Diversity/inClusion agenDa - Charlotte

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Diversity/inClusion agenDa - Charlotte
2010
Charlotte Chamber
Diversity/Inclusion
Agenda
2010
2010 was a year of new normals, while the nation’s economy continued
to reset and find its way. Locally, we experienced much of that same reality. Amidst all of the
change, and as we continue to forge ahead to energize our economy and stimulate job growth, some basic
principles remain true.
For the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce, one of those truths is that a diverse and inclusive economy is an economy
that is resilient. One that is diverse and inclusive in every sense. While the Chamber has had a continued focus on
diversity and inclusion, like so many other reminders during this time of change, we were reminded of the business
imperative of diversity and inclusion. 2010 saw the Charlotte Chamber focus on how to leverage its strengths to
support and grow minority- and women-owned business enterprises. Our new economic reality mandates that
we be focused on ensuring that this vital sector of our economy is equipped to grow and reach sustainability.
Over the course of the summer, the Charlotte Chamber’s Diversity Advisory Cabinet convened Charlotte Chamber
leaders and strategic partners for a series of conversations focused on ensuring that Charlotte move toward the
vision of becoming the most inclusive business community in the United States. The conversations revealed broad
and diverse viewpoints on the topic. The outcome of those conversations uncovered a commitment to change
the landscape by focusing our efforts, leveraging best practices and tapping in to our own Charlotte business
community know-how.
Following those discussions, we hosted the Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community Summit, which
further substantiated the economic/community benefit in ensuring that our city’s minority- and women-owned
business enterprises thrive in this changed economy. We all have a vested interest. A special thank you to
Dr. Ron Carter and Johnson C. Smith University for hosting this very important summit. A further recap of the
summit will follow in the subsequent pages.
In summary, 2010 was a time for the Charlotte Chamber to “re-set” the stage relative to our role in positively
impacting the thrival of minority- and women-owned businesses in Charlotte.
We are clear that the role of the Charlotte Chamber is to:
➣Lead and influence
• Convene/rally corporate support…leverage best practices
• Engage corporate diversity champions to build a strategy that:
– Identifies best practices in supporting and growing diverse businesses
– Develops guidelines/metrics to create competitive advantage for Charlotte Chamber MWBE members
– Creates opportunity for MWBE’s to engage with corporate diversity champions
• Appropriately lobby on behalf of MWBE/small business
➣Identify and recruit MWBE businesses to Charlotte (through qualified leads)
➣Shape the business climate to grow, develop and support MWBE’s/small businesses
• Expand partnerships with CMSDC (and other partners) to better equip/prepare Charlotte Chamber
MWBE members for success
• Identify Charlotte Chamber members ready for engagement with corporate diversity champions
While this is a noble charge for the Charlotte Chamber, we recognize that the overall economic climate creates an
even more daunting challenge as we move forward. But moving forward is what we must do. We’ve come far in
our evolution relative to matters of diversity and inclusion. We are now positioned to focus on economic inclusion,
which will further move us closer to our vision of the most inclusive business community in the United States.
We thank all who are a part of this movement. We will continue to need your support, involvement and commitment to continue advancing the ball. We will be the most inclusive business community in the United States.
Regards,
Pat Rodgers
2011 Chair
Charlotte Chamber
David Darnell
2010 Chair
Charlotte Chamber
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
2
The Whitehead Conversations
During summer of 2010, the Charlotte Chamber’s Diversity Advisory Cabinet held a series of three leadership
conversations examining the question of how to ensure the growth and success of minority- and women-owned
businesses and continually build an inclusive business community in Charlotte.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Results from the sessions:
Session I
•
•
•
•
•
•
Drafted a framework for success
Vision/Goals/Guiding Principles
Identified additional information needed
Data
Models from other cities
Action timeline
Session II
• Reviewed data on the status of minority-owned businesses
• Reviewed a concept model of support for growing and developing minority- and women-owned businesses
• Asked “What can the Charlotte Chamber do?”
Session III
•Reviewed best practices from corporate leaders on how they are supporting minority- and women-owned
business growth – Balfour Beatty, Bank of America, Duke Energy, Wachovia/Wells Fargo
•Reached agreement on the beginnings of a model that addresses our draft vision/goals and guiding
principles – Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce - Minority Business Accelerator
The Vision
Charlotte will create competitive advantage by being the most inclusive business community in the United States.
The Guiding Principles
•
•
•
•
•
Recruit diverse businesses to bring jobs and investment to Charlotte
Build sustainable strategies
Build accountability into strategies
Build opportunities that create relationship with potential for business
Build measurable strategies
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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Inclusive Business Community Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010
7:30 - 11:45 a.m.
Johnson C. Smith University
100 Beatties Ford Road
We will CHALLENGE existing models and explore new ways of creating an inclusive business community;
LEARN about the economic impact of investing in inner-city communities and
minority and women owned businesses; and IDENTIFY opportunities for Charlotte to
build a sustainable, inclusive strategy that creates competitive advantage.
Featuring Keynote Speaker
John Robinson
Director of the Office of Civil Rights and Chief Diversity Officer,
U.S. Department of State
SILVER SPONSORS
BRONZE SPONSORS
K & L Gates LLP | Peak10
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
7:30 a.m. Registration and Networking
8 a.m. Breakfast
8 a.m. Welcome
David Darnell, President of Global Commercial Banking, Bank of America Merrill Lynch
and Chair, Charlotte Chamber of Commerce
8: 15-9 a.m. I AM A LEADER
Challenge our existing models and explore new ways of creating an inclusive business community
Keynote Speaker:
John Robinson, Director of the Office of Civil Rights and Chief Diversity Officer,
U.S. Department of State
8:15-8:45 a.m. Presentation
8:45-9 a.m. Audience Discussion:
What actions will you personally commit to, to make Charlotte a more inclusive business community?
9:15-10:20 a.m. I AM A BUSINESS PERSON
Learn from successful models that create economic impact by investing in minority- and womenowned businesses and inner-city communities.
9:15-9:35 a.m. Presentation
Overview of Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s Capital Access Fund and the business and social impacts
it has created.
Speaker:
Matt HoganBruen, Managing Director – Washington, D.C., Bank of America Merrill Lynch Capital
Access Funds
9:35-10:05 a.m. Panel Discussion:
Driving Charlotte’s minority, women-owned and inner-city businesses development and growth.
Moderator: Bob Morgan, President, Charlotte Chamber of Commerce
Panelists: Todd Collins, CEO, iRealtyManager
Bonny Moellenbrock, Executive Director, SJF Advisory Services
Mary Kay Leonard, President and CEO, Initiative for a Competitive Inner City
Craig Fowler, Managing Director – St. Louis, Bank of America Merrill Lynch Capital Access Funds
10:05-10:20 a.m. Audience Discussion:
Based upon the models discussed, what components would you want to ensure are replicated in
Charlotte?
10:35-11:45 a.m. I
AM A COMMUNITY MEMBER
Identify opportunities for Charlotte to build a sustainable strategy that creates competitive
advantage by being the most inclusive business community in the United States.
Facilitator: Nicholas Beamon, Principal Consultant, Whitehead Associates
Panelists:
Anthony Foxx, Mayor, City of Charlotte
Dr. Ronald L. Carter, President, Johnson C. Smith University
Andrea Harris, President, North Carolina Institute of Minority Economic Development
Pat Rodgers, President and CEO, Rodgers Builders, Inc. and incoming Chair, Charlotte Chamber
10:35-11:05 a.m. Panel Discussion
11:05-11:45 a.m. Audience Discussion:
What does Charlotte’s inclusive business community look like to you?
11:45 a.m. Summit concludes
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
I Am A Leader
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
State Dept. Chief Diversity Officer Shares Message of Economic Impact of Inclusiveness
It’s an issue that will no doubt drive our economy’s future – diversity. We already know that the minorities of today
will surely become the majority in years to come. So how do we as a business community prepare for that change?
Are we as a chamber doing enough intentionally now to become more inclusive? Those were among the questions
discussed during a half-day summit on September 29 at Johnson C. Smith University.
More than 150 participants engaged in the conversation with a diverse group of panelists including keynote speaker
John Robinson, director of the Office of Civil Rights and Chief Diversity Officer, U.S. State Department.
Robinson told the crowd it isn’t enough just to talk about diversity in broad terms. He encouraged them to share
their personal stories and experiences with co-workers. It’s through such openness and sensitivity, Robinson stressed,
that true understanding and trust is achieved.
Pictured from left to right:
David Darnell, 2010 chamber chair;
John Robinson, U.S. State Dept.;
Pat Rodgers, 2011 chamber chair;
Keva Walton, Sr. V.P. Member Engagement;
and Bob Morgan, chamber president.
John M. Robinson
Director Office of Civil Rights and Chief Diversity Officer
U.S. Department of State
John M. Robinson was sworn in on Monday, March 3, 2008, as Director of the Office of Civil
Rights and Chief Diversity Officer. Robinson serves as the primary advisor to the Secretary
of State and the Department’s senior leadership on equal opportunity, diversity, affirmative
employment and related issues. Robinson is coming to State from the staff of the Office of the
Director of National Intelligence (ODNI).
Prior to joining ODNI, he served as Chief of EEO and Diversity for the Internal Revenue Service. He was Senior Policy
Advisor to the Secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE) from 1999 to 2001. His federal service began in 1994 as
Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) of the U.S. Department of Labor
(DOL).
Prior to federal service, he served in the Rhode Island Governor’s Cabinet as Director of the Rhode Island Department
of Employment and Training from 1991 to 1993. He was a senior dean at Brown University before joining state
government and held various administrative positions in higher education from 1973 to 1990. A Vietnam-era veteran,
he served as a naval officer aboard a destroyer and an ammunition ship, and earned the Navy Commendation Medal.
A graduate of Brown University, He holds a Masters degree from Tuskegee University, is a Senior Intelligence Fellow,
and completed programs at the Center for Creative Leadership - Greensboro, the Federal Executive Institute Charlottesville, and the Institute for Education Management at Harvard University. In 2007, Robinson received the
Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Center for Creative Leadership.
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
6
The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
I AM A BUSINESS PERSON
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Inner City Capital Connections – www.icic.org/resources-for-inner-city-ceos/inner-city-capital-connections
INCREASING ACCESS TO CAPITAL
Established in 2005, Inner City Capital Connections (ICCC) is a free program, sponsored by the Initiative for a
Competitive Inner City and Bank of America, that is designed to stimulate the flow of capital to inner city businesses.
ICCC is the country’s only program that educates investment-ready inner city companies about equity and other
sources of capital and matches them with investors to grow their businesses and create jobs.
PROGRAM BENEFITS
•Discover a full range of financial options ranging from private equity and venture capital to debt and
mezzanine financing
• Learn how to optimize business plans and growth strategies to attract potential investors
• Build networks and strengthen relationships with investors
•Obtain company-specific feedback from seasoned investors about growth plans, business models and
investment pitches
ICCC FACTS
•Growing participation: Nearly 200 inner city companies and 150 equity providers have participated in the
program since 2005
•$335 million in capital: ICCC companies have raised approximately $138 million in equity financing and $197
million in debt
•Connecting with investors: Over 85 percent of participants met at least one potential investor at ICCC
•Increased visibility: Many ICCC participants have been featured in national and local publications, including
Wall Street Journal, Reuters, Inc. Magazine, Portfolio, PE Hub, MSN Money and Small Business
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC) – www.icic.org
ICIC’s mission is to promote economic prosperity in America’s inner cities through private sector engagement that
leads to jobs, income and wealth creation for local residents.
ICIC is a national not-for-profit organization that was founded in 1994 by Harvard Business School Professor Michael
Porter. ICIC believes that private sector investment is the key to ensuring the economic prosperity of America’s inner
cities and the financial stability and advancement of inner city residents. We employ four key strategies to increase
business development in urban areas: 1) document the market opportunities and gaps in inner city economies;
2) identify the factors that drive business success; 3) influence the environments in which businesses operate; and
4) model new programs to address the most vexing challenges for inner city businesses.
Exploring New Thinking and Sparking Innovative Solutions
ICIC’s path-breaking research highlights the competitive advantages of inner cities and provides the foundation for
new and effective economic strategies for urban communities. ICIC’s ongoing State of the Inner Cities Economies
(SICE) research effort examines the economic performance and potential of the inner cities within the 100-largest
cities to uncover drivers of performance, fuel greater private investment in urban areas and sharpen public policy
with the objective of leading to greater prosperity for inner city residents.
The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
ICIC’s current research agenda has four main objectives: 1) provide the necessary federal policy recommendations
for improving the economic competitiveness of distressed urban areas; 2) uncover the gaps and barriers preventing
additional capital investment into inner city businesses and economies; 3) identify the growth and market
opportunities for inner city industry clusters such as construction, housing and real estate (CHRE); retail, healthcare
and industrial; and 4) provide urban economic development strategy recommendations for cities.
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
ICIC’s research has had a profound effect on urban communities across the country. Notably, ICIC documented the
$89 billion retail market opportunity for urban areas, created a strategic map for urban colleges and universities to
transform their inner city neighborhoods, and developed the framework used to revitalize inner cities in Oakland,
Philadelphia, West Louisville and many more. ICIC’s research team is actively involved in a broad-based effort to
revitalize hard-hit Midwestern cities, such as Detroit and Flint, by focusing on the next-generation use for their
industrial assets and is leading an assessment of the construction, housing and real estate cluster in Boston. ICIC is
working with the Cleveland Clinic to develop a model for the role that health care institutions can play in rebuilding
urban economies and is also evaluating how to maximize “green” job creation for inner city residents.
Promoting Inner City Job Creation by Successful Businesses
Now in its 12th year, the Inner City 100 is a national program to recognize fast-growing companies in inner cities
across the U.S. The Inner City 100 also spotlights the importance of a robust business sector in creating healthy urban
communities. Winning companies are invited to attend the Inner City 100 Summit, an event at Harvard Business
School that provides executive educational sessions and networking opportunities. The event culminates with the
Inner City 100 Awards Dinner.
The annual Inner City 100 list, published in Bloomberg BusinessWeek, receives substantial national and local media
attention. Past winners have benefited from networking opportunities, recognition from local government and
increased access to capital as a result of being selected for this celebrated list. Participants have also cited such
benefits as meeting major investors, winning multi-million dollar contracts and gaining increased credibility.
Collectively, Inner City 100 firms have created more than 63,000 new jobs in the last decade. The Inner City 100
program is sponsored by the Chevron Corporation, Staples Foundation for Learning and Goldman Sachs Foundation.
Increasing Access to Capital
Access to capital is one of the most frequently cited barriers to growth for inner city firms. Inner city businesses, on
average, begin operations with 44 percent less start-up capital than other U.S. firms and receive 31 percent less
growth capital as their businesses expand. In 2005, Inner City Capital Connections (ICCC) was introduced in partnership with Bank of America as a national effort to stimulate the flow of capital to inner city markets. ICCC is the
country’s only program that matches urban entrepreneurs with revenues of over $2 million who are seeking growth
capital with investors. Since October 2005, approximately 150 inner city companies and 115 debt and equity providers
have participated in the program. These inner city companies have raised more than $335 million in capital and
increased total employment 55 percent since participating in the program. Most recently, ICIC has become a key
partner in Goldman Sachs’ newly announced 10,000 Small Businesses Initiative, a commitment of $500 million to
deliver education and capital access to underserved areas through community colleges and community development
financial institutions. ICIC’s Chairman Michael Porter is cochairing the initiative’s advisory council with Warren Buffet
and Goldman Sachs’ CEO and Chairman Lloyd Blankfein.
Transforming Inner City Economic Development
The Inner City Economic Forum is the country’s only national leadership network focused on business-led inner city
economic development. The forum was founded in 2003 as an ambitious and bold effort to create a national
movement around the revitalization of America’s inner cities. The forum’s agenda focuses on these critical areas:
increasing capital flows to inner cities, creating and growing inner city businesses of size and scale, and marketing
and promoting the business opportunities and competitive advantages of America’s inner cities.
The network has emerged as a powerful mechanism for generating innovative ideas on urban economic development and transforming those ideas into action. Forum members represent a dynamic national group of leaders and
opinion shapers from national corporations; inner city businesses; investment firms; government, civic and community
organizations; foundations; and academic and policy-making institutions.
As part of the forum, ICIC has convened policy roundtable discussions at Harvard Business School to develop concrete
strategies for a national cluster policy, hosted a strategy session with the Ford Foundation to address the challenges
urban businesses face when seeking access to capital and partnered with the Staples Foundation for Learning to
develop a supplier diversity resource guide for small businesses.
ICIC defines an “inner city” as an urban area within a central city with a population of at least 100,000 people that
have higher poverty and unemployment rates and lower median household income levels than the surrounding
Metropolitan Statistical Area.
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
8
The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
Inclusive Business Community Summit Survey Results
Format: Breakfast
Number of responses: 61
155 total attendees
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
SESSION I – I Am A Leader
Rating Scale of 4 to 1: 4 Strongly Agree, 3 Agree, 2 Disagree, 1 Strongly Disagree:
Average
A. Information shared was relevant
3.71
B. Information shared provided new/different insight
3.54
C. Session leader was knowledgeable
3.81
D. Overall session was effective
3.79
SESSION I COMMENTS
Awesome! Chamber needs to bring him back to speak to a larger group of corporate leaders.
Outstanding and practical
Nice touch about telling each one’s diversity story.
Instead of focusing on past stories, the message should be for individuals and businesses to create meaningful stories
in 2010.
Great speaker. Ability to tell stories and connect to the audience.
Terrific! John Robinson is really good.
Best speaker I’ve heard in a long time! Excellent! Would have liked him to talk longer.
Great speaker – very relevant. Engaging – provided practical and immediately usable information.
Interactive and engaging
Wonderful, knowledgeable and inspiring
The speaker was knowledgeable, but not as helpful after he spoke about his very useful article.
Great speaker, very helpful
Terrific speakers, great stories
In theory, it was great. Now, what do we do in practice?
Great opening. Loved Olympic story. Has a low key storytelling approach .
Excellent!
Excellent and candid comments that provided great insight.
Thought provoking and engaging
Powerful! Enjoyed his message and storytelling.
Loved the lighthouse story and Olympic story.
Crisp, clear, useful
Wonderful speaker and I felt like I gained insight. At our firm, we fully believe in telling a story.
Terrific – love Mr. Robinson!
Wonderful opportunity and tremendous event. Kudos to Chamber staff for arranging.
Message was relevant and inspiring.
Very authentic. Idea of sharing your experience to lead was spot on.
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
9
The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
SESSION II – I AM A BUSINESS PERSON
Rating Scale of 4 to 1: 4 Strongly Agree, 3 Agree, 2 Disagree, 1 Strongly Disagree:
Average
A. Information shared was relevant
3.29
B. Information shared provided new/different insight
3.03
C. Session leader was knowledgeable
2.54
D. Overall session was effective
3.10
SESSION II COMMENTS
Good program
Gained new insights, great overall discussion.
Good information about access to capital.
Visual presentation too small.
The speaker’s sincerity and candor were extremely appropriate for this type of dialogue and greatly appreciated.
New information for me.
Couldn’t read slides (print too small).
Not as personally relevant to the topic of the day. How do minority owners and entrepreneurs gain access to capital?
PowerPoint slides were basically unreadable and not provided for further review.
Very straight to the point
Clear voice, good passion, bad slides!
Good data (slides were a little hard to read).
Great theory. I don’t see it effecting minority community.
Interesting to hear a capital access person talk about “social impact” in the same sentence with capital return. Great
to hear.
Good
The presentation font was too small and illegible.
Had a difficult task presenting complicated subject in a short period of time. He did a good job introducing private
equity/social impact subject.
Content/presentation could be a bit more audience friendly.
Spoke above crowd. Needed to define “social impact” Felt a little like an informercial for BOA.
A bit too statistical. Not a lot of new insight.
The idea was good, but honestly, I would have really liked a specific drill down example.
Slides need to have less text. Information loses impact and importance when you obviously cannot read.
Not a small business or looking for capital, so didn’t apply as much, but imagine this would be a good program for
those groups.
Slide print copy too small to read on screens.
PANEL DISCUSSION
Rating Scale of 4 to 1: 4 Strongly Agree, 3 Agree, 2 Disagree, 1 Strongly Disagree:
Average
A. Information shared was relevant
3.46
B. Information shared provided new/different insight
3.62
C. Session leader was knowledgeable
3.6
D. Overall session was effective
3.35
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
PANEL DISCUSSION COMMENTS
How is the Chamber going to bring corporate leaders to the table and engage them in this discussion?
Good panel
Relationships, education and capital are factors. Someone needs to take more action. There needs to be more
discussion about action.
Todd Collins was particularly good – some others not so much.
Next summit, perhaps a focus on philanthropic leadership influence on business. If you look at top 20 non profit
leaders and top 20 CEO’s, COO’s – not a great visual!
Great resources – valuable perspective/experience from varied roles.
Each panelist provided knowledgeable information and opinions.
Better than expected.
Todd C. was great! Mary Kay was useful and insightful.
Passion is high but specifics are low.
Great information. Nothing new.
Highlighted the role the Chamber can play in assisting in networking and the importance of our higher education
and leveraging what we already have.
Very good panel
Provided practical insight.
Session did not give specifics or strategies that would be beneficial for minority firms to use today.
Really good panel selection.
SESSION III – I AM A COMMUNITY MEMBER
Rating Scale of 4 to 1: 4 Strongly Agree, 3 Agree, 2 Disagree, 1 Strongly Disagree:
Average
A. Information shared was relevant
3.75
B. Information shared provided new/different insight
3.56
C. Session leader was knowledgeable
3.92
D. Overall session was effective
3.74
SESSION III COMMENTS
Effective if Charlotte’s corporate leaders are brought into discussion and being engaged.
Very powerful and impactful
Great panel
Clearly, the most effective session of the day.
Excellent panel
Andrea Harris fantastic straight speaker. Most relevant panel. Would have like to hear from these more, perhaps in 4
smaller discussion groups.
Great diversity on panel.
This part was more real, not just stories and opinion.
The thoughts shared and actions proposed are worth following. I would like to see which major corporations are
coming forward.
Inspiration provided.
Wonderful and engaging panel. Dr. Ronald Carter is fantastic! Andrea Harris was amazing!
Powerful discussion!
All great!
Need more to talk to action.
The best part, local conversation I can relate with.
Good suggestions on what Charlotte needs to do to achieve the goal of inclusion.
Great persuasive speakers
Dr. Carter’s vision, particularly poignant. Appreciated pat Rodgers comment about “early voices;” excellent moderation.
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
11
The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
THE OVERALL SUMMIT
Rating Scale of 4 to 1: 4 Strongly Agree, 3 Agree, 2 Disagree, 1 Strongly Disagree:
Average
A. Information shared was relevant
3.71
B. Information shared provided new/different insight
3.79
C. Session leader was knowledgeable
3.84
D. Overall session was effective
3.54
OVERALL SUMMIT COMMENTS
There are items “To Do’s” that will result from this event.
Need more non-minority business leaders present and participating.
Wonderful session
I only trust and look forward to continued and deliberate and thoughtful next steps that are actionable and
meaningful. I hope to participate and hope to see CEO participation as well.
What was the goal of the session? Was it to have a conversation? There was no clear purpose and no clear
takeaways. The session was very “muddy!”
Valuable summit
Great meeting and an excellent use of time.
Sessions were muted – started very strong and ended strong.
Develop a conceptual framework for building an inclusive business community in Charlotte. How do we avail the
opportunities of the evolving “new economy?”
I’d suggest the next summit focus more on explicit questions such as what qualifies as an inclusive business.
community. Does Charlotte meet that criteria? Where are the gaps and how do we attack them?
Would like the event to be a bit longer to allow for more interaction/discussion.
It would have been good for Johnson Control meeting to be held at another time.
Hearing stories and opinions is good, but we should have had conversation about challenges at the tables.
More actual business powers in panels.
The right thing to do.
Enjoyed it immensely!
Great, relevant and very timely conversation.
Need to review/discuss hard question “What are the biases and what is our role as leaders to overcome them in
making Charlotte a world class inclusive future city?”
Need to take the conversation into actions – build and execute the plan. Opening a new presentation at closing
time was a miss.
Overall excellent
Wonderful job. I look forward to the next summit.
Still need a call to action that is more targeted.
How effective the summit can be depends on the actions coming out of the session. I didn’t hear about any actions.
Thanks for having this event.
Incorporating comments/introduction of businesses to give them opportunity to highlight their offerings is a great
model (should be used again). Incorporating scribes is excellent method for recording results.
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
12
The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
Outcomes/Next Steps
Building and Inclusive Business Community, What Will the Charlotte Chamber Do?
Inner-City Capital Connections (ICCC) & Initiative for Competitive Inner City (ICIC)
Inner City Capital Connections (ICCC) is a free national program that identifies and prepares a select group of entrepreneurs searching for finance to support their business growth. The program is designed to stimulate the growth of
capital to underserved inner city markets by matching urban businesses with investors. ICCC is a partnership between
The Initiative for a Competitive Inner City and Bank of America. www.icic.org/iccc
As a direct result of the Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community, two Charlotte Chamber member
companies were selected to participate in a two-day session in Los Angeles, including a reception with Irvin “Magic”
Johnson.
The Charlotte Chamber will continue to build a working relationship with ICCC & ICIC to support the growth,
development and sustainability of minority- and women-owned business
Expanded Survive & Thrive Programming
Building upon the success of the standing monthly breakfast series designed to deliver
tactical, nuts and bolts information to small business Charlotte Chamber members and
non-members, Survive and Thrive content will expand to deliver added content in
addition to the monthly breakfast series. Development and delivery of the expanded
series will be in partnership with new and existing, Charlotte Chamber Chapters and Diversity Business Council.
The Northwest and East geographic foot prints are specific target areas, given the significant number of diverse
small businesses.
The Charlotte Chamber’s NorthWest Chapter has established a strategic partnership with Johnson C. Smith University to deliver expanded Survive and Thrive
program content in the Beatties Ford Road corridor.
Minority Business Development Strategy
In partnership with Carolinas Minority Supplier Diversity Council, the
Charlotte Chamber will develop and implement a strategy focused on
increasing the growth and sustainability of minority-owned business.
The desired outcome of the overall initiative over an 18-24 month
cycle with enrolled MBEs being:
– Increased utilization of enrolled minority-owned companies
– Increased sales/revenue of enrolled minority-owned companies
– Increased jobs created within enrolled minority-owned companies
– Increase overall spending with enrolled minority-owned companies by participating corporations
Modeled after the Cincinatti Chamber of Commerce’s Minority Business Accelerator, this initiative is a direct result of
the Whitehead conversations held over the summer of 2010 (see page 3).
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
13
The Economic Impact of an Inclusive Business Community
Charlotte Chamber Economic Development Summit
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, Johnson C. Smith University
Working Partnerships with Diversity Partners
Initiated in 2007, the Charlotte Chamber enjoys continued working partnership with six diverse business organzations. Jointly the Charlotte Chamber will work this the diversity partners to identify opportunities to add value to
respective members as well as strengthen cross-cultural connections within the business community. Additionally,
the Charlotte Mecklenburg Black Chamber of Commerce will continue co-located office space within the Charlotte
Chamber offices.
Leaderhips Development Inititive (LDI)
Charlotte Chamber staff and volunteer leadership will continue to be active in Leadership Development Initiative
(LDI). LDI is a 12-month leadership program begun in 2001 that develops, connects and guides diverse groups of
leaders in increasing their awareness of and ability to influence racial and ethnic inclusion and equity. LDI is
intended for board members and senior staff of non-profit and public organizations.
Targeted Recruitment
Directly responsible for the recruitment of new business and industry to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg region, the
Charlotte Chamber’s economic development department will develop a marketing piece targeted to recruit diverse
companies to Charlotte. Additionally, a list of target companies will be developed to receive the marketing piece.
This strategy is a direct result of the Whitehead conversations held of the summer of 2010 (see page 3).
Minority Business Guide/Analysis
In partnership with Pride Communications, the Charlotte Chamber’s research department will coordinate the development of an asset inventory and analysis of minority businesses within the 16 county region. Phase I of the project
would initially combine all of the current minority-owned business lists.
Once a single database is created, analysis to understand the market potential for minority business within the area
will take place. The initial focus of the study will be African American owned businesses. Ultimately, all ethnic and
racial groups, gender, and foreign-born status will take place in the future updates. Key elements of the study will
include businesses characteristics, industrial distribution, and spatial distribution. This analysis will further assist in
understand the challenges and opportunities faced by minority-owned businesses in the Charlotte region.
Realignment of Charlotte Chamber Diversity Advisory Cabinet (DAC)
Realign the structure of DAC, which will include alignment with the Diversity Business
Council, to further support the growth and development of diverse member businesses
and an inclusive business community.
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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2010 Belk Innovation in Diversity Award
The Belk Innovation in Diversity Award is presented by the Charlotte Chamber to a local business that has
demonstrated innovative measures to improve diversity and inclusion in the work place.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The Finalists
AXA Equitable strives to be an industry leader with innovative
products and processes that require engaged input of a diverse
employee population and an inclusive workplace. Its diversity
program requires diversity training for all manager-level and
above employees and ties senior management compensation to
completion of diversity and inclusion goals.
Banco de la Gente is a division of Peoples Bank created to reach
the Hispanic market. Many Hispanic employees were hired, and branches and service centers were updated. While Peoples Bank
was already a diverse company, the influx of employees developed
a culture of change and interaction that favors adaption and evolution.
Carolinas HealthCare System must be culturally sensitive and strive to
meet diverse patient needs to obtain optimum health outcomes. Its
diversity program includes a diversity hotline, extensive language
services, a recruitment and retention program, supplier diversity goals,
and an employee communications program. Each segment of CHS’s
diversity program has well documented results.
The Vanguard Group focused its diversity program on Diversity
Advancement Committees (DACs) that operate in all departments and
at all levels of the firm. These DACs empower employees to create
department-level diversity events, training and activities and companywide events. Performance appraisals for the firm’s leadership include
diversity management criteria.
LendingTree, a division of Tree.com, offers a benefits package that
extends to domestic partners and allows for remote and work-fromhome arrangements. Its hiring and management practices and
company culture have attracted a loyal, diverse workforce that focuses
on excellence.
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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2010 Belk Innovation in Diversity Award
2010 Recipient
The 2010 honor was awarded to Carolinas HealthCare System, a highly visible area business that represents the spirit
and the intent of the award – leadership in diversity and inclusion in its industry and in the community.
Carolinas HealthCare System’s seasoned approach and methodology
in tracking, measuring and reporting results is outstanding. The
organization has documented results that clearly show diversity has
positively affected its business.
Those results include:
• A significant increase in spending with diverse suppliers
• More language options available to serve a diverse client base
• A dedicated orientation program that ensures new employees are exposed to the company’s values of diversity
from day one
• A Diversity Hotline that opens up the lines of communications within all staff levels
• A Diversity Advisory Council that aids in the recruitment of physicians
• Classes through their Gateway Academy which trains managers in diversity
While Carolinas HealthCare System’s current diversity and inclusion programs are models for others to follow,
company leaders believe that incorporating diversity and inclusion into its day-to-day operation is simply not a
series of one-time tasks, but a journey.
Pictured from left to right:
David Darnell, 2010 chamber chair;
Nicole Dean, VP Corporate HR and Chief Diversity Officer,
Carolinas Healthcare System;
and Michael Tarwater, CEO, Carolinas Healthcare System.
Photo by Ron Deshaies, Treasured Events of Charlotte
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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2010 Diversity and Inclusion Event Recap
January 21, 2010
Charlotte Chapter of Black MBA’s in partnership with the Charlotte Chamber Diversity Advisory Cabinet –
Blink, The Speed of Change (Economics, Careers Charlotte)
Keynote Address –
David Darnell, President of global commercial banking for Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Charlotte Chamber Chair
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
February 18, 2010
The Mint Museum in partnership with the Charlotte Chamber’s Diversity Officer’s Roundtable co-host
The Vibrant Colors of Diversity Networking, featuring the collection Lois Mailou Jones.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
March 10, 2010
Supplier Diversity Professionals Forum
Sponsored by Carolinas Minority Supplier Development Council
Hosted by Lowe’s
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
March 24, 2010
Minority Women Business Enterprise (MWBE) Strategic Alliance Workshop
Hosted by Carolinas Healthcare System
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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2010 Diversity and Inclusion Event Recap
April 19, 2010
Charlotte Chamber Diversity Officer’s Roundtable host conversation with Joe Echevarria, US Managing Partner –
Operations, Deloitte LLP
Discussion Topic: Best Practices - The Business Impact of Corporate Diversity and Inclusion
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
April 27, 2010
Business Opportunity Meeting, Charlotte Chamber Diversity Business Council in Partnership with Carolinas Minority
Supplier Development Council
Featuring: TIAA CREF, NC Department of Transportation, City of Charlotte
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
April 27, 2010
Ribbon Cutting: National Hispanic Entrepreneurs Organization (NHEO)
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
May 11, 2010
Compass, NA – Foodbuy Minority Supplier Showcase
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
May 18, 2010
East Chapter Luncheon: Purchasing Power of the Latin American Community
Guest speaker Edgar Saucedo, General Manager, Norsan Multimedia
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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2010 Diversity and Inclusion Event Recap
June 19, 2010
Johnson C. Smith University Commemorative Classic Press Conference
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
August 19, 2010
Charlotte Chapter of Black MBA’s in partnership with the Charlotte Chamber Diversity Advisory Cabinet:
Women Who Lead
Guest Panelists: Janet Manzullo, Vice President Talent Acquisition, Time Warner Cable
Okeatta Brown, Vice President, Sourcing Manager, Mid West Region, Wells Fargo
Nicole Dean, Vice President, Corporate HR & Chief Diversity Officer, Belk
Jaslyn Robert, Volunteer Training and Curriculum Specialist, Goodwill Industries
Marleana Werder, Vice President, Commercial Technical Support, Microsoft
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
August 25, 2010
Survive and Thrive Breakfast: How to do Business with Big Business:
Panelists:
Angela Bauer, Owner, Tropical Nut & Fruit
Skyne Betha, Supplier Diversity & Relations, Foodbuy, LLC (Compass, N.A.)
Walter B. Davis, Owner, Walter B. Davis Company
Eric Reichard, Chief Operations Officer, Rodgers Builders
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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2010 Diversity and Inclusion Event Recap
August 26, 2010
Held at the VanLandingham Estate in August 2011, this networking event promoted the diverse businesses in
Charlotte East. The event connected the broader community with the diverse, cultural cuisine of Charlotte East as
a means of building and celebrating an inclusive business community, while also highlighting the positive business
attributes of the Central Avenue corridor and Charlotte East.
Presenting Sponsor:
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
September 29, 2010
The Economic Impact of An Inclusive Business Community Summit
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
October 20, 2010
Johnson C. Smith University in partnership with the Charlotte Chamber:
Breakfast with Brett C. Carter, President, Duke Energy North Carolina
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
November 18, 2010
Charlotte Chapter of Black MBA’s in partnership with the Charlotte Mecklenburg Black Chamber of Commerce and
the Charlotte Chamber Diversity Advisory Cabinet present Strategic and Long Term Investing
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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2010 Diversity and Inclusion Event Recap
November 30, 2010
Charlotte Chamber 2010 Annual Meeting:
Belk Innovation in Diversity Award – Carolinas Healthcare System
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
December 8, 2010
Survive and Thrive Breakfast: How to Present and Pitch to a Major Corporation
Guest Speaker:
Jeffrey Jones, SVP, Senior Supplier Development Manager, Global Supply Chain Management, Bank of America
2010 CHARLOTTE CHAMBER DIVERSITY RECAP
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diversity partners
diversity business
2010 Diversity and Inclusion Event Recap
council sponsors
platinum
silver
supporting
gold
silver
bronze
ADT Security Services
AFL Network
Carolina Business Interiors
CB Richard Ellis
Charlotte Latin School
Childress Klein Properties
Coca Cola Consolidated
Collabera
Compucom
Cushman & Wakefield
CVS Caremark
DDB Los Angeles
G4S Wackenhut
Grogan Associates, Inc.
Herman Miller
Hewlett Packard
Lesco Restorations Inc.
Lincoln Harris
Lippincot
Microsoft
NELSON
Otis Elevator Company
Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP
Perkins+Will
Pitney Bowes, Inc.
The Shaw Group, Inc
Silvestri California
Steele Fab
Tandus Commercial Carpet
Technology Project Management, Inc.
Turner Construction Co.
Unico
Aerotek Inc.
BBDO Worldwide
DiscoverReady, LLC
Field Glass
Insight Global, Inc
Moore & Van Allen, PLLC
National Gypsum
Norfolk Southern Corp.
Pike Electric Inc.
Sandy Alexander
Shearman & Sterling
Sidney Austin LLP
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, LLP
Special Counsel