said she hired the advisory firm CohnReznick in January
to vet potential investment targets
in the commercial, industrial, and
community-shared solar space. At
the same time, Nexamp chief executive Zaid Ashai was looking for
new investors for his firm.
The timing was perfect for these
two partners: Nexamp ended up
being Mitsubishi’s top choice. Zagrecki said the culture was a good
fit, and the 45-person Nexamp
team had the skills and expertise
she sought.
Plus, she said, Massachusetts’
state government has the right
kind of policies in place to spur solar construction.
Zagrecki and Ashai were not
saying much about the deal’s specifics, though Zagrecki conceded it
could lead to a full acquisition of
Nexamp in a few years.
One thing is clear: The Boston
venture capital firm PJC (formerly
Point Judith Capital) remains on
board as a key shareholder.
Now, it’s time to expand. Ashai
said Nexamp is active in five states
Jon Chesto can be reached at
[email protected] Follow him
on Twitter @jonchesto.
‘I just don’t see
myself being there at
this point for either
candidate.’
‘It is a painful and
difficult decision not
to support our
candidate.’
‘It’s very clear that
Donald Trump is
laying out a different
path.’
SCOTT SPERLING
KERRY HEALEY
DARRELL CRATE
By Jon Chesto
GLOBE STAFF
Markets
Stocks slip, wipe out earlier gains
DOW JONES industrial average
and is starting to make inroads in
another three, all on the East
Coast. As a result of Mitsubishi’s
investment, Ashai said he hopes
Nexamp can add another five to 10
states within 18 months, including
California.
Zagrecki said more deals with
other solar installers could be part
of that growth.
“Too often, we hear stories in
Boston about companies that don’t
scale,” Ashai said, referring to the
longtime complaint that a relatively limited number of businesses
gain a national scope from Boston.
“This is going to be different.
This is going to be a company that
scales nationally. . . . Our goal is to
have a national leading solar player
that’s based here in Boston.”
Executives on sidelines in election
BUSINESS VOTE
A sell-off in energy companies pulled stocks modestly lower
Wednesday, wiping out Tuesday’s small gains. Another slide
in oil prices weighed on the energy sector. Benchmark US
crude fell 2.5 percent to $41.71 a barrel. Banking, health
care, and tech companies declined; consumer stocks and
phone companies gained. With no big economic news in a
slow season for the markets, investors mostly focused on
earnings, looking for clues about how the second half of
2016 is shaping up. Last week’s strong jobs report boosted
confidence in the US economy; now, investors are looking
ahead to Friday, when the government delivers monthly retail sales figures. Most companies have already posted
quarterly financial reports, and earnings and revenue have
been relatively good. Among S&P 500 companies, roughly
65 percent beat Wall Street’s expectations. Yet earnings
overall are expected to fall 2.1 percent. On Wednesday,
Michael Kors slid 2.8 percent; it lowered its sales outlook.
SunPower, a solar company, tumbled 30.2 percent after reporting that its power plant business is struggling. Yelp
jumped 12.8 percent on strong quarterly results.
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Continued from Page C1
Boston’s largest hedge fund manager, Seth Klarman, who ordinarily
supports GOP candidates, also has
defected to Clinton.
But for many in this state’s financial sector — who rallied around
Romney in the last cycle — there is
no appealing choice this year.
Healey, who served as lieutenant
governor under Romney and is now
president of Babson College in
Wellesley, said in an interview that
she is leaning toward the Libertarian ticket, which includes former
Massachusetts governor William
Weld.
“As a lifelong Republican who
has deeply conservative values concerning the economy and foreign
policy, it is a painful and difficult decision not to support our candidate,’’
she said. “But I cannot vote for Donald Trump.”
Her reasons: “Trump’s arrogant
and offensive verbal assaults on veterans and their families, the disabled, women, Hispanics, immigrants, and anyone who dares to
question his opinions,” she said, “reveal a deeply flawed personal character.”
She added: “His ignorance of our
Constitution is unforgivable in a
candidate for president.”
As to whether casting a ballot for
Weld is a throw-away vote, Healey
said, “It’s the only scenario that
seems to offer an alternative to those
of us who feel caught in the middle.”
Others, though, are just avoiding
the topic of politics in a particularly
divisive year. Privately, a number of
Republicans and Democrats in Boston financial circles are predicting
that more people will move toward
Clinton, casting a ballot, if not writing a check.
Abigail Johnson, chief executive
of Fidelity Investments, supported
Jeb Bush last fall, but it’s not yet
known whom she’ll support next.
Construction magnate John Fish
wrote checks to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and Senator Marco Rubio of Florida before the primary. He was unavailable for comment this week.
Better evidence of where the
city’sexecutives stand should come
later this month, when the next
round of fund-raising reports for
presidential campaigns and SuperPACs are due at the Federal Election
Commission.
Amid the uncertainty, some party
stalwarts are standing their ground.
Jerry Jordan, a longtime Boston
investment executive and GOP
donor, was a co-chair of a Trump
fund-raiser over the weekend on
Cape Cod at the home of billionaire
Bill Koch.
Darrell Crate, an investment executive who formerly oversaw the
Massachusetts Republican Party
and served as a Romney campaign
official, said he is suppor ting
Trump.
“Fundamentally, I’m in the camp
of, disruption in government is
good. We do need a new path,’’ Crate
said in an interview. “It’s very clear
that Donald Trump is laying out a
different path.”
Beth Healy can be reached at
[email protected] Follow her
on Twitter @HealyBeth.
US funds 6 probes on paid family leave
By Danielle Paquette
WASHINGTON POST
NASDAQ Composite index
S&P 500 index
SOURCE: Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON — In California,
the first state to guarantee paid family leave for all workers since 2004,
payroll deductions fund a state-run
insurance pool that allows employees to take off up to six weeks at partial income. Working parents in
New Jersey and Rhode Island receive comparable benefits. New
York State, meanwhile, recently
passed similar laws that ensure
compensation doesn’t disappear
when employees pause work to care
for a new child or sick relative.
The public programs provide pay
for workers whose employers don’t
offer the benefit — and the federal
government wants to see these local
efforts spread.
The US Labor Department on
Tuesday announced it will grant
$1.1 million to six states and municipalities that want to start their own
paid family-leave programs. The recipients — Denver; Franklin, Ohio;
Madison, Wis.; and the states of Hawaii, Indiana, and Pennsylvania —
will use the money to research how
much it would cost to open the public aid to its residents, Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said.
“Our nation has increasingly recognized we are far behind the world
on this critical issue,” he said. “We
live in a modern family world, and
we need to stop living by ‘Leave It To
Beaver’ rules.”
The United States guarantees
just 12 weeks of job-protected time
off to new parents — none of which
is paid. The issue is also fiercely divisive: The Democratic Party believes
all workers should be paid for those
12 weeks’ leave, while the Republican Party platform makes no mention of a paid leave policy. Republican leaders have argued such rules
would damage business and discourage employers from hiring
young women.
Some oppose local mandates,
too. Rhode Island state Representative Brian Newberry told CBS News
last year the publicly funded paidleave program effectively imposes a
tax on many people who would never benefit from it. The insurance, he
said, should be private.
As American women surged into
the workforce — female breadwinners now support about 40 percent
of households — companies started
adding paid leave as a way to attract
and retain talent. Fifty-eight percent
of large American firms offer some
paid maternity leave, a 2014 Labor
Department study found. But only
12 percent of all private sector workers receive paid family leave to care
for a newborn or ailing relative, government data shows.
Thus far, only three states — Cali-
fornia, New Jersey, and Rhode Island — guarantee paid family leave
for all workers. Each covers at least
four weeks, paying at least 55 percent of employees’ full income, financed through employee-funded
temporary disability insurance programs. New York passed a measure
earlier this year to add the benefit,
which goes into effect in 2018.
A bill to establish paid family
leave in Massachusetts died in the
last legislative session.
San Francisco took a different approach in April, becoming the first
city in the country to require businesses to fund their employees’
leave. As for federal workers, President Obama signed an executive order last year allowing federal workers to take off up to six weeks of paid
leave.
The new Labor Department
grants are the latest installment of
the Paid Leave Analysis Grant Program that has allocated more than
$3 million to 17 states and municipalities over the last two years to
support research on how to create
local paid leave programs that fit a
particular area’s needs.
The Hawaii Department of Human Services, for example, will collect $240,000 to study how the state
could adopt a program similar to
those in California, New Jersey, and
Rhode Island.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
I didn’t choose my bank.
I ended up with them.
How long has it been since you chose your bank? Was it
back when you were in college? Or when you got your first
job? Likely the name of the bank you chose back then is
not the name of that same bank now. And you’re still there?
We understand.
Surely, you’ve thought about leaving your big bank over the
years but you just haven’t gotten around to it. After all, you
need lots of ATMs, online and mobile bank technology. You’re
too busy. And switching is too disruptive…too onerous.
We’re here to help you.
Whether you’re a small business owner, a family, or an
individual, there are many compelling reasons to leave your big
bank for Needham Bank.
• They don’t love you – we will.
• Chances are, we can save you enough money to matter on
those annoying big bank fees.
• We reinvest locally by supporting a myriad of community
organizations, just like you do.
• With NB Checking you can use any ATM in the world and
whatever you are charged for using that bank’s ATM, we
will automatically reimburse to your NB Checking account
each month.
• Our products, including online and mobile, are state of the
art.
• Our branch personnel in Needham, Dedham, Wellesley,
Dover, Medfield, Westwood, Ashland, Millis, and Natick are
eager to help you with the paperwork to switch banks.
• Or, if you’d prefer, we’ll send someone to your home
or office before, during, or after hours to help with the
paperwork.
Welcome to Needham Bank.
Please visit us at any of our offices or at Needhambank.com.
And should you have any questions or wish to schedule an
appointment, we’d be delighted to hear from you. Please
contact Chris Teachout at [email protected] or
781-474-5476. More and more people are making the switch
to Needham Bank every day. How may we help you?
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EQUAL HOUSING LENDER | MEMBER SIF
Business
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T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
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boston.com/monster
GENERAL HELP
GENERAL HELP
Publishers Circulation Fulfillment
is seeking
Delivery Service Providers-DSPs
for newspaper home delivery
routes. Most routes are
7 days per week,
2-3 hours daily,
starting around 3AM.
$400-$500/bi-weekly.
No $$ collections.
Routes in:
Bristol, Essex, Middlesex,
Norfolk, Plymouth, & Suffolk
Counties.
Must be 18+ years old.
DSPs are independently contracted.
Ask our staff about our Sign on and Referral
Program at select plants!
Call 1-800-515-8000
or online
www.pcfcorp.com/dsp.php
GENERAL HELP
HOTELS
RESTAURANTS
Drivers
Local -Home Nightly!
$2,000 Sign-On Bonus!
West Bridgewater Flatbed!
Great Pay, Benefits!
CDL-A, 1yr. Exp. Req.
Estenson Logistics
Apply: www.goelc.com
855-513-1333
PROFESSIONAL
Entertainment
MUSICIANS/ENTERTAINERS
The Front Porch in Ogunquit, Maine is looking for
new talent! Applicants must
be proficient in both piano
and voice, able to perform
a wide variety of music-Broadway to Rock-N-Roll.
Competitive Pay. Fun, energetic working environment.
Video submissions must include 3 songs, from 3 different genres. Only solo piano/
solo vocal submissions will
be considered. Send to [email protected]
by
08/22/2016.
LEGAL NOTICES
Hilton Garden Seeks
ROOM ATTENDANTS
Full and part time positions.
Join
our
housekeeping
team cleaning guest rooms.
We provide excellent pay,
uniforms,
free
parking,
benefits, incentives, travel
discounts and a great hotel
company to work for. Contact
[email protected] or Zulma.
[email protected]
com or at 781-890-0100.
Apply on line at interstatehotels.com/careers Hilton
Garden inn 450 Totten Pond
Road, Waltham, MA
powered by
LEGAL NOTICES
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS
In the matter of )
Case No. 16-cv-11567
LYNN & WILLIAM, INC. )
OWNER OF F/V WILLIAM LYNN, O.N. 674825) In Admiralty
Plaintiff, )
for Exoneration from or Limitation of Liability )
NOTICE OF ACTION BROUGHT FOR EXONERATION FROM
OR LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that plaintiff Lynn & William,
Inc. filed a verified Complaint pursuant to 46 U.S.C. §§
30501-12 and Supplemental Rule F of the Federal Rules of
Civil Procedure for exoneration from or limitation of liability
for any and all claims for injuries, damages, and losses arising from the voyage ending on or about January 4, 2015 in
Gloucester, Massachusetts, including personal injuries allegedly sustained by Eric Rand.
All persons having claims for injuries, losses, or damages arising from that voyage must file them, as provided
by Supplemental Rule F(4), via the CM/ECF system with the
Clerk of the United States District Court for the District of
Massachusetts, on or before September 16, 2016, or be
defaulted.
Any claimant desiring to contest plaintiffs’ right to exoneration from or right to limitation of liability must file an
answer to the Complaint, as required by Supplemental Rule
F(5), via the CM/ECF system.
DATED this 2nd day of August, 2016.
Barbara I. Beatty
Deputy Clerk
District of Massachusetts
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
100 Cambridge Street, Suite 900
Boston, MA 02114
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS
AND ADMINISTATION AND FINANCE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that the Massachusetts Executive Office
of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) and Administration and
Finance (ANF) are proposing to amend four regulations, rescind
one regulation and hold two public hearings in conformance with
M.G.L. c.30A:
• LAND ACQUISITION at 301 CMR 51.00 and simultaneous rescission of 801 CMR 28.00, REIMBURSEMENTS TO NON-PROFIT
ORGANIZATIONS. Pursuant to M.G.L. c. 21A; St. 2014, c.286, §
41(EEA) and St. 1987, c. 564, § 37 (ANF), these changes modernize 301 CMR 51.00 and incorporate related regulations from
801 CMR 28, consolidating regulations under one agency.
• SELF HELP AND URBAN SELF HELP PROGRAMS at 301 CMR
5.00 (NOTE: Now the LAND and PARC Programs respectively).
Pursuant to M.G.L. c. 21A, § 2; c. 132A, § 11; St. 1977, c. 933; St.
1987, c. 564, §§ 8 and 9; St. 1996, c. 15, § 2; St. 2002, c. 236, §
2; St. 2007, c. 27, § 2; St. 2008, c. 312, § 2, changes are proposed
to modernize and enhance the LAND and PARC regulations.
• DENSELY DEVELOPED AREAS at 301 CMR 10.00. Under M.G.L. c.
131, § 40, amendments are proposed to update the regulations
governing petitions for designation of densely developed areas
under the Rivers Protection Act.
• AREAS OF CRITICAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN at 301 CMR
12.00. Pursuant to M.G.L. c. 21A, § 2(7); St. 1974, c. 806, § 40(e),
updates are proposed to address current issues, such as mitigation of climate change impact, and to make minor technical
corrections.
Public hearings will be conducted on the following dates at the following locations to receive comments on the proposed revisions.
Testimony may be presented orally or in writing at either of the
hearings.
Wednesday, September 7, 2016, 9:00 AM–12:00 PM
MassDEP Western Regional Office, Courtroom
436 Dwight Street, Springfield, MA 01103
and
Thursday, September 8, 2016, 9:00 AM–12:00 PM
MA Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
100 Cambridge Street, 2nd Floor Conference Room C
Boston, MA 02114
Written testimony will also be accepted from the opening of the
comment period on Friday,August 12, 2016 until 5 P.M. Friday, September 16, 2016. Written testimony should be submitted via email
to [email protected] or mailed to: Kurt Gaertner, Executive
Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, 100 Cambridge Street,
Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114. Copies of the proposed regulations
are available on the EEA website at http://www.mass.gov/eea/
proposed-amendments-to-regulations.html. For special accommodations for this event or to obtain this information in an alternative format, you may contact Evanice Torres, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, ADA coordinator, at 617-626-1161,
100 Cambridge Street, Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114.
By the order of the Executive Office of Energy and
Environmental Affairs
Matthew A. Beaton
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
100 Cambridge Street, Suite 900
Boston, MA 02114
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF PUBLIC COMMENT
Notice is hereby given that the Massachusetts Executive Office of
Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA), under its authority pursuant to M.G.L. c. 29, § 2IIII, and in conformance with M.G.L. c.30A,
will hold a public comment period on a proposed amendment
to 301 CMR 15.00: PROVISIONS FOR ADMINISTRATION OF THE
DAM AND SEA WALL REPAIR OR REMOVAL FUND. The current
regulation refers to an obsolete state procurement website and
a technical correction is proposed to replace it with a nonspecific
reference to the Commonwealth’s website.
Written testimony will be accepted from the opening of the
comment period on Friday, August 26, 2016 until 5 P.M. Friday,
September 23, 2016. Written testimony should be submitted
via email to [email protected] or mailed to: Linda
Benevides, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental
Affairs, 100 Cambridge Street, Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114.
Copies of the proposed regulations are available on the EEA
website at http://www.mass.gov/eea/proposed-amendments
-to-regulations.html.
For special accommodations for this event or to obtain this
information in an alternative format, you may contact Evanice
Torres, ADA coordinator, at 617-626-1161, 100 Cambridge Street,
Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114.
By the order of the Executive Office of Energy and
Environmental Affairs
Matthew A. Beaton
LEGAL NOTICES
ORDER OF NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
Docket Number
1677CV01025
Trial Court
of Massachusetts
The Superior Court
Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr.
Clerk of Courts
Essex County Superior
Court - Lawrence
43 Appleton Way
Lawrence, MA 01841
Case Name:
Michael W. Donnelly et al
vs.
Jose Bulnes et al
WHEREAS a civil action
has been begun against
you in our Superior Court
by Michael W. Donnelly
wherein it is seeking to Remove any clouds on title for
the property known as 169
Lawrence Street, Lawrence,
Massachusetts.
We COMMAND YOU if you
intend to make any defense, that on 08/31/2016
or within such further time
as the law allows you do
cause your written pleading to be filed in the office
of the Clerk of Court named
above, in said Commonwealth, and further that you
defend against said suit according to law if you intend
any defense, and that you
do and receive what the
Court shall order and adjudge therein.
Hereof fail not, at your
peril, or as otherwise said
suit may be adjudged and
orders entered in your absence.
It appearing to this Court
that no personal service
of the Complaint has been
made on the defendant a
deputy sheriff having made
a return on the summons
that after diligent search
he can find no one upon
whom he can lawfully make
service, a copy of which is
hereto attached and made
part of this notice, it is ORDERED that notice of this
suit be given to them by
publishing, once a week
for three successive weeks,
the last publication to be at
least 20 days before said
return day in the: Boston
Globe.
City/Town: City of Boston
Dated issued 07/20/2016
Clerk of Courts
Thomas H. Driscoll Jr.
ABCD HEATING PROGRAM
2016-2018
Request for Proposal –
Action for Boston Community Development, Inc (ABCD)
Heating Assistance Program
is accepting sealed proposal for residential heating system work, asbestos
abatement, and chimney
work (No-heat calls, repairs
and replacements, both gas
& oil, chimney repair/
lining) from Affirmative Action/EEO firms. Proposal
packages are available at
ABCD, Inc, 178 Tremont St
4 th fl Boston, MA 02111.
Contact Person-Alix Monestime. All proposals must
be received no later than
12:00 PM Monday, September 19th, 2016, at which
time they will be publicly
opened. All proposals subject to negotiation. ABCD
reserves the right to accept
or reject any and all proposals deemed in its best interest to do so. Small &
Minority firms encouraged
to submit proposals. ABCD
is an affirmative action/
equal opportunity employer.
This advertisement subject
in all respects to the terms
and conditions of the Invitation to Bid/Request For
Proposal.
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New FAFSA date offers
chance to simplify aid filing
By Ann Carrns
NEW YORK TIMES
NEW YORK — As collegebound students prepare for a
new school year, they should be
aware of a date that’s newly important for future financial aid:
Oct. 1.
That’s the new, earlier date
after which students can file the
FAFSA, or Free Application for
Federal Student Aid. The infamous form is used to calculate
how much students and their
families must contribute to the
cost of college, and how much
help they will get in the form of
grants, scholarships, and loans.
Students seeking financial aid
must file the form, used by
most states and colleges as the
gateway to financial aid, each
year.
In the past, students had to
wait until Jan. 1 to file the form.
But in an effort to align the financial aid process with the
typical college admissions cycle, the federal Education Department moved the initial filing date three months earlier.
The department also
changed the rules to allow students to complete the form using older financial information.
Previously, the form that was
available Jan. 1 used income
from the tax year that had just
ended. Students filing the form
early this year, for instance, had
to use 2015 income tax data. Financial advisers often urged
students and families to file as
soon as possible after Jan. 1, to
maximize their chances of getting state grants because some
states have early financial aid
deadlines.
That presented a problem,
however, because most people
do not have the necessary information, like wage statements,
to file their tax returns in early
January. Instead, they had to
file FAFSA forms using estimated income data, and remember
to revise the form later, after
they filed their tax return. That
often meant the form was selected for “verification,” which
requires submitting extra documents, said Mark Kantrowitz, a
financial-aid expert.
The alternative was simply
to file much later, he said, and
risk missing out on aid.
The new rules have FAFSA
filers use tax information from
a year earlier — known, awkwardly, as “prior prior” year returns. (Students filing for the
2017-2018 academic year, then,
will use 2015 tax data.)
The main benefit of that
change is that many more students can use the Internal Revenue Service’s Data Retrieval
Tool, which automatically fills
in the online FAFSA form with
the necessary tax information,
said Lauren Asher, president of
the Institute for College Access
and Success.
“This really does simplify
the aid process,” she said.
Colleges are taking steps to
notify students of the new date.
Thomas M. Ratliff, associate
vice president at Indiana Wesleyan University in Marion,
Ind., said the university was
sending e-mails to students
who had indicated interest in
attending, making them aware
of the Oc t . 1 date. And the
state’s association of financial
aid professionals will hold a
workshop in September for
high school counselors, he said,
to notify them of the change.
One question is whether colleges will change their own financial aid application deadlines. Some — particularly institutions with rolling admissions
— are reportedly moving up
their “priority” financial aid application deadlines to Novem-
ber or December. That could
put students in a time crunch in
the fall, said Carrie Warick, director of partnerships and policy at the National College Access Network, which promotes
college education for low-income students.
“At some institutions, if you
miss the priority deadline,
there may be little to no aid after,” Warick said. The network,
she said, is urging colleges to
set their aid application deadlines no earlier than Feb. 1.
Still, the Education Department is advising financial aid
counselors to tell families to
double-check their state and
school financial aid deadlines.
Parents, the department notes
on its website, should “make
sure that your child’s school
and state deadlines have not
changed, and plan accordingly.”
Questions and answers
about the new FAFSA date:
R Does the change mean I
must file the FAFSA form by
Oct. 1?
No. The form becomes available Oct. 1, and you can file
when you’re ready — although
it’s still wise to file as soon as
you can, Kantrowitz said.
R I already filed a FAFSA
form this spring. Should I file it
again after Oct. 1?
Yes, if you’re seeking aid for
the 2017-2018 academic year.
Because of the filing date
change, students may actually
file two separate FAFSA forms
this calendar year — one that
they already completed, for
2016-2017, and a second one,
which can be filed starting in
October, for the following academic year.
R How do I use the IRS Data
Retrieval Tool?
The online FAFSA form has
a link that will allow you to use
the tool.
Apple, others see innovation slowing
TECH LAB
Continued from Page C1
Faced with fierce competition from Android smartphones, the company obliges
its fans with annual iPhone updates. But Mac users are far less
likely to defect. They love the
unique operating system and
dread the expense and trouble
of converting to a Windows
machine, even one with a newer, faster processor.
And after all, the speed
boost would hardly matter.
Intel, which makes about 95
percent of the world’s PC processors, keeps producing better
and better chips. But lately the
improvements have been marginal. Moore’s Law, the principle that computers would double in processing power every
couple of years, is finally petering out.
“If you look at what Intel
has today versus three or four
years ago, it’s maybe 10 percent
better, 20 percent better,” said
chip analyst Linley Gwennap of
the Linley Group in Mountain
View, Calif. “Computers have
become like cars. You don’t buy
a new car every year or two,”
Gwennap said. Indeed, “the
cars are actually getting better
faster than the PCs.”
It’s bad news for Intel,
whose chief executive, Brian
Krzanich, warned in June that
most users now go for five or
six years before thinking about
a new PC. That’s why Intel is
laying off 12,000 employees, 11
percent of its global workforce.
Clearly, Apple is onto something. Why invest millions in
annual Mac updates, when few
customers will benefit? For that
matter, why offer price cuts on
aging Macs, when customers
keep buying? For quarter after
quarter, Mac sales continued
upward, bucking the yearslong
slump in Windows PC sales.
But not lately. Mac sales
have now declined for three
quarters in a row, probably because many potential buyers
are sick of being offered leftovers.
Michael Oh, founder of
TSP, a Boston company that
creates Mac-based computer
systems for businesses, said
that Apple needs to make some
moves with the Mac, and fast.
“If we get into the fall and Apple hasn’t done what amounts
to a complete refresh,” Oh said,
“I don’t know what the message is.”
Actually, the message is
coming through loud and clear.
On Wednesday, Bloomberg
Technology reported that Apple
will soon roll out a new batch
of MacBook Pro laptops.
They’ll feature a slightly
faster processor, a bit more
storage, and other marginal improvements, like a keyboard
that replaces the traditional
row of function keys with a
long, thin touchscreen.
Still, all these enhancements
add up to nothing much.
Expect the same from the
next iPhone, from new Android
smartphones and Windows
computers, and for all kinds of
tablet computers. There’s been
a great leveling off of innovation in digital hardware, and
apart from a busted touchscreen or a crashed hard drive,
it’s hard to see much point in
buying the latest gadget.
So you might as well stick
with same old, same old.
After all, that’s what you’ll
get — even if you get something
new.
Hiawatha Bray can be reached
at [email protected]
Follow him on Twitter
@GlobeTechLab.
Sports
TV HIGHLIGHTS
Baseball: Yankees-Red Sox, 7:10 p.m., NESN
Exhibition football: Saints-Patriots, 7:30 p.m., Ch. 4
Baseball: Cardinals-Cubs, 8 p.m., MLB
Olympics: Swimming, 9 p.m., NBC
Listings, D9
D
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, AU G US T 1 1 , 2 01 6 | B O S T O N G L O B E .C O M / S P O RT S
RIO
Christopher L.
Gasper
World
beater
Ebner
earned
stripes
RIO DE JANEIRO — Nate Ebner came
off the field
drenched in
sweat, his red,
white, and
blue uniform
clinging to
him like Saran Wrap, tank
emptied. The scene was familiar. The setting — an Olympic
rugby field nearly 5,000 miles
from Gillette Stadium — was
not.
The Patriots safety/special
teamer is not going to join Dallas Cowboys Hall of Fame receiver and 1964 Olympic 100meter champion “Bullet” Bob
Hayes as the only athlete with a
Super Bowl ring and a gold
medal. The US rugby sevens
team was eliminated from
medal contention Wednesday.
But Ebner joins the list of legitimate two-sport professional
athletes, a rarity in today’s era
of sports hyper-specialization.
Bo and Deion, make some
room, boys.
It’s doubtful that Nike is going to come out with a Nate
All around, Biles is the best
female gymnast on the planet
R
By John Powers
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
IO DE JANEIRO — Simone Biles began
hearing the questions as soon as she won
her third straight world all-around title last
autumn. How are you handling the pressure? What would it mean to you to win
gold in Rio?
“Well,” the planet’s best female gymnast
kept saying, “I have to make the team first. Well, I have to
qualify for the all-around first.”
Now that she has done those things, the shortest member
of the entire 550-member US squad (at a sturdy 4 feet 8 inches) finally gets her chance to come up big at Olympus in
Thursday afternoon’s all-around. Up to this point, the focus
had been on her American teammates and
ANALYSIS how much they were going to win by in the
team competition.
Now it’s whether the 19-year-old from Spring, Texas, can
defy the Olympic jinx that has undone the last four world
champions and whether she can go on to win three more gold
medals in the event finals, which would give her a record five
for a women’s gymnast at one Games.
By her nature and by her training, Biles doesn’t look beyond the next rotation, the next tumbling pass, the next dismount. The notion that wealth and fame may await her after
these Games is not something that she dwells upon.
“I never really think about it because it’s something you
GASPER, Page D7
M O R E O LY M P I C S
BILES, Page D8
‘The Biles’
Simone Biles’s signature move on the floor exercise is a
marquee tumbling pass that bears her name. The double
flip with a half twist ends with Biles facing forward.
MARCOS BRINDICCI /GETTY IMAGES
Gold star
Katie Ledecky (above) anchored US 4 x 200 relay team
for her third gold in Rio. D6
Cruise is over
Anthony (31 points) keeps US
men’s basketball team afloat in
98-88 win over Australia. D7
King is back
Japan star Uchimura wins
men’s all-around gymnastics
gold on his last rotation. D8
EPA/HOW
HWEE YOUNG
Five things to keep an eye on
Ben Volin
ON FOOTBALL
The Patriots finally play their first
exhibition game of 2016 Thursday
night when they face the Saints at Gillette Stadium. And the temptation will
be strong to overreact to what we see
on the field.
All eyes will be on Jimmy Garoppolo in his third preseason. The battles at
wide receiver, running back, and offensive line are fierce. But a good per-
Yankees quash Red Sox
formance in a preseason game is not
always indicative of who will make the
53-man roster.
There is no real game-planning for
a preseason game; many starters sit
out entirely, and blitzing is kept to a
minimum.
“I’d say just because a player makes
a couple of plays in preseason doesn’t
necessarily . . . it depends on what the
circumstances are — what the play is,
who he made it against, so forth and
so on,” Bill Belichick said this week.
Ortiz takes a foul ball off right shin in ninth
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
Yankees 9 It didn’t seem one of the
worst nights of the seaRed Sox 4 son could get any more
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
ON FOOTBALL, Page D4
2016 Chevy
Silverado
Crew Cab
Steven Wright will miss his
start Thursday after he hurt his
shoulder pinch running. D3
ugly for the Red Sox. Then David Ortiz,
their most vital player, fouled a ball off
his right shin in the ninth inning and
had to be helped off the field.
A sellout crowd at Fenway Park, already agitated by the poor play of the
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Sox, fell silent when Ortiz slumped to
one knee after swinging at a 99-milesper-hour pitch from Dellin Betances.
With manager John Farrell and
physical therapist Adam Thomas assisting him, Ortiz limped off the field
and down the steps into the dugout.
An initial fluoroscan was negative
and Ortiz was able to walk on his own
afterward. It was the second time in a
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T h e
Sports
GIANTS 1, MARLINS 0
SAN FRAN.
Núñez 3b
Pagán lf
Belt 1b
Posey c
Crawford ss
Panik 2b
Law p
Span ph
Pence rf
Blanco cf
Samardzija p
Adrianza 2b
Totals
BREWERS 4, BRAVES 3
AB R H BI BB SO
5 0 1 0 0 1
3 0 1 0 1 0
2 0 0 0 2 0
4 0 1 0 0 1
4 1 2 1 0 0
3 0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 1
4 0 0 0 0 3
3 0 0 0 1 1
2 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 1 0
32 1 6 1 5 8
Avg.
.225
.286
.280
.291
.277
.237
.000
.262
.276
.228
.146
.278
MIAMI
AB R H BI BB SO
Gordon 2b
3 0 0 0 1 0
Prado 3b
4 0 0 0 0 0
Yelich lf
4 0 0 0 0 1
Ozuna cf
3 0 1 0 1 0
Dietrich 1b
2 0 1 0 0 0
Johnson ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 2
Suzuki rf
4 0 2 0 0 1
Realmuto c
3 0 0 0 1 2
Hechavarra ss 3 0 1 0 0 1
Phelps p
1 0 0 0 0 0
Stanton ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Rojas ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
31 0 5 0 3 7
Avg.
.282
.321
.323
.285
.279
.227
.318
.311
.251
.200
.242
.252
San Francisco.....000 100 000 — 1 6 0
Miami...................000 000 000 — 0 5 1
E—Phelps (2). LOB—San Francisco 9,
Miami 7. 2B—Suzuki (10). HR—Crawford
(11), off Phelps. SB—Pagán (11), Gordon
(12). DP—Miami 1.
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Smrzja W 10-8 5„ 3 0 0 3 3 4.23
Smith
„ 0 0 0 0 2 4.74
Strickland
„ 1 0 0 0 0 2.53
Law
1 0 0 0 0 0 2.05
Casilla S 26
1 1 0 0 0 2 2.78
MITCHELL LAYTON/GETTY IMAGES
Jayson Werth was the engine behind the
Nationals’ offense as he smacked a three-run
home run in the second inning.
EAST
Toronto
*Baltimore
Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
W
65
63
61
57
46
L
50
49
51
56
67
Pct.
.565
.563
.545
.504
.407
GB
—
½
2½
7
18
Div. Last 10 Streak
27-21
6-4
W1
26-19
5-5
L2
22-21
5-5
L1
15-24
5-5
W1
19-24
4-6
L1
CENTRAL
Cleveland
*Detroit
*Chicago
*Kansas City
*Minnesota
W
63
61
54
53
46
L
48
52
58
59
67
Pct.
.568
.540
.482
.473
.407
GB
—
3
9½
10½
18
Div. Last 10 Streak
31-16
4-6
L1
20-24
6-4
L3
19-25
4-6
W1
23-16
4-6
L1
14-26
7-3
L1
WEST
Texas
*Seattle
*Houston
*Oakland
Los Angeles
W
68
59
58
50
49
L
47
53
55
63
64
Pct.
.591
.527
.513
.442
.434
GB
—
7½
9
17
18
Div. Last 10 Streak
29-19
7-3
W5
19-24
7-3
W5
28-23
3-7
W1
21-24
3-7
W2
20-27
3-7
L6
NL
W
67
60
57
53
43
L
46
54
56
63
71
Pct.
.593
.526
.504
.457
.377
GB
—
7½
10
15½
24½
Div. Last 10 Streak
30-14
6-4
W1
22-28
4-6
L1
23-24
4-6
L2
22-25
5-5
W1
19-25
7-3
L1
CENTRAL
Chicago
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
W
71
60
56
50
46
L
41
54
55
62
67
Pct.
.634
.526
.505
.446
.407
GB
—
12
14½
21
25½
Div. Last 10 Streak
28-14
9-1
W9
26-20
4-6
W1
21-24
4-6
L1
16-23
4-6
W1
18-28
5-5
L1
WEST
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Colorado
San Diego
Arizona
W
65
64
55
49
47
L
49
50
59
64
66
Pct.
.570
.561
.482
.434
.416
GB
—
1
10
15½
17½
Div. Last 10 Streak
31-18
5-5
W1
26-21
6-4
L1
24-26
3-7
L4
19-27
5-5
W1
20-28
5-5
W3
* — Not including late game
RESULTS
WEDNESDAY
at Boston 4
At Texas 5
at Miami 0
Philadelphia 6
Atlanta 3
Houston
at Pittsburgh 0
at Minnesota
Chi. White Sox
At Toronto 7
Tampa Bay 0
Baltimore
Arizona 3 (12 inn.)
at NY Mets 2
Detroit
At St. Louis 3
LA Angels 1
At Milwaukee 4
Cleveland 4
San Diego 4
Colorado 4
At Chi. Cubs 3
at LA Dodgers 2
At Washington 7
at Kansas City
at Oakland
at Seattle
Cincinnati 2
TUESDAY
At Boston 5
NY Yankees 3
Atlanta 2
at Milwaukee 1
Texas 7
at Colorado 5
Houston 7
at Minnesota 5
Cleveland 3
Chi. White Sox 7 (10 inn.)at Kansas
City 5
at Washington 1
At Pittsburgh 6
San Diego 4
Cincinnati 7
Tampa Bay 9
at Toronto 2
At Oakland 2
at NY Mets 3
At Seattle 6 (15 inn.)
Arizona 5
At Miami 2
San Francisco 0
At Chi. Cubs 5
at St. Louis 4
Baltimore 1
At LA Dodgers 9
Detroit 5
Philadelphia 3
LA Angels 1
2016
Team ......2016 vs. opp ...... ......Last 3 starts ......
W-L ERA rec. W-L
IP ERA W-L
IP ERA
NY YANKEES AT BOSTON, 7:10 p.m.
Pineda (R)
Rodríguez (L)
Off
Off
6-10
2-5
5.17 11-11
5.93
4-7
0-2
1-0
16.0
7.0
5.06
1.29
2-1
0-1
19.0
16.0
4.74
3.94
4.15
2.64
2-1
13-8
0-0
0-0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1-1
0-2
17.1
18.0
4.15
4.00
7-8
6-3
0-0
0-0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
0-1
0-1
16.0
18.0
5.63
3.00
3.47
8.31
14-8
2-4
0-0
1-0
0.0
5.1
0.00
3.38
0-1
1-1
16.2 3.78
11.2 10.80
5.13
3.46
14-9
5-2
0-0
0-1
0.0 0.00
3.2 12.27
2-0
2-0
18.0
15.2
4.00
2.30
1-0
4-6
0-0
0-0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
1-0
2-0
5.0
17.1
5.40
3.12
19-5
0-1
1-0
0-0
6.1
1.0
4.26
0.00
0-2
0-0
16.2
3.0
5.94
3.00
5.27
6-9
3.22 11-11
0-0
1-0
0.0
9.0
0.00
2.00
0-3
2-0
11.1 11.12
22.0 1.64
ARIZONA AT NY METS, 12:10 p.m.
Shipley (R)
Syndergaard (R)
+206
-225
1-1
9-6
SAN DIEGO AT PITTSBURGH, 12:35 p.m.
Friedrich (L)
Taillon (R)
+160
-174
4-7
2-2
4.76
3.29
HOUSTON AT MINNESOTA, 1:10 p.m.
Fister (R)
Berrios (R)
-123
+114
10-7
2-2
COLORADO AT TEXAS, 2:05 p.m.
Bettis (R)
Harrell (R)
+137
-149
10-6
3-2
ATLANTA AT MILWAUKEE, 2:10 p.m.
Hernández (R)
Garza (R)
+134
-145
1-0
3-4
5.40
5.03
BALTIMORE AT OAKLAND, 3:35 p.m.
Tillman (R)
Triggs (R)
-141
+130
14-4
0-0
3.50
5.35
LA ANGELS AT CLEVELAND, 7:10 p.m.
Chacin (R)
Kluber (R)
+201
-220
3-7
11-8
ST. LOUIS AT CHI. CUBS, 8:05 p.m.
Martínez (R)
Lester (L)
+152
-165
10-7
12-4
PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO
CeHernndz 2b 5 0 1 0 0 3
Altherr cf-rf
5 0 1 0 0 2
Franco 3b
4 0 0 0 0 0
Joseph 1b
4 0 0 0 0 2
Ruiz c
2 2 1 0 2 0
Paredes rf-lf
3 1 0 0 1 1
Goeddel lf
2 0 0 0 1 2
Herrera ph-cf
1 1 1 0 0 0
Galvis ss
3 2 1 3 1 0
Hellickson p
2 0 1 0 0 1
Featherstn ph 1 0 0 0 0 1
Howard ph
1 0 1 3 0 0
Totals
33 6 7 6 5 12
Avg.
.285
.241
.250
.251
.265
.200
.199
.284
.231
.132
.118
.187
LA DODGERS AB R H BI BB SO
Utley 2b
4 0 0 0 1 2
Reddick rf
5 1 2 0 0 0
Seager ss
3 0 2 0 0 0
González 1b
4 0 1 1 0 1
Grandal c
3 0 0 0 1 2
Pederson cf
3 0 0 0 1 1
Kendrick lf
4 1 2 0 0 1
Segedin 3b
4 0 1 1 0 1
Kazmir p
2 0 0 0 0 1
Turner ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
KiHernándz ph 1 0 0 0 0 1
Totals
34 2 8 2 3 11
Avg.
.249
.125
.305
.295
.234
.240
.267
.300
.105
.275
.200
Philadelphia........000 000 303 — 6 7 0
LA Dodgers.........100 000 100 — 2 8 0
LOB—Philadelphia 5, LA Dodgers 9.
2B—Altherr (3), Howard (8), Seager (32),
González (22), Kendrick (19). HR—Galvis
(11), off Dayton. SB—Ruiz (3), Herrera
(18). CS—Reddick (1). DP—LA Dodgers 1.
Philadelphia
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Hellickson
5 3 1 1 1 7 3.65
Araujo W 2-1
1 1 0 0 0 0 5.19
Ramos
„ 2 1 1 0 2 3.54
Neris
1‚ 1 0 0 1 1 2.44
Gómez
1 1 0 0 1 1 2.56
3.29 10-11
2.93 16-6
1-1
0-0
12.0
0.0
5.25
0.00
1-1
2-0
17.0
17.0
6.35
3.18
CHI. WHITE SOX AT KANSAS CITY, 8:15 p.m.
González (R)
+143
2-6 4.09
8-9
0-1
Duffy (L)
-155
8-1 2.97 13-3
1-0
Team rec. — Record in games started by pitcher
12.1
15.2
IP H R ER BB SO
6 4 2 2 3 6
1 1 1 1 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 2
„ 2 3 3 2 2
‚ 0 0 0 0 0
ERA
4.44
1.50
0.00
1.81
0.00
Inherited runners-scored—Neris 1-0,
Dayton 2-2, Ravin 1-0. IBB—off Jansen
(Galvis). HBP—by Araujo (Seager).Umpires—Home, John Tumpane; First, Alan
Porter; Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Jeff
Kellogg. T—3:17. A—41,098 (56,000).
NATIONALS 7, INDIANS 4
CLEVELAND
Davis cf
Santana ph
Kipnis 2b
Lindor ss
Napoli 1b
Ramírez 3b
Guyer lf
AB R H BI BB SO
4 1 2 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 1 0 0 0
4 1 1 2 0 0
3 1 1 0 1 2
4 0 3 1 0 0
2 1 1 0 0 0
Chisenhall ph-rf
2 0 0 0 0 0
Almonte rf-lf
4 0 1 1 0 1
Giménez c
3 0 0 0 0 1
Martínez ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Tomlin p
2 0 0 0 0 1
Naquin ph-cf
2 0 0 0 0 2
Totals
36 4 10 4 1 9
Avg.
.263
.242
.284
.305
.253
.309
.249
.293
.262
.204
.265
.400
.311
WASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO
Turner 2b
4 1 1 0 0 0
Werth lf
3 3 2 3 1 1
Murphy 1b
4 1 1 1 0 1
Ramos c
4 0 1 1 0 0
Rendón 3b
4 0 2 2 0 2
Goodwin rf
4 0 1 0 0 1
Espinosa ss
4 1 1 0 0 1
Revere cf
4 1 2 0 0 0
GGonzález p
2 0 0 0 0 2
Difo ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Robinson ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
35 7 11 7 1 8
Avg.
.286
.253
.346
.336
.268
.167
.222
.216
.088
.353
.209
Cleveland............013 000 000 — 4 10 0
Washington........130 030 00x — 7 11 0
LOB—Cleveland 6, Washington 5. 2B—
Napoli (17), Ramírez (28), Almonte (8),
Turner (5), Werth (23), Murphy (33),
Rendón 2 (27). HR—Lindor (14), off
GGonzález, Werth (15), off Tomlin. SB—
Ramírez (14), Almonte (1). DP—Washington 1.
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Tomlin L 11-5
4 8 7 7 1 4 4.18
Otero
2 1 0 0 0 1 1.53
McAllister
2 2 0 0 0 3 4.96
Washington
IP H R ER BB SO
5 7 4 4 1 5
Belisle
1 0 0 0 0 0
Treinen
„ 1 0 0 0 2
OlPérez
0 1 0 0 0 0
Kelley
1‚ 1 0 0 0 1
Melancon S 32 1 0 0 0 0 1
GGonzález W 8-9
ERA
4.24
1.84
1.96
4.40
2.81
1.35
Inherited runners-scored—Otero 2-2,
Belisle 2-0, OlPérez 1-0, Kelley 2-0. Umpires—Home, Ryan Blakney; First, Ron
Kulpa; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Jerry
Meals. T—2:53. A—30,185 (41,313).
3.65
2.87
0-1
2-0
19.2
20.2
2.75
2.18
LA ANGELS
AB R H BI BB SO
Escobar 3b
4 1 3 0 0 0
Calhoun rf
4 0 1 0 0 1
4 0 1 0 0 2
Trout cf
Pujols 1b
4 0 0 1 0 1
Simmons ss
4 0 1 0 0 1
Choi lf
3 0 0 0 0 0
Bandy ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Soto c
3 0 0 0 1 1
Nolasco p
1 0 0 0 1 0
Pnnngtn ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1
Petit 2b
3 0 0 0 0 2
Totals
33 1 6 1 2 10
Avg.
.319
.276
.312
.253
.283
.169
.278
.271
.000
.230
.276
CHICAGO
AB R H BI BB SO
Fowler cf
4 0 2 1 0 1
Bryant lf
4 1 1 0 0 1
Rizzo 1b
4 0 1 1 0 0
Zobrist 2b
3 0 0 0 1 0
Russell ss
4 1 1 1 0 1
Heyward rf
4 0 0 0 0 0
Contreras c
3 0 1 0 0 0
Báez 3b
3 0 0 0 0 2
Hammel p
2 1 1 0 0 1
Szczur ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Strop p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Wood p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Edwards Jr. p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
32 3 7 3 1 6
Avg.
.288
.284
.288
.277
.243
.227
.266
.274
.235
.306
.000
.125
.000
LA Angels............000 000 010 — 1 6 1
Chicago...............001 010 01x — 3 7 0
E—Nolasco (1). LOB—LA Angels 7, Chicago 6. 2B—Calhoun (19), Fowler (21),
Bryant (26). HR—Russell (13), off Ramírez. SB—Trout (18), Simmons (4).
LA Angels
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Nolasco L 4-9
6 6 2 2 1 6 5.14
DeGuerra
1 0 0 0 0 0 2.70
Ramírez
1 1 1 1 0 0 3.00
Chicago
Hammel W
12-5
Strop
Wood
Edwards Jr.
Chapman S 4
ATLANTA
AB R H BI BB SO
Inciarte cf
4 0 2 1 0 0
Aybar ss
4 0 0 0 0 0
FFreeman 1b
3 2 3 2 1 0
Kemp lf
4 0 0 0 0 2
Markakis rf
4 0 1 0 0 2
Garcia 3b
4 0 1 0 0 1
Beckham 2b
4 0 0 0 0 1
Pierzynski c
4 1 1 0 0 0
d’Arnaud ph
1 0 1 0 0 0
Francoeur ph
0 0 0 0 1 0
Peterson ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
33 3 9 3 2 6
Avg.
.267
.234
.280
.257
.273
.268
.227
.216
.260
.247
.261
MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO
Villar 3b
4 1 1 0 0 0
Arcia ss
4 1 1 0 0 0
Braun lf
4 0 2 1 0 1
Gennett 2b
3 1 1 0 1 0
Carter 1b
4 1 1 3 0 1
HePérez rf
3 0 0 0 1 0
Nieuwenhs cf
3 0 1 0 1 1
Maldonado c
4 0 3 0 0 0
Anderson p
2 0 0 0 0 2
Wilkins ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
32 4 10 4 3 5
Avg.
.302
.219
.325
.268
.217
.280
.209
.213
.118
.143
Atlanta.................001 100 010 — 3 9 1
Milwaukee..........004 000 00x — 4 10 0
E—Garcia (16). LOB—Atlanta 6, Milwaukee 7. 2B—Pierzynski (14), Gennett (18).
HR—FFreeman 2 (21), off Anderson, off
Knebel, Carter (26), off De La Cruz. SB—
d’Arnaud (9), Gennett (8). CS—HePérez
(4). S—De La Cruz. DP—Milwaukee 1.
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
De La Cruz L 0-5 4 7 4 4 2 2 4.09
Roe
1‚ 2 0 0 0 2 0.00
O’Flaherty
„ 0 0 0 0 0 6.31
Ramírez
2 1 0 0 1 1 4.91
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO
Andrsn W 7-10 5‚ 6 2 2 1 3
Boyer
„ 1 0 0 0 0
Torres
1 1 0 0 1 0
Knebel
1 1 1 1 0 2
Thornburg S 4 1 0 0 0 0 1
ERA
4.93
3.26
2.68
4.05
2.12
Inherited runners-scored—O’Flaherty
1-0, Boyer 1-0. NP—De La Cruz 69, Roe 17,
O’Flaherty 9, Ramírez 26, Anderson 84,
Boyer 9, Torres 16, Knebel 19, Thornburg
12. Umpires—Home, Paul Nauert; First,
Andy Fletcher; Second, Mark Ripperger;
Third, Kerwin Danley. T—2:50. A—20,035
(41,900).
BLUE JAYS 7, RAYS 0
TAMPA BAY
Forsythe 2b
Kiermaier cf
Longoria 3b
Miller 1b
Mahtook lf
Souza Jr. rf
Beckham ss
Shaffer dh
Maile c
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
3 0 1 0 1 0
4 0 2 0 0 1
4 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0 3
4 0 0 0 0 1
3 0 0 0 1 0
3 0 0 0 0 3
3 0 2 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 2
31 0 5 0 2 10
Avg.
.283
.217
.280
.260
.177
.248
.212
.333
.176
TORONTO
AB R H BI BB SO
Travis 2b
5 1 2 1 0 2
Donaldson 3b
5 2 1 0 0 1
Encrnación dh 3 1 0 0 2 2
Martin c
3 0 1 0 1 1
Tulowitzki ss
3 1 2 5 1 1
Upton Jr. cf
3 0 1 0 1 0
Saunders rf
4 0 0 0 0 3
Ceciliani rf
0 0 0 0 0 0
Smoak 1b
4 1 1 1 0 2
Barney lf
4 1 1 0 0 0
Totals
34 7 9 7 5 12
Avg.
.305
.294
.263
.230
.248
.146
.271
.000
.222
.256
Tampa Bay......... 000 000 000 — 0 5 2
Toronto................320 001 10x — 7 9 0
E—Miller (15), Souza Jr. (3). LOB—Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 9. 2B—Shaffer (1), Martin (12), Barney (9). HR—Tulowitzki (19),
off Snell, Smoak (13), off Garton. SB—Upton Jr. 3 (3). DP—Toronto 1.
Tampa Bay
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Snell L 3-5
1„ 5 5 2 4 2 3.18
Floro
2‚ 1 0 0 0 4 4.50
Farquhar
1„ 2 1 1 1 2 6.28
Garton
1‚ 1 1 1 0 2 5.14
Jepsen
1 0 0 0 0 2 5.12
Toronto
Happ W 16-3
Biagini
Grilli
Tepera
IP H R ER BB SO
6 4 0 0 2 7
1 1 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 1
ERA
2.96
2.09
1.90
4.76
Inherited runners-scored—Floro 3-0,
Garton 2-0. HBP—by Farquhar (Martin).
Balk—Snell. NP—Snell 68, Floro 35, Farquhar 40, Garton 20, Jepsen 10, Happ 98,
Biagini 20, Grilli 10, Tepera 12. Umpires—
Home, Clint Fagan; First, Alfonso Marquez; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, David Rackley. T—3:01. A—45,501 (49,282).
PADRES 4, PIRATES 0
SAN DIEGO
AB R H BI BB SO
Jankowski cf
4 1 2 0 0 1
Myers 1b
4 0 0 0 0 2
Solarte 3b
1 0 0 0 0 0
Rosales 3b
3 0 0 0 0 1
Dickerson lf
4 0 0 0 0 1
Schimpf 2b
3 1 1 0 1 0
Blash rf
3 1 1 0 1 2
Bethancourt c 4 1 1 0 0 1
Ramírez ss
4 0 1 1 0 0
Jackson p
3 0 0 0 0 1
Buchter p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Maurer p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
33 4 6 1 2 9
Avg.
.266
.278
.296
.205
.284
.213
.212
.250
.237
.308
—
—
PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO
Harrison 2b
4 0 0 0 0 2
Marte lf
4 0 0 0 0 0
McCutchen cf 4 0 1 0 0 1
Polanco rf
3 0 0 0 0 2
Freese 1b
2 0 0 0 1 1
Kang 3b
2 0 0 0 1 0
Cervelli c
0 0 0 0 1 0
Fryer c
2 0 0 0 0 0
Mercer ss
3 0 1 0 0 0
Vogelsong p
1 0 0 0 0 1
Joyce ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Nicasio p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Bastardo p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Rodríguez ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Hughes p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
27 0 2 0 3 9
Avg.
.268
.312
.242
.279
.280
.230
.263
.289
.275
.000
.271
.158
—
.246
.000
San Diego............020 000 110 — 4 6 0
Pittsburgh...........000 000 000 — 0 2 2
E—Kang (8), Vogelsong (1). LOB—San
Diego 4, Pittsburgh 3. 2B—Jankowski (8),
Schimpf (10), Blash (2). HR—. SB—
Jankowski (25). DP—San Diego 2; Pittsburgh 1.
San Diego
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Jackson W 3-2 7 2 0 0 3 7 4.19
Buchter
1 0 0 0 0 1 2.66
Maurer
1 0 0 0 0 1 4.75
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO
Vgelsong L 1-2 6 3 2 0 1 5
Nicasio
1„ 3 2 2 0 4
Bastardo
‚ 0 0 0 0 0
Hughes
1 0 0 0 1 0
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
7
4
0
0
2
6 2.90
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
3
2.89
2.62
1.42
1.35
ERA
2.67
4.98
4.60
3.35
Inherited runners-scored—Bastardo
1-1. WP—Jackson. NP—Jackson 103, Buchter 13, Maurer 16, Vogelsong 75, Nicasio 32, Bastardo 6, Hughes 15. Umpires—
Home, Tom Hallion; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Adam Hamari. T—
2:57. A—29,623 (38,362).
Inherited runners-scored—Wood 1-0,
Edwards Jr. 2-1. WP—Nolasco. Umpires—
Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Jerry
Layne; Second, Stu Scheurwater; Third,
Tripp Gibson. T—2:50. A—41,015 (41,268).
CINCINNATI
AB R H BI BB SO
Hamilton cf
4 0 0 0 0 0
Cozart ss
4 0 0 0 0 0
Votto 1b
4 1 2 0 0 0
Duvall lf
3 0 1 0 1 1
Suárez 3b
4 1 1 1 0 0
Renda 2b
4 0 0 0 0 1
Holt rf
3 0 0 0 0 1
Barnhart c
3 0 1 0 0 1
DeSclafani p
2 0 1 0 0 1
Smith p
0 0 0 0 0 0
JDiaz p
0 0 0 0 0 0
DeJesús Jr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0
Wood p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
32 2 6 1 1 5
Avg.
.255
.266
.293
.240
.239
.222
.216
.262
.174
.250
—
.229
.000
ST. LOUIS
AB R H BI BB SO
Carpenter 1b
3 2 2 1 1 0
Wong 2b
4 0 1 0 0 2
Moss rf-lf
4 0 1 1 0 2
Holliday lf
4 0 1 0 0 0
Piscotty rf
0 0 0 0 0 0
Molina c
4 0 1 0 0 1
Peralta 3b
4 1 1 1 0 2
Hazelbaker cf
3 0 1 0 1 0
GrGarcía ss
4 0 0 0 0 1
JaGarcía p
2 0 1 0 1 0
Oh p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
32 3 9 3 3 8
Avg.
.297
.243
.259
.241
.278
.281
.246
.247
.259
.200
.000
Cincinnati............000 100 001 — 2 6 0
St. Louis.............. 101 100 00x — 3 9 0
LOB—Cincinnati 4, St. Louis 8. 2B—Votto (20), Barnhart (17), Moss (18), Hazelbaker (6). 3B—Carpenter (6). HR—Suárez
(18), off JaGarcía, Carpenter (15), off DeSclafani, Peralta (6), off DeSclafani. DP—
St. Louis 1.
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
DeSclfni L 6-1
5 6 3 3 2 5 3.11
Smith
1‚ 2 0 0 1 1 3.90
JDiaz
„ 0 0 0 0 0 3.63
Wood
1 1 0 0 0 2 3.31
St. Louis
JaGrcía W 9-8
Oh S 10
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
DIAMONDBACKS 3, METS 2
CARDINALS 3, REDS 2
CUBS 3, ANGELS 1
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Odds
ERA
2.40
3.24
3.08
0.57
2.82
Inherited runners-scored—Smith 2-0.
Umpires—Home, Cory Blaser; First, Jeff
Nelson; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Laz
Diaz. T—3:04. A—21,096 (37,442).
LA Dodgers
Kazmir L 9-6
Dayton BS 1
Fields
Jansen
Ravin
EAST
Washington
Miami
New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta
San Francisco 1
IP H R ER BB SO
5 4 1 1 3 5
1 1 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 2 3
PHILLIES 6, DODGERS 2
AL
NY Yankees 9
Miami
Phelps L 5-6
Dunn
Wittgren
Ellington
Barraclough
B o s t o n
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
8 6 2 2 1 4 3.93
1 0 0 0 0 1 2.03
J.García pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scored—JDiaz 2-0, Oh
2-1. NP—DeSclafani 96, Smith 38, JDiaz 4,
Wood 15, JaGarcía 85, Oh 5. Umpires—
Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Will Little;
Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Lance Barksdale. T—2:42. A—40,019 (45,538).
ARIZONA
AB R H BI BB SO
Segura 2b
5 2 3 0 1 0
Bourn cf
5 0 2 0 0 1
Gldschmidt 1b 4 0 2 2 0 2
Lamb 3b
5 0 0 0 0 4
Drury lf-rf
4 0 0 0 1 1
Owings ss
5 0 3 0 0 0
Brito rf
4 0 0 0 0 0
Hudson p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Hathaway p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Gosselin ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Delgado p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Hernandez c
5 1 1 1 0 0
Ray p
3 0 0 0 0 3
Burgos p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Barrett p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Loewen p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Weeks Jr. lf
2 0 0 0 0 2
Totals
43 3 11 3 2 13
Avg.
.311
.246
.297
.280
.258
.267
.186
—
—
.273
.000
.200
.195
—
—
—
.244
NY METS
AB R H BI BB SO
Grndrson cf-lf 5 0 0 0 0 2
Blevins p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Kelly lf
3 0 1 0 0 0
Johnson ph-ss 2 1 1 2 0 1
Walker 2b
5 0 2 0 0 1
Bruce rf
5 0 1 0 0 0
Flores 1b-ss
4 0 0 0 0 0
Familia p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Conforto lf
1 0 0 0 0 1
TRivera 3b
5 0 1 0 0 0
d'Arnaud c
4 0 0 0 0 1
Reynolds ss
2 0 0 0 0 0
Loney ph-1b
2 0 0 0 0 0
Colón p
2 0 0 0 0 1
Reed p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Goeddel p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Niese p
0 0 0 0 0 0
De Aza ph-cf
1 1 0 0 1 0
Totals
41 2 6 2 1 7
Avg.
.230
.000
.200
.245
.274
.259
.250
—
.221
.200
.228
.203
.282
.075
—
—
.100
.199
Arizona........001 000 010 001 — 3 11 0
NY Mets.......000 000 002 000 — 2 6 1
E—d'Arnaud (1). LOB—Arizona 8, NY
Mets 4. 2B—Segura 2 (26), Goldschmidt
(24), Owings (14). HR—Hernandez (1), off
Blevins, Johnson (7), off Barrett. SB—Segura 2 (22), Bourn (10), Owings (11). CS—
Segura (8), Goldschmidt (5). S—Bourn.
SF—Goldschmidt. DP—Arizona 1.
Arizona
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Ray
7 3 0 0 0 4 4.57
Burgos
1 0 0 0 0 0 2.88
Barrett BS 4
‚ 1 2 2 1 1 3.80
Loewen
‚ 1 0 0 0 0 9.64
Hudson
„ 1 0 0 0 0 6.86
Hathaway
„ 0 0 0 0 0 4.26
Delgado W 3-1 2 0 0 0 0 2 4.50
NY Mets
Colón
Reed
Goeddel
Niese
Familia
Blevins L 4-2
IP H R ER BB SO
7 7 1 1 1 8
1 1 1 1 0 1
‚ 0 0 0 1 0
„ 0 0 0 0 0
2 2 0 0 0 3
1 1 1 1 0 1
ERA
3.35
2.01
2.88
4.77
2.80
2.73
Inherited runners-scored—Hudson 1-0,
Hathaway 1-0, Niese 1-0. PB—Hernandez.
NP—Ray 98, Burgos 13, Barrett 15, Loewen 9, Hudson 10, Hathaway 8, Delgado
20, Colón 110, Reed 14, Goeddel 12, Niese
5, Familia 38, Blevins 13. Umpires—Home,
John Hirschbeck; First, Bill Welke; Second, D.J. Reyburn; Third, Vic Carapazza.
T—4:03. A—31,277 (41,922).
RANGERS 5, ROCKIES 4
COLORADO
Blackmon cf
LeMahieu 2b
Arenado 3b
Reynolds 1b
Dahl lf
Raburn dh
Parra rf
Hundley c
Adames ss
Descalso ph
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
5 1 3 0 0 0
3 0 1 1 1 0
3 1 0 0 1 0
4 1 1 0 0 0
4 1 1 2 0 0
1 0 0 1 2 1
4 0 0 0 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 1
3 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1
32 4 6 4 4 6
Avg.
.312
.327
.286
.279
.365
.230
.262
.232
.187
.311
AB R H BI BB SO
TEXAS
Choo rf
4 1 1 0 0 2
Desmond cf
3 0 1 2 1 0
Beltrán dh
4 0 1 0 1 0
Béltre 3b
4 0 1 2 1 0
Odor 2b
4 0 1 0 1 0
Lucroy c
3 1 1 1 1 0
Profar 1b-lf
4 1 1 0 0 0
Stubbs lf
0 0 0 0 0 0
Andrus ss
4 1 1 0 0 1
DeShields lf
2 0 1 0 0 0
Mreland ph-1b 1 1 0 0 1 0
Totals
33 5 9 5 6 3
Avg.
.270
.290
.304
.278
.280
.250
.280
.267
.296
.215
.249
Colorado..............100 000 030 — 4 6 1
Texas...................010 110 02x — 5 9 3
E—Reynolds (6), Andrus (10), Odor (15),
Pérez (1). LOB—Colorado 6, Texas 12.
2B—Odor (26). 3B—Dahl (3). HR—Lucroy
(4), off De La Rosa. SB—Choo (6), Andrus
(15), Moreland (1). SF—Raburn, Desmond. DP—Texas 2.
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
De La Rosa
5 7 3 3 3 1 5.25
Germen
1 0 0 0 2 1 5.31
Estévez
1 1 0 0 0 0 5.05
Logan L 1-2
‚ 0 2 0 0 1 2.86
Lyles
‚ 0 0 0 1 0 5.85
Ottavino BS 2 ‚ 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Texas
Pérez
Barnette
Kela
Dkmn BS 1; W 3-1
Bush S 1
IP H R ER BB SO
5„ 4 1 1 2 3
1‚ 0 0 0 1 1
‚ 1 2 2 1 0
„ 1 1 1 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1
ERA
4.22
1.93
6.11
2.43
2.56
Inherited runners-scored—Lyles 2-0,
Ottavino 3-2, Barnette 1-0, Diekman 2-2.
IBB—off Lyles (Beltrán). HBP—by Logan
(Choo). WP—Estévez, Ottavino. NP—De
La Rosa 101, Germen 29, Estévez 17, Logan 9, Lyles 8, Ottavino 7, Pérez 104, Barnette 22, Kela 12, Diekman 16, Bush 14.
Umpires—Home, Greg Gibson; First, Carlos Torres; Second, Paul Emmel; Third,
Mike Estabrook. T—3:27. A—29,866
(48,114).
DIAMONDBACKS 5, METS 3
Tuesday night game
ARIZONA
Segura 2b
Bourn cf
AB R H BI BB SO
5 0 1 0 0 2
5 1 1 2 0 2
Goldschmidt 1b
4 1 2 2 0 2
Weeks Jr. lf
2 0 0 0 2 1
Burgos p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Barrett p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Drury rf-lf
4 1 2 1 0 0
Lamb 3b
4 0 0 0 0 2
Owings ss
4 1 1 0 0 1
Gosewisch c
4 0 1 0 0 1
Greinke p
1 0 0 0 0 1
Gosselin ph
0 1 0 0 1 0
Delgado p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Brito rf
1 0 0 0 0 1
Totals
34 5 8 5 3 13
Avg.
.308
.243
.295
.248
—
—
.261
.284
.260
.154
.263
.275
.000
.205
NY METS
AB R H BI BB SO
Granderson cf 4 1 1 0 0 1
Walker 2b
4 2 3 2 0 1
Bruce rf
3 0 1 0 1 2
Loney 1b
4 0 0 1 0 1
Flores 3b-ss
3 0 0 0 0 0
De Aza ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Conforto lf
3 0 0 0 1 2
d'Arnaud c
3 0 0 0 0 0
Kelly ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Reynolds ss
3 0 1 0 0 1
Goeddel p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Matz p
2 0 0 0 0 1
Robles p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Edgin p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Johnson 3b
1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals
32 3 6 3 2 9
Avg.
.233
.273
.259
.284
.254
.200
.221
.234
.188
.209
—
.147
.000
—
.243
Arizona................010 001 300 — 5 8 1
NY Mets...............100 002 000 — 3 6 1
HR—Goldschmidt (18), off Matz, Drury
(10), off Matz, Walker (20), off Greinke.
Arizona
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Greinke W 11-3
6 5 3 3 1 6 3.67
Delgado
1 0 0 0 0 1 4.66
Burgos
1 1 0 0 0 2 3.00
Barrett S 4
1 0 0 0 1 0 3.40
NY Mets
Matz
Robles BS 2; L 5-4
Edgin
Goeddel
IP H R ER BB SO
6 5 2 2 1 9
„ 3 3 3 2 2
„ 0 0 0 0 1
1„ 0 0 0 0 1
T—3:04. A—31,884 (41,922).
ERA
3.60
3.31
0.00
2.92
MARLINS 2, GIANTS 0
Tuesday night game
SAN FRANCISCO AB
Span cf
Pagán lf
Belt 1b
Crawford ss
Romo p
Gillaspie 3b
Pence rf
Panik 2b
Brown c
Moore p
Peavy p
López p
Núñez ph-ss
Totals
4
3
2
4
0
4
4
3
3
2
0
0
1
30
R H BI BB SO
0 0 0 0 1
0 2 0 1 0
0 0 0 2 0
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 3 0 4 7
Avg.
.262
.285
.281
.275
—
.262
.281
.236
.254
.000
.185
.000
.229
MIAMI
Gordon 2b
Prado 3b
Yelich lf
Stanton rf
Ellington p
Dietrich ph
AB R H BI BB SO
1 1 0 0 3 1
4 1 1 0 0 0
4 0 1 0 0 1
2 0 1 1 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 1 0 0
3 0 0 0 1 2
0 0 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 1
3 0 1 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 0
27 2 4 2 6 9
Avg.
.288
.324
.326
.243
.000
.277
.251
.285
.229
—
.240
.253
.081
.314
Hechavarria ss
Ozuna cf
Johnson 1b
Rodney p
Mathis c
Rojas ss-1b
Koehler p
Suzuki ph-rf
Totals
San Francisco.....000 000 000 — 0 3 0
Miami...................200 000 00x — 2 4 1
E—Gordon (4). LOB—San Francisco 7,
Miami 7. 2B—Stanton (19). HR—. DP—Miami 1.
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Moore L 0-1
6 3 2 2 5 7 3.00
Peavy
„ 1 0 0 1 0 5.45
López
‚ 0 0 0 0 0 3.79
Romo
1 0 0 0 0 2 3.60
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO
Koehler W 9-8 7 2 0 0 3 6
Ellington
1 1 0 0 1 0
Rodney S 19
1 0 0 0 0 1
ERA
3.83
0.61
2.30
Inherited runners-scored—López 2-0.
PB—Brown. NP—Moore 111, Peavy 18, López 4, Romo 14, Koehler 112, Ellington 17,
Rodney 11. Umpires—Home, Laz Diaz;
First, Cory Blaser; Second, Jeff Nelson;
Third, Doug Eddings. T—2:58. A—19,636
(37,442).
INDIANS 3, NATIONALS 1
Tuesday night game
CLEVELAND
Santana 1b
Kipnis 2b
Lindor ss
Ramírez 3b
Chisenhall rf
Naquin cf
Almonte lf
Miller p
Shaw p
Allen p
RoPérez c
Bauer p
Davis lf
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
4 0 0 0 0 3
4 1 1 0 0 2
4 1 1 0 0 1
4 1 2 2 0 0
4 0 1 1 0 1
3 0 0 0 1 3
3 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0 1
2 0 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 1
32 3 5 3 1 14
Avg.
.242
.284
.305
.305
.295
.313
.263
—
—
—
.087
.000
.260
WASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO
Turner 2b
5 0 0 0 0 2
Werth lf
3 1 1 1 1 0
Murphy 1b
4 0 0 0 0 0
Rendón 3b
4 0 1 0 0 1
Ramos c
4 0 1 0 0 0
Severino pr-c
0 0 0 0 0 0
Heisey rf
3 0 0 0 1 2
Espinosa ss
4 0 0 0 0 2
Revere cf
4 0 2 0 0 1
Scherzer p
2 0 1 0 0 1
Goodwin ph
1 0 0 0 0 0
Treinen p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Solís p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Robinson ph
0 0 0 0 1 0
Totals
34 1 6 1 3 9
Avg.
.287
.250
.347
.265
.337
.375
.208
.222
.212
.140
.000
—
.000
.211
Cleveland............000 000 201 — 3 5 2
Washington........000 000 010 — 1 6 1
E—Lindor (8), Ramírez (6), Scherzer (1).
LOB—Cleveland 3, Washington 9. 2B—
Kipnis (23), Ramírez (27), Rendón (25),
Revere (6). HR—Werth (14), off Miller.
SB—Ramírez (13). DP—Cleveland 1.
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Bauer W 8-5 6‚ 4 0 0 2 4 3.88
Miller
1 1 1 1 0 1 1.65
Shaw
„ 1 0 0 0 2 3.75
Allen S 21
1 0 0 0 1 2 2.44
Washington
Scherzer L
12-7
Treinen
Solís
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
7
3
2
1
1 10 2.80
„
1‚
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
0
1 1.99
3 2.27
Inherited runners-scored—Miller 1-0.
NP—Bauer 92, Miller 14, Shaw 13, Allen
24, Scherzer 108, Treinen 9, Solís 25. Umpires—Home, Jerry Meals; First, Ryan
Blakney; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Chris
Conroy. T—2:55. A—30,978 (41,313).
RANGERS 7, ROCKIES 5
Tuesday afternoon game
TEXAS
AB R H BI BB SO
Desmond cf
5 2 1 0 0 2
Odor 2b
5 1 2 1 0 0
Beltrán rf
4 0 1 1 0 1
DeShields pr-lf 1 1 0 0 0 1
Dyson p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Béltre 3b
4 1 2 2 0 0
Moreland 1b
4 1 1 0 0 1
Andrus ss
4 1 2 1 0 1
Mazara lf
3 0 2 1 0 1
Lucroy ph
1 0 0 0 0 1
Jeffress p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Rua lf
0 0 0 0 0 0
Chirinos c
3 0 0 1 0 1
Griffin p
2 0 0 0 0 2
Cláudio p
0 0 0 0 0 0
Choo ph-rf
1 0 0 0 1 1
Totals
37 7 11 7 1 12
Avg.
.290
.280
.305
.211
—
.278
.250
.296
.284
.240
—
.266
.183
.000
—
.271
COLORADO
Blackmon cf
LeMahieu 2b
Dahl lf
Arenado 3b
Parra rf
Descalso 1b
Avg.
.308
.327
.373
.288
.266
.314
.279
.191
.233
.146
—
—
.232
.000
Reynolds ph-1b
Adames ss
Wolters c
Chatwood p
Oberg p
McGee p
Raburn ph
Lyles p
Totals
AB R H BI BB SO
5 2 2 1 0 1
5 0 2 0 0 0
4 2 1 0 1 2
3 1 2 2 2 0
5 0 2 1 0 1
1 0 0 0 1 0
2 0 1 1 0 0
4 0 0 0 0 1
4 0 1 0 0 1
3 0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0
37 5 11 5 4 8
Texas...................000 010 141 — 7 11 0
Colorado..............202 010 000 — 5 11 0
LOB—Texas 5, Colorado 9. 2B—Odor
(25), Béltre (20), Andrus (19), Mazara
(13), Blackmon (23), LeMahieu (23). 3B—
Dahl (2). HR—Blackmon (14), off Griffin.
SF—Chirinos.
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Texas
4„ 7 5 5 3 5 4.38
Griffin
Cláudio W 3-1 2‚ 3 0 0 0 1 2.70
Jeffress
1 0 0 0 0 1 4.50
Dyson S 25
1 1 0 0 1 1 2.58
Colorado
Chatwood
Oberg BS 1; L 0-1
McGee
Lyles
IP H R ER BB SO
6„ 5 2 2 0 8
„ 4 4 4 0 2
„ 1 0 0 0 1
1 1 1 1 1 1
ERA
3.58
5.14
5.13
5.90
Inherited runners-scored—Cláudio 2-1,
Oberg 1-0, McGee 1-1. WP—Chatwood.
NP—Griffin 97, Cláudio 35, Jeffress 19, Dyson 24, Chatwood 108, Oberg 24, McGee
8, Lyles 19. Umpires—Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Carlos
Torres; Third, Paul Emmel. T—3:14.
A—27,671 (50,398).
LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Not including last night’s games
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
Altuve, Hou................. 440 82 159 .361
Bogaerts, Bos ............. 454 80 144 .317
YEscobar, LAA............ 403 53 127 .315
Trout, LAA................... 397 88 124 .312
MiCabrera, Det........... 425 65 132 .311
Betts, Bos.................... 474 87 147 .310
Ortiz, Bos..................... 369 50 114 .309
Lindor, Cle................... 426 74 130 .305
Machado, Bal ............. 433 77 132 .305
JoRamirez, Cle............ 371 56 113 .305
HOME RUNS
Frazier, Chicago.........................................31
Trumbo, Baltimore....................................31
Encarnacion, Toronto...............................31
Napoli, Cleveland.......................................28
RUNS BATTED IN
Encarnacion, Toronto...............................94
Ortiz, Boston...............................................88
Pujols, Los Angeles...................................86
Napoli, Cleveland.......................................79
Trumbo, Baltimore....................................77
PITCHING
Happ, Toronto.........................................15-3
Porcello, Boston.....................................15-3
Tillman, Baltimore................................. 14-4
Sale, Chicago..........................................14-5
SWright, Boston.....................................13-5
Iwakuma, Seattle...................................13-7
Not including last night’s games
BATTING
AB
R
H Avg.
Murphy, Was.............. 401 66 139 .347
WRamos, Was............ 344 52 116 .337
LeMahieu, Col ............ 392 71 128 .327
Braun, Mil.................... 350 56 113 .323
Yelich, Mia .................. 406 60 131 .323
CGonzalez, Col ........... 414 72 133 .321
Prado, Mia .................. 427 54 137 .321
Marte, Pit .................... 387 59 122 .315
ADiaz, StL.................... 353 64 110 .312
Realmuto, Mia............ 363 42 113 .311
HOME RUNS
Arenado, Colorado....................................30
Bryant, Chicago.........................................28
Story, Colorado..........................................27
Duvall, Cincinnati...................................... 26
RUNS BATTED IN
Arenado, Colorado....................................91
Murphy, Washington................................81
Rizzo, Chicago............................................80
Jay Bruce, Cincinnati................................80
PITCHING
Strasburg, Washington.........................15-2
Cueto, San Francisco............................ 13-3
Arrieta, Chicago.....................................13-5
Lester, Chicago.......................................12-4
Fernandez, Miami..................................12-6
Roark, Washington................................12-6
Scherzer, Washington...........................12-7
Werth
propels
Nationals
ASSOCIATED PRESS
At some point in mid-June, Jayson Werth decided to stop listening
to everyone who told him to swing at
the first pitch and be
BASEBALL more aggressive.
ROUNDUP
The result is a 40game on-base streak
that has Werth setting the table for
the Washington Nationals’ potent offense. On Wednesday, Werth got on
base and drove in runs himself with
a homer while the Nationals beat the
Cleveland Indians, 7-4, in Washington.
Werth hit a three-run homer off
Josh Tomlin in the second inning but
takes more pride in getting on base
than anything else.
‘‘I'm an on-base guy that can drive
in runs,’’ said Werth, who was 2 for 3
with a ground-rule double and a
walk. ‘‘I think I've silenced all those
people that have told me over the
years that that’s the way I should hit.
Just getting back to being myself. I
think that’s what it comes down to.’’
Werth spearheaded an offensive
outburst for the Nationals, who had
scored three runs in their previous
three games combined.
Anthony Rendon also went 2 for
4 with a two-run double and Daniel
Murphy and Wilson Ramos each had
an RBI.
It wasn’t the best day for starter
Gio Gonzalez (8-9), who allowed four
runs and seven hits, including a tworun home run by Francisco Lindor,
and struck out five in five-plus innings.
But Gonzalez got plenty of run
support, and reliever Matt Belisle
bailed him out by inducing a double
play in the sixth and getting out of
the inning unscathed.
Cleveland got three hits from Jose
Ramirez, who extended his hitting
streak to 14 games, but Tomlin
(11-5) failed to get through the fifth
inning for the second consecutive
start. Tomlin allowed seven runs and
eight hits and struck out four in fourplus innings.
Brewers 4, Braves 3 — Chris Carter
hit a three-run homer, Chase Anderson won his third straight decision,
and host Milwaukee held off Atlanta.
Braves starter Joel De La Cruz left
after getting hit in the right knee by
Orlando Arcia’s two-out grounder in
the fourth.
The Braves said he has a right
knee contusion, X-rays were negative and he is day-to-day.
Cardinals 3, Reds 2 — Matt Carpenter and Jhonny Peralta homered to
back up a second straight dominant
start by Jaime Garcia as host St. Louis edged Cincinnati.
Blue Jays 7, Rays 0 — J.A. Happ and
three relievers combined on a fourhitter as Happ became the first 16game winner in the majors, and host
Toronto dominated Tampa Bay.
Giants 1, Marlins 0 — Brandon
Crawford homered in the fourth inning and visiting San Francisco won
a series for the first time since the
All-Star break.
Phillies 6, Dodgers 2 — Shortstop
Freddy Galvis hit a three-run home
run in the seventh inning to help
Philadelphia beat host Los Angeles.
Padres 4, Pirates 0 — Edwin Jackson
pitched two-hit ball over seven innings, Travis Jankowski capped the
scoring with a straight steal of home,
and San Diego shut out host Pittsburgh.
Cubs 3, Angels 1 — Jason Hammel
won his career-best fifth straight
start, pitching four-hit ball over six
scoreless innings, and host Chicago
topped Los Angeles for its seasonhigh ninth straight win.
Rangers 5, Rockies 4 — Adrian Beltre singled in two runs in the eighth
inning, and host Texas rallied late for
the third straight game against Colorado.
Diamondbacks 3, Mets 2 — Oscar
Hernandez hit his first major league
homer in the 12th inning, leading
visiting Arizona over New York.
. . .
The Astros-Twins game in Minneapolis was postponed by persistent
rain that started in the third inning
and was forecast to last throughout
the night. The decision was made after a 2½-hour delay.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Yankees 9, Red Sox 4
NY YANKEES
Gardner lf
Ellsbury cf
Headley 3b
Teixeira 1b
Castro 2b
Gregorius ss
Sánchez dh
Romine c
Hicks rf
a-AlRodríguez
ph
Refsnyder rf
Totals
At Fenway Park
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
5 0 1 0 0 1 .265
3 1 1 1 1 0 .272
5 1 2 1 0 1 .257
3 0 1 0 2 2 .198
5 0 1 2 0 1 .258
5 2 2 1 0 1 .286
5 2 4 1 0 0 .321
4 2 2 1 1 0 .252
2 0 0 0 0 1 .191
BOSTON
Pedroia 2b
Bogaerts ss
Betts rf
Holt rf
Ortiz dh
b-Brentz ph-dh
HRamírez 1b
Bradley Jr. cf
Shaw 3b
c-Hill ph-3b
León c
Benintendi lf
Totals
0
0
0
0 .203
1
39
1
1 1
9 15
0
0
7
0
4
0 .264
7
AB
5
3
4
1
2
0
5
5
1
2
3
4
35
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
1
4
H BI BB SO Avg.
2 1 0 0 .298
0 1 1 0 .315
2 1 0 0 .312
0 0 0 0 .251
0 0 3 1 .307
0 0 0 0 .279
0 0 0 1 .268
2 0 0 0 .288
0 0 1 0 .261
0 0 0 2 .220
2 0 1 1 .371
1 1 0 0 .450
9 4 6 5
NY Yankees................000 010 530 — 9 15 0
Boston.........................001 102 000 — 4 9 0
a-flied out for Hicks in 7th, b-was announced for Ortiz in 9th, c-struck out for
T.Shaw in 5th. LOB—NY Yankees 8, Boston 11.
2B—Castro (21), Pedroia (27), Betts 2 (34).
HR—Gregorius (14), off Pomeranz, Sánchez
(1), off Tazawa. S—Ellsbury. Runners left in
scoring position—NY Yankees 6 (Gardner,
Teixeira 2, Castro, Gregorius 2), Boston 6 (Pedroia, Ortiz, HRamírez 2, Hill 2). RISP—NY
Yankees 4 for 15, Boston 2 for 11. Runners
moved up—AlRodríguez. GIDP—Gardner, Castro. DP—Boston 2 (Pedroia, Bogaerts, HRamírez), (Hill, Pedroia, HRamírez).
NY Yankees
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Eovaldi
1 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.76
Shreve
1‚ 2 1 1 1 0 29 4.15
Parker
1‚ 2 1 1 1 0 30 3.86
Goody
„ 1 0 0 2 0 20 4.23
Layne
„ 1 2 2 1 1 12 4.11
Clippard W
1 3 0 0 1 0 30 2.25
1-0
Warren
2 0 0 0 0 2 28 0.00
Betances
1 0 0 0 0 2 14 2.32
Boston
Pomeranz
Buchholz
Barnes
Abad BS 3; L
1-6
Tazawa
Ross Jr.
Ziegler
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
5‚ 6 1 1 1 5 93 5.26
„ 0 0 0 0 0 3 5.64
‚ 3 3 3 0 0 15 3.48
‚
2
2
2
0
1 14 3.19
‚
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
0 20 3.96
1 25 3.89
0 10 0.87
Layne pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Clippard pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Tazawa
pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Parker 3-1, Goody 2-0, Layne
3-0, Clippard 2-2, Warren 1-0, Buchholz 2-0,
Abad 2-2, Tazawa 2-2, Ross Jr. 1-1. IBB—off
Goody (Ortiz), off Clippard (Ortiz). HBP—by
Shreve (Bogaerts). WP—Clippard, Ross Jr. 3.
Umpires—Home, Brian Knight; First, Tony
Randazzo; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Todd
Tichenor. T—4:15. A—37,779 (37,949).
HOW THE RUNS SCORED
THIRD INNING
RED SOX — León hit an infield single to
third. Benintendi fouled out on a bunt to
catcher. Pedroia doubled to left, S.León to
third. Bogaerts was hit by a pitch. B.Parker
pitching. Betts grounded into fielder’s choice,
second baseman to shortstop, S.León scored,
Pedroia to third, Bogaerts out. Ortiz flied out
to left.
FOURTH INNING
RED SOX — Ramírez flied out to right. Bradley Jr. singled to center. Shaw walked, Bradley Jr. to second. León singled to right, Bradley Jr. to third, Shaw to second. Benintendi
grounded into fielder’s choice, shortstop unassisted, Bradley Jr. scored, Shaw to third,
S.León out. Goody pitching. Pedroia popped
out to shortstop.
FIFTH INNING
YANKEES — Gregorius homered to right.
Sánchez singled to center. Au.Romine singled
to left, G.Sánchez to second. Hicks struck out.
Gardner grounded into a double play, second
to shortstop to first, Au.Romine out.
SIXTH INNING
RED SOX — León walked. Benintendi singled to right, León to third. Clippard pitching.
Pedroia singled to left, S.León scored, Benintendi to third. Bogaerts grounded into fielder’s choice, shortstop to second, Benintendi
scored, Pedroia out. Betts doubled to center,
Bogaerts to third. Bogaerts was out advancing, center to shortstop to catcher, Bogaerts
out. Ortiz was intentionally walked. On Clippard’s wild pitch, Betts to third, Ortiz to second. H.Ramírez flied out to left.
SEVENTH INNING
YANKEES — Barnes pitching. Gregorius singled to center. Sánchez singled to left, Gregorius to second. Romine singled to left, Gregorius scored, G.Sánchez to second. Rodríguez
pinch-hitting for Hicks flied out to right, Sánchez to third. Abad pitching. Gardner struck
out. Ellsbury singled to right, G.Sánchez
scored, Romine to third. Headley singled to
left, Romine scored, Ellsbury to second. Tazawa pitching. Teixeira walked on a full count,
Ellsbury to third, Headley to second. S.Castro
doubled to left, Ellsbury scored, Headley
scored, Teixeira to third. Gregorius popped
out to third baseman A.Hill.
EIGHTH INNING
YANKEES — Sánchez homered to center.
Romine walked. Ross Jr. pitching. Refsnyder
singled to center, Romine to second. On Ross
Jr.’s wild pitch, Romine to third, Refsnyder to
second. Gardner flied out to left. Ellsbury
walked. On Ross Jr.’s wild pitch, Au.Romine
scored, Refsnyder to third, Ellsbury to second.
Headley fouled out to first. On Ross Jr.’s wild
pitch, Refsnyder scored, Ellsbury to third.
Teixeira struck out.
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
Alex Rodriguez, who is
retiring Friday, pinch hit in
the seventh — to a chorus of
boos — and flied to right.
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D3
Wright will miss his next start
He hurt shoulder
pinch running
By Peter Abraham
GLOBE STAFF
All-Star righthander Steven
Wright will miss his start
against the Yankees on Thursday beRED SOX
cause of inNOTEBOOK
flammation in his
shoulder, the result of a pinchrunning mishap on Sunday.
Wright ran for David Ortiz
in the sixth inning against the
Dodgers and dove back to second base when Los Angeles
pitcher Joe Blanton faked a
pickoff throw.
“Jarred his pitching shoulder and there’s some inflammation. No structural damage but
inflammation in the right
shoulder,” manager John Farrell
said Wednesday.
Wright had an MRI on Tuesday that came back negative.
Farrell said Wright is not a candidate for the disabled list “at
this point.”
Wright said the exam
showed no damage to his rotator cuff or labrum. He tried
throwing on Tuesday and decided to stop because of the discomfort, then went for the
MRI.
“Hopefully in a couple of
days I’ll be able to start throwing,” said Wright, who felt some
improvement on Wednesday.
Eduardo Rodriguez will face
the Yankees on Thursday. David
Price will pitch Friday and Clay
Buchholz returns to the rotation on Saturday.
Wright is 13-5 with a 3.01
earned run average in 22 starts
and has been one of the most
valuable players on the roster.
His loss for more than a game
or two would be significant.
“We’re hopeful in the next
couple of days he’ll respond favorably to treatment,” Farrell
said.
Ortiz pinch hit on Sunday
and drew a walk. When he advanced to second with the Red
Sox down by a run, pinch running for him was the expected
move. Rather than waste a po-
BARRY CHIN/GLOBE STAFF
David Ortiz grimaces after fouling a ball off his shin in the ninth. He had to be helped off.
sition player, Farrell used
Wright.
That is a common move in
National League parks. But
Farrell was uneasy nonetheless.
“You always are,” he said.
“The fact we’re in a National
League game, you’re looking to
do what’s right by the game situation. Trying to get David off
his feet for precaution of injury
there and yet it shows up in another way.”
Farrell said he selected
Wright to run based on watching him hit on Friday.
“The way he swung the bat
. . . was more of an indication
to me of, ‘Here’s a guy that’s
just a baseball player.’ Rick Porcello has flown back early and
was not available to us,” the
manager said. “Looking at a
starter that’s not going to be
used [to pitch] inside that
game. He was the guy.”
Wright knew when he dove
back that something was
wrong.
“Right after it happened, it
felt weird,” he said. “When we
got back, I said something. . . .
It just felt different.”
Through Tuesday, pitchers
had been used as pinch runners
25 times this season.
“It’s a little surprising but I
was prepared,” Wright said. “I
think every pitcher is prepared
that that was something that
could come up.”
Wright said he had not run
the bases since 2004, his freshman year in college.
Buchholz last made a start
on July 2. He has not thrown
more than 35 pitches in a relief
appearance since. He needed
only three pitches to get a double-play ball Wednesday night
when he came on for Drew Pomeranz in the sixth inning. It’s
uncertain how deep he will be
able to go against the Arizona
Diamondbacks.
“That’s going to be dependent upon the stress inside the
outing,” Farrell said. “Would
feel comfortable he’s in the that
65-75 pitch range.”
Buchholz is 2-8 with a 6.31
ERA in 13 starts.
Rodriguez is 4-1 with a 2.01
ERA in five career starts
against the Yankees. He faced
them in New York on July 16
and allowed one run over seven
innings.
Young gets going
Chris Young, on the disabled
list since June 24 with a
strained right hamstring, starts
a rehabilitation assignment
with Triple A Pawtucket on
Thursday afternoon at McCoy
Stadium against Durham.
He will be the DH and get
three or four at-bats. Young will
then play the outfield on Saturday.
Because Young has been out
so long, he will get at least 2025 at-bats before the Sox consider activating him.
“That’s just kind of a marker. That doesn’t mean he’ll be
back at that day.”
Young was hitting .277 with
an .846 OPS at the time of his
injury.
Surgery for Swihart
When the options were laid
out for Blake Swihart, it was an
easy decision to have surgery
on his left ankle.
The 24-year-old catcher and
outfielder decided it was best to
start getting ready for 2017 instead of continuing what had
been a frustrating experience
with rehab since his injury on
June 4.
“It’s one of those injuries
that wasn’t going to go away. As
much as I wanted to come back
and play this season, it wasn’t
going to happen,” he said.
The surgery, by Dr. Robert
Anderson, will be on Monday
in Charlotte, N.C. Swihart
needs the sheath covering his
peroneal tendon repaired.
“Everything points to him
being full-go in spring training,” Farrell said.
Swihart opened the season
as the starting catcher.
But that lasted only six
games as the Red Sox turned to
Christian Vazquez.
Swihart was demoted to
Pawtucket and returned to the
majors as a left fielder on May
20.
He played only 13 games before getting injured trying to
make a catch while colliding
with the fence along the foul
line in left field at Fenway Park.
Swihart said his goal is to return as a catcher in 2017.
“That’s my position,” he
said. “I just want to come back
and help this team again.
There’s such a bright future
here.”
Kimbrel not KO’d
Craig Kimbrel, who walked
a career-high four batters on
Tuesday, did not report any
soreness in his surgically repaired left knee on Wednesday.
He said after the game that his
knee was giving him trouble. In
his previous appearance, on
Aug. 4 in Seattle, Kimbrel
struck out three of the four batters he faced . . . Mookie Betts
extended his hit streak to 11
games with a double in the fifth
inning . . . Farrell said it was
likely infielder Josh Rutledge
would need surgery to correct
patellar tendinitis in his left
knee . . . The Yankees added
righthander Blake Parker and
optioned righthander Luis Severino, who allowed five runs in
4‚ innings on Tuesday.
Peter Abraham can be reached
at [email protected]
Follow him on Twitter
@PeteAbe.
Ortiz hurt in ninth after Red Sox bullpen falters
RED SOX
Continued from Page D1
week he fouled a ball off the
same spot.
“My heart sunk a little bit
when I saw it but fortunately I
just saw him back there and
he’s doing much better,” president of baseball operations
Dave Dombrowski said.
The Red Sox also lost right
fielder Mookie Betts in the
eighth inning when he came
out with a tight right calf. He
missed two games last month
with a sore right knee.
Betts will undergo testing on
Thursday and is doubtful for
the final game of the series.
“It was just kind of going on
all day. Having some stiffness
and just kind of gradually got a
little worse so just precautionary,” Betts said.
Before the game, it was announced righthander Steven
Wright would miss his next
start with a shoulder injury that
came via running the bases in
Los Angeles on Sunday.
Three injuries to three AllStars, it was almost enough to
make the result of the game, a
9-4 loss, seem superfluous.
Of course, it’s not. The Red
Sox, up, 4-1, after six innings,
saw relievers Matt Barnes, Fernando Abad, Junichi Tazawa,
and Robbie Ross Jr. allow eight
runs on eight hits, three walks,
and three wild pitches over only
two innings.
“We as a bullpen let that one
get away from us tonight,” Farrell said.
The Sox have lost five of
their last eight games and are
12-13 since the All-Star break.
A once-potent offense has averaged 3.6 runs in the last 14
games.
It was a year ago this week
that Farrell learned he had lymphoma and had to step away
from the team to pursue treatment. Bench coach Torey Lovullo managed the final 48
games.
The Sox have 50 games remaining this season and Lovullo could soon be managing
again if the Sox cannot break
out of what has been several
weeks of desultory play.
Farrell tried changing his
lineup, using Dustin Pedroia
leading off with Xander Bogaerts and Betts ahead of Ortiz.
The Yankees responded by
walking Ortiz three times, twice
intentionally, to get to slumping
Hanley Ramirez. He was 0 for 5
and left six runners on base.
The Sox were 2 for 11 with
runners in scoring position and
left 11 men on base. That inefficiency came on a night when
Yankees starter Nathan Eovaldi
left the game after one inning
with a sore elbow. Manager Joe
Girardi used seven relievers to
secure the victory.
Red Sox starter Drew Pomeranz went 5‚ innings and
allowed one run on six hits. But
he has pitched only 25„ innings in five starts since being
obtained from the San Diego
Padres.
“I’d like to get deeper into
the game,” said Pomeranz, who
needed 93 pitches to get 16
outs. Pomeranz left with a 2-1
lead.
The Sox loaded the bases
with one out in the third inning
and scratched out a run when
Betts grounded slowly to second base and was able to beat
the double play. Ortiz then
popped to left field.
The Sox again loaded the
bases with one out in the third
inning. This time Andrew Benintendi avoided a double play to
drive in a run.
When the Sox loaded the
bases in the fifth inning, they
could have used another slow
grounder. But Ramirez popped
to left, Jackie Bradley Jr. fouled
out, and pinch hitter Aaron Hill
struck out.
The Sox took a 4-1 lead in
the sixth inning as the reconfigured lineup clicked a bit. Sandy
Leon drew a walk from former
teammate Tommy Layne. Benintendi grounded a single into
right and Leon went to third.
Facing Tyler Clippard, Pedroia
followed with a single to left,
driving in Leon and sending Benintendi to third.
Benintendi scored when Bogaerts grounded into a force at
second. Betts followed with his
second double, a blast to center
field. But Bogaerts was thrown
out at the plate.
The Yankees intentionally
walked Ortiz and Ramirez flied
out to left field.
The lead did not last as the
Yankees scored five runs on six
hits in the seventh inning to
take the lead.
Barnes, who got his first career save on Tuesday, started
the inning and allowed groundball singles by Didi Gregorius,
Gary Sanchez, and Austin Romine for one run.
To a chorus of boos, Alex Rodriguez pinch hit and flied to
right field. That advanced Sanchez to third base.
Abad came in and struck out
Brett Gardner. But the lefty specialist failed to get lefthanded
hitting Jacoby Ellsbury, who
singled in a run. Chase Headley
did the same.
Tazawa walked Mark Teixeira and Starlin Castro followed
with a two-run double down
the line in left.
The eighth inning was more
of the same. Tazawa, who also
wore down in August last season, allowed a towering homer
by Sanchez. When Ross came
in, a series of poorly located
pitches led to two more runs
scoring.
Now in good health, Farrell has made job his sole focus
By Nora Princiotti
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
With 51 games remaining
in the regular season, Red Sox
manager John Farrell sat at the
podium during his pregame
press conference Wednesday
faced with many questions
about injuries, availabilities,
and all the minutiae that will
collectively help shape the
team’s push for the playoffs.
What made him decide to
put All-star pitcher Steven
Wright at risk by sending him
to pinch run, a move that led to
Wright being scratched from
his Thursday start after he irritated his shoulder diving back
to second base on Sunday in
Los Angeles? Would Blake
Swihart be lost for the season
because of a severe ankle
sprain that included separation of his peroneal tendon?
Farrell parried the hindsight-enhanced qualms and
quibbles that sometimes irk
managers. But on this particular day, Aug. 10, Farrell didn’t
mind so much.
“I’d rather talk about peroneal tendons rather than
Burkitt lymphoma,” Farrell
said.
It has been one year since
Farrell, on a road trip to Detroit last August, was diagnosed with cancer. He’d gone
to Henry Ford Hospital for routine hernia surgery and wound
up diagnosed with Stage 1
non-Hodgkin’s Burkitt lymphoma. Farrell missed the last
48 games of the season, ceding
his role to Torey Lovullo, while
undergoing chemotherapy.
“It was hell going through
[it],” Farrell said. “But I’ve
learned a lot about myself, I’ve
learned a lot about the things
that, again, life deals people
and you find that you put faith
in a lot of people to help you
get through some tough moments, so honestly I’m very
fortunate.
“And I hold a hell of a lot of
gratitude towards the things of
daily life right now.”
The Red Sox announced
that Farrell’s cancer was in remission on the final day of the
regular season, Oct. 22, saying
that he would return as manager contingent on further
medical tests. Farrell said he
should receive the results of
his one-year checkup Thursday
morning.
Before the diagnosis, Farrell
hadn’t been experiencing any
symptoms. He thought he was
in great health. Saying goodbye to his career, much less
family and friends, wasn’ t
something he’d had to think
about seriously. He’d never pictured himself weakened by
grueling treatments, either.
Farrell expected very little
of what has happened to him
in the past year, a change in
course he said he has grown
from.
“I’d like to think I’m a better
person,” he said. “Maybe not
everything works out as you
anticipate, but there’s a different perspective on things, I
will tell you that.”
Farrell said he has become a
better manager, too. He has experience to draw from when
telling players, who tend to see
everything with “a sense of urgency” where every start or atbat seems overwhelmingly important, not to get worked up
over a small setback or issue.
“If you can give a little perspective when maybe guys take
a step back, take a breather a
little bit as a result of sharing
an experience . . . then there’s
been some help given along
the way,” he said.
Farrell also has a stronger
appreciation for his work in
baseball. His own expectations
were challenged when it was
taken away from him for a
time, but when he came back
he was suddenly saddled with
the expectations of others, for
his team to win, once again.
On the one-year anniversary of his cancer diagnosis, Farrell is managing a team 1½
games out of first place in the
AL East. He may not have expected that, either.
“I guess the best way I can
say it is there’s a real reason
why they pop champagne
when this is over,” Farrell said.
“Because it isn’ t easy. And
we’re right in the thick of it
and that’s what we want to
sign up for every year is be in
the hunt, be in the race, hopefully we’re dumping champagne.”
Nora Princiotti can be reached
at [email protected]
Follow her on Twitter at
@NoraPrinciotti.
D4
T h e
Sports
Patriots practice report
ATTENDANCE, PLEASE
R LB Rob Ninkovich, RB Dion Lewis, TE
Bryce Williams, G Jonathan Cooper, and
OT Sebastian Vollmer were not spotted.
R WR Danny Amendola was at the session but did not practice.
NEW INJURIES: None.
DRESS CODE: Shorts and shells.
THREE UP
R Jacoby Brissett: The rookie QB hasn’t
received a ton of snaps between the last
few scrimmages and joint practices, but
he did go 8 of 9 during a half-speed seven-on-seven exercise at the end of practice under the eyes of Bill Belichick.
R Eric LeGrand: The former Rutgers player
who was paralyzed in 2010 delivered an
inspirational message to both teams after
practice. Patriots Devin McCourty, Logan
Ryan, Duron Harmon, and Jonathan
Freeny played with LeGrand at Rutgers.
R The Foxborough Faithful: Despite monsoon-like conditions at the start of practice and a steady rain that followed, the
sideline bleachers remained packed and
lively for the two-hour-plus session.
THREE DOWN
R Mother Nature: The big lady really put
on a show, but the deluge kept the practice, which was going to be a noncontact
exercise anyway, at slower than halfspeed.
R Ken Crawley: The defensive back picked
off a Jimmy Garoppolo pass during a drill
in which the Saints weren’t supposed to
be defending and took some friendly grief
from his teammates.
R The unidentified referee/staffer . . . who
called a false start on Chris Hogan (forcing him to take a penalty lap) when clearly
the call should have been offside on the
Saints. We’re stretching here, but it was a
very uneventful practice.
TOP PLAYS
R With most of the practice run at halfspeed — maybe even quarter-speed —
highlight moments were at a premium because of the pouring rain and slick field.
However, it is worth mentioning that tight
ends Bear Pascoe and A.J. Derby, and
rookie receiver Malcolm Mitchell all
made nice receptions during Brissett’s
late 11-on-11 session. It might have been
Pascoe’s first reception during a full-team
drill this camp.
R Rob Gronkowski twice made nice recoveries during onside kick drills.
R DeAndre Carter made a nice leaping
end zone catch from Brissett during oneon-one drills.
R Veteran receiver Nate Washington
made three nice catches from Garoppolo
during the one-on-ones, beating three different Saints defenders.
ODDS AND ENDS
R Patriots left tackle Nate Solder was
back on the field after a one-day absence
for an undisclosed reason.
R Receivers Julian Edelman and Keshawn
Martin, running backs D.J. Foster and
Donald Brown, defensive linemen Anthony Johnson and Frank Kearse, and linebacker Freeny all did some work on the
lower conditioning field.
R The teams spent a lot of time working
on onside kicks and recoveries. Interestingly, the Patriots offensive and defensive
linemen did bag work at the far end of the
field, while the Saints just stood on the
sideline and watched the kicks.
R The always humorous Alan Branch had
fun in the rain, rushing out from the sideline with an exaggerated leg kick and his
arms flailing. He looked like he was doing
the Fred Sanford heart attack dance.
R Belichick wore a Gatorade towel over his
shoulders like a cape during the heaviest
downpours.
R Vinnie Sunseri, a former Saint and Alabama alum, walked out to practice with
Saints rookie Dillon Lee, also an ex-Crimson Tider.
R Ramon Humber, also a former Saint, arrived with current Saint Stephone Anthony.
R Tom Brady worked on his hard counts,
screaming, “Hut, hut, hut!” before several
snaps.
R Belichick exchanged laughs and a handshake with Saints tackle Nick Fairley, who
was on New England’s free agent radar
screen last March.
R Patrick Chung and Drew Brees exchanged friendly helmet slaps after
Chung arrived in the pocket unfettered on
a perfect safety blitz.
UPCOMING SCHEDULE
Thursday: Exhibition game vs. Saints,
7:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday: No practice.
JIM MCBRIDE
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Garoppolo has priorities in order
QB ready to go in
preseason opener
By Jim McBride
GLOBE STAFF
FOXBOROUGH — Jimmy Garoppolo knows he’s the starting
quarterback for New England’s first
four regular-season
PATRIOTS
games. As for
NOTEBOOK Thursday night’s
exhibition opener?
“I don’t know,’’ Garoppolo said
Wednesday after wrapping up a
soggy shorts-and-shells joint practice with the Saints. “Your guess is
as good as mine.’’
The guess here is that Tom Brady
gets the start but delivers nothing
more than a cameo appearance before Garoppolo gets the lion’s share
of the snaps.
After starting camp like a house
on fire, Garoppolo has cooled over
the last several practices, which
have included a pair of scrimmages
and the two sessions with the
Saints, Thursday night’s opponent.
The third-year quarterback has
completed just about 60 percent of
his passes (58 of 104, unofficially)
over the last five practices with
three interceptions. Garoppolo has
made some poor throws but also
has been victimized by dropped
balls.
He has shown the ability to fire
the ball and to put touch on it. He
ran a nice two-minute drill toward
the end of Wednesday’s practice, alternately zipping and floating the
ball to tight end Martellus Bennett
during the half-speed possession.
He wasn’t willing to say whether
he was satisfied with his camp performance but did say, “We’re moving in the right direction, I’ll say
that.’’
Starting or relieving isn’t a big
concern for Garoppolo at this point;
getting better every day is at the top
of his agenda.
“There’s always room for improvement,’’ he said. “As a quarterback, especially as a young quarterback, I’m only going into my third
year, so there’s always room for improvement.”
He’s more concerned with learning from his mistakes than he is
with any practice performance.
“Little things here and there,
nothing real specific,’’ he said when
asked what areas he’d like to improve. “You just want to be sharp,
especially tomorrow night when
game time comes around.’’
Garoppolo said he hasn’t really
ADAM BOGHOSIAN FOR THE GLOBE
V’Angelo Bentley (left) talks with Julian Edelman, who surprised the crowd by appearing at practice.
thought about how many snaps he
needs with the starters to be ready
for the season because right now
the starters aren’t set in stone.
Building a rapport with everybody
is the mission.
“It’s tough right now because
you don’t know who the first unit is
or the second unit is,’’ said Garoppolo, who led the Patriots to a comeback preseason win over the Saints
last season in the Superdome.
“I kind of like how Coach [Bill
Belichick] does it. We rotate in and
out. Injuries are going to happen
throughout the year, so you have to
be able to play with different guys
and adapt to how they play. I think
it’s a good situation to put us out
there like that.’’
Edelman answers bell
When Julian Edelman wasn’t
spotted at the beginning of Wednesday’s practice it was assumed he
was taking the day off after his injury scare Tuesday.
But Edelman appeared about
five minutes into the workout to the
surprise of most in attendance at
Gillette Stadium. His arrival was
met by a roar that grew louder as he
took his spot in drills.
He moved at half speed through
the first drill, likely due to a combination of his left foot and the poor
footing. He spent some time chatting with a referee who was on
hand and then brought another
roar when he caught a pass from
Tom Brady during individual drills.
Edelman later fielded some
punts and chatted up would-be
punt returner V’Angelo Bentley before he played a three-way game of
catch with Garoppolo and safeties
coach Steve Belichick. He later departed to the conditioning fields.
“Julian, he hasn’t been out there
as much as everyone would hope,
but he came out here and it was
good to see him running around,’’
said Garoppolo. “. . . You love to
have a guy like that who is a competitor, who is going to fight for
you, and you know he cares about
the game. It makes you want to play
that much better and perform at a
higher level just having guys
around you like that.’’
Timetable for Ninkovich
As expected, Rob Ninkovich, who
tore his triceps in Tuesday’s practice
according to ESPN, was not at practice. Ninkovich reportedly does not
need surgery and could return in
4-6 weeks. Shea McClellin got most
of the work on the left edge in Ninkovich’s absence . . . Shaq Mason
took first-team reps at right guard
for the first time this summer. He
was joined on the top offensive line
by David Andrews (center), Joe
Thuney (left guard), Nate Solder
(left tackle), and Marcus Cannon
(right tackle) . . . Tight end Michael
Hoomanawanui, who was sent to
the Saints in the Akiem Hicks trade
last season, was glad to be back in
town and see some familiar faces. “I
had a great three years here and a
lot of lasting relationships,’’ he said.
“It’s just great to see those guys and
coaches. I was very appreciative of
those years and what they did for
me as a football player and a person.’’ Asked the difference between
playing with future Hall of Fame
quarterbacks Brady and Drew
Brees, Hoo-man quipped, “Tom’s a
little taller. That’s about it.’’ . . . Rob
Gronkowski, who hasn’t played in
an exhibition game since 2012, was
asked if he’s planning on being in
the lineup Thursday night. “Coach’s
decision, baby,’’ he said with a big
laugh. “I have no idea. Whatever
coach is planning for us. I’m planning on playing the whole game.’’
. . . The first game of the Kraft Era
was a 1994 preseason game against
the Saints at Foxboro Stadium. The
Patriots prevailed in that one, 24-6.
Jim McBride can be reached at
[email protected] Follow
him on Twitter @globejimmcbride.
Five things to watch in Patriots’ first game
ON FOOTBALL
Continued from Page D1
“Sometimes we make plays because
they make mistakes, not necessarily
because we made a play.”
However, the preseason does offer a good opportunity to evaluate
how players operate in pressurized
game situations, and which players
can fill specific roles. So as we sort
through the position battles, here
are five specific areas to monitor:
R Which running backs can do
the little things?
The best way to make the Patriots as a running back is to be a complete player. Not only run hard, follow the right blocks, and gain yards
after contact, but also catch the
football in competitive situations,
function in pass protection, and
contribute on special teams.
The Patriots are likely keeping
Dion Lewis, LeGarrette Blount, and
special teams ace Brandon Bolden,
leaving one spot for James White,
Donald Brown, Joey Iosefa, Tyler
Gaffney, and rookie D.J. Foster.
Most notably, I want to see which
running backs can make tough
catches in traffic, particularly on
wheel routes. The running back/
linebacker matchup is a key one
that the Patriots like to exploit, and
the offense was dominant with Lewis in that matchup last year.
The offense was much less dominant with White, who caught only 5
of 16 targets in the AFC Championship game and couldn’t capitalize
on several potential big plays in the
fourth quarter.
Gaffney has gotten a lot of work
in training camp and could be in
line for a decent number of snaps
against the Saints.
R Which wide receivers can
block and play special teams?
This is another position where
the final roster spot likely will be
decided by the player’s ability to do
the little things. Julian Edelman,
Chris Hogan, Danny Amendola, and
Malcolm Mitchell are locked into
roster spots (assuming good
health), leaving Keshawn Martin,
Aaron Dobson, Chris Harper, Nate
Washington, DeAndre Carter, and
Devin Lucien battling for one spot.
The Patriots’ fifth receiver needs
to have reliable hands and run crisp
routes, of course, but he also likely
will have to contribute on special
teams.
Martin has great speed for a
backup receiver, and can return
kickoffs and punts. Harper has
punt-return skills (last year’s regular-season game in Denver aside),
and Carter and Lucien can likely
help somewhere on the punt teams.
But Dobson and Washington don’t
have any special teams value, putting them at a significant disadvantage.
I also want to see if any of the receivers can throw his weight around
in the run game — a good skill to
have, particularly in cold-weather
Foxborough games.
R Which interior offensive linemen will play the most snaps?
We know that Nate Solder and
either Sebastian Vollmer or Marcus
Cannon are going to be the offensive
tackles, but the interior of the line is
still up for grabs at this point.
David Andrews, Bryan Stork,
Josh Kline, Shaq Mason, Tre’ Jackson, Joe Thuney, and Ted Karras are
fighting for three starting spots and
five roster spots overall, meaning
one or two familiar names won’t be
with the team this fall.
I’m most interested in seeing
which players get the most snaps at
center, as there has been rotation
among Andrews, Stork, Kline, and
Karras. And I’m curious whether
the Patriots will mix-and-match
their line combinations throughout
the game, or keep the units intact
and try to develop some continuity,
as they have through much of camp.
R Can the Patriots generate any
pass rush without blitzing?
The Patriots finished second in
the NFL in sacks last year with 49,
but they traded away 12.5 of them
with Chandler Jones and just lost
Rob Ninkovich for probably the first
month of the regular season. They
have several new edge rushers this
year, and Ninkovich’s injury paves
the way for Chris Long, Geneo Grissom, Trey Flowers, and Shea McClellin to get more playing time.
Do the Patriots have enough firepower coming off the edge to still be
a dangerous defense? Against the
Saints, I want to see which players
can get to the quarterback not because of a confusing blitz but by
beating their man one on one.
R Jacoby Brissett.
The microscope will be on Garoppolo in a very important preseason for him, but let’s not forget
about the rookie quarterback, the
third-round pick. Brissett will get a
lot of work in this preseason as well,
and this will be a great opportunity
for the Patriots to determine whether he is ready to be Garoppolo’s
backup this year or whether they
need to sign a veteran as insurance.
Brissett’s performance also can
help determine whether the Patriots
would feel comfortable trading Garoppolo next offseason.
Ben Volin can be reached at
[email protected] Follow him
on Twitter @BenVolin
Veteran ESPN broadcaster Saunders dead at 61
By Chad Finn
GLOBE STAFF
JOE FARAONI/ESPN VIA AP
Studio host and play-by-play
man John Saunders began
at ESPN in 1986.
John Saunders, a versatile
and esteemed personality at
ESPN for 30 years, has died,
the network announced
Wednesday. He was 61 years
old.
According to an ESPN
spokesman, the cause of death
was not immediately known.
Saunders, who joined ESPN
in December 1986, worked in a
variety of high-profile studio
and play-by-play roles during
h i s c a r e e r. H e b e g a n a s a
“SportsCenter” anchor and
was a staple during that program’s late ’80s/early ’90s heyday.
He hosted studio programs
for college football and basketball, handled play-by-play for
college basketball and the WNBA, and anchored various MLB
and NHL studio programs
through the years. Since 2001,
he has hosted the round-table
program “The Sports Reporters” on Sunday mornings.
Saunders’s death was announced on “SportsCenter”
Wednesday morning by Hannah Storm, a longtime colleague.
“John was an extraordinary
talent and his friendly, informative style has been a warm
welcome to sports fans for decades,” said ESPN president
John Skipper in a statement.
“His wide range of accomplishments across numerous sports
and championship events is
among the most impressive
this industry has ever seen.”
Saunders was a founding
member and ser ved on the
board of directors for The V
Foundation for Cancer Research, named for his late former colleague Jim Valvano.
“John was a beloved and devoted family man who cared
deeply about people and
causes, as evidenced by his
long-standing efforts as a passionate board member for The
V Foundation for Cancer Research,’’ said Skipper.
“He was one of the most significant and influential members of the ESPN family, as a
colleague and mentor, and he
will be sorely missed. Our
thoughts are with his loved
ones at this extremely difficult
time.”
Saunders is survived by his
wife, Wanda, and daughters
Aleah and Jenna. Obituary, B6.
Chad Finn can be reached at
[email protected] Follow him
on Twitter @GlobeChadFinn.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
D5
Sports
RIO
LAURENT KALFALA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
NICE RING TO IT — Olympic champion Haruka Tachimoto of Japan (white) took down Colombia’s Yuri Alvear for the gold medal in judo in the women’s 70-kilogram weight class.
Today at Olympics
Fore!
After a 112-year hiatus, golf finally makes its Olympic return
Thursday morning in Rio de Janeiro with the first round of the
men’s 72-hole tournament. The
men’s medals will be awarded
Sunday, while the women will hit
the links next week, playing from
Aug. 17-20.
Although some of the world’s
top male players will not be vying
for Olympic gold after withdrawing before the Games, citing
health concerns, four Americans
ranked in the top 15 made the trip
to Brazil. World No. 5 Bubba Watson leads the way for the US,
earning the top Olympic ranking
among the 60-player field. Watson is followed by seventh-ranked
Rickie Fowler, No. 13 Patrick Reed,
and No. 15 Matt Kuchar.
The US is the only team to
boast four golfers because of its
high rankings. No other country
has more than two.
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHTS
R Biles, Raisman set for individual all-around
They captured team all-around
gold Tuesday with the rest of the
“Final Five.” Now American gymnasts Simone Biles and Aly Raisman will compete for individual
all-around medals. Biles is the
heavy favorite, and Raisman could
end up on the podium after losing
out on all-around bronze in London
four years ago on a tiebreaker.
R More hardware on deck
Swimming medals are up for
grabs in the women’s 200-meter
breaststroke, the men’s 200 backstroke, the men’s 200 individual
medley, and the women’s 100
freestyle.
TV HIGHLIGHTS
NBC
10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Rowing: semifinals and gold
medal finals
Women’s water polo: US vs.
China
Swimming: qualifying heats
Women’s beach volleyball: Fendrick/Sweat (US) vs. TBA (Russia)
Men’s beach volleyball: Dalhausser/Lucena (US) vs. Nicolai/
Lupo (Italy)
Canoe/kayak: whitewater gold
medal finals
8 p.m.-midnight
Women’s gymnastics: individual all-around gold medal final
Swimming: Men’s 50m freestyle semifinals, women’s 200m
breaststroke gold medal final,
men’s 200m backstroke gold
medal final, women’s 200m backstroke semifinals, men’s 200m individual medley gold medal final,
women’s 100m freestyle gold
medal final, men’s 100m butterfly
semifinals
NBCSN
8 a.m.-midnight
Beach volleyball
Men’s rugby: bronze medal and
gold medal final
Women’s field hockey: US vs.
India
Boxing: elimination matches
Men’s table tennis: singles
gold medal final
Men’s volleyball: US vs. Brazil
MSNBC
Noon-5 p.m.
Beach volleyball
Golf Channel
6:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Men’s golf: first round
EMILY MCCARTHY
TALES FROM THE GAMES
Sprinter Gatlin pays
no attention to critics
By Emily McCarthy
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
American sprinter Justin Gatlin is
trying to focus on the 100 meters, but
his attention was diverted Wednesday,
thanks to American swimmer Lilly
King.
King, who has had a running feud
with convicted doper Yulia Efimova, a
Russian swimmer, has said suspended
drug users should not be allowed to
compete in the Olympics, and that includes her fellow American, Gatlin.
Gatlin fired back, saying he’s served
his ban and isn’t paying attention to
those who say he shouldn’t be competing at the Olympics.
Gatlin said he’s dealt with his punishment and moved forward.
Gatlin says that’s what it is — the
past.
He was reinstated in 2010 after a
four-year ban and will take to the track
Saturday to begin competition in the
men’s 100 meters. Gatlin is considered
the biggest threat to world recordholder Usain Bolt.
Oscar winners
The US women’s rugby team’s consolation prize after missing the podium in Rio was better than all right, all
right, all right.”
The fifth-place Americans completed their post-Olympics debriefing
meeting and went to a hotel bar to enjoy some passionfruit caipirinhas, Brazil’s national drink.
In walked Matthew McConaughey,
who was spotted at rugby matches earlier in the week. The actor posed for
pictures with members of the team,
said a few encouraging words, and
even told the team the origin of his signature saying from the movie ‘‘Dazed
and Confused.’’
‘‘I think we'll remember that one,’’
said US rugby player Alev Kelter.
Although the Americans would
have preferred to leave Rio with a
medal, enjoying fruity drinks with an
Academy Award winner makes for a
pretty solid Olympic experience.
Not too shammy
If you’ve ever seen the commercials
for “ShamWow!” you’ve watched people use the small orange shammies to
dry off boats, wipe off cars, and even
soak up unrealistic amounts of spilled
soda.
But shammies also are crucial pieces of equipment in the world of diving.
The tiny towels are made of rayon
or poly-vinyl, can hold up to 10 times
their weight in liquid, and quickly dry
after being rung out.
In the early days, shammies were
made of chamois skin — hence the
name — from an animal similar to a
ALEXANDER HASSENSTEIN/GETTY IMAGES
US sprinter Justin Gatlin, who was reinstated in 2010 after a four-year
ban, said he’s not listening to those who say he shouldn’t be in Olympics.
goat that’s found in Europe and western Asia. Shammies first became popular after Europeans used the small
towels in diving competitions in the
late 1960s and early ’70s. Soon after,
the towels were made of synthetic material.
In many diving positions (such as
pikes and tucks), divers need to hold
on to their legs. If a divers’ hands or
legs are wet, it can be easy to lose grip.
If a diver loses his or her grip, a dive
quickly goes awry and valuable points
are lost. To solve the problem, divers
use shammies to dry off between
dives. Many divers consider their
shammies to be like security blankets.
Shammies are affordable, as well,
running from $5-$20 on swimming
gear websites.
Not a bad investment when the
payoff could be Olympic gold.
Swimmer insulted
Even Olympians can’t escape bodyshaming.
Robel Kiros Habte swam in the
men’s 100-meter freestyle heats on
Tuesday and finished last in the threeswimmer heat. In one of the more
charitable comments, someone said
he had a “dad bod.”
He also finished last overall among
the 59 competitors in the eight heats
with a time of 1 minute, 4.95 seconds.
Habte confessed that his personal best
was 59.08 seconds, while Australia’s
Kyle Chalmers had the best time of
the heats at 47.9 seconds.
An Ethiopian news site called him
‘‘out of shape.’’ Others called him ‘‘Robel the Whale.’’ Habte is 5 feet, 9 inches and weighs 179 pounds. Chalmers,
in comparison, is 6-4, 194.
Some noted that Habte is the son of
the president of the country’s swimming federation.
‘‘I wanted to do something different
for my country, that’s why I chose
swimming,’’ the 24-year-old college
student told Reuters. ‘‘Everybody, every day you wake up in Ethiopia, you
run. Not swimming. But I didn’t want
to run, I wanted to be a swimmer. It
didn’t matter where I finished.’’
A heartfelt apology
Gymnast Gabby Douglas said she
‘‘meant no disrespect’’ and apologized
after she was peppered with critical
tweets when, unlike the rest of the Final Five after their golden performance, she did not place her hand
over her heart as she stood at attention
during the American national anthem.
‘‘In response to a few tweets I saw
tonight, I always stand at attention out
of respect for our country whenever
the national anthem is played,’’ Douglas tweeted, in part.
‘‘I never meant any disrespect and
apologize if I offended anyone. I’m so
overwhelmed at what our team accomplished today and overjoyed that
we were able to bring home another
gold for our country!’’
There are no team rules for podium
behavior, other than standing at attention and looking at the flag and Douglas is not the first US gold-medal winner to not place her hand over her
heart.
Material from the Associated Press
was used in this report. Emily
McCarthy can be reached at
[email protected] Follow
her on Twitter @emilymccahthy.
MEDALISTS
CANOE-KAYAK
Kayak (K1) Men
Gold: Joseph Clarke, Britain
Silver: Peter Kauzer, Slovenia
Bronze: Jiri Prskavec, Czech Republic
CYCLING (ROAD)
Men's Individual Time Trial
Gold: Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland
Silver: Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands
Bronze: Christopher Froome, Britain
Women's Individual Time Trial
Gold: Kristin Armstrong, United States
Silver: Olga Zabelinskaya, Russia
Bronze: Anna van der Breggen, Netherlands
DIVING
Men's Synchronized 3m Springboard
Gold: Britain (Jack Laugher, Chris Mears)
Silver: United States (Sam Dorman, Mike
Hixon)
Bronze: China (Yuan Cao, Kai Qin)
FENCING
Men's Sabre Individual
Gold: Aron Szilagyi, Hungary
Silver: Daryl Homer, United States
Bronze: Junghwan Kim, South Korea
Women's Foil Individual
Gold: Inna Deriglazova, Russia
Silver: Elisa di Francisca, Italy
Bronze: Ines Boubakri, Tunisia
GYMNASTICS
Men's Individual All-Around
Gold: Kohei Uchimura, Japan
Silver: Oleg Verniaiev, Ukraine
Bronze: Max Whitlock, Britain
JUDO
Men’s 90 kilograms
Gold: Mashu Baker, Japan
Silver: Varlam Liparteliani, Georgia
Bronze: Donghan Gwak, South Korea
Bronze: Xunzhao Cheng, China
Women’s 70 kilograms
Gold: Haruka Tachimoto, Japan
Silver: Yuri Alvear, Colombia
Bronze: Laura Vargas Koch, Germany
SHOOTING
50m Pistol Men
Gold: Jongoh Jin, South Korea
Silver: Xuan Vinh Hoang, Vietnam
Bronze: Song Guk Kim, North Korea
Double Trap Men
Gold: Fehaid Aldeehani, Independent
Silver: Marco Innocenti, Italy
Bronze: Steven Scott, Britain
SWIMMING
Men's 100 Freestyle
Gold: Kyle Chalmers, Australia
Silver: Pieter Timmers, Belgium
Bronze: Nathan Adrian, United States
Men's 200m Breaststroke
Gold: Dmitriy Balandin, Kazakhstan
Silver: Josh Prenot, United States
Bronze: Anton Chupkov, Russia
Women's 200 Butterfly
Gold: Mireia Belmonte Garcia, Spain
Silver: Madeline Groves, Australia
Bronze: Natsumi Hoshi, Japan
Women's 4 x 200m Freestyle Relay
Gold: United States (Allison Schmitt, Madeline Dirado, Leah Smith, Katie Ledecky, pMissy Franklin, p-Melanie Margalis, pCierra Runge)
Silver: Australia (Leah Neale, Emma
McKeon, Bronte Barratt, Tamsin Cook, pJessica Ashwood)
Bronze: Canada (Katerine Savard, Brittany
Maclean, Taylor Madison Ruck, Penny
Oleksiak, p-Kennedy Goss, p-Emily Overholt)
TABLE TENNIS
Women's Singles
Gold: Ding Ning, China
Silver: Li Xiaoxia, China
Bronze: Kim Song I, North Korea
WEIGHTLIFTING
Men's 77 kilograms
Gold: Nijat Rahimov, Kazakhstan.
Silver: Xiaojun Lyu, China.
Bronze: Mohamed Mahmoud, Egypt
Women's 69 kilograms
Gold: Yanmei Xiang, China
Silver: Zhazira Zhapparkul, Kazakhstan
Bronze: Sara Ahmed, Egypt
MEDAL COUNT
Through 73 of 306 events
G
United States ................... 11
China.................................. 10
Japan ................................... 6
Russia .................................. 4
Australia.............................. 5
Britain.................................. 3
Italy...................................... 3
South Korea ....................... 4
Hungary .............................. 5
Kazakhstan......................... 2
France.................................. 2
Canada ................................ 0
Thailand .............................. 2
Germany ............................. 1
Netherlands........................ 1
North Korea........................ 0
Sweden................................ 1
Belgium ............................... 1
Taiwan................................. 1
Ukraine................................ 0
S
11
5
1
7
2
3
6
2
1
2
3
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
0
2
B
10
8
11
4
5
6
2
3
1
3
1
5
1
1
2
2
0
1
2
1
All
32
23
18
15
12
12
11
9
7
7
6
6
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
D6
T h e
Sports
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
RIO
SWIMMING
Ledecky captures relay gold; Phelps cruises
By Paul Newberry
ASSOCIATED PRESS
RIO DE JANEIRO — Katie Ledecky was the
fastest swimmer in the pool, and she brought
her American teammates along for the ride.
The 19-year-old turned in another overpowering performance to carry the United States to
victory in the 4 x 200-meter freestyle relay
Wednesday night, capturing her third gold and
fourth medal overall at the Rio Olympics.
The United States trailed through the first
three legs of the race, as Sweden, China and
then Australia swapped the top spot.
Then, it was Ledecky’s turn on the anchor
leg.
She blew everyone away.
Ledecky turned in a split of 1 minute, 53.74
seconds, which was nearly 2.5 seconds faster
than her next-fastest teammate, Allison Schmitt
in 1:56.21.
Only one other swimmer in the race, Australia’s Emma McKeon, got within a second of
Ledecky’s four-lap time.
‘‘I was prepared for any circumstance,
whether we were ahead or behind,’’ Ledecky
said.
The US finished in 7 minutes, 43.03 seconds,
with Ledecky a full body length ahead of Tamsin Cook, who touched in 7:44.87 to give Australia the silver. Canada took the bronze in
7:45.39.
And get this: Ledecky’s relay time was only
one-100th of a second slower than her winning
time in the 200 free the previous night.
‘‘It’s good consistency, I guess,’’ she said nonchalantly.
The teenager from suburban Washington
has one more race to go, and it might be the
biggest lock of all. She’s the world record-holder
and defending Olympic champion in the 800
free.
On the fifth night of swimming at the Olympic Aquatic Center, 18-year-old Kyle Chalmers
dethroned defending champion Nathan Adrian
in the final of the 100 freestyle, the first Australian to be crowned king of speed in 48 years.
Kazakhstan claimed its first-ever swimming
medal — a gold one, at that — when Dmitriy
Balandin pulled off a stunning upset in the 200
SGABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
(From left) Allison Schmitt, Maya Dirado, and Leah Smith cheer for anchor Katie Ledecky
(not pictured ) after the US struck gold in the women’s 4 x 200-meter freestyle relay.
breaststroke.
Also, Spain’s Mireia Belmonte Garcia finally
won her first gold medal after two silvers and a
bronze, touching first in the 200 butterfly.
Coming off the 20th and 21st gold medals of
his career, Michael Phelps wasn’t up for any
hardware. But he did cruise through the semifinals of the 200 individual medley with the fastest time, besting longtime rival and countryman Ryan Lochte.
Swimming next to Lochte, Phelps put up an
effortless-looking time of 1:55.78 to claim the
prime middle lane in Thursday night’s final.
Lochte will be right next to him again, ranking second in 1:56.28.
Phelps will be seeking his fourth straight
200 IM title at the Olympics. He’s also got a
chance to pull off that feat in the 100 butterfly.
In the relay, Schmitt captured gold in what
was likely the final race of her career. Winner of
three golds and five medals overall in London
four years ago, she battled depression and
didn’t qualify for an individual event in Rio.
Still, she added two more medals to her trophy
case, also getting a silver in the 4 x 100 relay
along with Ledecky.
The other US swimmers were Maya DiRado,
who added a gold to go along with silver and
bronze in the two individual medleys, and Leah
Smith, who picked up her second medal of the
games after earning bronze in the 400 free.
Oh, and let’s not forget Missy Franklin, the
darling of the London Games. She'll also get a
gold after swimming in the afternoon preliminaries, though her time wasn’t good enough to
land her a spot in the evening final.
Franklin’s torch has been passed to Ledecky,
who joined Phelps and Hungary’s Katinka
Hosszu as three-time swimming gold medalists
in Rio.
In the furious down-and-back sprint that is
the 100 free, Chalmers rallied on the return lap
to win with a time of 47.58. Pieter Timmers of
Belgium claimed the silver in 47.80, while Adri-
an made it onto the medal podium — with a
bronze this time — in 47.85.
‘‘It would be great to have gold,’’ said Adrian,
who barely advanced out of the preliminaries
but nearly pulled off the first back-to-back titles
in the 100 since Pieter van den Hoogenband in
2000 and 2004. ‘‘But in this day and age, the
100 freestyle is maybe the most fickle event out
there. I am so proud to be a medalist for two
Olympiads.’’
For Australia, a country known more for its
distance freestylers, Chalmers became the first
100 free champion since Michael Wenden at
Mexico City in 1968. The teenager is also the
youngest Olympic gold medalist in that event
since 17-year-old Jorg Woithe of East Germany
at the 1980 Moscow Games.
From lane eight, not normally a spot that
produces gold medalists, Balandin put his central Asian country on the swimming map.
Yosuhiro Koseki of Japan went out fast and
was more than a second under world-record
pace at the final turn. But Balandin was right
with him on the outside, and Koseki couldn’t
keep up the pace.
Balandin touched in 2:07.46, while Josh
Prenot of the United States rallied to claim silver in 2:07.53. Russia’s Anton Chupkov landed
the bronze in 2:07.70, with Koseki fading to
fifth.
Balandin pulled himself onto a lane rope
and whipped his arms in the air, savoring his
historic achievement.
‘‘I'm very proud to win a medal for my country,’’ the 21-year-old said through an interpreter. ‘‘It’s the best thing I can do for my country.’’
Belmonte Garcia claimed a pair of silver
medals in London, including a runner-up finish
in the 200 fly. She made the podium again in
Rio by finishing third in the 400 individual
medley.
Now, she’s on top.
Belmonte Garcia used one last half-stroke to
get to the wall ahead of Madeline Groves in
2:04.85.
The Australian settled for the silver, just
three-hundredths of a second behind. Japan’s
Natsumi Hoshi claimed the bronze, beating out
Cammile Adams of the United States.
PILAR OLIVARES/REUTERS
MEDAL ROUNDUP
Homer bows to Szilagyi in gold medal sabre bout
By Shira Springer
GLOBE STAFF
United States fencer Daryl
Homer faced a familiar opponent in the saber final Wednesday night in Rio de Janeiro.
Maybe too familiar.
Homer has competed
against Hungry’s Aron Szilagyi
since they were both 16 years
old. As a result, Homer fell to
Szilagyi in the gold medal bout,
15-8, and claimed silver.
The medal represented the
culmination of a 15-year journey and capped a tough season
for Homer.
“I struggled a lot individually [this season],” said Homer. “I
struggled a lot with my own
confidence this year af ter
climbing the podium [for silver] last year in Moscow for the
World Championships. You
start tinkering a little bit trying
to get better and you fall off a
little bit. It was great to see that
I could put together this kind of
performance.”
Almost from the start, Homer trailed Sziliagyi and tried to
catch up. But it the early deficit
proved too large to overcome.
Ranked No. 10 in the world,
Homer was assured of making
history in the final.
With the silver, Homer, 26,
became the first US men’s saber
medal winner since Peter Westbrook took home bronze at the
1984 Los Angeles Olympics.
Homer was also the first American to win a silver medal in
men’s individual saber in 112
years. And along with the silver
medal Alex Massialas earned in
foil, the US has its first multiple
medal performance in individual men’s fencing since the 1904
St. Louis Games.
But the historic connection
to Westbrook goes far beyond
medals. Both Homer and Westbrook are black, something of a
rarity in fencing. It was through
the Peter Westbrook Foundation that the Bronx-raised
Homer first learned fencing.
The LA Olympian started the
foundation to introduce fencing
to inner-city children from New
York. Homer chose saber as his
weapon because of Westbrook.
“I wouldn’t have found an
access point to fencing without
Peter,” said Homer. “So, I probably would have been here. He
lives 10 blocks away from me. I
stop by his house from time to
time.
“I’ll probably stop by when I
get back and talk a little trash
because I just dethroned him.”
Women’s fencing — Russian
Inna Deriglazova won gold in
women’s foil, giving her country its second fencing title of the
Rio Games.
Deriglazova beat Italy’s Elisa
Di Francisca, the gold medalist
from the London Olympics, 1211, to claim a world title for the
second year in a row. Tunisia’s
Ines Boubakri took bronze.
Italian Arianna Errigo, the
heavy favorite entering the
tournament, was upset in the
round of 16. So was third-
PILAR OLIVARES/REUTERS
Michael Hixon (left) and Sam Dorman were in synch,
taking the silver medal in men’s synchronized diving.
ranked American Lee Kiefer,
who said afterward that this
will likely be her last Olympic
appearance.
Men’s diving — There won’t be
a golden sweep in the Olympic
diving pool. Britain upset China
to win the men’s synchronized
3-meter springboard with Jack
Laugher and Chris Mears totaling 454.32 points.
Sam Dorman and Amherst’s
Mike Hixon took silver for the
United States with 450.21. China’s Cao Yuan and Qin Kai settled for bronze with 443.70,
ending their country’s bid to
sweep the eight diving medals
at the Rio de Janeiro Games.
The Chinese had won the first
three synchro events.
Women’s cycling — Kristin
Armstrong of the United States
won her third consecutive
Olympic time trial, her golden
effort on the brutal course leaving her in an exhausted heap on
the road at the finish line.
Armstrong covered the
course through driving wind
and rain in 44 minutes, 26.42
seconds, beating Olga Zabelinskaya of Russia by just 5.55 seconds. Anna van der Breggen of
the Netherlands added a
bronze medal to her gold from
the road race.
Armstrong, who turns 43 on
Thursday, joined speedskater
Bonnie Blair as the only Ameri-
can women to win three gold
medals in the same event at any
Olympics. She also won in Beijing and London.
Men’s cycling — Fabian Cancellara capped his remarkable
career with his second Olympic
gold medal, the retiring Swiss
star powering over the hilly,
rain-slicked course to deny favorite Tom Dumoulin and British rival Chris Froome.
Judo — Japan’s Mashu Baker
won the gold medal in the
men’s 90-kilogram division, in a
clean sweep for the country of
Wednesday ’s judo medals.
Compatriot Haruka Tachimoto
earlier won the women’s gold in
the 70-kilogram category.
Men’s weightlifting — Kazakhstan’s Nijat Rahimov shattered
the clean and jerk world record
to take gold in the men’s 77-kilogram weightlifting class.
With reigning champion
Lyu Xiaojun of China looking a
surefire bet for gold, Rahimov
took the audacious step of moving up 12 kilograms on his second clean and jerk attempt for a
world-record 214.
Women’s weightlifting — Chinese weightlifter Xiang Yanmei
survived a nasty collision with
the bar to win gold in the women’s 69-kilogram class.
Silver went to Kazakhstan’s
Zhazira Zhapparkul with a 259
total. Egypt’s Sara Ahmed won
bronze with 255 kilos.
Women’s table tennis — China’s Ding Ning avenged her loss
in the London Olympics to
countrywoman Li Xiaoxia, taking gold over Li in the women’s
finals and extending China’s supremacy in the sport.
Men’s canoe — British slalom
canoeist Joseph Clarke, initially
turned away from his local club
because he was too young to
join, won the kayak gold medal
at Whitewater Stadium.
He’s t h e s e c o n d B r i t i s h
Olympic champion in canoe
slalom. Peter Kauzer won the
silver, Jiri Prskavec the bronze.
Men’s trap shooting — Kuwait’s Fehaid Al Deehani, competing as an independent, captured double-trap gold by defeating Italy’s Marco Innocenti
in the final match.
The veteran of six Olympics
needed a shoot-off with American Joshua Richmond to get into the finals, but hit 28 targets
to reach the gold medal match
against Innocenti.
Men’s pistol shooting — South
Korea’s Jin Jong-oh shot his
way back from the brink of
elimination to win his third
straight gold in the 50-meter
event.
With a steadier hand in the
final rounds, Jin prevailed over
Vietnam’s Xuan Vinh Hoang,
who made history on Saturday
by winning his country’s first
gold medal.
Kim Song Guk of North Korea won the bronze in his first
international final.
Associated Press contributed to
this report.
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Sports
D7
RIO
No cruise for US men’s basketball team
Gary Washburn
ON BASKETBALL
RIO DE JANEIRO — The United
States men’s basketball team has been
in Brazil for a week now, living on a
luxury boat docked on a pier next to
this spacious city and enjoying their
time as they breezed through the first
two games.
Some players even went to the
swimming venue to watch Michael
Phelps grab a pair of gold medals on
Tuesday.
On Wednesday, Team USA found
out there will be resistance in its
quest for gold. The Americans faced a
veteran and NBA-laden Australian
team, several players so familiar with
the US roster they were hardly daunted by its talent and athleticism.
The United States didn’t scare Australia. It had to play through a plethora of mistakes, cold shooting, lackadaisical play, and poor defense to eke
out a 98-88 win at Carioca Arena in
Group A pool play.
The United States extended its international winning streak to 71
games, its last loss 12 years ago at the
Athens Olympics. The US is expected
to dominate the tournament, especially with challengers such as Spain,
Argentina, and France running out
the same, aging players they have had
in previous Olympics.
Team USA has 10 new Olympic
players and perhaps they weren’t prepared for such a challenge from an
Australian team that played with precision, especially from San Antonio
Spur Patty Mills and new Dallas Maverick Andrew Bogut, who punished
the US with his passing.
In the end, the United States depended (perhaps too heavily) on fourtime Olympic veteran Carmelo Anthony, who has been maligned the
past several years for his inability to
turn the New York Knicks into a contender. Anthony dazzled with 31
points on 9-for-15 shooting from the
3-point line and became the US Olympic all-time leading scorer.
In these types of games, Team
USA has learned — almost the hard
way – that experience does matter.
And the team’s talent allows Anthony
to simply score against one-on-one
coverage. He is allowed to freely roam
the 3-point line and spot up for open
shots.
“In this situation it doesn’t call for
me to put the team on my back where
I have to create something every play
and the ball is in my hands every
play,” said Anthony, who has 293 career Olympic points in 26 games. “I
can space out, take my time, hit my
JIM YOUNG/REUTERS
Carmelo Anthony celebrates this
3-pointer en route to 31 points as
Team USA held off Australia.
spots, play off the other guys that I
have on my team. The NBA is a much
different game as far as a lot is required from myself and other guys on
the team. You have the ball in your
hands more. They rely on you to do
much more scoring, much more playmaking.
“On this team, we have the best
players in the world, so that’s what
makes it fun for myself.”
It’s difficult to throw a bunch of
newcomers out there and expect to
cruise. And previous NBA performance does not translate in international play, just ask Klay Thompson,
the All-Star and former NBA champion who has looked lost in his first international exposure.
Through three games, Thompson
is 3-for-20 shooting, 2 for 13 from the
3-point line and has scored 8 total
points, and two of the US’s opponents
have been China and Venezuela.
The only criticism of Team USA is
its lack of experience, and some players, who made multiple All-Star
Games, look befuddled on the international stage. DeMarcus Cousins has
14 fouls in the three games. Kyle Lowry, an offensive dynamo, has attempted 11 shots in the three games.
“You learn by experience,” US
coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “We’re
still learning about [the international
game]. I’m proud of what they’ve
done, but can we play better? We’ll
need to.”
DeMar DeRozan played three minutes Wednesday and Harrison Barnes
didn’t play at all. It seems Krzyzewski
is learning more about the strengths
and weaknesses of his team, and
Wednesday he shortened the rotation,
allowing his team to counter Australia’s girth with outside shooting. He
let them play through mistakes.
The quartet of Kevin Durant, Low-
ry, Thompson and Paul George went
10 for 37 from the field. Anthony converted 11 field goals by himself.
“For us a group, that’s the first
real, real international game we’ve
had,” Krzyzewski said. “The first two
games we played, we were significantly better than those teams. This is the
real world now.
“That was good for us. We earned
the win and we’re going to have to
earn our wins throughout. So this was
a really good night for us.”
The win wasn’t picturesque. Many
Americans could have flipped on their
televisions to see the United States
trailing by 5 at halftime.
The United States is not supposed
to trail at the half, ever. And tensions
weren’t eased until the final two minutes of the game, when Anthony and
Irving provided a flurry of buckets to
secure the victory.
Team USA got away with one
Wednesday. The Americans were supposed to be dominant and perhaps
face a challenge in the medal rounds,
but it occurred much earlier.
So the players might have to slice
time relaxing on the boat, touring the
city or hobnobbing with other athletes and concentrate on the real goal
of gold, because it won’t be easy.
Gary Washburn can be reached at
[email protected] Follow him
on Twitter @GwashburnGlobe.
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
US cracks
century
mark
Taurasi leads the way
in victory over Serbia
By Doug Feinberg
ASSOCIATED PRESS
US
110 RIO DE JANEIRO —
Diana Taurasi had a
Serbia 84 career game to help
the US women’s basketball team top
Serbia.
Taurasi scored 22 of her Olympicbest 25 points in the first half to help
the Americans beat Serbia, 110-84,
on Wednesday.
While the US had easily routed
Senegal and Spain in its first two
games, winning by an average of 52.5
points, they had a harder time
against the hot-shooting Balkan nation.
Serbia came out shooting well
from behind the arc and led 17-16 —
the latest the Americans have trailed
in the Olympics — before Taurasi
took over. She scored 9 points, including two 3-pointers, during a 15-4
run to close the opening period.
Tina Charles, who finished with 15
points, got going in the second quarter to help the US extend the advantage to 22 at the half. Taurasi had five
3-pointers in the first 20 minutes,
equaling her Olympic team record.
She broke the mark early in the third
quarter and finished the game with
six 3’s to set a US Olympic mark.
While Serbia could never recover
from its halftime deficit, the Serbians
did make the US work on both ends
of the floor. They kept pace with the
US in the third quarter, only being
outscored by 1 point. Serbia finished
the game 12 for 20 from behind the 3point arc.
The US (3-0) has been scoring at a
record pace, topping 100 points for
the third consecutive game. The
Americans have never done that in
the Olympics and are on pace to
break the 102.4 points a game the
1996 team averaged en route to the
gold medal that started this run of
five straight that the US is currently
on. The victory was the 44th consecutive for the Americans in the Olympics.
The US had only played Serbia
once in major international competition, winning by 20 points at the
2014 world championship. Serbia has
had a disappointing first Olympics after winning the Eurobasket last year.
The Serbians lost their first two
games by a combined 8 points, including blowing an 18-point lead
against Canada. Now they sit at 0-3
and in danger of not making it to the
quarterfinals.
Next up for the US is Canada on
Friday. The Canadians won their first
two games of the Olympics and faced
winless Senegal later Wednesday. In
the only other game of the day, Spain
beat China, 89-68.
DAVID ROGERS/GETTY IMAGES
Patriots special teamer Nate Ebner (left) finally scored — for the US rugby team in a 24-19 loss to Fiji. Ebner was one of the standouts for the US.
Patriot Ebner earned his stripes with US rugby team
GASPER
Continued from Page D1
Knows marketing campaign. But
Ebner has proven at the 2016 Summer
Olympics that rugby is still part of his
repertoire.
“People oohed and ahhed about
whether Nate Ebner was a rugby player. He has shown here, and in the six
months of hard work he has put in that
he is a proper rugby player,” said USA
Rugby coach Mike Friday.
Football was always Ebner’s fallback, rugby his true love. He switched
to football his junior year at Ohio
State.
At age 17, Ebner was the youngest
player to ever play for the US national
team sevens.
Becoming a two-sport athlete was a
return to Ebner’s roots.
“Nate is a rugby guy. He played it
growing up. He’s not your stereotypical NFL player who wants to try out a
new game,” said teammate Danny Barrett who played college rugby against
Ebner. “He was a guy that wanted to
come home and play what he knows.
Knocking a bit of rust off is definitely
tough. Getting fit is definitely tough,
but he fit in seamlessly.”
Well, minus a few Deflategate jokes
Barrett said were told at Ebner’s expense.
Unfortunately, Ebner’s Olympic experience is ending almost as fast as the
don’t-blink rugby sevens games, which
consist of two seven-minute halves.
Despite a late try from Ebner, the
US team failed to make it out of group
play with a 24-19 loss to powerhouse
Fiji in their first of two matches on
Wednesday. They’ ll play for ninth
place against Spain on Thursday at Deodoro Stadium.
Ebner wants the US team to heed
the mantra of the man who introduced
him to rugby, his late father Jeff, who
was murdered in 2008 at the family
auto reclamation business in Springfield, Ohio.
“Finish Strong.”
“ We’re going to finish this out
strong,” said Ebner. “That’s all we can
do, but the experience has been great.
It’s been awesome. I wouldn’t have
done anything differently. I wish we
would have had a better day [Tuesday]
to put ourselves in a better position,
but it is what it is. Ultimately, we gave
everything we had to this. Yeah, no regrets at all.”
The only regret Ebner would have
had is if he had not taken an NFL sabbatical to try to play in rugby’s reintroduction to the Olympics for the first
time since 1924.
“Obviously, it’s a tough decision to
make,” said Ebner. “But at the end of
the day, you see a sport in the Olympics that you grew up playing your
whole life. How do you not want to be
a part of that? It was kind of eating me
up a little bit. I just didn’t want to live
with the regret of not trying or thinking what would that experience have
been like if I could have made that
team.
“Once I had the conviction that I
wanted to do this I put everything into
it. There is risk involved. I have a career in football and whatnot. But those
weren’t good enough reasons for me to
not try a once-in-a-lifetime dream.”
Ebner has been on the big stage before. He was US MVP at the Under-19
and the Under-20 International Rugby
Board (now World Rugby) World
Championships in 2007 and 2008, respectively.
He showed why the last few days.
After being on the bench for the team’s
haunting opening loss to Argentina on
Tuesday, Ebner scored a try in the US’s
win over Brazil later that day. He also
leveled Gustavo Albuquerque with a
tackle that would have made Rodney
Harrison proud.
“It has been awesome to see him
come back as a rugby player,” said US
captain Madison Hughes, whose
mother is from Leominster, Mass. “I
think he showed you he is a worldclass player, and having an extra
world-class player never hurts. I think
he would be an incredible asset for our
team. Obviously, he has got a big career going on that means a lot. We
wish the best for him.”
Ebner’s love for rugby is clear. Even
though his nickname at Ohio State was
“Leonidas” after the legendary laconic
Greek warrior and he has been Patriot
programmed to say little, Ebner has
embraced his role as a spokesperson
and ambassador for the game in the
United States.
He has repeatedly answered the
same questions about the NFL and the
high-profile support he has gotten
from the Patriots.
One of the precepts of the Patriot
Way is that football must be important
to you. Perhaps, Patriots coach Bill
Belichick signed off on this Olympic
excursion though because of the similarities between Ebner and his father
and their relationship to rugby and
Belichick’s relationship with his late father Steve and football.
The No. 12 Ebner donned for the
US was the same number his father
wore when he played rugby at the University of Minnesota.
Ebner said once he explained his
convictions to Belichick and the others
in the organization, they were on
board. That support has meant the
world to him.
“I think ultimately they understood
what they were getting when they
drafted me back in 2012 as a rugby
player with a rugby background,” said
Ebner.
Ebner isn’t quite the modern answer to Gene Conley, a three-time AllStar pitcher in the major leagues who
played on three championship Celtics
teams as center/forward (1959, 1960
and 1961).
But he’ll return to Foxborough with
dual-sport citizenship.
Christopher L. Gasper can be reached
at [email protected] Follow him on
Twitter @cgasper.
D8
Sports
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
RIO
MEN’S GYMNASTICS
Rio security:
Media bus
hit with rocks
King Kohei keeps
all-around crown
Japan star’s last shot
is just enough to win
By John Powers
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
RIO DE JANEIRO — King Kohei’s
crown was off-kilter and his throne
was wobbling. Kohei Uchimura was
down by nearly a point to Ukraine’s
Oleg Verniaiev with one rotation left
in the men’s all-around on Wednesday
evening and a coup seemed imminent.
“Since 2009 I have maintained this
title but this time was really the trickiest for me,” said Japan’s rock star with
chalked hands, who’d won the gold
medal in London and three world titles both before and since. “I felt close
to admitting that it might be really difficult.”
It was high drama on the high bar,
a five-ringed showdown at 9 feet,
where one slipped hand would make
the difference. Thus did the glamour
event in Olympic men’s gymnastics
come down to the top two contenders
with the rest of the competition completed. And when the numbers went
u p , r o y a l ty h a d p r e va i l e d b y 9 9
1,000ths of a point (92.365-92.266)
and the Japanese, who’d unhorsed the
Chinese for the team title on Monday,
had won the only other one that matters to them.
“This is a great victory for me — six
world championships and two Olympic Games,” the 27-year-old Uchimura
proclaimed after he’d become the first
male gymnast since countryman
Sawao Kato in 1972 to win consecutive Olympic all-arounds and the first
since Kato in 1976 to collect medals in
the event at three straight Games. “I
proudly say I raised the bar of individual events.”
Not that the decision was unquestioned. Coincidentally or not,
Uchimura just happened to make up
everything that he needed to plus a
golden sliver. Did reputation count?
Quite possibly. Uchimura had won
three times as many consecutive
world titles as anyone else ever had.
He was the reigning global champion
on high bar. Verniaiev had been 11th
in 2012 and missed the podium at last
year’s global meet in Glasgow. Was
anybody outside of Donetsk going to
holler that the fix was in at Olympus?
“Absolutely no,” Uchimura declared. “It will never happen. All the
athletes are on par in the eyes of judges. There is no such thing as judges
liking a certain athlete or not.”
He may not be a global icon like
swimmer Michael Phelps or sprinter
Usain Bolt. “Everybody knows their
names but Kohei Uchimura — who is
this man?” he acknowledged. “I don’t
think I am well known in the world.”
But ever yone who can tell the
horse from the rings knows who King
Kohei is. “He’s a legend and it’s very
exciting to watch him,” said Simone
Biles, the three-time world titlist
who’s favored to win the women’s
crown on Thursday. “It’s awesome seeing him around the village because
he’s just so chill. Every time he’s in the
cafeteria he’s like, ‘Yeah, like whatever, you know.’ He just carries himself
very well and we all look up to him because he’s a normal human being like
the rest of us, but he’s done so much.”
Uchimura’s third turn around
Olympus hadn’t begun well. He ran
up a $5,000 cellphone bill shortly after he arrived by playing Pokemon Go,
not realizing how steep the roaming
charges were. “He looked dead at the
team meal that day,” said teammate
Kenzo Shirai. His service provider
back home let him off the hook by
signing him up retroactively to an unlimited daily contract but nobody
could stop Uchimura from falling off
the high bar in team qualifying.
His teammates rebounded in the
final to unhorse the Chinese and give
Uchimura the one medal that he really
craved. “Winning the individual gold
would make me happy,” he said, “but
the team gold means you get five
times the happiness.”
The all-around didn’t figure to be
as much of a challenge but from the
start, when he fell behind Max Whitlock, whose bronze was Great Britain’s
first medal in the event since 1908,
Uchimura was scrambling. Though he
briefly had the lead after pommel
horse, the champ had slipped to third
midway along.
When Verniaiev posted a lofty
16.100 on parallel bars to go up by
9/10ths of a point after five rotations,
Uchimura feared that the math for
once wouldn’ t go his way. “Oleg
achieved an incredible score, so I
knew that of course,” he said. “I heard
the announcement so I knew what I
had to achieve as a target point.”
Nobody here could match Uchimura’s skywalking abilities or his daring
release moves. His 15.800 on high bar
was by far the highest score of the day
on the apparatus. What Verniaiev
needed was a 14.899. What he got for
his conservative set was 14.800. “I feel
that I managed to make Kohei very
nervous,” said the runner-up, who
shrugged when he saw the score. “But
he still retained his title.”
It was, said US rival Chris Brooks,
“a crazy tight score” but it was enough
to put Uchimura up with the sport’s
immortals and possibly enough to
persuade him to continue on to 2020,
when the gym will be in Tokyo and
where he might just see his younger
Ukrainian pursuer again.
“I respect him a lot,” Verniaiev said.
“Next time we will see who’s the strongest. At the world championships I
told people I would be back to win in
Rio. Now I say I’ll win next time.”
By Shira Springer
GLOBE STAFF
year in Glasgow, everyone immediately put Biles
on a rocket ship to Rio, which baffled her. Didn’t
they know there were Olympic trials?
So she went to San Jose last month feeling unsettled.
“I was very nervous, because even before the
competition, everyone named me to the team,”
she said. “But it was not final.”
Even after Biles won the event to claim the automatic spot, she found herself reluctant to exult.
“When we were in the room, Aly [Raisman]
was like, ‘Hey, Simone, you can start crying, you
already made the team,’ ” she said. “But I wasn’t
going to celebrate or take anything for granted
until Martha comes in and announces it.”
Even after she’d moved into the athletes village here, Biles wouldn’t let herself believe that
she was an Olympian.
“Every day in the room, Laurie [Hernandez]
and I are like, ‘OK, this is a joke.’ We’re waiting to
be woken up,” she said.
Once they’d performed on floor exercise in
Sunday’s qualifying round, Biles turned to Hernandez and declared, “We’re officially Olympians.”
Had qualifying gone poorly, Biles could have
missed out not only on the all-around — as world
champ Jordyn Wieber did in London — but also
on the event finals. No problem there: Biles
placed first overall ahead of Raisman but also
earned places on vault, beam, and floor as the top
performer in each.
Five gold medals would put her up with the
Olympic immortals, but the way that Biles got
herself here was by being relentlessly temporal.
All there is for her now is the Amanar vault in
Thursday’s first rotation. If she lands that, then
you can ask her about bars.
RIO DE JANEIRO — Conflicting versions of
an attack on a media bus dominated the International Olympic Committee’s Wednesday morning press briefing. The incident in question occurred roughly 15 hours earlier, when a bus traveling from the Deodoro venue cluster to the
Media Transport Mall in the Olympic Park was
hit by window-shattering projectiles. Of the 12
journalists on the bus, two suffered minor injuries because of the broken glass.
Rio Olympics head of security, Luiz Fernando
Correa, repeatedly stated that rocks, not gunfire,
hit the bus. He noted that forensic findings confirmed that.
When asked if he was 100 percent certain
that rocks hit the bus, Correa said through a
translator, “The information that says that it’s a
stone is from public authorities who were there
at the moment. That’s why I’m sure it was not
gunfire.” Additionally, Correa considered the incident “an act of vandalism not a criminal act
with the intent of injuring people.”
But passengers on the bus said they heard
gunshots and that the holes in the windows
looked like they came from bullets. One passenger, Sherryl “Lee” Michaelson, a retired US Air
Force captain working as a basketball reporter at
the Games, attended the briefing, questioned
Correa, and cast doubt on the projectiles being
rocks, not bullets. Michaelson recalled the bus
traveling at a high rate of speed when she heard
two shots ring out.
“There were two points of impact, pop, pop,”
said Michaelson. “I don’t want to accuse anybody of a cover-up. But I will not believe this was
stone-throwing unless I see a forensic and a ballistics report, looking . . . at the glass, which was
the point of impact in not one but two places,
from a competent, forensic authority that has no
reason to put any good spin on it.”
In her mind, she added: “It was clearly bullets.”
The attack on the media bus was the latest incident to raise concerns about security at the Rio
Olympics. The official version of events differed
greatly from the passengers’ recollection,
prompting suspicions that authorities were concealing the truth, or, at least, downplaying critical security lapses at the Games.
Prior to the Games, the spokesman for the Rio
Organizing committee, Mario Andrada, said Rio
de Janeiro would be “the safest city in the world”
during the event. On Wednesday, Andrada was
asked if he regretted that statement.
“I don’t regret saying that,” said Andrada.
“That’s because that’s our mission. It’s to make
Rio the safest city in the world.”
A stray bullet from a favela hit the media tent
near the equestrian center on Saturday. Rio
Olympics officials believe the shooter was aiming for security cameras on a blimp hovering
over the venue. Roughly two hours before the
men’s cycling road race ended on Saturday, Brazil’s anti-bomb squad destroyed a suspicious
package near the finish with a controlled explosion. And that was only the first full day of competition.
Last Thursday, a few miles from the Olympic
Park and Athletes Village, an armed motorcyclist
attempted to mug a man in his car. The man
pulled the attacker into the car, they struggled,
and the attacker was killed with his own gun. At
an Ipanema coffee shop, a photographer had
$40,000 worth of gear stolen along with his official, numbered photo vest. The photographer
later spotted someone wearing his photo vest
and getting through security at the archery venue, even though the person did not have the
proper press credential.
Also, journalists have reported media bus
drivers getting lost going to or returning from
venues, and sometimes taking accidental detours close to or through favelas.
When asked for his evaluation of Rio’s security efforts to date, Correa said, “Generally, we do
have incidents. Our utopian quest is a city without incidents, but in a big city like Rio, we have
incidents.”
Then, Correa spoke proudly about declines in
Rio’s crime rates and urban violence during the
Games and said, “We believe this is due to a lot of
patrolling.” To better protect the bus route between Deodoro and the Media Transport Mall,
Correa said the police presence on the road
would be reinforced.
In an attempt to make the Games safe, approximately 85,000 soldiers and police officers
have been deployed throughout the city, twice as
many as London had during the 2012 Summer
Games.
But given what happened with the media bus
and other incidents, the question remains: Are
security forces being smartly deployed throughout Rio?
“In a city as big as Rio, there is going to be
crime whether there is an Olympics or not,” said
Juliette Kayyem, founder of security consulting
firm Kayyem Solutions and former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security.
“The question for the Rio committee is whether
they’ve adequately deployed resources and personnel that minimizes risk to the Olympic community. While each individual incident may not
seem like a big deal by itself, at some stage the
cumulative numbers tell you something.”
John Powers can be reached at
[email protected] Follow him on Twitter
@JPowizglobe
Shira Springer can be reached at
[email protected] Follow her on Twitter
@ShiraSpringer
MATTHIAS HANGST/GETTY IMAGES
Japan’s Kohei Uchimura kept his composure on the horizontal
bar and grabbed the all-around title on his final rotation.
All around, Biles is the best female gymnast
BILES
Continued from Page D1
can’t expect,” said Biles, who has collected a record 10 gold medals at the global level. “You
don’t know what it’s going to be like until it happens, so I just kind of do everyday life.”
Far from pondering her place in history, Biles
doesn’t even follow her own sport.
“I’m not a gymnastics fan,” she said. “I don’t
really watch gymnastics a lot. I know it’s crazy to
say, but I don’t follow what the other girls are doing. Other coaches say, ‘Did you watch this?’ I’ll
say, ‘I don’t even know what you’re talking
about.’ ”
Everybody else, of course, has been watching
Biles for a while now.
“The gymnastics world has known about Simone for many years,” said Nadia Comaneci, who
put the sport on the map in Montreal four decades ago.
And what they’re saying is that Biles is unbeatable.
“She’s in a class all by herself,” said Mary Lou
Retton, who in 1984 became the first US woman
to win the all-around. “Honestly, she’s just untouchable. She can have a couple of falls and still
beat everybody.”
Biles has won the last three world titles on
floor exercise, where her tumbling pass with a
double back layout and a half-twist is named after her. She won the last two global crowns on
balance beam, where her full-twisting doubleback dismount is the planet’s toughest. And she
has made the last three world podiums on vault.
So advanced is Biles on those three events that
she could have a pratfall on uneven bars and still
outpoint everyone.
“Going against her is going to be a huge challenge, and I don’t believe anybody is going to
stand up,” reckoned Bela Karolyi, who coached
both Comaneci and Retton. “I’ll be honest. I don’t
believe there is anybody on earth at this point
that I know can beat her.”
Biles’s road to Olympus has been most unlikely. Her mother was addicted to drugs and alcohol,
so Biles was raised by her grandparents, who adopted her and whom she considers her parents.
She was introduced to the sport on a day-care
field trip to a Houston gym when she was 6, and
powered her way through the USA Gymnastics
pipeline.
Her senior debut came a year after the 2012
London Games, and it took a near-disaster at the
Classic event, where Biles withdrew after multiple mishaps, to channel her into the championship lane.
“I almost killed myself,” she recalled. “But it’s
OK because everyone needs a reality check.”
After a sitdown with national team coordinator Martha Karolyi and visits with a sports psychologist, Biles soon became unstoppable, winning that summer’s US championships and becoming the first African-American to claim the
world crown. When she won her third one last
REBECCA BLACKWELL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Simone Biles was doing some scoreboardwatching in the team finals on Tuesday.
T h e
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For updated scores: bostonglobe.com/sports
On the radio, unless noted: Red Sox, WEEI-FM 93.7; Revolution, WBZ-FM 98.5
ON THE AIR
Latest line
AMATEUR BASEBALL
1 p.m.
Little League N.E. semifinal: N.H. vs. Conn. ESPN
YURI CORTEZ/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Nico Hernandez (right) outpointed Ecuador’s Carlos Quipo, 2928, in the light flyweight division to guarantee the US a medal.
OLYMPIC NOTEBOOK
Americans will
medal in boxing
Shut out in London, US back in game
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four years after an embarrassing shutout, the United States will
medal in the Olympic boxing
tournament.
Kansas fighter Nico Hernandez is guaranteed at least a
bronze and become the first
American to medal in the tournament since 2008.
Hernandez moved to 3-0 with
a tight, unanimous decision victory over Ecuador’s Carlos Quipo on
Wednesday.
Hernandez won, 29-28, on all
three cards and leaped in the air
when the decision was read. Quipo dropped to his knees in
stunned disbelief, losing the third
round, 10-9, after the judges
scored it 19-19 through two.
Hernandez was coming off an
upset win over the No. 2 seed in
the light flyweight bracket, Vasilii
Egorov of Russia.
Beach ball
April Ross was so excited to
finish the preliminary round of
the beach volleyball tournament
unbeaten that she took a victory
lap around the Copacabana court,
slapping hands with fans as she
ran.
Her partner, Kerri Walsh Jennings, spun around in circles as
she jumped in the sand.
‘‘It’s the Olympics. We've got to
celebrate everything,’’ Walsh Jennings said after the Americans
beat Switzerland, 21-13, 22-24,
15-12. ‘‘That was a really hardfought match. It deserved a victory lap.’’
Not so lucky were American
men Casey Patterson and Jake
Gibb, who lost to Spain and finished 1-2. They are done for the
Olympics, finishing last in their
pool because of a tiebreaker.
It’s the first US men’s team to
fail to advance out of pool play
since the 2004 Games in Athens.
Speeding up
So much for the slow starts by
the US women’s field hockey
team.
Melissa Gonzalez scored on a
penalty corner 22 seconds into
the team’s match against Japan,
and Katie Bam scored the first of
her three goals four minutes later.
The Americans went on to rout
Japan, 6-1, in the Pool B contest
to earn a slot in the quarterfinals.
In their first two matches at
the Olympics, the Americans
struggled early before finishing
strong to beat Argentina and Australia. This time, they avoided a
sluggish start on a rainy, dreary
evening with temperatures in the
mid-60s.
Rain washes out tennis
Rafael Nadal went from being
scheduled for a busy-as-can-be
day to a day off at the Rio Olympics on Wednesday, thanks to rain
that forced postponement of 20 of
26 matches.
None of the nine courts at the
Rio tennis venue has a roof, so
near-constant showers prevented
any competition until at least
6:15 p.m. — 7½ hours after play
was supposed to start.
After waiting and waiting in
the hope of getting in matches,
organizers eventually decided to
take all but a half-dozen off the
day’s schedule. Among those that
were called off: All three that Nadal was supposed to take part in.
Instead, Nadal will wait to get
back on court.
Another man who wound up
without a match to play: 2012
London Games champion Andy
Murray, who plays Fabio Fognini
of Italy next.
Both Murray and Nadal are attempting to become the first tennis player to win two singles gold
medals.
Not easy being green
It looks as if the water polo
pool is turning green with envy.
The men’s Olympic tournament resumed in green-tinged
water after the diving pool at Maria Lenk Aquatics Centre turned a
dark green the previous day.
There was no sign of any water
quality issues with the water polo
pool during the first day of the
women’s competition Tuesday.
A decrease in the alkaline level
in the diving well Tuesday afternoon led to the green color, organizing committee spokesman Mario Andrada said. He added that
the pool for water polo and synchronized swimming is being affected in the same way.
‘‘We have treated both pools
during the night and the alkalinity levels have already improved,’’
Andrada said. ‘‘We expect the color to be back to blue very shortly.’’
Maybe not, according to a US
pool expert.
‘‘Once you get behind, it gets
hard to get back in front of it,’’
said Jerry Wallace, chairman of
the California Pool & Spa Association, a trade group.
According to FINA, the world
governing body for aquatic
sports, water tanks ran out of
some of the chemicals used in the
water treatment process, causing
the pH level to go outside the usual range, leading to the discoloration.
Andrada and FINA said there
is no risk to athletes competing in
either pool.
‘‘Just from TV and pictures on
the computer, it looks more like
an algae than alkaline problem
turning the water green,’’ Wallace
said by phone from Sacramento.
Mexico out in soccer
Defending champion Mexico
has been eliminated from the
men’s soccer tournament after
1-0 loss to South Korea.
Kwon Chang-hoon scored a
77th-minute winner in Brasilia to
end Mexico’s hopes of repeating
as Olympic champion. The Mexicans upset Brazil in the final of
the London Games four years
ago.
Argentina took another hit
when its men’s team was eliminated.
The South American power
has won two Olympic gold medals in soccer, but it failed to advance from the group stage after a
1-1 draw against Honduras.
The result follows the senior
team’s loss in the Copa America
final in June and added to the crisis enveloping the sport at home.
PRO BASEBALL
12:30 p.m. San Diego at Pittsburgh
3:30 p.m. Colorado at Texas (in progress)
7:10 p.m. NY Yankees at Boston
8 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs
MLB
MLB
NESN
MLB
PRO FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m. Exhibition: New Orleans at New England
Ch. 4
GOLF
2 p.m.
5 p.m.
FS1
Golf
US Senior Open
PGA Tour: John Deere Classic
OLYMPICS*
6:30 a.m. Men’s golf (first round)
10:40 a.m. Women’s water polo: US vs. China
6:30 p.m. Women’s field hockey: US vs. India
8 p.m.
Women’s gymnastics: ind. all-around final
8:35 p.m. Men’s volleyball: US vs. Brazil
9 p.m.
Swimming
Thursday
NFL
Thursday
Favorite................Pts. .............Underdog
At Atlanta..............3 .........Washington
At Phila..................3 ..........Tampa Bay
At NY Jets.............2½ .........Jacksonville
At Baltimore.........1½ ................Carolina
At NEW ENGLAND3 ....... New Orleans
At Chicago......... PK ..................Denver
Friday
At NY Giants.........3 ................... Miami
At Pittsburgh........3 ..................Detroit
At Cincinnati.........3 ............Minnesota
At Green Bay..... NL .............Cleveland
At Arizona.............3 ................Oakland
Golf
NBC
NBCSN
NBC
NBCSN
NBC
*for complete Olympic listings, go to bostonglobe.com/sports
International
Eastern League
Eastern Division
W
L
Reading....................77 39
Trenton ....................75 42
Hartford...................63 51
Binghamton ............54 61
New Hampshire .....54 61
Portland...................45 70
Pct.
.664
.641
.553
.470
.470
.391
GB
—
2½
13
22½
22½
31½
Pct. GB
.449 —
.449 —
.432
2
.424
3
Western Division
W
L
Altoona ....................63 52
Harrisburg...............62 54
Akron........................58 59
Bowie .......................49 67
Richmond ................47 69
Erie ...........................47 69
Pct.
.548
.534
.496
.422
.405
.405
GB
—
1½
6
14½
16½
16½
Pct. GB
.563 —
.487
9
.479 10
.454 13
WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
Binghamton 7..........................Reading 3
Harrisburg 5............................. Altoona 2
Akron 3.....................................Hartford 2
New Hampshire 7.......................Bowie 4
Portland 16...................................... Erie 1
Trenton 5..............Richmond 4 (10 inn.)
North Division
W
Scranton/W-B.........74
Lehigh Valley..........70
Rochester ................65
Pawtucket ...............62
Buffalo .....................59
Syracuse..................53
L
43
47
53
55
59
64
Pct. GB
.632 —
.598
4
.551 9½
.530 12
.500 15½
.453 21
South Division
W
Gwinnett..................53
Durham....................53
Charlotte .................51
Norfolk .....................50
L
65
65
67
68
West Division
W
Columbus ................67
Indianapolis ............58
Louisville .................57
Toledo ......................54
L
52
61
62
65
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Norfolk 4.................................Gwinnett 1
Syracuse 6............................Rochester 4
Columbus 7.................................Toledo 5
Pawtucket 5.............................Durham 4
Buffalo 1............................Indianapolis 0
Scranton/W-B 10...........Lehigh Valley 0
Louisville 3.............................Charlotte 2
Pawtucket 5, Durham 4
at McCoy Stadium, Pawtucket, R.I.
DURHAM
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
EPerez cf
4 1 1 0 0 0 .228
MDuffy ss
4 0 0 0 0 0 .182
Motter 2b
4 1 1 0 0 0 .210
Arencibia 1b
4 2 2 1 0 2 .237
Casali c
4 0 2 1 0 1 .250
Robertson 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .255
Varona rf
4 0 1 1 0 1 .234
Field lf
2 0 1 0 1 1 .264
Hager dh
3 0 0 0 0 1 .242
Totals
33 4 9 4 1 7
PAWTUCKET AB R H
RCastillo cf
4 1 2
LaMarre lf
4 0 0
MHrnandez 2b
4 2 2
CMarrero 1b
2 1 1
Boesch dh
4 0 2
Vazquez c
4 0 1
Witte 3b
4 0 1
HRamos rf
4 0 0
DMarrero ss
3 1 1
Totals
33 5 10
BI BB SO Avg.
0 0 1 .262
0 0 1 .291
1 0 1 .319
2 1 0 .288
1 0 0 .250
0 0 0 .277
0 0 2 .269
0 0 2 .256
1 0 1 .195
5 1 8
Durham
200 000 101 — 4 9 1
Pawtucket 211 010 00x — 5 10 0
E—Casali (3). LOB—Durham 3, Pawtucket 6. 3B—RCastillo (2), MHernandez (4). HR—Arencibia (13), DMarrero
(1), CMarrero (21). SB—RCastillo (9),
HRamos (4). SF—CMarrero. GIDP—
Hager, Boesch. DP—Durham 1, Pawtucket 1.
DURHAM
Cobb L 0-1
Gamboa
Sturdevant
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
12.0
3 8 4 4 0 4
0
4 2 1 0 1 3 2.49
1 0 0 0 0 1 1.14
PAWTUCKET IP
BJhnson W 5-4 6‚
JKelly
1„
NRamirez S 5 1
H
8
0
1
R
3
0
1
ER BB SO
3 1 2
0 0 2
1 0 3
ERA
4.14
2.03
2.04
WP—Gamboa. T—2:27. A—5,654.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Durham at Pawtucket..........................12
Indianapolis at Buffalo.......................... 1
Rochester at Syracuse...........................6
Columbus at Toledo...............................7
Lehigh Valley at Scranton/W-B ..........7
Louisville at Charlotte............................7
NY-Penn League
WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 5...............................Vermont 4
Mahoning Valley 8...................Batavia 4
Connecticut 8............................Auburn 4
Hudson Valley at Williamsport......ppd.
Aberdeen 7..................... Staten Island 3
Tri-City at Lowell..............................ppd.
West Virginia at State College.....susp.
THURSDAY'S GAMES
Vermont at Brooklyn..............................7
Batavia at Mahoning Valley.................7
Connecticut at Auburn..........................7
Hudson Valley at Williamsport............7
Staten Island at Aberdeen....................7
Tri-City at Lowell....................................7
West Virginia at State College.............7
Golf
U.S. MID-AMATEUR
SECTIONAL QUALIFYING
At Stockbridge GC, Stockbridge
Par: 71 — (36-35)
Qualifiers
68 — Andy Drohen, Granville, 37-31;
Doug Clapp, Walpole, 34-34.
Alternates
71 — John Kelly, East Longmeadow,
35-36.
72 — Herbie Aikens, Pembroke, 3636.
Road Racing
COLONIAL SUMMER SERIES
At Brockton, MA
3.75 Miles
MEN
1. Corey Pires, N. Easton, 20:14; 2.
Liban Adew, Brockton, 23:04; 3. Bob
Ruel, Whitman, 24:06; 4. Thomas Dorr,
Whitman, 24:43; 5. Brian Lamoureux,
Plymouth, 25:13.
WOMEN
1. MaryAnn Johnson, Canton, 28:40;
2. Mado Mbuyamba, Bridgewater,
31:59; 3. Gail Martin, Sharon, 32:19; 4.
Kara LeClair, East Taunton, 33:38; 5.
Debi Caprio, E. Taunton, 34:07.
Portland 16, Erie 1
at Jerry Uht Park, Erie, Pa.
PORTLAND
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
ATavarez rf
4 4 4 0 2 0 .338
Dubon ss
6 2 3 3 0 1 .315
Court 3b
6 1 2 5 0 1 .299
Freiman dh
5 2 2 0 0 2 .279
CDecker 1b
6 2 3 3 0 2 .247
Sturgeon cf
6 0 1 0 0 1 .267
Romanski c
5 3 4 2 0 0 .306
RRosario lf
5 1 1 1 0 0 .277
TLin 2b
5 1 2 2 0 0 .237
Totals
48 16 22 16 2 7
ERIE
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
CHarrell dh
4 0 0 0 0 3 .267
GNunez ss
3 0 1 0 0 0 .277
Gose rf
4 0 0 0 0 3 .225
Ficociello 1b
2 0 0 0 2 1 .247
Stewart lf
4 1 1 1 0 1 .125
Greiner c
3 0 0 0 0 1 .244
Gerber cf
3 0 0 0 1 0 .250
HCastro 2b
4 0 0 0 0 0 .237
Eaves 3b
2 0 1 0 1 0 .193
Totals
29 1 3 1 4 9
Portland
116 124 001 — 16 22 0
Erie
000 000 001 — 1 3 0
LOB—Portland 8, Erie 7. 2B—ATavarez (17), RRosario (11), Romanski 2 (20).
3B—Dubon (5), ATavarez (11). HR—
Court (3), TLin (2), Romanski (3),
CDecker 2 (10), Stewart (1). GIDP—
Court, Gerber. DP—Portland 1, Erie 1.
PORTLAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Beeks W 4-2
6 2 0 0 2 5 4.08
Buttrey
2 0 0 0 1 2 4.35
Maddox
1 1 1 1 1 2 3.23
ERIE
Collier L 7-7
DMartinez
JMantiply
Ravenelle
Alaniz
IP
2‚
3‚
1‚
1
1
H
10
11
0
0
1
R
7
8
0
0
1
ER BB SO
7 0 2
8 1 2
0 0 2
0 1 0
1 0 1
ERA
3.55
6.90
3.18
5.30
3.48
HBP—by Collier (Freiman), by Buttrey (Greiner), by Beeks (GNunez).
WP—Collier. T—2:50. A—1.
Hockey
HLINKA MEMORIAL CUP
Saturday
At Kansas City......3 ..................Seattle
At Buffalo...........NL .........Indianapolis
At Los Angeles.....4½ ....................Dallas
At Tennessee........3 ............ San Diego
Sunday
At San Francisco..3 ................Houston
Transactions
BASEBALL
Office Of The Commissioner Of Baseball: Suspended Cubs minor league P
Luiz Escanio (Dominican SL) 144
games, without pay, after testing positive for a metabolite of Boldenone, a
performance-enhancing substance in
violation of the Minor League Drug
Prevention and Treatment Program.
Los Angeles (AL): Optioned C Carlos
Perez to Salt Lake (PCL). Activated C
Geovany Soto from 15-day DL.
Minnesota (AL): Placed P Trevor May
on 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 7. Recalled P J.T. Chargois from Rochester
(IL).
New York (AL): Optioned P Luis Severino to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Added P Blake Parker to the roster.
San Diego (NL):Selected the contract
of INF Nick Noonan from El Paso (PCL).
Optioned INF Jose Rondon to El Paso.
Waived INF/OF Hector Olivera.
Seattle (AL): Optioned OF Guillermo
Heredia to Tacoma (PCL).
Texas (AL): Optioned OF Ryan Rua to
Round Rock (PCL). Activated OF Drew
Stubbs from 60-day DL. Designated INF
Kyle Kubitza for assignment.
FOOTBALL
Chicago (NFC): Signed OL Mike Adams. Waived OL Nick Becton.
Detroit (NFC): Signed CB Rashaad
Reynolds. Waived-injured CB Ian
Wells.
Miami (AFC): Signed CB Chris Culliver
to a one-year contract and then placed
him on the PUP list. Released C-G
Jacques McClendon and LB Danny Lansanah.
Seattle (NFC): Activated TE Jimmy Graham from the PUP list.
GOLF
U.S. Solheim Cup : Named Pat Hurst,
Wendy Ward and Nancy Lopez assistant captains for the 2017 Solheim Cup
team.
HOCKEY
New Jersey (NHL): Re-signed LW Reid
Boucher to a one-year, two-way contract.
ECHL
Elmira Jackals : Signed Fs Colin Murray, Kyle Rankin and Zach Luczyk.
SOCCER
Concacaf: Named Guilherme Carvalho
chief legal and chief compliance officer, effective Aug. 23, 2016.
Philadelphia Union (MLS): Signed D
Auston Trusty.
Portland Timbers (MLS): Signed MF Diego Valeri to a contract extension as a
designated player.
COLLEGE
NJCAA: Announced the retirement of
executive director Mary Ellen Leicht
following the 2016-17 season.
Charlotte: Named Bo Robinson baseball recruiting coordinator.
Chestnut Hill: Named Andrew Egan
strength and conditioning intern.
Hampton: Named Frank Hughes women’s soccer coach.
Illinois: Announced redshirt freshman
QB Jimmy Fitzgerald is leaving the
football team.
La Salle: Named Allyson Heavens and
Ben Whitcraft women’s assistant lacrosse coaches.
Shenandoah: Named Becca Toler
women’s assistant soccer coach.
Tennessee: Announced sophomore DB
Darrell Miller Jr. has left the football
team.
Wichita State: Suspended men’s basketball coach Gregg Marshall for the
last game of an exhibition tour in Canada after receiving two technical fouls
and getting kicked out of a game
against McGill University on Tuesday.
US Under-18 Select, 4-2
BOYS
At Breclav, Czech Republic
Czech Republic......................1 1 0 — 2
UNITED STATES......................1 3 0 — 4
Goals: US, Lodnia (Chmelevski),
(pp), 8:50; CR, Chytil (Safin, Bukac),
11:12; US, Poehling (Pastujov), 8:47;
CR, Safin (Necas, Kaut), (pp), 14:38; US,
Poehling (Chmelevski, Pastujov), (pp),
18:46; US, Poehling (Pastujov), (pp),
19:49.
Saves: CR, Vomacka 38; US, Primeau
23.
FRIDAY’S GAME
Semifinals
UNITED STATES vs. Russia..........11:30a
FIVE NATIONS TOURNEY
US Under-17, 10-1
BOYS
At Dallas, Texas
Slovakia...................................1 0 0 — 1
UNITED STATES................... 3 4 3 — 10
Goals: S, Fasko-Rudas (Okuliar), 0:38;
US, Randl (Drury), 6:11; US, Semik
(Randl, Drury), 6:46; US, Savage (Hain),
(pp), 17:49; US, Kiefiuk (McLaughlin,
Krygier), (pp), 4:10; US, Devlin McCabe,
(Semik, Smith), (pp), 6:45; US, Savage
(Hain, Walsh), (pp), 10:56; US, Malone
(Helgeson), 18:05; US, McLaughlin,
(Kiefiuk), 1:31; US, Davidson (Smith,
Helgeson), 14:26; US, McLaughlin (McCabe), (pp) 19:59.
Saves: US, Saville 15; S, Batory 52.
Schools
BASEBALL
LLWS New England Regionals
Semifinals
Warwick R.I. 10.........Wellesley South 7
Lacrosse
CONCORD ELITE LEAGUE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts.
NYC FC .................10 7 7 37
Toronto FC...........10 7 6 36
New York............... 9 9 6 33
Montreal ................ 8 5 9 33
Philadelphia .......... 8 8 7 31
NEW ENGLAND ..... 6 9 8 26
Orlando City.......... 5 6 11 26
D.C. United ............ 5 8 9 24
Columbus............... 3 8 10 19
Chicago.................. 4 11 6 18
GF
40
33
40
37
38
29
36
22
26
20
GA
40
24
32
31
37
40
39
28
35
30
WESTERN CONFERENCE
FC Dallas..............13 6 5 44
Colorado ..............11 3 8 41
Real Salt Lake.....10 7 7 37
Los Angeles........... 9 3 10 37
Kansas City .........10 11 4 34
Portland ................. 8 8 8 32
Vancouver ............. 8 10 6 30
San Jose................. 6 6 10 28
Seattle.................... 7 12 3 24
Houston.................. 4 10 8 20
37
26
35
37
28
36
33
23
24
24
31
19
34
22
28
34
39
24
29
28
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 12
San Jose at Vancouver........................11
SATURDAY, AUGUST 13
Montreal at New York...........................7
Portland at D.C. United..........................7
New York City FC at Columbus......7:30
Philadelphia at NEW ENGLAND......7:30
Sporting Kansas City at FC Dallas...... 9
Toronto FC at Houston..........................9
Colorado at Los Angeles................10:30
SUNDAY, AUGUST 14
Orlando City at Chicago........................4
Real Salt Lake at Seattle.......................7
NWSL
2
3
5
4
5
5
9
7
7
11
5
2
2
4
4
5
0
4
3
1
29
29
26
25
22
20
18
16
12
7
20
22
29
14
18
18
14
11
13
7
12
12
18
13
20
14
19
14
15
29
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
THURSDAY, AUG. 18
Washington at Houston........................ 8
Tennis
Arena Football
At Los Cabos, Mexico
Singles
Second Round
Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def.
Sam Querrey (4), United States, 7-6 (1),
6-3; Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, def.
Austin Krajicek, United States, 6-0, 6-3.
Cubs pitcher banned again
Chicago Cubs pitcher Luiz Escanio was suspended for 144 games for a positive test for a
metabolite of Boldenone, his second violation
of baseball’s minor league drug program. Escanio, a righthander who turned 24 on July 1,
was suspended for 72 games on June 18 last
year following a positive test for Stanozolol
metabolites . . . The National League’s only living seven-hit men met in Miami before the
San Francisco Giants victory over the Marlins.
Rennie Stennett, 65, and a South Florida resident, stopped by Marlins Park to meet with
Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford, who had
seven hits in Monday’s 14-inning victory at
Miami. Stennett went 7 for 7 for the Pittsburgh Pirates at Wrigley Field in 1975. ‘‘It was
cool to meet him,’’ Crawford said. ‘‘We talked
about the game he had a little bit and how
he’ll never forget it. I said, ‘I’m sure I won’t either.’ ”
NFL
Bills rookie LB out for year
Bills rookie linebacker Reggie Ragland, the
team’s second-round pick out of Alabama, will
have surgery to repair a torn ligament in his
left knee and is expected to miss the entire
season. Ragland was the second of Buffalo’s
top two draft picks to be sidelined by injury after defensive end Shaq Lawson, a first-round
pick from Clemson, was expected to miss the
first month of the season recuperating from
shoulder surgery in May. Said Bills coach Rex
Ryan, “Obviously, we think they’re rare talents
and that’s not going to change either based on
an injury. It’s just unfortunate that we’ve got
to be a little more patient than maybe we
wanted to.’’ . . . The Seahawks activiated tight
end Jimmy Graham from the physically unable to perform list. Graham went through a
light practice with the team in Renton, Wash.,
marking another step in his recovery from a
torn right patellar tendon suffered in a Week
12 game against Pittsburgh . . . The Broncos
named Mark Sanchez as the starting quarterback for Denver’s preseason opener in Chicago on Thursday night. Sanchez got the starting nod from coach Gary Kubiak over Trevor
Siemian, who is listed as the co-No. 1 quarterback on the team’s depth chart and rookie
Paxton Lynch, who is slotted to play the second half.
COLLEGES
Former Baylor football coach Art Briles, 60,
was confident he will get another chance after
losing his job over allegations that his program mishandled complaints of sexual assault. “Things happen and that happened and
it’s unfortunate for a lot of people, not myself,
being at the last, a lot of other people involved,
victims first and foremost,’’ Briles said during
a visit Tuesday to the Dallas Cowboys’ training
camp in Oxnard, Calif. “Then when you break
down, assistant coaches that are involved,
support staff, players, recruits, it’s unfortunate
but that’s the path that was taken so we’ll all
learn from it and be better for it. That’s going
to be my goal.’’. . .Wichita State basketball
coach Gregg Marshall was suspended for the
last game of an exhibition tour in Canada after
receiving two technical fouls and getting
kicked out of a game Tuesday night against
McGill University. Marshall complained several times about physical play that resulted in
one of Wichita State’s players sustaining a
concussion and had to be restrained from
chasing after two referees.
MISCELLANY
Club Championship
Billerica 11......................North Shore 10
ATP LOS CABOS
Prince Fielder tearfully confirmed Wednesday his career is over and will not be able to
come back after a second neck surgery. The
32-year-old Texas Rangers slugger wept as he
said health issues forced him to end his 12season major league career. He was still wearing a neck brace 12 days after his second cervical fusion in just over two years. “The doctors
told me that with two spinal fusions, I can’t
play anymore,” said Fielder, who sat flanked at
the podium by his two young sons, Jadyn and
Haven, who grew up around the game much
like he did when he followed around his father, Cecil Fielder, during his 13-year career
with five different teams. “I just want to thank
my teammates and coaches. I’m really going
to miss being around them. It was a lot of fun.
I’ve been in a big league clubhouse since I was
little. Not playing is tough. I’m happy I got to
enjoy my career.” The six-time All-Star hit .283
for his career with 319 home runs (the same
number his father hit) and 1,028 RBIs playing
for the Brewers, Tigers and Rangers.
Briles: ‘We’ll learn from it’
MLS
Portland ................. 8
Washington........... 9
Western NY........... 8
Chicago.................. 7
Sky Blue FC ........... 6
Seattle.................... 5
Orlando .................. 6
FC Kansas City ..... 4
Houston.................. 3
Boston .................... 2
SportsLog
Fielder forced
to retire after
second surgery
NO
(exh.)
7:30
Ch. 4
Home games shaded
D9
Conference Championship
Saturday, AUG. 13
National Conference
Cleveland at Arizona.........................9:30
Sunday, AUG. 14
American Conference
Jacksonville at Philadelphia................. 6
ArenaBowl XXIX
FRIDAY, AUG. 26
TBD............................................................7
Devils re-sign LW Boucher
The New Jersey Devils re-signed restricted
free agent left wing Reid Boucher to a oneyear, two-way contract. Boucher, 22, had eight
goals and 11 assists in 39 games with the Devils last season . . . Kyle Vance and Travis Vick
shared the second-round lead in the Junior
PGA Championship at Wannamoisett in Rumford, R.I., while the girls’ round was washed
out. The 16-year-old Vick, from Houston, shot
a 4-under 65 to match the 17-year-old Vance,
from Audubon, Pa., at 2-under 136. Vance had
a 67 . . . A sore left wrist forced the withdrawl
of Novak Djokovic, who was upset in straight
sets by Argentina’s Juan Martin del Potro at
the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, from playing
in an ATP Masters event in Cincinnati.
T h e
D10
B o s t o n
G l o b e
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ThursdayScene
NIGHTLIFE
G
SOCIETY
STYLE
T H E B O S T O N G L O B E T H U R S DAY, AU G US T 1 1 , 2 01 6 | B O S T O N G L OB E .C O M / L I F E S T Y L E
KATHERINE STREETER FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
From Cuba
with love
plus postage
Miami company ships products that carry
a taste of the island — even to Western Mass.
N
B Y C R I S T E L A G U E R RA | G L O B E S TA F F
ORTHFIELD
— Every
month, Kristen
Gonzalez waits
for a delivery
from the Florida tropics to
arrive on her doorstep in Western Massachusetts. Inside a cardboard box, she
finds a care package with magnets
shaped like vegetables, cookies,
clothespins, and slabs of guava jelly
that she bakes into traditional Cuban
pastelitos or pastries with white
cheese.
These are the tastes and smells of
her childhood. They’re staples of a Cuban-American household, but not easy
to find in Northfield or most of New
England. So she pays $20 a month to
have them shipped by strangers who
feel like family. The parcel is mailed
from Miami by a box subscription service she found on Facebook. It’s called
Abuela Mami, or “Grandmother Mom.”
The company, which started in December, has gained a small but devoted
ThursdayArts
A romance in parallel universes
ABUELA MAMI, Page G3
Inside
By Don Aucoin
GLOBE STAFF
STOCKBRIDGE – Although the
road less traveled was the one romanticized and immortalized by Robert
Frost, who shall be our
THEATER guide to multiple roads
traveled at the same
time?
The young British playwright and
screenwriter Nick Payne, that’s who.
His “Constellations’’ is a fascinating
drama about love, fate, parallel universes, simultaneous states of being,
and the infinite possibilities of any human life.
A small gem that runs a little more
than an hour, Payne’s play was staged
on Broadway last year, starring Jake
Gyllenhaal and Ruth Wilson. But it’s
hard to envision performances more
subtly piercing than those delivered by
Kate Baldwin and Graham Rowat in
the quietly spellbinding production of
“Constellations,’’ directed by Gregg
Edelman, that is now at Berkshire Theatre Group.
This makes it three years in a row
that Baldwin and Rowat, who are married, have anchored a highlight of the
summer theater season. The duo
memorably paired up in “A Little Night
‘‘CONSTELLATIONS,’’ Page G5
MUSIC
BOOMING
BUSINESS
Erick Sermon and Parrish Smith
of the classic hip-hop duo EPMD
celebrate three decades
G7
PLATED
SWEET
RELIEF
After a near-disaster at the
farmstand, Volante is back in
business in time for corn season
EMMA ROTHENBERG-WARE
Kate Baldwin and Graham Rowat in the Berkshire Theatre Group’s “Constellations.”
G2
T h e
G2
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Insider
FROM THE BAR
Cute but
Psycho:
What’s in
a name?
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
PLATED
TERI VOLANTE BOARDMAN OF VOLANTE FARMS IN NEEDHAM
After reopening, sweet relief
D
espite an extremely challenging summer,
Teri Volante Boardman — who owns Volante Farms in Needham with brothers
Dave and Steve Volante — remains upbeat. As farmers, she says, “you are at the
mercy of so much, so you just count your blessings and
hope it doesn’t get worse.”
On top of the unseasonably dry summer that all
farmers are facing, Volante Farms had to close for three
weeks midseason, after a company they hired to seal
their floors botched the job, using an exterior coating
that filled the farmstand with horrible-smelling (though,
thankfully, harmless) fumes.
“Anything that was brought into the building was immediately tainted by the smell. We had to throw everything away. The homegrown stuff was the most heartbreaking,” says Boardman. Everything from the produce
to the prepared foods and even the packaged goods had
to be discarded.
After hiring a disaster-relief company, which employed several tactics — from high heat and forced ventilation to releasing ozone into the building — the farmstand was able to fully reopen July 28.
The team had been selling some produce, picked
fresh from the field, out of a makeshift stand in a greenhouse; wholesaling what it could to restaurants; and donating the rest to local charities.
Now that it’s back to business as usual, Volante
Farms is focused on harvesting customer favorites, like
sweet corn — which, despite a slightly later start this
year due to “weird weather this spring,” Boardman says,
is delicious. “It’s one of our most popular homegrown
items. It’s such a big deal to have it be the sweetest, the
freshest, the most flavorful corn available.”
She has some tips for making the most of this season-
al crop, which is available through Columbus Day, barring a hard frost.
Choosing the right corn is the first step, but Boardman asks that you please don’t peek under the husk.
“Once you shuck that ear, it immediately starts to lose its
sweetness. Don’t shuck it until you absolutely have to.”
Instead, she suggests feeling along the ear of the corn
to be sure there are no big lumps or divots, which could
signal a worm. On the outside, look for a silk that’s intact and a bright green husk. “If it’s very dry, it’s not
fresh-picked,” says the farmer, who prefers to keep it
simple when it comes to preparation.
“Our rule is: You boil a pot of water, drop it in for 3
minutes only, and then you take it out.” Or, she says, you
can enjoy it raw. “My favorite thing to do in the summer,
especially when we have our homegrown tomatoes, is
halve a bunch of cherry or grape tomatoes and avocado,
and then take an ear or two and saw the kernels off — I
don’t even bother cooking it, which keeps it crunchy —
and throw that with a little bit of lime juice, and a little
bit of olive oil, and sometimes I throw in a little bit of
cumin if I’m feeling sassy,” she says. “It’s like a salsa-guac
combo. Super-easy, low key, you don’t have to boil water,
just serve it with some chips.”
With disaster behind them, Boardman and her team
are balancing the hard work of endless watering during
this dry spell with enjoying the sweet harvest.
“We kept saying to ourselves: It could have been way
worse. It could have been a dangerous situation, it could
have been a health hazard, and it was not. So in the end
it’s just stuff. It’s stuff that you put your blood, sweat,
and tears into, but it’s stuff.”
Volante Farms, 292 Forest St., Needham, 781-4442351, www.volantefarms.com
CATHERINE SMART
B
LIZA WEISSTUCH
efore any of your senses can react to a
drink, you instinctively assess it by
name. There are drink names that, quite
rightly, resound with dignity. (Vieux
Carre. Sazerac.) Others fittingly squeal
“fun!” (Mimosa! Margarita! Mai Tai!) A cocktail
dubbed Cute but Psycho, then, warns “Buyer beware.
Mischief lurks.” Here’s what happens when you order
this original cider-topped rum cocktail off the menu at
Ward 8 in the North End: You expect a somewhat enhanced daiquiri (rum, lime, sweetener), but what you
get is a full-blown tiki drink. See, the cider’s natural
spices fuse with the deep sweetness of the aged rum to
yield an unexpected nutty flavor similar to falernum,
a sweet, almond-y syrup common in island drinks.
LIZA WEISSTUCH
That’s mischief that I invite.
CUTE BUT PSYCHO
Makes 1 drink
1 ounce Ron Zacapa 23 Year (or any aged rum)
¾ ounce simple syrup (add ¼ cup sugar to ¼ cup water and stir until
integrated)
½ ounce grapefruit juice
½ ounce lemon juice
2 ounces Bantam Wunderkind cider (or any dry cider)
1 edible flower (for garnish)
1. Into a shaker, over ice, pour rum, simple syrup, grapefruit juice,
and lemon juice. Shake gently for 20 seconds (just long enough to combine ingredients).
2. Strain into a highball glass over ice.
3. Top with cider and garnish with flower.
Adapted from Ward 8
BOTTLES
DATA POINTS
Rethinking
pilsner,
with extra
attitude
‘Many
pilsners
have been
dumbed
down
beyond
. . . recognition.’
L
SHUTTERSTOCK
The number of nutritious meals given out
to those in need in Brazil. RefettoRio Gastromotiva, a project created by chefs David Hertz from Brazil and Massimo Bottura from Italy, plans to take excess food
from the Olympic village to feed hungry
Brazilians. In an interview, Hertz told Reuters that the project’s goal is to “promote
as much change as possible using gastronomy as a tool for social change and
social inclusion.” Gastromotiva will operate during the Paralympics as well and
will remain a business after the games
close.
Source: Reuters
ast year, Stone Brewing Company, the nation’s 10th-largest
craft brewery, announced it was spinning off its Arrogant Bastard line
of beers into a separate brand.
Now, when you pick up a sixpack of Arrogant Bastard Ale,
“Stone” is nowhere to be found
(though the familiar snarling gargoyle still greets you with the
words “You’re not worthy”). Stone
founder and CEO Greg Koch says
the brand distinction is a way to
separate several of his aggressively named beers from a product
line that includes Stone IPA and
Stone Smoked Porter.
“Arrogant Bastard approaches
the world from a viewpoint that
views typical compromise as offensive,” says Koch.
In that vein, Arrogant Brewing
has released Who You Callin’
Wussie Pilsner, the brand’s second
year-round release. In marketing
materials, the gargoyle has plenty
of thoughts on what industrialization has done to the pilsner style
in the last 100 years. Koch does as
well.
“Through a boiling-frog level
of homogenization and industrialization, the pilsner has become
sort of akin to vodka,” says Koch.
“Its new ideal is to be flavorless
and odorless.”
GREG KOCH,
founder and CEO
of Stone Brewing
Enter Wussie, a 5.8 percent alcohol by volume beer based on
some of the pilsners made in
Northern Germany.
“It’s closer to the range of what
a pilsner might have historically
been in some parts of the world,”
says Koch. “Many pilsners have
been dumbed down beyond any
recognition. . . . People have been
led by the nose by advertising
campaigns and price.”
What makes Who You Callin’
Wussie a good pilsner? Process.
Koch says a quality pilsner can’t
be inexpensive. Ingredients can’t
be an afterthought. In that vein,
he calls the hops in this style “critical,” despite the beer’s not being
hop-forward.
“You may not want fruity,
spicy, but basically you’ve got to
treat them as they are, which [is
as] critical ingredients,” says
Koch.
The result is a beer that may
look like a Budweiser in a glass
but drinks with more bite; it’s
clean, grassy, and pleasingly bitter
with a crisp, cracker-like finish.
There’s some incongruity between what Koch says and what
he does. When he says “what
pleases the masses is not an ideal,” he’s referring to mass-marketed beer and sliced, wrapped, processed cheese. But he’s also trying
to capture some of the masses for
himself. The birth of Arrogant
Brewing accompanies some significant expansion for the company. Plans are for Stone to open
new breweries later this year in
Richmond, Va., and Berlin, Germany, and to expand its current
brewery in Escondido, Calif.
“Now that consumers have also been able to grow in their passion and caring for things that are
real, it’s an opportunity to reclaim
some of that territory,” says Koch.
A drinkable, soon-to-be-everywhere pilsner is one way to do
just that.
GARY DZEN
DINING DECOR
WHERE: Bambara
WHAT: A large glass map of Boston
and Cambridge toward the back of the
Cambridge restaurant’s dining room.
WHOSE IDEA: The house restaurant at
the Hotel Marlowe got a makeover in
2014, complete with the 16-foot
glass map, which lights up at night.
“We wanted the restaurant to focus
on Cambridge relationships and history,” says general manager Amanda
McBride. Being inside a hotel, there’s
heavy tourist traffic, and many people
wander into the restaurant to strategize an agenda for the day. “It helps
people travel around the city; they
have breakfast with us, plot out how
far it is to the Back Bay, and look for
bike paths and the river,” she says.
They can also do some light reading:
Adjacent to the maps are several onlyin-Boston tomes, including vintage
MIT textbooks (complete with students’ names inscribed on the first
page) and Henry David Thoreau’s
“Walden.”
Bambara, Hotel Marlowe, 25 Edwin H.
Land Blvd., Cambridge, 617-8684444, www.bambara-cambridge.com
KARA BASKIN
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
T h e
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G3
A taste of
Cuba that
comes in
the mail
ABUELA MAMI
Continued from Page G1
following of Cuban-Americans across
the country seeking to connect with
their heritage. The founders would not
release how many boxes they mail out
a month, but they said that the number is growing.
To Gonzalez, 35, the box has become less about the food and more
about the memories. It’s a reminder of
growing up in her grandmother’s
house in Miami, surrounded by family.
It’s a temporary cure for homesickness
and a way of remembering her late father.
“I yearn for that culture, I yearn for
the food. It’s the little things,” Gonzalez
says. She’s lived in Massachusetts since
high school, but, she says, “I still consider Miami my home.”
There’s the surprise box, which
Gonzalez receives and which includes
items such as key chains, Badia seasoning, and strawberry-flavored candy. There’s also the coffee box, filled
only with different kinds of Cubanstyle coffee.
“Cuban coffee is essential to my
life,” Gonzalez says, laughing. “The only thing we have up here is Goya, and
that just doesn’t cut it.”
Some 1,500 miles south in a quiet
Miami suburb, brothers Humby and
Kiki Valdes talk about business in their
mother’s kitchen while she prepares
Cuban espresso in ceramic cups that
feature the Cuban flag. Once a month,
the family gathers to pack hundreds of
these cardboard boxes by hand in their
living room before shipping them
around the country. Above a leather
couch hangs a portrait of the brothers’
aunt as a young woman in a long formal gown at her quinceañera, or 15th
birthday celebration.
The Valdeses were inspired to start
the business by the matriarchs of their
family, Cuban-Americans in Florida
who during their childhoods would
mail box after box of necessities to relatives still in Cuba under a Communist
regime. When the boys got older and
moved to New Jersey for work in New
York City, Florida relatives would send
them Cuban-American treats, too.
PHOTOS BY MATTHEW CAVANAUGH FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE
‘I yearn for that culture, I yearn for the food. . . .
Cuban coffee is essential to my life. The only
thing we have up here is Goya, and that just
doesn’t cut it.’
KRISTEN GONZALEZ, pictured at her Northfield home, unpacking her monthly
delivery of Cuban products (above) from Abuela Mami
“Growing up down here, I never really liked Miami,” Humby Valdes, 40, a
web developer by trade, says in an interview. “Once I left, I realized most of
the stuff that I took for granted, like
Cuban crackers or guava, was impossible to find.”
Like Gonzalez, the brothers know
Cuba from what they learned growing
up among Miami’s community of exiles. The family business they run is
powered by nostalgia both for that
world in Miami and for the island that
many young Cuban-Americans have
never seen themselves.
Their grandmother, Blanca del Rio,
who is 90 and has hearing loss in her
left ear, wears pearls in the house. She
talks of Cuba as if she was there yesterday. Her brother passed away last year
in Cuba. She hadn’t seen him in 15
years.
Humby and Kiki’s mother, Gladys
Nancy Ferrer, 64, a pattern maker and
technical designer, still makes her own
clothing and helps select new products
for the boxes. She calls her kids the
best thing that ever happened to her.
Abuela Mami is a family business, she
says, looking at her sons with pride.
“They’ve wanted to start a business
since they were little,” Ferrer said in
Spanish. “Humby sold lemonade when
he was 6 years old. He’d say when he
was big he wanted to have people
working for him.”
She cries when she talks about leaving Cuba at 18, in 1970, after working
in labor camps for two years. Her father stayed with the family farm, but a
few years later he followed. In the
United States, like an army of ants,
neighbors hauled in a starter kit for
the small household: a couch, a dining
set, a coffee table, and some chairs.
Once they could afford to buy their
own furniture, the starter kit passed
on to another group of new arrivals.
In the ’70s, their grandfather started a grocery store. He named it after
their grandmother: Blanquita Supermarket. Kiki and Humby grew up
playing among stacks of groceries. It
became a place for people to gather
and find products that reminded them
of the island they left behind.
For its subscribers, Abuela Mami
offers a continuation of that mission,
says Humby Valdes.
“People wrote us and said once they
saw all those products they kind of tear
up,” he says. “Because they hadn’t seen
those products since they were little in
their abuelo or abuela’s [grandfather
or grandmother’s] house. It’s a very
emotional, personal connection.”
To Gonzalez, there’s a comfort that
comes with the smell of Cuban espresso that lingers in her kitchen every
morning. She pairs it with the Cuban
bread she paid $42 to ship frozen from
a Miami bakery. In Miami, you can buy
a loaf for $1.25 at the corner store.
But it’s worth it, she said. “It’s indescribable,” Gonzalez says. “It’s a very
unified culture. Everyone sticks together.”
When her box from the Valdeses arrives, Gonzalez likes to open it with
her 11-year-old daughter as a way to
pass on recipes, traditions, and Cuban
culture to the next generation. With
President Obama’s renewal of relations with Cuba, she’d like to finally go
to Cuba one day.
But, as the island nation transitions, Gonzalez’s 82-year-old grandmother, who lives in Miami, has asked
her to wait.
“She still has some really unsettling
feelings about how they left,” Gonzalez
says, “and the state of the country.”
Maybe someday, she says wistfully.
Her culture can’t be contained in a box
forever.
Cristela Guerra can be reached at
[email protected] Follow her
on Twitter @CristelaGuerra.
PARTY LINES
PHOTOS BY BILL BRETT
About 100 guests recently attended the Latina Circle Summer Mixer held at Coppersmith
Restaurant in South Boston.
From left: Christina Gonzalez of Winchester, Samantha Harrison of Brookline, Janelle
Liceaga of Cambridge, and Evelyn Barahona of Wellesley.
NOW ON VIEW
©ALEX JONES
From left: Ana Pascual and Meriel Marmanillo, both of Boston, Arivee Vargas of
Brookline, and Elke Trilla and Marcela Danesh, both of Boston.
THE
MEETING
HOUSE
The Old Manse
Concord, MA
Sam Durant
A platform to confront a history of
racial discrimination and segregation,
and to inspire a brighter path forward
INFO & PROGRAM DETAILS
From left: Anabel Brea and Lucianne Collado, both of Lawrence, Victoria Torres-Vega of
North Andover, Vanessa Jean of Randolph, and Megan Albert of South Boston.
thetrustees.org/art
#artXlandscape
join the
adventure
T h e
G4
B o s t o n
G l o b e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
TheWeek Ahead
MUSIC
reography by Joshua Bergasse. To
borrow from W.S. Gilbert: It is, it
is a glorious thing. Through Aug.
13. Barrington Stage Company at
Boyd-Quinson Mainstage, Pittsfield. 413-236-8888, www.
barringtonstageco.org
DON AUCOIN
Pop & Rock
EPMD
The influential hip-hop duo of Erick Sermon and Parrish Smith is
back in business again, celebrating its 30th anniversary with a
road trip focused on its classic
1988 debut LP, “Strictly Business.” (For more, see Page G7.)
Aug. 13, 8 p.m. $25, advance
$22. Middle East, Cambridge.
617-864-3278, www.mideast
club.com
Dance
BOSTON CONTEMPORARY
DANCE FESTIVAL
Urbanity Dance’s summer celebration returns with a wide variety of artists for two showcases.
The afternoon show features Boston-area troupes as well as Urbanity Dance’s Summer Intensive
students, while the evening show
brings together local and internationally known performers, including Ayako Takahashi (Japan),
Michael James (New York), and
Renay Aumiller (North Carolina).
Aug. 13, 2 and 7:30 p.m.
$30-$50. 617-572-3727, www.
bostoncontemporarydance.org
GOLDEN GATE WINGMEN
A special treat suited to the lazy,
hazy days of deep summer, this
all-star quartet reunites former
Furthur bandmates John Kadlecik, Jeff Chimenti, and Jay Lane
with bassist Reed Mathis (Jacob
Fred Jazz Odyssey, Tea Leaf
Green). Aug. 13, 8 p.m. $30, advance $25. Brighton Music Hall.
800-745-3000, www.ticket
master.com
MONUMENT
Contemporary dance artist and
former Jacob’s Pillow research
fellow Adam H. Weinert brings
his scholarship and unique vision
to the re-creation of classic solos
from the 1920s and ’30s by Doris
Humphrey, José Limón, and Ted
Shawn. His company’s program
complements these solos with his
original choreography. Through
Aug. 14. $25-$45. Jacob’s Pillow
Dance Festival, Becket. 413-2430745, www.jacobspillow.org
L7
Ferocious, snotty, and confrontational, this LA quartet arose during the grunge explosion, hit the
charts, and made its mark on the
burgeoning riot grrrl movement.
The present reunion coincides
with a Kickstarter campaign for a
documentary about the band,
“Pretend We’re Dead.” Aug. 11,
7 p.m. $28, advance $24.50. Paradise Rock Club. 800-745-3000,
www.ticketmaster.com
STEVE SMITH
Folk & World
ELKHORN
The duo of Jesse Sheppard and
Drew Gardner combines the fingerpicking folk of Sheppard’s 12string acoustic with the psychrock guitar flights of Gardner’s
electric to marvelous effect. The
pair release their latest, self-titled
album next week. Aug. 13, 8 p.m.
No cover. Mobius, Cambridge.
617-945-9481, www.mobius.org
ROANOKE
A rising band with a just-released
debut who despite its name isn’t
from where you might think, but
from Nashville. Roanoke evokes
comparisons to the likes of the
Lumineers and the Civil Wars,
and plays an engaging, harmonyforward version of folky Americana. With Nico Rivers and the
Wolff Sisters. Aug. 16, 9 p.m. $5.
Lizard Lounge, Cambridge. 800838-3006, www.brownpaper
tickets.com
STUART MUNRO
Jazz & Blues
BEES DELUXE
The Boston-based “acid blues &
jazz collective” is known for its
unique originals and creative reworkings of numbers by everyone
from Charles Mingus to B.B.
King, Jimi Hendrix to Amy Winehouse. Aug. 11, 8:30 p.m. $7.
Ryles, Cambridge. 617-876-9330,
www.rylesjazz.com
THE MAKANDA PROJECT
A free, outdoor performance presented by Unitarian Universalist
Urban Ministry on the grounds of
the historic First Church in Roxbury, featuring pianist John
Kordalewski’s marvelous big
band of eminent local players
who revivify the music of the late
Bostonian composer/multi-instrumentalist Makanda Ken
McIntyre. As well as youth performances, the event will include
arts and crafts and food vendors.
Aug. 13, 1 p.m. Free. First Church
in Roxbury. www.makanda
project.com
THE SHERYL BAILEY ORGAN
TRIO
The guitarist has long specialized
in organ trios, refreshing the venerable format with her lyricism,
swing, bell-like tone, and compelling compositional sense. With
organist Pat Bianchi and drummer Ian Froman. Aug. 16, 7:30
p.m. $10. Jocko’s Jazz at the Sahara Club, Methuen. 603-8981591, www.jockosjazz.com
KEVIN LOWENTHAL
Classical
NORFOLK CHAMBER
MUSIC FESTIVAL
The Claremont Trio stops by on
Friday with works by Dvorak,
Schubert, and Gabriela Lena
Frank. On Saturday, Norfolk presents “Unlikely Muse,” described
Cobi Moules:
New Kid — Back to the Beginning
The painter, who calls himself “a late-blooming transguy,” inserts himself into publicity shots
of Boston boy band New Kids on the Block, unpacking his childhood fantasies of romance
and friendship. Pictured: “Drug Free School Zone.’’ Through Aug. 20. Carroll and Sons, 450
Harrison Ave. 617-482-2477, ww.carrollandsons.net CATE McQUAID
as a “biographical drama” based
on Brahms’s late years, written by
Harry Clark, with participating
musical forces to include clarinetist David Shrifin and the Argus
String Quartet. Ellen Battell
Stoeckel Estate, Routes 44 and
272, Norfolk. 860-542-3000,
www.norfolkmusic.org
TANGLEWOOD
Charles Dutoit will be back on
the podium Friday leading the
BSO in works by Debussy and
Ravel, along with Mozart’s Piano
Concerto No. 22 with Emanuel
Ax as soloist. Saturday is the annual Film Night With the Pops
under the baton of John Williams
and Richard Kaufman. And on
Sunday, pianist Igor Levit makes
his Tanglewood debut as soloist
in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto
No. 3 under the baton of David
Afkham, who will also lead Schumann’s Symphony No. 4. In Ozawa Hall, look out for the Australian Chamber Orchestra performing “Barry Humphries’ Weimar
Cabaret” on Aug. 14. Lenox. 617266-1200, www.tanglewood.org
their service. Directed by Eric
Tucker. Through Aug. 13. Shakespeare & Company, Elayne P.
Bernstein Theatre, Lenox. 413637-3353, www.shakespeare.org
THE T PARTY
A bracingly original take on gender identity by playwright-director Natsu Onoda Power, told in a
whirling theatrical language that
is all her own: playful, idiosyncratic, self-indulgent at times, often bursting with energy and
ideas. Through Aug. 13. Company One Theatre at Roberts Studio
Theatre, Calderwood Pavilion,
Boston Center for the Arts.
617-933-8600, www.boston
theatrescene.com
THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE
As the Pirate King in Gilbert &
Sullivan’s still-piquant operetta,
Will Swenson delivers a performance that rivals Kevin Kline’s
storied turn in the role 35 years
ago. The rest of the cast is topnotch, too, especially Scarlett
Strallen as fair Mabel. There’s not
a better time to be had in the theater this summer than at this joyous and inspired production, directed by John Rando, with cho-
Galleries
JEAN-MARIE STRAUB
AND DANIÈLE HUILLET:
THREE WORKS
The French filmmakers teased
out riddles and layers of the
Western canon until Huillet died
in 2006. Three installations expand upon their process through
stills, text, and drawings.
Through Sept. 24. Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard
University, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge. 617-496-5387,
www.ccva.fas.harvard.edu
ALICIA EGGERT:
PARTIAL VISIBILITY
Eggert uses video, signage, projection, and neon sculpture, giving time and language concrete
forms in order, ultimately, to unveil their numinous, fleeting, and
contradictory qualities. To wit:
eternity and mortality. Time’s linear crawl and its great cyclic
sweep. Through Sept. 24. T+H
Gallery, 460 Harrison Ave.
401-390-1033, www.tandh
gallery.com
CATE McQUAID
Museums
DRAWINGS FROM THE AGE
OF BRUEGEL, RUBENS,
AND REMBRANDT
Forty Netherlandish, Dutch, and
Flemish drawings from the 15th
to the 18th centuries, all from
Harvard’s collection, one of the
most comprehensive in the United States. Through Aug. 14. Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy
St., Cambridge. 617-495-9400,
www.harvardartmuseums.org
BORROMEO QUARTET
The eloquent Boston-based ensemble boots up its signature laptops on Sunday for the final program of its midsummer series at
the Gardner. On the agenda: arrangements of Bach, Beethoven’s
dazzling Quartet Op. 59, No. 3,
and Thomas Adès’s “Arcadiana.”
Aug. 14, 1:30 p.m. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. 617-2785156, www.gardnermuseum.org
JEREMY EICHLER
ARTS
Theater
CRY ‘HAVOC!’
A raw and riveting solo show by
former US Army infantry officer
Stephan Wolfert about the psychological devastation of war,
both on the battlefield and long
after the soldier has left that battlefield. Wolfert forces us to think
about our responsibility to and
for the countless vets who were
“wired for war’’ but are now back
home, struggling before the eyes
of a society that claims to honor
RIOULT DANCE NY
The annual Chatham Dance Festival, presented by PS21: Performance Spaces for the 21st Century in Columbia County, N.Y.,
opens with this 22-year-old modern dance troupe. The company’s
intriguing program includes an
interpretation of Ravel’s classic
“Bolero” and a work based on
Helen of Troy with a score by Aaron Jay Kernis. Aug. 12-13.
$18-$35. PS21, Chatham, N.Y.
518-392-6121, www.ps21
chatham.org
KAREN CAMPBELL
Whitney Rose
Honky-tonk rejuvenator Rose left her Canadian homeland
last year for the Big Time: in her case, Austin, Texas, where’s
she’s quickly settled in to that town’s fabled music scene for
dancehall dates and a Continental Club residency with a
band of Austinites that she’s now taking on the road.
Aug. 13, 8 p.m. $15. Club Passim, Cambridge.
617-492-7679, passim.org STUART MUNRO
AMERICAN IMPRESSIONIST:
CHILDE HASSAM AND THE
ISLES OF SHOALS
The great American Impressionist painted the rocky shoals of Appledore Island off the coast of
Portsmouth, N.H., over three decades. This exhibition presents
40 oil paintings and related watercolors all made between the
late 1880s and 1912. Through
Nov. 6. Peabody Essex Museum,
East India Square, Salem.
978-745-9500. www.pem.org
SPLENDOR, MYTH,
AND VISION: NUDES
FROM THE PRADO
Twenty-eight Old Master paintings, all representing the nude,
on loan from Spain’s great museum. Includes work by Titian, Tin-
toretto, Rubens, Velazquez, Ribera, and Poussin. All but four
have never previously been seen
in the United States. The Clark is
the show’s only venue. Through
Oct. 10. Clark Art Institute,
225 South St., Williamstown.
413-458-2303. www.clarkart.edu
SEBASTIAN SMEE
EVENTS
Comedy
TRACY MORGAN
The former “Saturday Night Live”
cast member might join the Emmy club in September, having
been nominated for returning to
the show to host last year. Aug.
12, 8 p.m. $46.50-$68.50. Cape
Cod Melody Tent, 21 W. Main St.,
Hyannis. 508-775-5630,
www.melodytent.org. Aug. 13,
8 p.m. $46.50-$68.50. South
Shore Music Circus, 130 Sohier
St., Cohasset. 781-383-9850,
www.themusiccircus.org
DON GAVIN
One of the stalwarts of the Boston comedy boom in the 1980s,
Gavin crafts jokes that are funny
the first time you hear them, and
still funny the second (or third or
fourth) time around. Some of the
most durable material in the
business. Aug. 12-13, 8:30 p.m.
$27.50. Giggles Comedy Club,
517 Broadway (Route 1), Saugus.
781-233-9950, www.giggles
comedy.com
MIKE LAWRENCE
The 2016 champion of “Jeff Ross
Presents Roast Battle” competition and cohost of the “Nerd of
Mouth” podcast brings his standup comedy to Boston. Aug. 12-13,
7:30 p.m. $29-$39. Laugh Boston, 425 Summer St. 617-7252844, www.laughboston.com
NICK A. ZAINO III
Family
BOLTON STATE FAIR
Just a good old-fashioned state
fair! Come one, come all to marvel at the demolition derby, fiddler contest, craft fair, and monster truck show. Step right up
folks, and make sure you don’t
miss the hot dog race with real
cuddly pups. Aug. 12, 9 a.m.9 p.m. Free. The Lancaster Fairgrounds, 318 Seven Bridge Road,
Lancaster. 978-365-7206.
www.boltonfair.org
SWING DANCE WITH
COMPAQ BIG BAND
Get ready to cut a rug with the
coolest cats in town. Rock step a
little unsteady? Just Lindy hop on
over for an introductory lesson
before the floor opens up at 9.
Aug. 13, 8 p.m.-midnight. $18.
Swing City, 680 Huron Ave,
Cambridge. 617-513-9841.
www.swingcityboston.com
WILSON FARM CORN FEST
This festival looks a-maizeing!
Aw shucks, was that too corny?
Come see for yourself at the
sweetest harvest celebration in
town. New England’s favorite
corn festival wouldn’t be complete without a shucking contest,
petting zoo, and plenty of free
samples. Aug. 14, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Free. Wilson Farm, 10 Pleasant
Street, Lexington. 781-862-3900.
www.wilsonfarm.com
CARLY SITRIN
MARK YOUR
CALENDAR
AUG. 19 Aretha Franklin at Blue
Hills Bank Pavilion concerts.live
nation.com
SEPT. 3 Kanye West at TD Garden www.ticketmaster.com
SEPT. 4 Steven Tyler at Citi Performing Arts Center Wang Theatre
www.ticketmaster.com
SEPT. 5 The Heavy at Sinclair
www.ticketmaster.com
SEPT. 7 Corinne Bailey Rae at
Royale Boston www.ticket
master.com
SEPT. 7 The Lumineers and
BORNS at Blue Hills Bank Pavilion
concerts.livenation.com
SEPT. 9 “Sunday in the Park
With George” at BU Theatre
www.huntingtontheatre.org
SEPT. 12 Willie Nelson at Blue
Hills Bank Pavilion concerts.live
nation.com
SEPT. 14 Adele at TD Garden
www.ticketmaster.com
SONIA RAO
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
Dining Guide
DINING OUT
CHEAP EATS
These reviews have appeared in the
Globe’s Food section recently.
TWIN SEAFOOD
This is seafood-in-the-rough circa 1950. An “I
Love Lucy” rerun is on TV; half a dozen tables
are inside beside a fish case, more tables and
giant rocking chairs are on a deck beside the
shop. Order at a counter and grab a seat outside under the big pines (mind the sap). The
Acton location is the second for twins John
and Joseph Loblundo, who have owned a fish
market and restaurant of the same name in
West Concord for 25 years, and ran a similar
place in Belmont for six years. Fried clams are
luscious, lobster roll is bursting with big pink
chunks, and all the other seafood — grilled,
fried, or broiled — is very fresh. 541 Massachusetts Ave. West Acton, 978-635-0010,
www.twinsseafood.com (8/10/16)
SHERYL JULIAN
NOVARA
This latest addition to Milton’s once-nonexistent dining scene is a big, airy, gorgeous space
with charming hints of its former life as an
old-fashioned movie theater. The Italian
menu leans toward heavy, heavily sauced
dishes that can be off-putting in the summer,
and would benefit from lighter ingredients
that let subtle flavors emerge. When the
kitchen does apply a lighter touch, the results
are often quite nice. So is the lovely outdoor
patio. 556 Adams St., Milton, 617-696-8400,
www.novararestaurant.com (8/3/16)
SACHA PFEIFFER
OCEAN PRIME
Ocean Prime — a well-respected steakhouse
chain based in Columbus, Ohio — comes to
the Seaport with a reputation for high-quality
food and “VIP” service. Seafood, chicken,
chops, and steaks receive star treatment, but
service can be problematic. The $55 Sundaynight surf and turf special is a fine way to enjoy this pricey steakhouse fare for a fraction
of the cost. 140 Seaport Boulevard, Boston,
617-670-1345, www.ocean-prime.com
(7/27/16)
MAT SCHAFFER
UNI
Expanding in size and ambition, chef-owner
Ken Oringer and company have turned a subterranean sushi bar into something truly special. There is enough fresh, delicate fish —
some flown in from Tokyo — to please purists,
but the real joy is working through a dense,
creative menu of small and large plates that
pair traditional Japanese ideas and techniques with vibrant flavors from around Asia
and beyond. Eliot Hotel, 370 Commonwealth
Ave., Back Bay, Boston, 617-536-7200,
www.uni-boston.com (7/20/16)
NESTOR RAMOS
FORAGE
The hideaway cellar on quiet Craigie Circle
has been home to a run of fine Cambridge
restaurants for close to 40 years, among them
Craigie Street Bistrot and now Forage. The
vibe remains Old Cambridge, and the menu
traffics quietly, even modestly, in locally gathered, easily-looked-past ingredients. Sup on
fish stew and a cocktail floated with bee pollen and it’s easy to reenter a simpler, more elemental era before the start-up clamor hit
town. 5 Craigie Circle, Cambridge, 617-5765444, www.foragecambridge.com. (7/13/16)
TED WEESNER
JULIET
Former Beacon Hill Bistro chef Joshua Lewin
and Katrina Jazayeri, who was manager of
Belly Wine Bar and The Blue Room, serve
breakfast and lunch daily, and dinner three
JONATHAN WIGGS/GLOBE STAFF
Top of the Hub
There’s a reason Top of the Hub
continues to thrive 52 stories atop the
Prudential. Sure, it has incomparable
views, but it also vigorously embraces its
role as the city’s most obvious postgraduation, milestone birthday, and
now-we’re-serious dating venue.
Accordingly, the menu reads like the
greatest hits of catering kitchens. But
the excellent lobster roll, served at lunch
(on a sunny day), has the potential to
turn a ho-hum business meeting into a
love affair with New England’s gifts.
Pictured: Tuna Tartare. 800 Boylston St.,
Prudential Tower, Back Bay, 617-5361775, www.topofthehub.net (8/10/16)
RACHEL SLADE
nights, at this neighborhood cafe. Dishes display a lot of technique that manages not to be
show-offy, or even obvious, except that it
makes food irresistible. Prix-fixe dinners feature a whole fish, which you can fillet yourself
(or ask the staff to do it for you). Meals are
full of little surprises and delightful riffs on
classics. 257 Washington St., Union Square,
Somerville, 617-718-0958, www.juliet
somerville.com (7/6/16)
SHERYL JULIAN
G5
Pick Your Own Corn
FREE!
Saturday, August 13
5:50 a.m. SHARP!
Caravan to the field to learn about growing &
harvesting this crop, Pick a Dozen to take home!
11 Wheeler Road • Concord, MA
978-369-4494
www.verrillfarm.com
OLITOKI
Come to this tiny, mostly takeout spot for Korean-fusion dishes like the quesa-kimchi-dilla
with spicy dipping sauce, and bulgolgi beef
and cheese egg rolls. It’s cheap, it’s filling, it’s
flavorful, and where else can you eat ramenflavored fries? 76 Brighton Ave., Allston,
617-202-5038, www.olitoki.com (8/3/16)
CATHERINE SMART
SICHUAN GOURMET
Enthusiasts of spicy Chinese fare are delighted that a fifth location of Sichuan Gourmet
has opened in Burlington. Like its sister restaurants in Billerica, Brookline, Framingham,
and Sharon, the newest outpost showcases
the assertive flavors of the inland province,
plus a few Chinese American favorites for
good measure. Be sure to get the spicy Xiang
La fish, roast beef with tendon in chile sauce,
and a classic dish of dan dan noodles. 91 Middlesex Turnpike, Burlington, 781-221-7288,
www.laosichuan.com (7/27/16)
ELLEN BHANG
LowellSummerMusic.org
MOLDOVA RESTAURANT
The cuisine of Moldova, the small country
sandwiched between Romania and Ukraine,
may be familiar from other Eastern European
countries. At this friendly family run Nonantum spot, you’ll find rustic, peasant fare, such
as bean spread, chicken and mushroom
crepes (think blintzes with meat), hearty
chicken soup, and deliciously crisp and flaky
pies filled with farmer’s cheese or potatoes or
cabbage and more. 344 Watertown St., Newton, 617-916-5245, www.tastemoldova.com
(7/20/16)
S.J.
WINTER HILL BREWING
Winter Hill Brewing actually houses two concepts: a morning cafe with hearty egg sandwiches and very good coffee, and a brewery —
which, in addition to its (quite good) beer,
serves craveable snacks such as spicy Korean
Brussels sprouts, rich mac and cheese, and
crispy fried pickle chips. 328 Broadway,
Somerville,www.winterhillbrewing.com
(7/13/2016)
C.S.
Graham Rowat and Kate Baldwin
performing in “Constellations.”
EMMA ROTHENBERG-WARE
Stars align in ‘Constellations’
‘‘CONSTELLATIONS’’
Continued from Page G1
Music’’ (2014) and “Bells Are Ringing’’
(2015), two musicals that could scarcely be
more different in topic and tone, both also
presented at Berkshire Theatre Group.
You might say that the music of the
spheres is the subject of “Constellations,’’ a
love story that is steeped in and governed
by quantum physics and string theory. (An
understanding of which, I hasten to add, is
not required to appreciate the play. If it
were, I would not be the one writing this review. Parallel-universe Don, who paid attention in science class, would have taken
over).
The playwright’s approach, complex yet
utterly lucid, is to explore choice, chance,
and free will (or the lack thereof) by giving
us different iterations of the same handful
of vignettes that dramatize the romance between two people. The varying scenarios
naturally lead to different outcomes. The
musical “If/Then,’’ which was at the Boston
Opera House last month, explores roughly
similar territory, but in far more ham-hand-
S TA G E R E V I E W
CONSTELLATIONS
Presented by Berkshire Theatre Group at
Unicorn Theatre, Stockbridge. Through
Aug. 27. Tickets $50, 413-997-4444,
www.berkshiretheatregroup.org
ed and less satisfying fashion than “Constellations.’’
Notably, there is nothing cosmos-shaking about the love story in “Constellations’’
— make that love stories — or about the two
people at its heart. John Updike once noted
that his goal as a writer was to “give the
mundane its beautiful due,’’ and playwright
Payne seems to share that appreciation for
the quotidian, while also underscoring that
the mundane is anything but.
Marianne (Baldwin), a somewhat jittery
academic who specializes in what she calls
“theoretical early universe cosmology,’’ and
Roland (Rowat), a stolid beekeeper, do not
necessarily seem made for each other. Yet
there is something profoundly moving
about the way their love endures.
“In the quantum multiverse, every
choice, every decision you’ve ever and never made exists in an unimaginably vast ensemble of parallel universes,’’ Marianne explains to Roland, adding: “If every possible
future exists, then the decisions we do and
don’t make will determine which of these
futures we actually end up experiencing.
Imagine rolling a dice six thousand times.’’
So “Constellations’’ rolls the dice. First,
we witness their awkward first meeting, at
a friend’s barbecue. Then we see several alternate versions of that meeting, with a key
detail or two different each time. And then
the play suddenly leaps ahead in time,
when Marianne is grappling with a serious
illness, and then back in time, to when
Marianne is trying to decide whether to
sleep with Roland for the first time. Ultimately, the couple has to cope with episodes of infidelity, though the guilty party is
different, depending on the scenario.
Mind-bending though it is to contemplate, each scenario is taking place in a different universe as their romance unfolds
across time. Fittingly, the action in this
multiverse takes place on a circular stage
that somewhat resembles the face of a
clock, and the carefully orchestrated movements of Baldwin and Rowat around that
stage seem akin to the movements of a
clock’s hands. Kudos to Alan Edwards, who
designed the set and the lighting, the latter
of which is especially crucial to signaling
when Marianne and Roland have changed
universes. Ethereal music from resident
composer and sound designer Scott Killian
lends the production an otherworldly quality.
As the play makes its fragmentary, nonlinear way toward a fraught decision Marianne must make, “Constellations’’ movingly reminds us that a word, a glance, a silence, an action or reaction, can make all
the difference. Frost would approve.
Don Aucoin can be reached at
[email protected]
ALE
ON S AY
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NEW ENGLAND AQUARIUM
SIMONS IMAX THEATRE
Central Wharf 617-973-5200
5 8 DIG
Stadium Seating
NEAQ.org
Hearing Impaired
HUMPBACK WHALES 3D (NR) 12:00, 5:00
GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D (NR) 10:00, 1:00, 3:00,
6:00
GALAPAGOS 3D: NATURE'S WONDERLAND (NR)
11:00, 2:00, 4:00, 7:00
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ARLINGTON
CAPITOL THEATRE
204 Massachusetts Avenue 781-648-4340
6
CapitolTheatreOnline.com
BAD MOMS (R) 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:40
FINDING DORY (PG) 1:00, 3:20, 5:45
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30
HILLARY'S AMERICA: THE SECRET HISTORY OF
THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY (PG-13) 8:00
NINE LIVES (PG) 12:20, 2:20, 4:20, 6:20, 8:10
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 12:15, 2:40, 4:45,
7:00
BELLINGHAM
REGAL CINEMAS BELLINGHAM 14
Exit 18 Off Of 495 508-966-5096
5 6 8 DIG
RegalShowtimes.com
REGAL CINEMAS FENWAY 13 & RPX
201 Brookline Avenue 617-424-6266
5 6 8 I K DIG
RegalShowtimes.com
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) Advance Tickets
Available 6:30
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) RPX(12:10) 9:35
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:00,
10:00
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) RPX(9:15, 3:15) 6:30
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) (10:15, 2:10) 4:15, 7:30,
10:05
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) (11:15, 1:10) 5:15, 8:30,
10:35
BAD MOMS (R) (12:00, 2:45) 5:30, 8:15, 10:50
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) (9:45, 10:45, 12:05, 1:45,
3:10) 4:55, 6:20, 8:00, 9:25, 10:35
NERVE (PG-13) (11:00, 1:40) 4:25, 7:05, 10:55
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) (10:10, 1:35, 3:55) 6:15, 8:25
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) (9:30, 1:20,
3:50)
STAR TREK BEYOND 3D (PG-13) (10:00) 4:00, 10:15
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) (1:00) 7:00
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) (10:40, 1:45) 4:45, 7:50,
10:25
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) (11:45, 2:35) 5:10,
7:45, 10:45
FINDING DORY (PG) (9:50, 12:40)
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) Advance Tickets
Available 6:30
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:30,
10:30
NINE LIVES (PG) (10:35, 1:00, 4:15) 7:00, 9:40
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) (10:30, 12:30, 1:30, 4:30)
6:30, 8:30
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) (11:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30)
9:30, 9:50
BAD MOMS (R) (10:45, 1:45, 4:45) 8:00, 10:40
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) (11:15, 12:15, 1:15, 2:15,
3:15, 4:00) 6:15, 7:15, 10:00, 10:10
NERVE (PG-13) (11:45, 2:45, 5:20) 7:55, 10:25
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) (12:00, 3:00,
5:25) 8:05
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 10:35
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) (12:45) 6:45
STAR TREK BEYOND 3D (PG-13) (3:45) 10:15
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) (12:40, 3:40) 6:40, 10:05
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) (11:00, 2:00, 5:00)
7:45, 10:20
FINDING DORY (PG) (10:40, 1:50, 4:40)
INDIGNATION (R) 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45
CAFÉ SOCIETY (PG-13) 12:00, 2:30, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (R) 11:15, 1:45, 4:15, 6:15,
9:00
HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE (PG-13) 11:00, 1:30,
9:15
LIFE, ANIMATED (PG) 4:00
BRING IT ON (PG-13) 7:00
BELMONT
BURLINGTON
BRAINTREE
AMC BRAINTREE
121 Grandview Road
5 6 DIG
amctheatres.com
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:00, 9:30
Exit 25-B Off Route 290 508-229-8871
5 6 8 DIG
artsemerson.com
NO FILMS SHOWING TODAY (NR)
AMC LOEWS BOSTON COMMON
175 Tremont Street
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
5 6 DIG
amctheatres.com
CALL THEATER OR VISIT WEBSITE FOR SHOWTIMES.
CAMBRIDGE
APPLE CINEMAS
168 Alewife Brook Pkwy. 617-229-6555
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11:00, 1:45, 3:55,
6:05, 8:15
BAD MOMS (R) 11:40, 2:00, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:00, 9:00
NINE LIVES (PG) 11:15, 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15
NERVE (PG-13) 11:00, 1:05, 3:10, 5:15
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 12:15
FINDING DORY (PG) 11:30, 1:00
BABU BANGARAM (NR) 7:15, 10:15
THIKKA (NR) 9:30
WEEPAH WAY FOR NOW (NR) 10:15
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 11:00, 1:15, 3:00, 4:00,
5:45, 6:45, 8:30, 9:30
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 11:05, 1:40, 4:15, 7:10, 9:45
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 11:05, 1:40, 4:15, 6:50,
9:25
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 11:00, 3:20
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 2:00, 4:30, 7:00
LANDMARK THEATRES KENDALL SQUARE
1 Kendall Square Cambridge 617-621-1202
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
LandmarkTheatres.com
CAFÉ SOCIETY (PG-13) 5 (1:50, 4:20)
DON'T THINK TWICE (R) 5 (2:30, 5:30) 8:00
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 5 7:00, 9:35
HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE (PG-13) 5 (1:50,
4:35)
ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS: THE MOVIE (R) 5 (1:45,
4:40)
ANTHROPOID (R) 5 8:00
GLEASON (R) 5 (1:40, 4:15) 7:00, 9:35
DON'T THINK TWICE (R) 5 (1:30, 4:30) 7:15, 9:40
INDIGNATION (R) 5 (1:35, 4:25) 7:05, 9:40
CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (R) 5 (1:35, 4:15)
HELL OR HIGH WATER (R) 5 7:00, 9:30
OUR LITTLE SISTER (PG) 5 (2:00, 5:00) 8:05
CHESTNUT HILL
ShowcaseSuperLux.com
FOXBORO
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX
AT PATRIOT PLACE
24 Patriot Place, Route 1 1-800-315-4000
5 6 8 DSS I K DIG
NationalAmusements.com
FINDING DORY (PG) 11:35, 2:00
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:10, 9:50
NINE LIVES (PG) 11:45, 2:10, 4:25, 6:50, 9:05
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11:30, 1:50, 4:20,
6:35, 8:55
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:05
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:35
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 12:40, 3:40
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 12:10, 3:10, 6:10, 9:10
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 6:40, 9:40
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 1:00, 4:05, 7:00, 10:00
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 11:20, 1:40, 4:00
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) 6:30
NERVE (PG-13) 11:50, 2:20, 4:45, 7:05, 9:30
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 12:35, 2:45, 4:50, 7:40, 9:50
BAD MOMS (R) 12:00, 2:30, 4:55, 7:30, 9:55
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
FRAMINGHAM
AMC FRAMINGHAM
22 Flutie Pass
5 6 8 I K DIG
amctheatres.com
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:00, 9:45
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:00, 9:45
LEXINGTON
LEXINGTON VENUE
1794 Massachusetts Avenue 781-861-6161
5 DOL DSS
CAFÉ SOCIETY (PG-13) (4:15) 7:00
CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (R) (4:00) 6:45
LOWELL
SHOWCASE CINEMAS LOWELL
32 Reiss Avenue 1-800-315-4000
CALL THEATER OR VISIT WEBSITE FOR SHOWTIMES.
5 6 8 DIG
DANVERS
FINDING DORY (PG) 10:50, 1:25, 4:25
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:10, 9:50
NINE LIVES (PG) 11:10, 1:35, 3:55, 6:25, 8:50
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11:20, 1:55, 4:20
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 10:40, 1:10, 1:40, 4:10,
4:40, 7:05, 7:35, 10:05, 10:35
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 12:30, 1:00, 3:30, 4:00,
7:00, 10:00
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 6:30, 9:30
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 11:05, 1:45
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 10:30, 1:30, 4:30, 7:30,
10:30
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 10:55, 1:50, 4:45, 7:10,
7:40, 9:55, 10:25
AMC LOEWS LIBERTY TREE MALL
Exit 24 (Endicott St.) Route 128
5 6 8 DIG DOL DSS
amctheatres.com
RIFIFI (NR) 5:00
RAN (R) 7:30
FINDING DORY (PG) 9:50, 12:20
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:10, 9:50
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 9:40, 10:45, 11:50,
1:10, 2:15, 4:40
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 9:45, 10:15, 12:25, 12:55,
3:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:45, 7:15, 9:40, 10:10
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 10:00, 10:30, 1:00, 1:30,
4:00, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 10:00
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 10:30
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 10:35, 1:25, 4:05
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 9:30, 12:30, 3:30, 6:30,
9:30
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 10:20, 1:05, 3:50, 6:40,
9:25, 9:55
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 9:55, 12:10,
2:35, 4:55, 7:25
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) 6:30
NERVE (PG-13) 10:05, 12:35, 2:55, 5:20, 7:55, 10:15
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 10:40, 12:45, 3:00, 5:10, 7:50,
10:05
BAD MOMS (R) 9:35, 11:55, 2:20, 2:50, 4:45, 5:15,
7:10, 7:40, 9:45, 10:20
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
NATICK
IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S FURNITURE
Route 9 in Natick 508-424-0088
5 8
Jordans.com
SUICIDE SQUAD: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
1:30
SUICIDE SQUAD: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
4:15, 7:00, 9:40
NEWTON
SOMERVILLE
THE SOMERVILLE THEATRE
55 Davis Square (T) Redline 617-625-5700
5 6
SomervilleTheatreOnline.com
GET CARTER (R) 7:30
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00, 7:10, 9:45
POINT BLANK (NR) 9:45
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:00
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:40
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 9:30
SWISS ARMY MAN (R) 1:45, 4:30
THE LOBSTER (R) 2:00, 4:30
TAUNTON
REGAL CINEMAS SILVER CITY 10
2 Galleria Mall Drive 508-821-4561
FINDING DORY (PG) 10:25, 1:05, 4:10
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:10, 9:50
NINE LIVES (PG) 12:20, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10:30, 11:10, 1:00,
1:30, 3:40, 6:25, 9:05
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 10:00, 12:50, 7:10
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 12:15, 3:25, 6:35, 9:45
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 10:05, 1:15, 4:25
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 11:45, 2:55, 6:05, 9:15
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 7:35, 10:40
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 12:45, 3:55, 7:05, 10:15
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 10:10, 12:55, 3:50, 6:55,
10:05
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 10:35, 1:25, 4:35, 6:50,
7:20, 10:10
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 11:00, 1:35, 4:20
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) 6:30
NERVE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:20, 4:55, 9:55
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 11:05, 1:10, 4:15
BAD MOMS (R) 3:55, 7:00, 10:00
BAD MOMS (R) 10:55, 1:40, 4:30, 7:40, 10:30
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
THE INFILTRATOR (R) 9:50
55 Boylston Street
MFA.org/film
NationalAmusements.com
coolidge.org
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:00, 9:30
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30
SUICIDE SQUAD: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:30, 2:30,
5:30, 8:30
GLEASON (R) AMC Independent 7:00, 9:45
HELL OR HIGH WATER (R) 7:00, 9:30
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:00, 10:00
5 8 DOL DIG
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX
AT LEGACY PLACE
5 6 8 DSS
INDIGNATION (R) 5 12:55, 3:25, 4:45, 5:50, 7:25,
8:15
ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS: THE MOVIE (R) 3:55, 8:15
HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE (PG-13) 1:15, 3:40,
6:00, 8:10
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 12:40, 2:40, 5:00,
7:15
THE INNOCENTS (PG-13) 1:05, 5:45
THE MUSIC OF STRANGERS: YO-YO MA & THE SILK
ROAD ENSEMBLE (PG-13) 3:40, 8:10
FINDING DORY (PG) 5 12:45, 2:45
LOVE & FRIENDSHIP (PG) 1:30, 6:10
SHOWCASE SUPERLUX THE STREET
465 Huntington Avenue 617-369-3907
DEDHAM
Route 146 & 122A 1-800-315-4000
NationalAmusements.com
amctheatres.com
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 12:45, 3:30, 7:00, 9:10
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 1:45, 4:40, 7:15, 8:30
ME BEFORE YOU (PG-13) 1:15, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 1:00, 3:45, 6:15
THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE (PG) 12:15, 2:45
NOW YOU SEE ME 2 (PG-13) 5:15
X-MEN: APOCALYPSE (PG-13) 8:15
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 8:45
GLOUCESTERMEN (NR) 11:35
DAY IN LIFE OF A TRUCK DRIVER (NR) 12:05
BOSTON EARLY 1900 (NR) 12:25
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX
BLACKSTONE VALLEY
5 6
applecinemas.com
5 8 DOL
hhdt.com
MILLBURY
FINDING DORY (PG) 10:50, 1:20, 4:00, 6:30, 9:10
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11:50, 2:20, 4:40,
7:00, 9:40
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 10:40, 11:40, 12:40, 1:30,
2:50, 3:40, 4:30, 6:40, 7:30, 10:40
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 10:30, 4:10, 9:30
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:00, 9:20
NationalAmusements.com
Continued on next page
NINE LIVES (PG) 11:35, 2:05, 4:25, 7:05, 9:25
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10:00
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11:25, 11:55, 1:45,
2:15, 4:05, 6:40, 7:10, 9:00
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 10:10, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00,
10:00
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 10:40, 12:30, 1:30, 3:30,
4:30, 6:30, 7:30, 9:30, 10:30
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 12:00, 12:20, 2:50, 3:20,
5:50, 6:20, 9:20
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 8:40
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 9:55, 12:45, 3:40, 6:35,
9:15
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 10:05, 12:50, 3:50, 6:50,
9:50
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 10:00, 12:55, 3:45,
6:45, 9:35
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 7:15, 10:05
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 11:20, 1:50, 4:10
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 11:50, 2:20, 4:40
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) 6:30
NERVE (PG-13) 11:40, 2:35, 5:10, 7:35, 10:15
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 10:20, 12:35, 2:40, 4:45
BAD MOMS (R) 11:45, 12:15, 2:25, 2:55, 4:55, 5:25,
7:25, 7:55, 9:55, 10:25
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
CAFÉ SOCIETY (PG-13) 4:35, 9:40
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 11:00, 2:00, 4:50, 7:50,
10:40
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 11:30, 2:30, 5:20, 8:20
RegalShowtimes.com
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
559 Washington Street 617-824-8000
5 6 8 DOL DIG DSS
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 10:35, 1:20, 4:15
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) 6:30
NERVE (PG-13) 12:20, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 10:45, 12:50, 3:05, 5:10, 7:25,
9:40
BAD MOMS (R) 11:30, 2:05, 4:50, 7:15, 9:50
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
WestNewtonCinema.com
290 Harvard Street 617-734-2500
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available 7:00, 10:05
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) Advance Tickets
Available 6:30
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:30,
10:00
ANTHROPOID (R) 7:15, 10:15
NINE LIVES (PG) (11:30, 2:05) 4:35, 7:05, 9:50
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) (10:45, 11:50, 3:00) 6:15,
8:15, 9:20
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) (12:50, 1:50) 4:00, 4:55,
7:15, 10:20
BAD MOMS (R) (11:00, 1:40) 4:35, 7:25, 10:00
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) (10:40, 12:30, 2:00, 3:50)
5:20, 7:00, 8:30, 10:05
NERVE (PG-13) (11:10, 2:10) 5:05, 7:45, 10:15
CAFÉ SOCIETY (PG-13) (10:50, 1:30)
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) (11:20, 1:55)
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) (11:15, 1:35) 4:10
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) (12:45) 6:45
STAR TREK BEYOND 3D (PG-13) (3:45) 9:45
CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (R) 4:00
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) (12:15, 3:20)
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) (10:30, 1:05, 3:35)
6:00, 8:45
FINDING DORY (PG) (10:55, 1:45) 4:40, 7:35, 10:25
PARAMOUNT CENTER
ARTSEMERSON: THE WORLD ON STAGE
Exit 24 (Endicott St.) Route 128 978-777-4000
YY½ Absolutely Fabulous:
The Movie Jennifer Saunders
and Joanna Lumley bring familiar loopy energy to this
champagne-bubbly encore of
their cult-fave Britcom, donning the glamorpuss duds of
Edina Monsoon and Patsy
Stone for the first time since
5 6 8 DSS I K DIG
COOLIDGE CORNER THEATRE
RegalShowtimes.com
BOSTON
HOLLYWOOD HITS
Previously released
2012. The gals make a featurejustifying escape to Cannes after an encounter with Kate
Moss leaves them hounded by
media and cops. (86 min., R)
(Tom Russo)
Y½ Bad Moms Co-directors
Jon Lucas and Scott Moore,
who wrote “The Hangover,”
team up to empower suburban
mothers overwhelmed by helicopter parenting in this all-female buddy comedy. But the effort falls flat. Mila Kunis, Kathryn Hahn, Kristen Bell, and
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
20 South Avenue
REGAL CINEMAS SOLOMON POND MALL 15
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 8:20, 10:40
THE BFG (PG) 1:40
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 7:40,
8:00, 8:50, 9:50, 10:50
SUICIDE SQUAD: THE IMAX 2D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
10:30, 4:20
SUICIDE SQUAD: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
1:30, 7:15, 10:15
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) RealD 3D 11:30, 12:10,
2:30, 3:10, 5:30, 6:15, 9:15, 10:40
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 11:20, 1:20, 2:10, 4:20,
5:00, 7:50, 10:45
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 10:30, 1:15, 4:00, 7:30,
10:20
NINE LIVES (PG) 11:30, 1:50, 4:05, 6:40, 9:00
BAD MOMS (R) 11:10, 12:10, 1:50, 2:50, 4:30, 5:20,
7:10, 10:00
NERVE (PG-13) 10:35, 1:00, 3:30, 6:20, 9:10
ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS: THE MOVIE (R) AMC Independent 11:10, 4:35
GLEASON (R) AMC Independent 7:00, 9:40
CAFÉ SOCIETY (PG-13) AMC Independent 11:10,
2:00, 4:40
HILLARY'S AMERICA: THE SECRET HISTORY OF
THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY (PG-13) AMC Independent
10:45
ANTHROPOID (R) AMC Independent 7:00, 10:10
THE BROOKLYN BANKER (R) 1:20, 7:00
HOW TO BE YOURS (NR) AMC Independent 12:30,
3:10
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:00, 9:50
keeper) are the standouts, but
the movie’s a competent headache, not to mention an NRA
member’s wet dream. (122
min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)
1296 Washington St. Route 16 617-964-6060
AMC BURLINGTON
BERLIN
no other, this one takes a journey with its hangdog hero,
Chen, on a multiple quest that
ends up in a squalidly chimerical river town where present,
past, and future — and everyone’s point of view — merge.
(113 min., unrated). (Peter
Keough)
YY½ Suicide Squad For those
out of the DC Comics loop, this
is basically “The Dirty Dozen”
with added superpowers. Will
Smith (as Deadshot), Margot
Robbie (Harley Quinn), and Viola Davis (as their government
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
Route 1 & 128 (EXIT 15A) 1-800-315-4000
376 Trapelo Road (Bus 73) 617-484-1706
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 1:00, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
G l o b e
WEST NEWTON CINEMA
BROOKLINE
BELMONT STUDIO
StudioCinema.com
B o s t o n
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:15,
9:45
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) (1:30) 7:30
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) (12:00, 3:00) 4:30, 6:00,
9:00, 10:30
BAD MOMS (R) (11:35, 2:10) 4:50
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) (12:15, 3:15)
NERVE (PG-13) (11:30, 2:05) 4:35
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) (11:45, 2:15)
4:45
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) (11:50, 2:20) 4:40
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) (12:30)
STAR TREK BEYOND 3D (PG-13) (3:30)
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) (12:45, 3:45)
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) (11:55, 2:45) 5:15
640 S Washington St. Route 1 1-800-315-4000
WESTBOROUGH
SHOWCASE CINEMAS
NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
5 6 DIG
NationalAmusements.com
FINDING DORY (PG) 12:15, 5:20
NINE LIVES (PG) 12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 6:55, 9:15
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 12:35, 2:50, 5:05,
7:35, 9:55
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 12:45, 1:15, 3:45, 4:15,
7:15, 10:10
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 1:35, 4:35, 7:25, 10:10
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 1:05, 4:15, 7:05, 10:05
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 12:20, 2:40,
5:00, 7:20, 9:45
NERVE (PG-13) 12:15, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:15
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 2:45, 7:45, 10:25
BAD MOMS (R) 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:55, 10:25
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
RANDOLPH
SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX RANDOLPH
Route 139, Exit 20A off Route 24 1-800-315-4000
5 6 8 DIG
NationalAmusements.com
FINDING DORY (PG) 10:40, 1:15
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:10, 9:50
NINE LIVES (PG) 10:20, 12:45, 3:25, 6:30, 9:05
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10:35, 1:35, 4:35,
7:35, 10:05
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 11:10, 11:50, 12:20, 2:30,
3:00, 3:30, 7:50, 10:35
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 11:10, 2:30
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 10:15, 11:15, 1:10, 2:15,
4:10, 5:15, 7:10, 8:15, 10:10
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10
SUICIDE SQUAD: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 10:25, 1:20, 4:25, 7:20,
10:15
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 12:35, 4:05, 7:25, 9:30,
10:25
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 11:00, 1:45,
4:20, 6:55
DCI 2016: BIG, LOUD & LIVE 13 (NR) 6:30
NERVE (PG-13) 11:20, 2:05, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 11:35, 1:55, 4:15, 7:00, 10:00
BAD MOMS (R) 10:30, 1:25, 4:00, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 10:45, 1:40, 4:40, 7:40,
10:40
READING
IMAX 3D THEATRE AT JORDAN'S FURNITURE
Exit 39 off Route 128 in Reading 781-944-9090
5 8
Jordans.com
SUICIDE SQUAD: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG-13)
1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45
REVERE
SHOWCASE CINEMAS REVERE
Route 1 & Squire Road 1-800-315-4000
5 6 8 I K DIG
NationalAmusements.com
FINDING DORY (PG) 10:15, 12:40
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:10, 9:50
REGAL CINEMAS WESTBOROUGH 12
Route 9 Near Route 135 508-366-3877
5 6 8 DIG
RegalShowtimes.com
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) Advance Tickets
Available 7:30
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) Advance Tickets Available 7:00,
9:40
NINE LIVES (PG) (12:00, 2:45) 5:15, 8:00, 10:30
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) (11:30, 2:30) 8:30
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) (1:00) 4:00, 5:30, 7:00,
10:00
BAD MOMS (R) (11:15, 2:00) 4:45, 7:30, 10:10
DISHOOM (NR) (12:15, 3:15)
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) (1:15) 4:15, 7:15, 10:15
NERVE (PG-13) (12:25, 3:00) 5:40, 8:15, 10:50
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) (1:05, 3:45)
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) (12:30) 6:30
STAR TREK BEYOND 3D (PG-13) (3:30) 9:30
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) (1:30) 4:40, 7:40, 10:40
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) (11:00, 1:45) 4:30,
7:10, 9:40
FINDING DORY (PG) (1:25) 4:10, 6:40, 9:20
WALTHAM
LANDMARK THEATRES EMBASSY CINEMA
16 Pine Street, Near Moody St. 781-736-7852
5 6 DOL DIG DSS
LandmarkTheatres.com
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 5 (1:20) 7:20
STAR TREK BEYOND 3D (PG-13) 5 (4:10)
CAFÉ SOCIETY (PG-13) 5 (1:30, 4:30) 7:30
CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (R) 5 (1:10, 4:15) 7:15
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 5 (1:25, 4:20) 7:25
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 5 (1:00, 3:50) 7:10
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 5 (1:15) 7:00
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 5 (4:00)
WOBURN
SHOWCASE CINEMAS WOBURN
Route 128 Exit 35/Route 38 1-800-315-4000
5 6 DOL DIG
NationalAmusements.com
FINDING DORY (PG) 11:35, 1:55
FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS (PG-13) 7:10, 9:50
NINE LIVES (PG) 11:40, 2:00, 4:35, 7:00, 9:20
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11:00, 1:15, 3:35
JASON BOURNE (PG-13) 10:20, 10:50, 1:10, 1:40,
4:00, 4:30, 6:50, 9:40, 10:10
SUICIDE SQUAD (PG-13) 10:40, 12:30, 1:30, 3:25,
4:25, 6:15, 9:05
SUICIDE SQUAD 3D (PG-13) 10:10, 1:00, 3:55, 6:45,
7:15, 9:35, 10:05
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 10:45, 1:45, 4:40
STAR TREK BEYOND (PG-13) 10:15, 1:05, 3:50, 6:40,
9:00, 9:30
ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE (PG) 11:15, 1:35,
4:05, 6:35
NERVE (PG-13) 11:30, 2:10, 4:45, 7:35, 9:55
LIGHTS OUT (PG-13) 11:05, 1:20, 3:30, 5:35, 7:40,
9:45
BAD MOMS (R) 7:30
BAD MOMS (R) 10:25, 1:25, 4:10, 7:10, 9:50
SAUSAGE PARTY (R) 7:15, 9:30
CAFÉ SOCIETY (PG-13) 4:20, 6:55, 9:15
T h e
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
B o s t o n
G l o b e
G7
‘Around the world,
hip-hop still reigns
supreme — nobody on
this tour has hit
records and it’s still
sold out, so that just
shows you how
powerful the music is.’
ERICK SERMON (far left)
with Parrish Smith, his partner
in EPMD
SIMON ABRAMS
‘Business’
still booming
Classic hip-hop duo EPMD celebrates
three decades of churning out beats
E
By Sean L. Maloney
GLOBE CORRESPONDENT
PMD, Long Island’s long-running, pioneering hip-hop duo,
marks its 30th anniversary this year, and comes to the
Middle East in Cambridge this Saturday to celebrate. Over
the course of four albums released in the late ’80s and early
’90s, Erick Sermon and Parrish Smith created a body of
work that epitomized the party-funk of hip-hop’s early underground era,
and predicted the aesthetic that would fuel the art form’s mainstream
dominance. EPMD helped to foster the careers of other classic performers
like Redman and Das EFX, while continuing to create albums with a
depth and consistency often lost among later-career hip-hop acts. In a recent telephone interview, Sermon discussed the duo’s early influences, ingenious recording techniques, and three decades in the rap game.
Continued from preceding page
Christina Applegate star. (101
min., R) (Sonia Rao)
YY Café Society Woody Allen’s
latest takes place in a glamorous ’30s Hollywood and New
York. Jesse Eisenberg, playing
the Woody schlemiel part, runs
a swanky night club. Steve
Carell is his movie-agent uncle.
Corey Stoll, as his gangster older brother, has the most fun.
Kristen Stewart, charming, and
Blake Lively, wooden, provide
the love interests. The sets are
great, the movie lackluster. (96
min., PG-13) (Mark Feeney)
YY Captain Fantastic Someday Viggo Mortensen will find
the role that suits his brilliance.
Here he plays a countercultural, despotic, and charismatic
hippie who is training his six
kids to become a mini-army of
warrior-sage saints. Lots to
think about here. (119 min., R)
(Peter Keough)
YYY½ Finding Dory It’s been
13 years since “Finding Nemo,”
but there’s nothing stale or predictable about this sequel. Ellen DeGeneres returns as Dory,
a memory-challenged blue
tang. In the earlier film, she
helped Marlin (Albert Brooks)
reunite with his son. Now she’s
the one in search of a parental
reunion. Ed O’Neill, as a helpful octopus desperate to get to
Cleveland, heads an outstanding voice cast. (97 min., PG)
(Mark Feeney)
YY½ Ghostbusters Not a disaster but genial, sloppy, slightly above average summer movie fun. The gender switch of the
casting is the movie’s most subversive touch; more often, it’s
content to trade on our nostalgia for the 1984 original. A
pleasurable echo that you sense
aches to be something more.
With Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon, and
Leslie Jones. (116 min., PG-13)
(Ty Burr)
YYY Hunt for the Wilderpeople Thirteen-year-old newcomer Julian Dennison lends
quirky heart to a New Zealand
import with a knack for finding
humor in dreary, even ill-advised themes. This tale of a foster-care incorrigible wandering
the bush with his new guardian
(Sam Neill) is also a showcase
for filmmaker Taika Waititi.
(101 min., PG-13) (Tom Russo)
YY Ice Age: Collision Course
Scrat the squirrel is back in
fine, funny form in the series’
fifth installment, stumbling onto a glacierized flying saucer
and setting off eye-catching galactic chaos. Trouble is, there
isn’t nearly enough here that
feels this inspired or energetic.
Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo), and sabretooth Diego (Denis Leary) keep busy
with stopping an impending
asteroid strike triggered by
Scrat’s bumbling. (100 min.,
PG) (Tom Russo)
YY½ Jason Bourne From the
no-frills title to the splintery,
state-of-the-art action sequences, the fifth “Bourne” movie’s is
generic, functional, and entertaining. Matt Damon is back as
the amnesiac super-spy, while
Alicia Vikander and Tommy
Lee Jones liven up the sidelines. (121 min., PG-13) (Ty
Burr)
YYY Star Trek Beyond It plays
like an episode of the original
TV show, and that’s what’s good
about it. Under Justin Lin’s direction, the third in the new
“ST” series is more workmanlike and less inspired than the
films that preceded it, but it
eventually achieves warp
speed. With Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Idris Elba, and the
late Anton Yelchin. (122 min.,
PG-13) (Ty Burr)
For movie coverage, go to
www.bostonglobe.com/movies.
Q. Congratulations on hitting 30 years
— that’s a remarkable milestone for
any career in music.
A. I don’t realize that until we say it every night — when we say it, the crowd
erupts. Now I kind of get it, too, you
know? I take it for granted that it’s OK.
But it’s not just OK, you’re right: After
30 years, to still have people coming to
see you is something special.
Q. How has this tour been going? How
are crowds reacting?
A. Hip-hop is stronger than ever. Of
course, for so long there’s been a takeover in the rap business, cats making
whatever these new kids call hip-hop,
and the “mainstream” is still the mainstream, and they’re still promoting
and playing that other new rap music.
But around the world, hip-hop still
reigns supreme — nobody on this tour
has hit records and it’s still sold out, so
that just shows you how powerful the
music is.
Q. How did EPMD come together initially?
A. Around ’85 or whatever, we were going to make a demo. I had moved to
Parrish’s neighborhood, from the
north side to the west side of Brentwood [New York]. Parrish was playing
EPMD
At the Middle East, Cambridge,
Aug. 14 at 8 p.m. Tickets: $25,
advance $22. 617-864-3278,
www.mideastclub.com
football. . . he was in college playing at
SCSU [Southern Connecticut State
University]. By ’85 we had made that
demo, but Parrish had to go back
school. So in ’86 we made another
demo, and then we got signed at the
end of ’87, November. Our first album
came out in 1988. That was “Strictly
Business.”
Q. When you made those demos,
where did you record? What kind of
equipment were you using?
A. We recorded with this guy Charlie
Marotta. Back then, all the studios on
Long Island were in houses, not buildings or anything like that. Charlie was
upstairs in his attic, we had egg cartons [as sound baffles] and an eighttrack Mackie [mixing] board. It wasn’t
that much equipment.
We used to record to tape and then
record back to tape to make a loop —
there were no machines around that
could make a loop. [The sample of the
Whole Darn Family’s] “Seven Minutes
of Funk,” on the “It’s My Thing” single,
we had to make up a way to loop it.
You can’t really picture it, but we
would make a loop around the room,
around the chair, around the table,
whatever it took, and then record it
back to tape.
When we say “loop it,” we mean repeat it — we had to find a way to repeat
it, not having the equipment. So we
did it that way, by splicing tape, something that people didn’t do back then.
You didn’t want to splice tape, because
you didn’t know if it was going to be on
time or not. You have to see it for real;
I’m not doing it justice, no way. You
have to see this piece of tape going
around the chair, going around the
lamp, going around whatever, just to
make a loop to record back to another
tape.
Q. What were you listening to back in
those days?
A. Everything! EPMD was the group
that came out the latest, so we got listen to everyone. Eric B & Rakim, Big
Daddy Kane, Biz Markie, Public Enemy, Slick Rick, MC Lyte: They all came
before us. Even though we all dropped
records the same year, they all came
out before me and Parrish did. We
were able to have all that to listen to
before we came, that’s why we were so
on point. We were the last to come out,
of that era of great people, we were the
last to come out. . . . We were the last
ones in the bunch. We were blessed to
hear all of that before we came, that’s
why we were so advanced and we were
so different. We were able to see what
they were doing and them make our
own music.
Sean L. Maloney can be reached at
[email protected]
MUSEUMS
THEATER
THEATER
MUSIC
IN COMPANY WITH ANGELS
FIND YOUR GRAIL!
SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 9
DARE TO LIVE IN FULL COLOR.
8/12 - THE LONE BELLOW
8/13 - DR. DOG
The Museum of Russian Icons presents In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany
Windows. This exhibit features seven eight-foottall stained glass windows created by Tiffany in
1902 for a Swedenborgian church in Cincinnati
along with other objects from the Tiffany Studios.
Hours: Tues-Fri 11AM-4PM, Sat-Sun 11AM-5PM, Closed Mondays
203 Union Street, Clinton, MA 01510
www.museumofrussianicons.org
Don’t miss the show that has captivated
35 million people worldwide.
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton St.
Groups of 8+ Call 617.542.6700
1.800.BLUEMAN
BLUEMAN.COM
The funniest show on earth will spread
laughter and merriment throughout the land!
This outrageous musical comedy is lovingly
ripped off from the film classic “Monty Python
and the Holy Grail.” Flying cows, killer rabbits,
taunting Frenchmen and show-stopping musical
numbers are just a few of the reasons
you’ll be eating up SPAMALOT.
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 DUNHAM ROAD | BEVERLY | MA
TIX: 978.232.7200
NSMT.ORG
THEATER
OPERA
OPERA DEL WEST PRESENTS
“DON PASQUALE”
Enjoy Donizetti’s Comic Masterpiece
Fully staged in Italian with English Supertitles
Fri. August 12 at 8 PM, Sun. August 14 at 2 PM
Amazing Things Arts Center
160 Hollis St. in Framingham
www.amazingthings.org
THREE WEEKS ONLY!
AUGUST 16 - SEPTEMBER 4
WHAT A GLORIOUS FEELING!
Of course, you remember Gene Kelly splashing
his way through the classic MGM film, but have
you seen it live? Join us as we make a big
splash with this spectacular and romantic
musical comedy. There will be wonderful singin’
and dancin’ and, yes, it really will rain onstage!
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 DUNHAM ROAD | BEVERLY | MA
TIX: 978.232.7200
NSMT.ORG
BOSTON’S HILARIOUS
WHODUNIT!
“Laugh yourself silly!” - Boston Globe
Tues-Fri at 8, Sat at 6 & 9, Sun at 3 & 7
To order 617-426-5225 or shearmadness.com
Student rush & specially priced senior tix
Great group rates! 617-451-0195
Charles Playhouse, 74 Warrenton Street
with host: Brian O’Donovan
8/20 - Peter Wolf & The Midnight Travelers
9/1 - “Weird Al” Yankovic
9/3 - The B-52’s
MUSIC
AUGUST 4 - 14
781-891-5600
Tony Award-Winning Gershwin Musical Comedy
Starring Beverly and Kirby Ward
Helen Hayes and Olivier Award Nominees
Robinson Theatre
617 Lexington Street, Waltham
ReagleMusicTheatre.com - FREE PARKING
8/19 - WGBH “A Celtic Sojourn”
GREAT MUSIC FOR FREE
WEDNESDAYS AT 7PM
all @ DCR’s HATCH SHELL / ESPLANADE
WITH THE NEXT GENERATION
SEPTEMBER 11 AT 2PM
SUBLIME MUSICAL GREAT SEATS AVAILABLE!
Stephen Sondheim’s Pulitzer Prize-winning
masterpiece is the must-see event of the season!
Starts Sept 9. Buy now for the best prices!
A Huntington Theatre Company production
Avenue of the Arts / BU Theatre
617 266 0800 huntingtontheatre.org
The JACKIE WILSON SHOW with son BOBBY
WILSON (Higher and Higher) • Salute to THE
TEMPTATIONS with the original lead DAVID
RUFFIN’s son DAVID RUFFIN, JR. with A.J.
SMOOTH & Group (My Girl) • LOU RAWLS,
JR. (You’ll Never Find Another Love Like
Mine) • The RITCHIE VALENS SHOW
with ERNIE VALENS (La Bamba)
8/17 FOOTLOOSE AND FANCY FREE
8/24 LONGWOOD SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
8/31 RODGERS & HART’S
THE BOYS FROM SYRACUSE
landmarksorchestra.org
NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
62 Dunham ROad | Beverly | MA 01915
TIX: 978.232.7200
NSMT.ORG
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T h e
G8
B o s t o n
TV CRITIC’S CORNER
She wants past left in past
RICH FURY/INVISION/AP/FILE
Julian Fellowes Presents Dr. Thorne, Amazon
I almost expected to hear Julian Fellowes say, “Gooodeeevening.”
On vacation, I caught up with a few shows, including this fourpart Amazon miniseries released in May. It’s based on a novel by
the great Anthony Trollope, which goes simply by the title “Dr.
Thorne,” since it was written long before Julian Fellowes was able
to present anything.
“Julian Fellowes Presents Dr. Thorne” is certainly pretty, like
Fellowes’s “Downton Abbey,” and it makes for easy watching. But
it’s remarkably forgettable. The romantic leads are bland, although Stefanie Martini looks remarkably like Ruth Wilson, and
the story line is a paint-by-numbers conflict between love and
money, with none of Trollope’s subtleties or political notions. I’m a
sucker for Victorian period dramas, but this one failed to leave an
impression.
Here’s why I’m mentioning it. Each episode begins and ends
with commentary by Fellowes, as he sits in a red-velvet arm chair
beside a lit fireplace. And Fellowes is a likable sort, as he enthusiastically recaps the story; you can feel his passion for both Trollope
and “Dr. Thorne.”
But still, they are odd little bumpers that come off as unintentional self-parody. The atmosphere is so British-cozy it’s almost out
of a “Saturday Night Live” sketch, and the camera angles are peculiar, particularly those shot virtually up Fellowes’s nose.
I kept thinking of Alfred Hitchcock’s introductions on his series
“Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” particularly since Fellowes is also bald
and might look like Hitchcock in a side silhouette. But Hitchcock,
who greeted us with “Gooodeeevening,” was being droll, while Fellowes is quite sincere.
Hosting a scripted show is a hard job to do well, even while it’s
a fairly simple task. Rod Serling is the standard bearer for his bits
on “The Twilight Zone,” and Alistair Cooke did nicely on “Masterpiece Theatre.” But Gillian Anderson and Laura Linney — two actresses I generally like — were painful to watch in the years after
Cooke.
Q. I am currently dating/living with my boyfriend of three years. He has a daughter (9
years old) from a previous marriage that we
have with us every other weekend.
My boyfriend’s ex-wife has a son (age 14)
from a previous relationship, whom my boyfriend will occasionally refer to as his “stepson,” although for as long as we have been
together he has never spent any time with
him, nor had any contact with him, with the
exception of occasionally seeing the “stepson” when he drops off/picks up his daughter.
We have a vacation coming up, and my
boyfriend’s daughter invited her brother (the
“stepson”) to go without our permission.
My boyfriend seems comfortable with the
“stepson” going, but I’m not comfortable
with it.
To me the past should stay in the past,
and there is no reason to try and commingle
families (with the exception of my boyfriend’s daughter).
I should also mention that my boyfriend
and his ex-wife were only together for three
years. What are your thoughts on this? Am I
overreacting?
TORN
A. I don’t know if you are overreacting, but
you are definitely guilty of over-punctuating.
Your insistence on referring to your guy’s
stepson as a “stepson” — as if this is debatable — is revealing.
Your boyfriend was married to the boy’s
mother, correct? Then the boy is the man’s
stepson.
I know many, many stepparents who stay
close to their stepchildren after the marriage
has ended. This is ideal but not always possible, especially if the stepparent’s next partner has firm feelings about the “past staying
in the past,” and not “commingling families.”
Your guy’s daughter shouldn’t have invited this teen on your vacation, but — she’s 9.
He’s her brother. She probably made some
assumptions about what constitutes a “family vacation” that simply don’t seem to apply
in this case.
If this teen lives with his sister and their
mother, then he is in the girl’s life 10 times
more often than you are. It would be great if
your guy spent more time with him than just
waving across the driveway.
A 9-year-old shouldn’t be making final
choices about your vacation, but you should
talk with your partner about it privately and
decide between you what to do.
Thursday August 11, 2016
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tracks a weapons system. HD TV-PG
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Meet the Donors
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(6:05) ★★
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A long-buried
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FAMILY
Steven
Gumball King/Hill Burgers Burgers Clevelnd Am. Dad
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Stuck/
Girl Mt.
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Middle
to be a chef. HD TV-G
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An agent's life falls apart. R
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(11:15)
Flintst.
(7:25) The Good Dinosaur: Lost ★★★★ Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977):
Ant-Man
dinosaur befriends a boy. PG Extraterrestrials visit Earth. HD TV-14
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(6:15) ★★ Dark
returns. HD TV-14-V
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4
T H U R S D A Y, A U G U S T 1 1 , 2 0 1 6
ASK AMY
BY MATTHEW GILBERT
2
G l o b e
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If you two choose not to include the boy,
you can explain it like this: “We’re not going
to include him this time, but you’ve reminded me that I don’t know him that well. Maybe he would like to hang out with us sometime on one of the weekends you’re here.
Would you like that?”
Q. My daughter is getting married about 250
miles from home next year. I’ve already
asked my friends and relatives if they think
they might attend, and only 1 out of 20 said
she probably will.
I told my daughter that she, her fiance,
and his family should also casually poll their
loved ones so they don’t put a deposit on a
hall for a minimum of 100 people when only
20 may accept the invitation.
My daughter says that would be a rude
and unacceptable thing to do.
I say it may save many thousands of dollars if they have a vague idea of how many
attendees to plan for before committing to a
large banquet hall that they will need a loan
to afford.
What are your thoughts on this approach,
please?
VERY CONCERNED MOB
A. It is not rude to ask friends and relatives if
they can be available for a wedding on a specific date; some people try to accomplish this
by sending “save the date” notices well in advance, but (like you) I just think it is smart to
try to get a basic count before putting down
a deposit.
However — this is your daughter’s wedding, not yours. Unless you are financing
this or are being asked specifically for your
input, you should let the couple handle it.
It is not a good idea to take out loans to
pay for weddings; starting married life in
debt for a one-day celebration is putting a lot
of pressure on the couple.
Q. I had to laugh at the letter from “Peeved,”
who resented the fact that their friend (who
could afford professionals) had asked for
help moving.
I just faced this experience last weekend!
A bunch of us showed up to help. One friend
hurt his back, one friend dropped a table,
and overall it was a real mess.
RECOVERED MOVER
A. I’m picturing it now. Yikes.
Amy Dickinson can be reached at
[email protected]
AMC
ON WGBH
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story of Katie Piper.
Content Ratings: TV-Y Appropriate for all children; TV-Y7 For children age 7 and older; TV-G General audience; TV-PG Parental guidance suggested; TV-14 May be unsuitable for children under 14;
TV-MA Mature audience only Additional symbols: D Suggestive dialogue; FV Fantasy violence; L Strong language; S Sexual activity; V Violence; HD High-Definition; (CC) Close-Captioned
(11:03) Mountain
Men HD TV-PG-L
South Africa HD
News (CC)
★★ First Knight
20/20 on OWN (CC)
HD TV-14-V